WorldWideScience

Sample records for higher mental development

  1. Academic Career Development Stress and Mental Health of Higher Secondary Students--An Indian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anjali; Halder, Santoshi; Goswami, Nibedita

    2012-01-01

    The authors explored the mental health of students with their academic career-related stressors collecting data from 400 students of different schools of Eastern part of India by using; namely General Information Schedule (GIS), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), and the Academic Career Development Stress Scale. The data was subjected to t…

  2. Mental Health and Adjustment of Higher Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, P. Vel

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to find out the relationship between mental health and adjustment of higher secondary school students. Mental Health Scale developed by Sakthimani (2010) and Adjustment Inventory developed by A.K.P. Sinha and R.P. Singh (2007) were used to collect the relevant data. The sample consists of 103 higher secondary…

  3. Mental Health, Access, and Equity in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper tackles the difficult and often not openly discussed This paper tackles the difficult and often not openly discussed topic of access and equity in higher education for people with mental health difficulties. Recent legislative and policy developments in mental health, disability, anti-discrimination and education mean that all students who disclose a mental health condition can expect fair and equitable treatment. However the findings of an exploratory study at an Australian university reveal that just under two thirds of the 54 students who reported mental health difficulties did not disclose this to staff due to fears of discrimination at university and in future employment. Students who did disclose felt supported when staff displayed a respectful attitude and provided appropriate advice and useful strategies for them to remain engaged in university studies when experiencing mental health difficulties.

  4. Employee Assistance Programs in Higher Education. Alcohol, Mental Health and Professional Development Programming for Faculty and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoreson, Richard W., Ed.; Hosokawa, Elizabeth P., Ed.

    The promotion of employee assistance programs (EAP) in higher education is considered in 24 chapters, with an emphasis on enhancing resources and the academic environment for faculty and staff. Seven topical areas are addressed: history of EAP; characteristics of higher education; alcoholism and other risks in the academic life-style; EAP models…

  5. Mental health literacy in higher education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavley, Nicola J; McCann, Terence V; Jorm, Anthony F

    2012-02-01

    With approximately 50% of young people aged 18-24 in tertiary education, these are potential settings for programmes to improve mental health literacy. A survey was carried out with students and staff of a tertiary education institution to investigate recognition of depression, help-seeking intentions, beliefs about interventions and stigmatizing attitudes. Students of an Australian metropolitan university (with staff as a comparison group) participated in a telephone interview. They answered questions relating to mental health literacy. Of the completed interviews, 774 (65%) were students and 422 (35%) were staff. Over 70% of students and staff were able to recognize depression in a vignette, with greater likelihood of recognition in students associated with older age, female gender, being born in Australia and a higher level of education. Over 80% of respondents said they would seek help if they had a problem similar to that of the vignette. However, rates of specific help-seeking intentions for students were relatively low, with only 26% nominating a general practitioner and only 10% nominating a student counsellor. Factors associated with stigmatizing attitudes included male gender, younger age, lower level of education, being born outside Australia and lack of recognition of depression. There is a need for mental health literacy interventions targeted at students, particularly those who are younger, male, born outside Australia and of a lower level of education. As rates of specific help-seeking intentions for students were relatively low, there is a need for further exploration of the barriers to help seeking from professional sources. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. What imagination can teach us about higher mental functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tateo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The chapter uses the history of the concept of imagination as example of how psychology creates a normative model of mental processes that affects our understanding of development. Following the traditional hierarchy of psychological functions, with abstract rationality on top, we fail to underst......The chapter uses the history of the concept of imagination as example of how psychology creates a normative model of mental processes that affects our understanding of development. Following the traditional hierarchy of psychological functions, with abstract rationality on top, we fail...... in fictional world where we can find relief to the disquieting spectacle of the world, nor a sandbox in which we can play with alternative futures. It is one of the higher mental functions that makes the world how we experience it and how we are striving to experience it. The imaginative process plays a self...

  7. FY1995 technological development for the measurement of higher mental activities. Toward the construction of psychotechnology; 1995 nendo koji seishin katsudo no keisoku kodoka no tame no gijutsu kaihatsu. Ishiki kogaku no kochiku ni mukete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This research project was designed to develop the advanced measurement system for higher mental activities. Specifically, the following five issues were investigated: 1) the measurements of the mental activity on situations with ecological validity. 2) the construction of systematized measurement systems. 3) the development for integrated multiple measurement indices. 4) the development for comprehensive algorithm models. 5) the revision of concept for measurement of the mental activity. The following six sub-projects were run. 1) we constructed the system for high-speed seiral stimulus presentation on large-scale panel, and developed the technique for psychophysical measurements on dynamic characteristics of visual attention. 2) We developed the pseudo-habitat apparatus for measurement of possible involvement of brain acetylcholine in learning/memory function in rats. 3) We developed the computer-assisted system for measurement of achievement of long-term English-words home learning in high school students. 4) We developed the multi-phasic measurement system for concurrent recordings of eye-movement, behavior, response-time and correct responses during performance of cognitive tasks. 5) We constructed the standard audio-visual database for species-specific behavioral patterns of inter-individual behaviors such as aggressive and sexual behaviors in mice. 6 we developed the audio-visual recording system for measurement and analysis of conversation for social interaction in class rooms. (NEDO)

  8. Development of Mental Health Indicators in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyeree; Ahn, Dong Hyun; Song, Jinhee; Hwang, Tae Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Objective Promoting mental health and preventing mental health problems are important tasks for international organizations and nations. Such goals entail the establishment of active information networks and effective systems and indicators to assess the mental health of populations. This being said, there is a need in Korea develop ways to measure the state of mental health in Korea. Methods This paper reviews the mental health indicator development policies and practices of seven organizations, countries, and regions: WHO, OECD, EU, United States, Australia, UK, and Scotland. Using Delphi method, we conducted two surveys of mental health indicators for experts in the field of mental health. The survey questionnaire included 5 domains: mental health status, mental health factor, mental health system, mental health service, and quality of mental health services. We considered 124 potential mental health indicators out of more than 600 from indicators of international organizations and foreign countries. Results We obtained the top 30 mental health indicators from the surveys. Among them, 10 indicators belong to the mental health system. The most important five mental health indicators are suicide rate, rate of increase in mental disorder treatment, burden caused by mental disorders, adequacy of identifying problems of mental health projects and deriving solutions, and annual prevalence of mental disorders. Conclusion Our study provides information about the process for indicator development and the use of survey results to measure the mental health status of the Korean population. The aim of mental health indicator development is to improve the mental health system by better grasping the current situation. We suggest these mental health indicators can monitor progress in efforts to implement reform policies, provide community services, and involve users, families and other stakeholders in mental health promotion, prevention, care and rehabilitation. PMID:23251193

  9. Beyond behaviorism: on the automaticity of higher mental processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargh, J A; Ferguson, M J

    2000-11-01

    The first 100 years of experimental psychology were dominated by 2 major schools of thought: behaviorism and cognitive science. Here the authors consider the common philosophical commitment to determinism by both schools, and how the radical behaviorists' thesis of the determined nature of higher mental processes is being pursued today in social cognition research on automaticity. In harmony with "dual process" models in contemporary cognitive science, which equate determined processes with those that are automatic and which require no intervening conscious choice or guidance, as opposed to "controlled" processes which do, the social cognition research on the automaticity of higher mental processes provides compelling evidence for the determinism of those processes. This research has revealed that social interaction, evaluation and judgment, and the operation of internal goal structures can all proceed without the intervention of conscious acts of will and guidance of the process.

  10. Higher Education, Poverty and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilak, Jandhyala B. G.

    2010-01-01

    There is a presumption among many policy makers that higher education is not necessary for economic growth and development; it is literacy and basic education and at best secondary education that are argued to be important. Estimates of internal rate of return contributed to strengthening of such a presumption. Accordingly, higher education has…

  11. Stigma and Student Mental Health in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer Marie

    2010-01-01

    Stigma is a powerful force in preventing university students with mental health difficulties from gaining access to appropriate support. This paper reports on an exploratory study of university students with mental health difficulties that found most students did not disclose their mental health problems to staff at university. This was primarily…

  12. Social Development and Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina España-Chavarría

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay has as its main objective to reflect on the duty of the Costa Rican public university and its responsibility to educate in order to foster social development, which is understood as one of the multiple challenges that the higher education faces due to the demands imposed on the operation of knowledge in the present and the relation of such demands with independent knowledge development. In addition, a defense is made of some issues that have been approached weakly in previous studies, issues that become part of the essential elements for promoting a meaningful and functional education that has social impact, elements such as the following: a Ethics in the organization, b The university’s self-education, c The effect of curricular policies on the practices being promoted, d The transformation of the teaching culture to improve practice, and e The construction of knowledge on which to base criteria, decision making, problem solving and the development of life projects.

  13. New Developments in Mental Health and Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fazenda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The community mental health model implies a bio‐psycho‐social perspective of mental health/illness issues, as well as a set of values that advocate equity in service access, community treatment, respect for human rights, a recovery vision, promotion of independent living, social integration and user and family participation. In accordance with the priorities set by the European Union, mental health services must guarantee that these principles are applied in the prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and promotion of mental health. Inter‐sector cooperation is an essential part of developing transversal policies that ensure society’s involvement in mental health promotion. Advances in community mental health in‐ dicate the relevance of considering human rights both in policy development and in practice, of the recovery perspective and of the need to promote the participation of user and carer organizations.

  14. A Lifetime of Trauma: Mental Health Challenges for Higher Education in a Conflict Environment in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babury, Mohammed Osman; Hayward, Fred Manwarren

    2013-01-01

    More than 30 years of war in Afghanistan have resulted in immense policy challenges to address the resulting mental health issues. The purpose of this policy analysis is to examine the potential role of higher education in addressing the pressing mental health problems in Afghanistan's public universities and higher education institutions as a…

  15. Veterans' Mental Health in Higher Education Settings: Services and Clinician Education Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Noosha; Bennett, Lauren

    2017-06-01

    Utilization of the GI Bill and attendance at higher education institutions among student veterans have significantly increased since passage of the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Campus counseling centers should be prepared to meet the mental health needs of student veterans. This study identified the mental health resources and services that colleges provide student veterans and the education needs of clinical staff on how to serve student veterans. Directors of mental health services from 80 California colleges completed a semistructured phone interview. Few schools track the number, demographic characteristics, or presenting needs of student veterans who utilize campus mental health services or offer priority access or special mental health services for veterans. Directors wanted centers to receive education for an average of 5.8 veteran-related mental health topics and preferred workshops and lectures to handouts and online training. Significant training needs exist among clinical staff of campus mental health services to meet the needs of student veterans.

  16. Prevention and early intervention to improve mental health in higher education students: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavley, Nicola; Jorm, Anthony F

    2010-05-01

    The age at which most young people are in higher education is also the age of peak onset for mental and substance use disorders, with these having their first onset before age 24 in 75% of cases. In most developed countries, over 50% of young people are in higher education. To review the evidence for prevention and early intervention in mental health problems in higher education students. The review was limited to interventions targeted to anxiety, depression and alcohol misuse. Interventions to review were identified by searching PubMed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Interventions were included if they were designed to specifically prevent or intervene early in the general (non-health professional) higher education student population, in one or more of the following areas: anxiety, depression or alcohol misuse symptoms, mental health literacy, stigma and one or more behavioural outcomes. For interventions to prevent or intervene early for alcohol misuse, evidence of effectiveness is strongest for brief motivational interventions and for personalized normative interventions delivered using computers or in individual face-to-face sessions. Few interventions to prevent or intervene early with depression or anxiety were identified. These were mostly face-to-face, cognitive-behavioural/skill-based interventions. One social marketing intervention to raise awareness of depression and treatments showed some evidence of effectiveness. There is very limited evidence that interventions are effective in preventing or intervening early with depression and anxiety disorders in higher education students. Further studies, possibly involving interventions that have shown promise in other populations, are needed.

  17. Perinatal Maternal Mental Health, Fetal Programming and Child Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Lewis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Maternal mental disorders over pregnancy show a clear influence on child development. This review is focused on the possible mechanisms by which maternal mental disorders influence fetal development via programming effects. This field is complex since mental health symptoms during pregnancy vary in type, timing and severity and maternal psychological distress is often accompanied by higher rates of smoking, alcohol use, poor diet and lifestyle. Studies are now beginning to examine fetal programming mechanisms, originally identified within the DOHaD framework, to examine how maternal mental disorders impact fetal development. Such mechanisms include hormonal priming effects such as elevated maternal glucocorticoids, alteration of placental function and perfusion, and epigenetic mechanisms. To date, mostly high prevalence mental disorders such as depression and anxiety have been investigated, but few studies employ diagnostic measures, and there is very little research examining the impact of maternal mental disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and personality disorders on fetal development. The next wave of longitudinal studies need to focus on specific hypotheses driven by plausible biological mechanisms for fetal programming and follow children for a sufficient period in order to examine the early manifestations of developmental vulnerability. Intervention studies can then be targeted to altering these mechanisms of intergenerational transmission once identified.

  18. Perinatal Maternal Mental Health, Fetal Programming and Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Austin, Emma; Knapp, Rebecca; Vaiano, Tina; Galbally, Megan

    2015-11-26

    Maternal mental disorders over pregnancy show a clear influence on child development. This review is focused on the possible mechanisms by which maternal mental disorders influence fetal development via programming effects. This field is complex since mental health symptoms during pregnancy vary in type, timing and severity and maternal psychological distress is often accompanied by higher rates of smoking, alcohol use, poor diet and lifestyle. Studies are now beginning to examine fetal programming mechanisms, originally identified within the DOHaD framework, to examine how maternal mental disorders impact fetal development. Such mechanisms include hormonal priming effects such as elevated maternal glucocorticoids, alteration of placental function and perfusion, and epigenetic mechanisms. To date, mostly high prevalence mental disorders such as depression and anxiety have been investigated, but few studies employ diagnostic measures, and there is very little research examining the impact of maternal mental disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and personality disorders on fetal development. The next wave of longitudinal studies need to focus on specific hypotheses driven by plausible biological mechanisms for fetal programming and follow children for a sufficient period in order to examine the early manifestations of developmental vulnerability. Intervention studies can then be targeted to altering these mechanisms of intergenerational transmission once identified.

  19. Acknowledge the Barriers to Better the Practices: Support for Student Mental Health in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPlacito-DeRango, Maria Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Despite marked improvements, intervention for students with a mental health problem or illness in Canadian higher education settings remains not yet successful, mature, or sustainable. A number of challenges have been identified as contributory to the shortcomings surrounding student mental health in colleges and universities. In this paper, I…

  20. Psychometric properties of a Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roncalli, Silvia

    2013-02-01

    To assist in improving team working in Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs), the Mental Health Commission formulated a user-friendly but yet-to-be validated 25-item Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool (MHDAT).

  1. Technology development: imperatives for higher education | Broere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a major drive in South Africa to reshape the higher educational landscape, but traditional higher education at public contact institutions is certainly not geared to make an optimal contribution to this development in its present form. The question can be asked whether South Africa's higher education institutions (HEIs) ...

  2. Developing Mental Toughness: Lessons from Paralympians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Powell

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mental toughness (MT is a key psychological variable related to perseverance and success in performance domains. MT and its development has been explored across a range of contexts and across different sports, but no research to date has examined MT in relation to Paralympic athletes. We sought to understand the lived-experiences of mentally tough Paralympians, aiming to conceptualize MT in a Paralympic context and investigate its development. Ten Paralympic athletes were interviewed using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. The verbatim transcripts of the interviews served as the data for an interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three broad themes and several subthemes emerged in conceptualizing Paralympian MT: characteristics (determination, defiance, pragmatic, optimistic, resilient, self-belief and independence and autonomy, cognitions (normalization, sense of escape, non-acceptance of constraints, influence perception and connection and cognitive strategies (rational thinking, goal setting, pain management and control. In understanding MT development, two broad themes and several subthemes emerged: formative experiences (challenge, classification, setbacks, critical incident, trauma and recovery, sustained commitment, development of mind-set and perspective during challenge, failure, and acceptance, and support and coping resources (social support and significant others, external shaping, social support, overcoming problems, social comparison and reflective practice. The findings suggest that Paralympians benefited from exposure to highly demanding situations in a supportive environment and this helped develop mentally tough characteristics and behaviors and individualized cognitive coping strategies. Our findings highlight the association between the adaptive development of personal characteristics by overcoming physical and mental setbacks over a sustained time period. Overall, the findings suggest that to develop mentally tough

  3. Developing Mental Toughness: Lessons from Paralympians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Alexander J; Myers, Tony D

    2017-01-01

    Mental toughness (MT) is a key psychological variable related to perseverance and success in performance domains. MT and its development has been explored across a range of contexts and across different sports, but no research to date has examined MT in relation to Paralympic athletes. We sought to understand the lived-experiences of mentally tough Paralympians, aiming to conceptualize MT in a Paralympic context and investigate its development. Ten Paralympic athletes were interviewed using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. The verbatim transcripts of the interviews served as the data for an interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three broad themes and several subthemes emerged in conceptualizing Paralympian MT: characteristics (determination, defiance, pragmatic, optimistic, resilient, self-belief and independence and autonomy), cognitions (normalization, sense of escape, non-acceptance of constraints, influence perception and connection) and cognitive strategies (rational thinking, goal setting, pain management and control). In understanding MT development, two broad themes and several subthemes emerged: formative experiences (challenge, classification, setbacks, critical incident, trauma and recovery, sustained commitment, development of mind-set and perspective during challenge, failure, and acceptance), and support and coping resources (social support and significant others, external shaping, social support, overcoming problems, social comparison and reflective practice). The findings suggest that Paralympians benefited from exposure to highly demanding situations in a supportive environment and this helped develop mentally tough characteristics and behaviors and individualized cognitive coping strategies. Our findings highlight the association between the adaptive development of personal characteristics by overcoming physical and mental setbacks over a sustained time period. Overall, the findings suggest that to develop mentally tough characteristics

  4. Impact of Mental Poverty on Rural Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lan-xiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the definition of mental poverty and the status quo of mental poverty in China's rural areas. Mental poverty in China's rural areas embodies the following aspects: the sense of parochialism is serious; the small farmer consciousness is strong; there is misgiving about identity. This paper analyses the reason of Mental poverty influencing farmers' behavior model and rural economic development. Mental poverty influences the farmers' changing current situation; Mental pover...

  5. Sustainable spatial development in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Terlević

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is not only a great challenge for society as a whole, but also for higher education institutions, which have been rapidly including sustainable development in their educational process in the last two decades. Directly or indirectly, education for sustainable spatial development includes all aspects of sustainable development: environmental, economic, social and cultural. Space is a junction of various interests, which requires coordinating the entire process of spatial planning, taking into account the goal of sustainable spatial development. The existing values of space are insufficient for the rapid implementation of a sustainable spatial development paradigm. Suitable education is needed by both individuals and spatial planning professionals and at all levels of education. It is therefore necessary to transform some of the academic programs in the higher education curriculum by integrating teaching content and methods that include long-term knowledge and holistic thinking, taking into account the importance of interdisciplinary integration. This article reviews literature in sustainable development in higher education from 2002 to 2013. Topics discussed include students’ and teachers’ conceptions of sustainable development, the presence of sustainable development and sustainable spatial development in higher education and the reasons for the slow introduction of this material into the curriculum. Based on a literature analysis, the last section identifies important drivers that can contribute to a more rapid integration of a sustainable spatial development paradigm into higher education.

  6. Attentional Phenotypes for the Analysis of Higher Mental Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fossella

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We outline a strategy to relate normal cognitive processes to candidate genes. First, brain imaging is used to specify a cognitive process “attention” in terms of the neural networks involved. Next, evidence is presented showing that the operation of each network involves a dominant neuromodulator. Then we discuss development of a task designed to measure the efficiency of each network in normal individuals and consider evidence on the independence, reliability, and heritability of the networks. DNA from cheek swabs of subjects who performed the task are then used to examine candidate polymorphisms in genes related to the transmitters. We then examine the ability of these candidate alleles to predict the efficiency of relevant networks. This process has demonstrated that candidate genes are related to specific networks of attention to a greater degree than to overall performance as measured by reaction time and accuracy. These findings require replication and possible extension to other cognitive processes.

  7. Workforce Development, Higher Education and Productive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordern, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Workforce development partnerships between higher education institutions and employers involve distinctive social and technical dynamics that differ from dominant higher education practices in the UK. The New Labour government encouraged such partnerships in England, including through the use of funding that aimed to stimulate reform to…

  8. Leadership Competency Development: A Higher Education Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemiller, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Moving from why, how, and what, this chapter closes with a focus on how we know the outcomes of leadership education. This final chapter provides an overview of leadership competency development as a critical component of higher education.

  9. Responding to the Needs of Students with Mental Health Difficulties in Higher Education: An Irish Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Esther

    2017-01-01

    This article presents findings from a recent national study supported by Association for Higher Education Access & Disability and the National Learning Network (2016) to investigate the experiences of students with mental health difficulties in higher education in Ireland. The data investigation was a combination of both survey and qualitative…

  10. The impact of leadership development on GP mental health commissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Emma; Fenge, Lee-Ann; Rosenorn-Lanng, Emily

    2017-07-03

    Purpose This paper aims to explore the learning needs of general practitioners (GPs) involved in commissioning mental health provision in England, and offer an evaluation of a leadership and commissioning skills development programme for Mental Health Commissioners. Design/methodology/approach Retrospective mixed method, including online mixed method survey, rating participants' knowledge, skills, abilities, semi-structured telephone interviews and third-party questionnaires were used. Results were analysed for significant differences using the Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test. Open-ended responses and interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Findings Indicative results showed that participants perceived significant impacts in ability across eight key question groups evaluated. Differences were found between the perceived and observed impact in relation to technical areas covered within the programme which were perceived as the highest scoring impacts by participants. Research limitations/implications The indicative results show a positive impact on practice has been both perceived and observed. Findings illustrate the value of this development programme on both the personal development of GP Mental Health Commissioners and commissioning practice. Although the findings of this evaluation increase understanding in relation to an important and topical area, larger scale, prospective evaluations are required. Impact evaluations could be embedded within future programmes to encourage higher participant and third-party engagement. Future evaluations would benefit from collection and analysis of attendance data. Further research could involve patient, service user and carer perspectives on mental health commissioning. Originality value Results of this evaluation could inform the development of future learning programmes for mental health commissioners as part of a national approach to improve mental health provision.

  11. Alignment of Developments in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, John; George, Judith W.; Pinheiro-Torres, Andreia

    2004-01-01

    This study builds upon the concept of alignment within the curriculum (due to Biggs) and suggests, in the context of two current examples, an integrated methodology for effectively aligned development activities within universities. Higher Education institutions face important challenges. Firstly, quality enhancement of the curriculum is now an…

  12. Stress Coping Levels and Mental States of Police Vocational School of Higher Education Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Yildirim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY AIM: This study was planned and carried out with the objective of determining stress coping levels and mental state of students attending Police Vocational Schools of Higher Education, in addition to factors effecting these. MATERIAL and METHOD: This desciptive and cross-sectional study consisted of 300 male students enrolled in the 2005-2006 academic year, at Police Vocational School of Higher Education, located in central Erzincan, Turkey. In this study, instead of random sampling, 281 (93.7% students who were present at the school at the time of the study and accepted to partipate in it were included. Data for this study was collected using a desciptive form created by the researchers, Rosenbaum’s Learned Resourcefulness Scale (RLRS and The Symptom Check List-90-R (SCL-90-R. During the data analysis, frequency distributions, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis and analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA were used; and for analysis of independent groups, t-test was used. RESULTS: Among the students, it was determined that 54.8% were 1. grade, 90.7% had their parents living together, 43.5% had a father and 60.5% had a mother who graduated from elementary school, fathers of 23.5% of students were retired, 93.6% of them had mothers who were home makers. In addition, it was found out that 78.6% of students chose their profession willingly, the average family income of 71.5% of students were at medium levels, 82.9% always believed in themselves and 63.3% of students did not smoke. Based on the results obtained, it was observed that second grade students, those with mothers who are highly educated and those who trusted themselved all the time had significantly high stress coping levels; students who chose their own profession, believed in themselves and did not smoke had significantly low levels of mental symptom indications. CONCLUSION: In this study, the students were determined to posess averge levels of stress coping skills and they were found

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF MAPLE IN TRAINING HIGHER MATHEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr M. Mykhalevych

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the material presented in this paper due to the need to develop and implement new information technologies in teaching higher mathematics with the use of systems of symbolic mathematics. Brief analysis of the Maple and Mathematica is given. The basic results of authors on working out of a training complex on higher mathematics are given. The complex was created in an environment of symbolic mathematics Maple. Procedure simulators, which give the whole process of model solutions of mathematical problems are a major element of the complex. The results of such procedures for typical problems from different sections of higher mathematics in accordance with the program for technical universities are represented. Questions the benefits and methods of using such programs, in particular those related to deficits of licensed copies of Maple was touched.

  14. Situating competence development in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2017-01-01

    With the transition to a knowledge economy, research methodology has become an important part of the curricula of many business-oriented postgraduate programmes. In this paper, I will argue that research competence could and should be something more and something else than instrumental competence....... Inspired by Batesons logical categories of learning, I develop a conceptual typology of research methodology competencies in higher education, which highlight that research methodology competence includes not only instrumental, but also practical, analytical and critical competencies....

  15. Developing Mental Health Peer Counselling Services for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a wide spectrum of mental health/behavioural problems ... Less than half of those found to be affected by mental illness are opportune to receive ... training module and immediately thereafter had a knowledge post-test.

  16. The company you keep: Is socialising with higher-status people bad for mental health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Ah; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2017-09-01

    Socialising with higher-status individuals can be hypothesised to exert opposing influences on the mental health of the ego. On the one hand, socialising with higher-status alters might enable individuals to access valuable resources. On the other hand, status-discrepant friendships could be detrimental to mental health by engendering feelings of unfairness. We sought to examine the impact of status-discrepant social relationships on depressive symptoms in the 2012 Korean General Social Survey (KGSS), a nationally representative sample. We show that socialising with higher-status people is positively associated with depressive symptoms. There is no significant difference between those socialising with equivalent-status or with lower-status alters. Perceived unfairness also increase depressive symptoms. Respondents socialising with higher-status alters tend to report greater depressive symptoms as their perceived unfairness increases. Gender-stratified analyses reveal that the detrimental impact of status-discrepant relationships are observed for men only, not for women. These findings suggest that socialising with higher-status people can be a net detriment for mental wellbeing by increasing stress/frustration or decreasing psychological resources such as self-esteem, and that these effects are more pronounced for individuals who perceive that society is unfair. This pattern appears stronger for men, which might be associated with gender roles internalised through gender socialisation processes. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  17. Developing a culturally appropriate mental health care service for Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoka, Matamua Iokapeta Sina; Tenari, Aliilelei; Sili, Tupou; Peteru, Latama; Tago, Pisaina; Blignault, Ilse

    2013-06-01

    Mental Health Care Services are part of the National Health Services for Samoa. Their function is to provide mental health care services to the population of Samoa, which numbers 180,000 people. However, like many other countries in the Pacific region, mental health is considered a low priority. The mental health budget allocation barely covers the operation of mental health care services. More broadly, there is a lack of political awareness about mental health care services and mental health rarely becomes an issue of deliberation in the political arena. This article outlines the recent development of mental health care services in Samoa, including the Mental Health Policy 2006 and Mental Health Act 2007. It tells the story of the successful integration of aiga (family) as an active partner in the provision of care, and the development of the Aiga model utilizing Samoan cultural values to promote culturally appropriate family-focused community mental health care for Samoa. Mental Health Care Services today encompass both clinical and family-focused community mental health care services. The work is largely nurse-led. Much has been achieved over the past 25 years. Increased recognition by government and increased resourcing are necessary to meet the future health care needs of the Samoan people. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. [Development of the community mental health system and activities of the community mental health team in Kawasaki City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1960s, Kawasaki City has been leading the nation in its efforts regarding community mental health practices. Public institutions such as the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Center in the central area of the city and the Mental Health and Welfare Center in the southern area have mainly developed the psychiatric rehabilitation system. However, since 2000, new mental health needs have emerged, as the target of mental health and welfare services has been diversified to include people with developmental disorders, higher brain dysfunction, or social withdrawal, in addition to those with schizophrenia. Therefore, Kawasaki City's plan for community-based rehabilitation was drawn up, which makes professional support available for individuals with physical, intellectual, and mental disabilities. As the plan was being implemented, in 2008, the Northern Community Rehabilitation Center was established by both the public and private sectors in partnership. After the community mental health teams were assigned to both southern and northern areas of the city, the community partnership has been developed not only for individual support but also for other objectives that required the partnership. Takeshima pointed out that the local community should be inclusive of the psychiatric care in the final stage of community mental health care in Japan. Because of the major policies regarding people with disabilities, the final stage has been reached in the northern area of Kawasaki City. This also leads to improvement in measures for major issues in psychiatry, such as suicide prevention and intervention in psychiatric disease at an early stage.

  19. Integrating mental health and social development in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagerson, Sophie

    2015-03-01

    In many low and middle income countries, attention to mental illness remains compartmentalized and consigned as a matter for specialist policy. Despite great advances in global mental health, mental health policy and practice dovetail only to a limited degree with social development efforts. They often lag behind broader approaches to health and development. This gap ignores the small but growing evidence that social development unavoidably impacts the mental health of those affected, and that this influence can be both positive and negative. This article examines the theoretical and practical challenges that need to be overcome for a more effective integration of social development and mental health policy. From a theoretical perspective, this article demonstrates compatibility between social development and mental health paradigms. In particular, the capability approach is shown to provide a strong framework for integrating mental health and development. Yet, capability-oriented critiques on 'happiness' have recently been applied to mental health with potentially detrimental outcomes. With regard to policy and practice, horizontal and vertical integration strategies are suggested. Horizontal strategies require stronger devolution of mental health care to the primary care level, more unified messages regarding mental health care provision and the gradual expansion of mental health packages of care. Vertical integration refers to the alignment of mental health with related policy domains (particularly the social, economic and political domains). Evidence from mental health research reinforces aspects of social development theory in a way that can have tangible implications on practice. First, it encourages a focus on avoiding exclusion of those affected by or at risk of mental illness. Secondly, it underscores the importance of the process of implementation as an integral component of successful policies. Finally, by retaining a focus on the individual, it seeks to

  20. Workplace mental health: developing an integrated intervention approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental health problems are prevalent and costly in working populations. Workplace interventions to address common mental health problems have evolved relatively independently along three main threads or disciplinary traditions: medicine, public health, and psychology. In this Debate piece, we argue that these three threads need to be integrated to optimise the prevention of mental health problems in working populations. Discussion To realise the greatest population mental health benefits, workplace mental health intervention needs to comprehensively 1) protect mental health by reducing work–related risk factors for mental health problems; 2) promote mental health by developing the positive aspects of work as well as worker strengths and positive capacities; and 3) address mental health problems among working people regardless of cause. We outline the evidence supporting such an integrated intervention approach and consider the research agenda and policy developments needed to move towards this goal, and propose the notion of integrated workplace mental health literacy. Summary An integrated approach to workplace mental health combines the strengths of medicine, public health, and psychology, and has the potential to optimise both the prevention and management of mental health problems in the workplace. PMID:24884425

  1. Developing Higher-Order Materials Knowledge Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Anthony Nathan

    2011-12-01

    Advances in computational materials science and novel characterization techniques have allowed scientists to probe deeply into a diverse range of materials phenomena. These activities are producing enormous amounts of information regarding the roles of various hierarchical material features in the overall performance characteristics displayed by the material. Connecting the hierarchical information over disparate domains is at the crux of multiscale modeling. The inherent challenge of performing multiscale simulations is developing scale bridging relationships to couple material information between well separated length scales. Much progress has been made in the development of homogenization relationships which replace heterogeneous material features with effective homogenous descriptions. These relationships facilitate the flow of information from lower length scales to higher length scales. Meanwhile, most localization relationships that link the information from a from a higher length scale to a lower length scale are plagued by computationally intensive techniques which are not readily integrated into multiscale simulations. The challenge of executing fully coupled multiscale simulations is augmented by the need to incorporate the evolution of the material structure that may occur under conditions such as material processing. To address these challenges with multiscale simulation, a novel framework called the Materials Knowledge System (MKS) has been developed. This methodology efficiently extracts, stores, and recalls microstructure-property-processing localization relationships. This approach is built on the statistical continuum theories developed by Kroner that express the localization of the response field at the microscale using a series of highly complex convolution integrals, which have historically been evaluated analytically. The MKS approach dramatically improves the accuracy of these expressions by calibrating the convolution kernels in these

  2. Identity development in adolescents with mental problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Emanuel; Pick, Oliver; Schlüter-Müller, Susanne; Schmeck, Klaus; Goth, Kirstin

    2013-07-31

    In the revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5), "Identity" is an essential diagnostic criterion for personality disorders (self-related personality functioning) in the alternative approach to the diagnosis of personality disorders in Section III of DSM-5. Integrating a broad range of established identity concepts, AIDA (Assessment of Identity Development in Adolescence) is a new questionnaire to assess pathology-related identity development in healthy and disturbed adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. Aim of the present study is to investigate differences in identity development between adolescents with different psychiatric diagnoses. Participants were 86 adolescent psychiatric in- and outpatients aged 12 to 18 years. The test set includes the questionnaire AIDA and two semi-structured psychiatric interviews (SCID-II, K-DIPS). The patients were assigned to three diagnostic groups (personality disorders, internalizing disorders, externalizing disorders). Differences were analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance MANOVA. In line with our hypotheses, patients with personality disorders showed the highest scores in all AIDA scales with T>70. Patients with externalizing disorders showed scores in an average range compared to population norms, while patients with internalizing disorders lay in between with scores around T=60. The AIDA total score was highly significant between the groups with a remarkable effect size of f= 0.44. Impairment of identity development differs between adolescent patients with different forms of mental disorders. The AIDA questionnaire is able to discriminate between these groups. This may help to improve assessment and treatment of adolescents with severe psychiatric problems.

  3. Higher Education Leadership Graduate Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sydney, Jr.; Chambers, Crystal Renée; Newton, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Graduate programs in higher education administration and leadership have sought to equip students with the knowledge, skills, and competencies for higher education leadership; that is, to prepare globally minded leaders who can navigate the internal and external demands of, and for, higher education. With the use of the Lattuca and Stark model of…

  4. Mental health and development: targeting people with mental health conditions as a vulnerable group

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drew, Natalie; Faydi, Edwige; Freeman, Melvyn; Funk, Michelle; Kettaneh, Audrey; Van Ommeren, Mark

    2010-01-01

    .... It argues that mental health should be included in sectoral and broader development strategies and plans, and that development stakeholders have important roles to play in ensuring that people...

  5. Mental health literacy: focus on developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indonesia, Pakistan, Brazil and Chile) found the median prevalence rate of ..... aspects of well-being of their patients.39 Programs aimed at integrating mental health ... tural beliefs and formulate their inclusion in an appropriate referral system.

  6. Developing forensic mental healthcare in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Joachim Salize

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many economically struggling societies forensic psychiatry is still in its initial developmental stages and thus forensic patients pose an ongoing challenge for the healthcare and juridical systems. In this article we present the various issues and problems that arose when establishing the first forensic psychiatric institute in Kosovo- a country whose population has constantly been reported as suffering from a high psychiatric morbidity due to long-lasting traumatic experiences during the war of 1999. The implementation of a new forensic psychiatric institute in the developing mental healthcare system of Kosovo, still characterized by considerable shortages, required substantial effort on various levels. On the policy and financial level, it was made possible by a clear intent and coordinated commitment of all responsible national stakeholders and authorities, such as the Ministries of Health and Justice, and by the financial contribution of the European Commission. Most decisive in terms of the success of the project was capacity building in human resources, i.e. the recruitment and training of motivated staff. Training included essential clinical and theoretical issues as well as clearly defined standard operation procedures, guidelines and checklists to aid daily routine work and the management of challenging situations.

  7. Higher Education Solar Development: Policy Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation from a workshop session at the Smart and Sustainable Campuses Conference explores the policy issues and opportunities that influence a higher education institution’s approach to solar deployment.

  8. Normative data on mental and motor development in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Normative data on mental and motor development in Nigerian children. ... Inventory (DSI) and Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID): a screening and ... and the scores made blind to the researchers until after the subject\\'s assessment ...

  9. Prognosis of psychomotor and mental development in premature infants by early cranial ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yang; Sun, Fu-qiang; Li, Yue-qin; Que, Sheng-shun; Yang, Su-yan; Xu, Wen-jing; Yu, Wen-hong; Chen, Jun-hua; Lu, Ya-jie; Li, Xin

    2015-04-09

    It is of high incidence of brain injuries in premature infants, so it is necessary to diagnose and treat the brain injury early for neonatal clinical practice. We are aimed to investigate the relationship between early postnatal cranial ultrasonography and psychomotor and mental development in prematrue infants at the age of 12 months. Two-hundred and eight premature infants were selected and underwent follow-up from January, 2007 to November, 2012. Cranial ultrasonography was performed on them. The developmental outcomes of these premature infants at the age of 12 months were assessed by the psychomotor developmental index (PDI) scale and mental development index (MDI). The relationship between ultrasonic gray-scale value and PDI and MDI was analyzed. The worse prognosis for psychomotor and mental development was associated with the gestational age, Apgar score(1 min), gender, chorioamnionitis, duration of mechanical ventilation and duration of mechanic ventilation. The differences between the prognosis of psychomotor and mental development, and peri-intraventricular hemorrhage (PIVH) and periventricular white matter damage (PWMD), were statistically significant (Ppsychomotor development and mental development (Ppsychomotor and mental development for premature infants. The higher grade of PIVH and PWMD was associated with the worse prognosis of psychomotor and mental development.

  10. Mental development of tuberous sclerosis with regard to epileptic seizures and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katafuchi, Yukihiko; Ishihara, Osamu; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Shiotsuki, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yoichiro; Imuta, Fusae

    1985-01-01

    The relation of mental development to epileptic seizures and CT findings was examined in 17 patients with tuberous sclerosis. Epileptic seizures occurred in 16 of the 17 patients. The earlier it occurred, the higher the incidence of mental retardation was. There was no constant correlation between mental development and the type of epileptic seizures or the attainment of inhibition of seizures. In two patients in whom calcification spreading to the cerebral cortex and subcortical region was detected on CT, in addition to calcified tubercles around the cerebral ventricle, an intelligence quotient was significantly lower than in the other patients. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Program for suicidal prevention, mental disorder treatment, and mental health development for resident doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Jiménez López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High demand of care and the academic burden of courses of specialization in medicine affect the mental health of medical residents with events ranging from simple emotional discomfort to development of affective disorders in susceptible individuals. The suicide of physicians has produced programs for their attention in some countries. We present the first mental health clinic for residents of a high specialty hospital in Mexico, focused on the prevention of suicide and depression, treatment of mental disorders and mental health promotion. Unlike the reports of other countries, we get participation of more than 95%, we provide appropriate treatment and follow-up to residents with mental disorder, and there has not been a consummate suicide. We assume that the use of different strategies (scrutiny, adapting models of prevention of suicide as a peer and gatekeeper training, informative sessions of mental health promotion and stigma, interventions targeted at individuals and groups with conflicts has been useful against barriers that do not allow doctors to identify the risk of suicide warning signs, seek help for mental disorder, and seek to improve their mental health.

  12. Developing Students' Energy Literacy in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Debby R. E.; Miller, Wendy; Winter, Jennie; Bailey, Ian; Sterling, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate students' energy literacy at a UK university, and recommends ways in which it can be enhanced using a behaviour change model. Developing students' energy literacy is a key part of the "greening" agenda, yet little is known about how students develop their ideas about energy use and energy saving at…

  13. Spiritual Intelligence: Developing Higher Consciousness Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Dorothy A.

    2016-01-01

    This article will share the intellectual journey E. Paul Torrance and I traveled in 2001, in which we explored psychology, science and ancient wisdom and traditions, including Native American and indigenous traditions, to establish a foundation for spiritual intelligence. This section will be followed by ways to develop and nurture spiritual…

  14. Food and Higher Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clugston, Richard; Calder, Wynn

    2007-01-01

    This article argues that food issues are an appropriate, if not necessary, topic for education for sustainable development (ESD) both in terms of teaching and institutional practice. The first section summarises critical topics for a school or university course on food. The second section cites two examples of university efforts--at the University…

  15. Product Development in Higher Education Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Mark; Howcroft, Barry; Fairless, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: During the last 20 years or so the changing environment in which universities operate has meant that commensurately more emphasis has been placed on marketing principles. In light of this emphasis, it is perhaps a little surprising that relatively little attention has been directed towards the processes by which universities develop their…

  16. Research Skills Development in Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamini, Tiziana Priede; Navarro, Cristina Lopez-Cozar

    2014-01-01

    This case study presents the development of a research project in a third-year undergraduate course, Family Business Administration. The research project aimed at promoting research skills in students. The authors formed working groups of no more than six students, and each group had to select an original research topic after conducting a…

  17. Exploring links among imitation, mental development, and temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenstermacher, Susan K; Saudino, Kimberly J

    2016-01-01

    Links among imitation, performance on a standardized test of intellectual development, and laboratory-assessed temperament were explored in 311 24-month old twin pairs. Moderate phenotypic associations were found between imitation, mental development, and temperament dimensions of Affect/Extraversion and Task Orientation. Covariance between imitation and mental development reflected genetic and shared environmental influences, whereas associations between imitation and temperament reflected genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental influences. Genetic factors linking imitation and temperament were the same as those linking temperament and mental development. Nonetheless, approximately 62% of total genetic variance on imitation was independent of genetic influences on mental development and temperament, suggesting that young children's imitation is not simply an index of general cognitive ability or dispositional style but has many underlying genetic influences that are unique.

  18. Community mental health care worldwide: current status and further developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornicroft, Graham; Deb, Tanya; Henderson, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to give an overview of the key issues facing those who are in a position to influence the planning and provision of mental health systems, and who need to address questions of which staff, services and sectors to invest in, and for which patients. The paper considers in turn: a) definitions of community mental health care; b) a conceptual framework to use when evaluating the need for hospital and community mental health care; c) the potential for wider platforms, outside the health service, for mental health improvement, including schools and the workplace; d) data on how far community mental health services have been developed across different regions of the world; e) the need to develop in more detail models of community mental health services for low‐ and middle‐income countries which are directly based upon evidence for those countries; f) how to incorporate mental health practice within integrated models to identify and treat people with comorbid long‐term conditions; g) possible adverse effects of deinstitutionalization. We then present a series of ten recommendations for the future strengthening of health systems to support and treat people with mental illness. PMID:27717265

  19. Mental health care and average happiness: strong effect in developed nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touburg, Giorgio; Veenhoven, Ruut

    2015-07-01

    Mental disorder is a main cause of unhappiness in modern society and investment in mental health care is therefore likely to add to average happiness. This prediction was checked in a comparison of 143 nations around 2005. Absolute investment in mental health care was measured using the per capita number of psychiatrists and psychologists working in mental health care. Relative investment was measured using the share of mental health care in the total health budget. Average happiness in nations was measured with responses to survey questions about life-satisfaction. Average happiness appeared to be higher in countries that invest more in mental health care, both absolutely and relative to investment in somatic medicine. A data split by level of development shows that this difference exists only among developed nations. Among these nations the link between mental health care and happiness is quite strong, both in an absolute sense and compared to other known societal determinants of happiness. The correlation between happiness and share of mental health care in the total health budget is twice as strong as the correlation between happiness and size of the health budget. A causal effect is likely, but cannot be proved in this cross-sectional analysis.

  20. The origins of mental toughness – prosocial behavior and low internalizing and externalizing problems at age 5 predict higher mental toughness scores at age 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dena Sadeghi Bahmani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concept of mental toughness has gained increasing importance among groups other than elite athletes by virtue of its psychological importance and explanatory power for a broad range of health-related behaviors. However, no study has focused so far on the psychological origins of mental toughness. Therefore, the aims of the present study were: to explore, to what extent the psychological profiles of preschoolers aged five were associated with both 1 mental toughness scores and 2 sleep disturbances at age 14, and 3 to explore possible gender differences.Method: Nine years after their first assessment at age five (preschoolers, a total of 77 adolescents (mean age: 14.35 years; SD = 1.22; 42% females took part in this follow-up study. At baseline, both parents and teachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ, covering internalizing and externalizing problems, hyperactivity, negative peer relationships, and prosocial behavior. At follow-up, participants completed a booklet of questionnaires covering socio-demographic data, mental toughness, and sleep disturbances.Results: Higher prosocial behavior, lower negative peer relationships, and lower internalizing and externalizing problems at age five, as rated by parents and teachers, were associated with self-reported higher mental toughness and lower sleep disturbances at age 14. At age 14, and relative to males, females had lower MT scores and reported more sleep disturbances.Results: Higher prosocial behavior, lower negative peer relationships, and lower internalizing and externalizing problems at age five, as rated by parents and teachers, predicted self-reported higher mental toughness and lower sleep disturbances at age 14. At age 14, and relative to males, females had lower MT scores and reported more sleep disturbance.Conclusions: The pattern of results suggests that mental toughness traits during adolescence may have their origins in the pre-school years.

  1. Mental health in remote rural developing areas: concepts and cases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    "In this book, we illustrate some of the social and environmental incluences that shape health and mental health care, using examples from rural villages in Alaska as well as other developing areas of the world...

  2. Developing mental health mobile apps: Exploring adolescents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Rachel; Dooley, Barbara; Fitzgerald, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    Mobile applications or 'apps' have significant potential for use in mental health interventions with adolescents. However, there is a lack of research exploring end users' needs from such technologies. The aim of this study was to explore adolescents' needs and concerns in relation to mental health mobile apps. Five focus groups were conducted with young people aged 15-16 years (N = 34, 60% male). Participants were asked about their views in relation to the use of mental health mobile technologies and were asked to give their responses to a mental health app prototype. Participants identified (1) safety, (2) engagement, (3) functionality, (4) social interaction, (5) awareness, (6) accessibility, (7) gender and (8) young people in control as important factors. Understanding end users' needs and concerns in relation to this topic will inform the future development of youth-oriented mental health apps that are acceptable to young people. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Knowing right from wrong in mental arithmetic judgments: calibration of confidence predicts the development of accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Luke F; Mazzocco, Michèle M M

    2014-01-01

    Does knowing when mental arithmetic judgments are right--and when they are wrong--lead to more accurate judgments over time? We hypothesize that the successful detection of errors (and avoidance of false alarms) may contribute to the development of mental arithmetic performance. Insight into error detection abilities can be gained by examining the "calibration" of mental arithmetic judgments-that is, the alignment between confidence in judgments and the accuracy of those judgments. Calibration may be viewed as a measure of metacognitive monitoring ability. We conducted a developmental longitudinal investigation of the relationship between the calibration of children's mental arithmetic judgments and their performance on a mental arithmetic task. Annually between Grades 5 and 8, children completed a problem verification task in which they rapidly judged the accuracy of arithmetic expressions (e.g., 25 + 50 = 75) and rated their confidence in each judgment. Results showed that calibration was strongly related to concurrent mental arithmetic performance, that calibration continued to develop even as mental arithmetic accuracy approached ceiling, that poor calibration distinguished children with mathematics learning disability from both low and typically achieving children, and that better calibration in Grade 5 predicted larger gains in mental arithmetic accuracy between Grades 5 and 8. We propose that good calibration supports the implementation of cognitive control, leading to long-term improvement in mental arithmetic accuracy. Because mental arithmetic "fluency" is critical for higher-level mathematics competence, calibration of confidence in mental arithmetic judgments may represent a novel and important developmental predictor of future mathematics performance.

  4. Research skills development in higher education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Priede Bergamini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This case study presents the development of a research project in a third-year undergraduate course, Family Business Administration. The research project aimed at promoting research skills in students. The authors formed working groups of no more than six students, and each group had to select an original research topic after conducting a literature review. Students were guided by the teachers and provided with initial reading materials, as well as an activity rubric specifying the minimum requirements of a scientific paper. The activity evaluation consisted of two parts, a written article (group assessment and an oral presentation (individual assessment. After the activity concluded, students were asked to answer an online satisfaction survey. Results showed students viewed the activity as positive and appreciated the chance to develop several competencies, including research skills. The authors conclude several objectives were achieved, including: familiarize students with scientific research; make sure students are cable of finding information through primary sources; have students apply the knowledge acquired during the course; promote responsibility in students; cultivate in students the capacity to summarize ideas and expose them in a reasoned way; have students learn from the experiences and knowledge of others; and develop in students the capacity to synthesize all that information. -------------------------- El desarrollo de la capacidad investigadora en estudiantes de educación superior Resumen  Este estudio de caso presenta el desarrollo de un proyecto de investigación en la asignatura “Administración de la Empresa Familiar” de tercer curso. El proyecto de investigación tenía como propósito fomentar de forma específica la capacidad investigadora de los alumnos. Se formaron grupos de trabajo de no más de seis estudiantes, y cada grupo tenía que seleccionar un tema de investigación original tras realizar una búsqueda de

  5. Globalization of psychiatry - a barrier to mental health development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Suman

    2014-10-01

    The concept of globalization has been applied recently to ways in which mental health may be developed in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), sometimes referred to as the 'Third World' or developing countries. This paper (1) describes the roots of psychiatry in western culture and its current domination by pharmacological therapies; (2) considers the history of mental health in LMICs, focusing on many being essentially non-western in cultural background with a tradition of using a plurality of systems of care and help for mental health problems, including religious and indigenous systems of medicine; and (3) concludes that in a post-colonial world, mental health development in LMICs should not be left to market forces, which are inevitably manipulated by the interests of multinational corporations mostly located in ex-colonizing countries, especially the pharmaceutical companies.

  6. The Structure of the Managerial System of Higher Education's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, Elena Y.; Kutuev, Ruslan A.; Balakhnina, Lidia V.; Tumarov, Konstantin B.; Chudnovskiy, Alexey D.; Shagiev, ?ulat V.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by necessity of planning regulation of higher education development at all levels of management. The purpose of this article is to develop the structure of a control system of higher education development, the Foundation of which is understanding of the quality of higher education as factor for development of the…

  7. Strengthening practical wisdom: mental health workers' learning and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Kristin Ådnøy; Dahl, Hellen; Karlsson, Bengt; Arman, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Practical wisdom, understood as knowing how to be or act in any present situation with clients, is believed to be an essential part of the knowledge needed to be a professional mental health worker. Exploring processes of adapting, extending knowledge and refining tacit knowledge grounded in mental health workers' experiences with being in practice may bring awareness of how mental health workers reflect, learn and practice professional 'artistry'. The aim of the article was to explore mental health workers' processes of development and learning as they appeared in focus groups intended to develop practical wisdom. The main research question was 'How might the processes of development and learning contribute to developing practical wisdom in the individual as well as in the practice culture?' The design was multi-stage focus groups, and the same participants met four times. A phenomenological hermeneutical method for researching lived experience guided the analysis. Eight experienced mental health workers representing four Norwegian municipalities participated. The research context was community-based mental health services. The study was reported to Norwegian Social Data Services, and procedures for informed consent were followed. Two examples of processes of re-evaluation of experience (Association, Integration, Validation, Appropriation and Outcomes and action) were explored. The health workers had developed knowledge in previous encounters with clients. In sharing practice experiences, this knowledge was expressed and developed, and also tested and validated against the aims of practice. Discussions led to adapted and extended knowledge, and as tacit knowledge was expressed it could be used actively. Learning to reflect, being ready to be provoked and learning to endure indecisiveness may be foundational in developing practical wisdom. Openness is demanding, and changing habits of mind is difficult. Reflection on, and confrontation with, set practices are

  8. Mental Models of Proteins and Amino Acids Observed in Students in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F Silva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Biology and Biotechnology are part of the curriculum of basic education and are present in everyday life of students in situations that involve their thinking and  decision  making.  The  explanations  of  some  phenomena  and  processes related  to  these  themes  are  almost  always  in  atomic  and  molecular  level, described and explained with scientific models or through representations. In light of  the  Theory  of  Mental  Models  of  Johnson-Laird  some  people  reason  with images,  using  them  in  their  models,  while  others  find  it  difficult  to  infer  the  three dimensional  structure  from  two-dimensional  figures,  such  as  those  used  in textbooks or projected on screens. In this context it is proposed to raise the mental models and/or representations that students in higher education have on proteins and amino acids. For this purpose, we interviewed thirteen students, four from the course  of  Licenciatura  em  Ciências  Exatas  and  nine  from  Bacharelado  em Ciências Físicas e Biomoleculares (USP. Three basic types of mental models of proteins  have  been  detected:  the  two-dimensional  (15%,  the  three-dimensional (38.5% and a transition between these two types (38.5%. With respect to amino acids, the following types of models were identified: the two-dimensional (38.5%, the three-dimensional (8% and the atomic (23%. These data show the restricted way that situations of teaching and learning on this topic have been conducted in higher  education  and  point  to  the  use  of  teaching  methods  and  educational resources  that  allow  three-dimensional  visualization  of  these  organic  molecules, such as the use of tactile models, for understanding of these concepts.

