WorldWideScience

Sample records for higher human sensitivity

  1. Higher sensory processing sensitivity, introversion and ectomorphism: New biomarkers for human creativity in developing rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V; Leon-S, Martha E; Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E

    2012-05-01

    The highly sensitive trait present in animals, has also been proposed as a human neurobiological trait. People having such trait can process larger amounts of sensory information than usual, making it an excellent attribute that allows to pick up subtle environmental details and cues. Furthermore, this trait correlates to some sort of giftedness such as higher perception, inventiveness, imagination and creativity. We present evidences that support the existance of key neural connectivity between the mentioned trait, higher sensory processing sensitivity, introversion, ectomorphism and creativity. The neurobiological and behavioral implications that these biomarkers have in people living in developing rural areas are discussed as well.

  2. Higher sensory processing sensitivity, introversion and ectomorphism: New biomarkers for human creativity in developing rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos V Rizzo-Sierra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The highly sensitive trait present in animals, has also been proposed as a human neurobiological trait. People having such trait can process larger amounts of sensory information than usual, making it an excellent attribute that allows to pick up subtle environmental details and cues. Furthermore, this trait correlates to some sort of giftedness such as higher perception, inventiveness, imagination and creativity. We present evidences that support the existance of key neural connectivity between the mentioned trait, higher sensory processing sensitivity, introversion, ectomorphism and creativity. The neurobiological and behavioral implications that these biomarkers have in people living in developing rural areas are discussed as well.

  3. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  4. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  5. Human leukocyte test system. X. Higher sensitivity to x-irradiation in the GO stage of the cell cycle of early as compared to late replicating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, B.; Obe, G.

    1976-12-29

    Leukocyte cultures were set up with x-irradiated whole blood (200 R). Cells starting with their DNA synthesis between 25 and 35 h after culture initiation (''early replicating cells'') were pulse-labeled with tritiated thymidine ((3H)TdR). Mitoses were collected with colcemid in adjacent intervals from 36 up to 72 h after culture initiation. At fixation times of 50, 56, 62, and 72 h enough mitoses for a determination of the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations (dicentric and ring chromosomes) were found. After that the preparations were processed for autoradiography. All mitoses analyzed for chromosomal aberrations were re-analyzed for labeling, and the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in labeled (= ''late replicating cells'') mitoses were compared. At all fixation times, higher frequencies of dicentric chromosomes were found in labeled as compared to unlabeled mitoses, indicating a higher sensitivity of early replicating cells to x-irradiation in the GO stage of the cell cycle.

  6. On the issue of higher human sensitivity to carcinogenic substances in early childhood; Zur Frage einer hoeheren Empfindlichkeit von Kindern gegenueber krebserzeugenden Stoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K. [comp.

    1998-09-01

    Age-dependent carcinogenesis in humans has been proven with high probability for a number of substances investigated within one or several model systems. Sometimes, very high tumor incidence after short exposure time was observed. Extreme differences were found in some models. (A) Vinyl chloride, Maltoni et al.,1981: 6000 ppm, hepatic angiosarcoma incidence: - Exposure for 4 weeks, from day 1: 40.5 %, - exposure for 4 weeks, from week 13: 0%, - exposure for 52 weeks, from week 13: 22%. Hepatoma incidence: - Exposure for 4 weeks, from day 1: 47.6%, exposure for 4 weeks, from week 13: 0%, exposure for 52 weeks, from week 13: 1.7%. (B) Diethyl nitrosamine, Dyroff et al., 1986: (DEN + phenobarbital), hepatic carcinoma after exposure of rats for 6 weeks: - as from 4 weeks of age: 100% incidence, - as from 8 weeks of age: 0% incidence. (C) Benzopyrene, Vesselinovitch et al., 1975: Hepatic tumor incidence after single, parenteral administration to rats: - at day 1: males: 81%, females: 18%, - at day 42: males: 9%, females: 0%. As is shown by the study on vinyl chloride by Maltoni et al., the same exposure concentration may lead to higher tumor incidence in young animals after short exposure times than it does in long-term experiments with adult animals. Genetic toxicity was detected for all substances, except for saccharin. So it can be assumed that the mechanism of carcinogenesis has an essential influence on the age-dependence. This conclusion agrees well with mechanistic approaches. (orig./CB) [German] Fuer eine Reihe von Schadstoffen ist eine Altersabhaengigkeit der Kanzerogenese mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit in einem oder mehreren Modellsystemen gezeigt worden. Dabei wurden zum Teil bereits nach kurzer Expositionszeit sehr hohe Tumorausbeuten erzielt. Extreme Unterschiede wurden in folgenden Modellen beobachtet. (A) Vinylchlorid, Maltoni et al., 1981: 6000 ppm, Inzidenz Leberangiosarkome: - Exposition ueber 4 Wochen ab Tag 1: 40,5%, - Exposition ueber 4 Wochen ab 13

  7. Enhanced sensitivity at higher-order exceptional points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodaei, Hossein; Hassan, Absar U; Wittek, Steffen; Garcia-Gracia, Hipolito; El-Ganainy, Ramy; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Khajavikhan, Mercedeh

    2017-08-09

    Non-Hermitian degeneracies, also known as exceptional points, have recently emerged as a new way to engineer the response of open physical systems, that is, those that interact with the environment. They correspond to points in parameter space at which the eigenvalues of the underlying system and the corresponding eigenvectors simultaneously coalesce. In optics, the abrupt nature of the phase transitions that are encountered around exceptional points has been shown to lead to many intriguing phenomena, such as loss-induced transparency, unidirectional invisibility, band merging, topological chirality and laser mode selectivity. Recently, it has been shown that the bifurcation properties of second-order non-Hermitian degeneracies can provide a means of enhancing the sensitivity (frequency shifts) of resonant optical structures to external perturbations. Of particular interest is the use of even higher-order exceptional points (greater than second order), which in principle could further amplify the effect of perturbations, leading to even greater sensitivity. Although a growing number of theoretical studies have been devoted to such higher-order degeneracies, their experimental demonstration in the optical domain has so far remained elusive. Here we report the observation of higher-order exceptional points in a coupled cavity arrangement-specifically, a ternary, parity-time-symmetric photonic laser molecule-with a carefully tailored gain-loss distribution. We study the system in the spectral domain and find that the frequency response associated with this system follows a cube-root dependence on induced perturbations in the refractive index. Our work paves the way for utilizing non-Hermitian degeneracies in fields including photonics, optomechanics, microwaves and atomic physics.

  8. Higher insulin sensitivity in vegans is not associated with higher mitochondrial density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojda, J; Patková, J; Jaček, M; Potočková, J; Trnka, J; Kraml, P; Anděl, M

    2013-12-01

    Vegans have a lower incidence of insulin resistance (IR)-associated diseases and a higher insulin sensitivity (IS) compared with omnivores. The aim of this study was to examine whether the higher IS in vegans relates to markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and to intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content. Eleven vegans and 10 matched (race, age, sex, body mass index, physical activity and energy intake) omnivorous controls were enrolled in a case-control study. Anthropometry, bioimpedance (BIA), ultrasound measurement of visceral and subcutaneous fat layer, parameters of glucose and lipid homeostasis, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and muscle biopsies were performed. Citrate synthase (CS) activity, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and IMCL content were assessed in skeletal muscle samples. Both groups were comparable in anthropometric and BIA parameters, physical activity and protein-energy intake. Vegans had significantly higher glucose disposal (M-value, vegans 8.11±1.51 vs controls 6.31±1.57 mg/kg/min, 95% confidence interval: 0.402 to 3.212, P=0.014), slightly lower IMCL content (vegans 13.91 (7.8 to 44.0) vs controls 17.36 (12.4 to 78.5) mg/g of muscle, 95% confidence interval: -7.594 to 24.550, P=0.193) and slightly higher relative muscle mtDNA amount (vegans 1.36±0.31 vs controls 1.13±0.36, 95% confidence interval:-0.078 to 0.537, P=0.135). No significant differences were found in CS activity (vegans 18.43±5.05 vs controls 18.16±5.41 μmol/g/min, 95% confidence interval: -4.503 to 5.050, P=0.906). Vegans have a higher IS, but comparable mitochondrial density and IMCL content with omnivores. This suggests that a decrease in whole-body glucose disposal may precede muscle lipid accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction in IR development.

  9. Gravitropism in higher plant shoots. V - Changing sensitivity to auxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Frank B.; Gillespie, Linda; Rorabaugh, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    The relationship in plants between the sensitivity to auxin and differential growth and bending was investigated experimentally. Decapitated and marked sunflower hypocotyl sections were immersed in buffered auxin solutions of different concentrations (0, 10 to the -8th, or 0.001 molar) and were photographed at 1/2 hr intervals; the negatives were analyzed with a digitizer/computer to evaluate surface-length changes in terms of Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics. It was found that bending decreased with increasing concentration of auxin. Increasing the auxin concentration inhibits the elongation growth of lower surfaces but promotes upper-surface growth, indicating that the lower surfaces have a greater Km sensitivity to applied auxin than the upper surfaces. At optimum auxin levels (maximum growth), the growth of bottom surfaces exceeded that of top surfaces, indicating that bottom tissues had a greater Vmax sensitivity.

  10. Halogen Bonding Promotes Higher Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Photovoltages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sarah J C; Parlane, Fraser G L; Swords, Wesley B; Kellett, Cameron W; Du, Chuan; Lam, Brian; Dean, Rebecca K; Hu, Ke; Meyer, Gerald J; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2016-08-24

    We report here an enhancement in photovoltage for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) where halogen-bonding interactions exist between a nucleophilic electrolyte species (I(-)) and a photo-oxidized dye immobilized on a TiO2 surface. The triarylamine-based dyes under investigation showed larger rate constants for dye regeneration (kreg) by the nucleophilic electrolyte species when heavier halogen substituents were positioned on the dye. The open-circuit voltages (VOC) tracked these kreg values. This analysis of a homologous series of dyes that differ only in the identity of two halogen substituents provides compelling evidence that the DSSC photovoltage is sensitive to kreg. This study also provides the first direct evidence that halogen-bonding interactions between the dye and the electrolyte can bolster DSSC performance.

  11. Differential sensitivity of Chironomus and human hemoglobin to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaikwad, Pallavi S. [Stress Biology Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule University, Pune, 411007 (India); Molecular Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Panicker, Lata [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Mohole, Madhura; Sawant, Sangeeta [Bioinformatics Center, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune, 411007 (India); Mukhopadhyaya, Rita [Molecular Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Nath, Bimalendu B., E-mail: bbnath@gmail.com [Stress Biology Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule University, Pune, 411007 (India)

    2016-08-05

    Chironomus ramosus is known to tolerate high doses of gamma radiation exposure. Larvae of this insect possess more than 95% of hemoglobin (Hb) in its circulatory hemolymph. This is a comparative study to see effect of gamma radiation on Hb of Chironomus and humans, two evolutionarily diverse organisms one having extracellular and the other intracellular Hb respectively. Stability and integrity of Chironomus and human Hb to gamma radiation was compared using biophysical techniques like Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry and CD spectroscopy after exposure of whole larvae, larval hemolymph, human peripheral blood, purified Chironomus and human Hb. Sequence- and structure-based bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the sequence and structural similarities or differences in the heme pockets of respective Hbs. Resistivity of Chironomus Hb to gamma radiation is remarkably higher than human Hb. Human Hb exhibited loss of heme iron at a relatively low dose of gamma radiation exposure as compared to Chironomus Hb. Unlike human Hb, the heme pocket of Chironomus Hb is rich in aromatic amino acids. Higher hydophobicity around heme pocket confers stability of Chironomus Hb compared to human Hb. Previously reported gamma radiation tolerance of Chironomus can be largely attributed to its evolutionarily ancient form of extracellular Hb as evident from the present study. -- Highlights: •Comparison of radiation tolerant Chironomus Hb and radiation sensitive Human Hb. •Amino acid composition of midge and human heme confer differential hydrophobicity. •Heme pocket of evolutionarily ancient midge Hb provide gamma radiation resistivity.

  12. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Benso, Maria P; Rivero-Gutierrez, Belen; Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Anzola, Andrea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Lujan, Juan A; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In humans, insulin sensitivity varies according to time of day, with decreased values in the evening and at night. Mechanisms responsible for the diurnal variation in insulin sensitivity are unclear. We investigated whether human adipose tissue (AT) expresses intrinsic circadian rhythms in insulin sensitivity that could contribute to this phenomenon. Subcutaneous and visceral AT biopsies were obtained from extremely obese participants (body mass index, 41.8 ± 6.3 kg/m(2); 46 ± 11 y) during gastric-bypass surgery. To assess the rhythm in insulin signaling, AKT phosphorylation was determined every 4 h over 24 h in vitro in response to different insulin concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM). Data revealed that subcutaneous AT exhibited robust circadian rhythms in insulin signaling (P Insulin sensitivity reached its maximum (acrophase) around noon, being 54% higher than during midnight (P = 0.009). The amplitude of the rhythm was positively correlated with in vivo sleep duration (r = 0.53; P = 0.023) and negatively correlated with in vivo bedtime (r = -0.54; P = 0.020). No circadian rhythms were detected in visceral AT (P = 0.643). Here, we demonstrate the relevance of the time of the day for how sensitive AT is to the effects of insulin. Subcutaneous AT shows an endogenous circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity that could provide an underlying mechanism for the daily rhythm in systemic insulin sensitivity.-Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Rivero-Gutierrez, B., Lopez-Minguez, J., Anzola, A., Diez-Noguera, A., Madrid, J. A., Lujan, J. A., Martínez-Augustin, O., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity. © FASEB.

  13. Human motion perception: Higher-order organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of higher-order motion perception and organization. It is argued that motion is sufficient to fully specify a number of environmental properties, including: depth order, three-dimensional form, object displacement, and dynamics. A grammar of motion perception is proposed; applications of this work for display design are discussed.

  14. Does Human Capital Theory Account For Individual Higher Education Choice?

    OpenAIRE

    Alex van der Merwe

    2010-01-01

    South African higher education policy evidently assumes a human capital interpretation of the value of higher education. However, not much local evidence has been provided to support the human capital view that individuals enroll in higher education primarily on the basis of future earnings they expect to flow from such investments. This paper suggests that one reason for this circumstance is that neoclassical economic epistemology, human capital theory’s philosophical paradigm, cannot deal c...

  15. Restyling the Humanities Curriculum of Higher Education for Posthuman Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Jamila R.

    2016-01-01

    The future viability of the humanities in higher education has been broadly debated. Yet, most of these debates are missing an important consideration. The humanities' object of study is the human, an object that some would argue has been replaced in our onto-epistemological systems by the posthuman. In her 2013 book, "The Posthuman,"…

  16. Restyling the Humanities Curriculum of Higher Education for Posthuman Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Jamila R.

    2016-01-01

    The future viability of the humanities in higher education has been broadly debated. Yet, most of these debates are missing an important consideration. The humanities' object of study is the human, an object that some would argue has been replaced in our onto-epistemological systems by the posthuman. In her 2013 book, "The Posthuman,"…

  17. Anticancer drug sensitivity by human tumor clonogenic assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraki,Shunkichi

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers was tested by the human tumor clonogenic assay (HTCA. Of 152 human cancer specimens tested, 63 (41% formed more than 30 tumor cell colonies in control plates and could be used to evaluate the drug sensitivity of tumor cells. In 42 (93% of 45 clinical trials in 24 patients, a parallel correlation was observed between the in vitro anticancer drug sensitivity measured by the HTCA and the clinical response of tumors to anticancer drugs. These results suggest that the HTCA is a good technique for the in vitro test of the anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers.

  18. Temporal sensitivity. [time dependent human perception of visual stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1986-01-01

    Human visual temporal sensitivity is examined. The stimuli used to measure temporal sensitivity are described and the linear systems theory is reviewed in terms of temporal sensitivity. A working model which represents temporal sensitivity is proposed. The visibility of a number of temporal wave forms, sinusoids, rectangular pulses, and pulse pairs, is analyzed. The relation between spatial and temporal effects is studied. Temporal variations induced by image motion and the effects of light adaptation on temporal sensitivity are considered.

  19. Sensitive periods in human development: evidence from musical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penhune, Virginia B

    2011-10-01

    One of the primary goals of cognitive neuroscience is to understand the interaction between genes, development and specific experience. A particularly fascinating example of this interaction is a sensitive period - a time during development when experience has a differential effect on behavior and the brain. Behavioral and brain imaging studies in musicians have provided suggestive evidence for a possible sensitive period for musical training; showing that musicians who began training early show better task performance and greater changes in auditory and motor regions of the brain. However, these studies have not controlled for likely differences between early- (ET) and late-trained (LT) musicians in the number of years of musical experience. This review presents behavioral work from our laboratory comparing the performance of ET (before age seven) and LT musicians who were matched for years of experience on the ability to tap in synchrony with auditory and visual rhythms. The results demonstrate the existence of a possible sensitive period for musical training that has its greatest impact on measures of sensorimotor integration. Work on motor learning in children and how this might relate to the observed sensitive period effect is also reviewed. These studies are described in the context of what is currently known about sensitive periods in animals and humans; drawing on evidence from anatomy and physiology, studies of deafness, as well as structural and functional neuroimaging studies in trained musicians. The possible mechanisms underlying sensitive periods for musical training are discussed based on current theories describing the influence of both low-level features of sensory experience and higher-level cognitive processing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensitivity of the Indian Monsoon to Human Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. KNOPF; K. ZICKFELD; M. FLECHSIG; V. PETOUKHOV

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the authors perform an extensive sensitivity analysis of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall to changes in parameters and boundary conditions which are influenced by human activities. For this study, the authors use a box model of the Indian monsoon which reproduces key features of the observed monsoon dynamics such as the annual course of precipitation and the transitions between winter and summer regimes. Because of its transparency and computational efficiency, this model is highly suitable for exploring the effects of anthropogenic perturbations such as emissions of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide, and land cover changes, on the Indian monsoon. Results of a systematic sensitivity analysis indicate that changes in those parameters which are related to emissions of greenhouse gases lead to an increase in Indian summer rainfall. In contrast, all parameters related to higher atmospheric aerosol concentrations lead to a decrease in Indian rainfall. Similarly, changes in parameters which can be related to forest conversion or desertification, act to decrease the summer precipitation. The results indicate that the sign of precipitation changes over India will be dependent on the direction and relative magnitude of different human perturbations.

  1. Magnetic resonance Spectroscopy with Linear Algebraic Modeling (SLAM) for higher speed and sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Schär, Michael; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2012-05-01

    Speed and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are critical for localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of low-concentration metabolites. Matching voxels to anatomical compartments a priori yields better SNR than the spectra created by summing signals from constituent chemical-shift-imaging (CSI) voxels post-acquisition. Here, a new method of localized Spectroscopy using Linear Algebraic Modeling (SLAM) is presented, that can realize this additional SNR gain. Unlike prior methods, SLAM generates spectra from C signal-generating anatomic compartments utilizing a CSI sequence wherein essentially only the C central k-space phase-encoding gradient steps with highest SNR are retained. After MRI-based compartment segmentation, the spectra are reconstructed by solving a sub-set of linear simultaneous equations from the standard CSI algorithm. SLAM is demonstrated with one-dimensional CSI surface coil phosphorus MRS in phantoms, the human leg and the heart on a 3T clinical scanner. Its SNR performance, accuracy, sensitivity to registration errors and inhomogeneity, are evaluated. Compared to one-dimensional CSI, SLAM yielded quantitatively the same results 4-times faster in 24 cardiac patients and healthy subjects. SLAM is further extended with fractional phase-encoding gradients that optimize SNR and/or minimize both inter- and intra-compartmental contamination. In proactive cardiac phosphorus MRS of six healthy subjects, both SLAM and fractional-SLAM (fSLAM) produced results indistinguishable from CSI while preserving SNR gains of 36-45% in the same scan-time. Both SLAM and fSLAM are simple to implement and reduce the minimum scan-time for CSI, which otherwise limits the translation of higher SNR achievable at higher field strengths to faster scanning.

  2. Magnetic resonance Spectroscopy with Linear Algebraic Modeling (SLAM) for higher speed and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E; Schär, Michael; Weiss, Robert G; Bottomley, Paul A

    2012-05-01

    Speed and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are critical for localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of low-concentration metabolites. Matching voxels to anatomical compartments a priori yields better SNR than the spectra created by summing signals from constituent chemical-shift-imaging (CSI) voxels post-acquisition. Here, a new method of localized Spectroscopy using Linear Algebraic Modeling (SLAM) is presented, that can realize this additional SNR gain. Unlike prior methods, SLAM generates spectra from C signal-generating anatomic compartments utilizing a CSI sequence wherein essentially only the C central k-space phase-encoding gradient steps with highest SNR are retained. After MRI-based compartment segmentation, the spectra are reconstructed by solving a sub-set of linear simultaneous equations from the standard CSI algorithm. SLAM is demonstrated with one-dimensional CSI surface coil phosphorus MRS in phantoms, the human leg and the heart on a 3T clinical scanner. Its SNR performance, accuracy, sensitivity to registration errors and inhomogeneity, are evaluated. Compared to one-dimensional CSI, SLAM yielded quantitatively the same results 4-times faster in 24 cardiac patients and healthy subjects. SLAM is further extended with fractional phase-encoding gradients that optimize SNR and/or minimize both inter- and intra-compartmental contamination. In proactive cardiac phosphorus MRS of six healthy subjects, both SLAM and fractional-SLAM (fSLAM) produced results indistinguishable from CSI while preserving SNR gains of 36-45% in the same scan-time. Both SLAM and fSLAM are simple to implement and reduce the minimum scan-time for CSI, which otherwise limits the translation of higher SNR achievable at higher field strengths to faster scanning.

  3. Evidence for thiocyanate-sensitive peroxidase activity in human saliva.

    OpenAIRE

    Cowman, R A; Baron, S S; Obenauf, S D; Byrnes, J J

    1983-01-01

    A procedure was developed for determining the relative levels of lactoperoxidase, leukocyte myeloperoxidase, and thiocyanate-sensitive peroxidase in human saliva. With this procedure, most of the peroxidase activity in whole saliva from normal (those without cancer) subjects was found to be associated with lactoperoxidase and thiocyanate-sensitive peroxidase, with only a minor contribution from leukocyte myeloperoxidase. In contrast, thiocyanate-sensitive peroxidase and leukocyte myeloperoxid...

  4. Higher-order terms in sensitivity analysis through a differential approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubi, A.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    A differential approach to sensitivity analysis has been developed that eliminates some difficulties existing in previous work. The new development leads to simple explicit expressions for the first-order perturbation as well as any higher-order terms. The higher-order terms are dependent only on differentials of the transport operator, the unperturbed flux, the adjoint flux, and the unperturbed Green's function of the system.

  5. Modeling Human Behaviour with Higher Order Logic: Insider Threats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boender, Jaap; Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Kammuller, Florian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we approach the problem of modeling the human component in technical systems with a view on the difference between the use of model and theory in sociology and computer science. One aim of this essay is to show that building of theories and models for sociology can be compared...... it to the sociological process of logical explanation. As a case study on modeling human behaviour, we present the modeling and analysis of insider threats as a Higher Order Logic theory in Isabelle/HOL. We show how each of the three step process of sociological explanation can be seen in our modeling of insider’s state...

  6. Multivariate Models for Prediction of Human Skin Sensitization ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the lnteragency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Method's (ICCVAM) top priorities is the development and evaluation of non-animal approaches to identify potential skin sensitizers. The complexity of biological events necessary to produce skin sensitization suggests that no single alternative method will replace the currently accepted animal tests. ICCVAM is evaluating an integrated approach to testing and assessment based on the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization that uses machine learning approaches to predict human skin sensitization hazard. We combined data from three in chemico or in vitro assays - the direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA), human cell line activation test (h-CLAT) and KeratinoSens TM assay - six physicochemical properties and an in silico read-across prediction of skin sensitization hazard into 12 variable groups. The variable groups were evaluated using two machine learning approaches , logistic regression and support vector machine, to predict human skin sensitization hazard. Models were trained on 72 substances and tested on an external set of 24 substances. The six models (three logistic regression and three support vector machine) with the highest accuracy (92%) used: (1) DPRA, h-CLAT and read-across; (2) DPRA, h-CLAT, read-across and KeratinoSens; or (3) DPRA, h-CLAT, read-across, KeratinoSens and log P. The models performed better at predicting human skin sensitization hazard than the murine

  7. Editorial: Technology for higher education, adult learning and human performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhong Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This special issue is dedicated to technology-enabled approaches for improving higher education, adult learning, and human performance. Improvement of learning and human development for sustainable development has been recognized as a key strategy for individuals, institutions, and organizations to strengthen their competitive advantages. It becomes crucial to help adult learners and knowledge workers to improve their self-directed and life-long learning capabilities. Meanwhile, advances in technology have been increasingly enabling and facilitating learning and knowledge-related initiatives.. They have largely extended learning opportunities through the provision of resource-rich and learner-centered environment, computer-based learning support, and expanded social interactions and networks. Papers in this special issue are representative of ongoing research on integration of technology with learning for innovation and sustainable development in higher education institutions and organizational and community environments.

  8. Improved swimming pool achieves higher reproducibility and sensitivity to effect of food components as ergogenic AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kengo; Yamada, Ayumi; Mita, Yukiko; Goto, Ayako; Ishimi, Tomoe; Mabuchi, Haruko; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru; Yasumoto, Kyoden

    2009-06-01

    A previously developed current swimming pool for mice has been used to evaluate many food components that enhance endurance exercise performance. In this article, to improve reproducibility, reliability and sensitivity of this assay system, we improved the spout part to generate a uniform current and divided the pool into six lanes to avoid physical interference between swimming mice. The stability of the current flow was assessed by measuring the surface current speed and water volume from the spout part. Maximum swimming times of ddY and BALB/c mice were measured to assess the reproducibility of the maximum swimming time. The improvement in sensitivity compared to the original equipment was estimated under three physiological conditions: low carbohydrate diet feeding, low blood hemoglobin level, and carbohydrate supplementation during exercise. The new spout part improved uniformity and quick adjustment of surface current, yielding an increase of workload in a stepwise manner during swimming. Exercise workload was increased in proportion to surface current speed, as evidenced by cadence of kicks and serum lactic acid levels. The improved swimming pool showed higher reproducibility of swimming time until fatigue (pswimming time was improved in the swimming pool. The improved swimming pool yielded higher sensitivity for low carbohydrate diet feeding (pswimming pool. The improvement of the swimming pool achieved higher sensitivity and reproducibility in assessing various diet and food components compared to the original swimming pool.

  9. Human Mars Ascent Configuration and Design Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Tara P.; Gernhardt, Mike; Collins, Tim; Martin, John

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may utilize several small cabins where crew members could live for days up to a couple of weeks. At the end of a Mars surface mission the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) crew cabin would carry the crew to their destination in orbit in a matter of hours or days. Other small cabins in support of a Mars mission would include pressurized rovers that allow crew members to travel great distances from their primary habitat on Mars while unconstrained by time limits of typical EVAs. An orbital crew taxi could allow for exploration of the moons of Mars with minimum impact to the primary Earth-Mars transportation systems. A common crew cabin design that can perform in each of these applications is desired and could reduce the overall mission cost. However, for the MAV, the crew cabin size and mass can have a large impact on vehicle design and performance. The total ascent vehicle mass drives performance requirements for the Mars descent systems and the Earth to Mars transportation elements. Minimizing MAV mass is a priority and minimizing the crew cabin size and mass is one way to do that. This paper explores the benefits and impacts of using a common crew cabin design for the MAV. Results of a MAV configuration trade study will be presented along with mass and performance estimates for the selected design.

  10. Contrast sensitivity to angular frequency gratings is not higher than to Cartesian gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zana Y.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available When contrast sensitivity functions to Cartesian and angular gratings were compared in previous studies the peak sensitivity to angular stimuli was reported to be 0.21 log units higher. In experiments carried out to repeat this result, we used the same two-alternative forced-choice paradigm, but improved experimental control and precision by increasing contrast resolution from 8 to 12 bits, increasing the screen refresh rate from 30 Hz interlaced to 85 Hz non-interlaced, linearizing the voltage-luminance relation, modulating luminance in frequencies that minimize pixel aliasing, and improving control of the subject's exposure to the stimuli. The contrast sensitivity functions to Cartesian and angular gratings were similar in form and peak sensitivity (2.4 cycles per visual degree (c/deg and 32 c/360º, respectively to those reported in a previous study (3 c/deg and 32 c/360º, respectively, but peak sensitivity to angular stimuli was 0.13 log units lower than that to Cartesian stimuli. When the experiment was repeated, this time simulating the experimental control level used in the previous study, no difference between the peak sensitivity to Cartesian and angular stimuli was found. This result agrees with most current models that assume Cartesian filtering at the first visual processing stage. The discrepancy in the results is explained in part by differences in the degree of experimental control.

  11. The role of higher education in equitable human development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Chavanne; Svenson, Nanette

    2016-04-01

    As developing countries continue to battle poverty despite strong economic growth, understanding the relationship between equity and human development becomes increasingly important. In this context, equity is not equivalent to equality for any specific outcome such as health status, education or income. It is an objective ideal whereby people's achievements are increasingly dependent upon personal effort, choice and initiative rather than predetermined characteristics such as race, gender and socioeconomic background. As such, equity becomes an issue of moral equality based on the belief that people should be treated as equals, with equal access to life chances. This ideal pursues equal access to public services, infrastructure and rights for all citizens, including the right to education. While evidence suggests that education builds healthier, richer, more equitable societies, research on this has focused predominantly on primary and secondary schooling. The authors of this paper begin with an extensive review of existing research and relevant literature. In the second part of their article, they then report on their own study which furthers the discussion by exploring connections between tertiary education and development using equity as a reflection of human development - a holistic extension of economic development. After extracting relevant data from a number of available world reports by the United Nations, the World Bank and other organisations, they carried out a cross-national statistical analysis designed to examine the relationship between tertiary enrolment levels and a composite equity variable. Their results indicate a strong association between higher post-secondary education levels and higher levels of social equity.

  12. Sensitive Immunoassays of Nitrated Fibrinogen in Human Biofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hua; Qian, Weijun; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Smith, Richard D.; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-05-05

    Three new sandwich immunoassays for detection of nitrated biomarker have been established with potential applications in biomedical studies and clinical practice. In this study, nitrated human fibrinogen, a potential oxidative stress biomarker for several pathologies, was chosen as the target. To improve the sensitivity and overcome the interference caused by the complexity of human biofluids, we developed three sandwich strategies using various combinations of primary antibody and secondary antibody. All three strategies demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity towards nitrated forms of fibrinogen in buffer, but their performances were dramatically reduced when tested with human plasma and serum samples. Systematically optimizations were carried out to investigate the effects of numerous factors, including sampling, coating, blocking, and immunoreactions. Our final optimization results indicate that two of these strategies retain sufficient sensitivity and selectivity for use as assays in human physiological samples. Specifically, detection limits reached the pM level and the linear response ranges were up to nM level with a correlation coefficient > 0.99. To our best knowledge, this is the first example of using an electrochemical immunoassay for a nitrated biomarker in a physiological fluid. This novel approach provides a rapid, sensitive, selective, cost efficient and robust bioassay for detection of oxidative stress in pathology and for clinical applications. Moreover, the sandwich strategies developed in this paper can be readily used to establish effective methods targeting other nitration biomarkers.

  13. A non-human primate model for gluten sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Bethune

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Gluten sensitivity is widespread among humans. For example, in celiac disease patients, an inflammatory response to dietary gluten leads to enteropathy, malabsorption, circulating antibodies against gluten and transglutaminase 2, and clinical symptoms such as diarrhea. There is a growing need in fundamental and translational research for animal models that exhibit aspects of human gluten sensitivity. METHODS: Using ELISA-based antibody assays, we screened a population of captive rhesus macaques with chronic diarrhea of non-infectious origin to estimate the incidence of gluten sensitivity. A selected animal with elevated anti-gliadin antibodies and a matched control were extensively studied through alternating periods of gluten-free diet and gluten challenge. Blinded clinical and histological evaluations were conducted to seek evidence for gluten sensitivity. RESULTS: When fed with a gluten-containing diet, gluten-sensitive macaques showed signs and symptoms of celiac disease including chronic diarrhea, malabsorptive steatorrhea, intestinal lesions and anti-gliadin antibodies. A gluten-free diet reversed these clinical, histological and serological features, while reintroduction of dietary gluten caused rapid relapse. CONCLUSIONS: Gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques may be an attractive resource for investigating both the pathogenesis and the treatment of celiac disease.

  14. Human Capital Planning in Higher Education Institutions: A Strategic Human Resource Development Initiative in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Samer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study is to determine the status of human capital planning in higher education institutions in Jordan. Design/methodology/approach: A random sample of 120 faculty members (in administrative positions) responded to a human capital planning (HCP) survey. The survey consisted of a pool of 38 items distributed over…

  15. Skin Sensitive Difference of Human Body Sections under Clothing --Comparative Judging of Body Sections' Cold Sensitivity Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; WANG Yun-yi; WU Hai-yan

    2005-01-01

    Skin sensitive difference of human body sections under clothing is the theoretic foundation of thermal insulation clothing design. By a new psychological & physical researching method, the subjective psychological perception of human body sections affected by the same cold stimulus are studied, and with Thurstone comparative judgement the main human body sections' cold sensitivity sequences are obtained. Furthermore the physiological causes for skin sensitive difference of human body sections under clothing are suggested.

  16. Higher Sensitivity and Earlier Identification of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity by a Nonradioactive Assay for Transglutaminase Autoantibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher sensitive transglutaminase autoantibody (TGA assay will detect the onset of celiac disease (CD autoimmunity earlier. In developing a nonradioactive assay for TGA, we utilized electrochemiluminescence (ECL technology and compared it to a high-performance radioimmunoassay (RIA currently being used to screen patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and genetically at-risk individuals for CD. We selected 183 T1D patients with 60 patients having received biopsy and analyzed 396 sequential samples from 73 young children longitudinally followed up with TGA seroconversion, with 27 undergoing biopsy. In addition, 112 age-matched healthy control subjects were included in the study. With the 99th percentile of specificity, the ECL assay detected significantly more TGA positivity among patients with T1D (133/183 than RIA (114/183 and more of the sequential samples (34% from 73 children than RIA (18%. The TGA assay performed by ECL was positive in all 59 subjects with villous atrophy. Among 73 longitudinally followed up children, ECL assay had earlier detection of TGA on 34 children by a mean of 2.5 years. In conclusion, the new TGA assay by ECL has a higher sensitivity than the current RIA assay and may better predict the onset of CD.