  9. The Roles of Higher Education in Economic Development: Challenges and Prospects of Nigerian Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoku, Chimezie; Anyanwu, Jerome; Kaegon, Lies Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this paper was on the roles of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) especially universities in economic development, paying particular attention to the challenges and prospects of the Nigerian Universities. The role of higher education as a major driver of economic development is well established, and this role will increase as…

  10. Do socio-economic factors, elderly population size and service development factors influence the development of specialist mental health programs for older people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ajit

    2008-12-01

    Despite the increase in the proportion of older people in the population, little is known about factors that facilitate the development of specialist mental health services for older people. The relationship between the presence of specialist mental health programs for older people and elderly population size, proportion of older people in the population, gross national domestic product (GDP), and various parameters of health funding, mental health funding and mental health service provision was examined in an ecological study using data from the World Health Organization. The presence of specialist mental health programs for older people was significantly associated with higher GDP, higher expenditure on healthcare and mental healthcare, the presence of a national mental health policy and a national mental health program, the availability of mental health care in primary care and the community, and higher density of psychiatric beds, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, psychologists and social workers. The challenge will be to persuade policy-makers in low and medium income countries, where the increase in the elderly population is most rapid, to develop specialist mental health services for older people.

  11. Changes in higher mental functions in persons with late sequels of exposure to small ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turuspekova, S.

    2002-01-01

    This is a report on the results of studies on the state of higher mental function in individuals with a previous history of exposure to small doses ionizing radiations. The disorders observed are assigned under several groups as follows: dyspraxia, gnostic, visual-spatial agnosia, mnestic, mental processes impairment, neurodynamic. Mnestic and acoustic-gnostical disturbances, and those of the mental processes are rather markedly expressed. Mnestic derangements play a major role in the general pattern of cognitive disorders, being characterized by both modal-specific, and modal-nonspecific features. The topical principle of the classification proposed enables to distinguish the syndrome of middle nonspecific brain structures involvement and the cortical syndromes among the higher mental function disorders, invariably encountered in combination and not isolated. The aforementioned points to the diffuse nature of the neuropsychological disorders, with involvement in the process of both nonspecific and specific structures, characterized by predomination of the frontal and temporal brain cortex sections. Impairment of the higher mental functions in young persons of active age with a past history of exposure to small doses ionizing radiations, necessitate to work out effective measures precluding occurrence and intensification of the cognitive defect. (author)

  12. Mental health and the workplace: issues for developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Prem

    2009-02-20

    The capacity to work productively is a key component of health and emotional well-being. Common Mental Disorders (CMDs) are associated with reduced workplace productivity. It is anticipated that this impact is greatest in developing countries. Furthermore, workplace stress is associated with a significant adverse impact on emotional wellbeing and is linked with an increased risk of CMDs. This review will elaborate on the relationship between workplace environment and psychiatric morbidity. The evidence for mental health promotion and intervention studies will be discussed. A case will be developed to advocate for workplace reform and research to improve mental health in workplaces in developing countries in order to improve the wellbeing of employees and workplace productivity.

  13. Mental health and the workplace: issues for developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra Prem

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The capacity to work productively is a key component of health and emotional well-being. Common Mental Disorders (CMDs are associated with reduced workplace productivity. It is anticipated that this impact is greatest in developing countries. Furthermore, workplace stress is associated with a significant adverse impact on emotional wellbeing and is linked with an increased risk of CMDs. This review will elaborate on the relationship between workplace environment and psychiatric morbidity. The evidence for mental health promotion and intervention studies will be discussed. A case will be developed to advocate for workplace reform and research to improve mental health in workplaces in developing countries in order to improve the wellbeing of employees and workplace productivity.

  14. Career Development and Adults with Moderate to Severe Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, John; Cocco, Karen

    Lifelong career development activities may assist persons with more severe forms of mental retardation in achieving occupational tenure. Occupational tenure is important if individuals are to move away from a succession of entry-level employment. Adaptive career development strategies and techniques may prevent job dissatisfaction and poor…

  15. Adaptive management of higher school intellectual capital development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The essence of the intellectual capital in higher educational establishment and conditions of management is construed by his development. It is possible to consider an adaptive technique one of ways of management in an astable situation. Affirms, that the adaptive technique professional development of teachers helps to correct the activity. Higher educational establishment should possess organization by "capital" in the form of an advanced education system. A feature of an adaptive technique is managements of changes which give a push to development. Considering professional development of scientific and pedagogical collective of higher educational establishment it is possible to affirm about development of the intellectual capital of higher educational establishment.

  16. Higher education institutions, regional labour markets and population development

    OpenAIRE

    Stambøl, Lasse Sigbjørn

    2011-01-01

    An important motivation to establish and develop higher education institutions across regions is to improve and restructure the regional labour markets toward higher education jobs, contribute to maintain the regional settlement patterns of the population generally and to increase the numbers of higher educated labour especially. This paper introduces a short description of the Norwegian regional higher education institution system, followed by analyses of the impact of higher education insti...

  17. Developing a mental health care plan in a low resource setting: the theory of change approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam, Maji; Fekadu, Abebaw; Selamu, Medhin; Alem, Atalay; Medhin, Girmay; Giorgis, Tedla Wolde; DeSilva, Mary; Breuer, Erica

    2015-09-28

    Scaling up mental healthcare through integration into primary care remains the main strategy to address the extensive unmet mental health need in low-income countries. For integrated care to achieve its goal, a clear understanding of the organisational processes that can promote and hinder the integration and delivery of mental health care is essential. Theory of Change (ToC), a method employed in the planning, implementation and evaluation of complex community initiatives, is an innovative approach that has the potential to assist in the development of a comprehensive mental health care plan (MHCP), which can inform the delivery of integrated care. We used the ToC approach to develop a MHCP in a rural district in Ethiopia. The work was part of a cross-country study, the Programme for Improving Mental Health Care (PRIME) which focuses on developing evidence on the integration of mental health in to primary care. An iterative ToC development process was undertaken involving multiple workshops with stakeholders from diverse backgrounds that included representatives from the community, faith and traditional healers, community associations, non-governmental organisations, Zonal, Regional and Federal level government offices, higher education institutions, social work and mental health specialists (psychiatrists and psychiatric nurses). The objective of this study is to report the process of implementing the ToC approach in developing mental health care plan. A total of 46 persons participated in four ToC workshops. Four critical path dimensions were identified: community, health facility, administrative and higher level care organisation. The ToC participants were actively engaged in the process and the ToC encouraged strong commitment among participants. Key opportunities and barriers to implementation and how to overcome these were suggested. During the workshops, a map incorporating the key agreed outcomes and outcome indicators was developed and finalized later

  18. [Being personal: the development of community psychiatric mental health nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Shu-Jen; Lee, Shu-Hong

    2009-08-01

    Community psychiatric mental health nursing care emphasizes humanistic values and focuses on serving patient and family needs. In Taiwan, such care is delivered largely as part of patient discharge care plans and hospital / community based service models. Issues involved underscore the importance of operating an effective and integrated transfer system, the role and function of nurses and training in relevant competencies (Shiau, Huang & Lin, 2005). This article again emphasizes the importance of 'being personal' in the development of community psychiatric mental health nursing in Taiwan. Critical issues to consider include humanization, empowerment, nursing competencies, regulations, relating on a personal level, and facilitating empowerment and enlightenment on the healing process.

  19. Developing a manual for strengthening mental health nurses' clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Cassedy, Paul; Gonge, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report findings from a study aimed at developing the content and implementation of a manual for a research-based intervention on clinical supervision of mental health nursing staff. The intervention was designed to strengthen already existing supervision practices through...... educational preparation for supervision and systematic reflection on supervision. The intervention consists of three sessions and was implemented on two groups of mental health hospital staff. We present an outline of the manual and explain how the trial sessions made us adjust the preliminary manual....... The effects of implementing the manual will subsequently be analysed in an independent randomised controlled trial....

  20. Mental health literacy: focus on developing countries | Ganasen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... is of particular concern in low and middle-income countries where mental health services are already scarce. It is likely that strategies for improvement will need to be comprehensive and innovative, taking advantage of opportunities and meeting challenges faced in the developing world. African Journal of Psychiatry Vol.

  1. Developing preventive mental health interventions for refugee families in resettlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weine, Stevan Merrill

    2011-09-01

    In refugee resettlement, positive psychosocial outcomes for youth and adults depend to a great extent on their families. Yet refugee families find few empirically based services geared toward them. Preventive mental health interventions that aim to stop, lessen, or delay possible negative individual mental health and behavioral sequelae through improving family and community protective resources in resettled refugee families are needed. This paper describes 8 characteristics that preventive mental health interventions should address to meet the needs of refugee families, including: Feasibility, Acceptability, Culturally Tailored, Multilevel, Time Focused, Prosaicness, Effectiveness, and Adaptability. To address these 8 characteristics in the complex environment of refugee resettlement requires modifying the process of developmental research through incorporating innovative mental health services research strategies, including: resilience framework, community collaboration, mixed methods with focused ethnography, and the comprehensive dynamic trial. A preventive intervention development cycle for refugee families is proposed based on a program of research on refugees and migrants using these services research strategies. Furthering preventive mental health for refugee families also requires new policy directives, multisystemic partnerships, and research training. 2011 © FPI, Inc.

  2. A conceptual framework for competence development in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    The paper presents a conceptual framework for competence development in management education, and higher education in general, which includes not only instrumental, but also practical, analytical and critical competencies. One consequence of the customization and marketization of higher education...... that competence development could and should be something more and something else than instrumental competence development. Based on a pragmatic reading of Batesons logical categories of learning, the paper develops a conceptual framework for competence development in higher education, which highlight...... contextually is blind, whereas contextual competence without instrumentality is empty. Based on a pragmatic reading and further development of Bateson´s logical categories of learning, the paper develops a conceptual framework for competence development in management education, and higher education in general...

  3. Mentor development in higher education in Botswana: How ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mentor development in higher education in Botswana: How important is reflective practice? ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Mentors can develop their mentoring abilities through reflective practice and an overt transformational ...

  4. Developing a Credit Recognition System for Chinese Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuhui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a credit recognition system has been developing in Chinese higher education institutions. Much research has been done on this development, but it has been concentrated on system building, barriers/issues and international practices. The relationship between credit recognition system reforms and democratisation of higher education…

  5. Professional Identity Development: A Review of the Higher Education Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trede, Franziska; Macklin, Rob; Bridges, Donna

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the extant higher education literature on the development of professional identities. Through a systematic review approach 20 articles were identified that discussed in some way professional identity development in higher education journals. These articles drew on varied theories, pedagogies and learning strategies; however,…

  6. Development of a mental health smartphone app: perspectives of mental health service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, John; Cummins, John; Behan, Laura; O'Brien, Sinead M

    2016-10-01

    Current mental health policy emphasises the importance of service user involvement in the delivery of care. Information Technology can have an effect on quality and efficiency of care. The aim of this study is to gain the viewpoint of service users from a local mental health service in developing a mental health app. A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Eight volunteers aged 18-49 years were interviewed with the aid of a semi-structured questionnaire. Interviewees defined a good app by its ease of use. Common themes included availability of contact information, identifying triggers, the ability to rate mood/anxiety levels on a scale, guided relaxation techniques, and the option to personalise the app. The researchers will aim to produce an app that is easily accessible, highly personalisable and will include functions highlighted as important (i.e. contact information, etc.). This research will assist in the development of an easy-to-use app that could increase access to services, and allow service users to take an active role in their care. In previous studies, apps were developed without the involvement of service users. This study recognises the important role of service users in this area.

  7. Higher risk of probable mental emotional disorder in low or severe vision subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfah Rif’ati

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang: Gangguan penglihatan berat dan kebutaan, belum menjadi prioritas masalah kesehatan di Indonesia, dapat menimbulkan gangguan mental emosional. Pada tulisan ini disajikan penilaian gangguan mental emosional yang berkaitan dengan gangguan penglihatan berat. Metode: Analisis ini menggunakan sebagian data Riset Kesehatan Dasar (Riskesdas 2007. Subjek untuk keperluan analisis ini ialah yang berusia 15 tahun atau lebih. Gangguan mental emosional diukur dengan Self  Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ 20. Subjek yang mungkin menderita gangguan mental emosional, jika hasil SRQ sebesar 6 atau lebih, dan sebaliknya. Tajam penglihatan  ditentukan berdasarkan tes Snellen chart.  Visus normal/ringan ialah 20/20 to 20/60, visus rendah ialah kurang dari 20/60-3/60, sedangkan buta dengan visus kurang dari 3/60 sampai 0/0. Hasil: Di antara 972,989 subjek data Rskesdas 2007 terdapat 46,7% (554,886 yang berusia 15 tahun atau lebih. Subjek yang menderita gangguan mental emosional sebesar 11,4% (63,279/554,886,  prevalensi visus rendah sebesar 5,1% dan kebutaan 0,9%. Subjek yang menderita visus rendah dibandingkan subjek yang normal atau dengan gangguan tajam penglihatan ringan mempunyai 75% lebih besar menderita risiko gangguan mental emosional [risiko relatif (RRa=1,75; 95% interval kepercayaan (CI=1,71-1,79]. Sedangkan subjek yang buta dibandingkan subjek yang normal atau dengan gangguan tajam penglihatan ringan mempunyai risiko 2,7 kali lipat menderita gangguan mental emosional (RRa= 2,69; 95% (CI=2.60-2.78. Kesimpulan: Subjek dengan gangguan penglihatan makin berat mempunyai risiko menderita gangguan mental emosional. Oleh karena itu subjek yang menderita gangguan penglihatan berat perlu diperhatikan mental emosionalnya. (Health Science Indones 2011;2:9-13 Abstract Background: Severe visual impairments are able to induce psychological stress, especially among adults, which may stimulate mental emotional disorder (MED. Eye health problems are not a

  8. The Growth of Higher Educators for Social Justice: Collaborative Professional Development in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly K. Ness, PhD

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we investigate what happened when, contrary to the typical isolation of faculty in higher education, a group of higher educators from various disciplines in a graduate school of education met regularly to discuss issues related to our teaching and social justice. More specifically, we explored the following research question: How does collaboration among higher educators from various disciplines shape their beliefs and practices of teaching for social justice? Over three years of collaboration and conversation, not only did we expand our own knowledge and understandings of notions of social justice, but we began to take important steps towards increasing our social justice actions in our teaching. This article explores our efforts to create a self-directed professional development group of higher educators and provides suggestions for similarly interested higher educators.

  9. Mental health care in Nepal: current situation and challenges for development of a district mental health care plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luitel, Nagendra P; Jordans, Mark Jd; Adhikari, Anup; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Hanlon, Charlotte; Lund, Crick; Komproe, Ivan H

    2015-01-01

    Globally mental health problems are a serious public health concern. Currently four out of five people with severe mental illness in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC) receive no effective treatment. There is an urgent need to address this enormous treatment gap. Changing the focus of specialist mental health workers (psychiatrists and psychologists) from only service delivery to also designing and managing mental health services; building clinical capacity of the primary health care (PHC) workers, and providing supervision and quality assurance of mental health services may help in scaling up mental health services in LMICs. Little is known however, about the mental health policy and services context for these strategies in fragile-state settings, such as Nepal. A standard situation analysis tool was developed by the PRogramme for Improving Mental health carE (PRIME) consortium to systematically analyze and describe the current gaps in mental health care in Nepal, in order to inform the development of a district level mental health care plan (MHCP). It comprised six sections; general information (e.g. population, socio-economic conditions); mental health policies and plans; mental health treatment coverage; district health services; and community services. Data was obtained from secondary sources, including scientific publications, reports, project documents and hospital records. Mental health policy exists in Nepal, having been adopted in 1997, but implementation of the policy framework has yet to begin. In common with other LMICs, the budget allocated for mental health is minimal. Mental health services are concentrated in the big cities, with 0.22 psychiatrists and 0.06 psychologists per 100,000 population. The key challenges experienced in developing a district level MHCP included, overburdened health workers, lack of psychotropic medicines in the PHC, lack of mental health supervision in the existing system, and lack of a coordinating body in the Ministry

  10. Development of bladder control in mentally handicapped children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruschini Homero

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE:To analyze the role of mental handicap as a possible source of lack of development of bladder control and to find out the chance of continence to advise future patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The parents and relatives of 100 consecutive mentally handicapped patients were inquired by a personal interview. Questions included the age when they stopped using diapers, enuretic events, frequency, urgency and leakage episodes, urinary infections. Etiology of their mental problem was unknown in 34, perinatal anoxia in 17, Down syndrome in 15, phenylketonuria in 18 and others minors causes. The grade of mental deficiency were profound in 1, severe in 10, moderate in 39, mild in 33 and normal inferior value in 17. The age varied from 7 to 37 years old, with an average of 14 by the time of the interview, comprising 60 males and 40 females. RESULTS: All profound and severe patients presented leakage episodes regardless of the age. The mild and normal inferior value acquired progressive urinary control with aging, and 33% still remain with urinary symptoms above 16 years old. Urinary infection was similar in males and females, around 29%. The most committed group presented less urinary infections. The etiology of the mental handicap was not correlated to the incidence of urinary leakage. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of bladder control was correlated to the grade of mental handicap. In severe and profound groups, the expectancy of control is disappointing. In the less compromised groups, there is a delay in bladder training, with achievement of control in 2/3 after 16 years of age. Those in the normal inferior value have a chance of postponed urinary control, easily misdiagnosed by normal urological interviews.

  11. DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY OF PARTNERSHIP OF HIGHER EDUCATION, SCIENCE AND BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mazur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the cooperation of higher education, science and business is analysed. A conflict of civilizations wave development in the confrontation of two forces: the "factory of Education" and force change is disclosed. European and Ukrainian higher education quality estimation is analysed. The effect of unsynchronization in time is educed between the necessities of business and possibilities of education and science. Reasons of bribery are exposed at higher school. The development strategy of partnership of higher education, science and business is proposed.

  12. Breastfeeding, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in colostrum, and infant mental development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guxens, Mònica; Mendez, Michelle A; Moltó-Puigmartí, Carolina; Julvez, Jordi; García-Esteban, Raquel; Forns, Joan; Ferrer, Muriel; Vrijheid, Martine; López-Sabater, M Carmen; Sunyer, Jordi

    2011-10-01

    Breastfeeding has been associated with improved neurodevelopment in children. However, it remains unknown to what extent nutritional advantages of breast milk may explain this relationship. We assessed the role of parental psychosocial factors and colostrum long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) levels in the relationship between breastfeeding and children's neurodevelopment. A population-based birth cohort was established in the city of Sabadell (Catalonia, Spain) as part of the INMA-INfancia y Medio Ambiente Project. A total of 657 women were recruited during the first trimester of pregnancy. Information about parental characteristics and breastfeeding was obtained by using a questionnaire, and trained psychologists assessed mental and psychomotor development by using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development in 504 children at 14 months of age. A high percentage of breastfeeds among all milk feeds accumulated during the first 14 months was positively related with child mental development (0.37 points per month of full breastfeeding [95% confidence interval: 0.06-0.67]). Maternal education, social class, and intelligence quotient only partly explained this association. Children with a longer duration of breastfeeding also exposed to higher ratios between n-3 and n-6 PUFAs in colostrum had significantly higher mental scores than children with low breastfeeding duration exposed to low levels. Greater levels of accumulated breastfeeding during the first year of life were related to higher mental development at 14 months, largely independently from a wide range of parental psychosocial factors. LC-PUFA levels seem to play a beneficial role in children's mental development when breastfeeding levels are high.

  13. Monitoring positive mental health and its determinants in Canada: the development of the Positive Mental Health Surveillance Indicator Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Orpana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Mental Health Strategy for Canada identified a need to enhance the collection of data on mental health in Canada. While surveillance systems on mental illness have been established, a data gap for monitoring positive mental health and its determinants was identified. The goal of this project was to develop a Positive Mental Health Surveillance Indicator Framework, to provide a picture of the state of positive mental health and its determinants in Canada. Data from this surveillance framework will be used to inform programs and policies to improve the mental health of Canadians. Methods: A literature review and environmental scan were conducted to provide the theoretical base for the framework, and to identify potential positive mental health outcomes and risk and protective factors. The Public Health Agency of Canada’s definition of positive mental health was adopted as the conceptual basis for the outcomes of this framework. After identifying a comprehensive list of risk and protective factors, mental health experts, other governmental partners and non-governmental stakeholders were consulted to prioritize these indicators. Subsequently, these groups were consulted to identify the most promising measurement approaches for each indicator. Results: A conceptual framework for surveillance of positive mental health and its determinants has been developed to contain 5 outcome indicators and 25 determinant indicators organized within 4 domains at the individual, family, community and societal level. This indicator framework addresses a data gap identified in Canada’s strategy for mental health and will be used to inform programs and policies to improve the mental health status of Canadians throughout the life course.

  14. Quantitative Developments in Turkish Higher Education since 1933

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı GÜNAY

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, quantitative developments in Turkish higher education during the Republic period from 1933, when the first university was established, to date are tried to be demonstrated. In parallel with this purpose, first, establishment dates of universities, number of universities by years as well as number of universities established during the periods of each presidents of Turkish Council of Higher Education are listed. Also, spread to all provinces as of 2008, the distribution of the number of universities with regard to provinces is given. On the other hand, development of Turkish higher education by years is examined by using several quantitative indicators about higher education. Thus, number of students in higher education, total number of academic staffs as well as those with PhD, improvement in the number of students per academic staff and higher education gross enrollment rates by years are shown. Furthermore, especially for big provinces in Turkey (Ankara, İstanbul and İzmir number of universities, number of students in higher education and higher education gross enrollment rates are provided. Distribution of higher education students according to higher education institutions, higher education programs and education types in 2011 is presented as well as distribution of academic staffs according to higher education institutions and information about their academic positions. In addition, quantitative data about higher education bachelor and associate degrees (numbers of programs types, programs, quotas and placed students in 2010 is given. Finally, the position of Turkish higher education in the world with respect to the number of academic publications and the change in the number of academic publications per staff by years are analyzed.

  15. Mental health research and evaluation in multicultural Australia: developing a culture of inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    health services by immigrants and refugees the absence of adequate population epidemiological data prevents judgments about whether the observed patterns constitute under-utilisation. There are virtually no data on quality of service outcomes. The examination of national data collections revealed multiple gaps in these data collections. The review of papers published in four key Australian journals to determine whether immigrants and refugees are included in mental health research studies revealed a high rate (9.1%) of specific exclusion from studies (usually due to low English fluency) and a much higher rate of general neglect of the issue of population diversity in study design and reporting. Conclusions While there are many positive statements of policy intent in relation to immigrant and refugee communities in national mental health policies and strategies there is virtually no reporting by Commonwealth or State and Territory governments of whether policies that are relevant to immigrant and refugee communities are effectively implemented. It is not possible, on the basis of the data collected, to determine whether immigrant and refugee communities are benefiting from the mental health system reforms that are being actively carried out. The majority of Australian mental health research does not adequately include immigrant and refugee samples. On the basis of the findings of this study eight strategies have been recommended that will contribute to the development of a culture of inclusion of all Australians in the national mental health research enterprise. PMID:24093216

  16. Mental health research and evaluation in multicultural Australia: developing a culture of inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minas, Harry; Kakuma, Ritsuko; Too, Lay San; Vayani, Hamza; Orapeleng, Sharon; Prasad-Ildes, Rita; Turner, Greg; Procter, Nicholas; Oehm, Daryl

    2013-10-07

    and refugees the absence of adequate population epidemiological data prevents judgments about whether the observed patterns constitute under-utilisation. There are virtually no data on quality of service outcomes. The examination of national data collections revealed multiple gaps in these data collections. The review of papers published in four key Australian journals to determine whether immigrants and refugees are included in mental health research studies revealed a high rate (9.1%) of specific exclusion from studies (usually due to low English fluency) and a much higher rate of general neglect of the issue of population diversity in study design and reporting. While there are many positive statements of policy intent in relation to immigrant and refugee communities in national mental health policies and strategies there is virtually no reporting by Commonwealth or State and Territory governments of whether policies that are relevant to immigrant and refugee communities are effectively implemented. It is not possible, on the basis of the data collected, to determine whether immigrant and refugee communities are benefiting from the mental health system reforms that are being actively carried out. The majority of Australian mental health research does not adequately include immigrant and refugee samples. On the basis of the findings of this study eight strategies have been recommended that will contribute to the development of a culture of inclusion of all Australians in the national mental health research enterprise.

  17. Developing Affective Mental Imagery Stimuli with Multidimensional Scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Facciani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to provide an example of how multidimensional scaling (MDS can be used for stimuli development. The study described in this paper illustrates this process by developing affective mental imagery stimuli using the circumplex model of affect as a guide. The circumplex model of affect argues that all emotions can be described in terms of two underlying primary dimensions: valence and arousal (Russel, 1980. We used MDS to determine if affective mental imagery stimuli obtained from verbal prompts could be separated by arousal and valence to create four distinct categories (high –positive, low-positive, high-negative, and low-negative as seen in other stimuli. 60 students from the University of South Carolina participated in the first experiment to evaluate three sets of stimuli. After being analyzed using MDS, selected stimuli were then assessed again in a second experiment to validate their robust valence and arousal distinctions. The second experiment was conducted with 34 subjects to validate 40 of the best stimuli from experiment 1. It was found that mental imagery stimuli can produce a reliable affective response for the dimensions of valence and arousal and that MDS can be an effective tool for stimuli development.

  18. Recent psychological explanations of infant development and scales of early mental development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Zupančič

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews early infant measures based on standardised scales of development – both traditional ones and those based on Piaget's sensory-motor theory – and assesses their validity in predicting later mental development. The extremely low predictive power of test scores based on these measures in infancy has provided additional support for discontinuity theories of mental development from infancy to childhood. Conversely, the constructs implicit in earlier measures have been thoroughly criticised, and the search for valid measures of infant development that would reflect a construct similar to mental abilities in childhood has begun. At the outset, research was mostly influenced by the information processing theory. Two broad measures of information processing have been shown to be the most relevant indicators of an infant's mental development, namely habituation and dishabituation. Recent mental scales, such as the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II, thus include items that measure the efficiency of an infant's information processing. Examples of such items are presented and interpreted, as are items reflecting the development of object permanence, the only early sensory-motor measure that shows better predictive effectiveness when compared to traditional developmental test scores. Several newly-developed indicators of infants' mental development, which utilize other measures than those derived from the information-processing approach, are surveyed (understanding causal relations, joint attention behaviours, representation of number, and their possible application within the context of potential items for early mental scales is discussed. Finally, the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II, currently one of the best measures of early development, and presently undergoing a standardisation procedure in Slovenia, is evaluated, with analyses of some items from the Mental scale presented within the text.

  19. Evaluating Teaching Development Activities in Higher Education: A Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneale, Pauline; Winter, Jennie; Turner, Rebecca; Spowart, Lucy; Hughes, Jane; McKenna, Colleen; Muneer, Reema

    2016-01-01

    This toolkit is developed as a resource for providers of teaching-related continuing professional development (CPD) in higher education (HE). It focuses on capturing the longer-term value and impact of CPD for teachers and learners, and moving away from immediate satisfaction measures. It is informed by the literature on evaluating higher…

  20. Organizational Health and Higher Education: Concept and Measurement Scale Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingele, William E.; Lyden, Julie A.; Vaughan, Beverly J.

    2001-01-01

    A scale to measure higher education institutions' organizational health was developed and tested using 198 survey responses. Scale dimensions include communication adequacy, participation/involvement, commitment/loyalty, morale, external reputation, ethics, performance recognition, goal alignment, leadership, development, and resource use.…

  1. Effects of overweight and obesity on motor and mental development in infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, R; Huang, J; Calixte, R; Wong, A T; Bianchi-Hayes, J; Pati, S

    2016-10-01

    A consequence of childhood obesity may be poor developmental outcomes. This study aimed to examine the relationship between weight and developmental delays in young children. We conducted a secondary analysis of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth Cohort data. Logistic regression models quantified the association between different weight statuses (normal weight obese ≥95th percentile for weight) and delays in motor and mental development. Children classified as overweight in both waves had higher percentages of delays in wave 2 (motor [7.5 vs. 6.2-6.4%], mental [8.6 vs. 5.9-6.7%]), as well as wave 1 and/or wave 2 (motor [14.8 vs. 10.9-13.0%], mental [11.9 vs. 9.0-10.1%]), compared with other children. This association was also found in children who were obese at both time points in wave 2 (motor delay [8.9 vs. 4.9-7.3%], mental delay [10.3 vs. 6.0-7.2%]), as well as wave 1 and/or wave 2 (motor delay [14.5 vs. 10.9-12.9%], mental delay [14.1 vs. 9.4-10.1%]). In the adjusted models, children classified as always obese were more likely to have a mental delay in wave 2 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.89, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-2.95) as well as wave 1 and/or wave 2 (aOR 1.56, 95% CI: 1.08-2.26). These children were also more likely to have motor delay (aOR 1.47, 95% CI: 1.02-2.13) in wave 1 and/or wave 2. Overweight children are more likely than their normal-weight peers to have motor and mental developmental delays. Preventing obesity during infancy may facilitate reducing developmental delays in young children. © 2015 World Obesity.

  2. Making mental health an integral part of sustainable development: the contribution of a social determinants framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, M J

    2015-04-01

    There have been repeated calls to include mental health in the sustainable development goals (SDGs), arguing that progress in development will not be made without improvements in mental health. Although these calls are starting to gain political traction, currently only a tiny fraction of international development work includes mental health. A social determinants framework may be useful in incorporating mental health into sustainable development because it promotes a multi-sectorial and multi-disciplinary approach which is the corner stone of good development practice. Two approaches are suggested to make mental health a part of sustainable development: (1) integrate mental health into existing development programmes to promote social and economic environments that prevent mental health problems developing; (2) ensure that mental health programmes are better at promoting sustainable development by preventing the negative social and economic consequences of mental illness. Real-world examples of these approaches are provided. To achieve this, the mental health impact of wider development programmes, and the social and economic consequences of mental health interventions, must be evaluated. Development agencies should ensure that they have equity for mental health in all their policies, and investment must be increased for those mental health prevention, promotion and treatment programmes which have the greatest impact on sustainable development. The SDGs bring the promise of a more holistic approach to development. It is now the task of global mental health to demonstrate not just that mental health is an integral part of sustainable development, but that affordable and effective solutions exist which can improve mental health and development more broadly.

  3. Service Development for Intellectual Disability Mental Health: A Human Rights Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, E.; Howlett, S.; Kremser, T.; Simpson, J.; Kayess, R.; Trollor, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability (ID) experience higher rates of major mental disorders than their non-ID peers, but in many countries have difficulty accessing appropriate mental health services. The aim of this paper is to review the current state of mental health services for people with ID using Australia as a case example, and…

  4. Why higher economic growth cannot always enhance human development

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Md Montasir

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies why higher economic growth cannot always enhance human development. In general, these two dimensions have a strong and positive relationship, but some countries appear unable to balance this relationship. As a consequence, there are some countries with high economic growth but sluggish human development progress. This paper studies how other factors besides GDP – women labor force participation, urbanization, and inequality - are correlated to human development. I construct...

  5. Globalisation and Higher Education Development: A Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui

    2003-07-01

    This article sets out to analyse critically the nature of globalisation and how it is affecting higher education. The author first reviews the nature of globalisation, and then examines its international impact on higher education development. He contends that globalisation is predominantly economic, and points out that global exchanges in the economic, cultural and educational domains continue to be unequal. At the same time, education is increasingly treated as a business. By exposing the negative side of globalisation and its effects on universities, the author aims to counter the uncritical acceptance of globalisation as a positive force for higher education and society as a whole.

  6. Mapping the relationship between higher education and sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Martinsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    are in a conflict with each other and with respect to understanding of as well higher education, in casu the curriculum and assessment activity of the university, as sustainable development – and, first of all, it gives rise to very different conditions for future forms of life and learning inside as well......The article presents different approaches to the relationship between higher education and sustainable development. The purpose is firstly to provide an overview of four main approaches to this relationship and these approaches’ key conflicts. Secondly, the purpose is to argue that the approach...... "lifelong learning skills for a resilient life" is beginning to establish itself as part of a main conflict with the approach "necessary knowledge for a secured life". That is to say that these two approaches to the question of the relationship between higher education and sustainable development...

  7. Development of a work improvement checklist for occupational mental health focused on requests from workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Tatsuji; Nagafuchi, Keiko; Shirakawa, Chie; Suzuki, Kiyomi; Mafune, Kosuke; Kubota, Shinya; Hiro, Hisanori; Mishima, Norio; Nagata, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    To develop tools offering definite orientation for managers and employees to support their work improvement through occupational mental health. This research was a part of the Mental Health Improvement & Reinforcement Study (MIR study), conducted from October 2004 to March 2006. We developed a trial version named the Kaizen Check List (KCL) by referring to problem solving methods for quality management. Then we improved it for a formal version named MIR Research of Recognition (MIRROR). A feedback form named MIR Action Guidance (MIRAGe) was also developed. We analyzed data from 1,953 respondents at five manufacturing enterprises in Japan using MIRROR and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ) to determine whether or not the workers requesting work improvement had more stress than other workers. The KCL had 47 items, which indicated desirable working conditions for mental health at work, and four answer categories. MIRROR has 45 selected items and improved answer categories. MIRAGe displays the results of MIRROR and step-by-step guidance for work improvement. Respondents with request had significantly higher scores in stressor and lower scores in buffer factors compared with respondents without request in many items of MIRROR. A combinational use of MIRROR and stress scales is useful for finding worksites with high risk factors for mental health and for directing focus on work improvement at these worksites according to workers' requests.

  8. Student perception and conceptual development as represented by student mental models of atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jung

    The nature of matter based upon atomic theory is a principal concept in science; hence, how to teach and how to learn about atoms is an important subject for science education. To this end, this study explored student perceptions of atomic structure and how students learn about this concept by analyzing student mental models of atomic structure. Changes in student mental models serve as a valuable resource for comprehending student conceptual development. Data was collected from students who were taking the introductory chemistry course. Responses to course examinations, pre- and post-questionnaires, and pre- and post-interviews were used to analyze student mental models of atomic structure. First, this study reveals that conceptual development can be achieved, either by elevating mental models toward higher levels of understanding or by developing a single mental model. This study reinforces the importance of higher-order thinking skills to enable students to relate concepts in order to construct a target model of atomic structure. Second, Bohr's orbital structure seems to have had a strong influence on student perceptions of atomic structure. With regard to this finding, this study suggests that it is instructionally important to teach the concept of "orbitals" related to "quantum theory." Third, there were relatively few students who had developed understanding at the level of the target model, which required student understanding of the basic ideas of quantum theory. This study suggests that the understanding of atomic structure based on the idea of quantum theory is both important and difficult. Fourth, this study included different student assessments comprised of course examinations, questionnaires, and interviews. Each assessment can be used to gather information to map out student mental models. Fifth, in the comparison of the pre- and post-interview responses, this study showed that high achieving students moved toward more improved models or to advanced

  9. Special features of high-risk pregnancies as factors in development of mental distress: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Borba Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Approximately 22% of all pregnant women are classified as having high-risk pregnancies, which may involve feelings of vulnerability because of having a high-risk pregnancy, resulting in greater exposure to stressful feelings. Objective: To review aspects of high-risk pregnancy that can have a negative impact on the these women's mental health status. Method: Original articles were identified by conducting searches of the PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, followed by a manual search of references to select articles and additional bibliographic material. Articles from the last 22 years were included in the review (1992-2014. Results: Fifteen articles were found that specifically studied high-risk pregnancies and mental health outcomes. Women with high-risk pregnancies exhibited a significantly higher level of stress and reported negative emotions as they dealt with stress and had worse emotional status than women with normal pregnancies. Researchers found that hospitalized pregnant women had higher levels of anxiety than non-hospitalized women. Studies of women going through normal and high-risk pregnancies show that women with normal pregnancies had good self-perceived quality of life. Conclusion: Special features of high-risk pregnancies could be factors in development of mental distress, in addition to psychological and social factors. Therefore, only a biopsychosocial research study would be able to identify the factors that can affect the quality of mental health during high-risk pregnancy.

  10. Institutional Traps of Russia’s Higher Education Nonlinear Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article deals with the problems arising in the Russian higher education system during its transformation. The topicality of this study lies in posing a problem of higher education development within the boundaries of a Russian macroregion. The objective of this article is to reveal barriers to the implementation of nonlinear processes in Russian higher education, which trigger the emergence of institutional traps and to determine the ways to avoid them. The purpose of this article is to identify barriers to the implementation of nonlinear processes in Russian higher education, which cause the emergence of institutional traps and determine the ways out of them. Materials and Methods: an institutional approach and the concept of non-linear models of higher education are the methodological basis of this research. The methods were developed by the research group of the Ural Federal University for sociological estimation of higher education transformation in the region. The procedure for selecting experts was realized according to the sociological methodology of I. E. Shteinberg (eight-window selection. Results: a summary analysis is made; inter-institutional interaction in terms of the “higher education – stakeholders” dyad is presented; the principal problematic areas are highlighted; and institutional traps preventing potential nonlinear development in Russian higher education are described. In the first problem zone, motivation traps, traps of formalisation/individualisation of the educational process, traps of intensification of the introduction of new information technologies in education and traps of unification of management were revealed. In the second problem area, traps of network interactions, traps of network interactions of higher education and employers, as well as traps of global/local orientation of universities were identified and analysed. Discussion and Conclusions: the authors outlined the most significant

  11. INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT MECHANISMS OF RUSSIAN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Makirov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher school innovative development state programs and projects are created and start functioning in Russia. The «Education» priority national project is of special importance. Support of minor innovative entrepreneurship in higher schools and its interaction with production enterprises makes an essential part of this activity. The recently approved National Research University Concept is of great importance too. Measures are being taken on information support to these programs and projects as well as on improvement of legislation basis related to research, development, technical and innovative activities of higher schools. The Nizhny Novgorod State University experience is a good example of implementation of the state support to minor innovative business.

  12. Capacity building for higher education in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    "Higher education is the modern world's basic education, but many countries are falling further and further behind". This quote from a recent World Bank publication indicates that the role of the universities as a key driver for societal development is now widely recognized and included...... in the donor policies. However, donor projects are not easy to organize in this area, and the role of the western universities in this area is not easy to identify. The paper presents a case study from Mozambique dealing with a World Bank project in Higher Education. The project was focused on qualitative...... in the donor countries in order to merge the interests of the universities, the Ministry of Science/Education and the national/international donor agencies. It is argued that capacity building for higher education in developing countries should be a generally accepted part of the university strategy portfolio...

  13. Who Really Cares About Higher Education For Sustainable Development?

    OpenAIRE

    Torsten Richter; Kim P. Schumacher

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: It is agreed that integrating Higher Education for Sustainable Development (HESD) into the curricula of universities is of key importance to disseminate the idea of sustainability. Especially the curricula of teacher-training should contain elements of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) due to the crucial role of future teachers in information propagation. Approach: In order to find out about the spreading of ESD into the curricula and whether or not it is of inter...

  14. [Higher professional education as a means for development in nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi Castell, R

    2000-02-01

    The author reflects on how higher training contributes to development in Nursing, understanding by this term the discipline but also the set of professionals which exercise it. Therefore, the author analyzes those elements which are part of professional development; be this intrinsic, professional discourse, excellent professional exercise, market dominance, syndical capacity or representation. The author ends her article with a very simple proposal: make a world full of care, with a recognition of successes, a correction of errors and a deepening of attitudes.

  15. Research Issues in Evaluating Learning Pattern Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This article concludes the special issue of "Studies in Educational Evaluation" concerned with "Evaluating learning pattern development in higher education" by discussing research issues that have emerged from the previous contributions. The article considers in turn: stability versus variability in learning patterns; old versus new analytic…

  16. Developing Higher-Order Thinking Skills through WebQuests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, Drew; Ausband, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 32 teachers participated in a year-long professional development project related to technology integration in which they designed and implemented a WebQuest. This paper describes the extent to which higher-order thinking skills (HOTS) and levels of technology implementation (LoTI) occur in the WebQuests that participants designed.…

  17. Higher Education for Sustainable Development: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yen-Chun Jim; Shen, Ju-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to provide a complete understanding of academic research into higher education for sustainable development (HESD). Design/methodology/approach: This study utilizes a systematic review of four scientific literature databases to outline topics of research during the UN's Decade of Education for Sustainable Development…

  18. Computer-Mediated Assessment of Higher-Order Thinking Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilchin, Oleg; Raiyn, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Solving complicated problems in a contemporary knowledge-based society requires higher-order thinking (HOT). The most productive way to encourage development of HOT in students is through use of the Problem-based Learning (PBL) model. This model organizes learning by solving corresponding problems relative to study courses. Students are directed…

  19. Leadership development in South African higher education: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An extensive literature on leadership theories and models concerns large organizations in industry and has been developed mostly by outside researchers with expertise in conducting large surveys on and interviews with 'subjects' in leadership positions. Recently, such theories have been adopted or adapted to higher ...

  20. The Strategic Evaluation of Regional Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Juha

    2004-01-01

    The study analyses the role of regional development in higher education using the approach of the balanced scorecard, which provides a framework for organizations to describe and communicate their strategy. It turns out that the balanced scorecard is not only an approach for implementing the strategy, but it also provides a general framework for…

  1. Developing Globally Compatible Institutional Infrastructures for Indian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Raj; Bartning, Augustine; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2010-01-01

    The authors profile developments in the globalization of Indian higher education, with an emphasis on emerging globally compatible institutional infrastructures. In recent decades, there has been an enormous amount of brain drain: the exodus of the brightest professionals and students to other countries. The article argues that the implementation…

  2. Developing a New Zealand casemix classification for mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Kathy; Gaines, Phillipa; Burgess, Philip; Green, Janette; Bower, Alison; Buckingham, Bill; Mellsop, Graham

    2004-10-01

    This study aimed to develop a casemix classification of characteristics of New Zealand mental health services users. Over a six month period, patient information, staff time and service costs were collected from 8 district health boards. This information was analysed seeking the classification of service user characteristics which best predicted the cost drivers of the services provided. A classification emerged which explained more than two thirds of the variance in service user costs. It can be used to inform service management and funding, but it is premature to have it determine funding.

  3. Providing culturally appropriate mental health first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent: development of expert consensus guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background It is estimated that the prevalence of mental illness is higher in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents compared to non-Aboriginal adolescents. Despite this, only a small proportion of Aboriginal youth have contact with mental health services, possibly due to factors such as remoteness, language barriers, affordability and cultural sensitivity issues. This research aimed to develop culturally appropriate guidelines for anyone who is providing first aid to an Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent who is experiencing a mental health crisis or developing a mental illness. Methods A panel of Australian Aboriginal people who are experts in Aboriginal youth mental health, participated in a Delphi study investigating how members of the public can be culturally appropriate when helping an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent with mental health problems. The panel varied in size across the three sequential rounds, from 37–41 participants. Panellists were presented with statements about cultural considerations and communication strategies via online questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest additional content. All statements endorsed as either Essential or Important by ≥ 90% of panel members were written into a guideline document. To assess the panel members’ satisfaction with the research method, participants were invited to provide their feedback after the final survey. Results From a total of 304 statements shown to the panel of experts, 194 statements were endorsed. The methodology was found to be useful and appropriate by the panellists. Conclusion Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth mental health experts were able to reach consensus about what the appropriate communication strategies for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent. These outcomes will help ensure that the community provides the best possible support to Aboriginal adolescents who

  4. Providing culturally appropriate mental health first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent: development of expert consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Kathryn J; Bond, Kathy S; Jorm, Anthony F; Kelly, Claire M; Kitchener, Betty A; Williams-Tchen, Aj

    2014-01-28

    It is estimated that the prevalence of mental illness is higher in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents compared to non-Aboriginal adolescents. Despite this, only a small proportion of Aboriginal youth have contact with mental health services, possibly due to factors such as remoteness, language barriers, affordability and cultural sensitivity issues. This research aimed to develop culturally appropriate guidelines for anyone who is providing first aid to an Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent who is experiencing a mental health crisis or developing a mental illness. A panel of Australian Aboriginal people who are experts in Aboriginal youth mental health, participated in a Delphi study investigating how members of the public can be culturally appropriate when helping an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent with mental health problems. The panel varied in size across the three sequential rounds, from 37-41 participants. Panellists were presented with statements about cultural considerations and communication strategies via online questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest additional content. All statements endorsed as either Essential or Important by ≥ 90% of panel members were written into a guideline document. To assess the panel members' satisfaction with the research method, participants were invited to provide their feedback after the final survey. From a total of 304 statements shown to the panel of experts, 194 statements were endorsed. The methodology was found to be useful and appropriate by the panellists. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth mental health experts were able to reach consensus about what the appropriate communication strategies for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent. These outcomes will help ensure that the community provides the best possible support to Aboriginal adolescents who are developing mental illnesses or are in a

  5. Thematic development of declarations on Sustainability in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou; Holm, Tove

    2012-01-01

    think should be given top priority in order to develop a sustainable society. Hence, the article addresses the following issues: (1) a thematic analysis of the relation between declarations developed by the university sector and those developed by governmental and intergovernmental institutions; (2...... of the international SHE literature reveals no study that deals specifically with the interaction between declarations developed by the university sector and declarations developed by governmental and intergovernmental institutions. An analysis of this type can give us important insights in what themes these parties......) an analysis of themes the two types of declarations might have in common; and if so (3) an analysis of how they have developed during the past decade. The article finds four new themes that previous research has not identified, and shows how the valuation of nature is under reconfiguration in higher education...

  6. Global Mental Health: sharing and synthesizing knowledge for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, K; O'Donnell, M Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Global mental health (GMH) is a growing domain with an increasing capacity to positively impact the world community's efforts for sustainable development and wellbeing. Sharing and synthesizing GMH and multi-sectoral knowledge, the focus of this paper, is an important way to support these global efforts. This paper consolidates some of the most recent and relevant 'context resources' [global multi-sector (GMS) materials, emphasizing world reports on major issues] and 'core resources' (GMH materials, including newsletters, texts, conferences, training, etc.). In addition to offering a guided index of materials, it presents an orientation framework (global integration) to help make important information as accessible and useful as possible. Mental health colleagues are encouraged to stay current in GMH and global issues, to engage in the emerging agendas for sustainable development and wellbeing, and to intentionally connect and contribute across sectors. Colleagues in all sectors are encouraged to do likewise, and to take advantage of the wealth of shared and synthesized knowledge in the GMH domain, such as the materials featured in this paper.

  7. The motivation paradox: higher psychosocial problem levels in severely mentally ill patients are associated with less motivation for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Cornelis L; Jochems, E; Kortrijk, H E

    2014-04-01

    Lack of motivation for treatment makes a subgroup of patients with severe mental illness (SMI) difficult to engage in psychiatric treatment. Such difficult-to-engage patients may also be the most in need of treatment. We hypothesized that the level of psychosocial problems would be inversely related to motivation for treatment. Cross-sectional study in two independent samples. The first sample (n = 294) included SMI patients who participated in a randomized controlled trial and were assessed using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) and self-rated and clinician-rated motivation-for-treatment scales. The second sample (n = 1,170) included SMI patients who were treated in Assertive Outreach Teams and were routinely assessed with the HoNOS and a motivation-for-treatment scale. In both samples, patients also self-rated their quality of life. In both samples, patients with HoNOS scores of 16 and higher had lower motivation scores on all motivation scales than patients with lower HoNOS scores, and also a lower quality of life. A motivation paradox seems inherent to this association between higher psychosocial problems levels, less motivation for treatment, and lower quality of life. Such a paradox has clinical relevance, as it may provide an ethical basis for outreach services which aim to engage marginally motivated SMI patients with severe psychosocial problems into mental health care.

  8. Education for Sustainable Development in Higher Education Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Tapia-Fonllem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role that higher education plays in the promotion of sustainable development outstands in the declarations on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD, besides being a research priority in higher education. However, few studies exist that evaluate sustainable lifestyles among university students. The aim of this study was to analyze the mission and vision, processes and actions undertaken to promote sustainability in higher education institutions, and to compare the pro-sustainability orientation (PSO reported by 360 students coursing first or last semesters at college. The study was intended to evaluate the influence that four higher education institutions in Sonora, Mexico, have on students’ PSO. Results of the study indicate that a coherent PSO factor emerges from the interrelations among pro-environmental dispositional and behavioral variables reported by students. However, university programs and actions do not produce statistically significant differences between freshmen and senior students. Possible reasons explaining the lack of positive influence of those universities on students’ PSO are discussed.

  9. CHALLENGES AND ALTERNATIVE OF CREATIVITY DEVELOPMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yunus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is the human ability to think, modify, discover and create something. Creativity in the scientific world and the general public is common term. In reality, creativity and human life are two different things, but inseparable, thus affecting and closely correlated. Life and civilization will stagnate and vacuum without creativity. Creativity always presents and appears in the rhythm of space and time as the level of thinking and the human needs. Problems faced by higher education in Indonesia today is the low creativity of both students and lecturers. Those are caused by: (1 creativity is not taught in higher education, (2 the creativity of students is less supported by parents, (3 the leader of higher education considers creativity as a means of damaging the system or existing products, and (4 the routines of lectures and students. In order to develop creativity in higher education, then the leader and lecturers should eliminate bad habits in destroying the creativity of subordinates and students, parents should continue the natural talent of the child, select the child’s social environment, minimize  punishment, and do not curb excessively  child to “do“ something. Ways that can be taken to intensify creativity in higher education including by the use of creative techniques based practical such as: brainstorming, incubator method, and the method of mapping the mind

  10. From mental health policy development in Ghana to implementation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    schizophrenia, alcohol use disorders and bi-polar disorder account for a third of years ... Objective: This paper identifies the key barriers to mental health policy implementation in Ghana and suggests ways of overcoming them. Method: The ... of health workers trained and supervised in mental health care, and mental health ...

  11. The University Library and the development of higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luisa Figueredo Figueredo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the importance of the university library for Higher Education as a greater source of knowledge. It also deals with the tasks that have been carried out in this institution since its foundation in the XII century up to now. It also states the different technologies for communication. Besides, its relevance is shown not only to support the academic and research process but also to contribute in the users´ cultural development.

  12. Visual data mining for developing competitive strategies in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Ertek, Gürdal; Ertek, Gurdal

    2009-01-01

    Information visualization is the growing field of computer science that aims at visually mining data for knowledge discovery. In this paper, a data mining framework and a novel information visualization scheme is developed and applied to the domain of higher education. The presented framework consists of three main types of visual data analysis: Discovering general insights, carrying out competitive benchmarking, and planning for High School Relationship Management (HSRM). In this paper the f...

  13. The University Library and the development of higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Luisa Figueredo Figueredo; Maritza de la Caridad Figueredo Matos; Carlos Aponte Cabrera

    2013-01-01

    The article refers to the importance of the university library for Higher Education as a greater source of knowledge. It also deals with the tasks that have been carried out in this institution since its foundation in the XII century up to now. It also states the different technologies for communication. Besides, its relevance is shown not only to support the academic and research process but also to contribute in the users´ cultural development.

  14. Using Video Games to Develop Communication Skills in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Employers are increasingly concerned that university graduates possess the transferable skills – sometimes termed ‘graduate attributes’ (Barrie, 2006) – necessary to succeed in the workplace. Prominent among these skills are those which relate to communication; however, not all higher education courses are designed explicitly to teach or develop such skills. Many commercial video games, on the other hand, require players to communicate in order to succeed, particularly in an era of increasing...

  15. The role of higher education in equitable human development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Chavanne; Svenson, Nanette

    2016-04-01

    As developing countries continue to battle poverty despite strong economic growth, understanding the relationship between equity and human development becomes increasingly important. In this context, equity is not equivalent to equality for any specific outcome such as health status, education or income. It is an objective ideal whereby people's achievements are increasingly dependent upon personal effort, choice and initiative rather than predetermined characteristics such as race, gender and socioeconomic background. As such, equity becomes an issue of moral equality based on the belief that people should be treated as equals, with equal access to life chances. This ideal pursues equal access to public services, infrastructure and rights for all citizens, including the right to education. While evidence suggests that education builds healthier, richer, more equitable societies, research on this has focused predominantly on primary and secondary schooling. The authors of this paper begin with an extensive review of existing research and relevant literature. In the second part of their article, they then report on their own study which furthers the discussion by exploring connections between tertiary education and development using equity as a reflection of human development - a holistic extension of economic development. After extracting relevant data from a number of available world reports by the United Nations, the World Bank and other organisations, they carried out a cross-national statistical analysis designed to examine the relationship between tertiary enrolment levels and a composite equity variable. Their results indicate a strong association between higher post-secondary education levels and higher levels of social equity.

  16. Simulation in mental health nurse education: The development, implementation and evaluation of an educational innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Anne; Wright, Nicola

    2017-09-01

    Simulation is an important learning approach for the development of skills for healthcare practice. However, it remains under used in the education of mental health practitioners. This article examines the development, implementation and evaluation of a simulated learning experience for final year undergraduate BSc mental health nursing students in the UK. Scenarios involving managing care in an acute in patient ward and community older persons' team were designed to enable students to develop their complex decision making skills. An evaluation of the simulation experience was undertaken. This was informed by the principles of improvement science methodology and data was collected from the student participants using questionnaires. The findings indicated that simulation provided a realistic environment in which students were able to develop skills and manage clinical situations autonomously without fear of being assessed or making mistakes. Reflecting Dieckmann et al.'s (2007) position that simulation is a social situation in itself, the learning approach enabled mental health students to both experience the safety of the Higher Education setting and also the reality of clinical practice. Simulation may therefore provide an important tool to prepare students for the responsibilities of a qualified nurse. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. An evaluation of the development of a marketing strategy in mental healthcare delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierbooms, J.J.P.A.; Bongers, I.M.B.; van Oers, J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Budget restrictions and increasing market forces within the Dutch mental healthcare sector have been forcing mental healthcare providers to manifest the added value of their quality of care. This calls for the development of the marketing skills of a mental healthcare provider, which can

  18. The Sustainable Development Goals: An Experience on Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Crespo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is acquiring high attendance in higher education. In fact, one of the targets for the Sustainable Development Goals announced by the United Nations in September 2015 aims to ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, thorough education on sustainable development. The current study focuses on the evaluation of individual works based on the sustainable development suggested to students in a subject of the Master’s of Thermal Engineering at the University of Vigo. In addition, a sustainable holistic rubric is presented, which was used to analyze the ability of the students to incorporate sustainability principles in their work. The rubric was based on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals and the associated targets of the United Nations, more specifically on the Goals 7, 8, 12, and 13. A total of 10 works were evaluated. As a general conclusion, it was found that the students generally do not consider or consider to a lower extent the economic criteria opposite to the environmental, technical, and social dimensions. The environmental sub-criterion were applied to a greater extent in the development of the works. However, the technical and social dimensions were included to a greater or lesser extent depending on the type of work developed.

  19. Role of micronutrients for physical growth and mental development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meharban

    2004-01-01

    Due to control of florid and severe cases of protein-energy malnutrition, deficiencies of micronutrients in children have assumed public health importance. According to National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau of India, over 50% of apparently healthy looking children have subclinical or biochemical deficiencies of vitamin A, vitamins B2, B6, folate and vitamin C. Over two-third of children have clinical evidences of iron deficiency while deficiency of trace minerals like iodine and zinc is quite common in certain populations. Children have food preferences and they are quite fussy to take green leafy vegetables and fruits thus compromising their intake of micronutrients from dietary sources. The full genetic potential of the child for physical growth and mental development may be compromised due to subclinical deficiencies of micronutrients which are commonly referred to as "hidden hunger". Micronutrients are required for the integrity and optimal functioning of immune system. Children with subclinical deficiency of micronutrients are more vulnerable to develop frequent and more severe common day-to-day infections thus triggering a vicious cycle of undernutrition and recurrent infections. A number of micronutrients are required for optimal physical growth and neuromotor development. Isolated deficiencies of micronutrients are rare in clinical practice and usually deficiencies of multiple micronutrients co-exist. The first 3 years of life are most crucial and vulnerable to the hazards of undernutrition. All efforts should be made so that preschool children are given a balanced and nutritious home-based diet. However, it has been shown that it is not possible to meet 100% requirements of recommended dietary allowances (RDA's) of micronutrients from dietary sources alone and most preschool children need administration of nutritional supplements to optimize their genetic potential for physical growth and mental development.

  20. An Application of a Game Development Framework in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Inge Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how a game development framework was used as a learning aid in a software engineering. Games can be used within higher education in various ways to promote student participation, enable variation in how lectures are taught, and improve student interest. In this paper, we describe a case study at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU where a game development framework was applied to make students learn software architecture by developing a computer game. We provide a model for how game development frameworks can be integrated with a software engineering or computer science course. We describe important requirements to consider when choosing a game development framework for a course and an evaluation of four frameworks based on these requirements. Further, we describe some extensions we made to the existing game development framework to let the students focus more on software architectural issues than the technical implementation issues. Finally, we describe a case study of how a game development framework was integrated in a software architecture course and the experiences from doing so.

  1. Infant feeding and mental and motor development at 18 months of age in first born singletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florey, C D; Leech, A M; Blackhall, A

    1995-01-01

    To determine the relationship between type of infant feeding and mental and psychomotor development at age 18 months. A follow-up study of children born to primigravidae living in Dundee and booked into antenatal clinics in the City of Dundee (Local Authority District) from 1 May 1985 to 30 April 1986. The study population was 846 first born singletons, of whom 592 attended for developmental assessment at age 18 months. The main outcome measures were the Bayley Scales of Infant Mental and Motor Development. Higher mental development was significantly related to breast feeding on discharge from hospital and according to the health visitors' notes at about 2 weeks after discharge after allowing for partner's social class, mother's education, height, alcohol and cigarette consumption; placental weight and the child's sex, birth weight and gestational age at birth. After adjustment for statistically significant variables, the difference in Bayley mental development index between breast and bottle fed infants was between 3.7 and 5.7 units depending on the source of feeding data. No differences were found for psychomotor development or behaviour. The study provides further evidence of a robust statistical association between type of feeding and child intelligence. However, the literature is replete with suggestions for potential confounding variables which offer alternative causal explanations. To unravel what is an important clinical and public health question, further research should concentrate on randomized trials of supplemented formula feeds for children of mothers opting for bottle feeding and on epidemiological studies designed to disentangle the relation between method of feeding, parental intelligence and social environment.

  2. Mentally-Retarded Children of a Pre-School Age and the Development of Movement Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Morávková, Šárka

    2006-01-01

    The diploma work covers the issues of children with mental retardation in pre-school age aimed to the development of the movement abilities. It focuses on the relationships between the pre-school child with mental retardation and possibilities of developing its motor skills in context of an organized pre-school education. Theoretical part of the Diploma work indicates the development specifics of the indi- vidual due to mental retardation, describes mainly the movement development of the chil...

  3. Developing Indicators for the Child and Youth Mental Health System in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Julie; Kurdyak, Paul; Guttmann, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    When the Government of Ontario launched a comprehensive mental health and addictions strategy, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) was tasked with developing a scorecard for ongoing monitoring of the child and youth mental health system. Using existing administrative and survey-based healthcare and education data, researchers at ICES developed a scorecard consisting of 25 indicators that described at-risk populations, child and youth mental healthcare and relevant outcomes. This scorecard is the first in Canada to report on performance indicators for the child and youth mental health system and provides a model for monitoring child and youth mental health using routinely collected administrative data.

  4. Do Puerto Rican youth with asthma and obesity have higher odds for mental health disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Canino, Glorisa; Ramírez, Rafael; Prelip, Michael; Martin, Molly; Ortega, Alexander N

    2012-01-01

    Island Puerto Rican (PR) youth experience disproportionately high asthma and obesity rates compared with other racial/ethnic groups on the U.S. mainland. Previous research has demonstrated associations of chronic disease with psychiatric disorders. We examined the relationship among anxiety/depressive disorders, asthma, and obesity in an epidemiologic community sample of youth. The sample (n = 656) was derived from the second wave of an island-wide probabilistic representative household sample of PR youth stratified and based on whether or not they had a diagnosis of asthma and/or depressive/anxiety disorder. For this study, we used the subpopulation ages 10-19 years. Asthma and obesity were significantly related to higher odds of depressive/anxiety disorders in youth. Obesity moderated the relationship between asthma attacks and depressive/anxiety disorders. The relationship between asthma attack and higher odds for depressive/anxiety disorders was only present in the non-obese group. Among the obese, females show a significant increase from 11% to 36% in the prevalence of anxiety/depressive disorders. Asthma and obesity were highly prevalent and a significant association was found between asthma attack and depressive/anxiety disorders. The effects of asthma and obesity were not additive; the prevalence for psychiatric disorder for those having both conditions did not increase above the prevalence associated having only one of the conditions. Future studies should consider including longitudinal designs and examine the extent to which important variables not included in this study, such as body image dissatisfaction (particularly among females), teasing, and discrimination may moderate the relationship among obesity and depressive and anxiety disorders in youth. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Meeting the challenge of funding and allocating resources to mental health across Europe: developing the Mental Health Economics European Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaid, David; Knapp, Martin; Curran, Claire

    2006-01-01

    There is growing demand for economic analysis to support strategic decision-making for mental health but the availability of economic evidence, in particular on system performance remains limited. The Mental Health Economics European Network (MHEEN) was set up in 2002 with the broad objective of developing a base for mental health economics information and subsequent work in 17 countries. Data on financing, expenditure and costs, provision of services, workforce, employment and capacity for economic evaluation were collected through bespoke questionnaires developed iteratively by the Network. This was augmented by a literature review and analysis of international databases. Findings on financing alone suggest that in many European countries mental health appears to be neglected while mechanisms for resource allocation are rarely linked to objective measure of population mental health needs. Numerous economic barriers and potential solutions were identified. Economic incentives may be one way of promoting change, although there is no 'one size fits all solution. There are significant benefits and synergies to be gained from the continuing development of networks such as MHEEN. In particular the analysis can be used to inform developments in Central and Eastern Europe. For instance there is much that can be learnt on both how the balance of care between institutional and non-institutional care has changed and on the role played by economic incentives in ensuring that resources were used to develop alternative community-based systems.

  6. Effect of Use of Mobile Phone on Mental Health of Higher Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anboucarassy, B.; Begum, Mumtaz

    2014-01-01

    The world of today is shrinking due to globalization as many scientific and technological development has stepped in all fields. Nowadays, the mobile phone is widely used as a means of communication. Mobile phones are a fully-portable medium of electronic communication which enables the transmission of information in the form of sound, text or…

  7. Employability development in Higher Education institutions: a tourism student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Wakelin-Theron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the world‟s largest and fastest-growing industry. The South African tourism industry (TI contributes to the creation of employment (National Department of Tourism (NDT 2011, and the development and growth of the country's economy. Yet, the South African TI experiences a critical skills shortage. This results from the fact that many tourism graduates do not possess the skills required by the world of work. Put another way, tourism graduates are not adequately prepared for absorption in the tourism industry. This, in turn, prevents them from participating effectively in the tourism industry. As Fallows and Steven (2000 put it, the knowledge of an academic subject is no longer enough in today's challenging work environment; as such, it is important for graduates to develop skills that will increase their chances of finding employment. In light of the above, it is imperative for higher educational institutions to include the development of employability skills in their tourism-related programmes. Hence, it becomes essential to explore ways in which higher education institutions could respond more effectively to the needs and expectations of the tourism industry in order to reduce youth unemployment in South Africa. In this regard, focus group interviews constitute the most suitable qualitative research technique to elicit valuable information on employability development, from multiple student perspectives. In other words, focus groups allow for open, flexible, and democratic discussions. The researcher took the necessary precautions to ensure the high quality and trustworthiness of the focus group interviews. By getting students together, to discuss their experiences and opinions, the researcher obtained valuable and insightful information on the development of tourism students‟ employability attributes.

  8. Greening academia: Developing sustainable waste management at Higher Education Institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, N.; Williams, I.D.; Kemp, S.; Smith, N.F.

    2011-01-01

    Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are often the size of small municipalities. Worldwide, the higher education (HE) sector has expanded phenomenally; for example, since the 1960s, the United Kingdom (UK) HE system has expanded sixfold to >2.4 million students. As a consequence, the overall production of waste at HEIs throughout the world is very large and presents significant challenges as the associated legislative, economic and environmental pressures can be difficult to control and manage. This paper critically reviews why sustainable waste management has become a key issue for the worldwide HE sector to address and describes some of the benefits, barriers, practical and logistical problems. As a practical illustration of some of the issues and problems, the four-phase waste management strategy developed over 15 years by one of the largest universities in Southern England - the University of Southampton (UoS) - is outlined as a case study. The UoS is committed to protecting the environment by developing practices that are safe, sustainable and environmentally friendly and has developed a practical, staged approach to manage waste in an increasingly sustainable fashion. At each stage, the approach taken to the development of infrastructure (I), service provision (S) and behavior change (B) is explained, taking into account the Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal and Environmental (PESTLE) factors. Signposts to lessons learned, good practice and useful resources that other institutions - both nationally and internationally - can access are provided. As a result of the strategy developed at the UoS, from 2004 to 2008 waste costs fell by around Pounds 125k and a recycling rate of 72% was achieved. The holistic approach taken - recognizing the PESTLE factors and the importance of a concerted ISB approach - provides a realistic, successful and practical example for other institutions wishing to effectively and sustainably manage their waste.

  9. Development of higher order mode couplers at Cornell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) couplers are integral parts of a superconducting accelerator cavity. The damping which the couplers must provide is dictated by the frequency and shunt impedance of the cavity modes as well as by the stability requirements of the accelerator incorporating the cavities. Cornell's 5-cell 1500 MHz elliptical cavity was designed for use in a 50 x 50 GeV electron-positron storage ring with a total beam current of 3.5 mA (CESR-II). HOM couplers for the Cornell cavity were designed and evaluated with this machine in mind. The development of these couplers is described in this paper. 8 references, 8 figures

  10. Differentiated approach to improving the mental and physical state freshmen higher education sector as a problem of physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukavenko A.V.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The state issues related to implementation of the differentiated and individual approach to first-year institutions of higher learning in the process of improving their mental and physical state of the means of physical education. Analysis of scientific literature revealed that such a state of the vast majority of students below this, and adaptation to the training activities carried out by the irrational. In this connection it is necessary to improve student performance marked by using one of the most effective means - exercise, and taking into account their interests, needs, motives. One solution to this problem is the differentiation of the content of exercise on the basis of features, which are characterized by the representatives of different somatotype. At the same time, research in this area are rare, hence the need to address this problem.

  11. Developing New Working Methods in Medium Cycle Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Hans Jørgen

    and complete a higher education study, independently of the geographic, social and cultural distance from their home 2) to intensify collaboration between the university college and local enterprises. ICT-based satellites are supposed to facilitate a close collaboration with local enterprises and authorities......This paper outlines the intentions of a research and development project running from January 2011until July 2014. The project, called FlexVid, aims at developing new structures and working methods for university college education. The intentions are 1) to make it easier for students to join...... and reinforce the integration of current issues from every-day life in the enterprises into the educational programs. To do this, we need 3) to rethink the way teachers and students usually work and intensify the problem based approach in the educational programs....

  12. Mnemonic abilities of primary school children with delayed mental development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murafa S.V.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research regarding the mnemonic abilities of primary school children with developmental delays. Empirical studies of impaired mental development offer an opportunity to elucidate the psychological mechanisms underlying the process of normal development and enable us to consider at a micro level the formation of mental processes in ontogeny, which would, under normal conditions, be nondescript and not always amenable to psychological analysis. The research addresses an experimental investigation of productivity and qualitative characteristics of mnemonic abilities among primary school students with developmental delays. V.D. Shadrikov’s Theory of Abilities, developed in a systemic approach framework, is the theoretical basis of the research. The method of deploying a memorization activity, as elaborated by V.D. Shadrikov and L.V. Cheremoshkina, was the investigation tool used. The sample included students in grades 1 to 4 between ages 7 to 12 and included a total of 100 children (66 boys and 34 girls. The control group of primary school students with typical development included 105 children (50 boys and 55 girls. The research consisted of several stages: a pilot study, experimental research (the test task was to memorize card #1; the basic task was to memorize cards #2 and #3; to reproduce cards #2 and #3; and to poll the students, mathematical data processing, and a description of the levels of mnemonic ability development among primary students with developmental delays. The following procedures were employed during statistical analysis: Spearman r3, Mann-Whitney U-test, Jonckheere-Terpstra test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. The structure of mnemonic abilities in primary schoolchildren with developmental delays was determined to vary according to the underdevelopment of their operational mechanisms. For example, memory functions are based on the use of inborn mechanisms, and a portion of children differ in the

  13. The Development of the Caregiving System among women with severe mental illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røhder, Katrine

    attachment classification (George & Solomon, 2008). Aims of the Study: As little is known on how the caregiving system develops when the mother suffers from severe mental illness (SMI), this presentation will explore the role of maternal psychopathology for the pre- and postnatal development of caregiving...... representations in the WARM study. The hypothesis is that higher level of psychopathology is associated with higher levels of the caregiving representations: Deactivation, cognitive disconnection and the segregated systems – all dimensions found among mothers with children that show a pattern of insecure......, & Solomon, 2013). The development of psychopathology is assessed in pregnancy and at 4 and 16 weeks with The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, Kay et al., 1989), The Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS, Montgomery and Asberg, 1979) and The Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Rating Scale (BRMRS...

  14. Lifelong Learning Competencies Development Program for Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Martinez-Mediano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Lifelong learning (LLL is an intentional learning that people engage in throughout their lives for personal and professional fulfillment and to improve the quality of their lives. Develop the capability for lifelong learning in Higher Education is important to facilitate the incorporation of new graduates to work. To this end, we have designed a program on "Lifelong learning competencies for Higher Education students', which we have applied to students at University of San Diego, California, USA and to the University of Distance Education, Spain. Methodology. We have presented the program by means a workshop where the debate and the reflection played one important strategy. To check the program’s achievements we used mixed methodologies, according to the evaluative research. We applied one questionnaire, and together to a practice and the students' personal portfolio, they enabled us to assess the program effectiveness, satisfaction and impact. Results. The comparison of the answers in the questionnaire, before and after of the workshops sing that students improved in their knowledge and awareness about the importance of LLL and key competencies for their profession development plan. Discussion. The program contributes to improve key competencies and commitment to learning throughout the people’s lives.

  15. “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life!” – Higher Hypomania Scores Are Associated with Higher Mental Toughness, Increased Physical Activity, and Lower Symptoms of Depression and Lower Sleep Complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Jahangard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the present study, we explored the associations between hypomania, symptoms of depression, sleep complaints, physical activity and mental toughness. The latter construct has gained interest for its association with a broad variety of favorable behavior in both clinical and non-clinical samples.Subjects and Methods: The non-clinical sample consisted of 206 young adults (M = 21.3 years; age range: 18–24 years; 57.3% males. They completed questionnaires covering hypomania, mental toughness, symptoms of depression, physical activity, and sleep quality.Results: Higher hypomania scores were associated with higher mental toughness, increased physical activity, lower symptoms of depression and lower sleep complaints. No gender differences were observed. Higher hypomania scores were predicted by higher scores of mental toughness subscales of control and challenge, and physical activity.Conclusion: The pattern of results suggests that among a non-clinical sample of young adults, self-rated hypomania scores were associated with higher scores on mental toughness and physical activity, along with lower depression and sleep complaints. The pattern of results further suggests that hypomania traits are associated with a broad range of favorable psychological, behavioral and sleep-related traits, at least among a non-clinical sample of young adults.

  16. "Always Look on the Bright Side of Life!" - Higher Hypomania Scores Are Associated with Higher Mental Toughness, Increased Physical Activity, and Lower Symptoms of Depression and Lower Sleep Complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangard, Leila; Rahmani, Anahita; Haghighi, Mohammad; Ahmadpanah, Mohammad; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Soltanian, Ali R; Shirzadi, Shahriar; Bajoghli, Hafez; Gerber, Markus; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the present study, we explored the associations between hypomania, symptoms of depression, sleep complaints, physical activity and mental toughness. The latter construct has gained interest for its association with a broad variety of favorable behavior in both clinical and non-clinical samples. Subjects and Methods: The non-clinical sample consisted of 206 young adults ( M = 21.3 years; age range: 18-24 years; 57.3% males). They completed questionnaires covering hypomania, mental toughness, symptoms of depression, physical activity, and sleep quality. Results: Higher hypomania scores were associated with higher mental toughness, increased physical activity, lower symptoms of depression and lower sleep complaints. No gender differences were observed. Higher hypomania scores were predicted by higher scores of mental toughness subscales of control and challenge, and physical activity. Conclusion: The pattern of results suggests that among a non-clinical sample of young adults, self-rated hypomania scores were associated with higher scores on mental toughness and physical activity, along with lower depression and sleep complaints. The pattern of results further suggests that hypomania traits are associated with a broad range of favorable psychological, behavioral and sleep-related traits, at least among a non-clinical sample of young adults.

  17. Developing Marketing Higher Education Strategies Based on Students’ Satisfaction Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Orîndaru

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The educational system worldwide is currently under the spotlight as it shows significant signs of an ongoing crisis in its search for resources, visibility in the crowded market and significance to the ever-changing society. Within this framework, higher education institutions (HEIs are taking significant actions for maintaining students as clients of their educational services. As competition on this market is becoming stronger, HEIs face difficulties in keeping students, leading them to a continuous evaluation of student satisfaction indicators. Beyond HEIs’ managers, researchers in marketing higher education have contributed to the development of a comprehensive literature where still very few have forwarded a longitudinal research model for student satisfaction evaluation despite the need for such approaches. Given this context, the current paper presents a first step towards a longitudinal study as it displays, in a compare and contrast vision, the results of two different quantitative research projects developed in the same student community, with the same objective, but conducted in two different years. Among the most significant results of this research refer to an important decline in students’ satisfaction with a significant increase in the number of students that have a neutral perception. This is highly expected to determine a major impact on university’s overall performance and, therefore, it constitutes a strong argument for determining underlying causes, and especially developing the appropriate marketing strategies to tackle with these issues. Based on this result and other similar research outcomes, strategic and tactic recommendations are granted in the final part of this paper.

  18. Poverty and common mental disorders in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Kleinman, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    A review of English-language journals published since 1990 and three global mental health reports identified 11 community studies on the association between poverty and common mental disorders in six low- and middle-income countries. Most studies showed an association between indicators of poverty and the risk of mental disorders, the most consistent association being with low levels of education. A review of articles exploring the mechanism of the relationship suggested weak evidence to support a specific association with income levels. Factors such as the experience of insecurity and hopelessness, rapid social change and the risks of violence and physical ill-health may explain the greater vulnerability of the poor to common mental disorders. The direct and indirect costs of mental ill-health worsen the economic condition, setting up a vicious cycle of poverty and mental disorder. Common mental disorders need to be placed alongside other diseases associated with poverty by policy-makers and donors. Programmes such as investment in education and provision of microcredit may have unanticipated benefits in reducing the risk of mental disorders. Secondary prevention must focus on strengthening the ability of primary care services to provide effective treatment.

  19. Supporting the Development of Latino Bilingual Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michelle L.; Sawyer, Cheryl B.; Guzmán, Michele R.; Graziani, Cate

    2014-01-01

    Latino individuals who prefer to communicate in Spanish lack linguistically and culturally proficient mental health professionals with whom they can communicate effectively. This study illustrates the components necessary to facilitate the overall success of Latino, Spanish-speaking students in attaining advanced degrees in mental health services…

  20. Development of nuclear models for higher energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoian, M.; Siciliano, E.R.; Smith, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Two nuclear models for higher energy calculations have been developed in the regions of high and low energy transfer, respectively. In the former, a relativistic hybrid-type preequilibrium model is compared with data ranging from 60 to 800 MeV. Also, the GNASH exciton preequilibrium-model code with higher energy improvements is compared with data at 200 and 318 MeV. In the region of low energy transfer, nucleon-nucleus scattering is predominately a direct reaction involving quasi-elastic collisions with one or more target nucleons. We discuss various aspects of quasi-elastic scattering which are important in understanding features of cross sections and spin observables. These include (1) contributions from multi-step processes; (2) damping of the continuum response from 2p-2h excitations; (3) the ''optimal'' choice of frame in which to evaluate the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes; and (4) the effect of optical and spin-orbit distortions, which are included in a model based on the RPA the DWIA and the eikonal approximation. 33 refs., 15 figs

  1. Development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at higher temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkous, C.A. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This report describes efforts in developing new solid polymer electrolytes that will enable operation of proton exchange membrane electrolyzers at higher temperatures than are currently possible. Several ionomers have been prepared from polyetheretherketone (PEEK), polyethersulfone (PES), and polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) by employing various sulfonation procedures. By controlling the extent of sulfonation, a range of proton conductivities could be achieved, whose upper limit actually exceeded that of commercially available perfluoralkyl sulfonates. Thermoconductimetric analysis of samples at various degrees of sulfonation showed an inverse relationship between conductivity and maximum operating temperature. This was attributed to the dual effect of adding sulfonate groups to the polymer: more acid groups produce more protons for increased conductivity, but they also increase water uptake, which mechanically weakens the membrane. This situation was exacerbated by the limited acidity of the aromatic sulfonic acids (pK{sub A} {approx} 2-3). The possibility of using partial fluorination to raise the acid dissociation constant is discussed.

  2. Mental health policy and development in Egypt - integrating mental health into health sector reforms 2001-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siekkonen Inkeri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following a situation appraisal in 2001, a six year mental health reform programme (Egymen 2002-7 was initiated by an Egyptian-Finnish bilateral aid project at the request of a former Egyptian minister of health, and the work was incorporated directly into the Ministry of Health and Population from 2007 onwards. This paper describes the aims, methodology and implementation of the mental health reforms and mental health policy in Egypt 2002-2009. Methods A multi-faceted and comprehensive programme which combined situation appraisal to inform planning; establishment of a health sector system for coordination, supervision and training of each level (national, governorate, district and primary care; development workshops; production of toolkits, development of guidelines and standards; encouragement of intersectoral liaison at each level; integration of mental health into health management systems; and dedicated efforts to improve forensic services, rehabilitation services, and child psychiatry services. Results The project has achieved detailed situation appraisal, epidemiological needs assessment, inclusion of mental health into the health sector reform plans, and into the National Package of Essential Health Interventions, mental health masterplan (policy guidelines to accompany the general health policy, updated Egyptian mental health legislation, Code of Practice, adaptation of the WHO primary care guidelines, primary care training, construction of a quality system of roles and responsibilities, availability of medicines at primary care level, public education about mental health, and a research programme to inform future developments. Intersectoral liaison with education, social welfare, police and prisons at national level is underway, but has not yet been established for governorate and district levels, nor mental health training for police, prison staff and teachers. Conclusions The bilateral collaboration programme

  3. An Emerging Natural History in the Development, Mechanisms and Worldwide Prevalence of Major Mental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediaditakis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Conciliating recent findings from molecular genetics, evolutionary biology, and clinical observations together point to new understandings regarding the mechanism, development and the persistent worldwide prevalence of major mental disorders (MMDs), which should be considered the result of an evolutionary downside trade off. Temperamental/trait variability, by facilitating choices for individual and group responses, confers robustness flexibility and resilience crucial to success of our species. Extreme temperamental variants, originating evolutionarily from the asocial aspect of human nature, also constitute the premorbid personality of the disorders. The latter create vulnerable individuals out of whom some will develop MMDs but at much higher rate to that of the general population. Significantly, similar temperamental "lopsidedness" enables many of these vulnerable individuals, if intelligent, tenacious, and curious, to be creative and contribute to our survival while some may also develop MMDs. All have a common neural-developmental origin and share characteristics in their clinical expression and pharmacological responses also expressed as mixed syndromes or alternating ones over time. Over-pruning of synaptic neurons may be considered the trigger of such occurrences or conversely, the failure to prevent them in spite of it. The symptoms of the major mental disorders are made up of antithetical substitutes as an expression of a disturbed over-all synchronizing property of brain function for all higher faculties previously unconsidered in their modeling. The concomitant presence of psychosis is a generic common occurrence.

  4. Violence Exposure and the Development of School-Related Functioning: Mental Health, Neurocognition, and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, Suzanne; Graham-Bermann, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The relation between history of violence exposure and the development of academic and mental health problems is explored. Violence exposed children have an increased risk of developing school-related problems including: mental health problems, learning disabilities, language impairments, and other neurocognitive problems. These problems interact to create a complex web of deficits and disabilities where intervention access points are difficult to assess. Often mental health problems and acade...

  5. The City MISS: development of a scale to measure stigma of perinatal mental illness

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, D.; Ayers, S.; Drey, N.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to develop and validate a scale to measure perceived stigma for perinatal mental illness in women. \\ud \\ud Background: Stigma is one of the most frequently cited barriers to seeking treatment and many women with perinatal mental illness fail to get the treatment they need. However, there is no psychometric scale that measures how women may experience the unique aspects of perinatal mental illness stigma.\\ud \\ud Method: A draft scale of 30 items was developed from a...

  6. Development of the Competency Assessment Tool-Mental Health, an instrument to assess core competencies for mental health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Carla; Meyer, Cheryl; Brun, Carl; Mase, William; Cauley, Kate

    2003-01-01

    As the focus on accountability in health care increases, there has been a corresponding emphasis on establishing core competencies for health care workers. This article discusses the development of an instrument to establish core competencies for workers in inpatient mental health settings. Twenty-six competencies were identified and rated by mental health care personnel on two subscales: the importance of the competency and how much behavioral health care workers could benefit from training on the competency. The reliability of the scale and its contributions to the training, retention and recruitment of direct care workers for behavioral health are discussed.

  7. Meeting the millennium development goals in Sub-saharan Africa: what about mental health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeen, Sarah; Lund, Crick; Kleintjes, Sharon; Flisher, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Mental health is a crucial public health and development issue in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), a region where little progress has been made towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In this paper we argue that not only will limited progress in achieving these targets have a significant impact on mental health, but it will be impossible to achieve some of these aspirations in the absence of addressing mental health concerns. We consider the strong relationship of mental health with dimensions of human development represented in the MDGs, including reducing poverty, achieving universal primary education, decreasing child mortality rates, improving maternal health, HIV, environmental factors and improving the lives of those living in informal settlements. With these links in mind, we examine the mental health context in SSA settings and provide some specific examples of best practice for addressing mental health and the MDGs. It is recommended that the role of mental health interventions in accelerating the realization of the MDGs is investigated; further efforts are dedicated to probing the impact of different development projects upon mental health outcomes, and that mental health is declared a global development priority for the remainder of the MDG period and beyond.

  8. Mental Representation and Early Language Development: Directions for Exploring Relationships. Souvenir of Conversation Hour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolich, Lorraine McCune; And Others

    This collection of conference abstracts focuses on new directions for research on mental representation and early language development. One page summaries are provided on the following topics: Mental Representation and Initial Language Learning, by Lorraine M. Nicolich; Critical Issues in Language and Cognitive Development, by Roberta Corrigan;…

  9. The City MISS: development of a scale to measure stigma of perinatal mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Donna; Ayers, Susan; Drey, Nicholas

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a scale to measure perceived stigma for perinatal mental illness in women. Stigma is one of the most frequently cited barriers to seeking treatment and many women with perinatal mental illness fail to get the treatment they need. However, there is no psychometric scale that measures how women may experience the unique aspects of perinatal mental illness stigma. A draft scale of 30 items was developed from a literature review. Women with perinatal mental illness (n = 279) were recruited to complete the City Mental Illness Stigma Scale. Concurrent validity was measured using the Internalised Stigma of Mental Illness Scale. Factor analysis was used to create the final scale. The final 15-item City Mental Illness Stigma Scale has a three-factor structure: perceived external stigma, internal stigma and disclosure stigma. The scale accounted for 54% of the variance and had good internal reliability and concurrent validity. The City Mental Illness Stigma Scale appears to be a valid measure which provides a potentially useful tool for clinical practice and research in stigma and perinatal mental illness, including assessing the prevalence and characteristics of stigma. This research can be used to inform interventions to reduce or address the stigma experienced by some women with perinatal mental illness.

  10. PROBLEM OF RESEARCH OF EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN IN FOREIGN PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Valentinovna Shipova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The review of psychology and pedagogical researches of the mentally retarded children devoted to studying of a problem of emotional development in foreign science and practice is presented in article. Various approaches to an assessment of the importance of violations of the emotional sphere of the personality at mentally retarded children for all mental development of the child are considered, need of the accounting of emotional frustration of mentally retarded children for their education and education, and also social adaptation and integration into sociocultural and educational space is discussed. Research of emotional development of mentally retarded children in the course of training is important for development of programs of psychology and pedagogical diagnostics and correction of emotional violations at this category of school students, formation of their self-control, development of the emotional relations.

  11. Development of Mathematics Competences in Higher Education Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anda Zeidmane

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The changes in society require revision of the content of higher education. Mathematics as a classical subject has played an important part in higher education until now, especially in engineering education. The introduction of mathematics IT programmes  (MathCad, MathLab, Matematica, Maple… in labour market caused the reduction of the practical application of the classical mathematics, therefore it is important to draw attention to the development of mathematical competences. The theoretical part of the paper deals with the notion of competence, its aspects and types, considers the question of the essence of  mathematics, examines general competences driven teaching of mathematics, describes organisational model underlying the curriculum in mathematics that is based on the division of the content of mathematics into levels. The paper describes the main issues of the development of teaching of mathematics discussed by European mathematicians (SEFI Math Working Group.  The paper presents the results of the ERDF project “Cross-border network for adapting mathematical competences in the socio-economic development (MatNet”, which

  12. DEVELOPMENT ACQUIREMENTS AND WORKING LIFE COLLABORATION OF INTERNATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENTS : Case: Digital Business Development

    OpenAIRE

    Tuukkanen, Laura; Pudas, Sini

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is commissioned by Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences, Business Department. The research is a case study of an intensive study module Digital Business Development held in August 2014. The purpose of the thesis was to investigate international higher education students’ development acquirements during a three week Digital Business Development course. The research also investigated the success of partnership between Mamk, MPY and international higher education students in th...

  13. Higher Education Funding in the Netherlands: Recent Developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, Benjamin W.A.

    2005-01-01

    Mark Rutte, the Assistant Secretary of State for Higher Education in the Netherlands since June 2004, seems to waste no time in launching new ideas and publishing policy papers that - if accepted by Parliament - will thoroughly reshape the Dutch higher education landscape. The Dutch plans closely

  14. Social determinants of mental disorders and the Sustainable Development Goals: a systematic review of reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Crick; Brooke-Sumner, Carrie; Baingana, Florence; Baron, Emily Claire; Breuer, Erica; Chandra, Prabha; Haushofer, Johannes; Herrman, Helen; Jordans, Mark; Kieling, Christian; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Morgan, Ellen; Omigbodun, Olayinka; Tol, Wietse; Patel, Vikram; Saxena, Shekhar

    2018-04-01

    Mental health has been included in the UN Sustainable Development Goals. However, uncertainty exists about the extent to which the major social determinants of mental disorders are addressed by these goals. The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for the social determinants of mental disorders that is aligned with the Sustainable Development Goals, to use this framework to systematically review evidence regarding these social determinants, and to identify potential mechanisms and targets for interventions. We did a systematic review of reviews using a conceptual framework comprising demographic, economic, neighbourhood, environmental events, and social and culture domains. We included 289 articles in the final Review. This study sheds new light on how the Sustainable Development Goals are relevant for addressing the social determinants of mental disorders, and how these goals could be optimised to prevent mental disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimation of physical and mental development of children of the senior pre-school age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasichnyk V.M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work is conducted physical and mental development of children of the senior preschool age. In the experiment, 90 children took part in the fifth year of life, among which 55 boys and 35 girls. It is noted that the children surveyed rate the physical development of the index corresponds to level - above the average. It was determined that the parameters of the functional state of preschool age children meet the age norm. It is revealed that in determining physical performance among boys set a good level, and satisfactory in girls. It is established that the results of physical fitness of boys is slightly higher than in girls. It was found that the diagnosis of the level of mental development in children fifth year of life, the average productivity and stability of attention, visual and auditory memory, visual-imagery and visual-thinking, and perception of speech correspond to the average level, and cognitive processes such as switching and distribution attention, imagination - a low level.

  16. Stigma towards people with mental illness in developing countries in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Christoph; Rössler, Wulf

    2007-04-01

    There is a wide range of literature on stigmatization and discrimination of people with mental illness. Most studies, however, derive from Western countries. This review aims at summarizing results from developing countries in Asia published between 1996-2006. Medline search focusing on English-speaking literature. Comparable to Western countries, there is a widespread tendency to stigmatize and discriminate people with mental illness in Asia. People with mental illness are considered as dangerous and aggressive which in turn increases the social distance. The role of supernatural, religious and magical approaches to mental illness is prevailing. The pathway to care is often shaped by scepticism towards mental health services and the treatments offered. Stigma experienced from family members is pervasive. Moreover, social disapproval and devaluation of families with mentally ill individuals are an important concern. This holds true particularly with regards to marriage, marital separation and divorce. Psychic symptoms, unlike somatic symptoms, are construed as socially disadvantageous. Thus, somatisation of psychiatric disorders is widespread in Asia. The most urgent problem of mental health care in Asia is the lack of personal and financial resources. Thus, mental health professionals are mostly located in urban areas. This increases the barriers to seek help and contributes to the stigmatization of the mentally ill. The attitude of mental health professionals towards people with mental illness is often stigmatizing. This review revealed that the stigmatization of people with mental illness is widespread in Asia. The features of stigmatization-beliefs about causes of and attitudes towards mental illness, consequences for help-seeking-have more commonalities than differences to Western countries.

  17. A follow-up study on the association of working conditions and lifestyles with the development of (perceived) mental symptoms in workers of a telecommunication enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwazono, Y; Okubo, Y; Kobayashi, E; Kido, T; Nogawa, K

    2003-10-01

    This study investigated the association of working conditions and lifestyle with mental health in Japanese workers. A follow-up study was carried out in the Kanto district of Japan of workers in a telecommunications enterprise who received their first annual health check-up between 1992 and 1996 and were between 20 and 54 years old. Workers who reported mental symptoms, had a past history of disease, or current illness at their first check-up were excluded from the analysis. In total, the study included 23 837 workers. The association between working conditions and lifestyle and the development of mental symptoms was investigated by pooled logistic regression analyses. Working long hours and part-time work, as opposed to normal daytime hours of work, were factors associated with the development of mental symptoms in males, as were smoking, short sleeping hours, little physical exercise, rarely taking three meals a day, frequently eating within 1 h before sleep, much preference for salty meals and little preference for vegetables. Consumption of alcohol was negatively associated with the development of mental symptoms in males. Overall, the results suggested that the lower the Healthy Work and Lifestyle Score, the higher the risk of developing mental symptoms. Working conditions and lifestyle, especially food preferences, have an apparent influence on the mental health of Japanese workers. Moreover, the Healthy Work and Lifestyle Score indicates that working conditions and lifestyle appear to have a cumulative influence upon the mental health of Japanese workers.

  18. Influence of sports on human mental and physical development in various stages of life

    OpenAIRE

    SLÁDKOVÁ, Jitka

    2011-01-01

    The thesis deals with the impact of sports and physical activity on human physical and mental development in various developmental stages of life. It contains a brief description of the stages of life and presents the possibilities, nature and influence of sports and physical activity on human physical and mental state.

  19. Development of Antisocial Personality Disorder in Detained Youths: The Predictive Value of Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Jason J.; Romero, Erin Gregory; Welty, Leah J.; Abram, Karen M.; Teplin, Linda A.; McClelland, Gary M.; Paskar, Leah D.

    2007-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a serious public and mental health concern. Understanding how well conduct disorder (CD) and other mental disorders predict the development of APD among youths involved in the juvenile justice system is critical for prevention. The authors used a stratified random sample of 1,112 detained youths to examine…

  20. Participatory Model of Mental Health Programming: Lessons Learned from Work in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Varjas, Kristen; Sarkar, Sreeroopa; Jayasena, Asoka

    1998-01-01

    Describes application of participatory model for creating school-based mental health services in a developing country. Describes process of identifying individual and cultural factors relevant to mental health. Discusses importance of formative research and collaboration with stakeholders to ensure cultural specificity of interventions, and the…

  1. Maternal pre- and postnatal mental health and infant development in war conditions: The Gaza Infant Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punamäki, Raija-Leena; Diab, Safwat Y; Isosävi, Sanna; Kuittinen, Saija; Qouta, Samir R

    2018-03-01

    Women and their infants need special protection in war context, as traumatic events can risk maternal mental and obstetric health and compromise infant development. This prospective study examined, first, how exposure to war trauma is associated with maternal mental health in pregnancy and postpartum, obstetric and newborn health, and infant development. Second, it tested the role of maternal mental health and obstetric risks in mediating between war trauma and infant development. Palestinian women (N = 511) from the Gaza strip participated during pregnancy (T1) and at 4 (T2) and 12 (T3) months postpartum. They reported PTSD, depressive, anxiety, and dissociative symptoms, as well as pregnancy complications, newborn health risks such as prematurity, and infant sensorimotor and language development. First, exposure to war trauma was associated with high levels of maternal mental health and complications at pregnancy, and with increased postpartum mental health symptoms, but exposure was not directly associated with newborn health risks or problems in infant development. Second, maternal mental health both in pregnancy and postpartum, but not pregnancy complications or newborn health, mediated the negative impact of war trauma on infant sensorimotor and language development at 12 months. Interventions to protect early child development in war conditions should be tailored to support maternal mental health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Developing the philosophy of recovery in South African mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recovery movement has emerged as an important and powerful force in the design and implementation of mental health care in many countries around the world. This involves new and more positive understandings of the concept of recovery, both as an individual outcome and as a goal of services. The basis for these ...

  3. Using action research to develop midwives' skills to support women with perinatal mental health needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Deirdre; Sliney, Annmarie; O'Friel, Aoife; McMackin, Barbara; O'Callaghan, Bernie; Casey, Kate; Courtney, Lisa; Fleming, Valerie; Brady, Vivienne

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the research was to identify and develop midwives' skills to support women with mental health needs during pregnancy, using an action research approach. A review of perinatal mental health services in a large Dublin maternity unit revealed a high number of referred women who 'did not attend' the perinatal mental health service with few guidelines in place to support midwives in identifying and referring women for specialist help. Action research using cooperative inquiry involved a mental health nurse specialist and a team of midwives, who were drawn to each other in mutual concern about an area of practice. Data were gathered from three Cooperative Inquiry meetings, which incorporated one main Action Research Cycle of constructing, planning, taking and evaluating action. Data were analysed using a thematic content analysis framework. Participants experienced varying levels of uncertainty about how to support women with perinatal mental health needs. Cooperative inquiry supported participants in making sense of how they understood perinatal mental health and how they managed challenges experienced when caring for women with perinatal mental health issues. Participants developed a referral pathway, highlighted the significance of education to support women with perinatal mental health issues and identified the value of using open questions to promote conversation with pregnant women about mental health. Midwives value education and support to identify and refer women at risk of perinatal mental health issues. Cooperative inquiry, with a focus on action and shared reflection, facilitated the drawing together of two professional groups with diverse knowledge bases to work together to develop practice in an area of mutual concern. Perinatal mental health is a significant public health issue and midwives need support to make psychosocial assessments and to negotiate access to specialist services where available and when required. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  4. A meta-analysis of indicated mental health prevention programs for at-risk higher education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Colleen S; Shapiro, Jenna B; Kirsch, Alexandra C; Durlak, Joseph A

    2017-03-01

    This meta-analysis found empirical support for the effectiveness of indicated prevention programs for higher education students at risk for subsequent mental health difficulties based on their current subclinical levels of various presenting problems, such as depression, anxiety, or interpersonal difficulties. A systematic literature search identified 79 controlled published and unpublished interventions involving 4,470 college, graduate, or professional students. Programs were effective at post-intervention overall (ES = 0.49, CI [0.43, 0.55]), and for both targeted outcomes (ES = 0.58, CI [0.51, 0.64]) as well as additional nontargeted outcomes assessed in the studies (ES = 0.32, CI [0.25, 0.39]). Interventions compared with a no-intervention or a wait-list control (ES = 0.64, CI [0.57, 0.71], k = 68) demonstrated significantly larger effects overall than did interventions compared with an attention-placebo control (ES = 0.27, CI [0.11, 0.43], k = 11), although both were significant. Among the former group, modality and presenting problem emerged as significant moderators of intervention effectiveness, and among the 43 of these that assessed effectiveness at an average follow-up period of 35 weeks, the positive effects from intervention remained strong (ES = 0.59, CI [0.50, 0.68]). Overall, programs were fairly brief, attracted and retained students, were positively rated by students, and effective when administered by paraprofessionals as well as professionals. Current findings are promising and stimulate recommendations for improving future research, such as expanding the range of outcomes assessed, and clarifying moderators and mediators of intervention impact. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. MENTAL HEALTH: ISLAMIC PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzdalifah M. Rahman

    2015-02-01

    of mental health, especially mental health needs to be developed with an Islamic perspective various studies and research, especially the development of mental health recovery means Islamic perspective.

  6. Higher Education in the Sustainable Development Goals Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Taya Louise

    2017-01-01

    Agenda 2030 for sustainable development focuses attention on lifelong learning opportunities for all. The new targets expand on their predecessors, the Millennial Development Goals, by both widening and deepening the scope of system-wide quality education systems. Whilst the Millennial Development Goals focused attention on universal primary…

  7. The Leadership Conundrum: Leadership Development Perspectives in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David A.

    This paper presents the views of three leaders in the field of higher education on various aspects of the role of leadership in today's colleges and universities. Dave Ambler of the University of Kansas notes that the traditional leadership style, which he refers to as the "plastic president," produces leaders who become combinations of…

  8. Higher Education, Globalization and Economic Development in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In early 2009, the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) initiated an effort to assess the status of the Commonwealth's international education programs. A survey was distributed to the public and private institutions, focusing on critical aspects of contemporary international education programs as identified by an ad hoc group of…

  9. Neoliberal Developments in Higher Education: The United Kingdom and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Rosalind M. O.

    2011-01-01

    The paradigmatic values underlying British and German higher education emphasise personal growth, the wholeness of the individual, intellectual freedom and the pursuit of knowledge, which cumulatively can be viewed as a form of academic essentialism. However, these concepts were generated within a particular cultural and historical context which…

  10. Mental illness in Bwindi, Uganda: Understanding stakeholder perceptions of benefits and barriers to developing a community-based mental health programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Kristen L; Wheeler, Lydia; Shah, Arya; Farrell, Deenah; Agaba, Edwin; Kuule, Yusufu; Merry, Stephen P

    2017-11-30

    Mental illness has been increasingly recognised as a source of morbidity in low- and middle-income countries and significant treatment gaps exist worldwide. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of task sharing through community-based treatment models for addressing international mental health issues. This paper aims to evaluate the perceptions of a wide range of mental health stakeholders in a Ugandan community regarding the benefits and barriers to developing a community-based mental health programme. Bwindi Community Hospital (BCH) in south-west Uganda provides services through a team of community health workers to people in the Kanungu District. Thematic analysis of 13 semi-structured interviews and 6 focus group discussions involving 54 community members and 13 mental health stakeholders within the BCH catchment area. Stakeholders perceived benefits to a community-based compared to a hospital-based programme, including improved patient care, lower costs to patients and improved community understanding of mental illness. They also cited barriers including cost, insufficient workforce and a lack of community readiness. Stakeholders express interest in developing community-based mental health programmes, as they feel that it will address mental health needs in the community and improve community awareness of mental illness. However, they also report that cost is a significant barrier to programme development that will have to be addressed prior to being able to successfully establish such programming. Additionally, many community members expressed unique sociocultural beliefs regarding the nature of mental illness and those suffering from a psychiatric disease.

  11. Higher Education Development in Korea: Western University Ideas, Confucian Tradition, and Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Cheol

    2012-01-01

    The features of Korean higher education development are related to sociocultural tradition (Confucian tradition), the model university ideas, and economic development in Korea. The modern university ideas adopted in Korean are based on the German model which was established by the Japanese colonial government and drawing on the US university model…

  12. Thoroughly Applying Scientific Outlook on Development Implementing Sustainable Development Strategy in Higher Vocational Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Wang, Youhua

    2008-01-01

    To make breakthroughs, obtain further development, and win in the fierce competition, higher vocational colleges must apply scientific outlook on development, set up students-and-teachers oriented educational concept, enhance connotation construction, create competition advantages so as to fully improve education and teaching quality and realize…

  13. Action research as a means of course development in higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Action Research has been used in many fields of endeavour as a useful means of improving practice. This article describes how this methodology was used to develop a programme of language learning at the University of the Free State. The researcher was tasked with the development and implementation of an English ...

  14. Intercultural Communication for Professional Development: Creative Approaches in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesh, Linda Joy

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the development of telecollaborative exchange activities within blended language courses that are aimed at preparing post-graduate students for an intercultural workplace by developing valuable transversal competencies and intercultural awareness, which enable one to better adapt to changing work situations. A description is…

  15. The Role of Higher Education in Equitable Human Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Chavanne; Svenson, Nanette

    2016-01-01

    As developing countries continue to battle poverty despite strong economic growth, understanding the relationship between equity and human development becomes increasingly important. In this context, equity is not equivalent to equality for any specific outcome such as health status, education or income. It is an objective ideal whereby people's…

  16. Classification of natural and supernatural causes of mental distress. Development of a Mental Distress Explanatory Model Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbruch, M

    1990-11-01

    This paper describes the background and development of a Mental Distress Explanatory Model Questionnaire designed to explore how people from different cultures explain mental distress. A 45-item questionnaire was developed with items derived from the Murdock et al. categories, with additional items covering western notions of physiological causation and stress. The questionnaire was administered to 261 people, mostly college students. Multi-dimensional scaling analysis shows four clusters of mental distress: a) stress; b) western physiological; c) nonwestern physiological; and d) supernatural. These clusters form two dimensions: western physiological vs. supernatural and impersonal vs. personalistic explanations. Natural and stress items are separated from supernatural and nonwestern physiological items along the first dimension. Brain damage, physical illness, and genetic defects have the greatest separation along the first dimension. Being hot, the body being out of balance, and wind currents passing through the body most strongly represent the non-western physiological category. The questionnaire has the potential to be used for community health screening and for monitoring patient care, as well as with students in the health sciences and with health practitioners.

  17. Protective factors for child development at age 2 in the presence of poor maternal mental health: results from the All Our Babies (AOB) pregnancy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sheila W; Kehler, Heather L; Tough, Suzanne C

    2016-11-10

    To identify the combination of factors most protective of developmental delay at age 2 among children exposed to poor maternal mental health. Observational cohort study. Pregnant women were recruited from primary healthcare offices, the public health laboratory service and community posters in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. 1596 mother-child dyads who participated in the All Our Babies study and who completed a follow-up questionnaire when their child was 2 years old. Among participants who completed the 2-year questionnaire and had complete mental health data (n=1146), 305 women (27%) were classified as high maternal mental health risk. Child development at age 2 was described and a resilience analysis was performed among a subgroup of families at maternal mental health risk. The primary outcome was child development problems. Protective factors were identified among families at risk, defined as maternal mental health risk, a composite measure created from participants' responses to mental health life course questions and standardised mental health measures. At age 2, 18% of children were classified as having development problems, 15% with behavioural problems and 13% with delayed social-emotional competencies. Among children living in a family with maternal mental health risk, protective factors against development problems included higher social support, higher optimism, more relationship happiness, less difficulty balancing work and family responsibilities, limiting the child's screen time to mental health, public health and early intervention strategies that support interpersonal relationships, social support, optimism, work-life balance, limiting children's screen time and establishing good sleep habits in the child's first 2 years show promise to positively influence early child development. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Development of the staffing evaluation technique for mental tasks of the advanced main control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh Tsungling; Yang Chihwei; Lin Chiuhsiangjoe

    2011-01-01

    The key goals of staffing and qualifications review element are to ensure that the right numbers of people with the appropriate skills and abilities are available to support plant operations and events. If the staffing level is too few, excessive stress that caused human errors possibly will be placed on the operators. Accordingly, this study developed a staffing evaluation technique based on CPM-GOMS for the mental tasks such as operations in the advanced main control room. A within-subject experiment was designed to examine the validity of the staffing evaluation technique. The results indicated the performance of evaluated staffing level via the staffing evaluation technique was significantly higher than that of non-evaluated staffing level; thus, validity of the staffing evaluation technique can be accepted. Finally, the implications for managerial practice on the findings of this study were discussed. (author)

  19. Student Development in Higher Education: A Constructivist Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Rania; Sarirete, Akila

    Sustainable education requires a new approach to knowledge acquisition and learning. This approach is manifested in merging student experience inside and outside the classroom, which eventually results in shaping the 21 st century lifelong learner. This paper presents an innovative student development model based on the constructivist approach; showing the collaboration between student affairs and academics. Furthermore, it illustrates a unique experience implemented at Effat University for developing the student as a whole person. This is done to complement the student's academic experience with the necessary skills and abilities derived from Effat University mission that focuses on creating women leaders. The student finds herself in a journey of self development and growth throughout the course of her study until graduation. At the time of graduation, she is equipped with all what it takes to be a successful career woman and a leader of change in her society.