  17. Higher sensitivity to sweet and salty taste in obese compared to lean individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardikar, Samyogita; Höchenberger, Richard; Villringer, Arno; Ohla, Kathrin

    2017-04-01

    Although putatively taste has been associated with obesity as one of the factors governing food intake, previous studies have failed to find a consistent link between taste perception and Body Mass Index (BMI). A comprehensive comparison of both thresholds and hedonics for four basic taste modalities (sweet, salty, sour, and bitter) has only been carried out with a very small sample size in adults. In the present exploratory study, we compared 23 obese (OB; BMI > 30), and 31 lean (LN; BMI salty), citric acid (sour), and quinine hydrochloride (bitter) dissolved in water. Recognition thresholds were estimated with an adaptive Bayesian staircase procedure (QUEST). Intensity and pleasantness ratings were acquired using visual analogue scales (VAS). It was found that OB had lower thresholds than LN for sucrose and NaCl, indicating a higher sensitivity to sweet and salty tastes. This effect was also reflected in ratings of intensity, which were significantly higher in the OB group for the lower concentrations of sweet, salty, and sour. Calculation of Bayes factors further corroborated the differences observed with null-hypothesis significance testing (NHST). Overall, the results suggest that OB are more sensitive to sweet and salty, and perceive sweet, salty, and sour more intensely than LN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyclooxygenase products sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors in humans with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlekauff, Holly R; Chiu, Josephine; Hamilton, Michele A; Fonarow, Gregg C; Maclellan, W Robb; Hage, Antoine; Moriguchi, Jaime; Patel, Jignesh

    2008-04-01

    Prior work in animals and humans suggests that muscle mechanoreceptor control of sympathetic activation [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)] during exercise in heart failure (HF) patients is heightened compared with that of healthy humans and that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by metabolic by-products. We sought to determine whether cyclooxygenase products and/or endogenous adenosine, two metabolites of ischemic exercise, sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors during rhythmic handgrip (RHG) exercise in HF patients. Indomethacin, which inhibits the production of prostaglandins, and saline control were infused in 12 HF patients. In a different protocol, aminophylline, which inhibits adenosine receptors, and saline control were infused in 12 different HF patients. MSNA was recorded (microneurography). During exercise following saline, MSNA increased in the first minute of exercise, consistent with baseline heightened mechanoreceptor sensitivity. MSNA continued to increase during 3 min of RHG, indicative that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by ischemia metabolites. Indomethacin, but not aminophylline, markedly attenuated the increase in MSNA during the entire 3 min of low-level rhythmic exercise, consistent with the sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors by cyclooxygenase products. Interestingly, even the early increase in MSNA was abolished by indomethacin infusion, indicative of the very early generation of cyclooxygenase products after the onset of exercise in HF patients. In conclusion, muscle mechanoreceptors mediate the increase in MSNA during low-level RHG exercise in HF. Cyclooxygenase products, but not endogenous adenosine, play a central role in muscle mechanoreceptor sensitization. Finally, muscle mechanoreceptors in patients with HF have heightened basal sensitivity to mechanical stimuli, which also appears to be mediated by the early generation of cyclooxygenase products, resulting in exaggerated early increases in MSNA.

  19. Differential sensitivity of Chironomus and human hemoglobin to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Panicker, Lata; Mohole, Madhura; Sawant, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-08-05

    Chironomus ramosus is known to tolerate high doses of gamma radiation exposure. Larvae of this insect possess more than 95% of hemoglobin (Hb) in its circulatory hemolymph. This is a comparative study to see effect of gamma radiation on Hb of Chironomus and humans, two evolutionarily diverse organisms one having extracellular and the other intracellular Hb respectively. Stability and integrity of Chironomus and human Hb to gamma radiation was compared using biophysical techniques like Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry and CD spectroscopy after exposure of whole larvae, larval hemolymph, human peripheral blood, purified Chironomus and human Hb. Sequence- and structure-based bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the sequence and structural similarities or differences in the heme pockets of respective Hbs. Resistivity of Chironomus Hb to gamma radiation is remarkably higher than human Hb. Human Hb exhibited loss of heme iron at a relatively low dose of gamma radiation exposure as compared to Chironomus Hb. Unlike human Hb, the heme pocket of Chironomus Hb is rich in aromatic amino acids. Higher hydophobicity around heme pocket confers stability of Chironomus Hb compared to human Hb. Previously reported gamma radiation tolerance of Chironomus can be largely attributed to its evolutionarily ancient form of extracellular Hb as evident from the present study.

  20. Metabolic and Sensory Influences on Odor Sensitivity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaekers, Marielle G; Verhoef, Alard; Gort, Gerrit; Luning, Pieternel A; Boesveldt, Sanne

    2016-02-01

    Our olfactory sense plays an important role in eating behavior by modulating our food preferences and intake. However, hunger or satiety may also influence how we perceive odors. Albeit speculative, contradictory results found in the past may have resulted from confounding by type of meal that participants ate to induce satiety. We aimed to investigate the influence of hunger state on olfactory sensitivity, comparing hunger to satiety using 2 different types of lunch to control for sensory-specific satiety. Odor detection thresholds were measured in 2 groups of participants (39 per group, 18-40 years), under 3 conditions: when hungry (twice), after a sweet lunch, and after a savory lunch. One group had their detection thresholds tested for a sweet odor, whereas in the other group, sensitivity to a savory odor was measured. Differences in olfactory sensitivity conditions were analyzed using linear mixed models. Participants had higher scores on the odor sensitivity task in a hungry versus satiated state (P = 0.001). Within the satiated condition, there was no effect of type of lunch on odor sensitivity. In conclusion, hunger slightly enhances sensitivity to food odors, but did not significantly depend on the type of food participants ate, suggesting no clear influence of sensory-specific satiety.

  1. Sensitive detection of viral transcripts in human tumor transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Eric Schelhorn

    Full Text Available In excess of 12% of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped 14 transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates

  2. Sensitivity analysis techniques for models of human behavior.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bier, Asmeret Brooke

    2010-09-01

    Human and social modeling has emerged as an important research area at Sandia National Laboratories due to its potential to improve national defense-related decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. To learn about which sensitivity analysis techniques are most suitable for models of human behavior, different promising methods were applied to an example model, tested, and compared. The example model simulates cognitive, behavioral, and social processes and interactions, and involves substantial nonlinearity, uncertainty, and variability. Results showed that some sensitivity analysis methods create similar results, and can thus be considered redundant. However, other methods, such as global methods that consider interactions between inputs, can generate insight not gained from traditional methods.

  3. Sensitivity of Selected Arenaviruses to a Human Interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-25

    AUSTRAC ? (Coat~oue do reviers t-d ner..eemy and Idenify by block number) -sessment of arenavirus sensitivities to an interferon (IF) of human cell...plays a determinant role in the outcome of infection with these viruses. However, at the same time, these results do not ruLe out the possibility that... role in the eventual outcome of the cellular infectious process. In arenavirus-cell interactions, where IF synthesis is induced either upon primary

  4. Contrast sensitivity and higher-order aberrations in patients with astigmatism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Guang-ying; ZHANG Wei-xia; DU Jun; ZHANG Jin-song; LIU Su-bing; NIE Xiao-li; ZHU Xiao-hong; TANG Xiu-xia; XIN Bao-li; MAI Zhi-bin

    2007-01-01

    Background Astigmatism is one of the most significant obstacles for achieving satisfactory visual function. This study was to evaluate the influence of astigmatism on contrast sensitivity (CS) and higher-order aberrations.Methods CS, accommodation response and wavefront aberration were measured in 113 patients with astigmatism,aged 18-36 years. Both single and binocular visual performance were examined under four lighting conditions: photopia,photopia with glare, scotopia and scotopia with glare respectively. Accommodation response was classified as normal,abnormal and low. The contribution of the power and axis of astigmatism to CS, accommodation response and wavefront aberration was analyzed.Results As the dioptric power of astigmatism increased, the loss of CS spatial frequency changed from high to intermediate, and then to low frequency. CS scores varied at different illuminance levels, descending in the following sequence: photopia, photopia with glare, scotopia, and scotopia with glare. However, the normal accommodation group showed better CS values under photopia with glare than without glare. The range of influenced direction of sine-wave gratings remained mostly at the meridian line of high dioptric power, which would be expanded when optical accommadation attenuated. The patients with symmetrical astigmatism got higher CS scores with binoculus vision than with dominant eye vision, while the patients with asymmetrical astigmatism did this only at scotopia with glare. Among higher-order aberrations, coma aberration, secondary coma aberration and the total higher order aberration were influenced by astigmatism, all of which rising with the power of astigmatism increased.Conclusions Reducing astigmatism might improve the performance of visual function. Not only the power of astigmatism should be cut down, but also the binocular axes should be made symmetrically.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Outer Membrane Proteins from Salmonella Enteritidis Strains with Different Sensitivity to Human Serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Bartłomiej; Krzyżewska, Eva; Kapczyńska, Katarzyna; Rybka, Jacek; Pawlak, Aleksandra; Korzekwa, Kamila; Klausa, Elżbieta; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Differential analysis of outer membrane composition of S. Enteritidis strains, resistant to 50% normal human serum (NHS) was performed in order to find factors influencing the resistance to higher concentrations of NHS. Ten S. Enteritidis clinical strains, resistant to 50% NHS, all producing very long lipopolysaccharide, were subjected to the challenge of 75% NHS. Five extreme strains: two resistant and three sensitive to 75% NHS, were chosen for the further analysis of outer membrane proteins composition. Substantial differences were found in the levels of particular outer membrane proteins between resistant and sensitive strains, i.e. outer membrane protease E (PgtE) was present mainly in resistant strains, while sensitive strains possessed a high level of flagellar hook-associated protein 2 (FliD) and significantly higher levels of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). PMID:27695090

  6. Access to Gender-Sensitive Higher Education in Eastern and Central Europe: Reflections on the CEPES Project "Good Practice in Promoting Gender Equality in Higher Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunberg, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Summarizing the incomplete results of the United Nations Educational and Scientific Organization (UNESCO) program "Good Practice in Promoting Gender Equality in Higher Education," the author asks that any assessment of the progress made in the area of gender-sensitive education take regional specificities into account. The regional…

  7. Human capital and its development in the context of higher education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the concept of human capital in the context of higher education. The components of human capital are identified and characterized in the sphere of the University's teachers' staff. The important factors of human capital are considered. The definition of the higher school human capital is given. The components that can influence on human capital development in higher school are described. The basic elements of human capital and ways of its formation in the system of higher education are singled out.

  8. Fibroblasts maintained in 3 dimensions show a better differentiation state and higher sensitivity to estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montani, Claudia [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Civic Hospital of Brescia (Italy); Steimberg, Nathalie; Boniotti, Jennifer [Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Anatomy and Physiopathology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Brescia (Italy); Biasiotto, Giorgio; Zanella, Isabella [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Civic Hospital of Brescia (Italy); Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Diafera, Giuseppe [Integrated Systems Engineering (ISE), Milan (Italy); Biunno, Ida [IRGB-CNR, Milan (Italy); IRCCS-Multimedica, Milan (Italy); Caimi, Luigi [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Civic Hospital of Brescia (Italy); Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Mazzoleni, Giovanna [Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Anatomy and Physiopathology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Brescia (Italy); Di Lorenzo, Diego, E-mail: diego.dilorenzo@yahoo.it [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Civic Hospital of Brescia (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    maintaining cells in more physiological conditions. • RCCS-cultured fibroblasts showed higher hormonal sensitivity to estradiol. • This bioreactor is a novel 3D model to be applied to pharmacotoxicological studies.

  9. The Role of Higher Education in Equitable Human Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Chavanne; Svenson, Nanette

    2016-01-01

    As developing countries continue to battle poverty despite strong economic growth, understanding the relationship between equity and human development becomes increasingly important. In this context, equity is not equivalent to equality for any specific outcome such as health status, education or income. It is an objective ideal whereby people's…

  10. The Role of Higher Education in Equitable Human Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Chavanne; Svenson, Nanette

    2016-01-01

    As developing countries continue to battle poverty despite strong economic growth, understanding the relationship between equity and human development becomes increasingly important. In this context, equity is not equivalent to equality for any specific outcome such as health status, education or income. It is an objective ideal whereby people's…

  11. Modeling Human Behaviour with Higher Order Logic: Insider Threats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boender, Jaap; Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Kammüller, Florian; Primierio, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we approach the problem of modeling the human component in technical systems with a view on the difference between the use of model and theory in sociology and computer science. One aim of this essay is to show that building of theories and models for sociology can be compared and imp

  12. Effects of antimetabolites on adenovirus replication in sensitive and resistant human melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musk, P; Stowers, A; Parsons, P G

    1990-02-15

    Methotrexate (MTX), 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) inhibited the replication of adenovirus (viral capacity) more in drug-sensitive than in resistant human melanoma cell lines. By comparison, inhibition of cellular DNA and RNA synthesis after short treatment periods (less than 48 hr) was not a good predictor of cellular sensitivity. MTX, an inhibitor of de novo nucleotide synthesis, was most effective when added to cells just before infection with virus and inhibited viral capacity at doses 10-1000-fold lower than those required to affect cell survival. The MTX-sensitive cell lines, members of a DNA repair deficient group sensitive also to killing by methylating agents (the Mer- phenotype), were not deficient in dihydrofolate reductase but exhibited DNA fragmentation after treatment with MTX for 48 hr. 6-TG and ara-C, inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine salvage, were most inhibitory to viral capacity when added greater than 36 hr before virus infection and were less effective than MTX (doses 5-7-fold and 4-24-fold higher than for cell survival respectively). No correlation was found between MTX sensitivity and sensitivity to 6-TG or ara-C. These results indicate that (i) inhibition of viral capacity is a more comprehensive test of antimetabolite cytotoxicity than inhibition of cellular DNA or RNA synthesis; (ii) the viral capacity assay correctly predicts cellular sensitivity to MTX, 6-TG and ara-C and therefore has potential for application to primary cultures of human tumours; and (iii) MTX-sensitive cell lines and adenovirus replication rely heavily on de novo nucleotide synthesis, which in Mer- cells appears to be linked to a DNA repair defect as yet undefined.

  13. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R., E-mail: mundy.william@epa.gov

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  14. Inverted Pendulum-type Personal Mobility Considering Human Vibration Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misaki Masuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An inverted pendulum-type PM (personal mobility has been attracting attention as a low-carbon vehicle. For many people who like to use the PM, ride comfort is important. However, ride comfort of PM has not been focused on in previous studies. The vibration is one of causes that make riders feel uncomfortable. The PM is unstable system and horizontal vibration may be caused by a stabilizing control. Additionally, vertical vibration may also be caused by road disturbances. This study analyzes the vibration of the rider’s head in these two directions when the PM runs on a road with disturbances in numerical simulations, and evaluates ride comfort with the frequency characteristics of the vibration. To consider human vibration sensitivity, the frequency weighting proposed in ISO 2631-1 is used as an evaluation standard. The improvement methods are proposed from both software and hardware, and it is confirmed that the proposed method can improve ride comfort.

  15. Effect of higher-order aberrations and intraocular scatter on contrast sensitivity measured with a single instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junlei; Xiao, Fei; Zhao, Haoxin; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong

    2017-01-01

    Higher-order aberrations (HOAs) and intraocular scatter lead to the degradation of image quality on the retina, and consequently deteriorate subjective visual performance. In this article, we modified an adaptive optics double-pass system to combine objective and subjective visual testing capabilities. Employing the modified DP system, we investigated the effects of HOAs and intraocular scatter on contrast sensitivity. Contrast sensitivity measurements were performed with HOAs either retained or corrected by adaptive optics, and with scatter either remaining at the natural eye-induced level or further enhanced by a set of three different scatter filters. Contrast sensitivity was found to be worse when HOAs were uncorrected or scatter increased. Quantitative analysis indicated that the joint effect of HOAs and scatter on contrast sensitivity was not a simple summation of each contributing factor, suggesting a potential compensatory mechanism between HOAs and intraocular scatter on contrast sensitivity. PMID:28736660

  16. Discrimination of skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers by interleukin-1α and interleukin-6 production on cultured human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Daun; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Lim, Kyung-Min; Chun, Young-Jin; Heo, Yong; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-09-01

    In vitro testing methods for classifying sensitizers could be valuable alternatives to in vivo sensitization testing using animal models, such as the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the guinea pig maximization test (GMT), but there remains a need for in vitro methods that are more accurate and simpler to distinguish skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers. Thus, the aim of our study was to establish an in vitro assay as a screening tool for detecting skin sensitizers using the human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. HaCaT cells were exposed to 16 relevant skin sensitizers and 6 skin non-sensitizers. The highest dose used was the dose causing 75% cell viability (CV75) that we determined by an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. The levels of extracellular production of interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and IL-6 were measured. The sensitivity of IL-1α was 63%, specificity was 83% and accuracy was 68%. In the case of IL-6, sensitivity: 69%, specificity: 83% and accuracy: 73%. Thus, this study suggests that measuring extracellular production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-6 by human HaCaT cells may potentially classify skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Radioimmunoassay of calcitonin in unextracted human serum: a sensitive method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmertsen, K.; Marqversen, J.; Jensen, F.T.; Hansen, H.H. (Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1982-11-01

    A sensitive sequential direct radioimmunoassay of calcitonin (CT) is described. Human synthetic monomer CT was used for /sup 125/I-labelling. The antibody was directed against mid-portion and C-terminal parts of the human CT molecule. No significant cross reactivity with salmon or porcine CT was found. Separation of free from antibody-bound /sup 125/I-labelled CT was performed using a double antibody-polyethyleneglycol mixture. Dilution curves of sera from normal controls and patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MCT) were parallel to the standard curve. The intraassay coefficients of variation (CV) were 6% and 3% at serum concentrations of 90 and 230 ng/l respectively. The interassay CV were 13% and 10% at mean serum CT concentrations of 50 and 210 ng/l respectively. The lower limit of detection was 20 ng/l. Thirty-one healthy controls had serum CT levels in the range of 35-135 ng/l. Elevated basal serum CT concentrations were found in 11 patients with MCT and the serum concentrations increased markedly after pentagastrin stimulation. Subsequent thyroidectomy in eight of the 11 patients with MCT reduced basal serum CT levels, in six to within the reference range for normals.

  18. Adipogenesis-related increase of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and monoamine oxidase in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Sandy; Daviaud, Danièle; Gres, Sandra; Lefort, Corinne; Prévot, Danielle; Zorzano, Antonio; Wabitsch, Martin; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Valet, Philippe; Carpéné, Christian

    2007-08-01

    A strong induction of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) has previously been reported during murine preadipocyte lineage differentiation but it remains unknown whether this emergence also occurs during adipogenesis in man. Our aim was to compare SSAO and monoamine oxidase (MAO) expression during in vitro differentiation of human preadipocytes and in adipose and stroma-vascular fractions of human fat depots. A human preadipocyte cell strain from a patient with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome was first used to follow amine oxidase expression during in vitro differentiation. Then, human preadipocytes isolated from subcutaneous adipose tissues were cultured under conditions promoting ex vivo adipose differentiation and tested for MAO and SSAO expression. Lastly, human adipose tissue was separated into mature adipocyte and stroma-vascular fractions for analyses of MAO and SSAO at mRNA, protein and activity levels. Both SSAO and MAO were increased from undifferentiated preadipocytes to lipid-laden cells in all the models: 3T3-F442A and 3T3-L1 murine lineages, human SGBS cell strain or human preadipocytes in primary culture. In human subcutaneous adipose tissue, the adipocyte-enriched fraction exhibited seven-fold higher amine oxidase activity and contained three- to seven-fold higher levels of mRNAs encoded by MAO-A, MAO-B, AOC3 and AOC2 genes than the stroma-vascular fraction. MAO-A and AOC3 genes accounted for the majority of their respective MAO and SSAO activities in human adipose tissue. Most of the SSAO and MAO found in adipose tissue originated from mature adipocytes. Although the mechanism and role of adipogenesis-related increase in amine oxidase expression remain to be established, the resulting elevated levels of amine oxidase activities found in human adipocytes may be of potential interest for therapeutic intervention in obesity.

  19. Lower neighborhood quality in adolescence predicts higher mesolimbic sensitivity to reward anticipation in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlen Z. Gonzalez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Life history theory suggests that adult reward sensitivity should be best explained by childhood, but not current, socioeconomic conditions. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, 83 participants from a larger longitudinal sample completed the monetary incentive delay (MID task in adulthood (∼25 years old. Parent-reports of neighborhood quality and parental SES were collected when participants were 13 years of age. Current income level was collected concurrently with scanning. Lower adolescent neighborhood quality, but neither lower current income nor parental SES, was associated with heightened sensitivity to the anticipation of monetary gain in putative mesolimbic reward areas. Lower adolescent neighborhood quality was also associated with heightened sensitivity to the anticipation of monetary loss activation in visuo-motor areas. Lower current income was associated with heightened sensitivity to anticipated loss in occipital areas and the operculum. We tested whether externalizing behaviors in childhood or adulthood could better account for neighborhood quality findings, but they did not. Findings suggest that neighborhood ecology in adolescence is associated with greater neural reward sensitivity in adulthood above the influence of parental SES or current income and not mediated through impulsivity and externalizing behaviors.

  20. Neoliberalism, Human Capital and the Skills Agenda in Higher Education--The Irish Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holborow, Marnie

    2012-01-01

    The making of human capital is increasingly seen as a principal function of higher education. A keyword in neoliberal ideology, human capital represents a subtle masking of social conflict and expresses metaphorically the commodification of human abilities and an alienating notion of human potential, both of which sit ill with the goals of…

  1. Neoliberalism, Human Capital and the Skills Agenda in Higher Education--The Irish Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holborow, Marnie

    2012-01-01

    The making of human capital is increasingly seen as a principal function of higher education. A keyword in neoliberal ideology, human capital represents a subtle masking of social conflict and expresses metaphorically the commodification of human abilities and an alienating notion of human potential, both of which sit ill with the goals of…

  2. The Compton Camera - medical imaging with higher sensitivity Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Compton Camera reconstructs the origin of Compton-scattered X-rays using electronic collimation with Silicon pad detectors instead of the heavy conventional lead collimators in Anger cameras - reaching up to 200 times better sensitivity and a factor two improvement in resolution. Possible applications are in cancer diagnosis, neurology neurobiology, and cardiology.

  3. Influence of heredity on human sensitivity to environmental chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Hereditary peculiarities in individual responses to environmental chemicals are a common occurrence in human populations. Genetic variation in glutathione S-transferase, CYP1A2, N-acetyltransferase, and paraoxonase exemplify the relationship of metabolic variation to individual susceptibility to cancer and other toxicants of environmental origin. Heritable receptor protein variants, a subset of proteins of enormous pharmacogenetic, potential that have not thus far been extensively explored form the pharmacogenetic standpoint, and also considered. Examples of interest that are considered include receptor variants associated with retinoic acid resistance in acute promyelocytic leukemia, with paradoxical responses to antiandrogens in prostate cancer, and with retinitis pigmentosa. Additional heritable protein variants of pharmacogenetic interest that result in antibiotic-induced deafness, glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism and hypertension, the long-QT syndrome, and beryllium-induced lung disease are also discussed. These traits demonstrate how knowledge of the molecular basis and mechanism of the variant response may contribute to its prevention in sensitive persons as well as to improved therapy for genetically conditioned disorders that arise form environmental chemicals. 99 refs.

  4. Decitabine nanoconjugate sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yi; Naz, Asia; Thompson, David H; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed and characterized a delivery system for the epigenetic demethylating drug, decitabine, to sensitize temozolomide-resistant human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells to alkylating chemotherapy. A poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based nanoconjugate was fabricated to encapsulate decitabine and achieved a better therapeutic response in GBM cells than that with the free drug. After synthesis, the highly efficient uptake process and intracellular dynamics of this nanoconjugate were monitored by single-molecule fluorescence tools. Our experiments demonstrated that, under an acidic pH due to active glycolysis in cancer cells, the PLGA-PEG nanovector could release the conjugated decitabine at a faster rate, after which the hydrolyzed lactic acid and glycolic acid would further acidify the intracellular microenvironment, thus providing positive feedback to increase the effective drug concentration and realize growth inhibition. In temozolomide-resistant GBM cells, decitabine can potentiate the cytotoxic DNA alkylation by counteracting cytosine methylation and reactivating tumor suppressor genes, such as p53 and p21. Owing to the excellent internalization and endolysosomal escape enabled by the PLGA-PEG backbone, the encapsulated decitabine exhibited a better anti-GBM potential than that of free drug molecules. Hence, the synthesized nanoconjugate and temozolomide could act in synergy to deliver a more potent and long-term antiproliferative effect against malignant GBM cells.

  5. Comment on "Differential sensitivity to human communication in dogs, wolves, and human infants".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiset, Sylvain

    2010-07-09

    Topál et al. (Reports, 4 September 2009, p. 1269) reported that dogs' sensitivity to reading and using human signals contributes to the emergence of a spatial perseveration error (the A-not-B error) for locating objects. Here, I argue that the authors' conclusion was biased by two confounding factors: the use of an atypical A-not-B search task and an inadequate nonsocial condition as a control.

  6. Does Human Capital Theory Explain the Value of Higher Education? A South African Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Alex

    2010-01-01

    A perennial debate in the economics of education is whether human capital or screening/signalling theories best explain the value of schooling and hence the private demand for, in particular, higher education. Human capital theory proposes that formal training such as that offered by higher education institutions improves the productive capacity…

  7. Effect of training on insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake and lipolysis in human adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, Bente; Larsen, J J; Mikines, K J;

    2000-01-01

    Training increases insulin sensitivity of both whole body and muscle in humans. To investigate whether training also increases insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue, we performed a three-step hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp in eight endurance-trained (T) and eight sedentary (S) young men...... [insulin infusion rates: 10,000 (step I), 20,000 (step II), and 150,000 (step III) microU x min(-1) x m(-2)]. Glucose and glycerol concentrations were measured in arterial blood and also by microdialysis in interstitial fluid in periumbilical, subcutaneous adipose tissue and in quadriceps femoris muscle...... (glucose only). Adipose tissue blood flow was measured by (133)Xe washout. In the basal state, adipose tissue blood flow tended to be higher in T compared with S subjects, and in both groups blood flow was constant during the clamp. The change from basal in arterial-interstitial glucose concentration...

  8. Carbon dioxide instantly sensitizes female yellow fever mosquitoes to human skin odours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Teun; Geier, Martin; Cardé, Ring T

    2005-08-01

    Female mosquitoes are noted for their ability to use odours to locate a host for a blood meal. Two sensory organs contribute to their sense of smell: the maxillary palps, which measure the level of CO2, and the antennae, which detect other host-released odours. To establish the relative importance and interactions of CO2 and other body emissions in freely flying mosquitoes, we presented female yellow fever mosquitoes Aedes aegypti L. with broad plumes of human skin odour and CO2 at natural concentrations and dilutions thereof in a wind tunnel. 3-D video-recorded flight tracks were reconstructed. Activation, flight velocity, upwind turning and source finding waned quickly as skin odours were diluted, whereas in the presence of CO2 these parameters remained unchanged over more than a 100-fold dilution from exhaled concentrations. Although mosquitoes were behaviourally less sensitive to skin odours than to CO2, their sensitivity to skin odours increased transiently by at least fivefold immediately following a brief encounter with a filament of CO2. This sensitization was reflected in flight velocity, track angle, turning rate upon entering and exiting the broad odour plume and, ultimately, in the source-finding rate. In Ae. aegypti, CO2 thus functions as a ;releaser' for a higher sensitivity and responsiveness to skin odours. The initially low responsiveness of mosquitoes to skin odours, their high sensitivity to CO2, and the sensitization of the olfactory circuitry by CO2 are ecologically relevant, because rapidly fluctuating CO2 levels reliably signal a potential host. Possible mechanisms of the instantaneous sensitization are considered.

  9. Gravitropism in higher plant shoots. VI. Changing sensitivity to auxin in gravistimulated soybean hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorabaugh, P. A.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1989-01-01

    Although the Cholodny-Went model of auxin redistribution has been used to explain the transduction phase of gravitropism for over 60 years, problems are apparent, especially with dicot stems. An alternative to an auxin gradient is a physiological gradient in which lower tissues of a horizontal stem become more sensitive than upper tissues to auxin already present. Changes in tissue sensitivity to auxin were tested by immersing marked Glycine max Merrill (soybean) hypocotyl sections in buffered auxin solutions (0, 10(-8) to 10(-2) molar indoleacetic acid) and observing bending and growth of upper and lower surfaces. The two surfaces of horizontal hypocotyl sections responded differently to the same applied auxin stimulus; hypocotyls bent up (lower half grew more) in buffer alone or in low auxin levels, but bent down (upper half grew more) in high auxin. Dose-response curves were evaluated with Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with auxin-receptor binding analogous to enzyme-substrate binding. Vmax for the lower half was usually greater than that for the upper half, which could indicate more binding sites in the lower half. Km of the upper half was always greater than that of the lower half (unmeasurably low), which could indicate that upper-half binding sites had a much lower affinity for auxin than lower-half sites. Dose-response curves were also obtained for sections scrubbed' (cuticle abraded) on top or bottom before immersion in auxin, and gravitropic memory' experiments of L. Brauner and A. Hagar (1958 Planta 51: 115-147) were duplicated. [1-14C]Indoleacetic acid penetration was equal into the two halves, and endogenous plus exogenously supplied (not radiolabeled) free auxin in the two halves (by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectrometry) was also equal. Thus, differential growth occurred without free auxin redistribution, contrary to Cholodny-Went but in agreement with a sensitivity model.

  10. Comparison of risk sensitivity to human errors in the Oconee and LaSalle PRAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, S.; Higgins, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the comparative analyses of plant risk sensitivity to human errors in the Oconee and La Salle Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRAs). These analyses were performed to determine the reasons for the observed differences in the sensitivity of core melt frequency (CMF) to changes in human error probabilities (HEPs). Plant-specific design features, PRA methods, and the level of detail and assumptions in the human error modeling were evaluated to assess their influence risk estimates and sensitivities.

  11. Attenuated noradrenergic sensitivity during local cooling in aged human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Caitlin S; Holowatz, Lacy A; Kenney, W. Larry

    2005-01-01

    Reflex-mediated cutaneous vasoconstriction (VC) is impaired in older humans; however, it is unclear whether this blunted VC also occurs during local cooling, which mediates VC through different mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that the sensitization of cutaneous vessels to noradrenaline (NA) during direct skin cooling seen in young skin is blunted in aged skin. In 11 young (18–30 years) and 11 older (62–76 years) men and women, skin blood flow was monitored at two forearm sites with laser Doppler (LD) flowmetry while local skin temperature was cooled and clamped at 24°C. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; LD flux/mean arterial pressure) was expressed as percentage change from baseline (%ΔCVCbase). At one site, five doses of NA (10−10–10−2m) were sequentially infused via intradermal microdialysis during cooling while the other 24°C site served as control (Ringer solution + cooling). At control sites, VC due to cooling alone was similar in young versus older (−54 ± 5 versus −56 ± 3%ΔCVCbase, P= 0.46). In young, NA infusions induced additional dose-dependent VC (10−8, 10−6, 10−4 and 10−2m: −70 ± 2, −72 ± 3, −78 ± 3 and −79 ± 4%ΔCVCbase; P older skin does not display enhanced VC capacity until treated with saturating doses of NA, possibly due to age-associated decrements in Ca2+ availability or α2C-adrenoceptor function. PMID:15705648

  12. Murine and human CFTR exhibit different sensitivities to CFTR potentiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guiying; McCarty, Nael A

    2015-10-01

    Development of therapeutic molecules with clinical efficacy as modulators of defective CFTR includes efforts to identify potentiators that can overcome or repair the gating defect in mutant CFTR channels. This has taken a great leap forward with the identification of the potentiator VX-770, now available to patients as "Kalydeco." Other small molecules with different chemical structure also are capable of potentiating the activity of either wild-type or mutant CFTR, suggesting that there are features of the protein that may be targeted to achieve stimulation of channel activity by structurally diverse compounds. However, neither the mechanisms by which these compounds potentiate mutant CFTR nor the site(s) where these compounds bind have been identified. This knowledge gap partly reflects the lack of appropriate experimental models to provide clues toward the identification of binding sites. Here, we have compared the channel behavior and response to novel and known potentiators of human CFTR (hCFTR) and murine (mCFTR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both hCFTR and mCFTR were blocked by GlyH-101 from the extracellular side, but mCFTR activity was increased with GlyH-101 applied directly to the cytoplasmic side. Similarly, glibenclamide only exhibited a blocking effect on hCFTR but both blocked and potentiated mCFTR in excised membrane patches and in intact oocytes. The clinically used CFTR potentiator VX-770 transiently increased hCFTR by ∼13% but potentiated mCFTR significantly more strongly. Our results suggest that mCFTR pharmacological sensitivities differ from hCFTR, which will provide a useful tool for identifying the binding sites and mechanism for these potentiators.

  13. Sensitivity to an Illusion of Sound Location in Human Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Higgins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human listeners place greater weight on the beginning of a sound compared to the middle or end when determining sound location, creating an auditory illusion known as the Franssen effect. Here, we exploited that effect to test whether human auditory cortex (AC represents the physical vs. perceived spatial features of a sound. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to measure AC responses to sounds that varied in perceived location due to interaural level differences (ILD applied to sound onsets or to the full sound duration. Analysis of hemodynamic responses in AC revealed sensitivity to ILD in both full-cue (veridical and onset-only (illusory lateralized stimuli. Classification analysis revealed regional differences in the sensitivity to onset-only ILDs, where better classification was observed in posterior compared to primary AC. That is, restricting the ILD to sound onset—which alters the physical but not the perceptual nature of the spatial cue—did not eliminate cortical sensitivity to that cue. These results suggest that perceptual representations of auditory space emerge or are refined in higher-order AC regions, supporting the stable perception of auditory space in noisy or reverberant environments and forming the basis of illusions such as the Franssen effect.

  14. Early weight regain after gastric bypass does not affect insulin sensitivity but is associated with higher ghrelin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Robyn A.; Breitman, Igal; Marks-Shulman, Pam A.; Jabbour, Kareem; Melvin, Willie; Williams, Brandon; Clements, Ronald H.; Feurer, Irene D.; Abumrad, Naji N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine: 1) if early weight regain between one and two years after RYGB is associated with worsened hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity, and 2) if preoperative levels of ghrelin and leptin are associated with early weight regain after RYGB. Design and Methods Hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity and ghrelin and leptin plasma levels were assessed longitudinally in 45 subjects before RYGB and at one month, six months, one year, and two years post operatively. Weight regain was defined as ≥ 5% increase in body weight between one and two years after RYGB. Results Weight regain occurred in 33% of subjects, with an average increase in body weight of 10 ± 5 % (8.5 ± 3.3 kg). Weight regain was not associated with worsening of peripheral or hepatic insulin sensitivity. Subjects with weight regain after RYGB had higher preoperative and postoperative levels of ghrelin compared to those who maintained or lost weight during this time. Conversely, the trajectories of leptin levels corresponded with the trajectories of fat mass in both groups. Conclusions Early weight regain after RYGB is not associated with a reversal of improvements in insulin sensitivity. Higher preoperative ghrelin levels might identify patients that are more susceptible to weight regain after RYGB. PMID:24777992

  15. Machine Learning Approaches for Predicting Human Skin Sensitization Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of ICCVAM’s top priorities is the development and evaluation of non-animal approaches to identify potential skin sensitizers. The complexity of biological events necessary for a substance to elicit a skin sensitization reaction suggests that no single in chemico, in vit...

  16. Machine Learning Approaches for Predicting Human Skin Sensitization Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of ICCVAM’s top priorities is the development and evaluation of non-animal approaches to identify potential skin sensitizers. The complexity of biological events necessary for a substance to elicit a skin sensitization reaction suggests that no single in chemico, in vit...