  20. Development of Higher Education teaching: visibility and professional performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilda Aparecida Behrens

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This text presents some reflections based on a thorough review of studies carried out by the PEFOP (Educational Paradigms and Teacher Education group on teaching performance in higher education. The complex scenario of teaching activity and the challenges imposed by daily academic tasks were investigated in order to specify some indicators used by students to qualify teaching activity at university. It could be observed that such indicators interfere with the evaluation of the professors’ performance. The investigation also showed how professors deal with the required institutional evaluations, whose indicators and metric indices cause concern. Finally, a qualitative field research based on a semi-open-ended questionnaire was carried out with 89 students from a community university.

  1. Queering the relationship between evidence-based mental health and psychiatric diagnosis: Some implications for international mental health nurse curricular development

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Alec; Zeeman, Laetitia; Aranda, Kay

    2015-01-01

    We critique EB mental healthcare’s relationship with psychiatric diagnosis from a queer paradigm position. We sketch out some initial principles that will hopefully stimulate and contribute to the advancement of mental health nurse educational curricula internationally. This will help bring mental health nurse education more in-line with contemporary developments in narrative psychiatry and formulation as an emerging alternative to psychiatric diagnosis in UK clinical psychology.

  2. Developing Employability Skills: Peer Assessment in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Reports examining graduate employment issues suggest that employers are concerned by the lack of employability skills exhibited by entry-level job applications. It is also suggested that employers consider it the responsibility of educational institutions to develop such skills. The current study seeks to identify peer assessment as a…

  3. Collaborative Online Professional Development for Teachers in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teräs, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing teaching quality has become a priority for many universities. The need for high-quality professional development for university teachers is therefore crucial. Earlier research has indicated that isolated workshops often fail to result in significant changes in teaching practice. It has been suggested that the desired transformation…

  4. Professional Development of Sustainability Competences in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Wim; Verhulst, Elli; Rymenams, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide insights into the relation between professional development (PD) and organisational change processes towards sustainability, with a specific focus on empowerment. Design/methodology/approach: The paper builds upon a constructivist approach, combining a literature review, a desk research on key publications and…

  5. Mental Health Smartphone Apps: Review and Evidence-Based Recommendations for Future Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, David; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Rickwood, Debra; Rickard, Nikki

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of mental health apps (MHapps) developed and now available to smartphone users has increased in recent years. MHapps and other technology-based solutions have the potential to play an important part in the future of mental health care; however, there is no single guide for the development of evidence-based MHapps. Many currently available MHapps lack features that would greatly improve their functionality, or include features that are not optimized. Furthermore, MHapp de...

  6. MENTAL STATE LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT: THE LONGITUDINAL ROLES OF ATTACHMENT AND MATERNAL LANGUAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker Razuri, Erin; Hiles Howard, Amanda R; Purvis, Karyn B; Cross, David R

    2017-05-01

    Maternal mental state language is thought to influence children's mental state language and sociocognitive understanding (e.g., theory of mind), but the mechanism is unclear. The current study examined the longitudinal development of mental state language in mother-child interactions. The methodology included assessments of the child and/or mother-child dyad at six time points between 12 to 52 months of the child's age. Measures determined child's attachment style and language abilities, and mental state language used by mother and child during a block-building task. Results showed that (a) mental state talk, including belief and desire language, increased over time; (b) there were differences between the type of mental state words used by the mother in insecure versus secure dyads; (c) there were differences in patterns of mental state words used in both mothers and children in insecure versus secure dyads; and (d) attachment appeared to exert a consistent influence over time. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  7. Nine key principles to guide youth mental health: development of service models in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Deborah; Batchelor, Samantha; Coates, Dominiek; Cashman, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Historically, the Australian health system has failed to meet the needs of young people with mental health problems and mental illness. In 2006, New South Wales (NSW) Health allocated considerable funds to the reform agenda of mental health services in NSW to address this inadequacy. Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH), a service that provides mental health care for young people aged 12-24 years, with moderate to severe mental health problems, was chosen to establish a prototype Youth Mental Health (YMH) Service Model for NSW. This paper describes nine key principles developed by CYPMH to guide the development of YMH Service Models in NSW. A literature review, numerous stakeholder consultations and consideration of clinical best practice were utilized to inform the development of the key principles. Subsequent to their development, the nine key principles were formally endorsed by the Mental Health Program Council to ensure consistency and monitor the progress of YMH services across NSW. As a result, between 2008 and 2012 YMH Services across NSW regularly reported on their activities against each of the nine key principles demonstrating how each principle was addressed within their service. The nine key principles provide mental health services a framework for how to reorient services to accommodate YMH and provide a high-quality model of care. [Corrections added on 29 November 2013, after first online publication: The last two sentences of the Results section have been replaced with "As a result, between 2008 and 2012 YMH Services across NSW regularly reported on their activities against each of the nine key principles demonstrating how each principle was addressed within their service."]. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Towards a higher priority for health on the development agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yach, D; von Schirnding, Y E

    1994-01-01

    Over the last few years major international agencies (particularly the World Health Organisation and the World Bank) have increasingly recognised that investing in health is crucial for development. Development policies have the potential to enhance or impede progress in achieving Health for All. At the macro-economic level it is broadly recognised that the state of the economy of a country has a strong influence on its health level. The growing number of the population below the poverty line in sub-Saharan Africa is expected to have a substantial impact on health in the future. Further, structural adjustment programmes' impact on health has yet to be adequately evaluated. Rapid population growth in sub-Saharan Africa needs to be innovatively addressed as a matter of extreme urgency. The education of women is strongly related to child survival. Over the next few years the prospects for global disarmament are increasing. Options for using both the technology, financial savings, and personnel for improving health need to be investigated. A broader range of policy options for health needs to be considered by governments. A greater focus on information, education, and communication for health is needed that draws upon both the private and the public sector; greater use of regulation and legislation as solid policy instruments, for example, for pollution control, and banning tobacco and alcohol advertising, is required. Financial strategies using a combination of taxes and subsidies have not been adequately used in developing countries. The previous emphasis on urban-based expensive hospitals has proved to be inappropriate, resulting in severe inefficiency and inequity in the health systems of developing countries. Greater attention must be given to funding those areas with a high potential for positive externalities and that yield public goods. The final policy instrument involves using research to extend the options for intervention choice.

  9. Soft Skill: Its Urgency and Development at Islamic Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sabri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The success of a person in a career work is not only determined by his or her technical capability, but also the non-technical skills which is so called ‘soft-skills’.  It is an attitude which is exemplified among the cognitive and values in the interaction with people around. Several identified falures in the community’s life indicate that many Islamic university graduates suffered from lack of ability to build  harmonious relationship with the environment.  Therefore, it is a high time for this institution to consistently instil some types of soft-skills on the parts of the students.  The current study shares the urgent needs for developing students’ soft-skills for Islamic colleges and universities. The paper ends up with several conclusions while promoting some commitments to be held by the faculty development including: the identification of soft-skills that have already existed in the students’ minds and which need to be developed, the exploration of soft skills attributes for the next 5 years based on the inspiration or opinion of the stake holders and alumnaes, the setting of action plan for academic and non-cademic agendas, acting out the planned activities, as well as the sustainable blue-print of valid soft-skills. Copyright © 2014 by Al-Ta'lim All right reserved

  10. The Personal Norm of Reciprocity among mental health service users: conceptual development and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejkowski, Jason; McCarthy, Kevin S; Draine, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    A measure of an individual's level of internalization of the norm of reciprocity may signal exchange preferences and indicate whether "active" or "passive" mental health services are preferable to consumers. We evaluated the psychometric properties of one such measure, the Personal Norm of Reciprocity (PNR) scale. We recruited 70 persons receiving mental health services and 65 comparison participants to complete questionnaires assessing reciprocity tendencies and correlates of mental illness. Two of three subscales of a shortened PNR showed evidence of reliability and validity. Consumers endorsed higher levels of the reciprocity norm than persons not seeking services. Persons in "active" service settings displayed greater rigidity in application of the reciprocity norm than individuals in "passive" service settings or comparison participants. The shortened PNR can be a useful measure of individual reciprocity preferences. Measurement of the internalization of the norm of reciprocity may assist practitioners in identifying what types of services are more likely to retain and benefit mental health service consumers.

  11. Screening for mental health risk in high schools: The development of the Youth RADAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, John R; Rapee, Ronald M

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that as many as 1 in 5 young people will develop a mental health problem in any given year. Early detection and intervention are needed to reduce the impact that these conditions have-both for the young person and for the communities in which they live. This study reports the development of a new instrument aimed at helping identify students at risk of developing mental health difficulties. Rather than asking about the presence of symptoms of mental health conditions, the RADAR screening tool assesses a student's balance of risk and protective factors associated with the development of mental health problems. The RADAR was evaluated with a sample of 838 participants in high school Years 7-12. A robust internal factor structure was revealed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was satisfactory for each subscale, ranging from .73 to .90 while the reliability for the total scale was .91. Retest stability, measured over a 12 month period, was found to be strong (r = .72). Convergent validity was demonstrated with reference to standard measures of depression and behavioral problems. It is concluded that the RADAR is a promising measure for helping mental health professionals and educators decide which students may be at risk of developing mental health problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Development of Mentalizing and Communication: From Viewpoint of Developmental Cybernetics and Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Shoji

    The ability to mentalize is essential for human socialization. Such ability is strongly related to communication. In this paper, I discuss the development of mentalizing and communication from the perspectives of a new idea, Developmental Cybernetics, and developmental cognitive neuroscience. Children only attributed intention to a robot when they saw it behaving as a human and displaying social signals such as eye gaze. The emergence of powerful new methods and tools, such as neuroimaging, now allows questions about mentalizing to resolved more directly than before.

  14. Mental Health Problems of Iranian Female Adolescents and Its Association with Pubertal Development: A Nationwide Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Sotoudeh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mental health problems including emotional and behavioral problems during puberty may be under influence of different risk factors including cultures, living in urban or rural areas and ethnic factors which may vary between different countries. The main aim of this study is to investigate the profile of emotional and behavioral problems and the role of factors such as age, stage of puberty, ethnicity, rurality and living in urban area, as risk factors in Iranian girls. As a part of a large national study we evaluated the emotional and behavioral problems in different stages of puberty in a community sample of Iranian adolescent girls from public schools that were selected by clustered random sampling method. In all subjects, demographic characteristics, and pubertal stages were measured. Emotional and behavioral problems were evaluated using Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ. The associations of age, pubertal development indices, socioeconomic and demographic factors with the behavioral problems were assessed. A total number of 4576 students enrolled the study and responded to the questions. The mean age of participants was 13.83 2.19 years. The mean total score of difficulties in participants was 14.34 5.81. According to these results 813 (17.8% adolescents had total problem scores higher than Goodmans cutoff points and the most frequent problem domain was conduct problems (20.5%. According to the results the most related variable with the total difficulty score of SDQ were ethnicity, residency in urban areas and development of menstrual cycle respectively. The results of this study showed that the most correlated factors with mental health problems in Iranian girls during puberty are ethnicity, urbanity and development of menstrual cycle.

  15. Development of materials for higher burn-up rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Anderko, K.

    1983-01-01

    The results obtained so far concerning both high-nickel austenitic steels (X10CrNiMoTiB10 25) and ferritic-martensitic steels (X18CrMoVNb12 1 corresponds to 1.4914) justify the expectations placed in these materials. Future R and D work will concentrate on high-nickel austenitic steels, in particular on in-pile residence time in the range of maximum cladding mean temperatures (He embrittlement), on confirmation of the fairly good swelling and creep behaviour to be obtained from neutron irradiation experiments as well as on material qualification and technology. As far the development in the field of martensitic steels the major question concerns the influence of neutron irradiation on the transient temperature. It is just as important and interesting to detect and describe the ruling in-pile creep mechanism in the 400 to 600 0 C range. Furthermore, questions on the fabrication and qualification of cladding tube boxes are also preeminent. (orig.) [de

  16. Development of mental health quality indicators (MHQIs for inpatient psychiatry based on the interRAI mental health assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlman Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outcome quality indicators are rarely used to evaluate mental health services because most jurisdictions lack clinical data systems to construct indicators in a meaningful way across mental health providers. As a result, important information about the effectiveness of health services remains unknown. This study examined the feasibility of developing mental health quality indicators (MHQIs using the Resident Assessment Instrument - Mental Health (RAI-MH, a clinical assessment system mandated for use in Ontario, Canada as well as many other jurisdictions internationally. Methods Retrospective analyses were performed on two datasets containing RAI-MH assessments for 1,056 patients from 7 facilities and 34,788 patients from 70 facilities in Ontario, Canada. The RAI-MH was completed by clinical staff of each facility at admission and follow-up, typically at discharge. The RAI-MH includes a breadth of information on symptoms, functioning, socio-demographics, and service utilization. Potential MHQIs were derived by examining the empirical patterns of improvement and incidence in depressive symptoms and cognitive performance across facilities in both sets of data. A prevalence indicator was also constructed to compare restraint use. Logistic regression was used to evaluate risk adjustment of MHQIs using patient case-mix index scores derived from the RAI-MH System for Classification of Inpatient Psychiatry. Results Subscales from the RAI-MH, the Depression Severity Index (DSI and Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS, were found to have good reliability and strong convergent validity. Unadjusted rates of five MHQIs based on the DSI, CPS, and restraints showed substantial variation among facilities in both sets of data. For instance, there was a 29.3% difference between the first and third quartile facility rates of improvement in cognitive performance. The case-mix index score was significantly related to MHQIs for cognitive performance

  17. Positive mental health literacy: development and validation of a measure among Norwegian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Nissen Bjørnsen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health literacy (MHL, or the knowledge and abilities necessary to benefit mental health, is a significant determinant of mental health and has the potential to benefit both individual and public mental health. MHL and its measures have traditionally focused on knowledge and beliefs about mental -ill-health rather than on mental health. No measures of MHL addressing knowledge of good or positive mental health have been identified. Aim: This study aimed to develop and validate an instrument measuring adolescents’ knowledge of how to obtain and maintain good mental health and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the instrument. More specifically, the factor structure, internal and construct validity, and test-retest reliability were assessed. Methods The participants were Norwegian upper secondary school students aged 15–21 years. The development and validation of the instrument entailed three phases: 1 item generation based on the basic psychological needs theory (BPNT, focus group interviews, and a narrative literature review, 2 a pilot study (n = 479, and 3 test-retest (n = 149, known-groups validity (n = 44, and scale construction, item reduction through principal component analysis (PCA, and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA for factor structure and psychometric properties assessment (n = 1888. Results Thirty-two items were initially generated, and 15 were selected for the pilot study. PCA identified cross-loadings, and a one-factor solution was examined. After removing five problematic items, CFA yielded a satisfactory fit for a 10-item one-factor model, referred to as the mental health-promoting knowledge (MHPK-10 measure. The test-retest evaluation supported the stability of the measure. McDonald’s omega was 0.84, and known-groups validity test indicated good construct validity. Conclusion A valid and reliable one-dimensional instrument measuring knowledge of factors promoting good mental

  18. Positive mental health literacy: development and validation of a measure among Norwegian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnsen, Hanne Nissen; Eilertsen, Mary Elizabeth Bradley; Ringdal, Regine; Espnes, Geir Arild; Moksnes, Unni Karin

    2017-09-18

    Mental health literacy (MHL), or the knowledge and abilities necessary to benefit mental health, is a significant determinant of mental health and has the potential to benefit both individual and public mental health. MHL and its measures have traditionally focused on knowledge and beliefs about mental -ill-health rather than on mental health. No measures of MHL addressing knowledge of good or positive mental health have been identified. This study aimed to develop and validate an instrument measuring adolescents' knowledge of how to obtain and maintain good mental health and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the instrument. More specifically, the factor structure, internal and construct validity, and test-retest reliability were assessed. The participants were Norwegian upper secondary school students aged 15-21 years. The development and validation of the instrument entailed three phases: 1) item generation based on the basic psychological needs theory (BPNT), focus group interviews, and a narrative literature review, 2) a pilot study (n = 479), and 3) test-retest (n = 149), known-groups validity (n = 44), and scale construction, item reduction through principal component analysis (PCA), and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) for factor structure and psychometric properties assessment (n = 1888). Thirty-two items were initially generated, and 15 were selected for the pilot study. PCA identified cross-loadings, and a one-factor solution was examined. After removing five problematic items, CFA yielded a satisfactory fit for a 10-item one-factor model, referred to as the mental health-promoting knowledge (MHPK-10) measure. The test-retest evaluation supported the stability of the measure. McDonald's omega was 0.84, and known-groups validity test indicated good construct validity. A valid and reliable one-dimensional instrument measuring knowledge of factors promoting good mental health among adolescents was developed. The instrument has the

  19. Step-Up: Promoting Youth Mental Health and Development in Inner-City High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea, Stacey; Pardo, Gisselle; Conover, Kelly; Gopalan, Geetha; McKay, Mary

    2012-06-01

    African American and Latino youth who reside in inner-city communities are at heightened risk for compromised mental health, as their neighborhoods are too often associated with serious stressors, including elevated rates of poverty, substance abuse, community violence, as well as scarce youth-supportive resources, and mental health care options. Many aspects of disadvantaged urban contexts have the potential to thwart successful youth development. Adolescents with elevated mental health needs may experience impaired judgment, poor problem-solving skills, and conflictual interpersonal relationships, resulting in unsafe sexual behavior and drug use. However, mental health services are frequently avoided by urban adolescents who could gain substantial benefit from care. Thus, the development of culturally sensitive, contextually relevant and effective services for urban, low-income African American and Latino adolescents is critical. Given the complexity of the mental health and social needs of urban youth, novel approaches to service delivery may need to consider individual (i.e., motivation to succeed in the future), family (i.e., adult support within and outside of the family), and community-level (i.e., work and school opportunities) clinical components. Step-Up, a high school-based mental health service delivery model has been developed to bolster key family, youth and school processes related to youth mental health and positive youth development. Step-Up (1) intervenes with urban minority adolescents across inner-city ecological domains; (2) addresses multiple levels (school, family and community) in order to target youth mental health difficulties; and (3) provides opportunities for increasing youth social problem-solving and life skills. Further, Step-Up integrates existing theory-driven, evidence-based interventions. This article describes Step-Up clinical goals, theoretical influences, as well as components and key features, and presents preliminary data on

  20. The Development of Compulsive Internet Use and Mental Health: A Four-Year Study of Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarrochi, Joseph; Parker, Philip; Sahdra, Baljinder; Marshall, Sarah; Jackson, Chris; Gloster, Andrew T.; Heaven, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Is compulsive Internet use (CIU) an antecedent to poor mental health, a consequence, or both? Study 1 used a longitudinal design to track the development of CIU and mental health in Grade 8 (N = 1,030 males, 1,038 females, M[subscript age] = 13.7), 9, 10, and 11. Study 2 extended Study 1 by examining the kinds of Internet behaviors most strongly…

  1. Rapid mental computation system as a tool for algorithmic thinking of elementary school students development

    OpenAIRE

    Ziatdinov, Rushan; Musa, Sajid

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the possibilities of using a rapid mental computation system in elementary education. The system consists of a number of readily memorized operations that allow one to perform arithmetic computations very quickly. These operations are actually simple algorithms which can develop or improve the algorithmic thinking of pupils. Using a rapid mental computation system allows forming the basis for the study of computer science in secondary school.

  2. Developing the Mental Health Workforce: Review and Application of Training Approaches from Multiple Disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Kerns, Suzanne E. U.; Bruns, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Strategies specifically designed to facilitate the training of mental health practitioners in evidence-based practices (EBPs) have lagged behind the development of the interventions themselves. The current paper draws from an interdisciplinary literature (including medical training, adult education, and teacher training) to identify useful training and support approaches as well as important conceptual frameworks that may be applied to training in mental health. Theory and research findings a...

  3. [The Development of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing in Taiwan: Reflection From the Perspective of Recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Biau; Tsai, Sing-Ling

    2017-06-01

    Evidence-based nursing science has identified psychological recovery, partnership, and medication adherence as factors that have influenced the development of mental health care. This article discusses the process by which mental health care has developed from a medical / rehabilitation-focused model to a model that focuses on patient empowerment. The current model aims to assist patients to achieve self-awareness and to develop coping skills that enhance their motivation to transform. Medical advances have improved the control of psychiatric symptoms. Following the introduction of 2nd generation antipsychotics, patients were invited to establish decisions related to these prescription medications. Under the principles of patient-centered service, Taiwanese mental health professionals have changed their relationship with patients from a therapeutic model to a mutual-partnership model. Furthermore, investigations of the therapeutic care of patients with mental illness have used the needs of patients as their starting point and emphasized various aspects of patient and caregiver needs. Taiwanese mental health professionals are searching for a model of mental health care that is superior to the traditional operative framework of medical authority.

  4. Health Policy Brief: Global Mental Health and the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cratsley, Kelso; Mackey, Tim K

    2018-01-25

    Increased awareness of the importance of mental health for global health has led to a number of new initiatives, including influential policy instruments issued by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations (UN). This policy brief describes two WHO instruments, the Mental Health Action Plan for 2013-2020 (World Health Organization, 2013) and the Mental Health Atlas (World Health Organization, 2015), and presents a comparative analysis with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the UN's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (United Nations, 2015). The WHO's Action Plan calls for several specific objectives and targets, with a focus on improving global mental health governance and service coverage. In contrast, the UN's Sustainable Development Goals include only one goal specific to mental health, with a single indicator tracking suicide mortality rates. The discrepancy between the WHO and UN frameworks suggests a need for increased policy coherence. Improved global health governance can provide the basis for ensuring and accelerating progress in global mental health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Impact on infants' cognitive development of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency disorder and common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thach Duc; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Tran, Tuan; Simpson, Julie Anne; Hanieh, Sarah; Dwyer, Terence; Fisher, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and common mental disorders (CMD) on cognitive development of 6 months old infants in a developing country. A prospective population-based study in a rural province in Vietnam, which enrolled pregnant women at 12-20 weeks gestation and followed them up with their infants until six months postpartum. Criteria for IDA were Hb cognitive development was assessed by Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd Ed. Path analyses were performed to determine the direct and indirect, partly or fully mediated, causal effects of the antenatal exposures. A total of 497 pregnant women were recruited, of those 378 women provided complete data which were included in the analyses. Statistically significant direct adverse effects of persistent antenatal IDA (estimated difference of -11.62 points; 95% CI -23.01 to -0.22) and antenatal CMD (-4.80 points; 95% CI: -9.40 to -0.20) on infant Bayley cognitive scores at six months were found. Higher birthweight, household wealth, and self-rated sufficient supply of breastmilk were associated with higher cognitive scores. Maternal age >30 years and primiparity had an indirect adverse effect on infants' Bayley cognitive scores. These findings suggest that antenatal IDA and CMD both have adverse effects on child cognitive development, which if unrecognized and unaddressed are likely to be lasting. It is crucial that both these risks are considered by policy makers, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve child cognitive function in developing countries.

  6. Impact on Infants’ Cognitive Development of Antenatal Exposure to Iron Deficiency Disorder and Common Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thach Duc; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Tran, Tuan; Simpson, Julie Anne; Hanieh, Sarah; Dwyer, Terence; Fisher, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the effects of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and common mental disorders (CMD) on cognitive development of 6 months old infants in a developing country. Methods A prospective population-based study in a rural province in Vietnam, which enrolled pregnant women at 12–20 weeks gestation and followed them up with their infants until six months postpartum. Criteria for IDA were Hb cognitive development was assessed by Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd Ed. Path analyses were performed to determine the direct and indirect, partly or fully mediated, causal effects of the antenatal exposures. Results A total of 497 pregnant women were recruited, of those 378 women provided complete data which were included in the analyses. Statistically significant direct adverse effects of persistent antenatal IDA (estimated difference of −11.62 points; 95% CI −23.01 to −0.22) and antenatal CMD (−4.80 points; 95% CI: −9.40 to −0.20) on infant Bayley cognitive scores at six months were found. Higher birthweight, household wealth, and self-rated sufficient supply of breastmilk were associated with higher cognitive scores. Maternal age >30 years and primiparity had an indirect adverse effect on infants’ Bayley cognitive scores. Conclusions These findings suggest that antenatal IDA and CMD both have adverse effects on child cognitive development, which if unrecognized and unaddressed are likely to be lasting. It is crucial that both these risks are considered by policy makers, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve child cognitive function in developing countries. PMID:24086390

  7. An Empirical Analysis of the Development of China's Higher Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minglun, Wang

    2017-01-01

    After more than 20 years of practice and construction, China's higher vocational education has developed into an important educational category and become an important force in the development of China's higher education. But in the course of this development, higher vocational education is facing problems such as excessively fast development,…

  8. Preschool self regulation predicts later mental health and educational achievement in very preterm and typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Lianne J; Lu, Zhigang; Morris, Alyssa R; Healey, Dione M

    2017-02-01

    To examine the extent to which preschool emotional and behavioral regulatory difficulties were associated with an increased risk of later mental health and educational problems. Of particular interest was whether early regulatory abilities contributed to later risk once baseline child behavioral adjustment and cognitive function were taken into account. Data were drawn from a prospective longitudinal study of 223 children born very preterm (VPT; Regulation Checklist, and (3) tester ratings of child behavior during neuropsychological testing. At age 9 years, mental health and educational achievement were assessed using the Development and Well-being Assessment interview and the Woodcock Johnson-III Tests of Achievement. VPT-born children had poorer emotional and behavioral regulation across all measures and time points. They also had higher rates of DSM-IV mental health disorder and educational delay at age 9. Across both study groups, poorer self regulation was associated with an increased risk of ADHD, conduct disorder, anxiety disorders and any disorder net of preschool child behavior problems and social risk. In contrast, only associations between early regulation and later language and any educational delay remained significant after adjustment for preschool cognitive functioning and family social risk. Early assessment of regulation in addition to behavioral screening may improve the early identification of preschool children at mental health risk.

  9. Mental illness in Bwindi, Uganda: Understanding stakeholder perceptions of benefits and barriers to developing a community-based mental health programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen L. Sessions

    2017-11-01

    Results: Stakeholders perceived benefits to a community-based compared to a hospital-based programme, including improved patient care, lower costs to patients and improved community understanding of mental illness. They also cited barriers including cost, insufficient workforce and a lack of community readiness.Conclusions: Stakeholders express interest in developing community-based mental health programmes, as they feel that it will address mental health needs in the community and improve community awareness of mental illness. However, they also report that cost is a significant barrier to programme development that will have to be addressed prior to being able to successfully establish such programming. Additionally, many community members expressed unique sociocultural beliefs regarding the nature of mental illness and those suffering from a psychiatric disease.

  10. Higher cardio-respiratory fitness is associated with increased mental and physical quality of life in people with bipolar disorder: A controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Hagemann, Noemi; Wyckaert, Sabine; Rosenbaum, Simon; Stubbs, Brendon; Firth, Joseph; Schuch, Felipe B; Probst, Michel; Sienaert, Pascal

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether cardiorespiratory fitness among outpatients with bipolar disorder is associated with health related quality of life (HRQL) and explore differences versus healthy controls. Outpatients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls matched for age, sex and body mass index completed the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, the Positive-and-Negative-Affect-Schedule (PANAS), a maximal cardiorespiratory fitness test, and wore a Sensewear Armband to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior for eight days. Unpaired t-tests, Pearson correlations and backward regression analyses were performed. Outpatients with bipolar disorder (n = 20; 14♀; 47.9 ± 7.9 years) had a significantly lower physical and mental HRQL than healthy controls (n = 20; 14♀; 47.8 ± 7.6 years), a lower maximum oxygen uptake (VO 2 max) and were more sedentary. While no significant correlates were found for HRQL in controls, higher VO 2 max values and lower PANAS negative affect scores predicted better physical and mental HRQL in people with bipolar disorder. The final regression model explained 68% and 58% of the variability in physical and mental HRQL respectively. Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with mental and physical HRQL among people with bipolar disorder. The current study offers novel targets for scientific investigation and clinical interventions to increase HRQL in people with bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Determining the Motor Skills Development of Mentally Retarded Children through the Contribution of Visual Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erim, Gonca; Caferoglu, Müge

    2017-01-01

    Visual arts education is a process that helps the reflection of inner worlds, socialization via group works and healthier motor skills development of normally developing or handicapped children like the mentally retarded. This study aims to determine the influence of visual art studies on the motor skills development of primary school first grade…

  12. Exploring the Interconnectedness among Strategy Development, Shared Mental Models, Organisational Learning and Organisational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Renee

    2011-01-01

    The cognitive psychological processes related to learning and change behaviour are factors that impact on organisational strategy development. Strategy development is dependent on strategic thinking that is reciprocally influenced by shared mental models, organisational learning and organisational change. Although strategy development, shared…

  13. The second higher education and additional education as factors of development of commercialization in Ukrainian higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Strigul

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The attention in the article has been drawn to the nature and characteristics of commercialization in the higher education system of Ukraine. It has been noted that commercialization in the consumer society is a social process of transformation of knowledge into a product or service. It provides the growing influence of market relations on the goals and objectives of higher education, promotes the growing importance of knowledge as a source for economic development and focuses on the concept of rooting and academic capitalism and the creation of market-oriented and entrepreneurial universities, which provide dynamic development of economy based on knowledge. Defining the essence of the Ukrainian forms of commercialization, there is a significant role of further and second higher education (that is, the presence of a variety of educational forms, which allows the University receiving the profit in the monetary form. The model of commercialization, which is implemented in Ukrainian higher education, differs from the American and Western European ones, as it is focused on financial returns, not on the economization of intellectual profit. Secondly, a peculiar type of consumer behavior, consumerism, which provides growth of profitability of higher education institutions by a variety of additional services (training, additional courses, further education, developing classes, retaking tests, etc.. The factors of development and dynamics of the Ukrainian forms of commercialization, as well as recommendations for avoiding the negative consequences of the economization and commercialization in higher education structure of modern Ukraine have been considered in the article. It has been noted that the University lost its original purpose and became a huge supermarket, which offers various kinds of knowledge. Rational action considers in the desire to buy the most qualitative product – a diploma from a prestigious University. Nowadays, the higher

  14. Mental Development of Children with Non-epileptic Paroxysmal States in Medical History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turovskaya N.G.,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The author studied mental functions disorders in children with a history of paroxysmal states of various etiologies and compared mental development disorder patterns in patients with epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysms. Study sample were 107 children, aged 6 to 10 years. The study used experimental psychological and neuropsychological techniques. According to the empirical study results, non-epileptic paroxysms unlike epileptic much less combined with a number of mental functions disorders and intelligence in general. However, non-epileptic paroxysmal states as well as epileptic seizure associated with increasing activity exhaustion and abnormal function of the motor analyzer (dynamic and kinesthetic dyspraxia. Visual memory disorders and modal-nonspecific memory disorders have more pronounced importance in the mental ontogenesis structure in children with convulsive paroxysms compared to children with cerebral pathology without paroxysms history

  15. CASPR2 autoantibodies are raised during pregnancy in mothers of children with mental retardation and disorders of psychological development but not autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Ester; Jacobson, Leslie; Pedersen, Marianne Giørtz

    2017-01-01

    ) or CASPR2 antibodies (n=1) were identified in 5/11 (45.5%) women whose children were given a diagnosis of mild or unspecified mental retardation or disorders of psychological and motor development (collectively abbreviated as mental retardation and/or disorders of psychological development (MR...... a significantly higher frequency of CASPR2 antibodies in mothers of MD/DPD children (p=0.01). These autoantibodies were not increased in mothers of children with autistic spectrum disorder. CONCLUSIONS: These findings complement the known roles of CASPR2 in brain development, and warrant further epidemiological...

  16. Risk factors for unplanned pregnancy in women with mental illness living in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Elsa; Jordaan, Esme; Niehaus, Dana; Koen, Liezl; Leppanen, Jukka

    2018-06-01

    Pregnant women in general are at an increased risk of experiencing symptoms of mental illness, and those living in a developing country are even more vulnerable. Research points towards a causal relationship between unplanned pregnancy and perinatal mental illness and suggests that pregnancy planning can aid in reducing the negative impact of mental illness on a woman, her unborn baby, and the rest of the family. In this quantitative, descriptive study, we investigated both socio-demographic factors and variables relating to mental illness itself that may place women at an increased risk of experiencing unplanned pregnancy. Data was gathered at two maternal mental health clinics in Cape Town by means of semi-structured interviews. Univariate analyses of the data revealed five independent key risk factors for unplanned pregnancy: lower levels of education, unmarried status, belonging to the Colored ethnic population, substance use, and having a history of two or more suicide attempts. Some of these factors overlap with findings of similar studies, but others are unique to the specific population (women with mental illness within a developing country). Screening of women based on these risk predictors may pave the way for early interventions and reduce the incidence of unplanned pregnancy and the negative consequences thereof in the South African population.

  17. Development and implementation of a 'Mental Health Finder' software tool within an electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, D; Hannigan, A; Higgins, S; McDonnell, R; Meagher, D; Cullen, W

    2017-02-01

    In Ireland, as in many other healthcare systems, mental health service provision is being reconfigured with a move toward more care in the community, and particularly primary care. Recording and surveillance systems for mental health information and activities in primary care are needed for service planning and quality improvement. We describe the development and initial implementation of a software tool ('mental health finder') within a widely used primary care electronic medical record system (EMR) in Ireland to enable large-scale data collection on the epidemiology and management of mental health and substance use problems among patients attending general practice. In collaboration with the Irish Primary Care Research Network (IPCRN), we developed the 'Mental Health Finder' as a software plug-in to a commonly used primary care EMR system to facilitate data collection on mental health diagnoses and pharmacological treatments among patients. The finder searches for and identifies patients based on diagnostic coding and/or prescribed medicines. It was initially implemented among a convenience sample of six GP practices. Prevalence of mental health and substance use problems across the six practices, as identified by the finder, was 9.4% (range 6.9-12.7%). 61.9% of identified patients were female; 25.8% were private patients. One-third (33.4%) of identified patients were prescribed more than one class of psychotropic medication. Of the patients identified by the finder, 89.9% were identifiable via prescribing data, 23.7% via diagnostic coding. The finder is a feasible and promising methodology for large-scale data collection on mental health problems in primary care.

  18. People with diabetes, respiratory, liver or mental disorders, higher urinary antimony, bisphenol A, or pesticides had higher food insecurity: USA NHANES, 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ivy

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the prevalence of food insecurity and what social, health, and environmental characteristics could constitute such situation in a national and population-based setting. Data was retrieved from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2006. Information on demographics, lifestyle factors, self-reported ever medical conditions in the past and self-reported food security conditions in the last 12 months calculated on the household level was obtained by household interview. Bloods and urines (subsample) were collected at the interview as well. Only adults aged 20 years and above (n = 4979) were included for statistical analysis in the present study. Chi-square test, t test, and survey-weighted logistic regression modeling were performed. Three thousand eight hundred thirty-four (77.9%) people were with full food security, 466 (9.5%) people were with marginal food security and 624 (12.7%) people were with low or very low food security. Being younger, having higher ratios of family income to poverty thresholds (due to low level of education or lack of financial support), having prior asthma, arthritis, chronic bronchitis, depression, diabetes, eczema, emphysema or liver problems, having higher levels of serum cotinine, urinary antimony, bisphenol A, pesticides, or having lower levels of urinary Benzophenone-3 were associated with food insecurity. In addition to socioeconomic and smoking conditions, evidence on people with several prior health conditions and being exposed to environmental chemicals and food insecurity is further provided. Future social, health and environmental policy, and programs protecting people from food insecurity by considering both health and environmental factors mentioned above would be suggested.

  19. Effect of zinc intake on mental and motor development in infants: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissensohn, Mariela; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena; Fuentes Lugo, Daniel; Henríquez Sánchez, Patricia; Doreste Alonso, Jorge; Skinner, Anna L; Medina, Marisol W; Lowe, Nicola M; Hall Moran, Victoria; Serra-Majem, Lluis

    2013-01-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to evaluate the effect of zinc (Zn) intake on mental and motor development in infants. Out of 5500 studies identified through electronic searches and reference lists, 5 RCTs were selected after applying the exclusion/inclusion criteria. The influence of Zn intake on mental and motor development was considered in the overall meta-analysis. Other variables were also taken into account as possible effect modifiers: doses of Zn intake, intervention duration, nutritional situation, and risk of bias. Indices of mental and motor development assessed were the Mental Development Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Development Index (PDI). Additionally we carried out a sensitivity analysis. The pooled β was -0.01 (95 %CI -0.02, 0) for MDI and 0 (95 %CI -0.03, 0.02) for PDI, with a substantial heterogeneity in both analyses. When we performed a meta-regression, the effect of Zn supplementation on MDI changed depending on the dose of supplementation. Regarding PDI, there was a differential effect of Zn intake depending on intervention duration, dose of supplementation, nutritional situation, and risk of bias. Zn supplementation showed a negative, weak and significant effect on PDI score in those studies with a length of 4 to 20 weeks (β= -0.05; CI 95 % -0.06 to -0.04). In conclusion, no association was found between Zn intake and mental and motor development in infants. Further standardized research is urgently needed to clarify the role of Zn supplementation upon infant mental and motor development, particularly in Europe.

  20. The positive mental health instrument: development and validation of a culturally relevant scale in a multi-ethnic asian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaingankar Janhavi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Instruments to measure mental health and well-being are largely developed and often used within Western populations and this compromises their validity in other cultures. A previous qualitative study in Singapore demonstrated the relevance of spiritual and religious practices to mental health, a dimension currently not included in exiting multi-dimensional measures. The objective of this study was to develop a self-administered measure that covers all key and culturally appropriate domains of mental health, which can be applied to compare levels of mental health across different age, gender and ethnic groups. We present the item reduction and validation of the Positive Mental Health (PMH instrument in a community-based adult sample in Singapore. Methods Surveys were conducted among adult (21-65 years residents belonging to Chinese, Malay and Indian ethnicities. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (EFA, CFA were conducted and items were reduced using item response theory tests (IRT. The final version of the PMH instrument was tested for internal consistency and criterion validity. Items were tested for differential item functioning (DIF to check if items functioned in the same way across all subgroups. Results: EFA and CFA identified six first-order factor structure (General coping, Personal growth and autonomy, Spirituality, Interpersonal skills, Emotional support, and Global affect under one higher-order dimension of Positive Mental Health (RMSEA = 0.05, CFI = 0.96, TLI = 0.96. A 47-item self-administered multi-dimensional instrument with a six-point Likert response scale was constructed. The slope estimates and strength of the relation to the theta for all items in each six PMH subscales were high (range:1.39 to 5.69, suggesting good discrimination properties. The threshold estimates for the instrument ranged from -3.45 to 1.61 indicating that the instrument covers entire spectrums for the six dimensions. The

  1. Development of Lifetime Comorbidity in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Ormel, Johan; Petukhova, Maria; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Green, Jennifer Greif; Russo, Leo J.; Stein, Dan J.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura; Benjet, Corina; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Graaf, Ron; Demyttenaere, Koen; Fayyad, John; Haro, Josep Maria; Hu, Chi Yi; Karam, Aimee; Lee, Sing; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Matchsinger, Herbert; Mihaescu-Pintia, Constanta; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Uestuen, T. Bedirhan; Ustun, T.B.

    Context: Although numerous studies have examined the role of latent variables in the structure of comorbidity among mental disorders, none has examined their role in the development of comorbidity. Objective: To study the role of latent variables in the development of comorbidity among 18 lifetime

  2. Effects of Micronutrients during Pregnancy and Early Infancy on Mental and Psychomotor Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, H.; West, C.E.; Bleichrodt, N.; Dekker, P.H.; Born, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    The questions that are addressed in this chapter concern the extent to which a shortage of iodine and iron during fetal and infant development impairs mental development and the extent to which this impairment can be redressed by increasing the intake of these micronutrients

  3. Evidence-Based Mental Health Practices with Children Self-Efficacy Scale: Development and Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeel, Lorri S.; Leathers, Sonya J.; Strand, Tonya C.

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews existing measures related to evidence-based practices with children and self-efficacy and describes the development and psychometric properties of the Evidence-Based Mental Health Practices With Children Efficacy Scale. This scale was developed to assess students' and clinicians' self-efficacy in their abilities to use…

  4. Integration of Higher Education and Endogenous Development in Staff, Students and Curricula Development Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mwadiwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher education in most developing countries, particularly on the African continent, suffers a major contradiction, where even though the populations in nearly all African countries are of mixed cultural backgrounds, the university curriculum content encompasses, predominantly, the modern western view. Accordingly efforts and experiences for staff, student and curriculum development incorporating research, teaching and learning capacities focus, primarily, on modern concepts, approaches and methodologies. Thus most development initiatives are consequently looking to modern western view to motivate individuals who have come to associate modern western schooling and school-type programmes with success and the non-modern western world views with failure (Rustemeyer 2011:15. Arguably, modern western view pervades nearly every aspect of daily lives of traditional societies dwelling in rural communities whilst being increasingly influenced by inevitable factors of universal marketplace economically. This article challenges the University of Technology to become more passionately initiative in supporting the essence of ‘endogenous development (ED meaning development originating from within through encouraging and promoting networking with rural Community-based Traditional Institutions. The international Comparing and Supporting Endogenous Development (COMPAS Network describes endogenous development as an empowering process of the community, in which cultural awakening, creation of unity and participatory action are essential elements (COMPAS 2006:9. The significant aspect of the endogenous development approach is the willingness of development experts to implant their work and effort in the worldviews of the Traditional Institutions even though the professionals may not fully understand or agree with the worldviews of the respective Traditional Institutions.

  5. The development and maintenance of mental toughness: perceptions of elite performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Declan; Wadey, Ross; Hanton, Sheldon; Jones, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Seven participants from a previous study (Jones, Hanton, & Connaughton, 2002) agreed to be interviewed about the development of mental toughness. We also aimed to determine whether mental toughness requires maintenance. Semistructured interviews were conducted to elicit the participants' perceptions of how mental toughness is cultivated and retained. Findings indicated that the development of mental toughness is a long-term process that encompasses a multitude of underlying mechanisms that operate in a combined, rather than independent, fashion. In general, these perceived underlying mechanisms related to many features associated with a motivational climate (e.g. enjoyment, mastery), various individuals (i.e. coaches, peers, parents, grandparents, siblings, senior athletes, sport psychologists, team-mates), experiences in and outside sport, psychological skills and strategies, and an insatiable desire and internalized motives to succeed. It was also reported that once mental toughness had been developed, three perceived underlying mechanisms were required to maintain this construct: a desire and motivation to succeed that was insatiable and internalized, a support network that included sporting and non-sporting personnel, and effective use of basic and advanced psychological skills. Practical implications and future avenues of research are discussed.

  6. Development of a wearable system module for monitoring physical and mental workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sinbae; Nakamura, Hiromi; Yoshida, Toshihiko; Kishimoto, Masamichi; Imai, Yohsuke; Matsuki, Noriaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2008-11-01

    The population of most developed countries is rapidly aging, which has created a growing demand for home care. A key issue in medicine is supporting the increasing number of elderly patients, both physically and mentally. In this study, we developed a wearable computer that contained modules for measuring electrocardiograms (ECGs) and femoral artery pulse waves using an accelerometer. This system has several benefits: (a) it can provide a database server in each patient's home; (b) its high extendibility and flexibility facilitate adaptation to a patient's needs; and (c) it allows patients to keep their own data, thus protecting the privacy of personal information. To clarify the capabilities and reliability of the system, we applied it to 8 healthy young volunteers during states of physical and mental work. This system successfully detected clear ECGs and femoral artery pulse waves to calculate important bioinformation, including heart rate, pulse wave velocity, and the power spectral density of spontaneous beat-to-beat oscillations in the R-R interval. In this study, we proposed the way to provide an assessment of the physical and mental condition of the subject using analysis of the bio-information with respect to the physical and mental workloads. The present study provides useful knowledge for the development of a wearable computer designed to monitor the physical and mental conditions of older persons and patients.

  7. Social mechanisms of development and dynamics of economism and commercialization of Ukrainian higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Strigul

    2017-04-01

    education relevant and, in particular, the results of commercialization. The results of the research of the processes of economism and the commercialization in Ukrainian higher education have been given by the author in the form of standardized questionnaire survey of students of 6 state-owned universities and 4 universities of private ownership. The mechanisms of commercialization in the Ukrainian education is clear: disadvantaged social-economic situation of the country as a whole; low, sometimes a poor level of state support for he higher education; inadequate funding of universities and the choice of the irrational forms of management in the educational sector; lack of reform of the higher education’s system; the rapid development of private education and the emergence of privately owned universities; choice of their own ways of modernization of the education sector and lack of support for the European educational trends; the existence of a peculiar type of culture, mentality and consciousness of individuals that actually contributes to innovations’ deny.

  8. Policy development and challenges of global mental health: a systematic review of published studies of national-level mental health policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Yu, Yu; Yang, Mei; Chen, Lizhang; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2018-05-18

    Mental health policy can be an essential and powerful tool to improve a population's mental health. However, around one third of countries do not possess a mental health policy, and there are large disparities in population coverage rates between high- and low-income countries. The goal of this study is to identify the transition and implementation challenges of mental health policies in both high-income countries (HICs) as well as middle- and low-income countries (MLICs). PubMed, Cochrane Library and Campbell Library were searched from inception to 31 December 2017, for studies on implemented mental health policies at the national level. Abstracts and the main texts of papers were double screened, and extracted data were analysed through thematic synthesis. A total of 93 papers were included in this study, covering 24 HICs, 28 MLICs and 5 regions. Studies on mental health policies, especially those of MLICs, kept increasing, but MLICs were still underrepresented in terms of publication quantity and study frequency. Based on the included studies, nine policy domains were summarized: service organizing, service provision, service quality, human resources, legislation and human rights, advocacy, administration, surveillance and research, and financing and budgeting. HICs incrementally enriched their policy content in all domains over centuries of development; following HICs' experience, mental health policies in MLICs have boomed since the 1990s and quickly extended to all domains. Implementation problems in HICs were mainly related to service organizing and service provision; for MLICs, more severe implementation problems converged on financing and budgeting, administration and human resources. Mental health policy developments in both HICs and MLICs present a process of diversification and enrichment. In terms of implementation, MLICs are faced with more and greater challenges than HICs, especially in funding, human resources and administration. Therefore, future

  9. Conversations about mental states and theory of mind development during middle childhood: A training study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Federica; Lecce, Serena; Banerjee, Robin

    2016-09-01

    Despite 30years of productive research on theory of mind (ToM), we still know relatively little about variables that influence ToM development during middle childhood. Recent experimental studies have shown that conversations about the mind affect ToM abilities, but they have not explored the mechanisms underlying this developmental effect. In the current study, we examined two potential mechanisms through which conversations about mental states are likely to influence ToM: an increased frequency of references to mental states when explaining behavior and an increased accuracy of mental-state attributions. To this aim, we conducted a training study in which 101 children were assigned to either an intervention condition or a control condition. The conversation-based intervention was made up of four sessions scheduled over 2weeks. Children completed a battery of assessments before and after the intervention as well as 2months later. The groups were equivalent at Time 1 (T1) for age, family affluence, vocabulary, and executive functions. The ToM group showed an improvement in ToM skills (as evaluated on both the practiced tasks and a transfer task). Mediation analyses demonstrated that the accuracy of mental-state attributions, but not the mere frequency of mental-state references, mediated the positive effect of conversations about the mind on ToM development. Our results indicate that conversational experience can enhance mental-state reasoning not by simply drawing children's attention to mental states but rather by scaffolding a mature understanding of social situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of project wings home visits, a mental health intervention for Latino families using community-based participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carolyn; Hermann, Denise; Bartels, Anna; Matamoros, Pablo; Dick-Olson, Linda; Guerra de Patino, Janeth

    2012-11-01

    As the Latino population in the United States experiences rapid growth, the well-being of Latino adolescents is a growing concern because of their high rates of mental health problems. Latino adolescents have higher rates of mental health problems than their peers, including depressive symptoms, suicide attempts, and violence. Sophisticated, realistic health promotion efforts are needed to reduce these risk behaviors and enhance protective factors. Parents and schools can be key protective factors, or assets, in adolescents' lives. This article details the steps undertaken to develop Project Wings Home Visits, a collaborative school-based, community-linked mental health promotion intervention for Latino adolescents and their families. Core to the intervention is the use of a community health worker model to provide home-based outreach and education to parents of Latino adolescents. The intervention was developed using a community-based participatory research approach that involved the cooperation of a community health care system, a public high school, and a university. Our process demonstrates the benefits, strengths, and challenges of using community-based participatory research in creating and implementing health promotion interventions.

  11. Developing mental health services in Nigeria : the impact of a community-based mental health awareness programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Julian; Agomoh, Ahamefula O

    2008-07-01

    This grass-roots level mental health awareness programme considerably increased use of community-based mental health services in a part of Nigeria where knowledge about treatability of mental illness was limited. The benefits of the programme were sustained for a significant period after the initial awareness programme. In order for attitude changes to be reinforced, similar awareness programmes must be repeated at regular intervals.

  12. Addressing Gaps in Mental Health and Addictions Nursing Leadership: An Innovative Professional Development Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrs, Margaret; Strudwick, Gillian; Ling, Sara; Reisdorfer, Emilene; Cleverley, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Mental health and addictions services are integral to Canada's healthcare system, and yet it is difficult to recruit experienced nurse leaders with advanced practice, management or clinical informatics expertise in this field. Master's-level graduates, aspiring to be mental health nurse leaders, often lack the confidence and experience required to lead quality improvement, advancements in clinical care, service design and technology innovations for improved patient care. This paper describes an initiative that develops nursing leaders through a unique scholarship, internship and mentorship model, which aims to foster confidence, critical thinking and leadership competency development in the mental health and addictions context. The "Mutual Benefits Model" framework was applied in the design and evaluation of the initiative. It outlines how mentee, mentor and organizational needs can drive strategic planning of resource investment, mentorship networks and relevant leadership competency-based learning plans to optimize outcomes. Five-year individual and organizational outcomes are described. © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  13. SOCIALIZATION INFLUENCE ON KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT OF MEDIUM MENTALLY-RETARDED CHILDREN AND YOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zivko SOKOLOSKI

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The subjects of the research are mentally-retarded children and youth, and their possibilities in overcoming the programme contents from educational-upbringing area-SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT. The research has been conducted in Sremcica-Home for Mentally Disrupted Children and Youth. Results of the re­search presents approximately 50 percent of the positive accomplishments.The research has indicated to us that knowledge learned from a narrow environment (home, family are much better than ones learned from an expansive environment. By these facts we came to the conclusion that the adequate attention hasn’t been paid in realization of the programme contenses concerning familiarizing the expansive environment, especially in the charter SOCIAL INITIATIVE. We know that two basic goals in rehabilitation is not achieved too. However, the results of the research approve us that socialization has essential influence on the knowledge development of the medium mentally retarded

  14. Lev Semenovich Vygotsky (1896-1924): an introduction to the historico-cultural psychology and the development of the higher psychological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouesné, Christian

    2017-09-01

    In the 1930's LS Vygotsky developed an original conception of the psychology and the development of the higher psychological processes, which stands up the current theories in Russia and the West. He layed the bases for the study of the higher mental processes and their relationship with the brain functioning, which will be later on developped by AR Luria. After a brief historical notice, this paper will specify the relationships between Vygoski and Marx's and Engels's philosophy, the Soviet power and the works of Freud and Piaget.

  15. Research on the Coordinative Development of Regional Higher Education and Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yingjun

    2012-01-01

    In the current society, economic development in any region has to rely on higher education. Conversely, higher education cannot do without regional economic development in order to achieve greater progress in scale and level. Starting with the function of higher education in Wenzhou, this paper analyzes the reality and problems in Wenzhou's higher…

  16. Developing an ACT-R Model of Mental Manipulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelley, Troy

    2000-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory, and with the intent of supporting the Land Warrior program, members of the Manned Systems Design Methods Team of the Integration Methods Branch developed an adaptive control...

  17. "Tension" in South Asian women: developing a measure of common mental disorder using participatory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasz, Alison; Patel, Viraj; Kabita, Mahbhooba; Shimu, Parvin

    2013-01-01

    Although common mental disorder (CMD) is highly prevalent among South Asian immigrant women, they rarely seek mental treatment. This may be owing in part to the lack of conceptual synchrony between medical models of mental disorder and the social models of distress common in South Asian communities. Furthermore, common mental health screening and diagnostic measures may not adequately capture distress in this group. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is ideally suited to help address measurement issues in CMD as well as to develop culturally appropriate treatment models. To use participatory methods to identify an appropriate, culturally specific mental health syndrome and develop an instrument to measure this syndrome. We formed a partnership between researchers, clinicians, and community members. The partnership selected a culturally specific model of emotional distress/illness, "tension," as a focus for further study. Partners developed a scale to measure Tension and tested the new scale on 162 Bangladeshi immigrant women living in the Bronx. The 24-item "Tension Scale" had high internal consistency (α = 0.83). On bivariate analysis, the scale significantly correlated in the expected direction with depressed as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2), age, education, self-rated health, having seen a physician in the past year, and other variables. Using participatory techniques, we created a new measure designed to assess CMD in an isolated immigrant group. The new measure shows excellent psychometric properties and will be helpful in the implementation of a community-based, culturally synchronous intervention for depression. We describe a useful strategy for the rapid development and field testing of culturally appropriate measures of mental distress and disorder.

  18. Influence of breastfeeding and iron status on mental and psychomotor development during the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardí, Cristina; Hernández-Martínez, Carmen; Canals, Josefa; Arija, Victoria; Bedmar, Cristina; Voltas, Núria; Aranda, Núria

    2018-02-01

    Breastfeeding (BF) confers numerous benefits on the developing infant in both the short and the long term including psychological development, but there are multiple other factors that must be taken into account when these relationships are studied. To analyse how breastfeeding during the first 4 months of life affects infant mental and psychomotor development (MPD) at 6 and 12 months in a group of healthy infants from a Mediterranean Spanish city considering many important potential confounds. This is a longitudinal study conducted on infants from birth until the age of 12 months. A total of 154 healthy infants were evaluated by Paediatric Unit of Sant Joan University Hospital in Reus, Spain. Type of feeding, clinical history, anthropometry, iron status and mental and psychomotor development were assessed and analysed. At 4 months, 24% of infants received BF and 26% received mixed feeding (MF). Multiple Linear Regression models were applied adjusting for potential prenatal, perinatal and postnatal confounds showing that infants who received BF for at least four months presented higher psychomotor development index (PDI) at 6 and at 12 months of age. Also, gestational age and BMI at 6m were associated positively with PDI at 6 m, and haemoglobin levels at 12m and birth height were associated with PDI and MDI at 12m (respectively). In conclusion, after the adjustment of important potential confounds, BF during at least four months and adequate infant iron status are related to better psychomotor development during the first year. No associations were found between BF and mental development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enriching diets for childhood mental and physical development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To ensure optimal growth and development, strict diets should be discouraged and sound meal patterns should be encouraged, including starting the day with breakfast, and eating a variety of foods to ensure adequate intakes of nutrients and fibre. Regular physical activity promotes a healthy body weight and normal bone ...

  20. Normative data on mental and motor development in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Nigeria and sub-Saharan Africa at large, there has been heavy reliance on the “Caucasian data” in the developmental assessment of children. Hence, this study set out to establish normative data for psychomotor development on Nigerian children. Study design: One hundred and twenty eight children ...

  1. Development of Morphophonemic Segments in Children's Mental Representations of Words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Noel K.

    This study explores children's development of dual-level phonological processing posited by generative theory for adult language users. Evidence suggesting 6-year-olds' utilization of morphophonemic segments was obtained by asking children to imitate complex words, omit specified portions, and discuss the meaning of the resulting word-parts. The…

  2. Malnutrition and mental development: Is there a sensitive period? A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To examine the possibility that there is an early sensitive period for the effects of malnutrition on cognitive development, three groups of children (N = 197) were recruited from a birth cohort with known growth characteristics in south-west Ethiopia (N = 1563). All had initial weights;: 2500 g. Early growth falterers dropped in ...

  3. Development of Community Mental Health Services: The Case of Emilia‐Romagna Italian Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Fioritti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Italian psychiatry has gained International attention after its radical reform of 1978, which established the progressive closure of mental hospitals and the establishment of community services throughout the country. However it is technically inappropriate to talk about Italian psychiatry as the devolution process has transferred to the regions all competences about policy, planning and evaluating health services. This explains the variety of “community psychiatries” that can be found along the peninsula and the reasons of interest that can arise from their comparison. The development of community psychiatry in Emilia‐Romagna, a region of 4 million inhabitants in Northern Italy, has proceeded through two partially overlapping phases of deinstitutionalization (1978‐1997 and development of integrated mental health departments (1990‐2008. The analysis of raw data about allocation of resources and professional capital development give way to tentative comparisons with the current Portuguese situation of implementation of a similar reform. In 2006 the regional Council launched a three year project aimed at rethinking the welfare system and the integration of social and health services, considering the dramatic social and demographic changes occurring in the region. This project has implied also a three year process of redrafting mental health policy finalised in the Emilia‐Romagna Mental Health Action Plan 2009‐2011 approved by the council in March 2009. It basically follows two strategies: integration of health and social services and further qualification of health services. The former is pursued through a reshaping of the planning and commissioning bodies of both health and social services, previously separated and now merging. They are taking responsibility on many issues related to mental health care, such as prevention, mental health promotion, supported employment, supported housing, subsidies, self‐help. The improvement of

  4. Mental health care in Nepal : current situation and challenges for development of a district mental health care plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luitel, Nagendra P; Jordans, Mark Jd; Adhikari, Anup; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Hanlon, Charlotte; Lund, Crick; Komproe, Ivan H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Globally mental health problems are a serious public health concern. Currently four out of five people with severe mental illness in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC) receive no effective treatment. There is an urgent need to address this enormous treatment gap. Changing the focus

  5. Promoting mental wellbeing: developing a theoretically and empirically sound complex intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, S L; Donnelly, M

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a complex intervention to promote mental wellbeing using the revised framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions produced by the UK Medical Research Council (UKMRC). Application of the first two phases of the framework is described--development and feasibility and piloting. The theoretical case and evidence base were examined analytically to explicate the theoretical and empirical foundations of the intervention. These findings informed the design of a 12-week mental wellbeing promotion programme providing early intervention for people showing signs of mental health difficulties. The programme is based on the theoretical constructs of self-efficacy, self-esteem, purpose in life, resilience and social support and comprises 10 steps. A mixed methods approach was used to conduct a feasibility study with community and voluntary sector service users and in primary care. A significant increase in mental wellbeing was observed following participation in the intervention. Qualitative data corroborated this finding and suggested that the intervention was feasible to deliver and acceptable to participants, facilitators and health professionals. The revised UKMRC framework can be successfully applied to the development of public health interventions. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Nutrition and mental development of 4-5-year old children on macrobiotic diets.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herens, M.C.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Kleber, R.J.; Mol, M.C.; Staveren, van W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Mental development of 4–5-year old children on macrobiotic diets (almost devoid of animal foods and fat) with long-term growth deficits, was studied using the Snijders-Oomen Non-verbal Intelligence (SON) scale. In addition, food consumption and behavioural style of the children, and family and

  7. The Development and Validation of a Mental Toughness Scale for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeown, Sarah; St. Clair-Thompson, Helen; Putwain, David W.

    2018-01-01

    The present study examined the validity of a newly developed instrument, the Mental Toughness Scale for Adolescents, which examines the attributes of challenge, commitment, confidence (abilities and interpersonal), and control (life and emotion). The six-factor model was supported using exploratory factor analysis (n = 373) and confirmatory factor…

  8. Nursing-care dependency : Development of an assessment scale for demented and mentally handicapped patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Ate; Buist, Girbe; Dassen, T

    1996-01-01

    This article describing the first phase in the development of an assessment scale of nursing-care dependency (NCD) for Dutch demented and mentally handicapped patients focuses on the background to the study and the content validation of the nursing-care dependency scale. The scale aims to

  9. A Conceptual-Pictorial Approach to the Understanding of Piaget's Theory of Mental Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattimore-Knudson, Russell S.

    Utilizing a minimum of technical terminology, this eight-chapter monograph introduces beginning psychology students to the basic concepts of Piaget's theory of mental development and to its application by parents and teachers. As an aid to learning, each of the concepts discussed is illustrated by black-and-white drawings which can be reproduced…

  10. Development and Evaluation of Training for Rural LGBTQ Mental Health Peer Advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Tania; Willging, Cathleen; Ley, David

    2016-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) people in rural areas experience negative mental health consequences of minority stress, and encounter multiple barriers to accessing mental health and substance use treatment services. As part of a larger intervention study, we developed and piloted a unique training program to prepare peer advocates for roles as paraprofessionals who assist rural LGBTQ people with mental health needs. Thirty-seven people in New Mexico took part in either the initial training or a second revised training to improve their knowledge and skills to address LGBTQ mental health needs. Evaluation of this training consisted of self-administered structured assessments, focus groups, and open-ended interviews. Results for the initial training showed no significant increases from pre- and post-test scores on knowledge about LGBTQ people and their mental health issues, whereas significant increases were detected for the revised training. There also were significant increases in self-efficacy to perform tasks associated with the peer advocate role for all but a subset of tasks for the revised training. Qualitative data reveal that participants appreciated the opportunity to increase information and skills, especially concerning bisexual and transgender persons, and the opportunity to connect with others in the community who want to support LGBTQ people.

  11. Developing a change model for peer worker interventions in mental health services: a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, S; Gibson, S L; Holley, J; Lucock, M

    2015-10-01

    A range of peer worker roles are being introduced into mental health services internationally. There is some evidence that attests to the benefits of peer workers for the people they support but formal trial evidence in inconclusive, in part because the change model underpinning peer support-based interventions is underdeveloped. Complex intervention evaluation guidance suggests that understandings of how an intervention is associated with change in outcomes should be modelled, theoretically and empirically, before the intervention can be robustly evaluated. This paper aims to model the change mechanisms underlying peer worker interventions. In a qualitative, comparative case study of ten peer worker initiatives in statutory and voluntary sector mental health services in England in-depth interviews were carried out with 71 peer workers, service users, staff and managers, exploring their experiences of peer working. Using a Grounded Theory approach we identified core processes within the peer worker role that were productive of change for service users supported by peer workers. Key change mechanisms were: (i) building trusting relationships based on shared lived experience; (ii) role-modelling individual recovery and living well with mental health problems; (iii) engaging service users with mental health services and the community. Mechanisms could be further explained by theoretical literature on role-modelling and relationship in mental health services. We were able to model process and downstream outcomes potentially associated with peer worker interventions. An empirically and theoretically grounded change model can be articulated that usefully informs the development, evaluation and planning of peer worker interventions.

  12. Developing the mental health awareness of prison staff in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Elizabeth; Freshwater, Dawn

    2009-10-01

    In 2010, the prison population in England and Wales could reach a high of 91,500, according to a recent population projection. HM Prison Service (U.K.) reports that in 2004 to 2005, there were 33,144 prison officers employed to care for the prisoners in the prison system. This article focuses on the mental health of this prisoner population and the training needs of staff caring for them. It reports the experience of a national project, funded by the Department of Health, in which the project team developed and piloted mental health awareness training for prison officers on the residential units and for staff who work with prisoners and lack a mental health background. Key findings from the posttraining evaluation are highlighted. Participant feedback demonstrates the value placed on this type of training by those working in the prison setting.

  13. Individual perception and cultural development: Foucault's 1954 approach to mental illness and its history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joranger, Line

    2016-02-01

    In his 1954 book Mental Illness and Personality Foucault combines the subjective experience of the mentally ill person with a sociocultural historical approach to mental illness and suggests that there exists a reciprocal connection between individual perception and sociocultural development. This article examines the ramifications of these connections in Foucault's 1954 works and the connection with his later historical works. The article also examines the similarities between Foucault's 1954 thoughts and contemporary intellectual thought, such as those outlined in Maurice Merleau-Ponty's existential phenomenology and in Gaston Bachelard and Georges Canguilhem's historical epistemology. In sum, my study shows that Foucault's historical analysis began long before his 1961 dissertation History of Madness. It also shows that, more than announcing the "death" of the subject, Foucault's historical analysis may have contributed to saving it. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Reliability and Validity of a Newly Developed Measure of Citizenship Among Persons with Mental Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Maria J; Clayton, Ashley; Rowe, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Following development of a 46-item of measure citizenship, a framework for supporting the full membership in society of persons with mental illness, this study tested the measure's reliability and validity. 110 persons from a mental health center completed a questionnaire packet containing the citizenship measure and other measures to assess internal consistency and validity of the citizenship instrument. Correlation matrices were examined for associations between the citizenship instrument and other measures. Stepwise regression examines demographic factors, sense of community, and social capital as predictors of citizenship, recovery, and well-being. Analyses revealed that the measure is psychometrically sound. The measure captures subjective information about the degree to which individuals experience rights, sense of belonging, and other factors associated with community membership that have been previously difficult to assess. The measure establishes a platform for interventions to support the full participation in society of persons with mental illnesses.

  15. Developing the Mental Health Workforce: Review and Application of Training Approaches from Multiple Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Kerns, Suzanne E. U.; Bruns, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Strategies specifically designed to facilitate the training of mental health practitioners in evidence-based practices (EBPs) have lagged behind the development of the interventions themselves. The current paper draws from an interdisciplinary literature (including medical training, adult education, and teacher training) to identify useful training and support approaches as well as important conceptual frameworks that may be applied to training in mental health. Theory and research findings are reviewed, which highlight the importance of continued consultation/ support following training workshops, congruence between the training content and practitioner experience, and focus on motivational issues. In addition, six individual approaches are presented with careful attention to their empirical foundations and potential applications. Common techniques are highlighted and applications and future directions for mental health workforce training and research are discussed. PMID:21190075

  16. Assessing the Impact of Higher Education on Regional Development: Using a Realist Approach for Policy Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Management and Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Higher Education is widely seen as a crucial ingredient in the regional economic development mix, and as fundamental to the development of the knowledge economy (Barclays, 2002). Indeed the Higher Education Funding Council for England has issued broad guidelines for benchmarking good practice in assessing regional development contribution of a…

  17. Development and evaluation of a youth mental health community awareness campaign – The Compass Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Meredith G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection and treatment of mental disorders in adolescents and young adults can lead to better health outcomes. Mental health literacy is a key to early recognition and help seeking. Whilst a number of population health initiatives have attempted to improve mental health literacy, none to date have specifically targeted young people nor have they applied the rigorous standards of population health models now accepted as best practice in other health areas. This paper describes the outcomes from the application of a health promotion model to the development, implementation and evaluation of a community awareness campaign designed to improve mental health literacy and early help seeking amongst young people. Method The Compass Strategy was implemented in the western metropolitan Melbourne and Barwon regions of Victoria, Australia. The Precede-Proceed Model guided the population assessment, campaign strategy development and evaluation. The campaign included the use of multimedia, a website, and an information telephone service. Multiple levels of evaluation were conducted. This included a cross-sectional telephone survey of mental health literacy undertaken before and after 14 months of the campaign using a quasi-experimental design. Randomly selected independent samples of 600 young people aged 12–25 years from the experimental region and another 600 from a comparison region were interviewed at each time point. A series of binary logistic regression analyses were used to measure the association between a range of campaign outcome variables and the predictor variables of region and time. Results The program was judged to have an impact on the following variables, as indicated by significant region-by-time interaction effects (p Conclusion We believe this is the first study to apply the rigorous standards of a health promotion model including the use of a control region to a mental health population intervention. The

  18. Development of microcomputer-based mental acuity tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnage, J. J.; Kennedy, R. S.; Smith, M. G.; Baltzley, D. R.; Lane, N. E.

    1992-01-01

    Recent disasters have focused attention on performance problems due to the use of alcohol and controlled substances in the workplace. Environmental stressors such as thermal extremes, mixed gases, noise, motion, and vibration also have adverse effects on human performance and operator efficiency. However, the lack of a standardized, sensitive, human performance assessment battery has probably delayed the systematic study of the deleterious effects of various toxic chemicals and drugs at home and in the workplace. The collective goal of the research reported here is the development of a menu of tests embedded in a coherent package of hardware and software that may be useful in repeated-measures studies of a broad range of agents that can degrade human performance. A menu of 40 tests from the Automated Performance Test System (APTS) is described, and the series of interlocking studies supporting its development is reviewed. The APTS tests, which run on several versions of laptop portables and desktop personal computers, have been shown to be stable, reliable, and factorially rich, and to have predictive validities with holistic measures of intelligence and simulator performances. In addition, sensitivity studies have been conducted in which performance changes due to stressors, agents, and treatments were demonstrated. We believe that tests like those described here have prospective use as an adjunct to urine testing for the screening for performance loss of individuals who are granted access to workplaces and stations that impact public safety.

  19. The higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical analysis of the higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles. It is determined the background and components of the higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management system. It is specified the mechanisms for higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management: monitoring and coaching. It is shown their place in the higher school teaching staff professional development system on the adaptive management principles. The results of the system efficiency are singled out.

  20. Violence Exposure and the Development of School-Related Functioning: Mental Health, Neurocognition, and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Suzanne; Graham-Bermann, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The relation between history of violence exposure and the development of academic and mental health problems is explored. Violence exposed children have an increased risk of developing school-related problems including: mental health problems, learning disabilities, language impairments, and other neurocognitive problems. These problems interact to create a complex web of deficits and disabilities where intervention access points are difficult to assess. Often mental health problems and academic problems develop in parallel. Timing of violence exposure and the developmental stage of the child during exposure complicate our understanding of the underlying mechanism. A model is presented that explores pathways linking violence exposure to aspects of school-related functioning, both academically and behaviorally. Early life stress, in the form of violence exposure, is related to neurocognitive deficits, including executive functioning and problems in self-regulation. Deficits in self-regulation at the level of behavior, and cognitive control and executive functioning, at the level of brain processing, are related to both academic and mental health problems, suggesting a possible psychological mechanism. Biological mechanisms are also included in the model to illustrate the contribution of the stress response, neuroendocrine system response, and neuroanatomical structural and functional impairments associated with violence exposure.

  1. Workforce development to embed mental health promotion research and evaluation into organisational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joss, Nerida; Keleher, Helen

    2007-12-01

    This project engaged a mental health rehabilitation organisation in health promotion research and development to build its capacity in evaluation research. Participatory research methods were used. Staff skills development occurred through training in research and evaluation methods applied to an evaluation project in mental health promotion that they conducted. All staff had some previous training in research but little, if any, experience of research practice. Staff demonstrated commitment to the idea of embedding research practice into the organisation to strengthen its ability to demonstrate program outcomes. However, the realities of work demands eventually took precedence over the tasks involved in the research process. Staff commitment, knowledge and skills are not sufficient if an organisation lacks the capacity to provide the resources or foster support for a research culture. The health promotion capacity-building framework is relevant for efforts to build health promotion research into mental health organisations. This project demonstrated that workforce development to build the capacity for mental health promotion is more likely to be successful if it is embedded into organisational strategy and culture, has sufficient resources allocated including staff time, and is supported by management.

  2. Violence Exposure and the Development of School-Related Functioning: Mental Health, Neurocognition, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Suzanne; Graham-Bermann, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The relation between history of violence exposure and the development of academic and mental health problems is explored. Violence exposed children have an increased risk of developing school-related problems including: mental health problems, learning disabilities, language impairments, and other neurocognitive problems. These problems interact to create a complex web of deficits and disabilities where intervention access points are difficult to assess. Often mental health problems and academic problems develop in parallel. Timing of violence exposure and the developmental stage of the child during exposure complicate our understanding of the underlying mechanism. A model is presented that explores pathways linking violence exposure to aspects of school-related functioning, both academically and behaviorally. Early life stress, in the form of violence exposure, is related to neurocognitive deficits, including executive functioning and problems in self-regulation. Deficits in self-regulation at the level of behavior, and cognitive control and executive functioning, at the level of brain processing, are related to both academic and mental health problems, suggesting a possible psychological mechanism. Biological mechanisms are also included in the model to illustrate the contribution of the stress response, neuroendocrine system response, and neuroanatomical structural and functional impairments associated with violence exposure. PMID:22837647

  3. American Indian and Alaska Native Children and Mental Health: Development, Context, Prevention, and Treatment. Child Psychology and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarche, Michelle C., Ed.; Spicer, Paul, Ed.; Farrell, Patricia, Ed.; Fitzgerald, Hiram E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This unique book examines the physical, psychological, social, and environmental factors that support or undermine healthy development in American Indian children, including economics, biology, and public policies. American Indian and Alaska Native youth suffer disproportionately higher rates of trauma, substance abuse, and youth suicide. At the…

  4. Development and evaluation of a youth mental health community awareness campaign – The Compass Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Annemarie; McGorry, Patrick D; Harris, Meredith G; Jorm, Anthony F; Pennell, Kerryn

    2006-01-01

    Background Early detection and treatment of mental disorders in adolescents and young adults can lead to better health outcomes. Mental health literacy is a key to early recognition and help seeking. Whilst a number of population health initiatives have attempted to improve mental health literacy, none to date have specifically targeted young people nor have they applied the rigorous standards of population health models now accepted as best practice in other health areas. This paper describes the outcomes from the application of a health promotion model to the development, implementation and evaluation of a community awareness campaign designed to improve mental health literacy and early help seeking amongst young people. Method The Compass Strategy was implemented in the western metropolitan Melbourne and Barwon regions of Victoria, Australia. The Precede-Proceed Model guided the population assessment, campaign strategy development and evaluation. The campaign included the use of multimedia, a website, and an information telephone service. Multiple levels of evaluation were conducted. This included a cross-sectional telephone survey of mental health literacy undertaken before and after 14 months of the campaign using a quasi-experimental design. Randomly selected independent samples of 600 young people aged 12–25 years from the experimental region and another 600 from a comparison region were interviewed at each time point. A series of binary logistic regression analyses were used to measure the association between a range of campaign outcome variables and the predictor variables of region and time. Results The program was judged to have an impact on the following variables, as indicated by significant region-by-time interaction effects (p awareness of mental health campaigns, self-identified depression, help for depression sought in the previous year, correct estimate of prevalence of mental health problems, increased awareness of suicide risk, and a reduction

  5. Internationalization of Higher Education in Africa: Developments, Emerging Trends, Issues and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowi, James Otieno

    2009-01-01

    Higher education the world over has now become part of the globalization process and can no longer be strictly viewed from a national context. The realities of internationalization of higher education and its attendant impacts on the sector is an urgent priority for higher education, especially in developing economies such as Africa. This paper…

  6. Higher Education and Economic Development in the OECD: Policy Lessons for Other Countries and Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Rómulo; Pillay, Pundy

    2016-01-01

    This paper sheds light on the role of tertiary or higher education in economic development across two successful OECD case studies: Finland and South Korea. A number of key aspects are discussed, from the nature of the social contract between higher education and the economy to the endogenous characteristics of domestic higher education to the…

  7. Mental health first aid for Indigenous Australians: using Delphi consensus studies to develop guidelines for culturally appropriate responses to mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Claire M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnic minority groups are under-represented in mental health care services because of barriers such as poor mental health literacy. In 2007, the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA program implemented a cultural adaptation of its first aid course to improve the capacity of Indigenous Australians to recognise and respond to mental health issues within their own communities. It became apparent that the content of this training would be improved by the development of best practice guidelines. This research aimed to develop culturally appropriate guidelines for providing first aid to an Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person who is experiencing a mental health crisis or developing a mental illness. Methods A panel of Australian Aboriginal people who are experts in Aboriginal mental health, participated in six independent Delphi studies investigating depression, psychosis, suicidal thoughts and behaviours, deliberate self-injury, trauma and loss, and cultural considerations. The panel varied in size across the studies, from 20-24 participants. Panellists were presented with statements about possible first aid actions via online questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest additional actions not covered by the survey content. Statements were accepted for inclusion in a guideline if they were endorsed by ≥ 90% of panellists as essential or important. Each study developed one guideline from the outcomes of three Delphi questionnaire rounds. At the end of the six Delphi studies, participants were asked to give feedback on the value of the project and their participation experience. Results From a total of 1,016 statements shown to the panel of experts, 536 statements were endorsed (94 for depression, 151 for psychosis, 52 for suicidal thoughts and behaviours, 53 for deliberate self-injury, 155 for trauma and loss, and 31 for cultural considerations. The methodology and the guidelines themselves were found to be useful

  8. Development and validation of MyLifeTracker: a routine outcome measure for youth mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan B

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin Kwan,1 Debra J Rickwood,1,2 Nic R Telford2 1Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, 2headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Purpose: Routine outcome measures are now being designed for session-by-session use, with emphasis on clinically meaningful items and sensitivity to change. Despite an increasing mental health service focus for young people aged 12–25 years, there is a lack of outcome measures that are designed to be used across this age group. Consequently, MyLifeTracker (MLT was developed as a brief mental health outcome measure designed for young people for routine use. It consists of the following five items targeting areas of importance to young people: general well-being, day-to-day activities, relationships with friends, relationships with family, and general coping. Participants and methods: The measure was tested with 75,893 young people aged 12–25 years attending headspace centers across Australia for mental health-related issues. Results: MLT showed a robust unidimensional factor structure and appropriate reliability. It exhibited good concurrent validity against well-validated measures of psychological distress, well-being, functioning, and life satisfaction. The measure was further demonstrated to be sensitive to change. Conclusion: MLT provides a psychometrically sound mental health outcome measure for young people. The measure taps into items that are meaningful to young people and provides an additional clinical support tool for clinicians and clients during therapy. The measure is brief and easy to use and has been incorporated into an electronic system that routinely tracks session-by-session change and produces time-series charts for the ease of use and interpretation. Keywords: MyLifeTracker, youth mental health, routine outcome measure, routine outcome monitoring, adolescent and young adult

  9. Developing a holistic policy and intervention framework for global mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenti, Akwatu; Fréel, Stéfanie; Trainor, Ruth; Mohamoud, Sirad; Diaz, Pablo; Suh, Erica; Bobbili, Sireesha J; Sapag, Jaime C

    2016-02-01

    There are significant gaps in the accessibility and quality of mental health services around the globe. A wide range of institutions are addressing the challenges, but there is limited reflection and evaluation on the various approaches, how they compare with each other, and conclusions regarding the most effective approach for particular settings. This article presents a framework for global mental health capacity building that could potentially serve as a promising or best practice in the field. The framework is the outcome of a decade of collaborative global health work at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) (Ontario, Canada). The framework is grounded in scientific evidence, relevant learning and behavioural theories and the underlying principles of health equity and human rights. Grounded in CAMH's research, programme evaluation and practical experience in developing and implementing mental health capacity building interventions, this article presents the iterative learning process and impetus that formed the basis of the framework. A developmental evaluation (Patton M.2010. Developmental Evaluation: Applying Complexity Concepts to Enhance Innovation and Use. New York: Guilford Press.) approach was used to build the framework, as global mental health collaboration occurs in complex or uncertain environments and evolving learning systems. A multilevel framework consists of five central components: (1) holistic health, (2) cultural and socioeconomic relevance, (3) partnerships, (4) collaborative action-based education and learning and (5) sustainability. The framework's practical application is illustrated through the presentation of three international case studies and four policy implications. Lessons learned, limitations and future opportunities are also discussed. The holistic policy and intervention framework for global mental health reflects an iterative learning process that can be applied and scaled up across different settings through

  10. Police Mental Health Partnership project: Police Ambulance Crisis Emergency Response (PACER) model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, David; Griffiths, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    To review internationally recognized models of police interactions with people experiencing mental health crises that are sometimes complex and associated with adverse experience for the person in crisis, their family and emergency service personnel. To develop, implement and review a partnership model trial between mental health and emergency services that offers alternative response pathways with improved outcomes in care. Three unique models of police and mental health partnership in the USA were reviewed and used to develop the PACER (Police Ambulance Crisis Emergency Response) model. A three month trial of the model was implemented and evaluated. Significant improvements in response times, the interactions with and the outcomes for people in crisis were some of the benefits shown when compared with usual services. The pilot showed that a partnership involving mental health and police services in Melbourne, Australia could be replicated based on international models. Initial data supported improvements compared with usual care. Further data collection regarding usual care and this new model is required to confirm observed benefits. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  11. Effects of mental fatigue on the development of physical fatigue: a neuroergonomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ranjana K; Parasuraman, Raja

    2014-06-01

    The present study used a neuroergonomic approach to examine the interaction of mental and physical fatigue by assessing prefrontal cortex activation during submaximal fatiguing handgrip exercises. Mental fatigue is known to influence muscle function and motor performance, but its contribution to the development of voluntary physical fatigue is not well understood. A total of 12 participants performed separate physical (control) and physical and mental fatigue (concurrent) conditions at 30% of their maximal handgrip strength until exhaustion. Functional near infrared spectroscopy was employed to measure prefrontal cortex activation, whereas electromyography and joint steadiness were used simultaneously to quantify muscular effort. Compared to the control condition, blood oxygenation in the bilateral prefrontal cortex was significantly lower during submaximal fatiguing contractions associated with mental fatigue at exhaustion, despite comparable muscular responses. The findings suggest that interference in the prefrontal cortex may influence motor output during tasks that require both physical and cognitive processing. A neuroergonomic approach involving simultaneous monitoring of brain and body functions can provide critical information on fatigue development that may be overlooked during traditional fatigue assessments.

  12. The impact of mental disorders on the development of nosological features of gelotophobia, gelotophilia and katagelasticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Shportun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific psychological studies, which are provided in recent years, indicate lack of coverage of humour disorders as an emotion. Aim. In order to explore and discover the nosological features of gelotophobia, gelotophilia, katagelasticism, in 81 men and 50 women, 142 patients with mental disorders were included. Methods and results. Features of influence of diagnosis, gender, as well as symptoms of mental disorders on the development of gelotophobia, gelotophilia, katagelasticism were studied. The following methods were used: 1 a Russian-language version of the gelotophobia scale GELOPH-15; 2 Methodology of PhoPhiKat-45; 3 Gelotophobia scale GELOPH-15; 4 Picture Test Picture-GELOPH. The psychometric and factor analyses of data were also used. It was distinguished that the main factors in forming the main nosological features are: gender and diagnosis, that allow considering separately the impact of sexual differences and nosological specifics, as well as the impact of mental disorders symptoms on the development of gelotophobia, gelotophilia, katagelasticism. Conclusion. It indicates that the specificity of the manifestations of gelotophobia, gelotophilia, katagelasticism can be seen as indicators of the depth of the violation of human mental activity.

  13. Developing and implementing mental health policy in Zanzibar, a low income country off the coast of East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Said

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Zanzibar Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, concerned about mental health in the country, requested technical assistance from WHO in 1997. Aims This article describes the facilitation over many years by a WHO Collaborating Centre, of sustainable mental health developments in Zanzibar, one of the poorest countries in the world, using systematic approaches to policy design and implementation. Methods Based on intensive prior situation appraisal and consultation, a multi-faceted set of interventions combining situation appraisal to inform planning; sustained policy dialogue at Union and state levels; development of policy and legislation, development of strategic action plans, establishment of intersectoral national mental health implementation committee, establishment of national mental health coordination system, integration of mental health into primary care, strengthening of primary-secondary care liaison, rationalisation and strengthening of secondary care system, ensuring adequate supply of medicines, use of good practice guidelines and health information systems, development of services for people with intellectual disability, establishment of formal mechanism for close liaison between the mental health services and other governmental, non-governmental and traditional sectors, mental health promotion, suicide prevention, and research and development. Results The policy and legislation introduced in 1999 have resulted in enhanced mental health activities over the ensuing decade, within a setting of extreme low resource. However, advances ebb and flow and continued efforts are required to maintain progress and continue mental health developments. Lessons learnt have informed the development of mental health policies in neighbouring countries. Conclusions A multi-faceted and comprehensive programme can be effective in achieving considerable strengthening of mental health programmes and services even in extremely low

  14. Developing and implementing mental health policy in Zanzibar, a low income country off the coast of East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Rachel; Mussa, Mahmoud; Haji, Suleiman A; Haji, Mohammed S; Salim, Ahmed; Suleiman, Said; Riyami, Alya S; Wakil, Abdul; Mbatia, Joseph

    2011-02-14

    The Zanzibar Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, concerned about mental health in the country, requested technical assistance from WHO in 1997. This article describes the facilitation over many years by a WHO Collaborating Centre, of sustainable mental health developments in Zanzibar, one of the poorest countries in the world, using systematic approaches to policy design and implementation. Based on intensive prior situation appraisal and consultation, a multi-faceted set of interventions combining situation appraisal to inform planning; sustained policy dialogue at Union and state levels; development of policy and legislation, development of strategic action plans, establishment of intersectoral national mental health implementation committee, establishment of national mental health coordination system, integration of mental health into primary care, strengthening of primary-secondary care liaison, rationalisation and strengthening of secondary care system, ensuring adequate supply of medicines, use of good practice guidelines and health information systems, development of services for people with intellectual disability, establishment of formal mechanism for close liaison between the mental health services and other governmental, non-governmental and traditional sectors, mental health promotion, suicide prevention, and research and development. The policy and legislation introduced in 1999 have resulted in enhanced mental health activities over the ensuing decade, within a setting of extreme low resource. However, advances ebb and flow and continued efforts are required to maintain progress and continue mental health developments. Lessons learnt have informed the development of mental health policies in neighbouring countries. A multi-faceted and comprehensive programme can be effective in achieving considerable strengthening of mental health programmes and services even in extremely low resource settings, but requires sustained input and advocacy if gains are

  15. The development of teleological versus mentalizing observational learning strategies in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, György

    2003-01-01

    The author introduces the concept of mentalization as a central interpretative mechanism of social reality testing. It is argued that developmentally the emergence of this mentalizing capacity to interpret other people's actions in terms of their causal intentional mind states (such as beliefs, desires, intentions, and emotions) is preceded by an earlier, nonmentalistic, teleological action interpretational system that represents others' actions in terms of their concrete and visible outcomes. Then the early psychosocial determinants of the developmental unfolding of our mentalizing capacity are considered from the points of view of attachment theory and developmental psychopathology. It is argued that, in severely dysfunctional (neglecting, abusive, and/or dissociative) caregiving environments, the development of mentalization becomes inhibited and results in a predominantly teleological, nonmentalistic interpretation of intimate attachment relationships that is a core feature of certain developmental psychopathologies such as borderline personality disorder. The normal developmental shift from a teleological to a mentalistic mode of action interpretation is illustrated in terms of recently discovered qualitative changes in imitative and observational learning styles during infancy. It is hypothesized that these changes are related to the infant's developing capacity to interpret the communicative-referential behavioral cues that frame the caregiver's infant-directed actions as signaling a cooperative and benevolent mentalistic attitude toward the baby. In closing, it is proposed that the hypothesized role of severely dysfunctional attachment environments in inhibiting the establishment of mentalization skills could be directly tested in early development in the domain of observational learning. It is predicted that differential patterns of "teleological emulation" versus "mentalistic imitative learning" will be found in infants raised in severely dysfunctional

  16. Perinatal nutrition in maternal mental health and child development: Birth of a pregnancy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Brenda M Y; Giesbrecht, Gerald F; Letourneau, Nicole; Field, Catherine J; Bell, Rhonda C; Dewey, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    Mental disorders are one of the leading contributors to the global burden of disease. The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study was initiated in 2008 to better understand perinatal environmental impacts on maternal mental health and child development. This pregnancy cohort was established to investigate the relationship between the maternal environment (e.g. nutritional status), maternal mental health status, birth outcomes, and child development. The purpose of this paper is to describe the creation of this longitudinal cohort, the data collection tools and procedures, and the background characteristics of the participants. Participants were pregnant women age 16 or older, their infants and the biological fathers. For the women, data were collected during each trimester of pregnancy and at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36months after the birth of their infant. Maternal measures included diet, stress, current mental and physical health, health history, and lifestyle. In addition, maternal biological samples (DNA, blood, urine, and spot breast milk samples) were banked. Paternal data included current mental and physical health, health history, lifestyle, and banked DNA samples. For infants, DNA and blood were collected as well as information on health, development and feeding behavior. At the end of recruitment in 2012, the APrON cohort included 2140 women, 2172 infants, and 1417 biological fathers. Descriptive statistics of the cohort, and comparison of women who stayed in the study and those who dropped out are discussed. Findings from the longitudinal cohort may have important implications for health policy and clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Examining the Role of Mental Health and Clinical Issues within Talent Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy eHill

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although significant research supports the association between physical activity and mental wellbeing, current literature acknowledges that athletes are no less susceptible to mental illness than the general population. Despite welcomed initiatives aimed at improving mental health within elite sport, these programs often fail to target young athletes; an important concern given that the genesis of many mental illnesses are recognized to occur during this critical period. Given the importance of early intervention and effective treatment, and the potentially devastating consequences of clinical issues going undiagnosed, the implications for talent identification and development become obvious. With this in mind, this study sought to examine the range of mental health issues that may impact upon developing athletes and potential consequences for the development process, specific risk and protective factors associated with talent development, along with an examination of current practices concerning the identification of mental health issues in such environments. Qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively sampled clinicians (n = 8 experienced in working with adolescents and/or young athletes. Inductive content analysis was undertaken, identifying four main themes: key behavioral indicators; associated risk factors; associated protective factors; and issues around identification and diagnosis. Key behavioral indicators included behavioral change, along with behaviors associated with eating disorders, anxiety and depression. Risk factors centered on family background, the performance environment, and issues surrounding adolescence. Protective factors were primarily social in nature. Finally, a lack of awareness and understanding of clinical issues, multiple causes of symptoms, non-disclosure and the need for triangulation of assessment were identified. The need for improved identification and intervention strategies was apparent, with

  18. Examining the Role of Mental Health and Clinical Issues within Talent Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andy; MacNamara, Áine; Collins, Dave; Rodgers, Sheelagh

    2015-01-01

    Although significant research supports the association between physical activity and mental wellbeing, current literature acknowledges that athletes are no less susceptible to mental illness than the general population. Despite welcomed initiatives aimed at improving mental health within elite sport, these programs often fail to target young athletes; an important concern given that the genesis of many mental illnesses are recognized to occur during this critical period. Given the importance of early intervention and effective treatment, and the potentially devastating consequences of clinical issues going undiagnosed, the implications for talent identification and development (TID) become obvious. With this in mind, this study sought to examine the range of mental health issues that may impact upon developing athletes and potential consequences for the development process, specific risk and protective factors associated with talent development, along with an examination of current practices concerning the identification of mental health issues in such environments. Qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively sampled clinicians (n = 8) experienced in working with adolescents and/or young athletes. Inductive content analysis was undertaken, identifying four main themes: key behavioral indicators; associated risk factors; associated protective factors; and issues around identification and diagnosis. Key behavioral indicators included behavioral change, along with behaviors associated with eating disorders, anxiety and depression. Risk factors centered on family background, the performance environment, and issues surrounding adolescence. Protective factors were primarily social in nature. Finally, a lack of awareness and understanding of clinical issues, multiple causes of symptoms, non-disclosure and the need for triangulation of assessment were identified. The need for improved identification and intervention strategies was apparent, with coaches

  19. Examining the Role of Mental Health and Clinical Issues within Talent Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andy; MacNamara, Áine; Collins, Dave; Rodgers, Sheelagh

    2016-01-01

    Although significant research supports the association between physical activity and mental wellbeing, current literature acknowledges that athletes are no less susceptible to mental illness than the general population. Despite welcomed initiatives aimed at improving mental health within elite sport, these programs often fail to target young athletes; an important concern given that the genesis of many mental illnesses are recognized to occur during this critical period. Given the importance of early intervention and effective treatment, and the potentially devastating consequences of clinical issues going undiagnosed, the implications for talent identification and development (TID) become obvious. With this in mind, this study sought to examine the range of mental health issues that may impact upon developing athletes and potential consequences for the development process, specific risk and protective factors associated with talent development, along with an examination of current practices concerning the identification of mental health issues in such environments. Qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively sampled clinicians (n = 8) experienced in working with adolescents and/or young athletes. Inductive content analysis was undertaken, identifying four main themes: key behavioral indicators; associated risk factors; associated protective factors; and issues around identification and diagnosis. Key behavioral indicators included behavioral change, along with behaviors associated with eating disorders, anxiety and depression. Risk factors centered on family background, the performance environment, and issues surrounding adolescence. Protective factors were primarily social in nature. Finally, a lack of awareness and understanding of clinical issues, multiple causes of symptoms, non-disclosure and the need for triangulation of assessment were identified. The need for improved identification and intervention strategies was apparent, with coaches

  20. Professional development of teaching staff for the international higher education environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Els; van der Poel, Marcel H.

    The professional development of teaching staff in relation to the internationalisation of higher education institutions has not received the attention that it deserves from managers in higher education. This requires an HRM policy that explicitly addresses the issue of competence development of

  1. Trends and Developments of Higher Education Research in Hong Kong: In Pursuit of a Cosmopolitan Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, William Yat Wai; Ng, Felix Sai Kit

    2015-01-01

    With the processes of inter- and intranationalization, higher education in Hong Kong has been rapidly expanding in an effort to develop the city into a regional education hub. This article explores the trends and developments of higher education research (HER) in Hong Kong in the context of inter- and intranationalization. By drawing on the data…

  2. Regional Inequality of Higher Education in China and the Role of Unequal Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickenbach, Frank; Liu, Wan-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade the scale of higher education in China has expanded substantially. Regional development policies have attempted to make use of scale expansion as a tool to reduce inequality of higher education among regions with different development levels by providing poor regions with preferential treatment and support. This paper analyzes…

  3. The Innovation Blaze-Method of Development Professional Thinking Designers in the Modern Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, Irina V.; Barsukova, Natalia I.; Pallotta, Valentina I.; Skovorodnikova, Nadia A.

    2017-01-01

    This article proved the urgency of the problem of development of professional thinking of students studying design in modern conditions of higher education. The authors substantiate for the need of an innovative Blaise-method development of professional design thinking of students in higher education. "Blaise-method" named by us in…

  4. A qualitative evaluation of leadership development workshops for mental health workers from four Pacific Island Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Paul; Montague, Ros

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a qualitative evaluation of a series of leadership development workshops held at the New South Wales Institute of Psychiatry (NSWIOP) for mental health workers from Papua New Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Marshall Islands, and Palau. Fourteen mental health workers attended the week-long training focused on project management and partnership development skills. In-depth interviews were conducted with participants at the commencement and conclusion of the training, and questionnaires were completed. A focus group was conducted with the NSWIOP organisers. The data was analysed using qualitative techniques to identify emergent themes for both participants and NSWIOP project team. All Pacific Island participants responded positively to the training. All reported greater confidence in taking on formal or informal leadership roles in the workplace, developing project planning skills and interpersonal skills such as networking and partnerships. The NSWIOP organisers identified strengths and weaknesses in the delivery of this training. The strong partnerships developed between NSWIOP and the Ministry of Health in all four countries contributed to the success of the training. Leadership Development Programs are an important aspect of building capacity in the mental health services of Pacific Island Countries. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  5. Developing family rooms in mental health inpatient units: an exploratory descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobel, Sophie; Foster, Kim; Edwards, Clair

    2015-06-19

    Family-friendly spaces for children and families to visit inpatient mental health units are recommended in international mental health guidelines as one way to provide service delivery that is responsive to the needs of parent-consumers and families. There is a lack of evidence on the implementation of family-friendly spaces or Family Rooms. This study aimed to explore the development, role, and function of Family Rooms in four mental health inpatient units in a local health district in NSW Australia. An exploratory descriptive inductive-deductive design using multiple data sources was employed. Methods included Family Room usage and parental status data over a 12 week period, an open-ended questionnaire, and semi-structured interviews with 20 nurses. Available parental status data indicated that between 8-14 % of inpatients were parents of dependent children under 18. Family Room usage was multipurpose and used specifically for children & families 29 % of the time. As spaces in the units, Family Rooms were perceived as acknowledging of the importance of family, and providing comfortable, secure spaces for parent-consumers and their children and family to maintain connections. Units did not have local policies or guidelines on the development, maintenance, and/or use of the rooms. Despite long-standing recognition of the need to identify consumers' parental status, there remains a lack of systematic processes for identifying parents in mental health inpatient services nationally. Family Rooms as spaces within inpatient units acknowledge the importance of families and are a step towards provision of family-focused mental health care. Recommendations for establishing and maintaining Family Rooms are outlined.

  6. Development of an Instrument to Measure Higher Order Thinking Skills in Senior High School Mathematics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanujaya, Benidiktus

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop an instrument that can be used to measure higher-order thinking skills (HOTS) in mathematics instruction of high school students. This research was conducted using a standard procedure of instrument development, from the development of conceptual definitions, development of operational definitions,…

  7. [Evaluation of mental development of children with congenital hypothyroidism detected in screening test--personal observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kik, Eugenia; Noczyńska, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are crucial for a proper development of the central nervous system (CNS), skeleton and tooth buds. They are important from the early stages of fetal development. The aim of the study was to evaluate the mental development of children with congenital hypothyroidism detected in screening and to determine the effect of TSH, level of thyroid hormones during observation, perinatal factors as well as parental and environmental factors on the children's IQ. 44 children (28 girls and 16 boys) aged 3.5-18 years (mean age 7.3+/- 3.5) were enrolled in the study. The subjects' mental development was analyzed. General intelligence quotient was measured on verbal and non-verbal scale and chosen parameters of mental development were measured. The evaluation of mental development was performed in two age groups: group A - 20 patients in the age range 3.5-5.9 years (mean age 5.3+/-0.8) tested using the Columbus method, and group B - 24 patients in the age range 6-18 years (mean age 10.3+/-2.2) tested on the Wechsler Scale. The intelligence quotient (IQ) in both groups was within the average IQ range on Wechsler scale. Mean IQ values on verbal and non-verbal scale were comparable and within the average IQ range on Wechsler scale. The level of intelligence in group A correlated, on the brink of statistical significance (IS), with the education level of the parents (r=0.32; p=0.0934), while in the group B - IS correlated with birth weight (r=0.62; p=0.00247), it correlated on the brink of statistical significance with the education level of parents (r=0.4; p=0.0532) and mother's age (r=0.41; p=0.0514). The level of intelligence on verbal scale in group B, statistically significant, positively correlated with the body mass at birth (r=0.62; p=0.00147) and negatively with the mean value of TSH in 2-year follow-up period (r=-0.47; p=0.0381). The level of general intelligence and on verbal and non-verbal scale did not correlate with the time of commencement of therapy

  8. Mental health in France, policies and actors: developing administrative knowledge in a segmented world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossé, Philippe; Maury, Caroline; Daumerie, Nicolas; Roelandt, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    The new mental health care policy, which has been set up in France, involves a change of paradigm, which has been going on since the 2000s: the emphasis is shifting from psychiatry to mental health care. This shift mainly concerns the knowledge about mental health is produced and circulates among an increasingly large number of bodies. Mainly grounded on actor interview analysis, official reports and blueprints, this study shows that the results of this process are numerous. They include the development of ambulatory care and strong moves towards decentralization. More data and knowledge are therefore to be shared in this more complex system. However, the French State, in the form of the central administration, is taking advantage of this move and is still contributing significantly to the definition and implementation of the new policy. On the other hand, the new governance dynamic is not leading to standardization of medical practices, as the mental health field remains highly heterogeneous. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Influence of mental practice on development of voluntary control of a novel motor acquisition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, Jim

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess whether mental practice facilitates the development of voluntary control over the recruitment of the abductor hallucis muscle to produce isolated big toe abduction. A sample of convenience of 15 women and 20 men with a mean age of 28.8 yr. (SD=5.7) and healthy feet, who were unable voluntarily to abduct the big toe, were randomly assigned to one of three groups, a mental practice group, a physical practice group, and a group who performed a control movement during practice. Each subject received neuromuscular electrical stimulation to introduce the desired movement prior to each of five practice bouts over a single session lasting 2 hr. Big toe abduction active range of motion and surface electromyographic (EMG) output of the abductor hallucis and extensor digitorum brevis muscles were measured prior to the first practice bout and following each practice bout, yielding seven acquisition trials. Acquisition is defined as an improvement in both active range of motion and in the difference between the integrated EMG of the abductor hallucis and extensor digitorum brevis muscles during successive acquisition trials. Seven members of both the mental and physical practice groups and one member of the control group met the acquisition criteria. Chi-square analysis indicated the group difference was statistically significant, suggesting mental practice was effective for this task.

  10. Monitoring Compliance to Promote Quality Assurance: Development of a Mental Health Clinical Chart Audit Tool in Belize, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Rachel A; Bennett, Eleanor; Murillo, Illouise; Schuetz-Mueller, Jan; Katz, Craig L

    2015-09-01

    Belize trained psychiatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) in the early 1990s to provide mental health services throughout the country. Despite overwhelming success, the program is limited by lack of monitoring, evaluation, and surveillance. To promote quality assurance, we developed a chart audit tool to monitor mental healthcare delivery compliance for initial psychiatric assessment notes completed by PNPs. After reviewing the Belize Health Information System electronic medical record system, we developed a clinical audit tool to capture 20 essential components for initial assessment clinical notes. The audit tool was then piloted for initial assessment notes completed during July through September of 2013. One hundred and thirty-four initial psychiatric interviews were audited. The average chart score among all PNPs was 9.57, ranging from 3 to 15. Twenty-three charts-or 17.2%-had a score of 14 or higher and met a 70% compliance benchmark goal. Among indicators most frequently omitted included labs ordered and named (15.7%) and psychiatric diagnosis (21.6%). Explicit statement of medications initiated with dose and frequency occurred in 47.0% of charts. Our findings provide direction for training and improvement, such as emphasizing the importance of naming labs ordered, medications and doses prescribed, and psychiatric diagnoses in initial assessment clinical notes. We hope this initial assessment helps enhance mental health delivery compliance by prompting creation of BHIS templates, development of audits tools for revisit follow-up visits, and establishment of corrective actions for low-scoring practitioners. These efforts may serve as a model for implementing quality assurance programming in other low resource settings.

  11. Mental Health Smartphone Apps: Review and Evidence-Based Recommendations for Future Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, David; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Rickwood, Debra; Rickard, Nikki

    2016-03-01

    The number of mental health apps (MHapps) developed and now available to smartphone users has increased in recent years. MHapps and other technology-based solutions have the potential to play an important part in the future of mental health care; however, there is no single guide for the development of evidence-based MHapps. Many currently available MHapps lack features that would greatly improve their functionality, or include features that are not optimized. Furthermore, MHapp developers rarely conduct or publish trial-based experimental validation of their apps. Indeed, a previous systematic review revealed a complete lack of trial-based evidence for many of the hundreds of MHapps available. To guide future MHapp development, a set of clear, practical, evidence-based recommendations is presented for MHapp developers to create better, more rigorous apps. A literature review was conducted, scrutinizing research across diverse fields, including mental health interventions, preventative health, mobile health, and mobile app design. Sixteen recommendations were formulated. Evidence for each recommendation is discussed, and guidance on how these recommendations might be integrated into the overall design of an MHapp is offered. Each recommendation is rated on the basis of the strength of associated evidence. It is important to design an MHapp using a behavioral plan and interactive framework that encourages the user to engage with the app; thus, it may not be possible to incorporate all 16 recommendations into a single MHapp. Randomized controlled trials are required to validate future MHapps and the principles upon which they are designed, and to further investigate the recommendations presented in this review. Effective MHapps are required to help prevent mental health problems and to ease the burden on health systems.