  17. Higher vulnerability and stress sensitivity of neuronal precursor cells carrying an alpha-synuclein gene triplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Flierl

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a multi-factorial neurodegenerative disorder with loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and characteristic intracellular inclusions, called Lewy bodies. Genetic predisposition, such as point mutations and copy number variants of the SNCA gene locus can cause very similar PD-like neurodegeneration. The impact of altered α-synuclein protein expression on integrity and developmental potential of neuronal stem cells is largely unexplored, but may have wide ranging implications for PD manifestation and disease progression. Here, we investigated if induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal precursor cells (NPCs from a patient with Parkinson's disease carrying a genomic triplication of the SNCA gene (SNCA-Tri. Our goal was to determine if these cells these neuronal precursor cells already display pathological changes and impaired cellular function that would likely predispose them when differentiated to neurodegeneration. To achieve this aim, we assessed viability and cellular physiology in human SNCA-Tri NPCs both under normal and environmentally stressed conditions to model in vitro gene-environment interactions which may play a role in the initiation and progression of PD. Human SNCA-Tri NPCs displayed overall normal cellular and mitochondrial morphology, but showed substantial changes in growth, viability, cellular energy metabolism and stress resistance especially when challenged by starvation or toxicant challenge. Knockdown of α-synuclein in the SNCA-Tri NPCs by stably expressed short hairpin RNA (shRNA resulted in reversal of the observed phenotypic changes. These data show for the first time that genetic alterations such as the SNCA gene triplication set the stage for decreased developmental fitness, accelerated aging, and increased neuronal cell loss. The observation of this "stem cell pathology" could have a great impact on both quality and quantity of neuronal networks and could provide a

  18. Sensitivity analysis of complex coupled systems extended to second and higher order derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1989-01-01

    In design of engineering systems, the what if questions often arise such as: what will be the change of the aircraft payload, if the wing aspect ratio is incremented by 10 percent. Answers to such questions are commonly sought by incrementing the pertinent variable, and reevaluating the major disciplinary analyses involved. These analyses are contributed by engineering disciplines that are, usually, coupled, as are the aerodynamics, structures, and performance in the context of the question above. The what if questions can be answered precisely by computation of the derivatives. A method for calculation of the first derivatives has been developed previously. An algorithm is presented for calculation of the second and higher order derivatives.

  19. INTERACTION BETWEEN HUMAN BEING AND URBAN CULTURE SPACE: ONE OF THE MOTIVATIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION INTERNATIONALISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Liang Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the objective of this paper is to deeply and clearly explain the internationalisation of higher education from the aspect of the integration of human being with urban cultural space. Materials and Methods: the methods used in the research are mainly analytical and descriptive ones enabling to show how the integration of human being and urban cultural space promote and influence the internationalisation of higher education. Results: the motivation for the internationalisation of higher education is closely interrelated with that of urbanisation. Besides the economic and political incentives, modern urban culture, caused by globalisation, also plays a very important role in encouraging higher education internationalisation. Discussion and Conclusions: the appearance of higher education internationalisation is mediated by the alteration of the existing environment of urban culture space against the background of city internationalisation. Human beings’ need for self-assurance in urban culture space helps to stimulate the internationalisation of higher education, and human beings promote the development of modern culture space and their separation in urban culture space accelerates the development of higher education. From the perspective of higher education internationalisation, to sort out the cultural motivation for higher education and find its suitable form for the city’s internationalisation is crucial for adjusting the orientation and guaranteeing the efficacy of higher education internationalisation. From the aspect of human beings’ development, the separation between urban space and human beings caused by the city’s ongoing internationalisation is a pressing problem to be solved. From the aspect of the construction of urban culture space, as an important means of retaining human beings’ equilibrium, urban culture promotes the internationalisation of higher education.

  20. Development of a new in vitro skin sensitization assay (Epidermal Sensitization Assay; EpiSensA) using reconstructed human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazutoshi; Nukada, Yuko; Takenouchi, Osamu; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Naohiro

    2013-12-01

    Recent changes in regulatory requirements and social views on animal testing have accelerated the development of reliable alternative tests for predicting skin sensitizing potential of chemicals. In this study, we aimed to develop a new in vitro skin sensitization assay using reconstructed human epidermis, RhE model, which is expected to have broader applicability domain rather than existing in vitro assays. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of five genes (ATF3, DNAJB4, GCLM, HSPA6 and HSPH1) related to cellular stress response were significantly up-regulated in RhE model after 6h treatment with representative skin sensitizers, 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and oxazolone, but not a non-sensitizer, benzalkonium chloride. The predictive performance of five genes was examined with eight skin sensitizers (e.g., cinnamic aldehyde), four non-sensitizers (e.g., sodium lauryl sulfate) and four pre-/pro-haptens (e.g., p-phenylenediamine, isoeugenol). When the positive criteria were set to obtain the highest accuracy with the animal testing (LLNA), ATF3, DNAJB4 and GCLM exhibited a high predictive accuracy (100%, 93.8% and 87.5%, respectively). All tested pre-/pro-haptens were correctly predicted by both ATF3 and DNAJB4. These results suggested that the RhE-based assay, termed epidermal sensitization assay (EpiSensA), could be an useful skin sensitization assay with a broad applicability domain including pre-/pro-haptens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential sensitivity to human communication in dogs, wolves, and human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topál, József; Gergely, György; Erdohegyi, Agnes; Csibra, Gergely; Miklósi, Adám

    2009-09-04

    Ten-month-old infants persistently search for a hidden object at its initial hiding place even after observing it being hidden at another location. Recent evidence suggests that communicative cues from the experimenter contribute to the emergence of this perseverative search error. We replicated these results with dogs (Canis familiaris), who also commit more search errors in ostensive-communicative (in 75% of the total trials) than in noncommunicative (39%) or nonsocial (17%) hiding contexts. However, comparative investigations suggest that communicative signals serve different functions for dogs and infants, whereas human-reared wolves (Canis lupus) do not show doglike context-dependent differences of search errors. We propose that shared sensitivity to human communicative signals stems from convergent social evolution of the Homo and the Canis genera.

  2. Machine vision based on the concept of contrast sensitivity of the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzubik, Vitali; Belashenkov, Nikolai; Vdovin, Gleb

    2014-09-01

    The model of contrast sensitivity function (CSF) of machine vision system, based on the CSF of the human visual system is proposed. By analogy with the human eye, we employ the concept of ganglion cell receptive field to the artificial light-sensitive elements. By further following this concept, we introduced quantative metrics of local and global contrast of digital image. We suggested that the contrast sensitivity threshold forms an iso-line in the parameter space contrast - spatial frequency. The model, implemented in a computer vision system, has been compared to the results of contrast sensitivity research, conducted directly with the human visual system, and demonstrated a good match.

  3. Energy metabolism determines the sensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to mitochondrial inhibitors and biguanide drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Ling-Chia; Hsia, Cheng-Yuan; Yin, Pen-Hui; Chi, Chin-Wen; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Lee, Hsin-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide particularly in Asia. Deregulation of cellular energetics was recently included as one of the cancer hallmarks. Compounds that target the mitochondria in cancer cells were proposed to have therapeutic potential. Biguanide drugs which inhibit mitochondrial complex I and repress mTOR signaling are clinically used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (T2DM) and were recently found to reduce the risk of HCC in T2DM patients. However, whether alteration of energy metabolism is involved in regulating the sensitivity of HCC to biguanide drugs is still unclear. In the present study, we treated four HCC cell lines with mitochondrial inhibitors (rotenone and oligomycin) and biguanide drugs (metformin and phenformin), and found that the HCC cells which had a higher mitochondrial respiration rate were more sensitive to these treatments; whereas the HCC cells which exhibited higher glycolysis were more resistant. When glucose was replaced by galactose in the medium, the altered energy metabolism from glycolysis to mitochondrial respiration in the HCC cells enhanced the cellular sensitivity to mitochondrial inhibitors and biguanides. The energy metabolism change enhanced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, mTOR repression and downregulation of cyclin D1 and Mcl-1 in response to the mitochondrial inhibitors and biguanides. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased mitochondrial oxidative metabolism upregulates the sensitivity of HCC to biguanide drugs. Enhancing the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in combination with biguanide drugs may be a therapeutic strategy for HCC.

  4. Attentional modulation of temporal contrast sensitivity in human vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Motoyoshi

    Full Text Available Recent psychophysical studies have shown that attention can alter contrast sensitivities for temporally broadband stimuli such as flashed gratings. The present study examined the effect of attention on the contrast sensitivity for temporally narrowband stimuli with various temporal frequencies. Observers were asked to detect a drifting grating of 0-40 Hz presented gradually in the peripheral visual field with or without a concurrent letter identification task in the fovea. We found that removal of attention by the concurrent task reduced the contrast sensitivity for gratings with low temporal frequencies much more profoundly than for gratings with high temporal frequencies and for flashed gratings. The analysis revealed that the temporal contrast sensitivity function had a more band-pass shape with poor attention. Additional experiments showed that this was also true when the target was presented in various levels of luminance noise. These results suggest that regardless of the presence of external noise, attention extensively modulates visual sensitivity for sustained retinal inputs.

  5. Accumulating Human Capital While Increasing Educational Inequality: A Study on Higher Education Policy in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing Kit; Ngok, Kinglun

    2011-01-01

    Since 1999, the expansion of higher education has been viewed as an important step in accumulating human capital for China that was to gradually open its domestic sectors to the global market at a turbulent time at the turn of the century. Recent studies suggest that the improvement of human capital has succeeded in preparing China with a solid…

  6. Knowledge Management, Human Resource Management, and Higher Education: A Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peggy D.; Brewer, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    Much has been written on the importance of knowledge management, the challenges facing organizations, and the important human resource management activities involved in assuring the acquisition and transfer of knowledge. Higher business education plays an important role in preparing students to assume the knowledge management and human resource…

  7. Performance of the Higher Education Students Loans Board in Human Capital Investment from 2005-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memba, Albert Zephaniah; Feng, Zhao Zun

    2016-01-01

    Many studies conducted on the Higher Education Students Loans Board (HESLB) have mostly concentrated on its success, sustainability and effectiveness on loans issuance and repayment. None had focused on its performance towards human capital investment. This study sought to explain and analyze HESLB's performance in human capital investment, which…

  8. People Strategy in Human Resources: Lessons for Mentoring in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Vicki L.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I offer the notion of alignment, a human resources framework, as a conceptual tool for better informing the development of mentoring programming and policy in higher education. Alignment accounts for both individual and organizational factors as means for providing the necessary connections among human resources and organizational…

  9. Knowledge Management, Human Resource Management, and Higher Education: A Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peggy D.; Brewer, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    Much has been written on the importance of knowledge management, the challenges facing organizations, and the important human resource management activities involved in assuring the acquisition and transfer of knowledge. Higher business education plays an important role in preparing students to assume the knowledge management and human resource…

  10. Investment in Human Capital through Institutions of Higher Education for the Revival of Kenya's Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawire, Nelson W.; Nafukho, Fredrick M.

    2006-01-01

    Despite economic theory postulating that increases in investment in human capital and physical capital leads to increase in economic growth, in the Kenyan case, this has not been true. This paper empirically examines the contribution of human capital and physical capital to economic growth in Kenya. Measures to be undertaken by higher education…

  11. People Strategy in Human Resources: Lessons for Mentoring in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Vicki L.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I offer the notion of alignment, a human resources framework, as a conceptual tool for better informing the development of mentoring programming and policy in higher education. Alignment accounts for both individual and organizational factors as means for providing the necessary connections among human resources and organizational…

  12. Development of a sensitive and specific epitope-blocking ELISA for universal detection of antibodies to human enterovirus 71 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD in young children. It is often associated with severe neurological diseases and mortalities in recent outbreaks across the Asia Pacific region. Currently, there is no efficient universal antibody test available to detect EV71 infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present study, an epitope-blocking ELISA was developed to detect specific antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human or animal sera. The assay relies on a novel monoclonal antibody (Mab 1C6 that specifically binds to capsid proteins in whole EV71 viruses without any cross reaction to any EV71 capsid protein expressed alone. The sensitivity and specificity of the epitope-blocking ELISA for EV71 was evaluated and compared to microneutralization using immunized animal sera to multiple virus genotypes of EV71 and coxsackieviruses. Further, 200 serum sample from human individuals who were potentially infected with EV71 viruses were tested in both the blocking ELISA and microneutralization. Results indicated that antibodies to EV71 were readily detected in immunized animals or human sera by the epitope blocking ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other enteroviruses yielded negative results. This assay is not only simpler to perform but also shows higher sensitivity and specificity as compared to microneutralization. CONCLUSION: The epitope-blocking ELISA based on a unique Mab 1C6 provided highly sensitive and 100% specific detection of antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human sera.

  13. Androgen receptor signaling is required for androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Wanda V

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgens and androgen receptors (AR regulate normal prostate development and growth. They also are involved in pathological development of prostatic diseases, including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer (PCa. Antiandrogen therapy for PCa, in conjunction with chemical or surgical castration, offers initial positive responses and leads to massive prostate cell death. However, cancer cells later appear as androgen-independent PCa. To investigate the role of AR in prostate cell proliferation and survival, we introduced a vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA. This siRNA targeted 5'-untranslated region of AR mRNA for extended suppression of AR expression in androgen-sensitive human prostate LNCaP cells. Results The siRNA design successfully suppressed endogenous AR expression, as revealed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining in LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells did not proliferate in the absence of AR and underwent apoptosis, based on elevated phospho-Histone H2B expression and higher number of apoptotic body as compared to control cells. Conclusion We demonstrated that AR is vital for prostate cell proliferation and survival in this androgen-sensitive prostate cell line. These results further strengthen the hypothesis that AR can be a therapeutic target for treating androgen-sensitive stages of PCa. Unlike antiandorgens, however, siRNA targeting AR provides a direct inactivation of AR function through the suppression of AR protein expression.

  14. Special Issue: Creating a Tipping Point--Strategic Human Resources in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alvin; Chun, Edna

    2012-01-01

    This monograph examines the emergence of strategic human resource (HR) practices in higher education at a time when the budgetary crisis in public higher education has never been more acute. The wave of financial pressures on public research universities today heralds the advent of an era of unprecedented change. Financial upheaval resulting from…

  15. Special Issue: Creating a Tipping Point--Strategic Human Resources in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alvin; Chun, Edna

    2012-01-01

    This monograph examines the emergence of strategic human resource (HR) practices in higher education at a time when the budgetary crisis in public higher education has never been more acute. The wave of financial pressures on public research universities today heralds the advent of an era of unprecedented change. Financial upheaval resulting from…

  16. A novel color image compression algorithm using the human visual contrast sensitivity characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Juncai; Liu, Guizhong

    2017-03-01

    In order to achieve higher image compression ratio and improve visual perception of the decompressed image, a novel color image compression scheme based on the contrast sensitivity characteristics of the human visual system (HVS) is proposed. In the proposed scheme, firstly the image is converted into the YCrCb color space and divided into sub-blocks. Afterwards, the discrete cosine transform is carried out for each sub-block, and three quantization matrices are built to quantize the frequency spectrum coefficients of the images by combining the contrast sensitivity characteristics of HVS. The Huffman algorithm is used to encode the quantized data. The inverse process involves decompression and matching to reconstruct the decompressed color image. And simulations are carried out for two color images. The results show that the average structural similarity index measurement (SSIM) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) under the approximate compression ratio could be increased by 2.78% and 5.48%, respectively, compared with the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) compression. The results indicate that the proposed compression algorithm in the text is feasible and effective to achieve higher compression ratio under ensuring the encoding and image quality, which can fully meet the needs of storage and transmission of color images in daily life.

  17. A novel color image compression algorithm using the human visual contrast sensitivity characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Juncai; Liu, Guizhong

    2016-07-01

    In order to achieve higher image compression ratio and improve visual perception of the decompressed image, a novel color image compression scheme based on the contrast sensitivity characteristics of the human visual system (HVS) is proposed. In the proposed scheme, firstly the image is converted into the YCrCb color space and divided into sub-blocks. Afterwards, the discrete cosine transform is carried out for each sub-block, and three quantization matrices are built to quantize the frequency spectrum coefficients of the images by combining the contrast sensitivity characteristics of HVS. The Huffman algorithm is used to encode the quantized data. The inverse process involves decompression and matching to reconstruct the decompressed color image. And simulations are carried out for two color images. The results show that the average structural similarity index measurement (SSIM) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) under the approximate compression ratio could be increased by 2.78% and 5.48%, respectively, compared with the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) compression. The results indicate that the proposed compression algorithm in the text is feasible and effective to achieve higher compression ratio under ensuring the encoding and image quality, which can fully meet the needs of storage and transmission of color images in daily life.

  18. Higher cortical modulation of pain perception in the human brain: Psychological determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew Cn

    2009-10-01

    Pain perception and its genesis in the human brain have been reviewed recently. In the current article, the reports on pain modulation in the human brain were reviewed from higher cortical regulation, i.e. top-down effect, particularly studied in psychological determinants. Pain modulation can be examined by gene therapy, physical modulation, pharmacological modulation, psychological modulation, and pathophysiological modulation. In psychological modulation, this article examined (a) willed determination, (b) distraction, (c) placebo, (d) hypnosis, (e) meditation, (f) qi-gong, (g) belief, and (h) emotions, respectively, in the brain function for pain modulation. In each, the operational definition, cortical processing, neuroimaging, and pain modulation were systematically deliberated. However, not all studies had featured the brain modulation processing but rather demonstrated potential effects on human pain. In our own studies on the emotional modulation on human pain, we observed that emotions could be induced from music melodies or pictures perception for reduction of tonic human pain, mainly in potentiation of the posterior alpha EEG fields, likely resulted from underneath activities of precuneous in regulation of consciousness, including pain perception. To sum, higher brain functions become the leading edge research in all sciences. How to solve the information bit of thinking and feeling in the brain can be the greatest challenge of human intelligence. Application of higher cortical modulation of human pain and suffering can lead to the progress of social humanity and civilization.

  19. What did domestication do to dogs? A new account of dogs' sensitivity to human actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udell, Monique A R; Dorey, Nicole R; Wynne, Clive D L

    2010-05-01

    Over the last two decades increasing evidence for an acute sensitivity to human gestures and attentional states in domestic dogs has led to a burgeoning of research into the social cognition of this highly familiar yet previously under-studied animal. Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) have been shown to be more successful than their closest relative (and wild progenitor) the wolf, and than man's closest relative, the chimpanzee, on tests of sensitivity to human social cues, such as following points to a container holding hidden food. The "Domestication Hypothesis" asserts that during domestication dogs evolved an inherent sensitivity to human gestures that their non-domesticated counterparts do not share. According to this view, sensitivity to human cues is present in dogs at an early age and shows little evidence of acquisition during ontogeny. A closer look at the findings of research on canine domestication, socialization, and conditioning, brings the assumptions of this hypothesis into question. We propose the Two Stage Hypothesis, according to which the sensitivity of an individual animal to human actions depends on acceptance of humans as social companions, and conditioning to follow human limbs. This offers a more parsimonious explanation for the domestic dog's sensitivity to human gestures, without requiring the use of additional mechanisms. We outline how tests of this new hypothesis open directions for future study that offer promise of a deeper understanding of mankind's oldest companion.

  20. Is there a sensitive period in human incest avoidance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Liqun

    2011-06-24

    Many studies support the proposition that early cosocialization with opposite-sex children has the effect of inhibiting later mutual sexual attraction, but the existence of a period in the life cycle in which individuals are sensitive to the effect of early cosocialization has been a matter of controversy. Drawing on earlier traditional psychological research, and on more recent work guided by parental investment theory, we hypothesized that only for maternal perinatal association (MPA)-absent males a less-than- around-three-years age difference with the sister can predict stronger aversion to sibling incest. The results corroborated the hypothesis. The results can be interpreted as support for the existence of a sensitive period as well as for the potent role of MPA. Cross-cultural comparative studies were called on to further test the hypothesis.

  1. Sensitivity to musical structure in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Josh H.; Norman-Haignere, Sam; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from brain-damaged patients suggests that regions in the temporal lobes, distinct from those engaged in lower-level auditory analysis, process the pitch and rhythmic structure in music. In contrast, neuroimaging studies targeting the representation of music structure have primarily implicated regions in the inferior frontal cortices. Combining individual-subject fMRI analyses with a scrambling method that manipulated musical structure, we provide evidence of brain regions sensitive to musical structure bilaterally in the temporal lobes, thus reconciling the neuroimaging and patient findings. We further show that these regions are sensitive to the scrambling of both pitch and rhythmic structure but are insensitive to high-level linguistic structure. Our results suggest the existence of brain regions with representations of musical structure that are distinct from high-level linguistic representations and lower-level acoustic representations. These regions provide targets for future research investigating possible neural specialization for music or its associated mental processes. PMID:23019005

  2. Emerging contaminants: a potential human health concern for sensitive populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalgiri, Kiranmayi P; He, Ke; Blaney, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotic molecules are being increasingly detected in drinking water, food crops, and breast milk. This issue represents a novel toxicological concern, especially for sensitive populations like pregnant women and breastfeeding infants. This commentary calls for more interdisciplinary research efforts focused on elucidating the transfer of contaminants of emerging concern from mother to child, as well as the relevant toxicological impacts on the child. The need for more tangible efforts to reduce pharmaceutical loads in environmental systems is also highlighted.

  3. Migration of human antigen-presenting cells in a human skin graft onto nude mice model after contact sensitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefakker, S.; Balk, H.P.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Joost, T. van; Notten, W.R.F.; Claassen, E.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent contact chemical allergens provoke sensitization after application on both syngeneic and allogeneic skin grafts in mice. We attempted to determine whether the functional activity in a contact sensitization response of human skin graft was affected at the level of antigen uptake and

  4. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S; Mniszewski, Susan M; Del Valle, Sara Y; Hyman, James M

    2014-12-01

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule's regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity's regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. We use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.

  5. Enhancement of Bleomycin Sensitivity in Human Lung Cancer Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cytotoxic effect of bleomycin in the adenocarcinoma human alveolar basal epithelial A549 cell line. Methods: The .... advantageous (at 100 mg/kg body weight) in increasing the ... Cobalt-60 (60Co) gamma radiation at a sublethal dose of 8 Gy ...

  6. Human error in strabismus surgery: Quantification with a sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Schutte (Sander); J.R. Polling; F.C.T. van der Helm (Frans); H.J. Simonsz (Huib)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Reoperations are frequently necessary in strabismus surgery. The goal of this study was to analyze human-error related factors that introduce variability in the results of strabismus surgery in a systematic fashion. Methods: We identified the primary factors that influence th

  7. Human error in strabismus surgery: quantification with a sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, S.; Polling, J.R.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.; Simonsz, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background- Reoperations are frequently necessary in strabismus surgery. The goal of this study was to analyze human-error related factors that introduce variability in the results of strabismus surgery in a systematic fashion. Methods- We identified the primary factors that influence the outcome of

  8. The Public Benefits of Higher Education: Examining the Relationship Between State Spending on Higher Education and the Formation of Human Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, Matthew Craig

    2008-01-01

    This study contributes to the literature on the economic value of higher education by examining the extent to which a set of independent variables, including two measures of state spending on higher education predict the formation of human capital. The findings suggest that, in most states, increases in state spending per full-time equivalent enrollment in public higher education predict decreases in the formation of human capital, while increases in state spending per capita on public and pr...

  9. NGF-evoked sensitization of muscle fascia nociceptors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deising, Saskia; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Blunk, James; Obreja, Otilia; Schmelz, Martin; Rukwied, Roman

    2012-08-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces local hyperalgesia for a few days after intramuscular injection, but longer-lasting muscle pain upon systemic administration. As the muscle fascia is densely innervated by free nerve endings, we hypothesized a lasting sensitization of fascia nociceptors by NGF. We administered 1 μg NGF (dissolved in 100 μL saline) ultrasound-guided to the fascia of the Musculus erector spinae muscle at the lumbar level of 14 male volunteers and assessed hypersensitivity after 6 hours, and 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 days. Pain upon mechanical stimuli (constant pressure and dynamic impact), upon exercise and electrically induced M. erector spinae contraction, and upon injection of 100 μL phosphate buffer pH4 (at day 7 and 14 only) to the fascia of both NGF- and saline-treated muscles, was investigated. Injections into the muscle fascia did not cause acute pain. Local heat pain thresholds were unchanged following NGF and saline (control) administration. NGF evoked a lasting (days 1-7) and significant reduction of pressure pain, pressure thresholds, exercise-evoked muscle pain, and hyperalgesia to impact stimuli (12 m/s). Pain upon injected protons was significantly elevated (Pfascia to mechanical and chemical stimuli lasting for up to 2 weeks. As nociceptors in the fascia appear to be particularly prone to sensitization, they may contribute to acute or chronic muscle pain. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Greater phenological sensitivity on the higher Tibetan Plateau: new insights from weekly 5 km EVI2 datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bingwen; Zhong, Jiangping; Tang, Zhenghong; Feng, Min; Chen, Chongcheng; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-01

    Plateau vegetation is considered to be highly sensitive to climate change, especially at higher altitudes. Although the Tibetan Plateau has experienced intensive warming over the past few decades, there is much contradictory evidence regarding its phenological variations and the impact of climatic change. In this study, we explored vegetation phenology through the inflexion point-based method with the weekly 0.05° EVI2 datasets from 1982 to 2010. We observed complex spatiotemporal variations in vegetation phenology on the higher Tibetan Plateau from three aspects. From a spatial aspect, the altitudinal gradients of phenological dates, as well as their directions, varied among different altitudes over the past three decades. Compared with delaying with elevation at altitudes below 5000 m, the phenological parameters at altitudes above 5000 m significantly advanced with increasing altitudes. At higher altitudes, much stronger altitudinal gradients (slope) of phenological dates were observed in the 2000s than in the 1980s and 1990s, i.e., 2.19, 3.47, and 3.68 days' advance for start, maximum, and end dates, respectively, compared to less than 1 day's change per 100 m increase in altitude. From a temporal dynamic aspect, when analyzed at different altitudinal bands, the dynamic trends in phenological dates were generally not significant except the advancing trends in the maximum dates at altitudes above 5000 m and the delaying trend in the end dates at altitudes of 4500-5000 m in the twenty-first century. Remarkable elevation dependency was also observed at the pixel level: increasing amplitudes of phenological dynamic trends were observed at higher altitudes when obtaining their minimum around 5000 m. These spatiotemporal variations of vegetation phenology were due to combined effects from both temperature and precipitation: more abundant rainfall and greater magnitudes of dynamic trends were observed in the average daily minimum temperature (slope = 0.08

  11. Muscle IGF-1-Induced Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy Evokes Higher Insulin Sensitivity and Carbohydrate Use as Preferential Energy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Augusto Christoffolete

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized the metabolic profile of transgenic mice exhibiting enhanced muscle mass driven by increased mIGF-1 expression (MLC/mIGF-1. As expected, 6-month-old MLC/mIGF-1 mice were heavier than age-matched wild type (WT mice (37.4 ± 0.3 versus 31.8 ± 0.6 g, resp.. MLC/mIGF-1 mice had higher respiratory quotient when compared to WT (0.9 ± 0.03 versus 0.74 ± 0.02, resp. suggesting a preference for carbohydrate as the major fuel source. MLC/mIGF-1 mice had a higher rate of glucose disposal when compared to WT (3.25 ± 0.14 versus 2.39 ± 0.03%/min, resp.. The higher disposal rate correlated to ∼2-fold higher GLUT4 content in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle. Analysis of mRNA content for the glycolysis-related gene PFK-1 showed ∼3-fold upregulation in MLC/mIGF-1 animals. We also found a 50% downregulation of PGC1α mRNA levels in MLC/mIGF-1 mouse EDL muscle, suggesting less abundant mitochondria in this tissue. We found no difference in the expression of PPARα and PPARβ/δ, suggesting no modulation of key elements in oxidative metabolism. These data together suggest a shift in metabolism towards higher carbohydrate utilization, and that could explain the increased insulin sensitivity of hypertrophied skeletal muscle in MLC/mIGF-1 mice.

  12. In vitro sensitivity of human ovarian tumours to chemotherapeutic agents.

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    The in vitro chemosensitivity of primary monolayer cultures of human ovarian tumours to a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents has been determined using 3H-leucine incorporation as an index of cytotoxicity. Of 67 specimens received, 35 have been successfully cultured and tested for chemosensitivity. Drugs tested included alkylating agents, antibiotics, antimitotics, antimetabolites and progestogens. The overall incidence of efficacy of the drugs corresponded with the incidence which might be...

  13. Higher-level goals in the processing of human action events

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, M.L.; Zacks, J.M.; Flores, S.; Howard, L.H.; Woodward, A.L.; Loucks, J.; Meltzoff, A N; Cooper, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a goal critically separates dynamic events involving humans from other events. Human behaviours are motivated by goals, which are known to the actor but typically inferred on the part of the observer. Goals can be hierarchical in nature, such that a collection of sub-goals (e.g., getting a mug, boiling water) can be nested under a higher-level goal (e.g., making tea), which can be further nested under an even higher-level goal (e.g., making breakfast).\\ud The diverse set of tal...

  14. Evaluation of human skin tests for potential dermal irritant and contact sensitizing products: a position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loveren H van; Jong WH de; Garssen J; LPI

    1998-01-01

    Prediction of human cutaneous irritation and sensitization in view of hazard identification has primarily relied on the use of laboratory animals. Such studies in laboratory animals have been very instrumental in the detection of potential contact sensitizing agents. There are however many uncertain

  15. Sensitivity-enhanced C-13 MR spectroscopy of the human brain at 3 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, D.W.J.; Renema, W.K.J.; Graaf, M. van der; Galan, B.E. de; Kentgens, A.P.M.; Heerschap, A.

    2006-01-01

    A new coil design for sensitivity-enhanced C-13 MR spectroscopy (MRS) of the human brain is presented. The design includes a quadrature transmit/receive head coil optimized for C-13 MR sensitivity. Loss-less blocking circuits inside the coil conductors allow this coil to be used inside a homogeneous

  16. Sensitivity-enhanced 13C MR spectroscopy of the human brain at 3 Tesla.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, D.W.J.; Renema, W.K.J.; Graaf, M. van der; Galan, B.E. de; Kentgens, A.P.M.; Heerschap, A.

    2006-01-01

    A new coil design for sensitivity-enhanced 13C MR spectroscopy (MRS) of the human brain is presented. The design includes a quadrature transmit/receive head coil optimized for 13C MR sensitivity. Loss-less blocking circuits inside the coil conductors allow this coil to be used inside a homogeneous c

  17. Marijuana effects on sensitivity to reinforcement in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Scott D; Cherek, Don R

    2002-04-01

    Under controlled laboratory conditions, eight adult subjects smoked placebo and three different potencies of marijuana cigarettes ranging in Delta(9) THC content. Immediately following smoking, subjects were exposed to a laboratory task that provided concurrently available response options. One option systematically decreased in reinforcement frequency throughout the session, and thus required a reallocation of behavior to the non-decreasing option to maximize monetary earnings. After smoking the two highest doses (1.77% and 3.58% Delta(9) THC) subjects earned fewer reinforcers and allocated a higher proportion of responding to the decreasing option, compared with placebo and the lowest dose. The difference in reinforcers earned could not be accounted for by a change in response rates. Quantitative and graphical analyses revealed that the higher doses produced considerable periods of time spent on the decreasing option despite earning few reinforcers. The data are discussed with regard to marijuana effects on dopamine/cannabinoid systems and adaptive behavior change.

  18. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    -resistant individuals is characterized by increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which correlate with a gut microbiome that has an enriched biosynthetic potential for BCAAs and is deprived of genes encoding bacterial inward transporters for these amino acids. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus......Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin...

  19. Mortalin sensitizes human cancer cells to MKT-077-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deocaris, Custer C; Widodo, Nashi; Shrestha, Bhupal G; Kaur, Kamaljit; Ohtaka, Manami; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2007-07-18

    Mortalin is a chaperone protein that functions in many cellular processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis, intracellular trafficking, cell proliferation and signaling. Its upregulation in many human cancers makes it a candidate target for therapeutic intervention by small molecule drugs. In continuation to our earlier studies showing mortalin as a cellular target of MKT-077, a mitochondrion-seeking delocalized cationic dye that causes selective death of cancer cells, in this work, we report that MKT-077 binds to the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, causes tertiary structural changes in the protein, inactivates its chaperone function, and induces senescence in human tumor cell lines. Interestingly, in tumor cells with elevated level of mortalin expression, fairly low drug doses were sufficient to induce senescence. Guided by molecular screening for mortalin in tumor cells, our results led to the idea that working at low doses of the drug could be an alternative senescence-inducing cancer therapeutic strategy that could, in theory, avoid renal toxicities responsible for the abortion of MKT-077 clinical trials. Our work may likely translate to a re-appraisal of the therapeutic benefits of low doses of several classes of anti-tumor drugs, even of those that had been discontinued due to adverse effects.

  20. The Career Perceptions of Academic Staff and Human Resource Discourses in English Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strike, Tony; Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out findings from research that considered the interplay between English national policy developments in human resources management in higher education and the personal stories of academic staff as career participants. Academic careers are pursued in an institutional and national policy context but it was not clear that the formal…

  1. Human Capital Contracts: "Equity-Like" Instruments for Financing Higher Education. Policy Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Miguel

    Human capital contracts are "equity-like" instruments for financing higher education. Since repayment depends on earning and adjusts to student capital to pay, these contracts should be more attractive to students than traditional loans. By making transparent the relative economic value of certain fields of study or the value of degrees from…

  2. Dichotomous Identification Keys: A Ladder to Higher Order Knowledge about the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgo, Andrej

    2006-01-01

    We tried to enrich teaching human anatomy in high school biology lessons. Students construct dichotomous identification keys to the cells, tissues, organs, or body parts. By doing this, students have achieved higher-order cognitive levels of knowledge because construction of such keys is based on analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Students found…

  3. The Rewards of Human Capital Competences for Young European Higher Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Aracil, Adela; Mora, Jose-Gines; Vila, Luis E.

    2004-01-01

    The labour market rewards for a number of required human capital competences are analysed using a sample of young European higher education graduates. Factor analysis is applied to classify competences by jobs into eight orthogonal groups, namely participative, methodological, specialised, organisational, applying rules, physical, generic and…

  4. The Rewards of Human Capital Competences for Young European Higher Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Aracil, Adela; Mora, Jose-Gines; Vila, Luis E.

    2004-01-01

    The labour market rewards for a number of required human capital competences are analysed using a sample of young European higher education graduates. Factor analysis is applied to classify competences by jobs into eight orthogonal groups, namely participative, methodological, specialised, organisational, applying rules, physical, generic and…

  5. Localization and function of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Jung; Kristensen, Michael; Hellsten, Ylva

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated the localization of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels in human skeletal muscle and the functional importance of these channels for human muscle K+ distribution at rest and during muscle activity. Membrane fractionation based on the giant vesicle technique...

  6. New sensitive direct radioimmunoassay for human plasma renin and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higaki, J.; Ogihara, T.; Imai, N.; Kumahara, Y.; Hontani, S.; Nishiura, M.; Ogawa, H.; Hirose, S.; Murakami, K.

    1984-12-01

    A new sensitive direct radioimmunoassay for human plasma renin has been developed. Renin was purified from Haas' preparation utilizing a pepstatin-C/sub 6/-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Antiserum, prepared by immunizing rabbits with the purified renin, was used for the direct radioimmunoassay at a final dilution of 1:30,000. The antibody was specific for human renal and plasma renin, but did not cross-react with cathepsin D, trypsin, or renins of mouse, dog, and rat. Radioimmunoassay was performed by the double antibody technique using the delayed tracer addition method. In this method, a standard curve was obtained over a range from 0.2 to 8.0 ng/ml. The values from this assay correlated well with total renin activity measured as the generation rate of angiotensin I after trypsin activation, but correlated weakly with active renin activity. This finding disclosed that both active and inactive renin were detected by this method. In normal participants, plasma renin concentration determined by direct radioimmunoassay was increased by standing and furosemide injection. The plasma renin concentration determined by direct radioimmunoassay of patients with essential hypertension was not significantly different from values in normal controls. The values were higher in patients with renovascular hypertension, malignant hypertension and Bartter's syndrome, but lower in patients with primary aldosteronism than in normal controls. 20 references, 7 figures.

  7. Sensitivity of Borrelia genospecies to serum complement from different animals and human: a host-pathogen relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhide, Mangesh R; Travnicek, Milan; Levkutova, Maria; Curlik, Jan; Revajova, Viera; Levkut, Mikulas

    2005-02-01

    Different Borrelia species and serotypes were tested for their sensitivity to serum complement from various animals and human. Complement-mediated Borrelia killing in cattle, European bison and deer was higher irrespective of the Borrelia species whereas in other animals and human it was intermediate and Borrelia species-dependent. Activation of the alternative complement pathway by particular Borrelia strain was in correlation with its sensitivity or resistance. These results support the incompetent reservoir nature of cattle, European bison, red, roe and fallow deer, at the same time present the probable reservoir nature of mouflon, dog, wolf, cat and lynx. In short, this study reviews Borrelia-host relationship and its relevance in reservoir competence nature of animals.

  8. Exercise and improved insulin sensitivity in older women: evidence of the enduring benefits of higher intensity training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, Loretta; Dziura, James; Yeckel, Catherine W; Neufer, P Darrell

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have compared the relative benefits of moderate- vs. higher intensity exercise training on improving insulin sensitivity in older people while holding exercise volume constant. Healthy older (73 +/- 10 yr) women (N = 25) who were inactive, but not obese, were randomized into one of three training programs (9-mo duration): 1) high-intensity [80% peak aerobic capacity (V(O2)peak); T(H)] aerobic training; 2) moderate-intensity (65% V(O2)peak; T(M)) aerobic training; or 3) low-intensity (stretching) placebo control (50% V(O2)peak); C(TB)). Importantly, exercise volume (300 kcal/session) was held constant for subjects in both the T(H) and the T(M) groups. V(O2)peak was determined by using a graded exercise challenge on a treadmill. Total body fat and lean mass were determined with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The rate of insulin-stimulated glucose utilization as well as the suppression of lipolysis were determined approximately 72 h after the final exercise bout by using a two-step euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. We observed improved glucose utilization at the higher insulin dose with training, but these improvements were statistically significant only in the T(H) (21%; P = 0.02) compared with the T(M) (16%; P = 0.17) and C(TB) (8%; P = 0.37) groups and were observed without changes in either body composition or V(O2)peak. Likewise in the T(H) group, we detected a significant improvement in insulin-stimulated suppression (%) of adipose tissue lipolysis at the low-insulin dose (38-55%, P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that long-term higher intensity exercise training provides more enduring benefits to insulin action compared with moderate- or low-intensity exercise, likely due to greater transient effects.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy attenuates central sensitization induced by a thermal injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, V M; Borgen, A E; Jansen, E C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2 ) treatment has in animal experiments demonstrated antinociceptive effects. It was hypothesized that these effects would attenuate secondary hyperalgesia areas (SHAs), an expression of central sensitization, after a first-degree thermal injury in humans. METHODS......, compared with control. These new and original findings in humans corroborate animal experimental data. The thermal injury model may give impetus to future human neurophysiological studies exploring the central effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment....

  10. Cognitive task demands modulate the sensitivity of the human cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Smith

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies lead to the conclusion that focused attention, through the activity of corticofugal and medial olivocochlear efferent pathways, modulates activity at the most peripheral aspects of the auditory system within the cochlea. In two experiments we investigated the effects of different intermodal attention manipulations on the response of outer hair cells (OHCs, and the control exerted by the medial olivocochlear (MOC efferent system. The effect of the MOCs on OHC activity was characterized by measuring the amplitude and rapid adaptation time course of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs. In the first, DPOAE recordings were compared while participants were reading a book and counting the occurrence of the letter a (auditory ignoring and while counting the either short- or long-duration eliciting tones (auditory attending. In the second, DPOAEs were recorded while subjects watched muted movies with subtitles (auditory ignoring/visual distraction and were compared with DPOAEs recorded while subjects counted the same tones (auditory attending as in experiment 1. In both experiments 1 and 2, the absolute level of the averaged DPOAEs recorded during the auditory-ignoring condition was statistically higher than that recorded in the auditory-attending condition. Efferent-induced rapid adaptation was evident in all DPOAE contours, under all attention conditions, suggesting that two medial efferent processes act independently to determine rapid adaptation, which is unaffected by attention, and the overall DPOAE level, which is significantly affected by changes in the focus of attention.

  11. The LINA Study: Higher Sensitivity of Infant Compared to Maternal Eosinophil/Basophil Progenitors to Indoor Chemical Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Hörnig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Enhanced eosinophil/basophil (Eo/B progenitor cell levels are known to be associated with allergic inflammation and atopy risk. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different indoor exposures on the recruitment and differentiation of Eo/B progenitors in mother-child pairs. Methods. In 68 mother-child pairs of the LINA study peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used to assess Eo/B colony forming units (CFUs. Information about disease outcomes and indoor exposures was obtained from questionnaires. Indoor concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs were measured by passive sampling. Results. Infant’s Eo/B CFUs were positively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke, disinfectants, or VOCs. In contrast, for maternal Eo/B CFUs, only a few associations were seen. Higher numbers of infant Eo/B CFUs were observed in children with wheezing symptoms within the second year of life. Conclusions. We demonstrate that infant’s hematopoietic cells seem to respond with more sensitivity to environmental exposure compared to maternal cells. At least in infants, an activation of these hematopoietic cells by environmental exposure could contribute to an enhanced risk for the development of respiratory outcomes.

  12. Higher sensitivity and lower specificity in post-fire mortality model validation of 11 western US tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jeffrey M.; van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Lalemand, Laura; Keifer, MaryBeth

    2017-01-01

    Managers require accurate models to predict post-fire tree mortality to plan prescribed fire treatments and examine their effectiveness. Here we assess the performance of a common post-fire tree mortality model with an independent dataset of 11 tree species from 13 National Park Service units in the western USA. Overall model discrimination was generally strong, but performance varied considerably among species and sites. The model tended to have higher sensitivity (proportion of correctly classified dead trees) and lower specificity (proportion of correctly classified live trees) for many species, indicating an overestimation of mortality. Variation in model accuracy (percentage of live and dead trees correctly classified) among species was not related to sample size or percentage observed mortality. However, we observed a positive relationship between specificity and a species-specific bark thickness multiplier, indicating that overestimation was more common in thin-barked species. Accuracy was also quite low for thinner bark classes (<1 cm) for many species, leading to poorer model performance. Our results indicate that a common post-fire mortality model generally performs well across a range of species and sites; however, some thin-barked species and size classes would benefit from further refinement to improve model specificity.

  13. Sensitive targeted quantification of ERK phosphorylation dynamics and stoichiometry in human cells without affinity enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Gaffrey, Matthew J; Nicora, Carrie D; Fillmore, Thomas L; Chrisler, William B; Gritsenko, Marina A; Wu, Chaochao; He, Jintang; Bloodsworth, Kent J; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G; Liu, Tao; Rodland, Karin D; Smith, Richard D; Wiley, H Steven; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2015-01-20

    Targeted mass spectrometry is a promising technology for site-specific quantification of posttranslational modifications. However, a major constraint is the limited sensitivity for quantifying low-abundance PTMs, requiring the use of affinity reagents for enrichment. Herein, we demonstrate the direct site-specific quantification of ERK phosphorylation isoforms (pT, pY, pTpY) and their relative stoichiometry using a sensitive targeted MS approach termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection, and multiplexing (PRISM). PRISM provides effective enrichment of target peptides into a given fraction from complex mixture, followed by selected reaction monitoring quantification. Direct quantification of ERK phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) was demonstrated from as little as 25 μg tryptic peptides from whole cell lysates. Compared to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, PRISM provided ∼10-fold higher signal intensities, presumably due to the better peptide recovery of PRISM. This approach was applied to quantify ERK phosphorylation dynamics in HMEC treated by different doses of epidermal growth factor at both the peak activation (10 min) and steady state (2 h). The maximal ERK activation was observed with 0.3 and 3 ng/mL doses for 10 min and 2 h time points, respectively. The dose-response profiles of individual phosphorylated isoforms showed that singly phosphorylated pT-ERK never increases significantly, while the increase of pY-ERK paralleled that of pTpY-ERK. This data supports for a processive, rather than distributed model of ERK phosphorylation. The PRISM-SRM quantification of protein phosphorylation illustrates the potential for simultaneous quantification of multiple PTMs.

  14. Independent evolution of bitter-taste sensitivity in humans and chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooding, Stephen; Bufe, Bernd; Grassi, Christina; Howard, Michael T; Stone, Anne C; Vazquez, Maribel; Dunn, Diane M; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Weiss, Robert B; Bamshad, Michael J

    2006-04-13

    It was reported over 65 years ago that chimpanzees, like humans, vary in taste sensitivity to the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC). This was suggested to be the result of a shared balanced polymorphism, defining the first, and now classic, example of the effects of balancing selection in great apes. In humans, variable PTC sensitivity is largely controlled by the segregation of two common alleles at the TAS2R38 locus, which encode receptor variants with different ligand affinities. Here we show that PTC taste sensitivity in chimpanzees is also controlled by two common alleles of TAS2R38; however, neither of these alleles is shared with humans. Instead, a mutation of the initiation codon results in the use of an alternative downstream start codon and production of a truncated receptor variant that fails to respond to PTC in vitro. Association testing of PTC sensitivity in a cohort of captive chimpanzees confirmed that chimpanzee TAS2R38 genotype accurately predicts taster status in vivo. Therefore, although Fisher et al.'s observations were accurate, their explanation was wrong. Humans and chimpanzees share variable taste sensitivity to bitter compounds mediated by PTC receptor variants, but the molecular basis of this variation has arisen twice, independently, in the two species.

  15. Gold-silver@TiO2 nanocomposite-modified plasmonic photoanodes for higher efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Su Pei; Lim, Yee Seng; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Lim, Hong Ngee; Ng, Yun Hau; Ramaraj, Ramasamy; Bien, Daniel Chia Sheng; Abou-Zied, Osama K; Huang, Nay Ming

    2017-01-04

    In the present investigation, gold-silver@titania (Au-Ag@TiO2) plasmonic nanocomposite materials with different Au and Ag compositions were prepared using a simple one-step chemical reduction method and used as photoanodes in high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The Au-Ag incorporated TiO2 photoanode demonstrated an enhanced solar-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency of 7.33%, which is ∼230% higher than the unmodified TiO2 photoanode (2.22%) under full sunlight illumination (100 mW cm(-2), AM 1.5G). This superior solar energy conversion efficiency was mainly due to the synergistic effect between the Au and Ag, and their surface plasmon resonance effect, which improved the optical absorption and interfacial charge transfer by minimizing the charge recombination process. The influence of the Au-Ag composition on the overall energy conversion efficiency was also explored, and the optimized composition with TiO2 was found to be Au75-Ag25. This was reflected in the femtosecond transient absorption dynamics in which the electron-phonon interaction in the Au nanoparticles was measured to be 6.14 ps in TiO2/Au75:Ag25, compared to 2.38 ps for free Au and 4.02 ps for TiO2/Au100:Ag0. The slower dynamics indicates a more efficient electron-hole separation in TiO2/Au75:Ag25 that is attributed to the formation of a Schottky barrier at the interface between TiO2 and the noble metal(s) that acts as an electron sink. The significant boost in the solar energy conversion efficiency with the Au-Ag@TiO2 plasmonic nanocomposite showed its potential as a photoanode for high-efficiency DSSCs.

  16. A Paleolithic diet confers higher insulin sensitivity, lower C-reactive protein and lower blood pressure than a cereal-based diet in domestic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Tommy; Ahrén, Bo; Pacini, Giovanni; Sundler, Frank; Wierup, Nils; Steen, Stig; Sjöberg, Trygve; Ugander, Martin; Frostegård, Johan; Göransson, Leif; Lindeberg, Staffan

    2006-11-02

    A Paleolithic diet has been suggested to be more in concordance with human evolutionary legacy than a cereal based diet. This might explain the lower incidence among hunter-gatherers of diseases of affluence such as type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to experimentally study the long-term effect of a Paleolithic diet on risk factors for these diseases in domestic pigs. We examined glucose tolerance, post-challenge insulin response, plasma C-reactive protein and blood pressure after 15 months on Paleolithic diet in comparison with a cereal based swine feed. Upon weaning twenty-four piglets were randomly allocated either to cereal based swine feed (Cereal group) or cereal free Paleolithic diet consisting of vegetables, fruit, meat and a small amount of tubers (Paleolithic group). At 17 months of age an intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed and pancreas specimens were collected for immunohistochemistry. Group comparisons of continuous variables were made by use of the t-test. P Paleolithic group weighed 22% less and had 43% lower subcutaneous fat thickness at mid sternum. No significant difference was seen in fasting glucose between groups. Dynamic insulin sensitivity was significantly higher (p = 0.004) and the insulin response was significantly lower in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.001). The geometric mean of C-reactive protein was 82% lower (p = 0.0007) and intra-arterial diastolic blood pressure was 13% lower in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.007). In evaluations of multivariate correlations, diet emerged as the strongest explanatory variable for the variations in dynamic insulin sensitivity, insulin response, C-reactive protein and diastolic blood pressure when compared to other relevant variables such as weight and subcutaneous fat thickness at mid sternum. There was no obvious immunohistochemical difference in pancreatic islets between the groups, but leukocytes were clearly more frequent in sampled pancreas

  17. A Paleolithic diet confers higher insulin sensitivity, lower C-reactive protein and lower blood pressure than a cereal-based diet in domestic pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugander Martin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Paleolithic diet has been suggested to be more in concordance with human evolutionary legacy than a cereal based diet. This might explain the lower incidence among hunter-gatherers of diseases of affluence such as type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to experimentally study the long-term effect of a Paleolithic diet on risk factors for these diseases in domestic pigs. We examined glucose tolerance, post-challenge insulin response, plasma C-reactive protein and blood pressure after 15 months on Paleolithic diet in comparison with a cereal based swine feed. Methods Upon weaning twenty-four piglets were randomly allocated either to cereal based swine feed (Cereal group or cereal free Paleolithic diet consisting of vegetables, fruit, meat and a small amount of tubers (Paleolithic group. At 17 months of age an intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed and pancreas specimens were collected for immunohistochemistry. Group comparisons of continuous variables were made by use of the t-test. P Results At the end of the study the Paleolithic group weighed 22% less and had 43% lower subcutaneous fat thickness at mid sternum. No significant difference was seen in fasting glucose between groups. Dynamic insulin sensitivity was significantly higher (p = 0.004 and the insulin response was significantly lower in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.001. The geometric mean of C-reactive protein was 82% lower (p = 0.0007 and intra-arterial diastolic blood pressure was 13% lower in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.007. In evaluations of multivariate correlations, diet emerged as the strongest explanatory variable for the variations in dynamic insulin sensitivity, insulin response, C-reactive protein and diastolic blood pressure when compared to other relevant variables such as weight and subcutaneous fat thickness at mid sternum. There was no obvious immunohistochemical difference in pancreatic islets

  18. EMG-normalised kinase activation during exercise is higher in human gastrocnemius compared to soleus muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Jensen

    Full Text Available In mice, certain proteins show a highly confined expression in specific muscle groups. Also, resting and exercise/contraction-induced phosphorylation responses are higher in rat skeletal muscle with low mitochondrial content compared to muscles with high mitochondrial content, possibly related to differential reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging ability or resting glycogen content. To evaluate these parameters in humans, biopsies from soleus, gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis muscles were taken before and after a 45 min inclined (15% walking exercise bout at 69% VO2(max aimed at simultaneously activating soleus and gastrocnemius in a comparable dynamic work-pattern. Hexokinase II and GLUT4 were 46-59% and 26-38% higher (p<0.05 in soleus compared to the two other muscles. The type I muscle fiber percentage was highest in soleus and lowest in vastus lateralis. No differences were found in protein expression of signalling proteins (AMPK subunits, eEF2, ERK1/2, TBC1D1 and 4, mitochondrial markers (F1 ATPase and COX1 or ROS-handling enzymes (SOD2 and catalase. Gastrocnemius was less active than soleus measured as EMG signal and glycogen use yet gastrocnemius displayed larger increases than soleus in phosphorylation of AMPK Thr172, eEF2 Thr56 and ERK 1/2 Thr202/Tyr204 when normalised to the mean relative EMG-signal. In conclusion, proteins with muscle-group restricted expression in mice do not show this pattern in human lower extremity muscle groups. Nonetheless the phosphorylation-response is greater for a number of kinase signalling pathways in human gastrocnemius than soleus at a given activation-intensity. This may be due to the combined subtle effects of a higher type I muscle fiber content and higher training status in soleus compared to gastrocnemius muscle.

  19. Olfactory Sensitivity for Six Predator Odorants in CD-1 Mice, Human Subjects, and Spider Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafchi, Amir; Odhammer, Anna M. E.; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Using a conditioning paradigm, we assessed the olfactory sensitivity of six CD-1 mice (Mus musculus) for six sulfur-containing odorants known to be components of the odors of natural predators of the mouse. With all six odorants, the mice discriminated concentrations <0.1 ppm (parts per million) from the solvent, and with five of the six odorants the best-scoring animals were even able to detect concentrations <1 ppt (parts per trillion). Four female spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) and twelve human subjects (Homo sapiens) tested in parallel were found to detect the same six odorants at concentrations <0.01 ppm, and with four of the six odorants the best-scoring animals and subjects even detected concentrations <10 ppt. With all three species, the threshold values obtained here are generally lower than (or in the lower range of) those reported for other chemical classes tested previously, suggesting that sulfur-containing odorants may play a special role in olfaction. Across-species comparisons showed that the mice were significantly more sensitive than the human subjects and the spider monkeys with four of the six predator odorants. However, the human subjects were significantly more sensitive than the mice with the remaining two odorants. Human subjects and spider monkeys significantly differed in their sensitivity with only two of the six odorants. These comparisons lend further support to the notion that the number of functional olfactory receptor genes or the relative or absolute size of the olfactory bulbs are poor predictors of a species’ olfactory sensitivity. Analysis of odor structure–activity relationships showed that in both mice and human subjects the type of alkyl rest attached to a thietane and the type of oxygen moiety attached to a thiol significantly affected olfactory sensitivity. PMID:24278296

  20. Gambling for Gatorade: risk-sensitive decision making for fluid rewards in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Benjamin Y; Platt, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    Determining how both humans and animals make decisions in risky situations is a central problem in economics, experimental psychology, behavioral economics, and neurobiology. Typically, humans are risk seeking for gains and risk averse for losses, while animals may display a variety of preferences under risk depending on, amongst other factors, internal state. Such differences in behavior may reflect major cognitive and cultural differences or they may reflect differences in the way risk sensitivity is probed in humans and animals. Notably, in most studies humans make one or a few choices amongst hypothetical or real monetary options, while animals make dozens of repeated choices amongst options offering primary rewards like food or drink. To address this issue, we probed risk-sensitive decision making in human participants using a paradigm modeled on animal studies, in which rewards were either small squirts of Gatorade or small amounts of real money. Possible outcomes and their probabilities were not made explicit in either case. We found that individual patterns of decision making were strikingly similar for both juice and for money, both in overall risk preferences and in trial-to-trial effects of reward outcome on choice. Comparison with decisions made by monkeys for juice in a similar task revealed highly similar gambling styles. These results unite known patterns of risk-sensitive decision making in human and nonhuman primates and suggest that factors such as the way a decision is framed or internal state may underlie observed variation in risk preferences between and within species.

  1. Human intestinal acyl-CoA synthetase 5 is sensitive to the inhibitor triacsin C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elke Kaemmerer; Anne Peuscher; Andrea Reinartz; Christian Liedtke; Ralf Weiskirchen; Jürgen Kopitz; Nikolaus Gassler

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether human acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) is sensitive to the ACSL inhibitor triacsin C.METHODS: The ACSL isoforms ACSL1 and ACSL5 from rat as well as human ACSL5 were cloned and recombinantly expressed as 6xHis-tagged enzymes. Ni2+-affinity purified recombinant enzymes were assayed at pH 7.5 or pH 9.5 in the presence or absence of triacsin C. In addition, ACSL5 transfected CaCo2 cells and intestinal human mucosa were monitored. ACSL5 expression in cellular systems was verified using Western blot and immunofluorescence.The ACSL assay mix included TrisHCl (pH 7.4), ATP, CoA, EDTA, DTT, MgCl2, [9,10-3H] palmitic acid, and triton X-100. The 200 μL reaction was initiated with the addition of solubilized, purified recombinant proteins or cellular lysates. Reactions were terminated after 10, 30 or 60 min of incubation with Doles medium.RESULTS: Expression of soluble recombinant ACSL pro-teins was found after incubation with isopropyl beta-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside and after ultracentrifugatio these were further purified to near homogeneity with Ni2+-affinity chromatography. Triacsin C selectively and strongly inhibited recombinant human ACSL5 protein at pH 7.5 and pH 9.5, as well as recombinant rat ACSL1 (sensitive control), but not recombinant rat ACSL5 (insensitive control). The IC50 for human ACSL5 was about 10 μmol/L. The inhibitory triacsin C effect was similar for different incubation times (10, 30 and 60 min) and was not modified by the N- or C-terminal location of the 6xHis-tag. In order to evaluate ACSL5 sensitivity to triacsin C in a cellular environment, stable human ACSL5 CaCo2 transfectants and mechanically dissected normal human intestinal mucosa with high physiological expression of ACSL5 were analyzed. In both models, ACSL5 peak activity was found at pH 7.5 and pH 9.5, corresponding to the properties of recombinant human ACSL5 protein. In the presence of triacsin C (25 μmol/L), total ACSL activity was dramatically diminished in

  2. Higher-order Multivariable Polynomial Regression to Estimate Human Affective States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Chen, Tong; Liu, Guangyuan; Yang, Jiemin

    2016-03-01

    From direct observations, facial, vocal, gestural, physiological, and central nervous signals, estimating human affective states through computational models such as multivariate linear-regression analysis, support vector regression, and artificial neural network, have been proposed in the past decade. In these models, linear models are generally lack of precision because of ignoring intrinsic nonlinearities of complex psychophysiological processes; and nonlinear models commonly adopt complicated algorithms. To improve accuracy and simplify model, we introduce a new computational modeling method named as higher-order multivariable polynomial regression to estimate human affective states. The study employs standardized pictures in the International Affective Picture System to induce thirty subjects’ affective states, and obtains pure affective patterns of skin conductance as input variables to the higher-order multivariable polynomial model for predicting affective valence and arousal. Experimental results show that our method is able to obtain efficient correlation coefficients of 0.98 and 0.96 for estimation of affective valence and arousal, respectively. Moreover, the method may provide certain indirect evidences that valence and arousal have their brain’s motivational circuit origins. Thus, the proposed method can serve as a novel one for efficiently estimating human affective states.

  3. Higher-order Multivariable Polynomial Regression to Estimate Human Affective States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Chen, Tong; Liu, Guangyuan; Yang, Jiemin

    2016-03-21

    From direct observations, facial, vocal, gestural, physiological, and central nervous signals, estimating human affective states through computational models such as multivariate linear-regression analysis, support vector regression, and artificial neural network, have been proposed in the past decade. In these models, linear models are generally lack of precision because of ignoring intrinsic nonlinearities of complex psychophysiological processes; and nonlinear models commonly adopt complicated algorithms. To improve accuracy and simplify model, we introduce a new computational modeling method named as higher-order multivariable polynomial regression to estimate human affective states. The study employs standardized pictures in the International Affective Picture System to induce thirty subjects' affective states, and obtains pure affective patterns of skin conductance as input variables to the higher-order multivariable polynomial model for predicting affective valence and arousal. Experimental results show that our method is able to obtain efficient correlation coefficients of 0.98 and 0.96 for estimation of affective valence and arousal, respectively. Moreover, the method may provide certain indirect evidences that valence and arousal have their brain's motivational circuit origins. Thus, the proposed method can serve as a novel one for efficiently estimating human affective states.

  4. Inhibition of Notch1 increases paclitaxel sensitivity to human breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Li; Ma Yongjie; Gu Feng; Fu Li

    2014-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel (PAC) is the first-line chemotherapy drug for most breast cancer patients,but clinical studies showed that some breast cancer patients were insensitive to PAC,which led to chemotherapy failure.It was reported that Notch1 signaling participated in drug resistance of breast cancer.Here,we show whether Notch1 expression is related to PAC sensitivity of breast cancer.Methods We employed Notch1 siRNA and Notch1 inhibitor,N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-1-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butylester (DAPT),to down regulate Notch1 expression in human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231,and detected the inhibition effect by Western blotting and reverse trans cription-polymerase chain reaction,respectively.After 24 hours exposure to different concentration of PAC (0,1,5,10,15,20,and 25 μg/ml),the viability of the control group and experimental group cells was tested by MTT.We also examined the expression of Notch1 in PAC sensitive and nonsensitive breast cancer patients,respectively by immunohistochemistry (IHC).The PAC sensitivity of breast cancer patients were identified by collagen gel droplet embedded culture-drug sensitivity test (CD-DST).Results Down regulation of Notch1 expression by Notch1siRNA interference or Notch1 inhibitor increased the PAC sensitivity in MDA-MB-231 cells (P <0.05).Also,the expression of Notch1 in PAC sensitive patients was much lower than that of PAC non-sensitive patients (P <0.01).Conclusion Notch1 expression has an effect on PAC sensitivity in breast cancer patients,and the inhibition of Notch1 increases paclitaxel sensitivity to human breast cancer.

  5. Proteomic allergen-peptide/protein interaction assay for the identification of human skin sensitizers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, L.; Kinzebach, S.; Ohnesorge, S.; Franke, B.; Goette, I.; Koenig-Gressel, D.; Thierse, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by skin sensitizers is a pivotal step in T cell mediated allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). In this process small reactive chemicals interact covalently or non-covalently with cellular or extracellular skin self-proteins or self-peptides to become recognized by the human imm

  6. A Rapid and Sensitive Method for the Quantitation of Legionella Pneumophila Antigen from Human Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-12

    reverse% passive hemagglutination test was developed to assay concentrations of solubl4 antigen of Legionnaires’ Disease ( Legionella pneumophila ) in... Legionella pneumophila Antigen from Humanl Urine JOSEPH A. MANGIAFICO, KENNETH W. HEDLUND, AND ALLEN R. KNOTT Running title: L. PNEUMOPHILA ANTIGEN IN...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited A Rapid and Sensitive Method for the Quantitation of Legionella pneumophila Antigen from Human

  7. Repeated high-intensity exercise modulates Ca(2+) sensitivity of human skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, K D; Hvid, L G; Willis, S J;

    2016-01-01

    The effects of short-term high-intensity exercise on single fiber contractile function in humans are unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were: (a) to access the acute effects of repeated high-intensity exercise on human single muscle fiber contractile function; and (b) to examine whether...... the fourth sprint with respect to Ca(2+) sensitivity and maximal Ca(2+) -activated force. To investigate the oxidative effects of exercise on single fiber contractile function, a subset of fibers was incubated with dithiothreitol (DTT) before analysis. Ca(2+) sensitivity was enhanced by exercise in both MHC...... I (17%, P exercise. In conclusion, repeated high-intensity exercise increased Ca(2+) sensitivity in both MHC I and MHC II...

  8. Human MCG measurements with a high-sensitivity potassium atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, K; Ito, Y; Kobayashi, T

    2012-06-01

    Measuring biomagnetic fields, such as magnetocardiograms (MCGs), is important for investigating biological functions. To address to this need, we developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer. In this study, human MCGs were acquired using a potassium atomic magnetometer without any modulating systems. The sensitivity of the magnetometer is comparable to that of high-T(c) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and is sufficient for acquiring human MCGs. The activity of a human heart estimated from the MCG maps agrees well with that measured with SQUID magnetometers. Thus, our magnetometer produces reliable results, which demonstrate the potential of our atomic magnetometer for biomagnetic measurements.

  9. Effect of training on insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake and lipolysis in human adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Larsen, J J; Mikines, K J

    2000-01-01

    Training increases insulin sensitivity of both whole body and muscle in humans. To investigate whether training also increases insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue, we performed a three-step hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp in eight endurance-trained (T) and eight sedentary (S) young men...... [insulin infusion rates: 10,000 (step I), 20,000 (step II), and 150,000 (step III) microU x min(-1) x m(-2)]. Glucose and glycerol concentrations were measured in arterial blood and also by microdialysis in interstitial fluid in periumbilical, subcutaneous adipose tissue and in quadriceps femoris muscle......-time: T, 44 +/- 9 min (n = 7); S, 102 +/- 23 min (n = 5); P insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in subcutaneous adipose tissue and in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, interstitial glycerol data suggest that training also increases insulin sensitivity of lipolysis...

  10. Development of a sensitive enzyme immunoassay for human epidermal growth factor (urogastrone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobe, M; Tokida, N; Furukawa, S; Ishikawa, E; Hayashi, K

    1986-04-15

    A sensitive two-site enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) was developed, based on the sandwiching of an antigen between anti-hEGF IgG-coated polystyrene beads and anti-hEGF Fab'-linked peroxidase complex (horseradish peroxidase, EC. 1.11.1.7). This method has four advantages: the anti-hEGF Fab'-linked peroxidase complex is more stable than 125I-labelled antibody; the procedure is simple and rapid compared to bioassay; its discriminatory sensitivity is as low as 0.1 pg/assay tube; and serial dilution curves of unextracted human serum and urine samples all paralleled that of standard hEGF. The validity of the measurement of hEGF-like immunoreactivity in human serum and plasma is discussed.

  11. Deep Neural Networks as a Computational Model for Human Shape Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op de Beeck, Hans P.

    2016-01-01

    Theories of object recognition agree that shape is of primordial importance, but there is no consensus about how shape might be represented, and so far attempts to implement a model of shape perception that would work with realistic stimuli have largely failed. Recent studies suggest that state-of-the-art convolutional ‘deep’ neural networks (DNNs) capture important aspects of human object perception. We hypothesized that these successes might be partially related to a human-like representation of object shape. Here we demonstrate that sensitivity for shape features, characteristic to human and primate vision, emerges in DNNs when trained for generic object recognition from natural photographs. We show that these models explain human shape judgments for several benchmark behavioral and neural stimulus sets on which earlier models mostly failed. In particular, although never explicitly trained for such stimuli, DNNs develop acute sensitivity to minute variations in shape and to non-accidental properties that have long been implicated to form the basis for object recognition. Even more strikingly, when tested with a challenging stimulus set in which shape and category membership are dissociated, the most complex model architectures capture human shape sensitivity as well as some aspects of the category structure that emerges from human judgments. As a whole, these results indicate that convolutional neural networks not only learn physically correct representations of object categories but also develop perceptually accurate representational spaces of shapes. An even more complete model of human object representations might be in sight by training deep architectures for multiple tasks, which is so characteristic in human development. PMID:27124699

  12. Persistent human Borna disease virus infection modifies the acetylome of human oligodendroglia cells towards higher energy and transporter levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Forensic Medicine, Institute of Forensic Science, Ministry of Justice, Shanghai 200063 (China); Liu, Siwen [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhang, Liang [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Xiao [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Li, Dan [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Basic Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Lei, Yang [Department of Internal Medicine, University-Town Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Peng, Xiaojun [Jingjie PTM BioLab (Hangzhou) Co. Ltd, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Cheng, Zhongyi [Advanced Institute of Translational Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); and others

    2015-11-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus persistently infecting mammalian hosts including humans. Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a key protein post-translational modification (PTM). The unexpectedly broad regulatory scope of Kac let us to profile the entire acetylome upon BDV infection. Methods: The acetylome was profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Results: We identified and quantified 791 Kac sites in 473 Kac proteins in human BDV Hu-H1-infected and non-infected oligodendroglial (OL) cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that BDV infection alters the acetylation of metabolic proteins, membrane-associated proteins and transmembrane transporter activity, and affects the acetylation of several lysine acetyltransferases (KAT). Conclusions: Upon BDV persistence the OL acetylome is manipulated towards higher energy and transporter levels necessary for shuttling BDV proteins to and from nuclear replication sites. - Highlights: • We used SILAC-based proteomics to analyze the acetylome of BDV infected OL cells. • We quantified 791Kac sites in 473 proteins. • Bioinformatic analysis revealed altered acetylation of metabolic proteins et al. • BDV manipulates the OL acetylome towards higher energy and transporter levels. • BDV infection is associated with enriched phosphate-associated metabolic processes.

  13. Muscle triacylglycerol and hormone-sensitive lipase activity in untrained and trained human muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Biba, Taus O; Galbo, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    During exercise, triacylglycerol (TG) is recruited in skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that both muscle hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and TG recruitment would be higher in trained than in untrained subjects in response to prolonged exercise. Healthy male subjects (26 +/- 1 years, body ...

  14. Tailored sensitivity reduction improves pattern recognition and information recovery with a higher tolerance to varied sample concentration for targeted urinary metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhixiang; Yan, Ru

    2016-04-22

    Variation in total metabolite concentration among different samples has been a major challenge for urinary metabolomics. Here we investigated the potential of tailored sensitivity reduction of high abundance metabolites for improved targeted urinary metabolomics. Two levels of sensitivity reduction of the 21 predominant urinary metabolites were assessed by employing less sensitive transition or collision energy with level 1 (reduced 1) and 2 (reduced 2) exhibiting 30-90% and 2-20% of the optimal sensitivity, respectively. Five postacquisition normalization methods were compared including no normalization, probabilistic quotient normalization, and normalization to sample median, creatinine intensity, and total intensity. Normalization to total intensity with reduced 2 gave the best pattern recognition and information recovery with a higher tolerance to varied sample concentration. Pareto scaling could improve the performance of tailored sensitivity reduction (reduced 2) for targeted urinary metabolomics while data transformation and autoscaling were susceptible to varied sample concentration. Using controlled spike-in experiments, we demonstrated that tailored sensitivity reduction revealed more differentially expressed markers with higher accuracy than did the conventional optimal sensitivity. This was particularly true when the differences between the sample groups are small. This work also served as an introductory guideline for handling targeted metabolomics data using the open-source software MetaboAnalyst.

  15. Sensitive Procedure for Rapid Detection of Human Brucellosis, Based on PCR Method in Contaminated Serum Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslam Ghezelsofla

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and objective: Brucellosis is a zoonosis transmittable to humans poses a significant public health problem in many developing countries and requires rapid and accurate diagnostic methods. Here, our aim was to develop a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay in artificially contaminated serum samples as a model for rapid and accurate laboratory confirmation of human brucellosis. Material and methods: In this study, initially the standard Brucella abortus strain (2308 were cultured on Brucella agar medium and then colonies were inactivated by formalin 10 %. Genomic DNA was extracted from inactivated bacterial colonies. Serial dilutions of bacterial-DNA were prepared in fetal bovine serum (FBS and water and subsequently DNA extraction were repeated on these artificially contaminated samples. The two pairs of primers amplified two different fragments included in: a gene encoding an outer membrane protein (omp-2 (primers JPF/JPR and a sequence 16S rRNA of B. abortus (primers F4/R2. Results: The two primers assayed showed a difference in sensitivity for detecting Brucella DNA, ranging between 5 pg and 50 pg for artificially contaminated serum samples and 50Fg and 5 pg for contaminated control samples. Therefore, the sensitivity of PCR using F4/R2 primers was greater than the PCR using JPF/JPR primers.Conclusion: Although the sensitivity of PCR using these primers was affected by serum inhibitors, they are still the most sensitive and they could provide a useful tool for the diagnosis of human brucellosis.