  12. The Design and Development of Staff Wellbeing Initiatives: Staff Stressors, Burnout and Emotional Exhaustion at Children and Young People's Mental Health in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dominiek D; Howe, Deborah

    2015-11-01

    Mental health work presents problems for staff over and above those encountered in other organisations, including other areas of healthcare. Healthcare workers, in particular mental health workers, have poorer job satisfaction and higher job burnout and turnover compared with established norms for other occupational groups. To make sense of why healthcare workers experience high levels of burnout, a strong body of literature points to the emotionally demanding nature of people-work. The negative effects of mental health work on employee health can be mitigated by the provision of appropriate job resources and wellbeing initiatives. As to develop initiatives that appropriately target staff sources of stress and needs, it is important to engage staff in this process. As such, Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH) and headspace Gosford, in Australia, New South Wales (NSW), developed a survey to identify how staff experience and manage the emotional demands of mental health work, what they identify as key stressors and which initiatives they would like to see implemented. Fifty-five staff (response rate of 73 %) completed the survey, and the results suggest that while staff find the work emotionally demanding, they do not appear to be emotionally exhausted and report administrative rather than client issues as their primary concerns. While a strong body of literature identifies the management of emotions in the workplace as a significant cause of stress, organisational stressors such as working in a bureaucratic environment are also important to understanding staff wellbeing.

  13. Effect of Sandplay Therapy on Cognitive Development of Educable Mentally Retarded

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *M. Malekpour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of sandplay therapy on cognitive development of educable mentally disabled children. The statistical population of this study included all children with educable mental disability in preschool and children in grades 1, 2, 3 in city of Isfahan. The sample included 32 children (16 boys and 16 girls who were randomly selected from 2 schools. Then they were randomaly assigned to 2 groups: the experimental and control groups. The material used in this research was: Kay Cognitive Diagnostic Test. A pretest was administered to both the experimental and control groups. Then sandplay therapy employed on experimental group. There post test was administered to both groups at the end of the training. The results analysis of covariance show that sandplay therapy significantly increased cognitive development among the experimental group as compared to the experimental group. The results also showed that there was a significant difference between the mean scores of Kay Cognitive Diagnostic Test of cognitive development in the experimental and the control group in the post test (P<0.001, and that sand play therapy intervention had a significant effect on conceptualization, symbolic thinking, social cognition, visuo_motor perception, attention span and mental_motor speed development (P<0.001.

  14. The Serenity of the Meditating Mind: A Cross-Cultural Psychometric Study on a Two-Factor Higher Order Structure of Mindfulness, Its Effects, and Mechanisms Related to Mental Health among Experienced Meditators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ulrich S.; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Glück, Tobias M.; Soler, Joaquim; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; von Moy, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the psychometric and structural properties of the Five Facets Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) among meditators, to develop a short form, and to examine associations of mindfulness with mental health and the mechanisms of mindfulness. Methods Two independent samples were used, a German (n = 891) and a Spanish (n = 393) meditator sample, practicing various meditation styles. Structural and psychometric properties of the FFMQ were investigated with multigroup confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory structural equation modeling. Associations with mental health and mechanisms of mindfulness were examined with path analysis. Results The derived short form broadly matched a previous item selection in samples of non-meditators. Self-regulated Attention and Orientation to Experience governed the facets of mindfulness on a higher-order level. Higher-order factors of mindfulness and meditation experience were negatively associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety, and perceived stress. Decentering and nonattachment were the most salient mechanisms of mindfulness. Aspects of emotion regulation, bodily awareness, and nonattachment explained the effects of mindfulness on depression and anxiety. Conclusions A two-component conceptualization for the FFMQ, and for the study of mindfulness as a psychological construct, is recommended for future research. Mechanisms of mindfulness need to be examined in intervention studies. PMID:25330072

  15. The serenity of the meditating mind: a cross-cultural psychometric study on a two-factor higher order structure of mindfulness, its effects, and mechanisms related to mental health among experienced meditators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich S Tran

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the psychometric and structural properties of the Five Facets Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ among meditators, to develop a short form, and to examine associations of mindfulness with mental health and the mechanisms of mindfulness. METHODS: Two independent samples were used, a German (n = 891 and a Spanish (n = 393 meditator sample, practicing various meditation styles. Structural and psychometric properties of the FFMQ were investigated with multigroup confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory structural equation modeling. Associations with mental health and mechanisms of mindfulness were examined with path analysis. RESULTS: The derived short form broadly matched a previous item selection in samples of non-meditators. Self-regulated Attention and Orientation to Experience governed the facets of mindfulness on a higher-order level. Higher-order factors of mindfulness and meditation experience were negatively associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety, and perceived stress. Decentering and nonattachment were the most salient mechanisms of mindfulness. Aspects of emotion regulation, bodily awareness, and nonattachment explained the effects of mindfulness on depression and anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: A two-component conceptualization for the FFMQ, and for the study of mindfulness as a psychological construct, is recommended for future research. Mechanisms of mindfulness need to be examined in intervention studies.

  16. Development of a measure of model fidelity for mental health Crisis Resolution Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Bond, Gary R; Ruud, Torleif; Ivanecka, Ada; Gray, Richard; Osborn, David; Nolan, Fiona; Henderson, Claire; Mason, Oliver; Goater, Nicky; Kelly, Kathleen; Ambler, Gareth; Morant, Nicola; Onyett, Steve; Lamb, Danielle; Fahmy, Sarah; Brown, Ellie; Paterson, Beth; Sweeney, Angela; Hindle, David; Fullarton, Kate; Frerichs, Johanna; Johnson, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    Crisis Resolution Teams (CRTs) provide short-term intensive home treatment to people experiencing mental health crisis. Trial evidence suggests CRTs can be effective at reducing hospital admissions and increasing satisfaction with acute care. When scaled up to national level however, CRT implementation and outcomes have been variable. We aimed to develop and test a fidelity scale to assess adherence to a model of best practice for CRTs, based on best available evidence. A concept mapping process was used to develop a CRT fidelity scale. Participants (n = 68) from a range of stakeholder groups prioritised and grouped statements (n = 72) about important components of the CRT model, generated from a literature review, national survey and qualitative interviews. These data were analysed using Ariadne software and the resultant cluster solution informed item selection for a CRT fidelity scale. Operational criteria and scoring anchor points were developed for each item. The CORE CRT fidelity scale was then piloted in 75 CRTs in the UK to assess the range of scores achieved and feasibility for use in a 1-day fidelity review process. Trained reviewers (n = 16) rated CRT service fidelity in a vignette exercise to test the scale's inter-rater reliability. There were high levels of agreement within and between stakeholder groups regarding the most important components of the CRT model. A 39-item measure of CRT model fidelity was developed. Piloting indicated that the scale was feasible for use to assess CRT model fidelity and had good face validity. The wide range of item scores and total scores across CRT services in the pilot demonstrate the measure can distinguish lower and higher fidelity services. Moderately good inter-rater reliability was found, with an estimated correlation between individual ratings of 0.65 (95% CI: 0.54 to 0.76). The CORE CRT Fidelity Scale has been developed through a rigorous and systematic process. Promising initial testing indicates

  17. The development and validation of an interprofessional scale to assess teamwork in mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Ryoko; Yamano, Mayumi; Osako, Mitue; Misawa, Takeshi; Hirabayashi, Naotugu; Oshima, Nobuo; Sigeta, Masahiro; Reeves, Scott

    2014-09-01

    Currently, no evaluative scale exists to assess the quality of interprofessional teamwork in mental health settings across the globe. As a result, little is known about the detailed process of team development within this setting. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a global interprofessional scale that assesses teamwork in mental health settings using an international comparative study based in Japan and the United States. This report provides a description of this study and reports progress made to date. Specifically, it outlines work on literature reviews to identify evaluative teamwork tools as well as identify relevant teamwork models and theories. It also outlines plans for empirical work that will be undertaken in both Japan and the United States.

  18. Developing and Sustaining Recovery-Orientation in Mental Health Practice: Experiences of Occupational Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Alexandra; Hancock, Nicola; Honey, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, mental health policy requires clinicians to shift from a medical to a recovery-oriented approach. However, there is a significant lag in the translation of policy into practice. Occupational therapists have been identified as ideally situated to be recovery-oriented yet limited research exploring how they do this exists. This study aimed to explore Australian occupational therapists' experiences of developing and sustaining recovery-orientation in mental health practice. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted with twelve occupational therapists working across different mental health service types. Participants identified themselves as being recovery-oriented. Data were analysed using constant comparative analysis. Occupational therapists described recovery-oriented practice as an active, ongoing, and intentional process of seeking out knowledge, finding fit between understandings of recovery-oriented practice and their professional identity, holding hope, and developing confidence through clinical reasoning. Human and systemic aspects of therapists' workplace environment influenced this process. Being a recovery-oriented occupational therapist requires more than merely accepting a specific framework. It requires commitment and ongoing work to develop and sustain recovery-orientation. Occupational therapists are called to extend current leadership activity beyond their workplace and to advocate for broader systemic change.

  19. Developing and Sustaining Recovery-Orientation in Mental Health Practice: Experiences of Occupational Therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Nugent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Internationally, mental health policy requires clinicians to shift from a medical to a recovery-oriented approach. However, there is a significant lag in the translation of policy into practice. Occupational therapists have been identified as ideally situated to be recovery-oriented yet limited research exploring how they do this exists. This study aimed to explore Australian occupational therapists’ experiences of developing and sustaining recovery-orientation in mental health practice. Methods. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted with twelve occupational therapists working across different mental health service types. Participants identified themselves as being recovery-oriented. Data were analysed using constant comparative analysis. Results. Occupational therapists described recovery-oriented practice as an active, ongoing, and intentional process of seeking out knowledge, finding fit between understandings of recovery-oriented practice and their professional identity, holding hope, and developing confidence through clinical reasoning. Human and systemic aspects of therapists’ workplace environment influenced this process. Conclusions. Being a recovery-oriented occupational therapist requires more than merely accepting a specific framework. It requires commitment and ongoing work to develop and sustain recovery-orientation. Occupational therapists are called to extend current leadership activity beyond their workplace and to advocate for broader systemic change.

  20. Perspectives on the Present State and Future of Higher Education Faculty Development in Kazakhstan: Implications for National Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitova, Dinara

    2016-01-01

    The article aims at examining the present state of higher education faculty development in Kazakhstan in the context of multidimensional nationwide development reforms and exploring implications for the National Human Resource Development of the country. For the purpose of this research, theoretical human resource development (HRD) and…

  1. Child's Attachment to Mother as the Basis of Mental Development Typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina V. Burmenskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the role of the attachment system (child-mother interactions in development of a wide spectrum of individual personality characteristics. Emotional attachment of the child to mother is considered as a complicated system of internal regulation and a basis of typology of mental development. Results of a series of empirical studies show the connection between the type of attachment, formed at the early stages of child development, and characteristics of his/her autonomy, consciousness (self-concept and self-esteem and empathy in preschool and middle childhood.

  2. Towards a Multi-Stakeholder-Driven Model for Excellence in Higher Education Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. H.; Bushney, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-stakeholder-driven model for excellence in higher education curriculum development has been developed. It is based on the assumption that current efforts to curriculum development take place within a framework of limited stakeholder consultation. A total of 18 multiple stakeholders are identified, including learners, alumni, government,…

  3. Slow Shift--Developing Provisions for Talented Students in Scandinavian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, Marca; Hogenstijn, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    For decades, Scandinavian culture effectively prohibited the development of special provisions for talented students in higher education. However, in recent years, a cultural shift has gradually made more room for excellence and talent development in the national discourses. This paper analyzes the climate for talent development in Denmark,…

  4. Team-Based Professional Development Interventions in Higher Education : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, Inken; Schildkamp, Kim; van der Veen, Jan T.

    Most professional development activities focus on individual teachers, such as mentoring or the use of portfolios. However, new developments in higher education require teachers to work together in teams more often. Due to these changes, there is a growing need for professional development

  5. The Concepts of Informational Approach to the Management of Higher Education's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, Elena Y.; Voronina, Marianna V.; Rybolovleva, Alla A.; Sharafutdinova, Mariya M.; Zhandarova, Larisa F.; Avilova, Vilora V.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by necessity to develop the informational support for management of development of higher education in conditions of high turbulence of external and internal environment. The purpose of the paper is the development of methodology for structuring and analyzing datasets of educational activities in order to reduce…

  6. Development of Self-Belief for Employability in Higher Education: Ability, Efficacy and Control in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nancy K.

    2014-01-01

    Self-belief is argued here to be a key aspect of employability development that has been largely under conceptualisation in terms of what the construct may mean and how it may be developed through higher education (HE) study. This paper proposes three fundamental beliefs that need to be fostered in order to develop student self-belief: (1) that…

  7. Offering Prescriptions of Leader-Member Exchanges towards Developing Academic Talent in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Andre Leonard

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines leader-member exchange behaviour for the development of academic talent in higher education. Drawing from a sample of academic leaders at a large South African university, interviews conducted with the chairs of departments (CoDs) provide new insight on development practices and actions for follower development within a…

  8. Structuring Serendipity: Mentoring as a Component of Leadership Development Programs in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonebright, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    The need to develop a pool of well-qualified future leaders is a key concern for human resource development scholars and practitioners in higher education. Research indicates that formal leadership development programs are most effective when they are based on experiential models. Mentoring is one experiential component that can enhance such…

  9. Team-Based Professional Development Interventions in Higher Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Inken; Schildkamp, Kim; van der Veen, Jan T.

    2017-01-01

    Most professional development activities focus on individual teachers, such as mentoring or the use of portfolios. However, new developments in higher education require teachers to work together in teams more often. Due to these changes, there is a growing need for professional development activities focusing on teams. Therefore, this review study…

  10. Young men?s attitudes and behaviour in relation to mental health and technology: implications for the development of online mental health services

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Louise A; Collin, Philippa; Hurley, Patrick J; Davenport, Tracey A; Burns, Jane M; Hickie, Ian B

    2013-01-01

    Background This mixed-methods study was designed to explore young Australian men?s attitudes and behaviour in relation to mental health and technology use to inform the development of online mental health services for young men. Methods National online survey of 486 males (aged 16 to 24) and 17 focus groups involving 118 males (aged 16 to 24). Results Young men are heavy users of technology, particularly when it comes to entertainment and connecting with friends, but they are also using techn...

  11. Development and Validation of a Questionnaire Measuring Teachers' Motivations for Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-Wijnveen, Gerda J.; Stes, Ann; Van Petegem, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A lot of research has been done into the motivations in teachers in primary/secondary education and into student motivation. However, teachers' motivations for teaching in higher education are rarely studied. A growing interest exists though in the professional development of teachers in higher education, of which motivation is an important…

  12. Nurturing Quality of Higher Education through National Ranking: A Potential Empowerment Model for Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumastuti, Dyah; Idrus, Nirwan

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the recently introduced National Higher Education ranking system in Indonesia in order to evaluate its potential as a sustainable model to improve the quality of higher education in the country. It is a scaffold towards an established world-universities ranking system that may prove formidable for a developing country. This…

  13. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume II, Country Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Howard; And Others

    This document, the second of three volumes concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, presents country profiles for Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Viet-Nam, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The profile emphasizes background, higher education, educational…

  14. Higher Education for National Development: Quality Assurance and Fostering Global Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzan, Masa; Aleksic-Maslac, Karmela

    2011-01-01

    Responding to the impact of globalization on delivering education and the increasing need to adapt to the needs of economic and social life, higher education institutions (HEI) effectiveness is depending on the use of technology and contribution to national development. While increasing access to higher education remains to be an important…

  15. Identifying Themes for Research-Based Development of Pedagogy and Guidance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskelä, Päivikki; Nissilä, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The high value accorded to the research-based development of education in higher education communities means that researchers in the field have an important role in determining the foci of such efforts. However, it is important to ask whether higher education research is providing answers that satisfy practical educational needs. In this study,…

  16. Matching of Developed Generic Competences of Graduates in Higher Education with Labour Market Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukelis, Kestutis; Pileicikiene, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Higher education provides graduates with both monetary and non-monetary benefits. Globalization and technological developments foster utilitarian approach, therefore the transmission of competences that are relevant in labour market is an important target for higher education institutions. The paper presents findings of research on the match of…

  17. Professional Development of Continuing Higher Education Unit Leaders: A Need for a Competency-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacheler, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of professional development experiences on the career competencies of continuing higher education unit leaders (CHEULs). In the American system of higher education, a CHEUL manages an administrative unit that offers educational programs to adult learners (Cranton, 1996). To face the challenges…

  18. Three Decades of Implementation Research in Higher Education: Limitations and Prospects of Theory Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The article adopts a comparative approach to review three periods of theory development in research into higher education policy implementation. Given the conceptual affinity between Cerych and Sabatier's 1986 seminal study into higher education policy implementation and public policy implementation theory, the field of public policy is chosen for…

  19. Association of postpartum maternal morbidities with children's mental, psychomotor and language development in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, J D; Tofail, F; Hilaly, A; Mehrin, F; Shiraji, S; Banu, S; Huda, S N

    2012-06-01

    Little is known from developing countries about the effects of maternal morbidities diagnosed in the postpartum period on children's development. The study aimed to document the relationships of such morbidities with care-giving practices by mothers, children's developmental milestones and their language, mental and psychomotor development. Maternal morbidities were identified through physical examination at 6-9 weeks postpartum (n=488). Maternal care-giving practices and postnatal depression were assessed also at 6-9 weeks postpartum. Children's milestones of development were measured at six months, and their mental (MDI) and psychomotor (PDI) development, language comprehension and expression, and quality of psychosocial stimulation at home were assessed at 12 months. Several approaches were used for identifying the relationships among different maternal morbidities, diagnosed by physicians, with children's development. After controlling for the potential confounders, maternal anaemia diagnosed postpartum showed a small but significantly negative effect on children's language expression while the effects on language comprehension did not reach the significance level (p=0.085). Children's development at 12 months was related to psychosocial stimulation at home, nutritional status, education of parents, socioeconomic status, and care-giving practices of mothers at six weeks of age. Only a few mothers experienced each specific morbidity, and with the exception of anaemia, the sample-size was insufficient to make a conclusion regarding each specific morbidity. Further research with a sufficient sample-size of individual morbidities is required to determine the association of postpartum maternal morbidities with children's development.

  20. Academic Development and Educational Developers: Perspectives from Different European Higher Education Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Roberto; Fry, Heather; Frenay, Mariane; Verhesschen, Piet; Verburgh, An

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports research in five European universities, in four countries between 2004 and 2008. The research explored and compared institutional contexts for academic development and the interpretations and reflections of a number of academic developers on the organizational position and role of academic development, and of…

  1. Development of Measures to Assess Personal Recovery in Young People Treated in Specialist Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Mary; Jeffries, Fiona W; Acuna-Rivera, Marcela; Warren, Fiona; Simonds, Laura M

    2015-01-01

    Recovery has become a central concept in mental health service delivery, and several recovery-focused measures exist for adults. The concept's applicability to young people's mental health experience has been neglected, and no measures yet exist. Aim The aim of this work is to develop measures of recovery for use in specialist child and adolescent mental health services. On the basis of 21 semi-structured interviews, three recovery measures were devised, one for completion by the young person and two for completion by the parent/carer. Two parent/carer measures were devised in order to assess both their perspective on their child's recovery and their own recovery process. The questionnaires were administered to a UK sample of 47 young people (10-18 years old) with anxiety and depression and their parents, along with a measure used to routinely assess treatment progress and outcome and a measure of self-esteem. All three measures had high internal consistency (alpha ≥ 0.89). Young people's recovery scores were correlated negatively with scores on a measure used to routinely assess treatment progress and outcome (r = -0.75) and positively with self-esteem (r = 0.84). Parent and young persons' reports of the young person's recovery were positively correlated (r = 0.61). Parent report of the young person's recovery and of their own recovery process were positively correlated (r = 0.75). The three measures have the potential to be used in mental health services to assess recovery processes in young people with mental health difficulties and correspondence with symptomatic improvement. The measures provide a novel way of capturing the parental/caregiver perspective on recovery and caregivers' own wellbeing. No tools exist to evaluate recovery-relevant processes in young people treated in specialist mental health services. This study reports on the development and psychometric evaluation of three self-report recovery-relevant assessments for young

  2. Development of disaster mental health guidelines through the Delphi process in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Yuriko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mental health community in Japan had started reviewing the country’s disaster mental health guidelines before the Great East Japan Earthquake, aiming to revise them based on evidence and experience accumulated in the last decade. Given the wealth of experience and knowledge acquired in the field by many Japanese mental health professionals, we decided to develop the guidelines through systematic consensus building and selected the Delphi method. Methods After a thorough literature review and focus group interviews, 96 items regarding disaster mental health were included in Delphi Round 1. Of 100 mental health professionals experienced in disaster response who were invited to participate, 97 agreed. The appropriateness of each statement was assessed by the participants using a Likert scale (1: extremely inappropriate, 9: very appropriate and providing free comments in three rounds. Consensus by experts was defined as an average score of ≥7 for which ≥70% of participants assigned this score, and items reaching consensus were included in the final guidelines. Results Overall, of the 96 items (89 initially asked and 7 added items, 77 items were agreed on (46 items in Round 1, and 19 positive and 12 negative agreed on items in Round 2. In Round 2, three statements with which participants agreed most strongly were: 1 A protocol for emergency work structure and information flow should be prepared in normal times; 2 The mental health team should attend regular meetings on health and medicine to exchange information; and 3 Generally, it is recommended not to ask disaster survivors about psychological problems at the initial response but ask about their present worries and physical condition. Three statements with which the participants disagreed most strongly in this round were: 1 Individuals should be encouraged to provide detailed accounts of their experiences; 2 Individuals should be provided with education if they are

  3. Consequences of moral Kohlberg´s moral development levels in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Bordignon, Nelso Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. This article presents the results of a research work about the implications of Kohlberg´s moral development level in higher education. Objective. To identify the state of moral development among higher education teachers, departing from the orientation they give to their lives and to those of their students, and from what they think and say they do for their students´ moral education.With the results, an analysis is done in order to establish the impli...

  4. MENTAL DEVELOPMENT TRAINING FOR MILITARY SOLDIER AT ISKANDAR MUDA MILITARY COMMAND (A Theocentrical Humanism Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Husein

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to reveal the process of soldier's mental development in Iskandar Muda Military Command, both seen from the selection process to be soldier in educational institutions as well as in the unit assignment. This research is expected to find the development pattern in accordance with the challenging tasks for the National Military (TNI ahead. By using a qualitative approach, this research has achieved several findings: 1 in the selection process, a soldier was just demanded to fundamentally have religious understanding without a standard point for depth understanding of religion, 2 in the first stage of education, the subject matter of religion only a broad outline of religious teachings, 3 religious activities is not part of military trainings curriculum, but it is merely education administrators’ policy, 4 the soldiers in unit deemed to have knowledge of the religion and an unwavering faith. Despite the fact that soldiers’ religious knowledge is still very low, while the faith is generally used as the symbolic emphasis that is less discussed. As a result, it is feared that mentality weakness when facing a tough task, both faced with the sophistication of tools, strategies and mental demands in modern warfare in the future.

  5. Progress in the development of integrated mental health care in Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Woods

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of integrated care through the promotion of ‘partnership working’ is a key policy objective of the Scottish Executive, the administration responsible for health services in Scotland. This paper considers the extent to which this goal is being achieved in mental health services, particularly those for people with severe and enduring mental illness. Distinguishing between the horizontal and vertical integration of services, exploratory research was conducted to assess progress towards this objective by examining how far a range of functional activities in Primary Care Trusts (PCTs and their constituent Local Health Care Co-operatives (LHCCs were themselves becoming increasingly integrated. All PCTs in Scotland were surveyed by postal questionnaire, and followed up by detailed telephone interviews. Six LHCC areas were selected for detailed case study analysis. A Reference Group was used to discuss and review emerging themes from the fieldwork. The report suggests that faster progress is being made in the horizontal integration of services between health and social care organisations than is the case for vertical integration between primary health care and specialist mental health care services; and that there are significant gaps in the extent to which functional activities within Trusts are changing to support the development of integrated care. A number of models are briefly considered, including the idea of ‘intermediate care’ that might speed the process of integration.

  6. Informing the development of services supporting self-care for severe, long term mental health conditions: a mixed method study of community based mental health initiatives in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Gillard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supporting self-care is being explored across health care systems internationally as an approach to improving care for long term conditions in the context of ageing populations and economic constraint. UK health policy advocates a range of approaches to supporting self-care, including the application of generic self-management type programmes across conditions. Within mental health, the scope of self-care remains poorly conceptualised and the existing evidence base for supporting self-care is correspondingly disparate. This paper aims to inform the development of support for self-care in mental health by considering how generic self-care policy guidance is implemented in the context of services supporting people with severe, long term mental health problems. Methods A mixed method study was undertaken comprising standardised psychosocial measures, questionnaires about health service use and qualitative interviews with 120 new referrals to three contrasting community based initiatives supporting self-care for severe, long term mental health problems, repeated nine months later. A framework approach was taken to qualitative analysis, an exploratory statistical analysis sought to identify possible associations between a range of independent variables and self-care outcomes, and a narrative synthesis brought these analyses together. Results Participants reported improvement in self-care outcomes (e.g. greater empowerment; less use of Accident and Emergency services. These changes were not associated with level of engagement with self-care support. Level of engagement was associated with positive collaboration with support staff. Qualitative data described the value of different models of supporting self-care and considered challenges. Synthesis of analyses suggested that timing support for self-care, giving service users control over when and how they accessed support, quality of service user-staff relationships and decision

  7. Development, implementation, and evaluation of a mental rehearsal strategy to improve clinical performance and reduce stress: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio, Jeanette; Dolmans, Diana; Scherpbier, Albert; Rethans, Jan-Joost; Lopez, Violeta; Liaw, Sok Ying

    2016-02-01

    Mental rehearsal is a form of mental training that has been used by physicians and nurses to improve performance of clinical skills, and as a vital component of stress management training. To help novice nurses deal with often stressful clinical events that require the processing of information essential to patient management, a mental rehearsal strategy was developed and implemented in a Year 3 nursing simulation program. Inherent to mental rehearsal is imagery, which facilitates cognitive and affective modification, and reduction of extraneous cognitive load. As such, it was expected that the mental rehearsal strategy would improve students' performance and reduce stress in managing deteriorating patients. The study used a mixed methods design. Eighteen Year 3 nursing students participated in the pre- and post-design study, which consisted of the development and implementation of a mental rehearsal strategy. The Rescuing A Patient In Deteriorating Situations (RAPIDS) tool was used to assess performance. Heart rates and systolic blood pressures were used to measure stress. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used as a psychological measure of stress/anxiety. Five participants were involved in a focus group discussion that evaluated the usefulness of the mental rehearsal strategy. There was a significant improvement in performance (Pstrategy. The mental rehearsal strategy for deteriorating patient management can be valuable based on the findings on performance and based on the participants' feedback. Its role in reducing stress, however, needs further evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Collaborative Professional Development in Higher Education: Developing Knowledge of Technology Enhanced Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipal-Jamani, Kamini; Figg, Candace; Gallagher, Tiffany; Scott, Ruth McQuirter; Ciampa, Katia

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a professional development initiative for teacher educators, called the "Digital Pedagogies Collaboration," in which the goal was to build faculty knowledge about technology enhanced teaching (TPACK knowledge), develop a collaborative learning and research community of faculty members around technology enhanced…

  9. Intentional Modelling: A Process for Clinical Leadership Development in Mental Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2016-05-01

    Clinical leadership is becoming more relevant for nurses, as the positive impact that it can have on the quality of care and outcomes for consumers is better understood and more clearly articulated in the literature. As clinical leadership continues to become more relevant, the need to gain an understanding of how clinical leaders in nursing develop will become increasingly important. While the attributes associated with effective clinical leadership are recognized in current literature there remains a paucity of research on how clinical leaders develop these attributes. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to generate new insights into the experiences of peer identified clinical leaders in mental health nursing and the process of developing clinical leadership skills. Participants in this study were nurses working in a mental health setting who were identified as clinical leaders by their peers as opposed to identifying them by their role or organizational position. A process of intentional modeling emerged as the substantive theory identified in this study. Intentional modeling was described by participants in this study as a process that enabled them to purposefully identify models that assisted them in developing the characteristics of effective clinical leaders as well as allowing them to model these characteristics to others. Reflection on practice is an important contributor to intentional modelling. Intentional modelling could be developed as a framework for promoting knowledge and skill development in the area of clinical leadership.

  10. The Inspiration Given by the Successful Practice of Development of Higher Vocational Education in the Developed Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gaoling

    2010-01-01

    Higher vocational education is the product of economic development, scientific and technological progress. If the country does not have a well-developed vocational education, it is impossible to make a good advanced science and technology into productive forces, it is also impossible to achieve economy development in a high speed. In turn, powers…

  11. Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers: Measuring Higher Education's Role in Economic Development. Critical Issues in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jason E., Ed.; Johnstone, D. Bruce, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Local, state, and national economies are facing unprecedented levels of international competition. The current fiscal crisis has hampered the ability of many governments in the developed world to directly facilitate economic growth. At the same time, many governments in the developing world are investing significant new resources into local…

  12. The development of mental hospitals in West Bengal: A brief history and changing trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Ranjan

    2018-02-01

    The communication between G. S Bose and Sigmund Freud is a well-documented fact, and philosophical blend of rich cultural experiences is unique to modification of traditional psychoanalysis in the context of development of psychiatry in West Bengal. The Calcutta lunatic asylum was established at Bhowanipore, and first general hospital psychiatric unit was formed at R. G. Kar Medical College, Calcutta. Prof. Ajita Chakraborty was a pioneer to describe her struggling days in the early career and shared her views with experiences in her autobiography. The volume and quality of research work, especially in the field of epidemiology led by Dr. D. N. Nandi is worth mentioning. A jail had been converted to mental hospital which is the largest in terms of bed strength ( n = 350) at Berhampore, Murshidabad district where Kazi Nazrul Islam and Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose had spent some period as prisoner during British rules. Bankura was the first district in West Bengal to start District Mental Health program. The various nongovernmental organizations are working together in public-private partnership model or indigenous ways in tandem over years for the betterment of mental health services both at institutional and community level.

  13. The Development Trend of the Non-governmental Higher Education in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dewen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In more than 30 years after China’s reform and opening to the outside world the non-governmental higher education has developed dramatically and enjoyed more and more favorable conditions, making great contributions to the popularization of higher education in China. According to the definition that “The non-governmental higher education is a major growth point for development of educational career and an important driving force in promoting educational reform”, quoting from The planning outline on the national medium and long-term educational reform and development (The Planning Outline for short issued in 2010 by China’s State Council, China has launched policies of greatly supporting the non-governmental higher education and designed the reform goals of the government as the main body of education, with the active participation of the whole society, and the mutual development of the governmental and non-governmental higher education. Soon afterwards, the nation has started the move of the non-governmental educational system, and positively explored the management of classification of profit and non-profit non-governmental educational institutions. Thus, the development of the Chinese non-governmental institutions of higher learning has been greatly influenced because of the policies and relevant practices. With the opening of the 18th national congress and the political direction mentioned in the report as “encouraging and guiding social organizations to initiate education”, the pace of development of the non-governmental institutions of higher learning will be accelerated and some new development trends will become clearer.

  14. Cross-Border Higher Education: Global and Local Tensions within Competition and Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Taya L.; Lane, Jason E.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors explore various types of cross-border higher education, considering equity and quality issues within these developments. With a particular focus on international branch campuses, the authors discuss the ways in which global competition for knowledge and economic development interact with tensions at the local level.

  15. Benchmarks and Quality Assurance for Online Course Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    As online education has entered the main stream of the U.S. higher education, quality assurance in online course development has become a critical topic in distance education. This short article summarizes the major benchmarks related to online course development, listing and comparing the benchmarks of the National Education Association (NEA),…

  16. Measuring Service Quality in Higher Education: Development of a Hierarchical Model (HESQUAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeroovengadum, Viraiyan; Kamalanabhan, T. J.; Seebaluck, Ashley Keshwar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to develop and empirically test a hierarchical model for measuring service quality in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: The first phase of the study consisted of qualitative research methods and a comprehensive literature review, which allowed the development of a conceptual model comprising 53 service quality…

  17. International E-Benchmarking: Flexible Peer Development of Authentic Learning Principles in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppisaari, Irja; Vainio, Leena; Herrington, Jan; Im, Yeonwook

    2011-01-01

    More and more, social technologies and virtual work methods are facilitating new ways of crossing boundaries in professional development and international collaborations. This paper examines the peer development of higher education teachers through the experiences of the IVBM project (International Virtual Benchmarking, 2009-2010). The…

  18. Mentor Development in Higher Education in Botswana: How Important Is Reflective Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, H.; Nyanjom, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Mentor development in higher education in Vocational Education and Training (VET) in Botswana is explored in this article. Changes in education policy require mentors to engage in individual as well as organisational change and transformation. Most studies focus on mentee development and the resulting organisational change but there is very little…

  19. Defining Strategic and Excellence Bases for the Development of Portuguese Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Maria Joao; Saraiva, Pedro M.; Diz, Henrique

    2005-01-01

    A self-assessment model was developed for the Portuguese higher education institutions (HEIs) which was based on an empirical study aiming at better understanding their strategic and quality management and innovation practices and tools and on the study of several quality assessment models developed both for HEIs and business organisations. From…

  20. How Often Are Theories Developed through Empirical Research into Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a review of empirical research published in selected higher education journals in 2008, which was focused on examining how often theories are developed through research. This review found relatively little evidence of theory development. Drawing on the notions of internal and external languages of description, it is argued…

  1. The Application of Open Systems Theory and Organization Development to Higher Education: A Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Vicki; Mink, Oscar G.

    This monograph sets forth a portion of the research and theory base underlying the organization development program, 1 of the 3 major components of the National Laboratory for Higher Education''s Administrative and Organizational Systems program. It depicts some of the linkages among organization development, institutional research, information…

  2. Perceived Effectiveness of Professional Development Programs of Teachers at Higher Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sufiana Khatoon; Nasim, Uzma; Tabassum, Farkhanda

    2015-01-01

    The major purpose of the study was to assess the perceived effectiveness of professional development programs of teachers at higher educational level. The objectives of the study were: "to assess university level teachers'" opinion about effectiveness of professional development training with reference to quality teaching, to measure…

  3. Sustainability Policy and Sustainability in Higher Education Curricula: The Educational Developer Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have investigated the views of higher education staff and students about sustainability, yet educational developer perspectives are under-represented in the research. This project gathered educational developer perspectives about sustainability in the curriculum. It sought to capture their views about a national sustainability…

  4. Developing a Mental Health eClinic to Improve Access to and Quality of Mental Health Care for Young People: Using Participatory Design as Research Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina-Pinillos, Laura; Davenport, Tracey A; Ricci, Cristina S; Milton, Alyssa C; Scott, Elizabeth M; Hickie, Ian B

    2018-05-28

    Each year, many young Australians aged between 16 and 25 years experience a mental health disorder, yet only a small proportion access services and even fewer receive timely and evidence-based treatments. Today, with ever-increasing access to the Internet and use of technology, the potential to provide all young people with access (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) to the support they require to improve their mental health and well-being is promising. The aim of this study was to use participatory design (PD) as research methodologies with end users (young people aged between 16 and 25 years and youth health professionals) and our research team to develop the Mental Health eClinic (a Web-based mental health clinic) to improve timely access to, and better quality, mental health care for young people across Australia. A research and development (R&D) cycle for the codesign and build of the Mental Health eClinic included several iterative PD phases: PD workshops; translation of knowledge and ideas generated during workshops to produce mockups of webpages either as hand-drawn sketches or as wireframes (simple layout of a webpage before visual design and content is added); rapid prototyping; and one-on-one consultations with end users to assess the usability of the alpha build of the Mental Health eClinic. Four PD workshops were held with 28 end users (young people n=18, youth health professionals n=10) and our research team (n=8). Each PD workshop was followed by a knowledge translation session. At the conclusion of this cycle, the alpha prototype was built, and one round of one-on-one end user consultation sessions was conducted (n=6; all new participants, young people n=4, youth health professionals n=2). The R&D cycle revealed the importance of five key components for the Mental Health eClinic: a home page with a visible triage system for those requiring urgent help; a comprehensive online physical and mental health assessment; a detailed dashboard of results; a

  5. Development of forensic mental health services in Japan: working towards the reintegration of offenders with mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Chiyo; Fukuda, Yusuke; Ando, Kumiko; Kikuchi, Akiko; Okada, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Until the recent enactment of the Medical Treatment and Supervision Act (MTSA) in 2005, neither legislations nor facilities for mentally disordered offenders were available in Japan. The aim of the country's forensic mental health services, based on this new law, is to improve the social reintegration of mentally disordered offenders. In order to provide optimal psychiatric care to these individuals, specialised court proceedings, treatment facilities, and concrete guidelines have been established. The aim of this study was to review the current status of the new system and to clarify future challenges for improving services. The authors collected official statistics regarding the new system published separately by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, the Ministry of Justice, and the Supreme Court of Japan. We aggregated the data and examined the system's current implementation status, nationwide. There were 2,750 requests for enrolment in the MTSA system between its initiation in 2005 and 31 December 2012. Of those requests, 2,724 cases had been concluded in court. In 63.1% of the cases, an inpatient treatment order had been made; 82.4% of those inpatients were diagnosed with schizophrenia. By the end of March 2012, two patients completing treatment under the MTSA had re-committed a serious offense. While overall designated inpatient and outpatient treatment facilities have reached national targets in terms of resources and beds available, a regional gap in MTSA designated facilities remains and the number of patients under inpatient treatment order is on the increase. Overall, the MTSA system has been running smoothly without encountering any serious problems. However, several concerns have emerged, such as the accumulation of patients under inpatient treatment order and insufficient regional resources. To more successfully promote the reintegration of mentally disordered offenders, improvements in outpatient treatment and welfare services are crucial. In

  6. Enfrentando o problema dos estágios no desenvolvimento mental das crianças Facing the problem of stages in the mental development of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Elkonin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo central do artigo é discutir o conceito naturalista e evolutivo de desenvolvimento mental, especialmente nos modelos teóricos que defendem uma concepção do desenvolvimento humano pautada numa divisão por estágios, relacionando marcadamente idade cronológica e mudanças intra e interindividuais. Tais modelos teóricos dicotomizam a psicologia da criança nos aspectos necessidade-motivação e intelectuais-cognitivos. Pretendendo superar essa dicotomia, Elkonin propõe que o desenvolvimento humano é melhor entendido como movimento dialético de assimilação, pela criança, desde o seu nascimento, dos objetivos, motivos e normas das relações humanas e de aquisição e interiorização dos modos social e historicamente evoluídos de ação com objetos, presentes em uma coletividade. Essa perspectiva dialética de compreender o desenvolvimento permite: 1. entender o processo de desenvolvimento mental como uma espiral ascendente, antes do que linearmente, 2. explanar a significância funcional dos diferentes períodos do desenvolvimento, clarificando seus padrões de transição, e 3. se mostra relevante como um auxílio para resolver a questão da suscetibilidade dos vários estágios do desenvolvimento da criança a tipos particulares de influência.The aim of the article is to discuss the naturalistic and evolutionary concept of mental development, especially in theoretical models which strongly defend a conception of human mental development into stages, relating chronological age and intra and interindividual changes. Such theoretical models dichotomize child psychology in need-motivational and cognitive-intellectual aspects. Intending to surpass this dichotomy, Elkonin considers that human mental development is better understood as a dialectical movement of the assimilation, by the child, since its birth, of the objectives, reasons and norms of human relations and of the acquisition and internalization of the socio

  7. Development of strategic cooperation of higher school and industrial enterprises to promote innovative development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ermakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author analyzes the provisions of the national system of strategic planning of innovation development, of strategic planning documents within the formation of the concept of innovative development of the Russian economy, its transition to the knowledge economy Along with this, the author reviewed the current development indicators of the Russian economy and comparative analysis of world GDP and volumes of financing of scientific development of the countries of the world - the Global Competitiveness Report. The article provides the analysis and decomposition of component Pillar 12. Innovation on the innovative activity in Russia. The author gives the analysis on number of people employed in research and development personnel in the dynamics and by countries. The article presents information on the funding of scientific research in the United States, Japan, Russia, etc. as percentage of GDP and in absolute values. The article shows a consolidated list of used Russia's innovation promotion instruments (subsidies of costs for innovative projects, project financing, etc., taking account of links to documents, implementating these tools. The author considers problems of cooperation of Universities with industry in the establishment of such interaction as a factor of innovative growth in foreign literature. In the conclusion the author formulates a proposal for the intensification of research to improve forms of strategic partnership of universities and industrial enterprises on the basis of experience researchers form eastern countries, the results of applying the introduced tools at the state and regional levels and binding of adapting them to Russian realities and specifics.

  8. Prenatal exposure to residential air pollution and infant mental development: modulation by antioxidants and detoxification factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guxens, Mònica; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Ballester, Ferran; Estarlich, Marisa; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Lertxundi, Aitana; Lertxundi, Nerea; Mendez, Michelle A; Tardón, Adonina; Vrijheid, Martine; Sunyer, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution effects on children's neurodevelopment have recently been suggested to occur most likely through the oxidative stress pathway. We aimed to assess whether prenatal exposure to residential air pollution is associated with impaired infant mental development, and whether antioxidant/detoxification factors modulate this association. In the Spanish INfancia y Medio Ambiente (INMA; Environment and Childhood) Project, 2,644 pregnant women were recruited during their first trimester. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and benzene were measured with passive samplers covering the study areas. Land use regression models were developed for each pollutant to predict average outdoor air pollution levels for the entire pregnancy at each residential address. Maternal diet was obtained at first trimester through a validated food frequency questionnaire. Around 14 months, infant mental development was assessed using Bayley Scales of Infant Development. Among the 1,889 children included in the analysis, mean exposure during pregnancy was 29.0 μg/m3 for NO2 and 1.5 μg/m3 for benzene. Exposure to NO2 and benzene showed an inverse association with mental development, although not statistically significant, after adjusting for potential confounders [β (95% confidence interval) = -0.95 (-3.90, 1.89) and -1.57 (-3.69, 0.56), respectively, for a doubling of each compound]. Stronger inverse associations were estimated for both pollutants among infants whose mothers reported low intakes of fruits/vegetables during pregnancy [-4.13 (-7.06, -1.21) and -4.37 (-6.89, -1.86) for NO2 and benzene, respectively], with little evidence of associations in the high-intake group (interaction p-values of 0.073 and 0.047). Inverse associations were also stronger in non-breast-fed infants and infants with low maternal vitamin D, but effect estimates and interactions were not significant. Our findings suggest that prenatal exposure to residential air pollutants may adversely affect infant mental

  9. Evaluating workforce developments to support children of mentally ill parents: implementing new interventions in the adult mental healthcare in Northern Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedtz, Charlotte; Lauritzen, Camilla; van Doesum, Karin T M

    2012-01-01

    variables for the patient and the child at pre-measures, as well as data on parental competence (PSOC) and parental concerns (PEDS) about their children. At post-measures, the authors evaluate the impact of the intervention in terms of user satisfaction, as well as changes between pre- and post-measures on parental competence (PSOC) and parental concerns (PEDS) about their children. The implication of implementing new interventions to safeguard children of mentally ill patients and the limitation of not measuring child development directly are discussed.

  10. Team-Based Professional Development Interventions in Higher Education: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Inken; Schildkamp, Kim; van der Veen, Jan T

    2017-08-01

    Most professional development activities focus on individual teachers, such as mentoring or the use of portfolios. However, new developments in higher education require teachers to work together in teams more often. Due to these changes, there is a growing need for professional development activities focusing on teams. Therefore, this review study was conducted to provide an overview of what is known about professional development in teams in the context of higher education. A total of 18 articles were reviewed that describe the effects of professional development in teams on teacher attitudes and teacher learning. Furthermore, several factors that can either hinder or support professional development in teams are identified at the individual teacher level, at the team level, and also at the organizational level.

  11. Perceptions of Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors on Career Development, Higher Education, and Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolini, William F.; Rayfield, John; Ripley, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Selected 4-H youth participated in the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassador program. Forty-five youth participated in the 3-day program delivered by university professors and staff, Texas AgriLife Extension faculty and industry representatives. An instrument was developed and administered to the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors at the end of their first…

  12. Fertility treatment: long-term growth and mental development of the children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Bjørn

    2014-10-01

    Fertility treatment has been associated with obstetrical and perinatal complications. It is, however, uncertain whether fertility treatment or parental subfertility is associated with long-term development of the children. We aimed to assess the growth and mental health of children and adolescents conceived after fertility treatment compared to spontaneously conceived controls. First, we evaluated all previous studies comparing neurodevelopmental outcomes between children conceived after fertility treatment and spontaneous conceived controls. The systematic review clarified methodological limitations in the existing literature on the long-term development of children conceived after medical assisted reproduction. Although several studies had been published, large, well-controlled studies with long-term follow-up and thorough statistical adjustments were still few. Second, we evaluated the children's mental health by assessing the risk of mental disorders. We studied a population of 555,828 children conceived after spontaneous conception and 33,139 children conceived after fertility treatment with follow-up in 2012 when the children were 8-17 years old. The absolute risk and hazard ratio of overall and specific mental disorders were estimated while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Further, we estimated the association between subtypes of procedures, hormonal treatment, gamete types and cause of infertility on the one hand and the risk of mental disorders on the other. Children conceived after ovulation induction had a low, but significantly increased risks of autism spectrum disorders, hyperkinetic disorders, conduct, emotional, or social disorders, and tic disorders. Children conceived after IVF or ICSI showed no increased risk, except for a small risk of tic disorders. There was no risk systematically related to any specific type of hormone drug treatment. Thus, the increased risks may rely on residual confounding such as unknown parental factors

  13. Higher Education Governance in Developing Countries, Challenges and Recommendations: Iran as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Raisan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the challenges to higher education in Iran and summarizes a range of expert studies, including those of the writer. Common to all the studies is the goal of improving Iran’s higher education system by analyzing its internal and external challenges. This review makes several policy recommendations, including a turn frombureaucratic management to transformational leadership, more resources dedicated to workforce development and research, and outreach for help and advice from institutions and experts.

  14. Development of a web based instrument on higher education structures of industrial engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Tarba Ioan-Cristian

    2017-01-01

    The research and development of assisted operational instruments on higher education structures of industrial engineering represent a continuous and complex process. The present paper contributes to the building up of support elements and an assisted operational instrument on higher education structures of industrial engineering, with focus on the specific curricula. The use of tested and validated constructive solutions from other projects, as base for the new design, reduces the design time.

  15. StreetWise: developing a serious game to support forensic mental health service users' preparation for discharge: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, L M; Davies, J P; Mann, B; Tulloch, S; Nidsjo, A; Hodge, P; Maiden, N; Simpson, A

    2017-05-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Serious gaming can support learning and development. The use of serious games for skills development and the rehearsal of the management of events that cannot be replicated in real life is well established. Few serious games have been used in mental health services, and none in forensic mental health care. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: How a serious game may be coproduced by forensic mental health service users and game developers The acceptability of the therapeutic use of serious gaming by forensic mental health service users and providers. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Computer games may be used by practitioners in their therapeutic work with forensic mental health service users. Mental health nurses to use serious games to creatively and safely bridge the gap for service users between receiving care in controlled environments and living more independent in the community. Introduction Assessment of users' skills and confidence to safely respond to risky community-based situations underpins discharge planning. Serious games have been used for skills development, and this study trialled their use in forensic mental health services. Aim The aim was to develop and test the acceptability and usability of an innovative serious game to support forensic mental health service users' preparation for discharge. Method A prototype serious game was developed by service users and researchers. Acceptability and usability testing was undertaken and service providers interviewed about the acceptability of serious gaming for forensic mental health services. Result A prototype game was produced and successfully trialled by service users. However, both service users and providers identified that work needed to be done to develop and test a game with greater complexity. Discussion The acceptability and usability of using serious games to support service users to develop skills needed for successful discharge was demonstrated

  16. Ranking of Higher Education Institutions: Ideology and Methodology of Development (Russian Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I V Trotsuk

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The article comprises the second part of the analytical review of ideology, methodology and actual practice of higher education institutions ranking development (the first part revealing the international experience was published in the second issue of the journal in 2008. The author examines the current circumstances of higher education institutions ranking and particular education programmes in Russia. Inparticular, the main approaches to ranking elaboration primarily associated with the authors’ and clients’ «status» and the appropriate goals of higher education institutions ranking are revealed in the paper.

  17. Active Involvement of End Users When Developing Web-Based Mental Health Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek de Beurs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough many web-based mental health interventions are being released, the actual uptake by end users is limited. The marginal level of engagement of end users when developing these interventions is recognized as an important cause for uptake problems. In this paper, we offer our perceptive on how to improve user engagement. By doing so, we aim to stimulate a discourse on user involvement within the field of online mental health interventions.MethodsWe shortly describe three different methods (the expert-driven method, intervention mapping, and scrum that were currently used to develop web-based health interventions. We will focus to what extent the end user was involved in the developmental phase, and what the additional challenges were. In the final paragraph, lessons learned are summarized, and recommendations provided.ResultsEvery method seems to have its trade-off: if end users are highly involved, availability of end users and means become problematic. If end users are less actively involved, the product may be less appropriate for the end user. Other challenges to consider are the funding of the more active role of technological companies, and the time it takes to process the results of shorter development cycles.ConclusionThinking about user-centered design and carefully planning, the involvement of end users should become standard in the field of web-based (mental health. When deciding on the level of user involvement, one should balance the need for input from users with the availability of resources such as time and funding.

  18. Young men's attitudes and behaviour in relation to mental health and technology: implications for the development of online mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Louise A; Collin, Philippa; Hurley, Patrick J; Davenport, Tracey A; Burns, Jane M; Hickie, Ian B

    2013-04-20

    This mixed-methods study was designed to explore young Australian men's attitudes and behaviour in relation to mental health and technology use to inform the development of online mental health services for young men. National online survey of 486 males (aged 16 to 24) and 17 focus groups involving 118 males (aged 16 to 24). Young men are heavy users of technology, particularly when it comes to entertainment and connecting with friends, but they are also using technology for finding information and support. The focus group data suggested that young men would be less likely to seek professional help for themselves, citing a preference for self-help and action-oriented strategies instead. Most survey participants reported that they have sought help for a problem online and were satisfied with the help they received. Focus group participants identified potential strategies for how technology could be used to overcome the barriers to help-seeking for young men. The key challenge for online mental health services is to design interventions specifically for young men that are action-based, focus on shifting behaviour and stigma, and are not simply about increasing mental health knowledge. Furthermore, such interventions should be user-driven, informed by young men's views and everyday technology practices, and leverage the influence of peers.

  19. Effect of pregnancy during TMI crisis on mothers' mental health and their child's development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, P.S.; Tokuhata, G.K.; Bratz, J.; Bartholomew, M.J.; Sheffer, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    Five years after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, the mental health of women who had been pregnant and living within 10 miles of Three Mile Island at the time of the accident was similar to that of women from the same area who became pregnant after the accident. Ratings of the development of the two groups of children when they were 5 years old were also similar. However, women who were pregnant during the crisis and had been extremely disturbed about their pregnancies rated their children's health as poorer than did the women who were pregnant later

  20. Impact on infants' cognitive development of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency disorder and common mental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thach Duc Tran

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency anemia (IDA and common mental disorders (CMD on cognitive development of 6 months old infants in a developing country. METHODS: A prospective population-based study in a rural province in Vietnam, which enrolled pregnant women at 12-20 weeks gestation and followed them up with their infants until six months postpartum. Criteria for IDA were Hb 30 years and primiparity had an indirect adverse effect on infants' Bayley cognitive scores. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that antenatal IDA and CMD both have adverse effects on child cognitive development, which if unrecognized and unaddressed are likely to be lasting. It is crucial that both these risks are considered by policy makers, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve child cognitive function in developing countries.

  1. Quality Assurance in Higher Technical Education and the Context of Youth Empowerment for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunmilayo T. Iyunade, Ph.D

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent empirical evidences on higher technical education at a national scale focused on the relevance, student’s poor perception, low enrolment and progression rates, and the growing impact of globalization on the management of higher technical and vocational education with little or no reference point to the factor of quality assurance. This paper therefore correlates quality assurance factors in higher technical education and the context of youth empowerment for sustainable development. A survey of public technical colleges was done in Ogun State. From an estimate population of 637 final year students and 28 instructors and management staff, a simple of 376 students and 17 instructors and management staff were selected using the stratify random sampling technique. A 4-point rating scale validated questionnaires tagged: ‘Higher Technical Education, Youth Empowerment and Sustainable Development Scale (HTEYESDS (r=0.79, complemented with focus Group Discussion (FGD was used for data collection. Three research questions were raised and answered. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics of Pearson correlation, multiple regression and analysis of variance at 0.05 apha level. Results showed that poor quality assurance limits the capacity of higher technical education in the empowerment of youth for sustainable development (82.6%. Quality assurance factors significantly correlated with higher technical education in the empowerment of youth for sustainable development (r=0.188; P < 0.05. It was therefore recommended that government should neither neglect nor compromise the factors of quality assurance in higher technical education as they predicts youth empowerment drive in the system.

  2. Synthetic cannabinoid: prevalence, mechanisms of addiction development, mental disorders associated with the use of synthetic cannabinoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antsyborov A.V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available according to the authors among the new psychoactive substances, the number of which is growing every year, despite the measures aimed at the obstacles to their dissemination there discovered the most frequent violations of psychotic conditions associated with use of synthetic cannabinoid in clinical practice. On the black market, they are distributed through online shops, under the guise of herbal mixtures for Smoking. When ingested, this group of drugs at the peak of intoxication raises a number of mental (different according to the depth of impaired consciousness, auditory and visual hallucinations, panic attacks, acute psychotic paranoid disorders, catatonic stupor, polar affective disorders, acute polythematic delusional symptoms and somatic disorders (disorders of heart rhythm and conduction, acute ischemic disorders, hypertension, depression of respiratory activity, violation of thermoregulation, development of acute renal failure, vomiting, expressed cephalgia, clinic of hypokalemia. In the reviewed literature and authors own observations there have been discovered some cases of mental addiction development to synthetic cannabinoids. The analysis of new literature data and own clinical observations helped the authors to compare the psychotropic effects caused by this group of drugs, relative to other known surfactants. The toxic effects of CSC on the body greatly exceeds the use of plant cannabinoids, and it has almost the same effects as the synthetic cathinone’s. The speed of formation of psychological dependence is lower compared to synthetic cathinone. Developing current strategies for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of patients who use synthetic cannabinoids remains an important task for practical healthcare.

  3. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment is superior to the Mini-Mental State Examination in detecting patients at higher risk of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, YanHong; Lee, Wah Yean; Basri, Nur Adilah; Collinson, Simon Lowes; Merchant, Reshma A; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian

    2012-11-01

    To examine the discriminant validity of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in detecting patients with cognitive impairment at higher risk for dementia at a memory clinic setting. Memory clinic patients were administered the MoCA, MMSE, and a comprehensive formal neuropsychological battery. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subtypes were dichotomized into two groups: single domain-MCI (sd-MCI) and multiple domain-MCI (md-MCI). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to compare the discriminatory ability of the MoCA and the MMSE. Two hundred thirty patients were recruited, of which 136 (59.1%) were diagnosed with dementia, 61 (26.5%) with MCI, and 33 (14.3%) with no cognitive impairment (NCI). The majority of MCI patients had md-MCI (n = 36, 59%). The MoCA had significantly larger AUCs than the MMSE in discriminating md-MCI from the lower risk group for incident dementia (NCI and sd-MCI) [MoCA 0.92 (95% CI, 0.86-0.98) vs. MMSE 0.84 (95% CI, 0.75-0.92), p = 0.02). At their optimal cut-off points, the MoCA (19/20) remained superior to the MMSE (23/24) in detecting md-MCI [sensitivity: 0.83 vs. 0.72; specificity: 0.86 vs. 0.83; PPV: 0.79 vs. 0.72; NPV: 0.89 vs. 0.83; correctly classified: 85.1% vs. 78.7%]. The MoCA is superior to the MMSE in the detection of patients with cognitive impairment at higher risk for incident dementia at a memory clinic setting.

  4. Development and Validation of a Self-Report Measure of Mentalizing: The Reflective Functioning Questionnaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fonagy

    Full Text Available Reflective functioning or mentalizing is the capacity to interpret both the self and others in terms of internal mental states such as feelings, wishes, goals, desires, and attitudes. This paper is part of a series of papers outlining the development and psychometric features of a new self-report measure, the Reflective Functioning Questionnaire (RFQ, designed to provide an easy to administer self-report measure of mentalizing. We describe the development and initial validation of the RFQ in three studies. Study 1 focuses on the development of the RFQ, its factor structure and construct validity in a sample of patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD and Eating Disorder (ED (n = 108 and normal controls (n = 295. Study 2 aims to replicate these findings in a fresh sample of 129 patients with personality disorder and 281 normal controls. Study 3 addresses the relationship between the RFQ, parental reflective functioning and infant attachment status as assessed with the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP in a sample of 136 community mothers and their infants. In both Study 1 and 2, confirmatory factor analyses yielded two factors assessing Certainty (RFQ_C and Uncertainty (RFQ_U about the mental states of self and others. These two factors were relatively distinct, invariant across clinical and non-clinical samples, had satisfactory internal consistency and test-retest stability, and were largely unrelated to demographic features. The scales discriminated between patients and controls, and were significantly and in theoretically predicted ways correlated with measures of empathy, mindfulness and perspective-taking, and with both self-reported and clinician-reported measures of borderline personality features and other indices of maladaptive personality functioning. Furthermore, the RFQ scales were associated with levels of parental reflective functioning, which in turn predicted infant attachment status in the SSP. Overall, this study lends

  5. Development of an online clinical trial recruitment portal for the NIHR mental health BRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    ; many said yes, they would. The manager of the BRC on reviewing the website, agreed that a final version of the website with the NIHR Mental Health BRC logo would be paid for and will form part of a new main website for the BRC in early 2016. ᅟ. Public & patient recruitment to clinical trials is viewed as one of the main barriers to the implementation of clinical trials. This difficulty is often attributed to the working culture of the NHS, rapid turnover of staff and patients and poor-gatekeeping in referring patients to suitable clinical trials. In response to the recruitment difficulties experienced by the Psychosis Studies Clinical Academic Group at the NIHR Mental Health Biomedical Research Centre, Denmark Hill, London, a member of the Office of Psychosis Studies at King's College London and a member (the author) of the King's Clinical Trials Unit, King's College London developed an initiative to create an online clinical trial recruitment portal/information hub for the NIHR Mental Health BRC. The primary purpose of this initiative being to promote patient and public awareness of and interest in participating in clinical trials.

  6. The development of a model for dealing with secondary traumatic stress in mental health workers in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean D. Iyamuremye

    2015-10-01

    Aim: To develop a comprehensive model to manage the effects of STS in mental health workers operating in Rwanda. Method: An action research project was initiated to develop this model and data for the model was collected through individual interviews with mental health workers (nurses, doctors, psychologists, trauma counsellors and social workers as well as a quantitative tool measuring secondary traumatic stress (Trauma Attachment Belief Scale in these health workers. Results: The Intervention Model to Manage Secondary Traumatic Stress (IMMSTS was synthesised from these findings and includes preventive, evaluative and curative strategies to manage STS in mental health workers in Rwanda at the individual, social and organisational levels. Conclusion: The model will offer mental health professionals an effective framework for addressing the issue of STS.

  7. Handbook of Research on Creative Problem-Solving Skill Development in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -solving. This has prompted institutions of higher education to implement new pedagogical methods such as problem-based and case-based education. The Handbook of Research on Creative Problem-Solving Skill Development in Higher Education is an essential, comprehensive collection of the newest research in higher...... education, creativity, problem solving, and pedagogical design. It provides the framework for further research opportunities in these dynamic, necessary fields. Featuring work regarding problem-oriented curriculum and its applications and challenges, this book is essential for policy makers, teachers......Developing students’ creative problem-solving skills is paramount to today’s teachers, due to the exponentially growing demand for cognitive plasticity and critical thinking in the workforce. In today’s knowledge economy, workers must be able to participate in creative dialogue and complex problem...

  8. A review of studies of the effect of severe malnutrition on mental development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham-McGregor, S

    1995-08-01

    This is a review of studies on the relationship between mental development and severe malnutrition. School-age children who suffered from early childhood malnutrition have generally been found to have poorer IQ levels, cognitive function, school achievement and greater behavioral problems than matched controls and, to a lesser extent, siblings. The disadvantages last at least until adolescence. There is no consistent evidence of a specific cognitive deficit. The evidence of a causal relationship is strong but not unequivocal because of difficulties in interpreting retrospective case control studies. Marked improvements in development can occur after adoption or intervention. Therefore, the outcome depends to a large extent on the quality of the subsequent environment. It is likely that extremely deprived environments would exacerbate the effects. There is limited evidence that other nutritional deficiencies may interact with previous malnutrition in affecting cognition. The mechanism linking malnutrition to poor development is still not established.

  9. Development of a Positive Youth Development Program: Promoting the Mental Health of Stressful Adolescents Using Principles of Problem Solving Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T.L. Shek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the proposal for the development, implementation, and evaluation of a positive youth development program that attempts to promote the mental health of stressful Chinese adolescents using principles of Problem Solving Therapy (PST. There are two general aims of PST: to help clients identify life difficulties and resolve them, as well as to teach them skills on how to deal with future problems. The proposed project will utilize the principles of PST as the guiding framework to run two mental health promotion courses for adolescents who are experiencing disturbing stressful responses and students who want to improve their stress management style. Both objective and subjective outcome evaluation strategies will be carried out to assess the effectiveness of the intervention to promote the psychological well-being in adolescents who are experiencing stress. A related sample proposal is described that can give social workers some insight on how to prepare a proposal for developing the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programs.

  10. Communique Declaration: The New Dynamics of Higher Education and Research for Societal Change and Development (2nd UNESCO Higher Education Assembly July, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult Learning, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the communique declaration on the new dynamics of higher education and research for societal change and development. This declaration begins with a preamble and focuses on (1) social responsibility of higher education; (2) access, equity and quality; (3) internationalisation, regionalisation and globalisation; (4) learning…

  11. Perceptions of Career Development Learning and Work-Integrated Learning in Australian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlveen, Peter; Brooks, Sally; Lichtenberg, Anna; Smith, Martin; Torjul, Peter; Tyler, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report on the perceived correspondence between career development learning and work-integrated learning programs that were delivered by career services in Australian higher education institutions. The study entailed a questionnaire survey of representatives of university career services. The questionnaire dealt with the extent to…

  12. Developing Learning Model Based on Local Culture and Instrument for Mathematical Higher Order Thinking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, Sahat; Napitupulu, E. Elvis; Fauzi, Amin

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to develop a student-centered learning model based on local culture and instrument of mathematical higher order thinking of junior high school students in the frame of the 2013-Curriculum in North Sumatra, Indonesia. The subjects of the research are seventh graders which are taken proportionally random consisted of three public…

  13. Coaching Academia: The Integration of Coaching, Educational Development, and the Culture of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Laura; Rosemond, LaNise

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a review of the literature on coaching in higher education and how the practice connects with the past, present, and future of the field of educational development. As the field shifts its focus from individual faculty to organizational change, the authors highlight the potential of coaching to play an integrative role in…

  14. What Determines Enterprises' Perceptions of Future Development in Higher Education--Strange Bedfellows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deželan, Tomaž; Laker, Jason; Pavlin, Samo

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, global changes such as an ever more integrated world economy, new technologies or the emergence of an international knowledge network have increasingly determined developments in European higher education. Policymakers have addressed these challenges using processes that support the practical orientation of higher…

  15. Seeking Learning Outcomes Appropriate for "Education for Sustainable Development" and for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Kerry; Harraway, John; Lovelock, Brent; Mirosa, Miranda; Skeaff, Sheila; Slooten, Liz; Strack, Mick; Furnari, Mary; Jowett, Tim; Deaker, Lynley

    2015-01-01

    This article shares and extends research-based developments at the University of Otago, New Zealand, that seek to explore how students' worldviews change as they experience higher education with us. We emphasise that sustainability attributes may be described in terms of knowledge, skills and competencies but that these are underpinned by…

  16. Development and Validation of the Blended Learning Environment Instrument (BLEI) in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljahni, Areej; Al-Begain, Khalid; Skinner, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Part of ongoing research into the efficacy of blended learning in higher education within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The need for, and development of, a Blended Learning Environment Instrument (BLEI) are explained. This new instrument assesses student perceptions across five core aspects of blended learning environments: Infrastructure,…

  17. Analyzing Networked Learning Practices in HigherEducation and Continuing Professional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    Deliverable 28.5.4 reports on the preparation of the book "Analysing Networked Learning Practices in Higher Education and Continuing Professional Development", which consists of an Introduction, case studies and a concluding section, which presents the theoretical work and empirical work conducte...

  18. Revolutions and Second-Best Solutions: Education for Sustainable Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Debby; Bailey, Ian; Warren, Martyn; Bissell, Susie

    2009-01-01

    Despite widespread policy support for education for sustainable development in higher education, and a strong academic literature arguing for a radical rethink of curriculum, pedagogy and institutional culture, progress towards the educational reforms advocated remains limited. Based on in-depth interviews with lecturers at a case-study…

  19. Development of Private Higher Education in Macau: Exploring the Relationship between Government and Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cheng Man Diana; Yuen, Pong Kau

    2010-01-01

    The development of private higher education in Macau has experienced rapid growth in the past two decades. The purpose of this paper is to understand this trend by investigating the facts and figures supplied by official sources and to analyze the role between the Government and the private sector. This paper shows that the attitude of the Macau…

  20. Leadership Development through Mentoring in Higher Education: A Collaborative Autoethnography of Leaders of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Heewon; Longman, Karen A.; Franco, Marla A.

    2014-01-01

    In this collaborative autoethnography, we explored how 14 academic and administrative leaders of color working in faith-based higher education have experienced personal and professional mentoring, and how mentoring experiences have influenced their leadership development. All participants identified a wide array of developmental relationships that…

  1. Faculty Development for Advancing Community Engagement in Higher Education: Current Trends and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Marshall; Plaxton-Moore, Star

    2017-01-01

    This research involved the conduct of a conceptual review of 28 refereed journal articles and a survey of campus centers for community engagement staff to identify salient features and trends of existing faculty development programming designed to advance service-learning and community engagement in higher education. Results of this investigation…

  2. Cross-Border Higher Education in China: How the Field of Research Has Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yunyun; Te, Alice Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate how the field of cross-border Chinese higher education has developed from 1990 to 2015. Ninety-five articles in international journals and 470 articles in national journals were collected and analyzed in terms of authorship pattern, thematic clusters, and research methods. Results show that cross-border…

  3. Enlightenment of Development of Higher Education in South Korea to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2012-01-01

    China and South Korea are two neighboring countries and are both developing countries. Furthermore, the modern and contemporary higher education of these two countries originates from the middle and late 19th Century, so there are a lot of similarities between the two countries. However, although the origination period of modern and contemporary…

  4. Evaluation and Development of Administrators. AAHE-ERIC/Higher Education Research Report No. 6, 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordvall, Robert C.

    Needs and methods for the evaluation and development of higher education administrators are reviewed in this monograph. Three major reasons for evaluation are cited: external and internal pressure, improvement of performance of individual administrators, and improvement of performance of the institution. Different approaches to evaluation are…

  5. Perceptions and Uses of Digital Badges for Professional Learning Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyjur, Patti; Lindstrom, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Few instructors in higher education have completed a formal teaching program and, therefore, rely on informal professional development opportunities to enhance their teaching practice. Micro-credentialing in the form of digital badges is one way in which instructors can document their non-credit learning and accomplishments. This mixed methods…

  6. The Higher Education Crisis in Developing Countries: Issues, Problems, Constraints and Reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Jamil

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the higher education crisis in developing countries in terms of the ways in which problems are analyzed and decisions are made. Focuses on discrepancies between objectives and achievements. Highlights the importance of risk analysis in strategic planning, advocating an impact assessment approach. (DMM)

  7. Professional Development for Sessional Staff in Higher Education: A Review of Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Danielle; Mahoney, Paige; Macfarlane, Susie

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an integrated review of evidence published in the past decade around professional development for sessional staff in higher education. Using the Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method, the review analysed recent evidence using the three principles of the Benchmarking Leadership and Advancement of…

  8. The Engagement of Higher Educational Institutions in Regional Development: An Overview of the Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, John; Puukka, Jaana

    2008-01-01

    Across the OECD, countries, regions and higher education institutions (HEIs) are discovering each other. More and more partnerships are being established based on a growing appreciation of shared interests. This paper explores the drivers behind such engagement, from both HEI and regional development perspectives, the barriers to effective working…

  9. DREAMer-Ally Competency and Self-Efficacy: Developing Higher Education Staff and Measuring Lasting Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Jesus; Cadenas, German

    2017-01-01

    DREAMzone is an educational intervention designed to increase higher education professionals' competency and self-efficacy for working with undocumented students. Grounded in social learning theory, we developed the DREAMer-ally instrument to investigate the effects of DREAMzone on DREAMer-ally competency and self-efficacy. Findings support the…

  10. Developing of Indicators of an E-Learning Benchmarking Model for Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Khow, Jirasak

    2014-01-01

    This study was the development of e-learning indicators used as an e-learning benchmarking model for higher education institutes. Specifically, it aimed to: 1) synthesize the e-learning indicators; 2) examine content validity by specialists; and 3) explore appropriateness of the e-learning indicators. Review of related literature included…

  11. Engineers' Spatial Orientation Ability Development at the European Space for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, C. Carbonell; Perez, J. L. Saorin; Cantero, J. de la Torre; Gonzalez, A. M. Marrero

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine whether the new geographic information technologies, included as teaching objectives in the new European Space for Higher Education Engineering degrees, develop spatial abilities. Bearing this in mind, a first year seminar using the INSPIRE Geoportal (Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe) was…

  12. Outsourcing Academic Development in Higher Education: Staff Perceptions of an International Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kerry; Hughes, Kate; Stephens, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, higher education support services are being outsourced. Our case study was of a program from a global, USA-based, non-profit organisation. From in-depth interviews, we investigated staff perceptions of academic development workshops and the efficacy of outsourcing to a transnational tertiary-support program. We found that…

  13. Training for Planning and Management: Improved Management Systems in Higher Education in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Kevin M.

    The management crisis within higher education in developing countries reflects the wider crisis in educational management and public administration. The contemporary management context is further threatened by narrowing management capacity and capability due to the continued dwindling of already scarce resources and the increasing across-the-board…

  14. Emblems of Quality in Higher Education. Developing and Sustaining High-Quality Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Jennifer Grant; Conrad, Clifton F.

    This book proposes an "engagement" theory of program quality to evaluate and improve higher education programs at all degree levels. Based on interviews with 781 participants in a national study of Masters degree programs, it focuses on the interactive roles of students, faculty, and administrators in developing high-quality programs…

  15. Rapid Mental Сomputation System as a Tool for Algorithmic Thinking of Elementary School Students Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushan Ziatdinov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the possibilities of using a rapid mental computation system in elementary education. The system consists of a number of readily memorized operations that allow one to perform arithmetic computations very quickly. These operations are actually simple algorithms which can develop or improve the algorithmic thinking of pupils. Using a rapid mental computation system allows forming the basis for the study of computer science in secondary school.

  16. Online group course for parents with mental illness: development and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Rianne A P; Speetjens, Paula A M; Arntz, Karlijn S E; Onrust, Simone A

    2010-12-19

    Children of parents with mental illness (COPMI) are at greater risk of developing mental disorders themselves. Since impaired parenting skills appear to be a crucial factor, we developed a facilitated 8-session preventative group course called KopOpOuders (Chin Up, Parents) delivered via the Internet to Dutch parents with psychiatric problems. The goal was to promote children's well-being by strengthening children's protective factors via their parents. To reach parents at an early stage of their parenting difficulties, the course is easily accessible online. The course is delivered in a secure chat room, and participation is anonymous. This paper reports on (1) the design and method of this online the group course and (2) the results of a pilot study that assessed parenting skills, parental sense of competence, child well-being, and course satisfaction. The pilot study had a pre/post design. Parenting skills were assessed using Laxness and Overreactivity subscales of the Parenting Scale (PS). Sense of parenting competence was measured with the Ouderlijke Opvattingen over Opvoeding (OOO) questionnaire, a Dutch scale assessing parental perceptions of parenting using the Feelings of Incompetence and Feelings of Competence subscales. Child well-being was assessed with the total problem score, Emotional Problems, and Hyperactivity subscales of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Paired samples t tests were performed, and Cohen's d was used to determine effect sizes. Intention-to-treat analyses and analyses of completers only were both performed. Course satisfaction was evaluated using custom-designed questionnaires. The sample comprised 48 parents with mental illness. The response rate was 100% (48/48) at pretest and 58% (28/48) at posttest. Significant improvements were found on PS Laxness and Overreactivity subscales (P children were not in the clinical range at both pretest and posttest. The mean course satisfaction score was 7.8 on a 10-point scale

  17. Development and evaluation of an Individualized Outcome Measure (IOM) for randomized controlled trials in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, Francesca; Williams, Julie; Bird, Victoria; Freidl, Marion; Le Boutillier, Clair; Leamy, Mary; Macpherson, Rob; Slade, Mike

    2015-12-01

    Pre-defined, researcher-selected outcomes are routinely used as the clinical end-point in randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, individualized approaches may be an effective way to assess outcome in mental health research. The present study describes the development and evaluation of the Individualized Outcome Measure (IOM), which is a patient-specific outcome measure to be used for RCTs of complex interventions. IOM was developed using a narrative review, expert consultation and piloting with mental health service users (n = 20). The final version of IOM comprises two components: Goal Attainment (GA) and Personalized Primary Outcome (PPO). For GA, patients identify one relevant goal at baseline and rate its attainment at follow-up. For PPO, patients choose an outcome domain related to their goal from a pre-defined list at baseline, and complete a standardized questionnaire assessing the chosen outcome domain at baseline and follow-up. A feasibility study indicated that IOM had adequate completion (89%) and acceptability (96%) rates in a clinical sample (n = 84). IOM was then evaluated in a RCT (ISRCTN02507940). GA and PPO components were associated with each other and with the trial primary outcome. The use of the PPO component of IOM as the primary outcome could be considered in future RCTs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Influence of Students’ Mental and Physical Performance on Development of Technical and Tactical Skills in Fencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І. В. Кривенцова

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: to reveal the relations between the indicators of physical and mental performance and the development of technical and tactical skills in fencers, to determine the significant criteria and tests for selecting students for health-improving and sports fencing groups. Methods: study and analysis of literature; pedagogical observations; physiological methods (physical performance by the Harvard step test with HSTI (Harvard step test Index calculation, mental performance by the correction tables, special exercises to assess fencers’ technical and tactical skills; statistical methods. The reference group students (9 female fencers had five workouts a week, the students (13 female students of test group 1 (TG1 had 2 hours of physical training per week, the TG2 and TG3  (8 and 10 female students respectively had 4 hours of fencing workouts per week. The TG2 had 4 months of fencing experience, and TG3 had one year and 4 months thereof. Results. The reciprocal effects of the performance indicators and the correlation between the indicators of technical and tactical skills of the student fencers allowed to establish the informative value of individual indicators for quality selection of students for the fencing group. The Harvard step test index and the standardized number of errors of the correction test can serve as the prognostic criteria for developing technical and tactical skills in student fencing.

  19. [Development of child mental health services in Lithuania: achievements and obstacles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pūras, Dainius

    2002-01-01

    In 1990, political, economic and social changes in Lithuania introduced the possibility to develop for the first time in nations's history an effective and modern system of child mental health services. During the period between 1990 and 1995 a new model of services was developed in the Department of Social pediatrics and child psychiatry of Vilnius University. The model included development of child and adolescent psychiatric services, as well as early intervention services for infants and preschool children with developmental disabilities. The emphasis, following recommendations of WHO and existing international standards, was made on deinstitutionalization and development of family-oriented and community-based services, which have been ignored by previous system. In the first half of 90's of 20th century, new training programs for professionals were introduced, more than 50 methods of assessment, treatment and rehabilitation, new for Lithuanian clinical practice, were implemented, and a new model of services, including primary, secondary and tertiary level of prevention, was introduced in demonstration sites. However, during next phase of development, in 1997-2001, serious obstacles for replicating new approaches across the country, have been identified, which threatened successful implementation of the new model of services into everyday clinical practice. Analysis of obstacles, which are blocking development of new approaches in the field of child mental health, is presented in the article. The main obstacles, identified during analysis of socioeconomic context, planning and utilization of resources, running of the system of services and evaluation of outcomes, are as follows: lack of intersectorial cooperation between health, education and social welfare systems; strong tradition of discrimination of psychosocial interventions in funding schemes of health services; societal attitudes, which tend to discriminate and stigmatize marginal groups, including

  20. Human rights principles in developing and updating policies and laws on mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze, M.

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization's Mental Health Action Plan 2013?2020 stipulates human rights as a cross-cutting principle (WHO, 2013) and foresees global targets to update policies as well as mental health laws in line with international and regional human rights instruments. The international human rights agreements repeatedly refer to health, including mental health. The most pertinent provisions related to mental health are enshrined in the 2006 Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disa...

  1. Vitamin B12 and folate during pregnancy and offspring motor, mental and social development at 2 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, V K; Joshi, S M; Ladkat, R S; Deshmukh, U S; Lubree, H G; Katre, P A; Bhat, D S; Rush, E C; Yajnik, C S

    2012-04-01

    Insufficiency of vitamin B12 (B12) and folate during pregnancy can result in low concentrations in the fetus and have adverse effects on brain development. We investigated the relationship between maternal B12 and folate nutrition during pregnancy and offspring motor, mental and social development at two years of age (2 y). Mothers (n = 123) and their offspring (62 girls, 61 boys) from rural and middle-class urban communities in and around Pune city were followed through pregnancy up to 2 y. Maternal B12 and folate concentrations were measured at 28 and 34 weeks of gestation. At 2 y, the Developmental Assessment Scale for Indian Infants was used to determine motor and mental developmental quotients and the Vineland Social Maturity Scale for the social developmental quotient. Overall, 62% of the mothers had low B12 levels (development was associated with maternal folate at 28 and 34 weeks of gestation. Mental and social development quotients were associated positively with head circumference and negatively with birth weight. In addition, pregnancy B12 and folate were positively associated with mental and social development quotients. Maternal B12 and folate during intrauterine life may favorably influence brain development and function. Pregnancy provides a window of opportunity to enhance fetal psychomotor (motor and mental) development.

  2. Development of Geriatric Mental Health Learning Objectives for Medical Students: A Response to the Institute of Medicine 2012 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Susan W; Brooks, William B; Popeo, Dennis; Wilkins, Kirsten M; Blazek, Mary C

    2017-10-01

    America is aging as the population of older adults increases. The shortage of geriatric mental health specialists means that most geriatric mental healthcare will be provided by physicians who do not have specialty training in geriatrics. The Institute of Medicine Report of 2012 highlighted the urgent need for development of national competencies and curricula in geriatric mental health for all clinicians. Virtually all physicians can expect to treat older patients with mental health symptoms, yet currently there are no widely accepted learning objectives in geriatric mental health specific for medical students. The authors describe the development of a set of such learning objectives that all medical students should achieve by graduation. The iterative process included initial drafting by content experts from five medical schools with input and feedback from a wider group of geriatric psychiatrists, geriatricians, internists, and medical educators. The final document builds upon previously published work and includes specific knowledge, attitudes and skills in six key domains: Normal Aging, Mental Health Assessment of the Geriatric Patient, Psychopharmacology, Delirium, Depression, and Dementia. These objectives address a pressing need, providing a framework for national standards and curriculum development. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Talking about Mental Illness: A Guide for Developing an Awareness Program for Youth. Community Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This guide contains all of the information, support and tools that community members need to implement "Talking About Mental Illness" in their community--an awareness program proven to be effective in bringing about positive change in young people's knowledge about mental illness, and in reducing stigma that surrounds mental illness. The…

  4. A Sports-Based Youth Development Program, Teen Mental Health, and Physical Fitness: An RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Frederick Ka Wing; Louie, Lobo Hung Tak; Wong, Wilfred Hing-Sang; Chan, Ko Ling; Tiwari, Agnes; Chow, Chun Bong; Ho, Walter; Wong, William; Chan, Meanne; Chen, Eric Yu Hai; Cheung, Yiu Fai; Ip, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a positive youth development (PYD)-based sports mentorship program on the physical and mental well-being of adolescents recruited in a community setting. This is a randomized controlled trial in which we recruited students from 12 secondary schools in Hong Kong, China. Participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to an intervention or a control arm after stratification for school from October 2013 to June 2014. Participants were not blinded to allocation because of the nature of the intervention. Students in the intervention arm received an after-school, PYD-based sports mentorship for 18 weeks. Each weekly session lasted 90 minutes. Students in the control arm received exclusive access to a health education Web site. Six hundred and sixty-four students (mean age 12.3 years [SD 0.76]; 386 girls [58.1%]) completed baseline and postintervention assessments. The intervention improved students' mental well-being (Cohen's d , 0.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10 to 0.40; P = .001), self-efficacy (Cohen's d , 0.22; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.37; P = .01), resilience (Cohen's d , 0.19; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.34; P = .02), physical fitness (flexibility [Cohen's d , 0.28; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.43; P = .02], lower limb muscle strength [Cohen's d , 0.18; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.33; P = .03], and dynamic balance [Cohen's d , 0.21; 95% CI, 0.06 to 0.37; P = .01]), and physical activity levels (Cohen's d , 0.39; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.55; P sports mentorship intervention improved healthy adolescents' mental well-being, psychological assets, physical fitness, and physical activity levels. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Differential roles of childhood adversities and stressful war experiences in the development of mental health symptoms in post-war adolescents in northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okello, James; De Schryver, Maarten; Musisi, Seggane; Broekaert, Eric; Derluyn, Ilse

    2014-09-09

    Previous studies have shown a relationship between stressful war experiences and mental health symptoms in children and adolescents. To date, no comprehensive studies on the role of childhood adversities have been conducted with war-exposed adolescents living in post-war, low-resource settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. A cross-sectional study of 551 school-going adolescents aged 13-21 years old was undertaken four years post-war in northern Uganda. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires assessing demographics, stressful war experiences, childhood adversities, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety symptoms. Our analyses revealed a main effect of gender on all mental health outcomes except avoidance symptoms, with girls reporting higher scores than boys. Stressful war experiences were associated with all mental health symptoms, after adjusting for potential confounders. Childhood adversity was independently associated with depression symptoms but not PTSD, anxiety, and PTSD cluster symptoms. However, in situations of high childhood adversity, our analyses showed that stressful war experiences were less associated with vulnerability to avoidance symptoms than in situations of low childhood adversity. Both stressful war experiences and childhood adversities are risk factors for mental health symptoms among war-affected adolescents. Adolescents with histories of high childhood adversities may be less likely to develop avoidance symptoms in situations of high stressful war experiences. Further exploration of the differential roles of childhood adversities and stressful war experiences is needed.

  6. Modern trends in economic regulation of the innovative development of the higher education system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аleksandr LEVCHENKO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The consensus in the high school is valued by how much we invest in human capital which is determinant of efficiency. High school is a pillar contributor to productivity growth. There is evidence that innovation is a key player in nurturing technology chan¬ge. In today’s knowledge based economy, it becomes more evident that investing in human capital has greater return for university and corporation which is more effec¬tive than that of physical assets. Simultaneously, the conceptual fundamental of hu¬man capital is based on knowledge, skills, competencies, and tools that are developed through coaching and learning activities provided by the concerned institution. This paper intend to tackle and to develop separate positions of the theory and practice of financing the innovative development of higher education (IDHE toward the formati¬on and development of the national economy of knowledge. Furthermore, it examines the retention of the increased globalization of higher education, while state financial obligation is in decrease, which leads to greater distinction among universities in res¬pect of financial support and security. Financial support should be a priority to support the innovative development of higher education.

  7. New Ways of Working in UK mental health services: developing distributed responsibility in community mental health teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Stephen; Harrison, Deborah; Pearson, Pauline; Dickinson, Claire; Lombardo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the introduction and operation of a number of support roles in mental health services. This is done in the context of concerns about the effectiveness of CMHTs. Three questions are addressed: the degree to which concern for the work of consultant psychiatrists informed the introduction of the new roles; what the reforms implied for the work of the psychiatrist and those in new roles; and the impact of any changes on the operation of CMHTs. Data were collected as part of a national-level evaluation. The main means of collection was the semi-structured interview. The study shows: that reform was underpinned by concerns about the workload of psychiatrists; and that while in principle the responsibilities of the psychiatrist were to be distributed across other team members, those in new roles felt themselves to be isolated. Despite the intentions of policy, the creation of the new roles did little to extend the idea of distributed responsibility in CMHTs.

  8. Development and validation of a prediction algorithm for the onset of common mental disorders in a working population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ana; Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Choi, Isabella; Calvo, Rafael; Harvey, Samuel B; Glozier, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Common mental disorders are the most common reason for long-term sickness absence in most developed countries. Prediction algorithms for the onset of common mental disorders may help target indicated work-based prevention interventions. We aimed to develop and validate a risk algorithm to predict the onset of common mental disorders at 12 months in a working population. We conducted a secondary analysis of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey, a longitudinal, nationally representative household panel in Australia. Data from the 6189 working participants who did not meet the criteria for a common mental disorders at baseline were non-randomly split into training and validation databases, based on state of residence. Common mental disorders were assessed with the mental component score of 36-Item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire (score ⩽45). Risk algorithms were constructed following recommendations made by the Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Prevention Or Diagnosis statement. Different risk factors were identified among women and men for the final risk algorithms. In the training data, the model for women had a C-index of 0.73 and effect size (Hedges' g) of 0.91. In men, the C-index was 0.76 and the effect size was 1.06. In the validation data, the C-index was 0.66 for women and 0.73 for men, with positive predictive values of 0.28 and 0.26, respectively Conclusion: It is possible to develop an algorithm with good discrimination for the onset identifying overall and modifiable risks of common mental disorders among working men. Such models have the potential to change the way that prevention of common mental disorders at the workplace is conducted, but different models may be required for women.

  9. Using an intervention mapping framework to develop an online mental health continuing education program for pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Amanda; Fowler, Jane; Hattingh, Laetitia

    2013-01-01

    Current mental health policy in Australia recognizes that ongoing mental health workforce development is crucial to mental health care reform. Community pharmacy staff are well placed to assist people with mental illness living in the community; however, staff require the knowledge and skills to do this competently and effectively. This article presents the systematic planning and development process and content of an education and training program for community pharmacy staff, using a program planning approach called intervention mapping. The intervention mapping framework was used to guide development of an online continuing education program. Interviews with mental health consumers and carers (n = 285) and key stakeholders (n = 15), and a survey of pharmacy staff (n = 504) informed the needs assessment. Program objectives were identified specifying required attitudes, knowledge, skills, and confidence. These objectives were aligned with an education technique and delivery strategy. This was followed by development of an education program and comprehensive evaluation plan. The program was piloted face to face with 24 participants and then translated into an online program comprising eight 30-minute modules for pharmacists, 4 of which were also used for support staff. The evaluation plan provided for online participants (n ≅ 500) to be randomized into intervention (immediate access) or control groups (delayed training access). It included pre- and posttraining questionnaires and a reflective learning questionnaire for pharmacy staff and telephone interviews post pharmacy visit for consumers and carers. An online education program was developed to address mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and skills required by pharmacy staff to work effectively with mental health consumers and carers. Intervention mapping provides a systematic and rigorous approach that can be used to develop a quality continuing education program for the health workforce

  10. Does higher economic and financial development lead to environmental degradation: Evidence from BRIC countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamazian, Artur [Department of Financial Economics and Accounting, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: artur.tamazian@usc.es; Chousa, Juan Pineiro [Department of Financial Economics and Accounting, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: efjpch@usc.es; Vadlamannati, Krishna Chaitanya [Department of Financial Economics and Accounting, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: kc_dcm@yahoo.co.in

    2009-01-15

    A vast number of studies addressed the environmental degradation and economic development but not financial development. Moreover, as argued by Stern [2004. The rise and fall of the environmental Kuznets curve. World Development 32, 1419-1439] they present important econometric weaknesses. Using standard reduced-form modeling approach and controlling for country-specific unobserved heterogeneity, we investigate the linkage between not only economic development and environmental quality but also the financial development. Panel data over period 1992-2004 is used. We find that both economic and financial development are determinants of the environmental quality in BRIC economies. We show that higher degree of economic and financial development decreases the environmental degradation. Our analysis suggests that financial liberalization and openness are essential factors for the CO{sub 2} reduction. The adoption of policies directed to financial openness and liberalization to attract higher levels of R and D-related foreign direct investment might reduce the environmental degradation in countries under consideration. In addition, the robustness check trough the inclusion of US and Japan does not alter our main findings.

  11. Does higher economic and financial development lead to environmental degradation. Evidence from BRIC countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamazian, Artur; Chousa, Juan Pineiro; Vadlamannati, Krishna Chaitanya [Department of Financial Economics and Accounting, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    A vast number of studies addressed the environmental degradation and economic development but not financial development. Moreover, as argued by Stern [2004. The rise and fall of the environmental Kuznets curve. World Development 32, 1419-1439] they present important econometric weaknesses. Using standard reduced-form modeling approach and controlling for country-specific unobserved heterogeneity, we investigate the linkage between not only economic development and environmental quality but also the financial development. Panel data over period 1992-2004 is used. We find that both economic and financial development are determinants of the environmental quality in BRIC economies. We show that higher degree of economic and financial development decreases the environmental degradation. Our analysis suggests that financial liberalization and openness are essential factors for the CO{sub 2} reduction. The adoption of policies directed to financial openness and liberalization to attract higher levels of R and D-related foreign direct investment might reduce the environmental degradation in countries under consideration. In addition, the robustness check trough the inclusion of US and Japan does not alter our main findings. (author)

  12. Does higher economic and financial development lead to environmental degradation. Evidence from BRIC countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamazian, Artur; Chousa, Juan Pineiro; Vadlamannati, Krishna Chaitanya

    2009-01-01

    A vast number of studies addressed the environmental degradation and economic development but not financial development. Moreover, as argued by Stern [2004. The rise and fall of the environmental Kuznets curve. World Development 32, 1419-1439] they present important econometric weaknesses. Using standard reduced-form modeling approach and controlling for country-specific unobserved heterogeneity, we investigate the linkage between not only economic development and environmental quality but also the financial development. Panel data over period 1992-2004 is used. We find that both economic and financial development are determinants of the environmental quality in BRIC economies. We show that higher degree of economic and financial development decreases the environmental degradation. Our analysis suggests that financial liberalization and openness are essential factors for the CO 2 reduction. The adoption of policies directed to financial openness and liberalization to attract higher levels of R and D-related foreign direct investment might reduce the environmental degradation in countries under consideration. In addition, the robustness check trough the inclusion of US and Japan does not alter our main findings. (author)

  13. The Development of the Mental Representations of the Magnitude of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Florence C.; Szucs, Denes; Content, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the development of the mental representation of the magnitude of fractions during the initial stages of fraction learning in grade 5, 6 and 7 children as well as in adults. We examined the activation of global fraction magnitude in a numerical comparison task and a matching task. There were global distance effects in the comparison task, but not in the matching task. This suggests that the activation of the global magnitude representation of fractions is not automatic in all tasks involving magnitude judgments. The slope of the global distance effect increased during early fraction learning and declined by adulthood, demonstrating that the development of the fraction global distance effect differs from that of the integer distance effect. PMID:24236169

  14. Development and initial evaluation of blended cognitive behavioural treatment for major depression in routine specialized mental health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, L. C.; Ruwaard, J.; Wiersma, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    the costs of mental health care, by reducing treatment duration and/or therapist contact. However, knowledge on blended care for depression is still limited. Objectives: To develop a blended cognitive behavioural treatment (bCBT) for depressed patients in an outpatient specialized mental health care centre...... with depressed patients (n = 9) in specialized mental health care. Patients' clinical profiles were established based on pre-treatment diagnostic information and patient self-reports on clinical measures. Patient treatment adherence rates were explored, together with patient ratings of credibility and expectancy...... the potential to be a valuable treatment option for patients with severe depression in specialized mental health care settings. Further exploration of the effectiveness of our bCBT protocol by means of a randomized controlled trial is warranted. © 2016 The Authors....

  15. Opening up mental health service delivery to cultural diversity: current situation, development and examples from three northern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäärnhielm, Sofie; Jávo, Cecilie; Mösko, Mike-Oliver

    2013-01-01

    There are inequalities in health among migrants and local populations in Europe. Due to migration, Germany, Norway and Sweden have become ethnic culturally diverse nations. There are barriers to mental health care access for refugees, migrants and minorities, and problems with quality of culturally sensitive care in the three countries. This is despite tax-funded health care systems based on equity in service provision. There is a need to develop culturally sensitive mental health services that respond to the increasing diversity of the populations. In this chapter, we will take a closer look at cultural diversity in the countries in question, discuss challenges and give examples of current work to open up mental health services to cultural diversity. The German example will focus on the movement of Interkulturelle Öffnung (cross-cultural opening of the health care system) and work on creating national guidelines and quality standards. From Norway, the work of the National Centre for Mental Health for the indigenous Sámi population will be presented. The Swedish example will focus on the work carried out by the Transcultural Centre. The latter is a competence centre supporting development of culturally sensitive care as an integrated part of the regional health and mental health care system in Stockholm. Finally, the relevance of mental health care for a culturally diverse population, as a part of the larger social project of building tolerant multicultural societies, will be discussed. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Integrating Quality Improvement and Continuing Professional Development: A Model From the Mental Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Tehrani, Hedieh; Lin, Elizabeth; Lieff, Susan; Harris, Ilene; Soklaridis, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    To explore the perspectives of leaders in psychiatry and continuing professional development (CPD) regarding the relationship, opportunities, and challenges in integrating quality improvement (QI) and CPD. In 2013-2014, the authors interviewed 18 participants in Canada: 10 psychiatrists-in-chief, 6 CPD leaders in psychiatry, and 2 individuals with experience integrating these domains in psychiatry who were identified through snowball sampling. Questions were designed to identify participants' perspectives about the definition, relationship, and integration of QI and CPD in psychiatry. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. An iterative, inductive method was used to thematically analyze the transcripts. To ensure the rigor of the analysis, the authors performed member checking and sampling until theoretical saturation was achieved. Participants defined QI as a concept measured at the individual, hospital, and health care system levels and CPD as a concept measured predominantly at the individual and hospital levels. Four themes related to the relationship between QI and CPD were identified: challenges with QI training, adoption of QI into the mental health care system, implementation of QI in CPD, and practice improvement outcomes. Despite participants describing QI and CPD as mutually beneficial, they expressed uncertainty about the appropriateness of aligning these domains within a mental health care context because of the identified challenges. This study identified challenges with aligning QI and CPD in psychiatry and yielded a framework to inform future integration efforts. Further research is needed to determine the generalizability of this framework to other specialties and health care professions.

  17. MENTAL AND PSYCHOMOTOR RETARDATION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD: Overview and development of a protocol for neuropsychological assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Sánchez-Joya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The last decades have brought great advances in the understanding of child neurodevelopment and knowledge of cognitive processes that occur in the brain from an early age. As a result and thanks to the large number of standardized and scientifically guaranteed neuropsychological tests that are available today, we can assess and diagnose with high specificity, deficits or delays in the acquisition of cognitive functions. Besides, it allows knowing the strengths or normality points of children with various pathologies. Objective: To present the concepts and a neuropsychological assessment protocol for mental retardation, pervasive developmental disorder and psychomotor retardation. Development: First, the authors present a general model of neuropsychological assessment in childhood. Second, he concept, classification and aetiology of mental retardation is revised and it is proposed a neuropsychological profile. Finally, the paradigms of pervasive developmental disorder and psychomotor retardation are shown. Conclusion: Based on standardized and validated test for child neuropsychological assessment, children cognitive disorders can be accurately identified to plan each child's cognitive stimulation, and thus optimize the results of the therapy.

  18. Innovation, development, and financing of institutions of Higher Education in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Roberto Dal Poz

    Full Text Available Abstract: The article analyzes the configuration and trends in institutions of Higher Education and their relationship as components of the Health Economic-Industrial Complex (HEIC. The expansion of higher education is part of the transition from elite to mass systems, with tensions between quantitative and qualitative aspects. Such changes reflect different cultures and are related to international phenomena such as globalization, economic transformations, the development of new information and communication technologies, and the emergence of an international knowledge network. The scale and content of these changes vary according to the expansion and institutional reconfiguration of educational systems, as well as the link between state and society. Market expansion for private higher education stirs competition, shapes business clusters, modifies training processes, and raises new public policy challenges.

  19. Development of a Higher Order Laminate Theory for Modeling Composites with Induced Strain Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1996-01-01

    A refined higher order plate theory is developed to investigate the actuation mechanism of piezoelectric materials surface bonded or embedded in composite laminates. The current analysis uses a displacement field which accurately accounts for transverse shear stresses. Some higher order terms are identified by using the conditions that shear stresses vanish at all free surfaces. Therefore, all boundary conditions for displacements and stresses are satisfied in the present theory. The analysis is implemented using the finite element method which provides a convenient means to construct a numerical solution due to the discrete nature of the actuators. The higher order theory is computationally less expensive than a full three dimensional analysis. The theory is also shown to agree well with published experimental results. Numerical examples are presented for composite plates with thicknesses ranging from thin to very thick.

  20. Tourism and Cultural Heritage: Higher Education and Entrepreneurship Development in Transition Phase. The Tunisian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faysal Mansouri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This is to lay down an approach to develop tourism and cultural heritage through higher education and entrepreneurship development for economies in transition: The case of Tunisia. There is a need to provide incentives to people to have favorable preferences toward a tourism based in part on cultural heritage in a phase where everything is being under construction institutions, legislations, and relationships alike. Cultural heritage and tourism development may be enhanced by a diversification strategy to enrich the image of local touristic destinations (diversification of site visits, purchases of new products, new circuits, and discovery of monumental heritage, museum, park and gardens, natural sites. Moreover, it is of great importance to invest in youth entrepreneurship development to orient toward business creation and development in the domain of tourism and cultural heritage.

  1. Development and Evaluation of Digital Game-Based Training for Managers to Promote Employee Mental Health and Reduce Mental Illness Stigma at Work: Quasi-Experimental Study of Program Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, Sabine Elisabeth; Birner, Ulrich Walter; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Nowak, Dennis; Sabariego, Carla

    2017-08-04

    To counteract the negative impact of mental health problems on business, organizations are increasingly investing in mental health intervention measures. However, those services are often underused, which, to a great extent, can be attributed to fear of stigmatization. Nevertheless, so far only a few workplace interventions have specifically targeted stigma, and evidence on their effectiveness is limited. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a digital game-based training program for managers to promote employee mental health and reduce mental illness stigma at work. We describe the empirical development of Leadership Training in Mental Health Promotion (LMHP), a digital game-based training program for leaders. A 1-group pre-post design and a 3-month follow-up were used for training evaluation. We applied multilevel growth models to investigate change over time in the dependent variables knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions to promote employee mental health in 48 managers of a global enterprise in the United Kingdom. Participants were mainly male (44/48, 92%) and ranged in age from 32 to 58 (mean 46.0, SD 7.2) years. We found a positive impact of the Web-based training program on managers' knowledge of mental health and mental illness (Pemployee mental health, which was initially high. Results provide first evidence of the effectiveness of LMHP to positively affect managers' skills to promote employee mental health at work. Furthermore, the high rate of participation in LMHP (48/54, 89%) supports the use of digital game-based interventions to increase user engagement and user experience in mental health programs at work. ©Sabine Elisabeth Hanisch, Ulrich Walter Birner, Cornelia Oberhauser, Dennis Nowak, Carla Sabariego. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 04.08.2017.

  2. Developing a Sustainable Practical Model of Graduate Employability for Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Umar Rufai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evolve a sustainable practical model of employability skills that is sure to capture relevant learning aspects of a particular occupational discipline to be used as framework for Undergraduate students to develop their employability potentials. The study was conducted in three Universities and Polytechnics each with three multi-national companies. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Using purposeful sampling 18 academic staff and 3 professionals representing company employers were selected as the study participants. The study evolved a model that is work-based, explicit in its outcome, fully articulated and realistic in terms of employability skill experiences. The proposed model can be used to establish a common higher education programme or curricula that is work-based and skill experience oriented, that can encourage students in higher education to think about work place learning more explicitly and reflectively, that will in turn help them to develop a broad range of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values, each of which ultimately contribute in some manner to graduate employability.  The paper is considered a contribution to the evolution and growth of knowledge on the linkage between higher education and workplace, through which the ‘skill gap’ occurring between the demand of employment and the level of educational preparation of graduates can be bridged. Keywords: Employability, Higher Education, Graduates, Model/Framework,   academic staff, Employers/Professionals

  3. International Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  4. A global learning-centered approach to higher education: workplace development in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tasso Eira de Aquino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Competition in the 21st century economy requires corporations, organizations, and professionals to face a common challenge: diverse individuals need consistent motivation towards building competences that increase personal marketability using a combination of higher education and professional development. This article represents an evolving report summary and non-traditional learning-centered approach focusing on adult competences necessary for succeeding in the competitive global marketplace of the 21st century. The purpose of this article is to understand the needs of constantly changing employer demands in the work environment. Exploring contemporary approaches related to skill development, adult education, and learning processes, will be the path towards higher levels of professional success. This article will provide readers with an enlightening discussion focusing on the necessary adult skills and competencies professionals need to succeed in the global marketplace.

  5. Extreme weather events in developing countries and related injuries and mental health disorders - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Rataj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to climate change, extreme weather events have an incremental impact on human health. Injuries and mental health disorders are a particular burden of disease, which is broadly investigated in high income countries. Most distressed populations are, however, those in developing countries. Therefore, this study investigates mental and physical health impacts arising from extreme weather events in these populations. Method Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD, injury [primary outcomes], anxiety and depressive disorders [secondary outcomes], caused by weather extremes were systematically analyzed in people of developing countries. A systematic review of observational studies was conducted searching six databases, complemented by hand search, and utilizing two search engines. Review processing was done independently by two reviewers. Prevalence rates were analyzed in a pre/post design; an additional semi-structured search was conducted, to provide reference data for studies not incorporating reference values. Results All 17 identified studies (70,842 individuals indicate a disease increase, compared to the reference data. Increase ranges from 0.7–52.6 % for PTSD, and from 0.3–37.3 % for injury. No studies on droughts and heatwaves were identified. All studies were conducted in South America and Asia. Conclusion There is an increased burden of psychological diseases and injury. This finding needs to be incorporated into activities of prevention, preparedness and general health care of those developing countries increasingly experiencing extreme weather events. There is also a gap in research in Africa (in quantity and quality of studies in this field and a predominant heterogeneity of health assessment tools. PROSPERO registration no.: CRD42014009109

  6. Arts-informed narrative inquiry as a practice development methodology in mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail M. Lindsay

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congruent with the practice development movement, arts-informed narrative inquiry addresses practitioner awareness of self and others within the social context of mental health care. Through our research programme, which explores experience using creative activities and dialogue, we invite nurses to reveal how they shape and are shaped by organisational change. The personhood of the nurse is implicated in the relationship with patients and others. Objectives: Participants and researchers renewed a commitment to enhance person-centred care through self-reflective practice, to make transparent the construction of knowledge and to transform the practice environment from the frontline perspective. Methods: We used arts-informed narrative inquiry processes with our participants in five sessions over eight weeks. Three group sessions were in person and two were completed independently with online resources for guidance. The creative activities preceding group dialogue included: writing stories, metaphor development, collage, walking meditation, mandalas and music-guided art. Findings/results: Arts-informed narrative inquiry illuminates the construction of practitioner knowledge and relationships within a mental health setting. Nurses articulated the autobiographical resonances they bring to relationships with patients and others, illuminating person-centred care. Heightened awareness of how nurses’ agency is connected to their values, other caregivers and organisational policies and practices was evident. The potential for transfer of the creative activities to patient care was discerned. How other disciplines, patients and the organisation could be involved in care delivery innovation was articulated. Implications for practice: • Practitioners demonstrate how arts-informed narrative inquiry can be used to construct knowledge and relationships to support practice development • Practitioners are guided to be more response-able, rather

  7. Development of mental health first aid guidelines for panic attacks: a Delphi study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panic attacks are common, and while they are not life-threatening events, they can lead to the development of panic disorder and agoraphobia. Appropriate help at the time that a panic attack occurs may decrease the fear associated with the attack and reduce the risk of developing an anxiety disorder. However, few people have the knowledge and skills required to assist. Simple first aid guidelines may help members of the public to offer help to people who experience panic attacks. Methods The Delphi method was used to reach consensus in a panel of experts. Experts included 50 professionals and 6 people who had experience of panic attacks and were active in mental health advocacy. Statements about how to assist someone who is having a panic attack were sourced through a systematic search of both professional and lay literature. These statements were rated for importance as first aid guidelines by the expert and consumer panels and guidelines were written using the items most consistently endorsed. Results Of 144 statements presented to the panels, 27 were accepted. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Conclusion There are a number of actions which are considered to be useful for members of the public to do if they encounter someone who is having a panic attack. These guidelines will be useful in revision of curricula of mental health first aid programs. They can also be used by members of the public who want immediate information about how to assist someone who is experiencing panic attacks.