  16. Common genetic variation in the human CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Z Lutz

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently, cardiotrophin-1, a member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines was described to protect beta-cells from apoptosis, to improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance, and to prevent streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Here, we studied whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, influence insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in humans. METHODS: We genotyped 1,771 German subjects for three CTF1 tagging SNPs (rs1046276, rs1458201, and rs8046707. The subjects were metabolically characterized by an oral glucose tolerance test. Subgroups underwent magnetic resonance (MR imaging/spectroscopy and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps. RESULTS: After appropriate adjustment, the minor allele of CTF1 SNP rs8046707 was significantly associated with decreased in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. The other tested SNPs were not associated with OGTT-derived sensitivity parameters, nor did the three tested SNPs show any association with OGTT-derived parameters of insulin release. In the MR subgroup, SNP rs8046707 was nominally associated with lower visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, the SNP rs1458201 showed a nominal association with increased VLDL levels. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study, even though preliminary and awaiting further confirmation by independent replication, provides first evidence that common genetic variation in CTF1 could contribute to insulin sensitivity in humans. Our SNP data indicate an insulin-desensitizing effect of cardiotrophin-1 and underline that cardiotrophin-1 represents an interesting target to influence insulin sensitivity.

  17. Sensitivity for Diagnosing Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis from Manufacturers is 10% Higher than Reported in Peer-Reviewed Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachhani, Raj; Patel, Toral; Centor, Robert M; Estrada, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Meta-analyses based on peer-reviewed publications report a sensitivity of approximately 85% for rapid antigen streptococcus tests to diagnose group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. Because these meta-analyses excluded package inserts, we examined the test characteristics of rapid antigen streptococcal tests and molecular methods that manufacturers report in their package inserts. We included tests available in the US market (Food and Drug Administration, period searched 1993-2015) and used package insert data to calculate pooled sensitivity and specificity. To examine quality, we used the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. We excluded 26 tests having different trade names but identical methods and data. The study design was prospective in 41.7% (10 of 24). The pooled sensitivity of the most commonly used method, lateral flow/immunochromatographic, was 95% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94-96) and the pooled specificity was 98% (96-98); 7108 patients. The pooled sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction or molecular methods was 98% (95% CI 96-98) and the pooled specificity was 96% (95% CI 95-97); 5685 patients. Package inserts include sponsored studies that overestimate the sensitivity of rapid tests to diagnose GAS pharyngitis by approximately 10%. Physicians should understand that package inserts overestimate diagnostic test utility; a negative test cannot be used to exclude GAS pharyngitis.

  18. Lower Bone Mass and Higher Bone Resorption in Pheochromocytoma: Importance of Sympathetic Activity on Human Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Jun; Kwak, Mi Kyung; Ahn, Seong Hee; Kim, Hyeonmok; Lee, Seung Hun; Song, Kee-Ho; Suh, Sunghwan; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Koh, Jung-Min

    2017-08-01

    Despite the apparent biological importance of sympathetic activity on bone metabolism in rodents, its role in humans remains questionable. To clarify the link between the sympathetic nervous system and the skeleton in humans. Among 620 consecutive subjects with newly diagnosed adrenal incidentaloma, 31 patients with histologically confirmed pheochromocytoma (a catecholamine-secreting neuroendocrine tumor) and 280 patients with nonfunctional adrenal incidentaloma were defined as cases and controls, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, subjects with pheochromocytoma had 7.2% lower bone mass at the lumbar spine and 33.5% higher serum C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTX) than those without pheochromocytoma (P = 0.016 and 0.001, respectively), whereas there were no statistical differences between groups in bone mineral density (BMD) at the femur neck and total hip and in serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSALP) level. The odds ratio (OR) for lower BMD at the lumbar spine in the presence of pheochromocytoma was 3.31 (95% confidence interval, 1.23 to 8.56). However, the ORs for lower BMD at the femur neck and total hip did not differ according to the presence of pheochromocytoma. Serum CTX level decreased by 35.2% after adrenalectomy in patients with pheochromocytoma, whereas serum BSALP level did not change significantly. This study provides clinical evidence showing that sympathetic overstimulation in pheochromocytoma can contribute to adverse effects on human bone through the increase of bone loss (especially in trabecular bone), as well as bone resorption.

  19. High-expanding cortical regions in human development and evolution are related to higher intellectual abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjell, Anders M; Westlye, Lars T; Amlien, Inge; Tamnes, Christian K; Grydeland, Håkon; Engvig, Andreas; Espeseth, Thomas; Reinvang, Ivar; Lundervold, Astri J; Lundervold, Arvid; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2015-01-01

    Cortical surface area has tremendously expanded during human evolution, and similar patterns of cortical expansion have been observed during childhood development. An intriguing hypothesis is that the high-expanding cortical regions also show the strongest correlations with intellectual function in humans. However, we do not know how the regional distribution of correlations between intellectual function and cortical area maps onto expansion in development and evolution. Here, in a sample of 1048 participants, we show that regions in which cortical area correlates with visuospatial reasoning abilities are generally high expanding in both development and evolution. Several regions in the frontal cortex, especially the anterior cingulate, showed high expansion in both development and evolution. The area of these regions was related to intellectual functions in humans. Low-expanding areas were not related to cognitive scores. These findings suggest that cortical regions involved in higher intellectual functions have expanded the most during development and evolution. The radial unit hypothesis provides a common framework for interpretation of the findings in the context of evolution and prenatal development, while additional cellular mechanisms, such as synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, dendritic arborization, and intracortical myelination, likely impact area expansion in later childhood.

  20. Endogenous Opioid-Masked Latent Pain Sensitization: Studies from Mouse to Human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel P Pereira

    Full Text Available Following the resolution of a severe inflammatory injury in rodents, administration of mu-opioid receptor inverse agonists leads to reinstatement of pain hypersensitivity. The mechanisms underlying this form of latent pain sensitization (LS likely contribute to the development of chronic pain, but LS has not yet been demonstrated in humans. Using a C57BL/6 mouse model of cutaneous mild heat injury (MHI we demonstrated a dose-dependent reinstatement of pain sensitization, assessed as primary (P < 0.001 and secondary hyperalgesia (P < 0.001 by naloxone (0.3–10 mg/kg, 168 hrs after the induction of MHI. Forward-translating the dose data to a human MHI model (n = 12 we could show that LS does indeed occur after naloxone 2 mg/kg, 168 hrs after a MHI. Our previous unsuccessful efforts to demonstrate unmasking of LS in humans are thus likely explained by an insufficient naloxone dose (0.021 mg/kg. However, while LS was consistently demonstrated in 21/24 mice, LS was only seen in 4/12 subjects. This difference is likely due to selection bias since the C57BL/6 mouse strain exhibits markedly enhanced pain sensitivity in assays of acute thermal nociception. Future exploratory studies in humans should prioritize inclusion of “high-sensitizers” prone to develop LS and use post-surgical models to elucidate markers of vulnerability to chronic postsurgical pain.EudraCT 2012-005663-27.

  1. Note: Improving low-light-level image detection sensitivity with higher speed using auxiliary sinusoidal light signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongying; Yu, Zhengtao

    2015-06-01

    An improved active imaging method, which upgraded the detection sensitivity by applying an auxiliary sawtooth wave light signal, was reported. Nevertheless, such method sacrificed the imaging speed. To speed up imaging, a sinusoidal light signal is used instead and superposed with the undetectable low-light-level signal on the image sensor. After acquiring a superimposed image set in one sine wave cycle, an unbiased low-light-level image estimation is obtained by using least-square optimization. Through probabilistic analysis and experimental study, we demonstrate that the sinusoidal signal could improve the detection sensitivity 1/3 faster than the sawtooth wave signal.

  2. Comparative study of the photopic spectral sensitivity of domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus), turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, C L; Prescott, N B; Jarvis, J R; Le Sueur, C; Perry, G C; Wathes, C M

    2006-06-01

    1. The photopic spectral sensitivity of domestic ducks and turkeys was determined using an operant psychophysical technique. Spectral sensitivity was determined over a range of specified wavelengths, including UVA, between 326 < lambda < 694 nm and the results were directly compared with human spectral sensitivity measured under similar experimental conditions. 2. Domestic ducks and turkeys had similar spectral sensitivities to each other, and could perceive UVA radiation, although turkeys were more sensitive to UVA than ducks. For both species, peak sensitivity was between 544 < lambda < 577 nm, with reduced sensitivity at lambda = 508 and 600 nm. Both ducks and turkeys had a very different and broader range of spectral sensitivity than the human subjects tested. 3. Spectral sensitivity and UVA perception in these avian species are discussed in relation to their visual ecology and the mechanisms controlling neural processing of colour information.

  3. Human adipocytes are highly sensitive to intermittent hypoxia induced NF-kappaB activity and subsequent inflammatory gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Cormac T. [School of Medicine and Medical Science, The Conway Institute, University College Dublin (Ireland); Kent, Brian D.; Crinion, Sophie J.; McNicholas, Walter T. [School of Medicine and Medical Science, The Conway Institute, University College Dublin (Ireland); Pulmonary and Sleep Disorders Unit, St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Ryan, Silke, E-mail: silke.ryan@ucd.ie [School of Medicine and Medical Science, The Conway Institute, University College Dublin (Ireland); Pulmonary and Sleep Disorders Unit, St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Intermittent hypoxia (IH) leads to NF-κB activation in human primary adipocytes. • Adipocytes bear higher pro-inflammatory potential than other human primary cells. • IH leads to upregulation of multiple pro-inflammatory genes in human adipocytes. - Abstract: Introduction: Intermittent hypoxia (IH)-induced activation of pro-inflammatory pathways is a major contributing factor to the cardiovascular pathophysiology associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Obesity is commonly associated with OSA although it remains unknown whether adipose tissue is a major source of inflammatory mediators in response to IH. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that IH leads to augmented inflammatory responses in human adipocytes when compared to cells of non-adipocyte lineages. Methods and results: Human primary subcutaneous and visceral adipocytes, human primary microvascular pulmonary endothelial cells (HUMEC-L) and human primary small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) were exposed to 0, 6 or 12 cycles of IH or stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. IH led to a robust increase in NF-κB DNA-binding activity in adipocytes compared with normoxic controls regardless of whether the source of adipocytes was visceral or subcutaneous. Notably, the NF-κB response of adipocytes to both IH and TNF-α was significantly greater than that in HUMEC-L and SAEC. Western blotting confirmed enhanced nuclear translocation of p65 in adipocytes in response to IH, accompanied by phosphorylation of I-κB. Parallel to p65 activation, we observed a significant increase in secretion of the adipokines interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6 and TNF-α with IH in adipocytes accompanied by significant upregulation of mRNA expression. PCR-array suggested profound influence of IH on pro-inflammatory gene expression in adipocytes. Conclusion: Human adipocytes demonstrate strong sensitivity to inflammatory gene expression in response to acute IH and hence, adipose tissue may be a key

  4. A Study to Assess the Achievement Motivation of Higher Secondary Students in Relation to Their Noise Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, Prema

    2014-01-01

    Disturbing sounds are often referred to as noise, and if extreme enough in degree, intensity or frequency, it is referred to as noise pollution. Achievement refers to a change in study behavior in relation to their noise sensitivity and learning in the educational sense by achieving results in changed responses to certain types of stimuli like…

  5. Differential sensitivity of hormone-responsive and unresponsive human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) to tumor necrosis factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Zhao (X.); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractTwo sublines, the hormone-sensitive LNCaP-FGC and the insensitive LNCaP-r (resistant) carcinoma cell lines, originating from the parental human prostatic carcinoma cell line LNCaP were tested for sensitivity to human tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) using the MTT assay. Irrespective of the

  6. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation.

  7. Tactile-direction-sensitive and stretchable electronic skins based on human-skin-inspired interlocked microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghwa; Lee, Youngoh; Hong, Jaehyung; Lee, Youngsu; Ha, Minjeong; Jung, Youngdo; Lim, Hyuneui; Kim, Sung Youb; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2014-12-23

    Stretchable electronic skins with multidirectional force-sensing capabilities are of great importance in robotics, prosthetics, and rehabilitation devices. Inspired by the interlocked microstructures found in epidermal-dermal ridges in human skin, piezoresistive interlocked microdome arrays are employed for stress-direction-sensitive, stretchable electronic skins. Here we show that these arrays possess highly sensitive detection capability of various mechanical stimuli including normal, shear, stretching, bending, and twisting forces. Furthermore, the unique geometry of interlocked microdome arrays enables the differentiation of various mechanical stimuli because the arrays exhibit different levels of deformation depending on the direction of applied forces, thus providing different sensory output patterns. In addition, we show that the electronic skins attached on human skin in the arm and wrist areas are able to distinguish various mechanical stimuli applied in different directions and can selectively monitor different intensities and directions of air flows and vibrations.

  8. Highly stretchable and wearable graphene strain sensors with controllable sensitivity for human motion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Jin; Hyun, Woo Jin; Mun, Sung Cik; Park, Yong Tae; Park, O Ok

    2015-03-25

    Because of their outstanding electrical and mechanical properties, graphene strain sensors have attracted extensive attention for electronic applications in virtual reality, robotics, medical diagnostics, and healthcare. Although several strain sensors based on graphene have been reported, the stretchability and sensitivity of these sensors remain limited, and also there is a pressing need to develop a practical fabrication process. This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of new types of graphene strain sensors based on stretchable yarns. Highly stretchable, sensitive, and wearable sensors are realized by a layer-by-layer assembly method that is simple, low-cost, scalable, and solution-processable. Because of the yarn structures, these sensors exhibit high stretchability (up to 150%) and versatility, and can detect both large- and small-scale human motions. For this study, wearable electronics are fabricated with implanted sensors that can monitor diverse human motions, including joint movement, phonation, swallowing, and breathing.

  9. Context-sensitive design and human interaction principles for usable, useful, and adoptable radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Laura A.; Klein, Laura M.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of exquisitely sensitive Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems is positioning this technology for use in time-critical environments, such as search-and-rescue missions and improvised explosive device (IED) detection. SAR systems should be playing a keystone role in the United States' Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance activities. Yet many in the SAR community see missed opportunities for incorporating SAR into existing remote sensing data collection and analysis challenges. Drawing on several years' of field research with SAR engineering and operational teams, this paper examines the human and organizational factors that mitigate against the adoption and use of SAR for tactical ISR and operational support. We suggest that SAR has a design problem, and that context-sensitive, human and organizational design frameworks are required if the community is to realize SAR's tactical potential.

  10. Is Cytox 3522 (10% methylene-bis-thiocyanate) a human skin sensitizer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1983-01-01

    Methylene-bis-thiocyanate is an antimicrobial agent in Cytox 3522 (American Cyanamid Corporation) and Nalco 206 (Nalco Chemical Company). Both are wide-spectrum industrial biocides. Cytox 3522 showed a strong sensitization potential in guineau pigs using the Guinea Pig Maximization Test and the O......Methylene-bis-thiocyanate is an antimicrobial agent in Cytox 3522 (American Cyanamid Corporation) and Nalco 206 (Nalco Chemical Company). Both are wide-spectrum industrial biocides. Cytox 3522 showed a strong sensitization potential in guineau pigs using the Guinea Pig Maximization Test...... and the Open Epicutaneous Test procedures. In spite of this, human sensitization has not been reported. This may be explained by several factors such as limited exposure, low-use concentration and a lack of diagnostic patch tests in selected patients....

  11. Assessing reliable human mobility patterns from higher-order memory in mobile communications

    CERN Document Server

    De Domenico, Manlio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how people move within a geographic area, e.g. a city, a country or the whole world, is fundamental in several applications, from predicting the spatio-temporal evolution of an epidemics to inferring migration patterns. Mobile phone records provide an excellent proxy of human mobility, showing that movements exhibit a high level of memory. However, the precise role of memory in widely adopted proxies of mobility, as mobile phone records, is unknown. Here we use 560 millions of call detail records from Senegal to show that standard Markovian approaches, including higher-order ones, fail in capturing real mobility patterns and introduce spurious movements never observed in reality. We introduce an adaptive memory-driven approach to overcome such issues. At variance with Markovian models, it is able to realistically model conditional waiting times, i.e. the probability to stay in a specific area depending on individual's historical movements. Our results demonstrate that in standard mobility models...

  12. Durations of extended mental rehearsals are remarkably reproducible in higher level human performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, L; Shaw, G L; Wright, E L

    1993-12-01

    It has been extremely difficult to quantify temporal aspects of higher level human brain function. We have found that mental rehearsals of musical performance of several minutes duration provide such a measure in that they can be highly reproducible, varying to less than 1%. These remarkable results pose fundamental neurophysiological problems. It is necessary to understand the underlying neuronal bases for this accuracy in the spatial-temporal activity of billions of neurons over minutes without sensory input. Further, they present a powerful constraint on neuronal models of brain function. Such highly reproducible (in duration) mental rehearsals might be used in conjunction with multielectrode EEG recordings to look for reproducible spatial-temporal patterns. Further, we suggest that our results may provide an extremely useful behavioural correlate for high level performance.

  13. Sensitive periods for the functional specialization of the neural system for human face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Brigitte; Ley, Pia; Shenoy, Bhamy H; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Bottari, Davide

    2013-10-15

    The aim of the study was to identify possible sensitive phases in the development of the processing system for human faces. We tested the neural processing of faces in 11 humans who had been blind from birth and had undergone cataract surgery between 2 mo and 14 y of age. Pictures of faces and houses, scrambled versions of these pictures, and pictures of butterflies were presented while event-related potentials were recorded. Participants had to respond to the pictures of butterflies (targets) only. All participants, even those who had been blind from birth for several years, were able to categorize the pictures and to detect the targets. In healthy controls and in a group of visually impaired individuals with a history of developmental or incomplete congenital cataracts, the well-known enhancement of the N170 (negative peak around 170 ms) event-related potential to faces emerged, but a face-sensitive response was not observed in humans with a history of congenital dense cataracts. By contrast, this group showed a similar N170 response to all visual stimuli, which was indistinguishable from the N170 response to faces in the controls. The face-sensitive N170 response has been associated with the structural encoding of faces. Therefore, these data provide evidence for the hypothesis that the functional differentiation of category-specific neural representations in humans, presumably involving the elaboration of inhibitory circuits, is dependent on experience and linked to a sensitive period. Such functional specialization of neural systems seems necessary to archive high processing proficiency.

  14. Cryptolepine, isolated from Sida acuta, sensitizes human gastric adenocarcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Firoj; Toume, Kazufumi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Ishibashi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay guided separation of Sida acuta whole plants led to the isolation of an alkaloid, cryptolepine (1), along with two kaempferol glycosides (2-3). Compound 1 showed strong activity in overcoming TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μm. Combined treatment of 1 and TRAIL sensitized AGS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis at the aforementioned concentrations. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Sensitivity field distributions for segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis based on real human anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, A. A.; Kramarenko, V. K.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Rudnev, S. G.; Salamatova, V. Yu; Smirnov, A. V.; Vassilevski, Yu V.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, an adaptive unstructured tetrahedral mesh generation technology is applied for simulation of segmental bioimpedance measurements using high-resolution whole-body model of the Visible Human Project man. Sensitivity field distributions for a conventional tetrapolar, as well as eight- and ten-electrode measurement configurations are obtained. Based on the ten-electrode configuration, we suggest an algorithm for monitoring changes in the upper lung area.

  16. A highly-sensitive multisubstrate-compatible chemiluminescent immunoassay for human fetuin A

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Sandeep Kumar Vashist ### Abstract We report a highly-sensitive chemiluminescent immunoassay (CIA) for the detection of human fetuin A (HFA), which is based on the leach-proof covalent crosslinking of anti-HFA capture antibodies on 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-functionalized 96-well chemiluminescent microtiter plates (CMTP) using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide. It has more than 3-fold reduced overall assay du...

  17. Insensitivity of volume-sensitive chloride currents to chromones in human airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Lantero, Sabina; Sacco, Oliviero; Rossi, Giovanni A; Galietta, Luis J V

    1998-01-01

    Chromones (sodium cromoglycate and sodium nedocromil) block cell swelling-activated Cl− channels in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and endothelial cells. This has led to hypothesize that cell volume regulation might be involved in asthma pathogenesis.Using whole-cell patch-clamp experiments, we studied the effect of chromones on volume-sensitive Cl− currents in transformed human tracheal epithelial cells (9HTEo-) and in primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells (BE).Cl− currents activated by hypotonic shock were poorly blocked by extracellular nedocromil or cromoglycate. The block was voltage-dependent since it was observed only at positive membrane potentials. At the concentration of 5 mM, the current inhibition by both chromones at +80 mV was about 40% for 9HTEo- and only 20% for BE.Intracellular application of chromones elicited a voltage-independent inhibition in 9HTEo- cells. Under this condition, volume-sensitive Cl− currents were reduced at all membrane potentials (60 and 45% inhibition by 2 mM nedocromil and cromoglycate respectively). In contrast intracellular chromones were ineffective in BE cells.The relative refractoriness to chromones, in contrast with the high sensitivity shown by other Cl− channels, suggests that the epithelial volume-sensitive Cl− channel is not involved in asthma. PMID:9863671

  18. Spatial sensitivities of human health risk to intercontinental and high-altitude pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jamin; Wang, Qiqi; Henze, Daven K.; Waitz, Ian A.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2013-06-01

    We perform the first long-term (>1 year) continuous adjoint simulations with a global atmospheric chemistry-transport model focusing on population exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and associated risk of early death. Sensitivities relevant to intercontinental and high-altitude PM pollution are calculated with particular application to aircraft emissions. Specifically, the sensitivities of premature mortality risk in different regions to NOx, SOx, CO, VOC and primary PM2.5 emissions as a function of location are computed. We apply the resultant sensitivity matrices to aircraft emissions, finding that NOx emissions are responsible for 93% of population exposure to aircraft-attributable PM2.5. Aircraft NOx accounts for all of aircraft-attributable nitrate exposure (as expected) and 53% of aircraft-attributable sulfate exposure due to the strong "oxidative coupling" between aircraft NOx emissions and non-aviation SO2 emissions in terms of sulfate formation. Of the health risk-weighted human PM2.5 exposure attributable to aviation, 73% occurs in Asia, followed by 18% in Europe. 95% of the air quality impacts of aircraft emissions in the US are incurred outside the US. We also assess the impact of uncertainty or changes in (non-aviation) ammonia emissions on aviation-attributable PM2.5 exposure by calculating second-order sensitivities. We note the potential application of the sensitivity matrices as a rapid policy analysis tool in aviation environmental policy contexts.

  19. Establishment of a drug sensitivity panel using human lung cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsushita A

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available We established a drug sensitivity panel consisting of 24 human lung cancer cell lines. Using this panel, we evaluated 26 anti-cancer agents: three alkylators, three platinum compounds, four antimetabolites, one topoisomerase I inhibitor, five topoisomerase II inhibitors, seven antimitotic agents and three tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This panel showed the following: a Drug sensitivity patterns reflected their clinically-established patterns of action. For example, doxorubicin and etoposide were shown to be active against small cell lung cancer cell lines and mitomycin-C and 5-fluorouracil were active against non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, in agreement with clinical data. b Correlation analysis of the mean graphs derived from the logarithm of IC50 values of the drugs gave insight into the mechanism of each drug's action. Thus, two drug combinations with reverse or no correlation, such as the combination of cisplatin and vinorelbine, might be good candidates for the ideal two drug combination in the treatment of lung cancer, as is being confirmed in clinical trials. c Using cluster analysis of the cell lines in the panel with their drug sensitivity patterns, we could classify the cell lines into four groups depending on the drug sensitivity similarity. This classification will be useful to elucidate the cellular mechanism of action and drug resistance. Thus, our drug sensitivity panel will be helpful to explore new drugs or to develop a new combination of anti-cancer agents for the treatment of lung cancer.

  20. Specific, sensitive and rapid detection of human plasmodium knowlesi infection by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP in blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Claudia N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of Plasmodium knowlesi in humans, which is in many cases misdiagnosed by microscopy as Plasmodium malariae due to the morphological similarity has contributed to the needs of detection and differentiation of malaria parasites. At present, nested PCR targeted on Plasmodium ssrRNA genes has been described as the most sensitive and specific method for Plasmodium detection. However, this method is costly and requires trained personnel for its implementation. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, a novel nucleic acid amplification method was developed for the clinical detection of P. knowlesi. The sensitivity and specificity of LAMP was evaluated in comparison to the results obtained via microscopic examination and nested PCR. Methods LAMP assay was developed based on P. knowlesi genetic material targeting the apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1 gene. The method uses six primers that recognize eight regions of the target DNA and it amplifies DNA within an hour under isothermal conditions (65°C in a water-bath. Results LAMP is highly sensitive with the detection limit as low as ten copies for AMA-1. LAMP detected malaria parasites in all confirm cases (n = 13 of P. knowlesi infection (sensitivity, 100% and none of the negative samples (specificity, 100% within an hour. LAMP demonstrated higher sensitivity compared to nested PCR by successfully detecting a sample with very low parasitaemia ( Conclusion With continuous efforts in the optimization of this assay, LAMP may provide a simple and reliable test for detecting P. knowlesi malaria parasites in areas where malaria is prevalent.

  1. Human skeletal muscle perilipin 2 and 3 expression varies with insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Ploug, Thorkil;

    2013-01-01

    was obtained from vastus lateralis, and a two-step sequential euglycaemic-hy- perinsulinaemic clamp was performed. Muscle sam- ples were analyzed by Western blot for expression of perilipin 2, 3, 5, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), endothelial lipase (EL) and lipoprotein...... lipase (LPL). Results: Perilipin 3 expression was higher in T2D compared to CON. Perilipin 2 expression was higher in CON than T2D. We observed no difference in expression of perilipin 5, ATGL, HSL, EL or LPL between the groups. Con- clusions: In the present study the muscle perilipin 3 expression...

  2. Contribution of protein kinase C to passively sensitized human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许淑云; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 倪望; 陈士新

    2004-01-01

    Background Airway smooth muscle proliferation plays an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. But little is known about the intracellular signal pathway in the airway smooth muscle cell proliferation in asthma. The objective of this paper is to investigate the contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) and its alpha isoform to passively sensitized human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) proliferation.Methods HASMCs in culture were passively sensitized with 10% serum from asthmatic patients, with non-asthmatic human serum treated HASMCs used as the control. The proliferation of HASMCs was examined by cell cycle analysis, 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunofluorescence staining. The effect of PKC agonist phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220 on the proliferation of HASMCs exposed to human asthmatic serum and non-asthmatic control serum was also examined by the same methods. The protein and mRNA expression of PKC-α in passively sensitized HASMCs were detected by immunofluorescence staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.Results The percentage of S phase, absorbance (value A) and the positive percentage of PCNA protein expression in HASMCs passively sensitized with asthmatic serum were (16.30±2.68)%, 0.430±0.060 and (63.4±7.4)% respectively, which were significantly increased compared with HASMCs treated with control serum [(10.01±1.38)%, 0.328±0.034 and (37.2±4.8)%, respectively] (P<0.05). After HASMCs were passively sensitized with asthmatic serum, they were treated with PMA, the percentage of S phase, value A and the positive percentage of PCNA protein expression were (20.33±3.39)%, 0.542±0.065 and (76.0±8.7)% respectively, which were significantly increased compared with asthmatic serum sensitized HASMCs without PMA(P<0.05). After HASMCs passively sensitized with asthmatic serum were treated with

  3. Label-free electrochemical immunosensor based on gold-silicon carbide nanocomposites for sensitive detection of human chorionic gonadotrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Shuangmei; Deng, Shuangsheng; Lv, Qi; Lin, Jie; Li, Can-Peng

    2014-07-15

    Uniform and highly dispersed gold-silicon carbide (Au@SiC) nanocomposites were prepared via simple way and used for fabrication of label-free electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive detection of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). Using Au@SiC as electrode material and using ferricyanide as mediator, the proposed immunosensor provides a simple and economic method with higher sensitivity and a wider concentration range for detection of hCG. Under the optimal condition, the approach provided a good linear response range from 0.1 to 5 IU/L and 5 to 1000 IU/L with a low detection limit of 0.042 IU/L. The immunosensor showed good selectivity, acceptable stability and reproducibility. Satisfactory results were obtained for determination of hCG in human serum samples. The proposed method provides a promising platform of clinical immunoassay for other biomolecules. In addition, the bio-functionalization of SiC combined with other nanomaterials will provide promising approach for electrochemical sensing and biosensing platform.

  4. Race-Sensitive Admissions in Higher Education: Commentary on How the Supreme Court Is Likely To Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Derrick; Kehlenberg, Richard D.; Dorf, Michael C.; Tushnet, Mark V.; Delgado, Richard; Stefancic, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Six legal scholars suggest possible outcomes of a future Supreme Court ruling on affirmative action in student admissions to higher education. The scholars examine other Supreme Court decisions and look at the impact that different justices and different presidents would have on an affirmative action ruling. (SM)

  5. Considerations in the development of a sensitive HPLC assay for human epidermal growth factors in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagel, J R; Rossi, D T; Nordblom, G D; Dudeck, R C; Barksdale, C M; Kuo, B S; Wright, D S

    1995-09-01

    A sensitive assay was developed for human epidermal growth factors (hEGF) 1-48 (dosed), hEGF 1-53 (endogenous), without interference from potential metabolites hEGFs 1-47 or 1-46. Spiked human plasma samples were injected directly, utilizing on-line immunoaffinity HPLC (anti-hEGF) clean-up. No change in capacity was noted after 81 cycles. After release from the immunoaffinity column, the fragments were further resolved by strong cation-exchange (SCX) via a column switching valve. Method development also required interfacing immunoaffinity, ion-exchange, and detection components. Immunoassays on collected fractions yielded a detection limit of 1 microgram ml-1, although a detection limit of 75 pg ml-1 appears feasible.

  6. S100A10 protein expression is associated with oxaliplatin sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Sayo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual responses to oxaliplatin (L-OHP-based chemotherapy remain unpredictable. The objective of our study was to find candidate protein markers for tumor sensitivity to L-OHP from intracellular proteins of human colorectal cancer (CRC cell lines. We performed expression difference mapping (EDM analysis of whole cell lysates from 11 human CRC cell lines with different sensitivities to L-OHP by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS, and identified a candidate protein by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry ion trap time-of-flight (LCMS-IT-TOF. Results Of the qualified mass peaks obtained by EDM analysis, 41 proteins were differentially expressed in 11 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Among these proteins, the peak intensity of 11.1 kDa protein was strongly correlated with the L-OHP sensitivity (50% inhibitory concentrations (P R2 = 0.80. We identified this protein as Protein S100-A10 (S100A10 by MS/MS ion search using LCMS-IT-TOF. We verified its differential expression and the correlation between S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells and their L-OHP sensitivities by Western blot analyses. In addition, S100A10 protein expression levels were not correlated with sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, suggesting that S100A10 is more specific to L-OHP than to 5-fluorouracil in CRC cells. S100A10 was detected in cell culture supernatant, suggesting secretion out of cells. Conclusions By proteomic approaches including SELDI technology, we have demonstrated that intracellular S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells differ according to cell lines and are significantly correlated with sensitivity of CRC cells to L-OHP exposure. Our findings provide a new clue to searching predictive markers of the response to L-OHP, suggesting that S100A10 is expected to be one of the candidate protein markers.

  7. Modulation of Higher-Order Olfaction Components on Executive Functions in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundo, Ana B.; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Islam, Mohammed Anisul; de la Torre, Rafael; Pastor, Antoni; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Crujeiras, Ana B.; Granero, Roser; Baños, Rosa; Botella, Cristina; Fernández-Real, Jose M.; Frühbeck, Gema; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Menchón, José M.; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The prefrontal (PFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) appear to be associated with both executive functions and olfaction. However, there is little data relating olfactory processing and executive functions in humans. The present study aimed at exploring the role of olfaction on executive functioning, making a distinction between primary and more cognitive aspects of olfaction. Three executive tasks of similar difficulty were used. One was used to assess hot executive functions (Iowa Gambling Task-IGT), and two as a measure of cold executive functioning (Stroop Colour and Word Test-SCWT and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-WCST). Sixty two healthy participants were included: 31 with normosmia and 31 with hyposmia. Olfactory abilities were assessed using the ‘‘Sniffin’ Sticks’’ test and the olfactory threshold, odour discrimination and odour identification measures were obtained. All participants were female, aged between 18 and 60. Results showed that participants with hyposmia displayed worse performance in decision making (IGT; Cohen’s-d = 0.91) and cognitive flexibility (WCST; Cohen’s-d between 0.54 and 0.68) compared to those with normosmia. Multiple regression adjusted by the covariates participants’ age and education level showed a positive association between odour identification and the cognitive inhibition response (SCWT-interference; Beta = 0.29; p = .034). The odour discrimination capacity was not a predictor of the cognitive executive performance. Our results suggest that both hot and cold executive functions seem to be associated with higher-order olfactory functioning in humans. These results robustly support the hypothesis that olfaction and executive measures have a common neural substrate in PFC and OFC, and suggest that olfaction might be a reliable cognitive marker in psychiatric and neurologic disorders. PMID:26083418

  8. Modulation of Higher-Order Olfaction Components on Executive Functions in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundo, Ana B; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Islam, Mohammed Anisul; de la Torre, Rafael; Pastor, Antoni; Casanueva, Felipe F; Crujeiras, Ana B; Granero, Roser; Baños, Rosa; Botella, Cristina; Fernández-Real, Jose M; Frühbeck, Gema; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Menchón, José M; Tinahones, Francisco J; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The prefrontal (PFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) appear to be associated with both executive functions and olfaction. However, there is little data relating olfactory processing and executive functions in humans. The present study aimed at exploring the role of olfaction on executive functioning, making a distinction between primary and more cognitive aspects of olfaction. Three executive tasks of similar difficulty were used. One was used to assess hot executive functions (Iowa Gambling Task-IGT), and two as a measure of cold executive functioning (Stroop Colour and Word Test-SCWT and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-WCST). Sixty two healthy participants were included: 31 with normosmia and 31 with hyposmia. Olfactory abilities were assessed using the ''Sniffin' Sticks'' test and the olfactory threshold, odour discrimination and odour identification measures were obtained. All participants were female, aged between 18 and 60. Results showed that participants with hyposmia displayed worse performance in decision making (IGT; Cohen's-d = 0.91) and cognitive flexibility (WCST; Cohen's-d between 0.54 and 0.68) compared to those with normosmia. Multiple regression adjusted by the covariates participants' age and education level showed a positive association between odour identification and the cognitive inhibition response (SCWT-interference; Beta = 0.29; p = .034). The odour discrimination capacity was not a predictor of the cognitive executive performance. Our results suggest that both hot and cold executive functions seem to be associated with higher-order olfactory functioning in humans. These results robustly support the hypothesis that olfaction and executive measures have a common neural substrate in PFC and OFC, and suggest that olfaction might be a reliable cognitive marker in psychiatric and neurologic disorders.