  8. Developing Organizational Competences for Conflict Management: The Use of the Prisoner's Dilemma in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Andreina Bruno; Giuseppina Dell'Aversana; Gloria Guidetti

    2018-01-01

    Interpersonal relationship require sophisticated competences of cohabitation. However, the availability of training tools to develop conflict management skills is limited and problematic. The prisoner's dilemma game (PDG), the most widely known example of game theory, a nonzero-sum game, has been used, in higher education, to provide students with an opportunity of active learning and for understanding counterintuitive concepts. It creates a condition of emotive, moral and decisional conflict...

  9. Developing Organizational Competences for Conflict Management: The Use of the Prisoner's Dilemma in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Andreina; Dell'Aversana, Giuseppina; Guidetti, Gloria

    2018-01-01

    Interpersonal relationship require sophisticated competences of cohabitation. However, the availability of training tools to develop conflict management skills is limited and problematic. The prisoner's dilemma game (PDG), the most widely known example of game theory, a nonzero-sum game, has been used, in higher education, to provide students with an opportunity of active learning and for understanding counterintuitive concepts. It creates a condition of emotive, moral and decisional conflict in and between agents. This paper presents a case-study in higher education in which PDG was proposed to enhance organizational competences for conflict management, according to the psychoanalytic approach to organizational studies. The study aims to explore: (1) the significant characteristics of PDG used in an affective-emotional key in higher education; (2) the learning outcomes that PDG enables to activate in the participants in relation to the development of organizational skills for conflict management. Twenty students' reflective journals were analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings indicated that PDG is perceived as a useful device in students' learning experience, which is appreciated in relation to its concreteness, intensity and debriefing phase. Learning outcomes allow new meanings about conflict, by emphasizing its defensive, automatic and interpersonal dimension. This paper contributes to the understanding of PDG as a tool to develop competences in dealing with the challenges of conflict management, since it seems to favor the overcoming of the individualistic stereotype in conflict representation by highlighting the interdependence of social interaction.

  10. Developing Organizational Competences for Conflict Management: The Use of the Prisoner's Dilemma in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreina Bruno

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal relationship require sophisticated competences of cohabitation. However, the availability of training tools to develop conflict management skills is limited and problematic. The prisoner's dilemma game (PDG, the most widely known example of game theory, a nonzero-sum game, has been used, in higher education, to provide students with an opportunity of active learning and for understanding counterintuitive concepts. It creates a condition of emotive, moral and decisional conflict in and between agents. This paper presents a case-study in higher education in which PDG was proposed to enhance organizational competences for conflict management, according to the psychoanalytic approach to organizational studies. The study aims to explore: (1 the significant characteristics of PDG used in an affective-emotional key in higher education; (2 the learning outcomes that PDG enables to activate in the participants in relation to the development of organizational skills for conflict management. Twenty students' reflective journals were analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings indicated that PDG is perceived as a useful device in students' learning experience, which is appreciated in relation to its concreteness, intensity and debriefing phase. Learning outcomes allow new meanings about conflict, by emphasizing its defensive, automatic and interpersonal dimension. This paper contributes to the understanding of PDG as a tool to develop competences in dealing with the challenges of conflict management, since it seems to favor the overcoming of the individualistic stereotype in conflict representation by highlighting the interdependence of social interaction.

  11. COLLECTIVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE INTEGRATION OF ICT IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro Guzman, Willy

    integration, and the teacher professional development as means to promote adoption. With the recognition of the potential of ICT in education, the study reflects the appropriateness of the dominant traditional approach to the first and second-order barriers to technology and attempts to overcome......In this thesis, I explore, analyse and reflect on the individual practice of adoption and the collective practice of integration of technology in teaching and learning in a Higher Education Institution. The study addresses the connections between ICT adoption in Education, the barriers of ICT...... the tradition of Cultural-Historical Activity Theory and brings significant changes in comparison with more traditional approaches in professional development to ICT adoption. The results of the intervention supports the idea of the need for changes in professional development to develop the professors’ agency...

  12. Effects of mental health interventions for students in higher education are sustainable over time: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Winzer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Symptoms of depression, anxiety, and distress are more common in undergraduates compared to age-matched peers. Mental ill health among students is associated with impaired academic achievement, worse occupational preparedness, and lower future occupational performance. Research on mental health promoting and mental ill health preventing interventions has shown promising short-term effects, though the sustainability of intervention benefits deserve closer attention. We aimed to identify, appraise and summarize existing data from randomized control trials (RCTs reporting on whether the effects of mental health promoting and mental ill health preventing interventions were sustained at least three months post-intervention, and to analyze how the effects vary for different outcomes in relation to follow-up length. Further, we aimed to assess whether the effect sustainability varied by intervention type, study-level determinants and of participant characteristics. Material and Methods A systematic search in MEDLINE, PsycInfo, ERIC, and Scopus was performed for RCTs published in 1995–2015 reporting an assessment of mental ill health and positive mental health outcomes for, at least, three months of post-intervention follow-up. Random-effect modeling was utilized for quantitative synthesis of the existing evidence with standardized mean difference (Hedges’ g used to estimate an aggregated effect size. Sustainability of the effects of interventions was analyzed separately for 3–6 months, 7–12 months, and 13–18 months of post-intervention follow-up. Results About 26 studies were eligible after reviewing 6,571 citations. The pooled effects were mainly small, but significant for several categories of outcomes. Thus, for the combined mental ill health outcomes, symptom-reduction sustained up to 7–12 months post-intervention (standardized mean difference (Hedges’ g effect size (ES = −0.28 (95% CI [−0.49, −0.08]. Further

  13. Developing the professional competence of future doctors in the instructional setting of higher medical educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokhovets, Halyna Yu; Lysanets, Yuliia V

    The main objectives of higher medical education is the continuous professional improvement of physicians to meet the needs dictated by the modern world both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. In this respect, the system of higher medical education has undergone certain changes - from determining the range of professional competences to the adoption of new standards of education in medicine. The article aims to analyze the parameters of doctor's professionalism in the context of competence-based approach and to develop practical recommendations for the improvement of instruction techniques. The authors reviewed the psycho-pedagogical materials and summarized the acquired experience of teachers at higher medical institutions as to the development of instruction techniques in the modern educational process. The study is based on the results of testing via the technique developed by T.I. Ilyina. Analytical and biblio-semantic methods were used in the paper. It has been found that the training process at medical educational institution should be focused on the learning outcomes. The authors defined the quality parameters of doctors' training and suggested the model for developing the professional competence of medical students. This model explains the cause-and-effect relationships between the forms of instruction, teaching techniques and specific components of professional competence in future doctors. The paper provides practical recommendations on developing the core competencies which a qualified doctor should master. The analysis of existing interactive media in Ukraine and abroad has been performed. It has been found that teaching the core disciplines with the use of latest technologies and interactive means keeps abreast of the times, while teaching social studies and humanities to medical students still involves certain difficulties.

  14. Learning processes in the professional development of mental health counselors: knowledge restructuring and illness script formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Josef; Gruber, Hans

    2015-05-01

    An important part of learning processes in the professional development of counselors is the integration of declarative knowledge and professional experience. It was investigated in-how-far mental health counselors at different levels of expertise (experts, intermediates, novices) differ in their availability of experience-based knowledge structures. Participants were prompted with 20 client problems. They had to explain those problems, the explanations were analyzed using think-aloud protocols. The results show that experts' knowledge is organized in script-like structures that integrate declarative knowledge and professional experience and help experts in accessing relevant information about cases. Novices revealed less integrated knowledge structures. It is concluded that knowledge restructuring and illness script formation are crucial parts of the professional learning of counselors.

  15. Content and quality of workplace guidelines developed to prevent mental health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Mette Andersen; Kristensen, Josefine Vejlby; Grønvad, Majbritt Thorhauge

    2018-01-01

    Objectives A wide range of guidelines have been developed to prevent work-related mental health problems (MHP), but little is known about the quality of such guidelines. We systematically reviewed the content and quality of workplace guidelines aiming to prevent, detect, and/or manage work......-related MHP. Methods We conducted systematic online and database searches (MEDLINE; Web of Science; PsychNET; occupational safety and health databases) to identify guidelines. Eligibility criteria included guidelines recommending primary, secondary, or tertiary preventive interventions to be implemented...... at the workplace by employers, employees or organizational staff. A minimum of minimum three independent reviewers assessed the quality of guidelines using the Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II). Guidelines rated ≥65% with regards to domain I, II, and III were considered to be of good developmental...

  16. Mental and psychomotor development in Indonesian infants of mothers supplemented with vitamin A in addition to iron during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, M.K.; Muslimatun, S.; West, C.E.; Schultink, J.W.; Hautvast, J.G.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Maternal nutrition is important for fetal development, but its impact on the functional outcome of infants is still unclear. The present study investigated the effects of vitamin A and Fe supplementation during gestation on infant mental and psychomotor development. Mothers of infants from five

  17. A Model for Sustainable Development of Child Mental Health Infrastructure in the LMIC World: Vietnam as a Case Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Bahr; Ngo, Victoria Khanh; Dang, Hoang-Minh; Pollack, Amie; Trung, Lam T; Tran, Cong V; Tran, Nam T; Sang, David; Do, Khanh N

    2012-01-01

    Children and adolescents are among the highest need populations in regards to mental health support, especially in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Yet resources in LMIC for prevention and treatment of mental health problems are limited, in particular for children and adolescents. In this paper, we discuss a model for development of child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) resources in LMIC that has guided a ten year initiative focused on development of CAMH treatment and research infrastructure in Vietnam. We first review the need for development of mental health resources for children and adolescents in general, and then in Vietnam. We next present the model that guided our program as it developed, focused on the twin Capacity Development Goals of efficacy and sustainability, and the Capacity Development Targets used to move towards these goals. Finally we discuss our CAMH development initiative in Vietnam, the center of which has been development of a graduate program in clinical psychology at Vietnam National University, linking program activities to this model.

  18. Factors associated with staff development processes and the creation of innovative science courses in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Jeanelle Bland

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine factors associated with staff development processes and the creation of innovative science courses by higher education faculty who have participated in a model staff development project. The staff development program was designed for college faculty interested in creating interdisciplinary, constructivist-based science, mathematics, or engineering courses designed for non-majors. The program includes workshops on incorporating constructivist pedagogy, alternative assessment, and technology into interdisciplinary courses. Staff development interventions used in the program include grant opportunities, distribution of resource materials, and peer mentoring. University teams attending the workshops are comprised of faculty from the sciences, mathematics, or engineering, as well as education, and administration. A purposeful and convenient sample of three university teams were subjects for this qualitative study. Each team had attended a NASA Opportunities for Visionary Academics (NOVA) workshop, received funding for course development, and offered innovative courses. Five questions were addressed in this study: (a) What methods were used by faculty teams in planning the courses? (b) What changes occurred in existing science courses? (c) What factors affected the team collaboration process? (d) What personal characteristics of faculty members were important in successful course development? and (e) What barriers existed for faculty in the course development process? Data was collected at each site through individual faculty interviews (N = 11), student focus group interviews (N = 15), and classroom observations. Secondary data included original funding proposals. The NOVA staff development model incorporated effective K--12 interventions with higher education interventions. Analysis of data revealed that there were four factors of staff development processes that were most beneficial. First, the team collaborative processes

  19. Development of a peer-supported, self-management intervention for people following mental health crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Alyssa; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Fullarton, Kate; Morant, Nicola; Paterson, Bethan; Hindle, David; Kelly, Kathleen; Mason, Oliver; Lambert, Marissa; Johnson, Sonia

    2017-11-09

    A documented gap in support exists for service users following discharge from acute mental health services, and structured interventions to reduce relapse are rarely provided. Peer-facilitated self-management interventions have potential to meet this need, but evidence for their effectiveness is limited. This paper describes the development of a peer-provided self-management intervention for mental health service users following discharge from crisis resolution teams (CRTs). A five-stage iterative mixed-methods approach of sequential data collection and intervention development was adopted, following the development and piloting stages of the MRC framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions. Evidence review (stage 1) included systematic reviews of both peer support and self-management literature. Interviews with CRT service users (n = 41) regarding needs and priorities for support following CRT discharge were conducted (stage 2). Focus group consultations (n = 12) were held with CRT service-users, staff and carers to assess the acceptability and feasibility of a proposed intervention, and to refine intervention organisation and content (stage 3). Qualitative evaluation of a refined, peer-provided, self-management intervention involved qualitative interviews with CRT service user participants (n = 9; n = 18) in feasibility testing (stage 4) and a pilot trial (stage 5), and a focus group at each stage with the peer worker providers (n = 4). Existing evidence suggests self-management interventions can reduce relapse and improve recovery. Initial interviews and focus groups indicated support for the overall purpose and planned content of a recovery-focused self-management intervention for people leaving CRT care adapted from an existing resource: The personal recovery plan (developed by Repper and Perkins), and for peer support workers (PSWs) as providers. Participant feedback after feasibility testing was positive regarding facilitation of

  20. War trauma and maternal-fetal attachment predicting maternal mental health, infant development, and dyadic interaction in Palestinian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punamäki, Raija-Leena; Isosävi, Sanna; Qouta, Samir R; Kuittinen, Saija; Diab, Safwat Y

    2017-10-01

    Optimal maternal-fetal attachment (MFA) is believed to be beneficial for infant well-being and dyadic interaction, but research is scarce in general and among risk populations. Our study involved dyads living in war conditions and examined how traumatic war trauma associates with MFA and which factors mediate that association. It also modeled the role of MFA in predicting newborn health, infant development, mother-infant interaction, and maternal postpartum mental health. Palestinian women from the Gaza Strip (N = 511) participated during their second trimester (T1), and when their infants were 4 (T2) and 12 (T3) months. Mothers reported MFA (interaction with, attributions to, and fantasies about the fetus), social support, and prenatal mental health (post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety) at T1, newborn health at T2, and the postpartum mental health, infant's sensorimotor and language development, and mother-infant interaction (emotional availability) at T3. Results revealed, first, that war trauma was not directly associated with MFA but that it was mediated through a low level of social support and high level of maternal prenatal mental health problems. Second, intensive MFA predicted optimal mother-reported infant's sensorimotor and language development and mother-infant emotional availability but not newborn health or maternal postpartum mental health.

  1. Overdiagnosis of mental disorders in children and adolescents (in developed countries)

    OpenAIRE

    Merten, Eva Charlotte; Cwik, Jan Christopher; Margraf, J?rgen; Schneider, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    During the past 50?years, health insurance providers and national registers of mental health regularly report significant increases in the number of mental disorder diagnoses in children and adolescents. However, epidemiological studies show mixed effects of time trends of prevalence of mental disorders. Overdiagnosis in clinical practice rather than an actual increase is assumed to be the cause for this situation. We conducted a systematic literature search on the topic of overdiagnosis of m...

  2. Intermittent explosive disorder: development of integrated research criteria for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccaro, Emil F

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a revised diagnostic criteria set for intermittent explosive disorder (IED) for consideration for inclusion in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). This revised criteria set was developed by integrating previous research criteria with elements from the current DSM-IV set of diagnostic criteria. Evidence supporting the reliability and validity of IED-IR ("IED Integrated Criteria") in a new and well-characterized group of subjects with personality disorder is presented. Clinical, phenomenologic, and diagnostic data from 201 individuals with personality disorder were reviewed. All IED diagnoses were assigned using a best-estimate process (eg, kappa for IED-IR >0.85). In addition, subjects meeting IED-IR criteria had higher scores on dimensional measures of aggression and had lower global functioning scores than non-IED-IR subjects, even when related variables were controlled. The IED-IR criteria were more sensitive than the DSM-IV criteria only in identifying subjects with significant impulsive-aggressive behavior by a factor of 16. We conclude that the IED-IR criteria can be reliably applied and have sufficient validity to warrant consideration as DSM-V criteria for IED. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing Instructional Design to Improve Mathematical Higher Order Thinking Skills of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apino, E.; Retnawati, H.

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to describe the instructional design to improve the Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) of students in learning mathematics. This research is design research involving teachers and students of class X MIPA 1 MAN Yigyakarta III, Special Region of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Data collected through focus group discussions and tests. Data analyzed by quantitative descriptive. The results showed that the instructional design developed is effective to improving students’ HOTS in learning mathematics. Instructional design developed generally include three main components: (1) involve students in the activities non-routine problem solving; (2) facilitating students to develop the ability to analyze and evaluate (critical thinking) and the ability to create (creative thinking); and (3) encourage students to construct their own knowledge.

  4. Higher mind-brain development in successful leaders: testing a unified theory of performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harung, Harald S; Travis, Frederick

    2012-05-01

    This study explored mind-brain characteristics of successful leaders as reflected in scores on the Brain Integration Scale, Gibbs's Socio-moral Reasoning questionnaire, and an inventory of peak experiences. These variables, which in previous studies distinguished world-class athletes and professional classical musicians from average-performing controls, were recorded in 20 Norwegian top-level managers and in 20 low-level managers-matched for age, gender, education, and type of organization (private or public). Top-level managers were characterized by higher Brain Integration Scale scores, higher levels of moral reasoning, and more frequent peak experiences. These multilevel measures could be useful tools in selection and recruiting of potential managers and in assessing leadership education and development programs. Future longitudinal research could further investigate the relationship between leadership success and these and other multilevel variables.

  5. CHALLENGES IN DEVELOPING A MANAGEMENT AND COMMUNICATION PLATFORM INSIDE A HIGHER EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSCALU EMANOIL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available At present, the world is in a phase of economic and social development, with many and varied features of the knowledge society based on science and education. The organization is defined not only by the products and / or services, but also the ability to communicate to its employees and management team. Continuous exchange of messages is the correlation factor that generates knowledge in the society and inside the organization to fulfill its mission and strategies. The purpose of this work is to identify the necessity of developing a platform which should provide the support for the organization and also for the specific activities developed inside the organization. Also, when developing such a system, there are few aspects that should be taken into consideration, according to the organization’s goals. Therefore the development of a platform by a higher educational institution could improve the communication inside the organization, could improve the management’s activity and also can provide access to knowledge for the students. Developing a judicial platform, for students, could provide possible solutions to problems like training and practice, or other problems emphasized by the law experts that recorded for example unreasonable deadlines given by the courts in insolvency and commercial cases in general, by improving internal and external communication and improving the quality of commercial law and not only.

  6. The Development of CyberLearning in Dual-Mode: Higher Education Institutions in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yau-Jane Chen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Open and distance education in Taiwan has evolved into the third phase – cyberlearning – conceptualized as teaching and learning interactions mediated entirely through the application of state-of-the-art information and communications technologies (ICT, such as the Internet and World Wide Web. Socio-economic influences, the development of new technologies and a marked shift in learning paradigms have increased the utilization of ICT at all levels of the Taiwanese education system. Since the advent and provision of cyberlearning programs, well over half (56 percent of the conventional universities and colleges have been upgraded to dual-mode higher educational institutions. They offer real-time multicast instructional systems using videoconferencing and cable TV technology, virtual classroom systems via network-based instructional management systems, and curriculum-on-demand systems utilizing video-on-demand technology. Critical success factors in the development of these cyber universities and the opportunities, challenges and implications inherent in these are analyzed. ICT and the provision of cyberlearning have gradually been changing the structure and vision of higher education institutions as well as the entire learning environment and educational systems. Because the Ministry of Education (MOE has initiated a policy on credit-based degrees for cyberlearning courses/ programs, the development of open and distance education is anticipated to hasten the transformation of Taiwan’s education system towards one which will create an ideal learning society in the 21st century.

  7. Attachment, Development, and Mental Health in Abused and Neglected Preschool Children in Foster Care: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, Mira; Petermann, Franz

    2016-09-22

    A proper preparation for foster parents to care for abused and neglected children includes effective training and initial diagnostics in order to plan individual treatment. Hence, a basic knowledge about the main psychosocial and developmental problems associated with abuse and neglect and their prevalence in foster children is needed. For this purpose, a systematical literature review and a series of meta-analyses were conducted. A total of 25 studies reporting data on development (n = 4,033), mental health (n = 726), and attachment (n = 255) of foster children in preschool age met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analyses indicated prevalence rates of approximately 40% for developmental, mental health problems, and insecure attachment. Rates of disorganized attachment were estimated to 22%. These findings outline the necessity of an initial trauma-oriented diagnostics and trainings for foster parents that address foster children's development, mental health, and disorganized attachment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Development of mental health first aid guidelines for suicidal ideation and behaviour: A Delphi study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitchener Betty A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a statistically rare event, but devastating to those left behind and one of the worst possible outcomes associated with mental illness. Although a friend, family member or co-worker may be the first person to notice that a person is highly distressed, few have the knowledge and skills required to assist. Simple guidelines may help such a person to encourage a suicidal individual to seek professional help or decide against suicide. Methods This research was conducted using the Delphi methodology, a method of reaching consensus in a panel of experts. Experts recruited to the panels included 22 professionals, 10 people who had been suicidal in the past and 6 carers of people who had been suicidal in the past. Statements about how to assist someone who is thinking about suicide were sourced through a systematic search of both professional and lay literature. The guidelines were written using the items most consistently endorsed by all three panels. Results Of 114 statements presented to the panels, 30 were accepted. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Conclusion There are a number of actions which are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. These guidelines will be useful in revision of curricula of mental health first aid and suicide intervention training programs. They can also be used by members of the public who want immediate information about how to assist a suicidal person.

  9. Development of the Family Stigma Stress Scale (FSSS) for Detecting Stigma Stress in Caregivers of People With Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Cheng; Su, Jian-An; Chang, Kun-Chia; Lin, Chung-Ying; Koschorke, Mirja; Rüsch, Nicolas; Thornicroft, Graham

    2017-01-01

    People with mental illness and their family caregivers often perceive public stigma, which may lead to stigma-related stress (or stigma stress). However, no instruments have been developed to measure this stress for family caregivers of people with mental illness. We modified an instrument that measures the stigma stress of people with mental illness (i.e., the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor) and examined the psychometric properties of the scores of the newly developed instrument: the Family Stigma Stress Scale (FSSS). Primary family caregivers of people with mental illness in Southern Taiwan ( n = 300; mean age = 53.08 ± 13.80; 136 males) completed the FSSS. An exploratory factor analysis showed that the FSSS score had two factors; both factor scores had excellent internal consistency (α = .913 and .814) and adequate test-retest reliability ( r = .627 and .533; n = 197). Significant correlations between FSSS factor scores and other instruments supported its concurrent validity and the ability of the FSSS to differentiate between clinical characteristics, for example, having been previously hospitalized or not. The FSSS is a brief and effective measure of the stigma stress of family caregivers of people with mental illness.

  10. Racism as a Unique Social Determinant of Mental Health: Development of a Didactic Curriculum for Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlock, Morgan; Weissman, Anna; Wong, Shane Shucheng; Carlo, Andrew; Zeng, Mary; Borba, Christina; Curry, Michael; Shtasel, Derri

    2017-01-01

    Mental health disparities based on minority racial status are well characterized, including inequities in access, symptom severity, diagnosis, and treatment. For African Americans, racism may affect mental health through factors such as poverty and segregation, which have operated since slavery. While the need to address racism in medical training has been recognized, there are few examples of formal didactic curricula in the psychiatric literature. Antiracism didactics during psychiatry residency provide a unique opportunity to equip physicians to address bias and racism in mental health care. With advocacy by residents in the Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Psychiatry residency program, the Division of Public and Community Psychiatry developed a curriculum addressing racial inequities in mental health, particularly those experienced by African Americans. Four 50-minute interactive didactic lectures were integrated into the required didactic curriculum (one lecture per postgraduate training class) during the 2015-2016 academic year. Of residents who attended lectures and provided anonymous feedback, 97% agreed that discussing racism in formal didactics was at least "somewhat" positive, and 92% agreed that it should "probably" or "definitely" remain in the curriculum. Qualitative feedback centered on a need for more time to discuss racism as well as a desire to learn more about minority mental health advocacy in general. Teaching about racism as part of required training conveys the explicit message that this is core curricular material and critical knowledge for all physicians. These lectures can serve as a springboard for dissemination and provide scaffolding for similar curriculum development in medical residency programs.

  11. [Indication and Evidence of Internationally Developed Online Coaches as Intervention for Mental Illness - a Meta-Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Janine; Röhr, Susanne; Luck, Tobias; Löbner, Margrit; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the current state of research concerning internationally developed Online Coaches for treatment support and prevention of mental disorders. Evidence and effectiveness of the Online Coaches ought to be explored. A systematic literature search was performed in international databases in order to provide a meta-review of existing Online Coaches for mental disorders. The assessment of the methodological quality and evidence of the studies was based on the established guidelines of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network. 52 studies (24 meta-analyses, 16 systematic reviews, 2 health-technology assessment reports, and 10 RCT studies) were identified. The efficacy was demonstrated for a variety of Online Coaches for mental disorders, especially for anxiety and depressive disorders, insomnia, and post-traumatic stress disorders, with predominantly acceptable and high quality. The present work provides an overview of internationally developed Online Coaches in the field of mental health care. Online Coaches can serve as a useful supplement to the treatment and prevention of mental disorders. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Collective Professional Development for the Integration of ICT in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro Guzman, Willy

    In this thesis, I explore, analyse and reflect on the individual practice of adoption and the collective practice of integration of technology in teaching and learning in a Higher Education Institution. The study addresses the connections between ICT adoption in Education, the barriers of ICT...... integration, and the teacher professional development as means to promote adoption. With the recognition of the potential of ICT in education, the study reflects the appropriateness of the dominant traditional approach to the first and second-order barriers to technology and attempts to overcome...

  13. The role of government policy in service development in a New Zealand statutory mental health service: implications for policy planning and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley-Clarke, Nicky; Sanders, Jackie; Munford, Robyn

    2014-12-01

    To explore the relationship between government policy and service development in a New Zealand statutory mental health provider, Living Well. An organisational case study utilising multiple research techniques including qualitative interviews, analysis of business and strategic documents and observation of meetings. Staff understood and acknowledged the importance of government policy, but there were challenges in its implementation. Within New Zealand's statutory mental health services staff struggled to know how to implement government policy as part of service development; rather, operational concerns, patient need, local context and service demands drove the service development process. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  14. World Health Organization's Mental Health Atlas 2005:implications for policy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAXENA, SHEKHAR; SHARAN, PRATAP; GARRIDO, MARCO; SARACENO, BENEDETTO

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched the second edition of the Mental Health Atlas, consisting of revised and updated information on mental health from countries. The sources of information included the mental health focal points in the Ministries of Health, published literature and unpublished reports available to WHO. The results show that global mental health resources remain low and grossly inadequate to respond to the high level of need. In addition, the revised Atlas shows that the improvements over the period 2001 to 2004 are very small. Imbalances across income groups of countries remain largely the same. Enhancement in resources devoted to mental health is urgently needed, especially in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:17139355

  15. Developing Student Worksheet Based On Higher Order Thinking Skills on the Topic of Transistor Power Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardia Ratna Kusuma, Luckey; Rakhmawati, Lusia; Wiryanto

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a student worksheet about the transistor power amplifier based on higher order thinking skills include critical, logical, reflective, metacognitive, and creative thinking, which could be useful for teachers in improving student learning outcomes. Research and Development (R & D) methodology was used in this study. The pilot study of the worksheet was carried out with class X AV 2 at SMK Negeri 5 Surabaya. The result showed satisfies aspect of validity with 81.76 %, and effectiveness (students learning outcomes is classically passed out with percentage of 82.4 % and the students gave positive responses to the student worksheet of each statement. It can be concluded that this worksheet categorized good and worthy to be used as a source of learning in the learning activities.

  16. Articulating current service development practices: a qualitative analysis of eleven mental health projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Gyuchan Thomas; Morrison, Cecily; Clarkson, P John

    2014-01-17

    The utilisation of good design practices in the development of complex health services is essential to improving quality. Healthcare organisations, however, are often seriously out of step with modern design thinking and practice. As a starting point to encourage the uptake of good design practices, it is important to understand the context of their intended use. This study aims to do that by articulating current health service development practices. Eleven service development projects carried out in a large mental health service were investigated through in-depth interviews with six operation managers. The critical decision method in conjunction with diagrammatic elicitation was used to capture descriptions of these projects. Stage-gate design models were then formed to visually articulate, classify and characterise different service development practices. Projects were grouped into three categories according to design process patterns: new service introduction and service integration; service improvement; service closure. Three common design stages: problem exploration, idea generation and solution evaluation - were then compared across the design process patterns. Consistent across projects were a top-down, policy-driven approach to exploration, underexploited idea generation and implementation-based evaluation. This study provides insight into where and how good design practices can contribute to the improvement of current service development practices. Specifically, the following suggestions for future service development practices are made: genuine user needs analysis for exploration; divergent thinking and innovative culture for idea generation; and fail-safe evaluation prior to implementation. Better training for managers through partnership working with design experts and researchers could be beneficial.

  17. Evaluation of the personal development portfolio in higher education: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Kevin S; Johnston, Jacqueline H

    2012-11-01

    Personal Development Profiles (PDPs) have been an important and necessary feature of United Kingdom (UK) Higher Education for more than a decade. There is significant agreement as to their core purpose and their key features are of relevance to higher education institutions internationally, irrespective of whether an equivalent formal system or process is in place. The aim of this exploratory study was to evaluate the use of PDPs within a Child Health Nursing Programme in a UK University, looking at the experiences of both teaching staff and of students coming to the end of their three year programme of study. A convenience sample of final year pre-registration Child Health Nursing students and their lecturers was used for the purposes of this study with mixed methods of collection used to generate the required data. A survey was conducted with questionnaires. Following the analysis of the questionnaires, a discussion group was undertaken with the students. A series of questions was developed to guide this discussion. The structure offered by the system of PDPs evaluated here was seen to offer much in the way of potential value. Staff saw it as offering direction, a tool for discussion and a clear time and reason for meeting their students. Students similarly appreciated the structure it provided, but did describe it as somewhat repetitive. These findings were clearly of use in terms of evaluating this ongoing work, but also offer the potential to inform the work of other educational institutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development and Evaluation of Digital Game-Based Training for Managers to Promote Employee Mental Health and Reduce Mental Illness Stigma at Work: Quasi-Experimental Study of Program Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birner, Ulrich Walter; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Nowak, Dennis; Sabariego, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Background To counteract the negative impact of mental health problems on business, organizations are increasingly investing in mental health intervention measures. However, those services are often underused, which, to a great extent, can be attributed to fear of stigmatization. Nevertheless, so far only a few workplace interventions have specifically targeted stigma, and evidence on their effectiveness is limited. Objective The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a digital game-based training program for managers to promote employee mental health and reduce mental illness stigma at work. Methods We describe the empirical development of Leadership Training in Mental Health Promotion (LMHP), a digital game-based training program for leaders. A 1-group pre-post design and a 3-month follow-up were used for training evaluation. We applied multilevel growth models to investigate change over time in the dependent variables knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions to promote employee mental health in 48 managers of a global enterprise in the United Kingdom. Participants were mainly male (44/48, 92%) and ranged in age from 32 to 58 (mean 46.0, SD 7.2) years. Results We found a positive impact of the Web-based training program on managers’ knowledge of mental health and mental illness (Pemployee mental health, which was initially high. Conclusions Results provide first evidence of the effectiveness of LMHP to positively affect managers’ skills to promote employee mental health at work. Furthermore, the high rate of participation in LMHP (48/54, 89%) supports the use of digital game-based interventions to increase user engagement and user experience in mental health programs at work. PMID:28778839

  19. Development and initial validation of primary care provider mental illness management and team-based care self-efficacy scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Danielle F; Crane, Lori A; Leister, Erin; Bayliss, Elizabeth A; Ludman, Evette; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Kline, Danielle M; Smith, Meredith; deGruy, Frank V; Nease, Donald E; Dickinson, L Miriam

    Develop and validate self-efficacy scales for primary care provider (PCP) mental illness management and team-based care participation. We developed three self-efficacy scales: team-based care (TBC), mental illness management (MIM), and chronic medical illness (CMI). We developed the scales using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory as a guide. The survey instrument included items from previously validated scales on team-based care and mental illness management. We administered a mail survey to 900 randomly selected Colorado physicians. We conducted exploratory principal factor analysis with oblique rotation. We constructed self-efficacy scales and calculated standardized Cronbach's alpha coefficients to test internal consistency. We calculated correlation coefficients between the MIM and TBC scales and previously validated measures related to each scale to evaluate convergent validity. We tested correlations between the TBC and the measures expected to correlate with the MIM scale and vice versa to evaluate discriminant validity. PCPs (n=402, response rate=49%) from diverse practice settings completed surveys. Items grouped into factors as expected. Cronbach's alphas were 0.94, 0.88, and 0.83 for TBC, MIM, and CMI scales respectively. In convergent validity testing, the TBC scale was correlated as predicted with scales assessing communications strategies, attitudes toward teams, and other teamwork indicators (r=0.25 to 0.40, all statistically significant). Likewise, the MIM scale was significantly correlated with several items about knowledge and experience managing mental illness (r=0.24 to 41, all statistically significant). As expected in discriminant validity testing, the TBC scale had only very weak correlations with the mental illness knowledge and experience managing mental illness items (r=0.03 to 0.12). Likewise, the MIM scale was only weakly correlated with measures of team-based care (r=0.09 to.17). This validation study of MIM and TBC self-efficacy scales

  20. Families First: the development of a new mentalization-based group intervention for first-time parents to promote child development and family health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalland, Mirjam; Fagerlund, Åse; von Koskull, Malin; Pajulo, Marjaterttu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the development of Families First, a new mentalization-based group intervention model for supporting early parenthood. The general aim of the intervention was to support well-functioning models of parenting and prevent transmission of negative parenting models over generations, and thus promote child development and overall family health. In the Finnish society, great concern has aroused during the last decade regarding the well-being and mental health of children and adolescents. Increased number of divorces, poverty, substance abuse, and mental health problems among parents enhance the risk for child neglect and abuse. New effective, preventive, and health-promoting intervention tools are greatly needed to support families with young children. At present, the Families First intervention is being implemented in primary social and healthcare units all over Finland. This article will provide a theoretical understanding of the importance of parental mentalization for the development of the parent-child relationship and the development of the child as well as proposed mechanisms of actions in order to enhance mentalizing capacity. The cultural context will be described. The article will also provide a description of the scientific evaluation protocol of the intervention model. Finally, possible limitations and challenges of the intervention model are discussed.

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT OF BUSINESS HIGHER EDUCATION THROUGH IMPLEMENTATION OF STUDENTS LEARNING OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT PLAN (SLOAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Ivanovski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents new vision how to upgrade business higher education at the Faculty of Economics at University of Tourism and Management in Skopje (UTMS. This paper is result of analyses of best practices of leading higher education institutions as well authors experience in higher education and business education and practice. The UTMS is orientated to introduce best practices and objective standards in order to offer high-quality business education for its students. UTMS has mission for permanent implementation of quality improvement measures as a way to achieve high professional and academic standards and become part of prosperous and respective Universities. In order to achieve this goal, UTMS plan to use additional measures, outcomes assessment as a way to measure institutional effectiveness, as well as effective technique for identifying where changes and improvements are necessary. UTMS has developed Students Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan (SLOAP as a way to reach this goal.Based on permanent analysis of students needs as well as business sector suggestions about desirable level of knowledge, skills and competence of the students from Faculty of Economics, gained from conducted evaluations, UTMS decide to make additional improvement and development of business education. This process have 4 phases: 1 evaluation of students attitude towards curricula and the instructors efficiency, 2preparation of the SLOAP (Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan document, 3 implementation of two direct measures from the SLOAP through assessment analysis and action planning, and 4 monitoring changes and improvements made as a result of action planning.The first phase was completed in spring semester 2012, as well as second one with development of Comprehensive Exam and Capstone Course as direct measures. Complete SLOAP also has indirect measures like student satisfaction inventory, course evaluations, alumni, and employers’ surveys, and a

  2. Aligning Strategy with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs: Process Scoping Diagram for Entrepreneurial Higher Education Institutions (HEIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Fleacă

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Seeing that the prosperity of people and society is possible with the aid of sustained and inclusive economic growth of all countries and regions, the sustainable development of our world has gained the particular attention of a wide range of decisional factors; civil society, the business sector, and the scientific community. Education has a decisive impact on changes in the way that societies are coping with national, regional, and global challenges and opportunities brought by sustainable development. The paper addressed the lack of capacity of higher education institutions (HEIs to integrate the principles and practices of sustainable development into all aspects of education and learning, which hampers the capability to act as an entrepreneurial university. Embarking on the path of sustainable development goals (SDGs requires HEI to design, launch, implement, and customize specific processes architecture to govern the advance of the sustainability approach. The authors applied the process scoping diagram to capture and conceptualize the educational model needed to guide the HEI through the process of change in its daily operations. The SIPOC method (Supplier, Input, Process, Output, Customer was applied and with the aid of Visio software tool, the processes relationships were articulated and embedded in the educational model of HEI. Finally, the authors shared their views on the scalability of the model, which may be customized and harmonized in accordance with different HEI’s circumstances and priorities.

  3. Developing Accounting Information System Course Content for Iraqi Higher Education Institution: An Instrument Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Yousif Hanna Lallo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In ensuring that competent graduates are produced in the universities, the course used embedding knowledge in the students, mindsets needs to be effective. However, the unusual circumstances that happened in Iraq were affected on a universities course. The revolution in information technology (IT affects most of our activations. As a result, it is important to consider the impact of IT on accounting careers. Developing accenting information system course content can generate an accountant who is armed with the knowledge and skills before entering accounting job. Also the development process required instructors have characteristics that make the integrating process of IT knowledge components in AIS course content more smoothly. Iraq is the country facing many difficulties that makes its higher education institutions (HEIs suffered from un updated learning environment and technological backwardness. This causes a low level of accounting graduates’ knowledge and in turn leads to led to consider the Iraqi accountant incapable of working with international organizations and companies or conducting was it professionally. The aim of this paper is to explain the role of IT knowledge elements in developing AIS course content in Iraqi HEIs with considering the moderate effect of the instructors’ characteristics. Furthermore, this paper discusses the development and validation of the quantitative instrument (questionnaire for IT knowledge elements in Iraqi HEIs. Moreover, the reliability of the constructs is also discussed.

  4. Development of a Diagnostic Inventory for Mental Health Pattern (MHP) : Reliability and Validity of the MHP Scale.

    OpenAIRE

    橋本, 公雄; 徳永, 幹雄

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Mental Health Pattern (MHP), a scale that classifies state of mental health as it pertains to stress and quality of life (QOL), and to confirm the reliability and validity of this scale. To achieve these ends, a 70-item questionnaire was administered to student (n=256) and adult (n=172) samples consisting of males and females. Factor analysis revealed that stress and QOL consisted of 13 factors. Based on these factors, the MHP was designed with...

  5. Effect of iodine and iron supplementation on physical, psychomotor and mental development in primary school children in Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shrestha, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Primary school children (n = 424) from the Ntcheu District, Malawi, aged 6 - 8 years, were selected for a double-blind placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effect of iodine and iron supplementation on physical, psychomotor and mental development. After the baseline measurements were

  6. Development and Evaluation of an Internet-Based Program to Improve the Mental Health and Wellbeing of Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Louise A.; McCabe, Kathryn; Davenport, Tracey; Burns, Jane M.; Rahilly, Kitty; Nicholas, Mariesa; Hickie, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the development of WorkOut, an Internet-based program designed to help young men overcome the barriers towards help-seeking and to build the skills they need to understand and manage their own mental health. Information and communication technologies (ICT) hold great potential to significantly improve mental…

  7. Effects of two types of intra-team feedback on developing a shared mental model in Command & Control teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasker, P.C.; Post, W.M.; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2000-01-01

    In two studies, the effect of two types of intra-team feedback on developing a shared mental model in Command & Control teams was investigated. A distinction is made between performance monitoring and team self-correction. Performance monitoring is the ability of team members to monitor each other's

  8. The relationship between structured and free play in the development of a mentally handicapped child: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, S; McConkey, R; Jeffree, D

    1980-01-01

    This case study provides an individual illustration of the work of the Parental Involvement Project. A key feature of the approach used was the structured play situation. Thus, the case study also serves to demonstrate the role of structured play, and its relation to free play, in the development of a young, mentally handicapped child.

  9. Development of Theory of Mind in Mentally Retarded Students and its Relation with the Number of the Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Abdollah-Zadeh Rafi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Theory of mind development of mental retarded students varies based on that type of task being used to assess. In total, the claim of Theory-Theory approach, that says theory of mind development is on the basis of necessary processes, could be accepted. Also those theories which are based on cultural-social approaches calming that experience with other people causes development of mind understanding need to be more examined.

  10. MRI in spastic cerebral palsy - correlations with motor development and mental retardation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulal, W.; Sobaniec, W.; Kubas, B.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) has improved our understanding of the pathophysiology and early diagnosis of cerebral palsy (CP). The aim of this study was to evaluate types of lesions on MR in children with CP in correlations with motor development, cognitive impairment and risk factors. Twenty-two children aged 4-17 years (boys 12, girls 10) with CP diplegia - 16 and tetraplegia - 6 were studied. Routine MR images were performed in all children. Results: All patients had periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) in MR findings. In addition three different degrees of MRI lesion patterns were defined: a mild pattern (nucleus lentiformis and thalamus) moderate (nucleus lentiformis, thalamus and pericentral region)and a severe pattern (nucleus lentiformis , thalamus, pericentral region and hippocampus). Significant correlations of the MR findings with the motor development and mental retardation were found. No significant relationships between the MR findings and the etiological factors (prematurity, low birthweight, Apgar score, sepsis, seizures, pre-eclamsia , and gestational age) were noted. MR imaging is useful in the evaluation structural abnormalities in the brains in the children with spastic diplegia and tetraplegia. (author)

  11. Development of the REFOCUS intervention to increase mental health team support for personal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Mike; Bird, Victoria; Le Boutillier, Clair; Farkas, Marianne; Grey, Barbara; Larsen, John; Leamy, Mary; Oades, Lindsay; Williams, Julie

    2015-12-01

    There is an emerging evidence base about best practice in supporting recovery. This is usually framed in relation to general principles, and specific pro-recovery interventions are lacking. To develop a theoretically based and empirically defensible new pro-recovery manualised intervention--called the REFOCUS intervention. Seven systematic and two narrative reviews were undertaken. Identified evidence gaps were addressed in three qualitative studies. The findings were synthesised to produce the REFOCUS intervention, manual and model. The REFOCUS intervention comprises two components: recovery-promoting relationships and working practices. Approaches to supporting relationships comprise coaching skills training for staff, developing a shared team understanding of recovery, exploring staff values, a Partnership Project with people who use the service and raising patient expectations. Working practices comprise the following: understanding values and treatment preferences; assessing strengths; and supporting goal-striving. The REFOCUS model describes the causal pathway from the REFOCUS intervention to improved recovery. The REFOCUS intervention is an empirically supported pro-recovery intervention for use in mental health services. It will be evaluated in a multisite cluster randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN02507940). © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  12. Anthropology, brokerage, and collaboration in the development of a Tongan public psychiatry: Local lessons for global mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltorak, Mike

    2016-12-01

    The Global Mental Health (GMH) movement has raised questions of the translatability of psychiatric concepts and the challenges of community engagement. In Tonga, the local psychiatrist Dr Puloka successfully established a publicly accessible psychiatry that has improved admission rates for serious mental illnesses and addressed some of the stigma attached to diagnosis. On the basis of historical analysis and ethnographic fieldwork with healers, doctors, and patients since 1998, this article offers an ethnographic contextualization of the development and reception of Puloka's three key interventions during the 1990s: (a) collaboration with traditional healers; (b) translation of psychiatric diagnoses into local cultural concepts; and (c) encouraging freedom of movement and legal appeal to involuntary admission. Dr Puloka's use of medical anthropological and transcultural psychiatry research informed a community-engaged brokerage between the implications of psychiatric nosologies and local needs that can address some of the challenges of the Global Mental Health movement.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF SERVICE MARKET OF HIGHER EDUCATION AS A PRIORITY DIRECTION OF VOCATIONAL SCHOOL MODERNIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Bedenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of the developed market of higher educational services, various problems in the regional higher education service markets are designated and disproportions in the educational services market are revealed which in case of a suspense pass into the category of barriers to representatives of all interested parties.In the unstable conditions of a social and economic situation in our society, absence of the forecast of economy development, formation of profile structure of specialist training is complicated. Violation of traditional educational communications with employers, weak influence of professional communities on educational system development, backwardness of a labor market complicates reduction of education content in compliance with economic and social sphere requirements, the organization of practical training for students, employment of graduates. New conditions of providing educational services in Russia, such as transition from the state monopoly to a multistructure education system as well as paid education have caused a need of reorganization in the work of educational institutions. Competitive fight for the consumer has toughened requirements to quality and conditions of training service. Creation of an extensive network of the most various non-state educational institutions, penetration of the foreign educational institutions into Russian market which have a rich market experience in the field of professional education, possibility for Russian citizens to get education abroad  have resulted in the fact that consumers of educational services can now make an independent choice of various training programs, depending on its contents, forms and training methods, as well as conditions of their acquisition.

  14. Youth Mental Health in a Populous City of the Developing World: Results from the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjet, Corina; Borges, Guilherme; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Zambrano, Joaquin; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Background: Because the epidemiologic data available for adolescents from the developing world is scarce, the objective is to estimate the prevalence and severity of psychiatric disorders among Mexico City adolescents, the socio-demographic correlates associated with these disorders and service utilization patterns. Methods: This is a multistage…

  15. Development and Validation of a Scale Assessing Mental Health Clinicians' Experiences of Associative Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanos, Philip T; Vayshenker, Beth; DeLuca, Joseph S; O'Connor, Lauren K

    2017-10-01

    Mental health professionals who work with people with serious mental illnesses are believed to experience associative stigma. Evidence suggests that associative stigma could play an important role in the erosion of empathy among professionals; however, no validated measure of the construct currently exists. This study examined the convergent and discriminant validity and factor structure of a new scale assessing the associative stigma experiences of clinicians working with people with serious mental illnesses. A total of 473 clinicians were recruited from professional associations in the United States and participated in an online study. Participants completed the Clinician Associative Stigma Scale (CASS) and measures of burnout, quality of care, expectations about recovery, and self-efficacy. Associative stigma experiences were commonly endorsed; eight items on the 18-item scale were endorsed as being experienced "sometimes" or "often" by over 50% of the sample. The new measure demonstrated a logical four-factor structure: "negative stereotypes about professional effectiveness," "discomfort with disclosure," "negative stereotypes about people with mental illness," and "stereotypes about professionals' mental health." The measure had good internal consistency. It was significantly related to measures of burnout and quality of care, but it was not related to measures of self-efficacy or expectations about recovery. Findings suggest that the CASS is internally consistent and shows evidence of convergent validity and that associative stigma is commonly experienced by mental health professionals who work with people with serious mental illnesses.

  16. Human rights principles in developing and updating policies and laws on mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, M

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization's Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 stipulates human rights as a cross-cutting principle (WHO, 2013) and foresees global targets to update policies as well as mental health laws in line with international and regional human rights instruments. The international human rights agreements repeatedly refer to health, including mental health. The most pertinent provisions related to mental health are enshrined in the 2006 Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which sets out human rights in an accessible and inclusive fashion to ensure the equal participation of persons with disabilities. The inconclusive description of disability in the treaty overtly refers to 'mental impairment' as part of an explicitly evolving understanding of disability. This text sketches some of the underlying concepts as they apply to the realm of mental health: non-discrimination of persons with disabilities and measures that should be taken to ensure accessibility in a holistic understanding; removal of social and attitudinal barriers as much as communication and intellectual barriers but also institutional hurdles. The CRPD's paradigm shift away from framing disability mainly through deficits towards a social understanding of disability as the result of interaction and focusing on capacity is the core on which the provision of mental health services at community level to enable participation in society shall be ensured. Questions of capacity, also to make decisions and the possible need for support in so doing, are sketched out.

  17. Social Media as It Interfaces with Psychosocial Development and Mental Illness in Transitional Age Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A; Escobar-Viera, César G

    2017-04-01

    For transitional age individuals, social media (SM) is an integral component of connecting with others. There are 2 billion SM users worldwide. SM users may experience an increase in perceived social support and life satisfaction. Use of SM may facilitate forming connections among people with potentially stigmatizing mental disorders. However, epidemiologic studies suggest that increased SM use is associated with conditions such as depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance. Future research should examine directionality of these associations and the role of contextual factors. It also will be useful to leverage SM to provide mental health care and surveillance of mental health concerns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MEDICAL SCIENCE, RESEARCH AND HIGHER EDUCATION IN AZERBAIJAN FROM BIOETHICAL DEVELOPMENTS PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    VUGAR, MAMMADOV; KERIM, MUNIR; LALA, JAFAROVA

    2017-01-01

    Azerbaijan is a modern, rapidly developing democratic country at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. The country is currently harmonizing its national legislation with international norms, and reforming its national scientific and medical. Higher standards of medical research and education will enhance public health and protect human rights to life and health that are specified in Azerbaijan Constitution. In order to raise its medical research and education to international standards, Azerbaijani scientists and authorities are studying the experience of other countries and taking measures to implement international standards and norms in the country’s national legislation. Cooperation with the WHO, UNESCO and other international and foreign organizations, both on regional and global level is creating steps to achieve this goal. These steps include, for example, creation of the Azerbaijan unit of the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and teaching bioethics based on UNESCO’s Bioethics Core Curriculum. Another step is providing research fellowship for young Azerbaijani professionals to study at leading medical research and educational centers around the world including Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital in the USA, and Koc University in Turkey. A complementary step is the development of local bioethical research, including its legal, ethical and scientific foundations. Adherence to ethical principles in different spheres of life is currently one of the most challenging social and professional issues, especially, this is true with the development of new medical technologies in recent decades and the development of new ethical and legal standards, issues involving different areas of health and medicine and their relation to human rights. Bioethics in Azerbaijan is developing as an important field that deals with universal moral principles within the context of both national laws and the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. PMID

  19. Resilient Learning: Towards Integration of Strategic Research Programmes, Higher Education Functions and Regional-National Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauno Ilmari Pirinen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the concept of Learning by Research and Development (R&D is furthered to the world of more resilient learning in the setting of security related R&D projects for development of co-creative products, services and action competence. The background of this study includes an interdisciplinary combination of service science, security, computer science, pedagogy, engineering, and management science. The interdisciplinary combination involves researchers, learners, teachers, and other participants connecting and integrating the academic disciplines, professions, and technologies, along with their methods and perspectives for co-creation of a common goal. This goal emphasizes results as high-value impacts, as well as the value of products, services, and innovations as “deliverables” of the integrative learning process. Until recently, the Learning by R&D model is clear and transparent; as such, it can be adopted by learning and R&D integration of other sciences and higher education institutions. The structure of the model is also easy to adapt and renew in case of a change, which means that it can develop from the inside on the one hand, and produce interactions, adaptions, resilience and innovations on the other.

  20. Symbolic Algebra Development for Higher-Order Electron Propagator Formulation and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo-Mendoza, Teresa; Flores-Moreno, Roberto

    2014-06-10

    Through the use of symbolic algebra, implemented in a program, the algebraic expression of the elements of the self-energy matrix for the electron propagator to different orders were obtained. In addition, a module for the software package Lowdin was automatically generated. Second- and third-order electron propagator results have been calculated to test the correct operation of the program. It was found that the Fortran 90 modules obtained automatically with our algorithm succeeded in calculating ionization energies with the second- and third-order electron propagator in the diagonal approximation. The strategy for the development of this symbolic algebra program is described in detail. This represents a solid starting point for the automatic derivation and implementation of higher-order electron propagator methods.