  9. Targeting CDKs with Roscovitine Increases Sensitivity to DNA Damaging Drugs of Human Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Serena; Tavanti, Elisa; Hattinger, Claudia Maria; Fanelli, Marilù; Versteeg, Rogier; Koster, Jan; Picci, Piero; Serra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been reported to be essential for cell proliferation in several human tumours and it has been suggested as an appropriate target to be considered in order to enhance the efficacy of treatment regimens based on the use of DNA damaging drugs. We evaluated the clinical impact of CDK2 overexpression on a series of 21 high-grade osteosarcoma (OS) samples profiled by using cDNA microarrays. We also assessed the in vitro efficacy of the CDKs inhibitor roscovitine in a panel of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant human OS cell lines. OS tumour samples showed an inherent overexpression of CDK2, and high expression levels at diagnosis of this kinase appeared to negatively impact on clinical outcome. CDK2 expression also proved to be relevant for in vitro OS cells growth. These findings indicated CDK2 as a promising candidate therapeutic marker for OS and therefore we assessed the efficacy of the CDKs-inhibitor roscovitine in both drug-sensitive and -resistant OS cell lines. All cell lines resulted to be responsive to roscovitine, which was also able to increase the activity of cisplatin and doxorubicin, the two most active DNA damaging drugs used in OS chemotherapy. Our results indicated that combined treatment with conventional OS chemotherapeutic drugs and roscovitine may represent a new candidate intervention approach, which may be considered to enhance tumour cell sensitivity to DNA damaging drugs.

  10. Deltamethrin Inhibits the Human T-type Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channel (Cav3.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B. Symington

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine the effect of deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, on CaV3.2, a human T-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel expressed in Xenopus laevis (X.laevis oocytes. Cav3.2 cDNA was transcribed into cRNA; the cRNA was then injected into X.laevis oocytes and electrophysiologically characterized using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique with Ba2+ as a charge carrier. Deltamethrin (10-7 M reduced peak current in a nonreversible manner compared to the untreated control, but had no effect on the voltagedependent activation and inactivation kinetics. These findings confirm that human CaV3.2 is a target for deltamethrin and quite possibly other pyrethroid insecticides. These studies provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of the effect that pyrethroids have on voltage-sensitive calcium channels in general. This information will allow a more complete understanding of the molecular and cellular nature of pyrethroid-induced toxicity and expand our knowledge of the structure-activity relationships of pyrethroids with regard to their action on voltage-sensitive calcium channels.

  11. Differential inhibitor sensitivity between human kinases VRK1 and VRK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Vázquez-Cedeira

    Full Text Available Human vaccinia-related kinases (VRK1 and VRK2 are atypical active Ser-Thr kinases implicated in control of cell cycle entry, apoptosis and autophagy, and affect signalling by mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK. The specific structural differences in VRK catalytic sites make them suitable candidates for development of specific inhibitors. In this work we have determined the sensitivity of VRK1 and VRK2 to kinase inhibitors, currently used in biological assays or in preclinical studies, in order to discriminate between the two proteins as well as with respect to the vaccinia virus B1R kinase. Both VRK proteins and vaccinia B1R are poorly inhibited by inhibitors of different types targeting Src, MEK1, B-Raf, JNK, p38, CK1, ATM, CHK1/2 and DNA-PK, and most of them have no effect even at 100 µM. Despite their low sensitivity, some of these inhibitors in the low micromolar range are able to discriminate between VRK1, VRK2 and B1R. VRK1 is more sensitive to staurosporine, RO-31-8220 and TDZD8. VRK2 is more sensitive to roscovitine, RO 31-8220, Cdk1 inhibitor, AZD7762, and IC261. Vaccinia virus B1R is more sensitive to staurosporine, KU55933, and RO 31-8220, but not to IC261. Thus, the three kinases present a different pattern of sensitivity to kinase inhibitors. This differential response to known inhibitors can provide a structural framework for VRK1 or VRK2 specific inhibitors with low or no cross-inhibition. The development of highly specific VRK1 inhibitors might be of potential clinical use in those cancers where these kinases identify a clinical subtype with a poorer prognosis, as is the case of VRK1 in breast cancer.

  12. Inhibition of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V enhances sensitivity of radiotherapy in human prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Huiyi; Chen, Wenxia [Department of Oncology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Liu, Qiulian [Department of Oncology, First People’s Hospital of Jiujiang City, Jiujiang 332000 (China); Wei, Ting; Zhu, Weiliang; Meng, Hui; Guo, Linlang [Department of Oncology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Zhang, Jian, E-mail: 13925091863@139.com [Department of Oncology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China)

    2014-08-29

    Highlights: • We first evaluated the effect of GnT-V on radiation sensitivity of prostate cancer. • Higher level of GnT-V was detected more frequently in the PCa advanced tumors. • Attenuation of GnT-V inhibited cell proliferation, migration and increased apoptosis. • Knockdown of GnT-V could decrease radiation-induced G2/M arrest and NF-κB activity. • Inhibition of GnT-V may be involved in increasing radiation sensitivity of PCa cells. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V) and radiation sensitivity of prostate cancer (PCa) cells both in vitro and in vivo. Firstly, the GnT-V expression was studied in 84 cases of PCa tissues, in which higher level of GnT-V was detected more frequently in the advanced tumors. Secondly, the GnT-V stably suppressed cell lines PCa/1079 (Lncap/1079 and PC3/1079) were constructed from PCa cell lines (Lncap and PC3) in vitro. Attenuation of GnT-V inhibited cell proliferation, migration and increased apoptosis, which resulted in enhanced radiation sensitivity of PCa cells. The underlying mechanism may be relevant to the increasing ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, the blocking transcription of NF-κB and the reduction of cell cycle G2-M arrest. Finally, in in vivo study, compared with control groups, the irradiated PCa xenograft nude mice of PCa/1079 indicated to reduce tumor-growth rate and enhance survival time. Summary, our studies showed that inhibition of GnT-V probably improved PCa cells’ radiation sensitivity.

  13. Perspectives on the Present State and Future of Higher Education Faculty Development in Kazakhstan: Implications for National Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitova, Dinara

    2016-01-01

    The article aims at examining the present state of higher education faculty development in Kazakhstan in the context of multidimensional nationwide development reforms and exploring implications for the National Human Resource Development of the country. For the purpose of this research, theoretical human resource development (HRD) and…

  14. Measuring higher order optical aberrations of the human eye: techniques and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alberto V. Carvalho

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we discuss the development of "wave-front", an instrument for determining the lower and higher optical aberrations of the human eye. We also discuss the advantages that such instrumentation and techniques might bring to the ophthalmology professional of the 21st century. By shining a small light spot on the retina of subjects and observing the light that is reflected back from within the eye, we are able to quantitatively determine the amount of lower order aberrations (astigmatism, myopia, hyperopia and higher order aberrations (coma, spherical aberration, etc.. We have measured artificial eyes with calibrated ametropia ranging from +5 to -5 D, with and without 2 D astigmatism with axis at 45º and 90º. We used a device known as the Hartmann-Shack (HS sensor, originally developed for measuring the optical aberrations of optical instruments and general refracting surfaces in astronomical telescopes. The HS sensor sends information to a computer software for decomposition of wave-front aberrations into a set of Zernike polynomials. These polynomials have special mathematical properties and are more suitable in this case than the traditional Seidel polynomials. We have demonstrated that this technique is more precise than conventional autorefraction, with a root mean square error (RMSE of less than 0.1 µm for a 4-mm diameter pupil. In terms of dioptric power this represents an RMSE error of less than 0.04 D and 5º for the axis. This precision is sufficient for customized corneal ablations, among other applications.

  15. Sexual dimorphism in hepatic, adipose tissue and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity in obese humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper W. ter Horst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and lipid metabolism differ between men and women, and women tend to have better whole-body or muscle insulin sensitivity. This may be explained, in part, by differences in sex hormones and adipose tissue distribution. Few studies have investigated gender differences in hepatic, adipose tissue and whole-body insulin sensitivity between severely obese men and women. In this study, we aimed to determine the differences in glucose metabolism between severely obese men and women using tissue-specific measurements of insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity was compared between age and body mass index (BMI-matched obese men and women by a two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose. Basal endogenous glucose production and insulin sensitivity of the liver, adipose tissue and peripheral tissues were assessed. Liver fat content was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a subset of included subjects. We included 46 obese men and women (age, 48±2 vs 46±2 years, p=0.591; BMI, 41±1 vs 41±1 kg/m2, p=0.832. There was no difference in basal endogenous glucose production (14.4±1.0 vs 15.3±0.5 µmol•kg fat-free mass-1•min-1, p=0.410, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of free fatty acids, 71.6±3.6 vs 76.1±2.6%, p=0.314 or peripheral insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated rate of disappearance of glucose, 26.2±2.1 vs 22.7±1.7 µmol•kg-1•min-1, p=0.211. Obese men were characterized by lower hepatic insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production, 61.7±4.1 vs 72.8±2.5% in men vs women, resp., p=0.028. Finally, these observations could not be explained by differences in liver fat content (men vs women, 16.5±3.1 vs 16.0±2.5%, p=0.913, n=27.We conclude that obese men have lower hepatic, but comparable adipose tissue and peripheral tissue, insulin sensitivity compared to similarly obese women. Hepatic insulin resistance may

  16. [Indoor air and human health--sick house syndrome and multiple chemical sensitivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masanori

    2002-01-01

    The number of complaints about the quality of indoor air has increased during the past two decades. These complaints have been frequent enough that the term "Sick House Syndrome or Sick Building Syndrome" and "Multiple Chemical Sensitivity" has been coined. Complaints are likely related to the increased use of synthetic organic materials in house, furnishing, and consumer products; and the buildings, furnishings, and consumer products; and the decreased ventilation for energy conservation in homes. Approximately thousand volatile chemicals have been identified in indoor air. The main sources of these chemicals are house materials, combustion fumes, cleaning compounds, and paints or stains. Exposure to high levels of these emissions and to others, coupled with the fact that most people spend more time indoors than outdoors, raises the possibility that the risk to human health from indoor air pollution may be potentially greater than the risk posed from outdoor pollutants. The complaints most frequently voiced with respect to Sick House Syndrome are irritations of the eye, nose, and throat; cough and hoarseness of voice; headache and mental fatigue. The syndrome of multiple chemical sensitivities is controversial subject with increasing impact on the field of indoor air quality. The controversy surrounding Multiple Chemical Sensitivity includes its definition, theories of etiology and pathogenesis, diagnostic, and life style. Multiple Chemical Sensitivity is considered the hypothesis that is a disease caused by exposure to many chemically distinct environmental substances at very low.

  17. Long-Term Human Outcomes of a "Shotgun" Marriage in Higher Education: Anatomy of a Merger, Two Decades Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Rosalind; Williamson, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses a gap in the research literature on mergers in higher education by giving special consideration to the human resource dimension. It focuses on the forced merger of two higher education institutions that was implemented in Northern Ireland over 20 years ago and from which the University of Ulster was established. The authors…

  18. Lansoprazole induces sensitivity to suboptimal doses of paclitaxel in human melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzarito, Tommaso; Venturi, Giulietta; Cesolini, Albino; Fais, Stefano

    2015-01-28

    Tumor acidity is now considered an important determinant of drug-resistance and tumor progression, and anti-acidic approaches, such as Proton Pump inhibitors (PPIs), have demonstrated promising antitumor and chemo-sensitizing efficacy. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the possible PPI-induced sensitization of human melanoma cells to Paclitaxel (PTX). Our results show that PTX and the PPI Lansoprazole (LAN) combination was extremely efficient against metastatic melanoma cells, as compared to the single treatments, both in vitro and in vivo. We also showed that acidity plays an important role on the anti-tumor activity of these drugs, being detrimental for PTX activity, while crucial for the synergistic effect of PTX following pretreatment with LAN, due to its nature of pro-drug needing protonation for a full activation. We obtained straightforward results in a human melanoma xenograft model combining well tolerated LAN doses with suboptimal and poorly toxic doses of PTX. With this study we provide a clear evidence that the PPI LAN may be included in new combined therapy of human melanoma together with low doses of PTX.

  19. A sensitive two-site enzyme immunoassay for human epidermal growth factor (urogastrone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K; Nomoto, H; Kurobe, M; Nishimuro, S; Hiratani, H; Furukawa, S

    1985-06-01

    A sensitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed for human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) or urogastrone, which was isolated from human urine. Our EIA system is based on the sandwiching of an antigen between anti-hEGF IgG coated on a polystyrene tube and anti-hEGF antibody Fab'-linked beta-D-galactosidase (beta-D-galactosidase, EC 3.2.1.23). This method has the advantages that the procedures are simple and rapid and that the antibody Fab'-beta-D-galactosidase complex is more stable than radioisotope-labeled IgG. Purified hEGF is detectable at as low as 100 pg/ml, which is very sensitive compared to the radioimmuno-assays or radioreceptor assays already reported. Using this new EIA system, hEGF levels in human urine were examined. The values for normal males and females were 48.4 and 83.5 ng/mg creatinine, respectively, which shows that females excrete 1.7 times more hEGF than males.

  20. Morusin Induces TRAIL Sensitization by Regulating EGFR and DR5 in Human Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dain; Ha, In Jin; Park, Sang-Yoon; Choi, Minji; Lim, Sung-Lyul; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Jun-Hee; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Yun, Miyong; Lee, Seok-Geun

    2016-02-26

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant primary tumors, and the prognosis for glioblastoma patients remains poor. Tumor-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered a promising anticancer agent due to its remarkable ability to selectively kill tumor cells. However, since many cancers are resistant to TRAIL, strategies to overcome resistance are required for the successful use of TRAIL in the clinic. In the present study, the potential of morusin as a TRAIL sensitizer in human glioblastoma cells was evaluated. Treatment with TRAIL or morusin alone showed weak cytotoxicity in human glioblastoma cells. However, combination treatment of TRAIL with morusin synergistically decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis compared with single treatment. Morusin induced expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), but not DR4 or decoy receptors (DcR1 and DcR2). Furthermore, morusin significantly decreased anti-apoptotic molecules survivin and XIAP. In addition, morusin reduced expression of EGFR and PDFGR as well as phosphorylation of STAT3, possibly mediating down-regulation of survivin and XIAP. Together these results suggest that morusin enhances TRAIL sensitivity in human glioblastoma cells through regulating expression of DR5 and EGFR. Therefore, the combination treatment of TRAIL and morusin may be a new therapeutic strategy for malignant glioma patients.

  1. Imprisonment and women's health: concerns about gender sensitivity, human rights and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, Brenda J; Gatherer, Alex; Fraser, Andrew; Moller, Lars

    2011-09-01

    The health of prisoners is among the poorest of any population group and the apparent inequalities pose both a challenge and an opportunity for country health systems. The high rates of imprisonment in many countries, the resulting overcrowding, characteristics of prison populations and the disproportionate prevalence of health problems in prison should make prison health a matter of public health importance.Women prisoners constitute a minority within all prison systems and their special health needs are frequently neglected. The urgent need to review current services is clear from research, expert opinion and experience from countries worldwide. Current provision of health care to imprisoned women fails to meet their needs and is, in too many cases, far short of what is required by human rights and international recommendations. The evidence includes a lack of gender sensitivity in policies and practices in prisons, violations of women's human rights and failure to accept that imprisoned women have more and different health-care needs compared with male prisoners, often related to reproductive health issues, mental health problems, drug dependencies and histories of violence and abuse. Additional needs stem from their frequent status as a mother and usually the primary carer for her children.National governments, policy-makers and prison management need to address gender insensitivity and social injustice in prisons. There are immediate steps which could be taken to deal with public health neglect, abuses of human rights and failures in gender sensitivity.

  2. Assessing reliable human mobility patterns from higher order memory in mobile communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamalas, Joan T; De Domenico, Manlio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how people move within a geographical area, e.g. a city, a country or the whole world, is fundamental in several applications, from predicting the spatio-temporal evolution of an epidemic to inferring migration patterns. Mobile phone records provide an excellent proxy of human mobility, showing that movements exhibit a high level of memory. However, the precise role of memory in widely adopted proxies of mobility, as mobile phone records, is unknown. Here we use 560 million call detail records from Senegal to show that standard Markovian approaches, including higher order ones, fail in capturing real mobility patterns and introduce spurious movements never observed in reality. We introduce an adaptive memory-driven approach to overcome such issues. At variance with Markovian models, it is able to realistically model conditional waiting times, i.e. the probability to stay in a specific area depending on individuals' historical movements. Our results demonstrate that in standard mobility models the individuals tend to diffuse faster than observed in reality, whereas the predictions of the adaptive memory approach significantly agree with observations. We show that, as a consequence, the incidence and the geographical spread of a disease could be inadequately estimated when standard approaches are used, with crucial implications on resources deployment and policy-making during an epidemic outbreak.

  3. Sex-specific differences in olfactory sensitivity for putative human pheromones in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Matthias; Wieser, Alexandra; Salazar, Laura Teresa Hernandez

    2006-05-01

    In humans, the volatile C19-steroids androsta-4,16-dien-3-one (AND) and estra-1,3,5(10),16-tetraen-3-ol (EST) have been shown to modulate autonomic nervous system responses, and to cause hypothalamic activation in a gender-specific manner. Using two conditioning paradigms, the authors here show that pigtail macaques and squirrel monkeys of both sexes were able to detect AND and EST at concentrations in the micromolar and mM range, respectively. Male and female spider monkeys, in contrast, differed markedly in their sensitivity to these two odorous steroids, with males not showing any behavioral responses to the highest concentrations of AND tested and females not responding to the highest concentrations of EST. These data provide the first examples of sex-specific bimodal distributions of olfactory sensitivity in a nonhuman primate species.

  4. Amphetamine Sensitization Alters Reward Processing in the Human Striatum and Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Daly, Owen G.; Joyce, Daniel; Tracy, Derek K.; Azim, Adnan; Stephan, Klaas E.; Murray, Robin M.; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission is implicated in a number of psychiatric illnesses characterised by disruption of reward processing and goal-directed behaviour, including schizophrenia, drug addiction and impulse control disorders associated with chronic use of dopamine agonists. Amphetamine sensitization (AS) has been proposed to model the development of this aberrant dopamine signalling and the subsequent dysregulation of incentive motivational processes. However, in humans the effects of AS on the dopamine-sensitive neural circuitry associated with reward processing remains unclear. Here we describe the effects of acute amphetamine administration, following a sensitising dosage regime, on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in dopaminoceptive brain regions during a rewarded gambling task performed by healthy volunteers. Using a randomised, double-blind, parallel-groups design, we found clear evidence for sensitization to the subjective effects of the drug, while rewarded reaction times were unchanged. Repeated amphetamine exposure was associated with reduced dorsal striatal BOLD signal during decision making, but enhanced ventromedial caudate activity during reward anticipation. The amygdala BOLD response to reward outcomes was blunted following repeated amphetamine exposure. Positive correlations between subjective sensitization and changes in anticipation- and outcome-related BOLD signal were seen for the caudate nucleus and amygdala, respectively. These data show for the first time in humans that AS changes the functional impact of acute stimulant exposure on the processing of reward-related information within dopaminoceptive regions. Our findings accord with pathophysiological models which implicate aberrant dopaminergic modulation of striatal and amygdala activity in psychosis and drug-related compulsive disorders. PMID:24717936

  5. Amphetamine sensitization alters reward processing in the human striatum and amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen G O'Daly

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission is implicated in a number of psychiatric illnesses characterised by disruption of reward processing and goal-directed behaviour, including schizophrenia, drug addiction and impulse control disorders associated with chronic use of dopamine agonists. Amphetamine sensitization (AS has been proposed to model the development of this aberrant dopamine signalling and the subsequent dysregulation of incentive motivational processes. However, in humans the effects of AS on the dopamine-sensitive neural circuitry associated with reward processing remains unclear. Here we describe the effects of acute amphetamine administration, following a sensitising dosage regime, on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal in dopaminoceptive brain regions during a rewarded gambling task performed by healthy volunteers. Using a randomised, double-blind, parallel-groups design, we found clear evidence for sensitization to the subjective effects of the drug, while rewarded reaction times were unchanged. Repeated amphetamine exposure was associated with reduced dorsal striatal BOLD signal during decision making, but enhanced ventromedial caudate activity during reward anticipation. The amygdala BOLD response to reward outcomes was blunted following repeated amphetamine exposure. Positive correlations between subjective sensitization and changes in anticipation- and outcome-related BOLD signal were seen for the caudate nucleus and amygdala, respectively. These data show for the first time in humans that AS changes the functional impact of acute stimulant exposure on the processing of reward-related information within dopaminoceptive regions. Our findings accord with pathophysiological models which implicate aberrant dopaminergic modulation of striatal and amygdala activity in psychosis and drug-related compulsive disorders.

  6. Adenovirus replication as an in vitro probe for drug sensitivity in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, P G; Maynard, K R; Little, J H; McLeod, G R

    1986-04-01

    The feasibility of using adenovirus 5 as an in vitro probe for chemosensitivity in short-term cultures of human tumors was evaluated using human melanoma cell lines and primary cultures of melanoma biopsies. A convenient immunoperoxidase method was developed for quantitating viral replication 2 days after infection. Two different approaches were explored: the host cell reactivation assay (HCR) using drug-treated virus; and the viral capacity assay using drug-treated cells. The HCR assay detected sensitivity to 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC) in Mer- (methyl excision repair deficient) cell lines as decreased ability of the cells to replicate MTIC-treated virus. This test should be applicable to DNA-damaging agents and repair-deficient tumors. Adenovirus replicated readily in nonproliferating primary cultures of melanoma biopsies; application of the HCR assays to this material identified one Mer- sample of 11 tested. Herpes viruses were not suitable for use in HCR because herpes simplex virus type 1 failed to distinguish Mer- from Mer+ melanoma cells; and nonproductive infection of MTIC-sensitive lymphoid cells with Epstein-Barr virus yielded an MTIC-resistant cell line. The second assay (viral capacity) involved determination of the inhibition of replication of untreated virus in treated cells. This approach correctly predicted sensitivity to hydroxyurea and deoxyadenosine in melanoma cell lines when compared with clonogenic survival assay. Viral capacity was also inhibited by cytosine arabinoside, fluorouracil, vincristine, adriamycin, 6-mercaptopurine and ionising radiation, and may therefore be useful for detecting sensitivity to a wide range of antitumor agents.

  7. Using citizen science data to identify the sensitivity of species to human land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Brian D; Rose, Jonathan P; Price, Steven J; Dorcas, Michael E

    2016-12-01

    Conservation practitioners must contend with an increasing array of threats that affect biodiversity. Citizen scientists can provide timely and expansive information for addressing these threats across large scales, but their data may contain sampling biases. We used randomization procedures to account for possible sampling biases in opportunistically reported citizen science data to identify species' sensitivities to human land use. We analyzed 21,044 records of 143 native reptile and amphibian species reported to the Carolina Herp Atlas from North Carolina and South Carolina between 1 January 1990 and 12 July 2014. Sensitive species significantly associated with natural landscapes were 3.4 times more likely to be legally protected or treated as of conservation concern by state resource agencies than less sensitive species significantly associated with human-dominated landscapes. Many of the species significantly associated with natural landscapes occurred primarily in habitats that had been nearly eradicated or otherwise altered in the Carolinas, including isolated wetlands, longleaf pine savannas, and Appalachian forests. Rare species with few reports were more likely to be associated with natural landscapes and 3.2 times more likely to be legally protected or treated as of conservation concern than species with at least 20 reported occurrences. Our results suggest that opportunistically reported citizen science data can be used to identify sensitive species and that species currently restricted primarily to natural landscapes are likely at greatest risk of decline from future losses of natural habitat. Our approach demonstrates the usefulness of citizen science data in prioritizing conservation and in helping practitioners address species declines and extinctions at large extents.

  8. 1/f Noise Outperforms White Noise in Sensitizing Baroreflex Function in the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Rika; Nozaki, Daichi; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-08-01

    We show that externally added 1/f noise more effectively sensitizes the baroreflex centers in the human brain than white noise. We examined the compensatory heart rate response to a weak periodic signal introduced via venous blood pressure receptors while adding 1/f or white noise with the same variance to the brain stem through bilateral cutaneous stimulation of the vestibular afferents. In both cases, this noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation optimized covariance between the weak input signals and the heart rate responses. However, the optimal level with 1/f noise was significantly lower than with white noise, suggesting a functional benefit of 1/f noise for neuronal information transfer in the brain.

  9. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  10. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  11. The human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET sensitizes bacterial pathogens to traditional antimicrobial agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R Marks

    Full Text Available The fight against antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to public health of our time. The inevitable development of resistance following the introduction of novel antibiotics has led to an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial drugs with new mechanisms of action that are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms. One such compound is HAMLET, a natural complex from human milk that kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus using a mechanism different from common antibiotics and is immune to resistance-development. In this study we show that sublethal concentrations of HAMLET potentiate the effect of common antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, and aminoglycosides against pneumococci. Using MIC assays and short-time killing assays we dramatically reduced the concentrations of antibiotics needed to kill pneumococci, especially for antibiotic-resistant strains that in the presence of HAMLET fell into the clinically sensitive range. Using a biofilm model in vitro and nasopharyngeal colonization in vivo, a combination of HAMLET and antibiotics completely eradicated both biofilms and colonization in mice of both antibiotic-sensitive and resistant strains, something each agent alone was unable to do. HAMLET-potentiation of antibiotics was partially due to increased accessibility of antibiotics to the bacteria, but relied more on calcium import and kinase activation, the same activation pathway HAMLET uses when killing pneumococci by itself. Finally, the sensitizing effect was not confined to species sensitive to HAMLET. The HAMLET-resistant respiratory species Acinetobacter baumanii and Moraxella catarrhalis were all sensitized to various classes of antibiotics in the presence of HAMLET, activating the same mechanism as in pneumococci. Combined these results suggest the presence of a conserved HAMLET-activated pathway that circumvents antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The ability to activate this

  12. The Human Milk Protein-Lipid Complex HAMLET Sensitizes Bacterial Pathogens to Traditional Antimicrobial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R.; Clementi, Emily A.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2012-01-01

    The fight against antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to public health of our time. The inevitable development of resistance following the introduction of novel antibiotics has led to an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial drugs with new mechanisms of action that are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms. One such compound is HAMLET, a natural complex from human milk that kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) using a mechanism different from common antibiotics and is immune to resistance-development. In this study we show that sublethal concentrations of HAMLET potentiate the effect of common antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, and aminoglycosides) against pneumococci. Using MIC assays and short-time killing assays we dramatically reduced the concentrations of antibiotics needed to kill pneumococci, especially for antibiotic-resistant strains that in the presence of HAMLET fell into the clinically sensitive range. Using a biofilm model in vitro and nasopharyngeal colonization in vivo, a combination of HAMLET and antibiotics completely eradicated both biofilms and colonization in mice of both antibiotic-sensitive and resistant strains, something each agent alone was unable to do. HAMLET-potentiation of antibiotics was partially due to increased accessibility of antibiotics to the bacteria, but relied more on calcium import and kinase activation, the same activation pathway HAMLET uses when killing pneumococci by itself. Finally, the sensitizing effect was not confined to species sensitive to HAMLET. The HAMLET-resistant respiratory species Acinetobacter baumanii and Moraxella catarrhalis were all sensitized to various classes of antibiotics in the presence of HAMLET, activating the same mechanism as in pneumococci. Combined these results suggest the presence of a conserved HAMLET-activated pathway that circumvents antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The ability to activate this pathway may extend

  13. The human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET sensitizes bacterial pathogens to traditional antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R; Clementi, Emily A; Hakansson, Anders P

    2012-01-01

    The fight against antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to public health of our time. The inevitable development of resistance following the introduction of novel antibiotics has led to an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial drugs with new mechanisms of action that are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms. One such compound is HAMLET, a natural complex from human milk that kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) using a mechanism different from common antibiotics and is immune to resistance-development. In this study we show that sublethal concentrations of HAMLET potentiate the effect of common antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, and aminoglycosides) against pneumococci. Using MIC assays and short-time killing assays we dramatically reduced the concentrations of antibiotics needed to kill pneumococci, especially for antibiotic-resistant strains that in the presence of HAMLET fell into the clinically sensitive range. Using a biofilm model in vitro and nasopharyngeal colonization in vivo, a combination of HAMLET and antibiotics completely eradicated both biofilms and colonization in mice of both antibiotic-sensitive and resistant strains, something each agent alone was unable to do. HAMLET-potentiation of antibiotics was partially due to increased accessibility of antibiotics to the bacteria, but relied more on calcium import and kinase activation, the same activation pathway HAMLET uses when killing pneumococci by itself. Finally, the sensitizing effect was not confined to species sensitive to HAMLET. The HAMLET-resistant respiratory species Acinetobacter baumanii and Moraxella catarrhalis were all sensitized to various classes of antibiotics in the presence of HAMLET, activating the same mechanism as in pneumococci. Combined these results suggest the presence of a conserved HAMLET-activated pathway that circumvents antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The ability to activate this pathway may extend

  14. Decoding of faces and face components in face-sensitive human visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Nichols

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A great challenge to the field of visual neuroscience is to understand how faces are encoded and represented within the human brain. Here we show evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI for spatially distributed processing of the whole face and its components in face-sensitive human visual cortex. We used multi-class linear pattern classifiers constructed with a leave-one-scan-out verification procedure to discriminate brain activation patterns elicited by whole faces, the internal features alone, and the external head outline alone. Furthermore, our results suggest that whole faces are represented disproportionately in the fusiform cortex (FFA whereas the building blocks of faces are represented disproportionately in occipitotemporal cortex (OFA. Faces and face components may therefore be organized with functional clustering within both the FFA and OFA, but with specialization for face components in the OFA and the whole face in the FFA.

  15. Paving the Way for the 21st Century: The Human Factor in Higher Education Financial Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Sigmund G., Ed.

    This book presents human resources issues that will affect the financial management of colleges and universities as they move into the 21st century. It examines how business managers and human resources managers must balance human resources management policies and practices against the financial demands on the institution. It discusses the…

  16. The glucocorticoid receptor 1A3 promoter correlates with high sensitivity to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Douglas R; Kyparissoudis, Konstantinos; Berzins, Stuart P; Cole, Timothy J; Godfrey, Dale I

    2014-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are powerful inhibitors of inflammation and immunity. Although glucocorticoid-induced cell death (GICD) is an important part of GCs actions, the cell types and molecular mechanisms involved are not well understood. Untranslated exon 1A3 of the human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene is a major determinant of GICD in GICD-sensitive human cancer cell lines, operating to dynamically upregulate GR levels in response to GCs. We measured the GICD sensitivity of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and thymocytes to dexamethasone in vitro, relating this to GR exon 1A3 expression. A clear GICD sensitivity hierarchy was detected: B cells>thymocytes/natural killer (NK) cells>peripheral T cells. Within thymocyte populations, GICD sensitivity decreased with maturation. Interestingly, NK cell subsets were differentially sensitive to GICD, with CD16(+)CD56(int) (cytotoxic) NK cells being highly resistant to GICD, whereas CD16(-)CD56(hi) (cytokine producing) NK cells were highly sensitive (similar to B cells). B-cell GICD was rescued by co-culture with interleukin-4. Strikingly, although no significant increases in GR protein were observed during 48 h of culture of GICD-sensitive and -resistant cells alike, GR 1A3 expression was increased over pre-culture levels in a manner directly proportional to the GICD sensitivity of each cell type. Accordingly, this is the first evidence that the GR exon 1A3 promoter is differentially regulated during thymic development and maturation of human T cells. Furthermore, human peripheral blood B cells are exquisitely GICD-sensitive in vitro, giving new insight into how GCs may downregulate immunity. Collectively, these data show that GR 1A3 expression is tied with GICD sensitivity in human lymphocytes, underscoring the potential for GR 1A3 expression to be used as a biomarker for sensitivity to GICD.

  17. Imaging of human breast tissue using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Y.; Gautam, M.; Divakar Rao, K.; Swami, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    We report a study on the use of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) for discriminating malignant (invasive ductal carcinoma), benign (fibroadenoma) and normal (adipocytes) breast tissue sites. The results show that while conventional OCT, that utilizes only the intensity of light back-scattered from tissue microstructures, is able to discriminate breast tissues as normal (adipocytes) and abnormal (malignant and benign) tissues, PS-OCT helps in discriminating between malignant and benign tissue sites also. The estimated values of birefringence obtained from the PSOCT imaging show that benign breast tissue samples have significantly higher birefringence as compared to the malignant tissue samples.

  18. IL-35 over-expression increases apoptosis sensitivity and suppresses cell growth in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jun; Zhang, Xulong; Wen, Mingjie; Kong, Qingli; Lv, Zhe; An, Yunqing; Wei, Xiao-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a novel heterodimeric cytokine in the IL-12 family and is composed of two subunits: Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) and IL-12p35. IL-35 is expressed in T regulatory (Treg) cells and contributes to the immune suppression function of these cells. In contrast, we found that both IL-35 subunits were expressed concurrently in most human cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines. In addition, we found that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulation led to increased IL-35 expression in human cancer cells. Furthermore, over-expression of IL-35 in human cancer cells suppressed cell growth in vitro, induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and mediated robust apoptosis induced by serum starvation, TNF-α, and IFN-γ stimulation through the up-regulation of Fas and concurrent down-regulation of cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-2 expression. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel functional role for IL-35 in suppressing cancer activity, inhibiting cancer cell growth, and increasing the apoptosis sensitivity of human cancer cells through the regulation of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis. Thus, this research provides new insights into IL-35 function and presents a possible target for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  19. Exercise increases human skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity via coordinated increases in microvascular perfusion and molecular signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Frøsig, Christian; Kjøbsted, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major health risk and although exercise clearly improves skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, the mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that initiation of a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp four hours after single-legged exercise in humans increased microvascular perfusion...... and glycogen synthase in muscle. This secures improved glucose delivery on the one hand and increased ability to take up and dispose of the delivered glucose on the other hand.......Insulin resistance is a major health risk and although exercise clearly improves skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, the mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that initiation of a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp four hours after single-legged exercise in humans increased microvascular perfusion...... the insulin stimulated increase in microvascular perfusion in both legs and abrogated the greater glucose uptake in the exercised compared with the rested leg. Skeletal muscle phosphorylation of TBC1D4 Ser(318) and Ser(704) and glycogen synthase activity were greater in the exercised leg before insulin...

  20. Efficient inhibition of human telomerase activity by antisense oligonucleotides sensitizes cancer cells to radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-mei JI; Cong-hua XIE; Ming-hao FANG; Fu-xiang ZHOU; Wen-jie ZHANG; Ming-sheng ZHANG; Yun-feng ZHOU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of the antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN) specific for human telomerase RNA (hTR) on radio sensitization and proliferation inhibition in human neurogliocytoma cells (U251). Methods: U251 cells were transfected with hTR ASODN or nonspecific oligonucleotides (NSODN). Before and after irradiation of 60Co-γray, telomerase activity was assayed by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP-PCR-ELISA), and DNA damage and repair were examined by the comet assay. The classical colony assay was used to plot the cell-survival curve, to detect the D0 value. Results: hTR antisense oligonucleotides could downregulate the telomerase activity, increase radiation induced DNA damage and reduce the subsequent repair. Furthermore, it could inhibit the proliferation and decrease the D0 value which demonstrates rising radiosensitivity. However, telomere length was unchanged over a short period of time. Conclusion: These findings suggest that an ASODN-based strategy may be used to develop telomerase inhibitors, which can efficiently sensitize radiotherapy.

  1. Evaluation of cloned cells, animal model, and ATRA sensitivity of human testicular yolk sac tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Junfeng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The testicular yolk sac tumor (TYST is the most common neoplasm originated from germ cells differentiated abnormally, a major part of pediatric malignant testicular tumors. The present study aimed at developing and validating the in vitro and vivo models of TYST and evaluating the sensitivity of TYST to treatments, by cloning human TYST cells and investigating the histology, ultra-structure, growth kinetics and expression of specific proteins of cloned cells. We found biological characteristics of cloned TYST cells were similar to the yolk sac tumor and differentiated from the columnar to glandular-like or goblet cells-like cells. Chromosomes for tumor identification in each passage met nature of the primary tumor. TYST cells were more sensitive to all-trans-retinoic acid which had significantly inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of TYST cells through the activation of p53 expression and down-regulation of Bcl- expression. Thus, we believe that cloned TYST cells and the animal model developed here are useful to understand the molecular mechanism of TYST cells and develop potential therapies for human TYST.

  2. A sensitive method for detecting proliferation of rare autoantigen-specific human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannering, Stuart I; Morris, Jessica S; Jensen, Kent P; Purcell, Anthony W; Honeyman, Margo C; van Endert, Peter M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2003-12-01

    The ability to measure proliferation of rare antigen-specific T cells among many bystanders is critical for the evaluation of cellular immune function in health and disease. T-cell proliferation in response to antigen has been measured almost exclusively by 3H-thymidine incorporation. This method does not directly identify the phenotype of the proliferating cells and is frequently not sufficiently sensitive to detect rare autoantigen-specific T cells. To overcome these problems, we developed a novel assay for antigen-specific human T-cell proliferation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were labelled with the fluorescent dye 5,6-carboxylfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) and cells that proliferated in response to antigen, with resultant reduction in CFSE intensity, were measured directly by flow cytometry. This assay was more sensitive than 3H-thymidine incorporation and detected the proliferation of rare antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells at 10-fold lower antigen concentrations. It also allowed the phenotype of the proliferating cells to be directly determined. Using the CFSE assay we were able to measure directly the proliferation of human CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors in response to the type 1 diabetes autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and proinsulin (PI).

  3. Improved Sensing Pulses for Increased Human Head Depth Measurement Sensitivity With Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an improved electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) stimulus paradigm, based on dual-energy pulses using the stochastic Gabor function (SGF) that may more sensitively assess deep brain tissue impedance than current single-pulse paradigms. The SGF is a uniformly distributed noise, modulated by a Gaussian envelope, with a wide-frequency spectrum representation regardless of the stimuli energy, and is least compact in the sample frequency phase plane. Numerical results obtained using a realistic human head model confirm that two sequential SGF pulses at different energies can improve EIS depth sensitivity when used in a dual-energy subtraction scheme. Specifically, although the two SGF pulses exhibit different tissue current distributions, they maintain the broadband sensing pulse characteristics needed to generate all the frequencies of interest. Moreover, finite-difference time domain simulations show that this dual-energy excitation scheme is capable of reducing the amplitude of weighted current densities surface directly underneath the electrodes by approximately 3 million times versus single stimulation pulses, while maintaining an acceptable tissue conductivity distribution at depth. This increased sensitivity for the detection of small, deep impedance changes might be of value in potential future EIS applications, such as the portable, point-of-care detection of deep brain hemorrhage or infarction. PMID:24043365

  4. Dynamic modulation of thymidylate synthase gene expression and fluorouracil sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Wakasa

    Full Text Available Biomarkers have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy. However, many biomarker candidates are still in debate. In addition to clinical studies, a priori experimental approaches are needed. Thymidylate synthase (TS expression is a long-standing candidate as a biomarker for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment of cancer patients. Using the Tet-OFF system and a human colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1, we first constructed an in vitro system in which TS expression is dynamically controllable. Quantitative assays have elucidated that TS expression in the transformant was widely modulated, and that the dynamic range covered 15-fold of the basal level. 5-FU sensitivity of the transformant cells significantly increased in response to downregulated TS expression, although being not examined in the full dynamic range because of the doxycycline toxicity. Intriguingly, our in vitro data suggest that there is a linear relationship between TS expression and the 5-FU sensitivity in cells. Data obtained in a mouse model using transformant xenografts were highly parallel to those obtained in vitro. Thus, our in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that TS expression is a determinant of 5-FU sensitivity in cells, at least in this specific genetic background, and, therefore, support the possibility of TS expression as a biomarker for 5-FU-based cancer chemotherapy.

  5. Evaluation on Sensitivity of the Human Sperm Motility Assay for Detecting Endotoxin in Culture Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI; Wen-hong ZHANG; Kang-shou YAO

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the sensitivity of the human sperm motility assay for detecting endotoxin in culture medium Materials & Methods Motile sperm were separated and exposed to different concentrations of endotoxin (0.5 ng/mL, 1 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, 1 000 ng/mL, 10 000 ng/mL, and 50 000 ng/mL), and sperm motility was determined after incubation. Effects of endotoxin on sperm motility in media without albumin were also examined. In addition, at the same concentrations of endotoxin (0.5 ng/mL, 1 ng/mL, and 10 ng/mL), the sensitivity of the human sperm motility assay was compared to those of 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryo bioassays.Results At levels of 0.5 ng/mL~1 000 ng/mL endotoxin in media with 2 mg/mL albumin, sperm did not show significant change in motility during 24 h of incubation when compared with the control (P>0.05). However, the sperm motility was significantly inhibited at endotoxin dosages of 10 000 and 50 000 ng/mL. In the absence of albumin supplementation, at endotoxin levels of 50 000 ng/mL, and 1 000 ng/mL, there was a marked decrease in sperm motility compared with the control after 2 h or 8 h of incubation, respectively (P<0.01). In media containing 0.5 ng/mL and 1 ng/mL endotoxin, 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryos had significantly reduced developmental rates in all developmental stages, and at the level of 10 ng/mL, the development of the embryos was arrested.Conclusion The human sperm motility assay could detect high levels of endotoxin in culture medium but its sensitivity to endotoxin would be inferior to that of the 1-cell or 2-cell mouse embryo bioassay. In the absence of albumin supplementation, the sensitivity of the sperm motility assay could be improved.

  6. Sensitivity of the human auditory cortex to acoustic degradation of speech and non-speech sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiitinen Hannu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that the human right-hemispheric auditory cortex is particularly sensitive to reduction in sound quality, with an increase in distortion resulting in an amplification of the auditory N1m response measured in the magnetoencephalography (MEG. Here, we examined whether this sensitivity is specific to the processing of acoustic properties of speech or whether it can be observed also in the processing of sounds with a simple spectral structure. We degraded speech stimuli (vowel /a/, complex non-speech stimuli (a composite of five sinusoidals, and sinusoidal tones by decreasing the amplitude resolution of the signal waveform. The amplitude resolution was impoverished by reducing the number of bits to represent the signal samples. Auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs were measured in the left and right hemisphere of sixteen healthy subjects. Results We found that the AEF amplitudes increased significantly with stimulus distortion for all stimulus types, which indicates that the right-hemispheric N1m sensitivity is not related exclusively to degradation of acoustic properties of speech. In addition, the P1m and P2m responses were amplified with increasing distortion similarly in both hemispheres. The AEF latencies were not systematically affected by the distortion. Conclusions We propose that the increased activity of AEFs reflects cortical processing of acoustic properties common to both speech and non-speech stimuli. More specifically, the enhancement is most likely caused by spectral changes brought about by the decrease of amplitude resolution, in particular the introduction of periodic, signal-dependent distortion to the original sound. Converging evidence suggests that the observed AEF amplification could reflect cortical sensitivity to periodic sounds.

  7. Adaptive Optics Analysis of Visual Benefit with Higher-order Aberrations Correction of Human Eye - Poster Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lixia; Dai, Yun; Rao, Xuejun; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Yiyun; Liu, Qian; Jiang, Wenhan

    2008-01-01

    Higher-order aberrations correction can improve visual performance of human eye to some extent. To evaluate how much visual benefit can be obtained with higher-order aberrations correction we developed an adaptive optics vision simulator (AOVS). Dynamic real time optimized modal compensation was used to implement various customized higher-order ocular aberrations correction strategies. The experimental results indicate that higher-order aberrations correction can improve visual performance of human eye comparing with only lower-order aberration correction but the improvement degree and higher-order aberration correction strategy are different from each individual. Some subjects can acquire great visual benefit when higher-order aberrations were corrected but some subjects acquire little visual benefit even though all higher-order aberrations were corrected. Therefore, relative to general lower-order aberrations correction strategy, customized higher-order aberrations correction strategy is needed to obtain optimal visual improvement for each individual. AOVS provides an effective tool for higher-order ocular aberrations optometry for customized ocular aberrations correction.

  8. Functional Study of the P32T ITPA Variant Associated with Drug Sensitivity in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Tarakhovskaya, Elena R.; Spitler, Kathryn; Frahm, Christin; Menezes, Miriam R.; Simone, Peter D.; Kolar, Carol; Marky, Luis A.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2009-01-01

    Sanitization of the cellular nucleotide pools from mutagenic base analogs is necessary for the accuracy of transcription and replication of genetic material and plays a substantial role in cancer prevention. The undesirable mutagenic, recombinogenic and toxic incorporation of purine base analogs (i.e. ITP, dITP, XTP, dXTP or 6-hydroxyaminopurine (HAP) deoxynucleoside triphosphate) into nucleic acids is prevented by inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA). The ITPA gene is a highly conserved, moderately expressed gene. Defects in ITPA orthologs in model organisms cause severe sensitivity to HAP and chromosome fragmentation. A human polymorphic allele 94C->A encodes for the enzyme with a P32T amino acid change and leads to accumulation of non-hydrolyzed ITP. ITPase activity is not detected in erythrocytes of these patients. The P32T polymorphism has also been associated with adverse sensitivity to purine base analog drugs. We have found that the ITPA-P32T mutant is a dimer in solution, as is wild-type ITPA, and has normal ITPA activity in vitro, but the melting point of ITPA-P32T is 5 degrees C lower than that of wild-type. ITPA-P32T is also fully functional in vivo in model organisms as determined by a HAP mutagenesis assay and its complementation of a bacterial ITPA defect. The amount of ITPA protein detected by western blot is severely diminished in a human fibroblast cell line with the 94C->A change. We propose that the P32T mutation exerts its effect in certain human tissues by cumulative effects of destabilization of transcripts, protein stability and availability. PMID:19631656

  9. RENAL ENDOGENOUS ET-1 AND URINARY SODIUM EXCRETION AND MICROALBUMINURIA IN HUMAN SALT-SENSITIVE HYPERTENSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the urinary endothelin-1 (ET-1) excretion and urinary sodium excretion,microalbuminuria and ambulatory blood pressure(ABP) in salt-sensitive(SS) hypertension patients. Methods Twenty-one cases of normotensive subjects and 32 cases of uncomplicated hypertensive patients were recruited in this study. Salt sensitivity was determined by acute venous saline loading test. Before saline loading, 24-hour ABP measurements were performed. Urine samples were collected to assay ET-1 ,urinary sodium excretion and urinary albumin excretion(UAF). Results Compared to slat-resistant(SR) subgroup, SS showed low urinary ET-1 excretion in normotensive group (P<0.05) or hypertensive group (P<0.01) ,regardless of saline loading or not. The nighttime MAP of SS was higher than SR subgroup in normotensive or hypertensive group. Urinary sodium excretion during 4h of saline loading was significantly lower in SS than that in SR hypertensive patients (P<0. 05). Twenty-four-hour UAE of SS patients was higher than SR group (P<0.01). Results of further correlation analysis indicated that the urinary ET-1 excretion was positively related to urinary sodium content and negatively to ABP and UAE. Conclusion Urinary ET-1 is low in SS normotensives or hypertension patients,which may play a role in renal sodium retention and renal impairment of SS hypertension patients.

  10. Involvement of Higher Education in Building Human Resources Character in the Era of Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishomuddin

    2015-01-01

    In general, the objectives of this study were to explain the role played by universities in improving its human resources are office holders, lecturers, and students, explain the program what is being done related to the improvement of human resources, and explains the non-academic program to support the implementation of a program that has been…

  11. Comparison study of the sensitivities of some indices of DDT exposure in human blood and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nhachi, C.F.B.; Loewenson, R. (Univ. of Zimbabwe (South Africa))

    1989-10-01

    Although exposure to DDT (2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl1)1,1,1,-trichloroethane) is not normally associated with fatality or chronic adverse effects to human life, it is a known hazard to the ecosystem. Blood levels of DDT and some of its derivatives have been used to assess extent of exposure or the body load of DDT in humans. In experimental studies, ingestion of DDT has been associated with reduced liver stores of vitamin A, and increased serum levels of vitamin A. The same study also revealed a significant correlation of vitamin A and DDE serum levels. Generally an increase in excreted 17-B-hydroxycortisone has been associated with DDT exposure. Increased excretion of 6-B-hydroxycortisol has been noted in workers who were involved in the formulation of DDT. The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivities of some indices of DDT exposure in humans. The indices which were compared are serum vitamin A and DDE levels and urinary 17-B-hydroxycortisol.

  12. Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not alter sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntyre Bradley W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy-induced cell death can involve the induction of apoptosis. Thus, aberrant function of the pathways involved might result in chemoresistance. Since cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix acts as a survival factor that homeostatically maintains normal tissue architecture, it was tested whether acquisition of resistance to deadhesion-induced apoptosis (anoikis in human osteosarcoma would result in resistance to chemotherapy. Methods Osteosarcoma cell lines (SAOS-2 and TE-85 obtained from ATCC and were maintained in complete Eagle's MEM medium. Suspension culture was established by placing cells in tissue culture wells coated with poly-HEMA. Cell cytotoxicity was determined using a live/dead cytotoxicity assay. Cell cycle/apoptosis analyses were performed using propidium iodide (PI staining with subsequent FACS analysis. Apoptosis was also assayed by Annexin-FITC/PI staining. Results Etoposide, adriamycin, vinblastine, cisplatin and paclitaxel were able to induce apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells SAOS-2 regardless of their anoikis resistance phenotype or the culture conditions (adhered vs. suspended. Moreover, suspended anoikis resistant TE-85 cells (TE-85ar retained their sensitivity to chemotherapy as well. Conclusion Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not result in a generalized resistance to all apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapy. Moreover, our results suggest that the pathways regulating anoikis resistance and chemotherapy resistance might involve the action of different mediators.

  13. Arsenic trioxide enhances the radiation sensitivity of androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wen Chiu

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men. In the present study, LNCaP (androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cells and PC-3 cells (androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells were used to investigate the anti-cancer effects of ionizing radiation (IR combined with arsenic trioxide (ATO and to determine the underlying mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. We found that IR combined with ATO increases the therapeutic efficacy compared to individual treatments in LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In addition, combined treatment showed enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation compared to treatment with ATO or IR alone in PC-3 cells. Combined treatment induced autophagy and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, and mainly induced autophagy in PC-3 cells. The cell death that was induced by the combined treatment was primarily the result of inhibition of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, we found that the combined treatment of cells pre-treated with 3-MA resulted in a significant change in AO-positive cells and cytotoxicity. In an in vivo study, the combination treatment had anti-tumor growth effects. These novel findings suggest that combined treatment is a potential therapeutic strategy not only for androgen-dependent prostate cancer but also for androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  14. Developing a set of ancestry-sensitive DNA markers reflecting continental origins of humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    den Dunnen Johan T

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and use of Ancestry-Sensitive Markers (ASMs, i.e. genetic polymorphisms facilitating the genetic reconstruction of geographical origins of individuals, is far from straightforward. Results Here we describe the ascertainment and application of five different sets of 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs allowing the inference of major human groups of different continental origin. For this, we first used 74 cell lines, representing human males from six different geographical areas and screened them with the Affymetrix Mapping 10K assay. In addition to using summary statistics estimating the genetic diversity among multiple groups of individuals defined by geography or language, we also used the program STRUCTURE to detect genetically distinct subgroups. Subsequently, we used a pairwise FST ranking procedure among all pairs of genetic subgroups in order to identify a single best performing set of ASMs. Our initial results were independently confirmed by genotyping this set of ASMs in 22 individuals from Somalia, Afghanistan and Sudan and in 919 samples from the CEPH Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP-CEPH Conclusion By means of our pairwise population FST ranking approach we identified a set of 47 SNPs that could serve as a panel of ASMs at a continental level.

  15. Mission and Design Sensitivities for Human Mars Landers Using Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Tara P.; Thomas, Herbert D.; Collins, Tim; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Samareh, Jamshid

    2017-01-01

    Landing humans on Mars is one of NASA's long term goals. The Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) is focused on evaluating architectural trade options to define the capabilities and elements needed for a sustainable human presence on the surface of Mars. The EMC study teams have considered a variety of in-space propulsion options and surface mission options. As we seek to better understand how these choices affect the performance of the lander, this work informs and influences requirements for transportation systems to deliver the landers to Mars and enable these missions. This paper presents the effects of mission and vehicle design options on lander mass and performance. Beginning with Earth launch, options include fairing size assumptions, co-manifesting other elements with the lander, and Earth-Moon vicinity operations. Capturing into Mars orbit using either aerocapture or propulsive capture is assessed. For entry, descent, and landing both storable as well as oxygen and methane propellant combinations are considered, engine thrust level is assessed, and sensitivity to landed payload mass is presented. This paper focuses on lander designs using the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIAD), one of several entry system technologies currently considered for human missions.

  16. Drug sensitivity and drug resistance profiles of human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nisana Tepsiri; Liengchai Chaturat; Banchob Sripa; Wises Namwat; Sopit Wongkham; Vajarabhongsa Bhudhisawasdi; Wichittra Tassaneeyakul

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of a number of chemotherapeutic drugs on five human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cell lines. The expressions of genes that have been proposed to influence the resistance of chemotherapeutic drugs including thymidylate synthase (TS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), multidrug resistance protein (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) were also determined.METHODS: Five human CCA cell lines (KKU-100, KKU M055, KKU-M156, KKU-M214 and KKU-OCA17) weretreated with various chemotherapeutic drugs and growth inhibition was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. Semi-quantitative levels of gene expression were determined by a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results of IC50 values and the ratios of gene expression were analyzed by linear regression to predict their relationship. RESULTS: Among five CCA cell lines, KKU-M055 was the most sensitive cell line towards all chemotherapeutic drugs investigated, particularly taxane derivatives with IC50 values of 0.02-3 nmol/L, whereas KKU-100 was apparently the least sensitive cell line. When compared to other chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin and pirarubicin showed the lowest IC50 values (<5 μmol/L) in all five CCA cell lines. Results from RT-PCR showed that TS, MRP1, MRP3 and GSTP1 were highly expressed in these five CCA cell lines while DPD and MRP2 were only moderately expressed. It should be noted that MDR1 expression was detected only in KKU-OCA17 cell lines. A strong correlation was only found between the level of MRP3 expression and the IC50 values of etoposide, doxorubicin and pirarubicin (r = 0.86-0.98, ,P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents is not associated with the histological type of CCA. Choosing of the appropriate chemotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of CCA requires knowledge of drug

  17. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric method for the sensitive determination of niflumic acid in human plasma and its application to pharmacokinetic study of talniflumate tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Ji; Na, Dong Hee; Shin, Young-Hee; Lee, Kang Choon

    2008-12-15

    A sensitive LC-MS method was developed and validated for the determination of niflumic acid (NFA), the active metabolite of the talniflumate formulation, in human plasma. The analyses were performed on C(18) column using acetonitrile-ammonium acetate buffer (pH 5.7, 40:60) as a mobile phase with quadrupole MS detection of NFA at m/z 281 in a negative ion-monitoring mode. Calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 1-1000ng/mL in human plasma. The higher sensitivity of LC-MS allowed low concentrations of NFA to be determined at initial drug absorption and terminal elimination phases following oral administration of talniflumate tablet.

  18. Quality Administration and Management in Higher Education in Nigeria: Implications for Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Gbenga M.; Abiddin, Norhasni Zainal

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic changes in today's world have made countries of the world masters of their own destinies. In this light, it has become noted today that "the affluence or penury of nations depends largely on the quality of higher education". This is informed by the fact that higher education systems of a nation is the "machinery of…

  19. Specific antibodies and sensitive immunoassays for the human epidermal growth factor receptors (HER2, HER3, and HER4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Marianne Nordlund; Westgaard, Arne; Paus, Elisabeth; Øijordsbakken, Miriam; Henanger, Karoline J; Naume, Bjørn; Bjøro, Trine

    2017-06-01

    The use of trastuzumab in patients with breast cancer that overexpresses human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 has significantly improved treatment outcomes. However, a substantial proportion of this patient group still experiences progression of the disease after receiving the drug. Evaluation of the changes in expression of the human epidermal growth factor receptors could be of interest. Monoclonal antibodies against the extracellular domain of the human growth factor receptors, 2, 3, and 4, have been raised, and specific and sensitive immunoassays have been established. Sera from healthy individuals (Nordic Reference Interval Project and Database) were analyzed in the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 assay (N = 805) and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 and 4 assays (N = 114), and reference limits were calculated. In addition, sera from 208 individual patients with breast cancer were tested in all three assays. Finally, the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 assay was compared with a chemiluminescent immunoassay for serum human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu. Reference values were as follows: human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, human epidermal growth factor receptor 3, human epidermal growth factor receptor 4, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 serum levels between the patients with tissue human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive and tissue human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative ( p = 0.0026, p = 0.000011) tumors, but not in the serum levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor 4 ( p = 0.054). There was good agreement between the in-house human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 assay and the chemiluminescent immunoassay. Our new specific antibodies for all the three human epidermal growth factor receptors may prove valuable in the development of novel anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapies with

  20. PKCδ regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity and hepatosteatosis in mice and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bezy, Olivier; Tran, Thien T; Pihlajamäki, Jussi;

    2011-01-01

    PKCδ. Here, we found that PKCδ expression in liver was 2-fold higher in B6 versus 129 mice from birth and was further increased in B6 but not 129 mice in response to a high-fat diet. PRKCD gene expression was also elevated in obese humans and was positively correlated with fasting glucose...... tolerance, and reduced hepatosteatosis with aging. Conversely, mice with liver-specific overexpression of PKCδ developed hepatic insulin resistance characterized by decreased insulin signaling, enhanced lipogenic gene expression, and hepatosteatosis. Therefore, changes in the expression and regulation...... of PKCδ between strains of mice and in obese humans play an important role in the genetic risk of hepatic insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatosteatosis; and thus PKCδ may be a potential target in the treatment of metabolic syndrome....

  1. Sensitive and cost-effective LC-MS/MS method for quantitation of CVT-6883 in human urine using sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate additive to eliminate adsorptive losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chungwen; Bajpai, Lakshmikant; Mollova, Nevena; Leung, Kwan

    2009-04-01

    CVT-6883, a novel selective A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonist currently under clinical development, is highly lipophilic and exhibits high affinity for non-specific binding to container surfaces, resulting in very low recovery in urine assays. Our study showed the use of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS), a low-cost additive, eliminated non-specific binding problems in the analysis of CVT-6883 in human urine without compromising sensitivity. A new sensitive and selective LC-MS/MS method for quantitation of CVT-6883 in the range of 0.200-80.0ng/mL using SDBS additive was therefore developed and validated for the analysis of human urine samples. The recoveries during sample collection, handling and extraction for the analyte and internal standard (d(5)-CVT-6883) were higher than 87%. CVT-6883 was found stable under the following conditions: in extract - at ambient temperature for 3 days, under refrigeration (5 degrees C) for 6 days; in human urine (containing 4mM SDBS) - after three freeze/thaw cycles, at ambient temperature for 26h, under refrigeration (5 degrees C) for 94h, and in a freezer set to -20 degrees C for at least 2 months. The results demonstrated that the validated method is sufficiently sensitive, specific, and cost-effective for the analysis of CVT-6883 in human urine and will provide a powerful tool to support the clinical programs for CVT-6883.

  2. Skin Sensitive Difference of Human Body Sections under Clothing-Smirnov Test of Skin Surface Temperatures' Dynamic Changing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; WU Hai-yan; WANG Yun-yi

    2004-01-01

    Skin sensitive difference of human body sections under clothing is the theoretic foundation of thermal insulation clothing design.By a new method of researching on clothing comfort perception,the skin temperature live changing procedure of human body sections affected by the same cold stimulation is inspected.Furthermore with the Smirnov test the skin temperatures dynamic changing patterns of main human body sections are obtained.

  3. Sensitive determination of bromazepam in human tissues using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X X; Kudo, K; Imamura, T; Jitsufuchi, N; Nagata, T

    1996-02-23

    A reliable and sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method was devised to determine the levels of bromazepam in human tissues. Bromazepam was extracted from body tissues using a three-step solvent extraction procedure. N-Desmethyldiazepam served as the internal standard. Selected ion monitoring with m/z 317 for bromazepam and m/z 270 for internal standard was used for quantitation. Calibration curves in all body tissues were linear over the concentration range from 50-500 ng/g. The lower detection limit in body tissues was 2-5 ng/g and the absolute recovery in body tissues was 27.8-68.0%. This method was used to determine the levels of bromazepam in tissues of an autopsied individual who had been prescribed psychotropic drugs and who was found dead in a car.

  4. Sensitive and specific liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric assay for barnidipine in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawula, M; Watson, D; Teramura, T; Watanabe, T; Higuchi, S; Cheng, K N

    1998-11-20

    A sensitive and specific LC-MS-MS assay has been developed and validated for barnidipine (1-benzyl-3-pyrrolidinyl)methyl-2,6-dimethyl-4(m-nitrophenyl)-1,4-dihydr opyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate). The assay involves a simple and rapid solid-phase extraction procedure. Sample analysis was on a Spherisorb S3ODS2 100 mmX2 mm I.D. column, with a Finnigan TSQ 7000 mass spectrometer, using an electrospray interface and selective reaction monitoring (SRM). The intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy, determined as the coefficient of variation and relative error, respectively, were 11.8% or less. The limit of quantitation was 0.03 ng/ml, and the calibration was linear between 0.03 and 3.0 ng/ml. The method has been used successfully for the measurement of over two thousand human plasma samples from pharmacokinetic clinical trials.

  5. Predicting risk sensitivity in humans and lower animals: risk as variance or coefficient of variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Elke U; Shafir, Sharoni; Blais, Ann-Renee

    2004-04-01

    This article examines the statistical determinants of risk preference. In a meta-analysis of animal risk preference (foraging birds and insects), the coefficient of variation (CV), a measure of risk per unit of return, predicts choices far better than outcome variance, the risk measure of normative models. In a meta-analysis of human risk preference, the superiority of the CV over variance in predicting risk taking is not as strong. Two experiments show that people's risk sensitivity becomes strongly proportional to the CV when they learn about choice alternatives like other animals, by experiential sampling over time. Experience-based choices differ from choices when outcomes and probabilities are numerically described. Zipf's law as an ecological regularity and Weber's law as a psychological regularity may give rise to the CV as a measure of risk.

  6. Oral sensitivity to fatty acids, food consumption and BMI in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jessica E; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Golding, Matthew; Delahunty, Conor; Clifton, Peter M; Keast, Russell S J

    2010-07-01

    Fatty acids are the chemical moieties that are thought to stimulate oral nutrient sensors, which detect the fat content of foods. In animals, oral hypersensitivity to fatty acids is associated with decreased fat intake and body weight. The aims of the present study were to investigate oral fatty acid sensitivity, food selection and BMI in human subjects. The study included two parts; study 1 established in thirty-one subjects (29 (sem 1.4) years, 22.8 (sem 0.5) kg/m2) taste thresholds using 3-AFC (3-Alternate Forced Choice Methodology) for oleic, linoleic and lauric acids, and quantified oral lipase activity. During study 2, fifty-four subjects (20 (sem 0.3) years, 21.5 (sem 0.4) kg/m2) were screened for oral fatty acid sensitivity using oleic acid (1.4 mm), and they were defined as hypo- or hypersensitive via triplicate triangle tests. Habitual energy and macronutrient intakes were quantified from 2 d diet records, and BMI was calculated from height and weight. Subjects also completed a fat ranking task using custard containing varying amounts (0, 2, 6 and 10 %) of fat. Study 1 reported median lipase activity as 2 mumol fatty acids/min per l, and detection thresholds for oleic, linoleic and lauric acids were 2.2 (sem 0.1), 1.5 (sem 0.1) and 2.6 (sem 0.3) mm. Study 2 identified twelve hypersensitive subjects, and hypersensitivity was associated with lower energy and fat intakes, lower BMI (P acid was correlated to performance in the fat ranking task (r 0.4, P fatty acid hypersensitivity is associated with lower energy and fat intakes and BMI, and it may serve as a factor that influences fat consumption in human subjects.

  7. Highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method for determination of certain aminoglycosides in pharmaceutical formulations and human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Mahmoud A; Nagy, Dalia M; Hammad, Mohamed A; Aly, Alshymaa A

    2013-06-01

    A simple, reliable, highly sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for determination of certain aminoglycosides namely amikacin sulfate, tobramycin, neomycin sulfate, gentamicin sulfate, kanamycin sulfate and streptomycin sulfate. The method is based on the formation of a charge transfer complexes between these drugs and safranin in buffer solution of pH 8. The formed complexes were quantitatively extracted with chloroform under the optimized experimental conditions. These complexes showed an excitation maxima at 519-524 nm and emission maxima at 545-570 nm. The calibration plots were constructed over the range of 4-60 pg mL(-1) for amikacin, 4-50 pg mL(-1) for gentamicin, neomycin and kanamycin, 4-40 pg mL(-1) for streptomycin and 5-50 pg mL(-1) for tobramycin. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of the cited drugs in dosage forms. The proposed method was validated according to ICH and USP guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision and robustness. The high sensitivity of the proposed method allowed determination of amikacin and gentamicin in spiked and real human plasma.

  8. Reduced sensitivity to sooner reward during intertemporal decision-making following insula damage in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela eSellitto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During intertemporal choice, humans tend to prefer small-sooner rewards over larger-delayed rewards, reflecting temporal discounting (TD of delayed outcomes. Functional neuroimaging evidence has implicated the insular cortex in time-sensitive decisions, yet it is not clear whether activity in this brain region is crucial for, or merely associated with, TD behaviour. Here, patients with damage to the insula (Insular patients, control patients with lesions outside the insula, and healthy individuals chose between smaller-sooner and larger-later monetary rewards. Insular patients were less sensitive to sooner rewards than were the control groups, exhibiting reduced TD. A Voxel-based Lesion-Symptom Mapping (VLSM analysis confirmed a statistically significant association between insular damage and reduced TD. These results indicate that the insular cortex is crucial for intertemporal choice. We suggest that he insula may be necessary to anticipate the bodily/emotional effects of receiving rewards at different delays, influencing the computation of their incentive value. Devoid of such input, insular patients’ choices would be governed by a heuristic of quantity, allowing patients to wait for larger options.

  9. Discovery of a Small-Molecule BMP Sensitizer for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Feng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sorely missing from the “toolkit” for directed differentiation of stem/progenitor cells are agonists of the BMP-signaling pathway. Using a high-throughput chemical screen, we discovered that PD407824, a checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1 inhibitor, increases the sensitivity of cells to sub-threshold amounts of BMP4. We show utility of the compound in the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells toward mesoderm or cytotrophoblast stem cells. Blocking CHK1 activity using pharmacological compounds or CHK1 knockout using single guide RNA (sgRNA confirmed that CHK1 inhibition increases the sensitivity to BMP4 treatment. Additional mechanistic studies indicate that CHK1 inhibition depletes p21 levels, thereby activating CDK8/9, which then phosphorylates the SMAD2/3 linker region, leading to decreased levels of SMAD2/3 protein and enhanced levels of nuclear SMAD1. This study provides insight into mechanisms controlling the BMP/transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β signaling pathways and a useful pharmacological reagent for directed differentiation of stem cells.

  10. Inhibition of SRC-3 enhances sensitivity of human cancer cells to histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Zhengzhi, E-mail: zouzhengzhi@m.scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510000 (China); Luo, Xiaoyong [Department of Oncology, The Affiliated Luoyang Central Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Luoyang 471000 (China); Nie, Peipei [KingMed Diagnostics and KingMed School of Laboratory Medicine, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510000 (China); Wu, Baoyan; Zhang, Tao; Wei, Yanchun [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510000 (China); Wang, Wenyi [Xiamen Cancer Center, Department of Medical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361000 (China); Geng, Guojun; Jiang, Jie [Xiamen Cancer Center, Department of Thoracic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361000 (China); Mi, Yanjun, E-mail: myjgj_77@163.com [Xiamen Cancer Center, Department of Medical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361000 (China)

    2016-09-09

    SRC-3 is widely expressed in multiple tumor types and involved in cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are promising antitumor drugs. However, the poor efficacy of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors has restricted its further clinical application. Here, we reported the novel finding that depletion of SRC-3 enhanced sensitivity of breast and lung cancer cells to HDAC inhibitors (SAHA and romidepsin). In contrast, overexpression of SRC-3 decreased SAHA-induced cancer cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that SRC-3 inhibitor bufalin increased cancer cell apoptosis induced by HDAC inhibitors. The combination of bufalin and SAHA was particular efficient in attenuating AKT activation and reducing Bcl-2 levels. Taken together, these accumulating data might guide development of new breast and lung cancer therapies. - Highlights: • Depletion of SRC-3 enhanced sensitivity of breast and lung cancer cells to HDAC inhibitors. • Overexpression of SRC-3 enhanced cancer cell resistance to HDAC inhibitors. • SRC-3 inhibitor bufalin increased cancer cell apoptosis induced by HDAC inhibitors. • Bufalin synergized with HDAC inhibitor attenuated AKT activation and reduced Bcl-2 levels in human cancer cell.

  11. Human Resource Management in Public Higher Education in the Tempus Partner Countries. A Tempus Study. Issue 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosc, Flora; Kelo, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to give an overview of the ways in which human resources are managed in public higher education institutions in the Tempus Partner Countries. It is based on a survey addressed to individuals involved in Tempus projects and on information gathered at the level of the national authorities. In all the countries covered by the…

  12. Human Resource Management in Public Higher Education in the Tempus Partner Countries. A Tempus Study. Issue 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosc, Flora; Kelo, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to give an overview of the ways in which human resources are managed in public higher education institutions in the Tempus Partner Countries. It is based on a survey addressed to individuals involved in Tempus projects and on information gathered at the level of the national authorities. In all the countries covered by the…

  13. Higher temperature sensitivity for stable than for labile soil organic carbon--evidence from incubations of long-term bare fallow soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Romain; Barré, Pierre; Moyano, Fernando E; Christensen, Bent T; Bardoux, Gérard; Eglin, Thomas; Girardin, Cyril; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; van Oort, Folkert; Chenu, Claire

    2014-02-01

    The impact of climate change on the stability of soil organic carbon (SOC) remains a major source of uncertainty in predicting future changes in atmospheric CO2 levels. One unsettled issue is whether the mineralization response to temperature depends on SOC mineralization rate. Long-term (>25 years) bare fallow experiments (LTBF) in which the soil is kept free of any vegetation and organic inputs, and their associated archives of soil samples represent a unique research platform to examine this issue as with increasing duration of fallow, the lability of remaining total SOC decreases. We retrieved soils from LTBF experiments situated at Askov (Denmark), Grignon (France), Ultuna (Sweden), and Versailles (France) and sampled at the start of the experiments and after 25, 50, 52, and 79 years of bare fallow, respectively. Soils were incubated at 4, 12, 20, and 35 °C and the evolved CO2 monitored. The apparent activation energy (Ea) of SOC was then calculated for similar loss of CO2 at the different temperatures. The Ea was always higher for samples taken at the end of the bare-fallow period, implying a higher temperature sensitivity of stable C than of labile C. Our results provide strong evidence for a general relationship between temperature sensitivity and SOC stability upon which significant improvements in predictive models could be based.

  14. Human Gut Bacteria Are Sensitive to Melatonin and Express Endogenous Circadian Rhythmicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiffin K Paulose

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are fundamental properties of most eukaryotes, but evidence of biological clocks that drive these rhythms in prokaryotes has been restricted to Cyanobacteria. In vertebrates, the gastrointestinal system expresses circadian patterns of gene expression, motility and secretion in vivo and in vitro, and recent studies suggest that the enteric microbiome is regulated by the host's circadian clock. However, it is not clear how the host's clock regulates the microbiome. Here, we demonstrate at least one species of commensal bacterium from the human gastrointestinal system, Enterobacter aerogenes, is sensitive to the neurohormone melatonin, which is secreted into the gastrointestinal lumen, and expresses circadian patterns of swarming and motility. Melatonin specifically increases the magnitude of swarming in cultures of E. aerogenes, but not in Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae. The swarming appears to occur daily, and transformation of E. aerogenes with a flagellar motor-protein driven lux plasmid confirms a temperature-compensated circadian rhythm of luciferase activity, which is synchronized in the presence of melatonin. Altogether, these data demonstrate a circadian clock in a non-cyanobacterial prokaryote and suggest the human circadian system may regulate its microbiome through the entrainment of bacterial clocks.

  15. Characterization of lipid metabolism in insulin-sensitive adipocytes differentiated from immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawitt, Janne; Niemeier, Andreas; Kassem, Moustapha; Beisiegel, Ulrike; Heeren, Joerg

    2008-02-15

    There is a great demand for cell models to study human adipocyte function. Here we describe the adipogenic differentiation of a telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell line (hMSC-Tert) that maintains numerous features of terminally differentiated adipocytes even after prolonged withdrawal of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonist rosiglitazone. Differentiated hMSC-Tert developed the characteristic monolocular phenotype of mature adipocytes. The expression of adipocyte specific markers was highly increased during differentiation. Most importantly, the presence of the PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone was not required for the stable expression of lipoprotein lipase, adipocyte fatty acid binding protein and perilipin on mRNA and protein levels. Adiponectin expression was post-transcriptionally down-regulated in the absence of rosiglitazone. Insulin sensitivity as measured by insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein was also independent of rosiglitazone. In addition to commonly used adipogenic markers, we investigated further PPARgamma-stimulated proteins with a role in lipid metabolism. We observed an increase of lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR, LRP1) and apolipoprotein E expression during differentiation. Despite this increased expression, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of lipoproteins was decreased in differentiated adipocytes, suggesting that these proteins may have an additional function in adipose tissue beyond lipoprotein uptake.

  16. Comprehensive and sensitive quantification of long-chain and very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in small samples of human and mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aihua; Terry, Ryan; Lin, Yanhua; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S

    2013-09-13

    Fatty acids (FAs), including long-chain and very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs, C12-22; VLC-PUFAs, C24-38), play an important role in retinal function and health. Deficiencies in LC-PUFAs and VLC-PUFAs, as well as mutations in the enzyme responsible for elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (ELOVL4), have been associated with macular dystrophies and degenerations. Published analytical methods, including high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and gas chromatography-MS (GC-MS), can quantify VLC-PUFAs but require at least an entire human retina which limits the ability to understand physiologically relevant variations in lipids that can occur at a regional level within the retina. Until now, quantification of VLC-PUFAs in just the human macula, the cone-rich region of the central retina responsible for high acuity vision, has not been feasible due to its small size (4-5mm in diameter). In this study, we have developed a sensitive GC-MS method using newer generation enhanced GC-MS detector sensitivity which for the first time quantifies not only 14 VLC-PUFAs and 26 LC-FAs but also n-3/n-6 ratios of PUFAs in 4mm punches of human retina or a single pair of mouse retinas. Our results showed that saturated LC-FAs are higher in the human peripheral retina than in the macula, while unsaturated LC-FAs are higher in the macula than in the peripheral retina. On the other hand, the VLC-PUFAs are higher in the peripheral retina compared to macula. There is no difference in n-3/n-6 ratios of PUFAs observed between human macula and peripheral retina, while mouse retina has almost ten times more VLC-PUFAs than human macula and peripheral retina (2.27% versus 0.25% and 0.32%, respectively) and much higher n-3/n-6 ratios compared to human retina (9:1 versus ∼0.9:1). This high sensitivity analytical technique provides a valuable new tool for studies on the role of FAs in the pathological processes of macular

  17. Androgen-Sensitized Apoptosis of HPr-1AR Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Chen

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR signaling is crucial to the development and homeostasis of the prostate gland, and its dysregulation mediates common prostate pathologies. The mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells have been investigated in human and rodent adult prostate. However, the cellular stress response of human prostate epithelial cells is not well understood, though it is central to prostate health and pathology. Here, we report that androgen sensitizes HPr-1AR and RWPE-AR human prostate epithelial cells to cell stress agents and apoptotic cell death. Although 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment alone did not induce cell death, co-treatment of HPr-1AR cells with DHT and an apoptosis inducer, such as staurosporine (STS, TNFt, or hydrogen peroxide, synergistically increased cell death in comparison to treatment with each apoptosis inducer by itself. We found that the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer led to activation of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is supported by robust cleavage activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Further, the dramatic depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential that we observed upon co-treatment with DHT and STS is consistent with increased mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP in the pro-apoptotic mechanism. Interestingly, the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer was abolished by AR antagonists and inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis, suggesting that AR mediates pro-apoptotic synergy through transcriptional regulation of MOMP genes. Expression analysis revealed that pro-apoptotic genes (BCL2L11/BIM and AIFM2 were DHT-induced, whereas pro-survival genes (BCL2L1/BCL-XL and MCL1 were DHT-repressed. Hence, we propose that the net effect of these AR-mediated expression changes shifts the balance of BCL2-family proteins

  18. Differentiation of human adipose stromal cells in vitro into insulin-sensitive adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttala, Outi; Mysore, R; Sarkanen, J R; Heinonen, T; Olkkonen, V M; Ylikomi, T

    2016-10-01

    Adipose tissue-related diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes are worldwide epidemics. In order to develop adipose tissue cultures in vitro that mimic more faithfully the in vivo physiology, new well-characterized and publicly accepted differentiation methods of human adipose stem cells are needed. The aims of this study are (1) to improve the existing natural adipose tissue extract (ATE)-based induction method and (2) to study the effects of a differentiation method on insulin responsiveness of the resulting adipocytes. Different induction media were applied on human adipose stromal cell (hASC) monocultures to study the differentiation capacity of the induction media and the functionality of the differentiated adipocytes. Cells were differentiated for 14 days to assess triglyceride accumulation per cell and adipocyte-specific gene expression (PPARγ, adiponectin, AP2, leptin, Glut4, Prdm16, CIDEA, PGC1-α, RIP140, UCP and ADCY5). Insulin response was studied by measuring glucose uptake and inhibition of lipolysis after incubation with 100 or 500 nM insulin. The selected differentiation method included a 3-day induction with ATE, 6 days in serum-free medium supplemented with 1.15 μM insulin and 9.06 μM Troglitazone, followed by 4 days in a defined serum- and insulin-free stimulation medium. This protocol induced prominent general adipocyte gene expression, including markers for both brown and white adipocytes and triglyceride accumulation. Moreover, the cells were sensitive to insulin as observed from increased glucose uptake and inhibition of lipolysis. This differentiation protocol provides a promising approach for the induction of hASC adipogenesis to obtain functional and mature human adipocytes.

  19. Quantification and parametrization of non-linearity effects by higher-order sensitivity terms in scattered light differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puķīte, Jānis; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We address the application of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) of scattered light observations in the presence of strong absorbers (in particular ozone), for which the absorption optical depth is a non-linear function of the trace gas concentration. This is the case because Beer-Lambert law generally does not hold for scattered light measurements due to many light paths contributing to the measurement. While in many cases linear approximation can be made, for scenarios with strong absorptions non-linear effects cannot always be neglected. This is especially the case for observation geometries, for which the light contributing to the measurement is crossing the atmosphere under spatially well-separated paths differing strongly in length and location, like in limb geometry. In these cases, often full retrieval algorithms are applied to address the non-linearities, requiring iterative forward modelling of absorption spectra involving time-consuming wavelength-by-wavelength radiative transfer modelling. In this study, we propose to describe the non-linear effects by additional sensitivity parameters that can be used e.g. to build up a lookup table. Together with widely used box air mass factors (effective light paths) describing the linear response to the increase in the trace gas amount, the higher-order sensitivity parameters eliminate the need for repeating the radiative transfer modelling when modifying the absorption scenario even in the presence of a strong absorption background. While the higher-order absorption structures can be described as separate fit parameters in the spectral analysis (so-called DOAS fit), in practice their quantitative evaluation requires good measurement quality (typically better than that available from current measurements). Therefore, we introduce an iterative retrieval algorithm correcting for the higher-order absorption structures not yet considered in the DOAS fit as well as the absorption dependence on

  20. A Human Development and Capabilities "Prospective Analysis" of Global Higher Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    In global times, university education policy that holds the greatest promise for social responsibility is the focus here; the argument made is that such policy ought to be conceptualised using a normative human development and capabilities approach, drawing on the work of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. Their ideas offer a values-based way of…

  1. A Human Development and Capabilities "Prospective Analysis" of Global Higher Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    In global times, university education policy that holds the greatest promise for social responsibility is the focus here; the argument made is that such policy ought to be conceptualised using a normative human development and capabilities approach, drawing on the work of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. Their ideas offer a values-based way of…

  2. Can Human Capital Metrics Effectively Benchmark Higher Education with For-Profit Companies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Kathy; Forlaw, Blair

    2007-01-01

    Last fall, Saint Louis University participated in St. Louis, Missouri's, first Human Capital Performance Study alongside several of the region's largest for-profit employers. The university also participated this year in the benchmarking of employee engagement factors conducted by the St. Louis Business Journal in its effort to quantify and select…

  3. Reflections on J.V. Wertsch's "From Social Interaction to Higher Psychological Processes," "Human Development," 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, Geoffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    In his 1979 "Human Development" article reprinted in this anniversary issue, James Wertsch presented an approach to genetic analysis of the shifting regulation of problem-solving behavior in early childhood. In my reflections on Wertsch's seminal contribution, I discuss ways that subsequent inquiry built upon ideas he elaborated in the…

  4. Promising Practices in Higher Education: Art Education and Human Rights Using Information, Communication Technologies (ICT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joanna; Cap, Orest

    2014-01-01

    Promising pedagogical practices is described in relation to incorporating ICT (Information, Communication and Technologies) with the study of Human Rights issues in Visual Arts Education for teacher candidates. As part of a course, "Senior Years Art," students at the Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba during 2013-2014…

  5. EMG-normalised kinase activation during exercise is higher in human gastrocnemius compared to soleus muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Leutert, Robin; Rasmussen, Søren T;

    2012-01-01

    to differential reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging ability or resting glycogen content. To evaluate these parameters in humans, biopsies from soleus, gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis muscles were taken before and after a 45 min inclined (15%) walking exercise bout at 69% VO2(max) aimed at simultaneously...

  6. Correlation between the adaptive response and individual sensitivity to monoepoxybutene in in vitro experiments on human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasiadek, M; Paprocka-Borowicz, M

    1997-05-23

    Individual variations in the susceptibility to mutagenic/carcinogenic chemicals depend on the activity of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and on DNA- and chromosome-damage repair systems. Monoepoxybutene (MEB) is a genotoxic metabolite of 1,3-butadiene (BD), which has been classified as a probable carcinogen in humans. The purpose of the present study was to investigate by in vitro experiments on human whole blood lymphocytes (WBL), whether an individual sensitivity to MEB correlates with the adaptive response to the tested agent. In the analyzed group, 8.3% of blood donors were relatively sensitive to MEB. The comparison of SCE induction in cultures pretreated and not pretreated with an adaptive dose (AD) of MEB showed, that there was an adaptive response to MEB. The adaptive response in the group of relatively sensitive donors was similar to that of the relatively resistant ones. This result suggests that individual sensitivity to the tested agent and adaptive response depend on different biological mechanisms.

  7. Consciousness in the Study of Human Life and Experience: "Higher Aspects" and Their Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, Klaus G.; Lee, Hyunju; Huang, Wanju

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the consciousness in a person when one tries to understand her more deeply and as a whole, as is done in studies using the "Participant as Ally-Essentialist Portraiture" approach, and focuses on "higher aspects" or moral-ethical, metaphysical, social and religious ideals, values, commitments, or inspiration in a person. The…

  8. Learning Organization Disciplines in Higher Education Institutions: An Approach to Human Resource Development in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Samer

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of higher education faculty members concerning the application of the learning organization disciplines, as proposed by Senge (1990), in the university environment. The study surveyed 202 faculty members at the Hashemite University, one of the leading state universities in Jordan. Results…

  9. Higher Agricultural Universities Serve for "Sannong" by Offering English Human Resources Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Youqin; Cheng, Baole

    2008-01-01

    This paper puts higher agricultural English education how to serve for "Sannong" construction as priority, combining the actual market demand, based on teaching reform in the past few years, tries to explore English nurturing model and curriculum system for real delivery the agriculture-related qualified foreign language professionals.…

  10. Shaping a Gender Equality Policy in Higher Education: Which Human Capabilities Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loots, Sonja; Walker, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    South African institutions still confront gendered inequalities, irrespective of transformative national policies, compounded by the absence of a national gender equality policy for higher education. We therefore explore the potential of the capabilities approach (CA) to inform policy formation and argue for the development of a policy for higher…

  11. Shaping a Gender Equality Policy in Higher Education: Which Human Capabilities Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loots, Sonja; Walker, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    South African institutions still confront gendered inequalities, irrespective of transformative national policies, compounded by the absence of a national gender equality policy for higher education. We therefore explore the potential of the capabilities approach (CA) to inform policy formation and argue for the development of a policy for higher…

  12. The cortical eye proprioceptive signal modulates neural activity in higher-order visual cortex as predicted by the variation in visual sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Siebner, Hartwig R; Paulson, Olaf B

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the links between eye movements and the shifts in visual attention are well established, less is known about how eye position affects the prioritization of visual space. It was recently observed that visual sensitivity varies with the direction of gaze and the level of excitability...... in the eye proprioceptive representation in human left somatosensory cortex (S1(EYE)), so that after 1Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over S1(EYE), targets presented nearer the center of the orbit are detected more accurately. Here we used whole-brain functional magnetic resonance...... target when the right eye was rotated leftwards as compared with when it was rotated rightwards. This effect was larger after S1(EYE)-rTMS than after rTMS of a control area in the motor cortex. The neural response to retinally identical stimuli in this area could be predicted from the changes in visual...

  13. CRITICAL THINKING DISPOSITION: A NEGLECTED LOOP OF HUMANITIES CURRICULUM IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maghsood Amin Khandaghi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This survey aimed at investigating students' critical thinking dispositions in humanities fields. 123 students were randomly selected by stratified sampling method among undergraduate students in the College of Humanities in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran during academic year of 2010-2011. They completed Ricketts' (2003 Critical Thinking Disposition Questionnaire. Overly, finding showed that all subjects achieved optimal level of critical thinking in the moderated level (p<0.001, t=17.56, but not in the strict level (p<0.001, t= -9.20. There were no significant differences in the subjects' critical thinking dispositions according to their gender and their year of study (study length. Based on the findings, revising all curriculum elements, especially that of teaching-learning methods is a necessity. Implications for applying active learning and problem solving approaches to enhance students' critical thinking disposition were proposed.

  14. Highly selective and sensitive determination of several antioxidants in human breast milk using high-performance liquid chromatography based on Ag(III) complex chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Shi, Hongmei; Lian, Kaoqi; Diao, Yingfei; Chen, Yang; Ma, Chunling; Kang, Weijun

    2017-03-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and glutathione (GSH) are the most important water-soluble antioxidants. The concentrations of GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and their molar ratio are the indicators of oxidative stress. Little is known about the contents of UA, GSH and GSSG in human milk; a reliable and sensitive method to monitor the concentrations of the four compounds simultaneously in human milk is of critical importance. A new method for separation and quantification of these water-soluble antioxidants by HPLC coupled with Ag(III) chemiluminescence detector has been developed in this work with better recoveries. The antioxidants contents were determined in different times of lactation utilizing this method. The results show that the levels of AA, UA, GSH and GSH/GSSG of human colostrum are significantly higher than those of mature milk (Pantioxidants than mature milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulation of Higher-Order Olfaction Components on Executive Functions in Humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Fagundo, Ana B.; Jiménez Murcia, Susana; Giner Bartolomé, Cristina; Anisul Islam, Mohammed; Torre Fornell, Rafael de la; Pastor, Antonio; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Crujeiras, Ana B.; Granero, Roser; Baños, Rosa; Botella, Cristina; Fernández Real, Jose M.; Frühbeck, Gema; Gómez Ambrosi, Javier; Menchón, José M.

    2015-01-01

    The prefrontal (PFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) appear to be associated with both executive functions and olfaction. However, there is little data relating olfactory processing and executive functions in humans. The present study aimed at exploring the role of olfaction on executive functioning, making a distinction between primary and more cognitive aspects of olfaction. Three executive tasks of similar difficulty were used. One was used to assess hot executive functions (Iowa Gambling T...

  16. Higher prevalence and abundance of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus in the human gut of healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Iebba

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Members of the human intestinal microbiota are key players in maintaining human health. Alterations in the composition of gut microbial community (dysbiosis have been linked with important human diseases. Understanding the underlying processes that control community structure, including the bacterial interactions within the microbiota itself, is essential. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a gram-negative bacterium that preys other gram-negative species for survival, acting as a population-balancer. It was found in terrestrial/aquatic ecosystems, and in animal intestines, postulating its presence also in the human gut. METHODS: The present study was aimed to evaluate, by end-point PCR and qPCR, the presence of B. bacteriovorus in intestinal and faecal biopsy specimens from 92 paediatric healthy subjects and patients, suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD, Celiac disease and Cystic fibrosis (CF. RESULTS: i B. bacteriovorus was present and abundant only in healthy individuals, while it was heavily reduced in patients, as in the case of IBD and Celiac, while in CF patients and relative controls we observed comparable results; ii B. bacteriovorus seemed to be mucosa-associated, because all IBD and Celiac biopsies (and related controls were treated with mucus-removing agents, leaving only the mucosa-attached microflora; iii B. bacteriovorus abundance was district-dependent, with a major preponderance in duodenum, and gradually decreasing up to rectum; iv B. bacteriovorus levels significantly dropped in disease status, in duodenum and ileum. CONCLUSIONS: Results obtained in this study could represent the first step for new therapeutic strategies aimed to restore a balance in the intestinal ecosystem, utilizing Bdellovibrio as a probiotic.

  17. Advancing human rights in patient care through higher education in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Tamar; Overall, Judy

    2013-12-12

    In Eastern Europe and Central Asia, for society's most marginalized people, health systems are too often places of violations of basic rights, rather than of treatment and care. At the same time, health practitioners are largely unaware of how to incorporate human rights norms in their work. Additionally, they may face abuses themselves, such as unsafe working conditions and sanctions for providing evidence-based care. Similarly, legal professionals have limited experience working in the health sector, trying to address abuses that occur. Republics of the former Soviet Union and Yugoslavia have emerged from communism and experienced continued restructuring of their health care systems. As faculties of law, public health, and medicine have sought to incorporate these rapid changes into their curricula, this period of reform and openness to new approaches presented a particular opportunity to integrate human rights education. The Open Society Foundations have attempted to respond to the need to build health and human rights capacity by supporting the development of over 25 courses in human rights in patient care in nine countries. Targeted at different audiences, these courses are now part of the regular offerings at the academic institutions where they are taught. Student evaluations point to the strength of the interdisciplinary approach and the need to integrate practical examples and exercises. Faculty response has led to the development of a virtual community of practice and series of workshops to gain exposure to new ideas, strengthen interactive teaching, and share materials and experiences. Critical to this initiative has been working with faculty champions in each university, who shaped this initiative to meet the needs in their context. It quickly became apparent that teaching methodology is as important as content in human rights education. Meaningful engagement with health practitioners has entailed connections to day-to-day practice, participatory

  18. Bortezomib sensitizes primary human esthesioneuroblastoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschny, Ronald; Holland, Heidrun; Sykora, Jaromir; Erdal, Hande; Krupp, Wolfgang; Bauer, Manfred; Bockmuehl, Ulrike; Ahnert, Peter; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Walczak, Henning; Ganten, Tom M

    2010-04-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a promising novel anti-cancer cytokine of the TNF superfamily, and Bortezomib, the first-in-class clinically used proteasome inhibitor, alone or in combination have been shown to efficiently kill numerous tumor cell lines. However, data concerning primary human tumor cells are very rare. Using primary esthesioneuroblastoma cells we analyzed the anti-tumor potential and the mechanism employed by Bortezomib in combination with TRAIL for the treatment of this rare but aggressive tumor. Expression of components of the TRAIL pathway was analyzed in tumor specimens and isolated primary tumor cells at the protein level. Cells were treated with TRAIL, Bortezomib, and a combination thereof, and apoptosis induction was quantified. Clonogenicity assays were performed to elucidate the long-term effect of this treatment. Despite expressing all components of the TRAIL pathway, freshly isolated primary esthesioneuroblastoma cells were completely resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. They could, however, be very efficiently sensitized by subtoxic doses of Bortezomib. The influence of Bortezomib on the TRAIL pathway was analyzed and showed upregulation of TRAIL death receptor expression, enhancement of the TRAIL death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), and downregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins of the TRAIL pathway. Of clinical relevance, TRAIL-resistant primary tumor cells could be repeatedly sensitized by Bortezomib, providing the basis for repeated clinical application schedules. This is the first report on the highly synergistic induction of apoptosis in primary esthesioneuroblastoma cells by Bortezomib and TRAIL. This combination, therefore, represents a promising novel therapeutic option for esthesioneuroblastoma.

  19. Highly sensitive automated chemiluminometric assay for measuring free human glandular kallikrein-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, G G; Goodmanson, M K; Jacobsen, S J; Young, C Y; Finlay, J A; Rittenhouse, H G; Wolfert, R L; Tindall, D J

    1999-06-01

    Human glandular kallikrein (hK2) is a serine protease that has 79% amino acid identity with prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Both free hK2 and hK2 complexed to alpha1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) are present in the blood in low concentrations. We wished to measure hK2 in serum with limited contribution from hK2-ACT for the results. We developed an automated assay for hK2 with use of a select pair of monoclonal antibodies. The prototype assay was implemented on a Beckman Coulter ACCESS(R) analyzer. The detection limit of the assay was 1.5 ng/L, the "functional sensitivity" (day-to-day CV <15%) was <4 ng/L, cross-reactivity with PSA and PSA-ACT was negligible, and cross-reactivity with hK2-ACT was 2%. After surgical removal of prostate glands, serum hK2 was <7 ng/L and was <15 ng/L in most healthy women. The median serum concentration of hK2 in healthy men without prostate cancer was 26 ng/L. The median concentration of hK2 was 72 ng/L for men having prostate cancer with lower Gleason scores compared with 116 ng/L for men with more advanced cancer. The concentration of hK2 correlated weakly with PSA, with the mean hK2 concentrations generally 30- to 80-fold lower than PSA concentrations. The availability of a robust, high sensitivity automated assay for hK2 should facilitate further investigations of the role of hK2 measurements in the management of patients with prostate disease.

  20. Sensitivity of different areas of the flexor aspect of the human forearm to corticosteroid-induced skin blanching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E; Smith, E W; Haigh, J M

    1992-10-01

    The intensity of corticosteroid-induced blanching has been found to vary at different areas of the flexor aspect of the human forearm. A retrospective analysis of 38,880 observations of skin blanching in 56 volunteers was conducted to assess the sensitivity of forearm skin to betamethasone 17-valerate. The mid-forearm appears to be more sensitive to the blanching response than do the areas close to the wrist or elbow. These results indicate that each preparation under evaluation should be applied to several sites along the forearm when using the human skin blanching assay in order to obtain an accurate comparative assessment of corticosteroid release from topical delivery vehicles.

  1. Some remarks on position of humanities in the internationalized higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Barbarić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Active participation in the internationalization of science and higher education would no longer be just a efficient tool to establish and promote a process of globalization with its strong unifying tendencies as quick as possibly, but could become free and equal dialogue between the independent nations and cultural circles in the equal and common pursuit of the listening each other in the pluralized world

  2. Humanism model of education on a physical culture in the institute of higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strel'tsov V.A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Humanistic approach to the modeling of educational process in physical training at the institute of higher education is exposed in the article. The article defines new contents of key categories aimed at transformation of pedagogical consciousness and practice. The article positions the integrity of the student's physical culture formation as the basis of the humanistic-oriented model of education. The realization of the given model shows improved results of students' personality development in comparison with the traditional technocratic approach.

  3. Higher sensitivity of pad2-1 and vtc2-1 mutants to cadmium is related to lower subcellular glutathione rather than ascorbate contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Polanschütz, Lisa; Zechmann, Bernd

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd) interferes with ascorbate and glutathione metabolism as it induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), binds to glutathione due to its high affinity to thiol groups, and induces the production of phytochelatins (PCs) which use glutathione as a precursor. In this study, changes in the compartment specific distribution of ascorbate and glutathione were monitored over a time period of 14 days in Cd-treated (50 and 100 μM) Arabidopsis Col-0 plants, and two mutant lines deficient in glutathione (pad2-1) and ascorbate (vtc2-1). Both mutants showed higher sensitivity to Cd than Col-0 plants. Strongly reduced compartment specific glutathione, rather than decreased ascorbate contents, could be correlated with the development of symptoms in these mutants suggesting that higher sensitivity to Cd is related to low glutathione contents rather than low ascorbate contents. On the subcellular level it became obvious that long-term treatment of wildtype plants with Cd induced the depletion of glutathione and ascorbate contents in all cell compartments except chloroplasts indicating an important protective role for antioxidants in chloroplasts against Cd. Additionally, we could observe an immediate decrease of glutathione and ascorbate in all cell compartments 12 h after Cd treatment indicating that glutathione and ascorbate are either withdrawn from or not redistributed into other organelles after their production in chloroplasts, cytosol (production centers for glutathione) and mitochondria (production center for ascorbate). The obtained data is discussed in respect to recently proposed stress models involving antioxidants in the protection of plants against environmental stress conditions.

  4. Inhibition of Hec1 expression enhances the sensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells to paclitaxel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-qing MO; Ping-bo CHEN; Xin JIN; Qian CHEN; Lan TANG; Bei-bei WANG; Ke-zhen LI

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Hec1,a member of the Ndc80 kinetochore complex,is highly expressed in cancers.The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanism of action of Hec1 with respect to the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in ovarian cancer.Methods:Thirty ovarian cancer samples and 6 normal ovarian samples were collected.Hec1 expression in these samples was determined with immunohistochemistry.Ovarian cancer cell lines A2780,OV2008,C13K,SKOV3,and CAOV3 and A2780/Taxol were examined.Cell apoptosis and cell cycle analysis were detected with flow cytometric technique.siRNA was used to delete Hec1 in the cells.The expression of related mRNAs and proteins was measured using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis,respectively.Results:Hec1 expression was significantly higher in ovarian cancer samples than in normal ovarian samples,and was associated with paclitaxel-resistance and poor prognosis.Among the 6 ovarian cancer cell lines examined,Hec1 expression was highest in paclitaxelresistant A2780/Taxol cells,and lowest in A2780 cells.Depleting Hec1 in A2780/Taxol cells with siRNA decreased the IC5o value of paclitaxel by more than 10-fold (from 590±26.7 to 45.6±19.4 nmol/L).Depleting Hec1 in A2780 cells had no significant effect on the paclitaxel sensitivity.In paclitaxel-treated A2780/Taxol cells,depleting Hec1 significantly increased the cleaved PARP and Bax protein levels,and decreased the Bcl-xL protein level.Conclusion:Hec1 overexpression is associated with the progression and poor prognosis of ovarian cancer.Inhibition of Hec1 expression can sensitize ovarian cancer cells to paclitaxel.

  5. Different oral sensitivities to and sensations of short-, medium-, and long-chain fatty acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Running, Cordelia A; Mattes, Richard D

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids that vary in chain length and degree of unsaturation have different effects on metabolism and human health. As evidence for a "taste" of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) accumulates, it may be hypothesized that fatty acid structures will also influence oral sensations. The present study examined oral sensitivity to caproic (C6), lauric (C12), and oleic (C18:1) acids over repeated visits. Analyses were also conducted on textural properties of NEFA emulsions and blank solutions. Oral thresholds for caproic acid were lower compared with oleic acid. Lauric acid thresholds were intermediate but not significantly different from either, likely due to lingering irritating sensations that prevented accurate discrimination. From particle size analysis, larger droplets were observed in blank solutions when mineral oil was used, leading to instability of the emulsion, which was not observed when emulsions contained NEFA or when mineral oil was removed from the blank. Rheological data showed no differences in viscosity among samples except for a slightly higher viscosity with oleic acid concentrations above 58 mM. Thus, texture was unlikely to be the property used to distinguish between the samples. Differences in oral detection and sensation of caproic, lauric, and oleic acids may be due to different properties of the fatty acid alkyl chains.

  6. Sensitive and Rapid UHPLC-MS/MS for the Analysis of Tomato Phenolics in Human Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Martínez-Huélamo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An UHPLC-MS/MS method for the quantification of tomato phenolic metabolites in human fluids was optimized and validated, and then applied in a pilot dietary intervention study with healthy volunteers. A 5-fold gain in speed (3.5 min of total run; 7-fold increase in MS sensitivity and 2-fold greater efficiency (50% peak width reduction were observed when comparing the proposed method with the reference-quality HPLC-MS/MS system, whose assay performance has been previously documented. The UHPLC-MS/MS method led to an overall improvement in the limits of detection (LOD and quantification (LOQ for all the phenolic compounds studied. The recoveries ranged between 68% and 100% in urine and 61% and 100% in plasma. The accuracy; intra- and interday precision; and stability met with the acceptance criteria of the AOAC International norms. Due to the improvements in the analytical method; the total phenolic metabolites detected in plasma and urine in the pilot intervention study were 3 times higher than those detected by HPLC-MS/MS. Comparing with traditional methods; which require longer time of analysis; the methodology described is suitable for the analysis of phenolic compounds in a large number of plasma and urine samples in a reduced time frame.

  7. The natural flavonoid apigenin sensitizes human CD44(+) prostate cancer stem cells to cisplatin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Suat; Turkekul, Kader; Serttas, Rıza; Erdogan, Zeynep

    2017-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common type of cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death among men. Development of chemoresistance, tumor relapse and metastasis remain major barriers to effective treatment and all been identified to be associated with cancer stem cells (CSCs). Natural flavonoids such as apigenin have been shown to have the ability to improve the therapeutic efficacy of common chemotherapy agents through CSCs sensitization. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the combination of apigenin with cisplatin on CD44(+) PCa stem cell growth and migration. Platinum-based anti-neoplastic drugs have been used to treat a number of malignancies including PCa. However, acquired resistance and side effects unfortunately have limited cisplatin's use. A CD44(+) subpopulation was isolated from human androgen-independent PC3 PCa cells by using human CD44-PE antibody. IC50 values were determined by MTT test. RT-qPCR, Western blot analyses and image-based cytometer were used to investigate apoptosis, cell cycle and their underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell migration was evaluated by wound healing test. The combination of the IC50 doses of apigenin (15μM) and cisplatin (7.5μM) for 48h significantly enhanced cisplatin's cytotoxic and apoptotic effects through downregulation of Bcl-2, sharpin and survivin; and upregulation of caspase-8, Apaf-1 and p53 mRNA expression. The combined therapy suppressed the phosphorylation of p-PI3K and p-Akt, inhibited the protein expression of NF-κB, and downregulated the cell cycle by upregulating p21, as well as cyclin dependent kinases CDK-2, -4, and -6. Apigenin significantly increased the inhibitory effects of cisplatin on cell migration via downregulation of Snail expression. In conclusion, our study showed the possible therapeutic approach of using apigenin to potentially increase the effects of cisplatin by targeting CSCs subset in prostate cancer.

  8. Does the A-not-B error in adult pet dogs indicate sensitivity to human communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Anna; Topál, József; Gácsi, Márta; Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Miklósi, Adám; Virányi, Zsófia

    2012-07-01

    Recent dog-infant comparisons have indicated that the experimenter's communicative signals in object hide-and-search tasks increase the probability of perseverative (A-not-B) errors in both species (Topál et al. 2009). These behaviourally similar results, however, might reflect different mechanisms in dogs and in children. Similar errors may occur if the motor response of retrieving the object during the A trials cannot be inhibited in the B trials or if the experimenter's movements and signals toward the A hiding place in the B trials ('sham-baiting') distract the dogs' attention. In order to test these hypotheses, we tested dogs similarly to Topál et al. (2009) but eliminated the motor search in the A trials and 'sham-baiting' in the B trials. We found that neither an inability to inhibit previously rewarded motor response nor insufficiencies in their working memory and/or attention skills can explain dogs' erroneous choices. Further, we replicated the finding that dogs have a strong tendency to commit the A-not-B error after ostensive-communicative hiding and demonstrated the crucial effect of socio-communicative cues as the A-not-B error diminishes when location B is ostensively enhanced. These findings further support the hypothesis that the dogs' A-not-B error may reflect a special sensitivity to human communicative cues. Such object-hiding and search tasks provide a typical case for how susceptibility to human social signals could (mis)lead domestic dogs.

  9. [A method for performing a study and assessment of the individual neurodynamic properties of human higher nervous activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, M V

    1999-01-01

    The proposed methods are directed at unification of conducting and assessing neurodynamic properties of the higher nervous activity of a human that are related to the processing of visual information of various complexity levels. It should be considered that the conducting of examinations in maximum close conditions of the same tests and assessment criteria will increase the possibilities and the value of the analysis of various experimental materials.

  10. Safety of higher dosages of Viscum album L. in animals and humans - systematic review of immune changes and safety parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiene Helmut

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viscum album L extracts (VAE, mistletoe and isolated mistletoe lectins (ML have immunostimulating properties and a strong dose-dependent cytotoxic activity. They are frequently used in complementary cancer treatment, mainly to improve quality of life, but partly also to influence tumour growth, especially by injecting VAE locally and in high dosage. The question is raised whether these higher dosages can induce any harm or immunosuppressive effects. Methods Systematic review of all experiments and clinical studies investigating higher dosages of VAE in animals and humans (Viscum album > 1 mg in humans corresponding to > 0.02 mg/kg in animals or ML > 1 ng/kg and assessing immune parameters or infections or adverse drug reactions. Results 69 clinical studies and 48 animal experiments reported application of higher doses of VAE or ML and had assessed immune changes and/or harm. In these studies, Viscum album was applied in dosages up to 1500 mg in humans and 1400 mg/kg in animals, ML was applied up to 6.4 μg/kg in humans and in animals up to 14 μg/kg subcutaneously, 50 μg/kg nasally and 500 μg/kg orally. A variety of immune parameters showed fluctuating or rising outcomes, but no immunosuppressive effect. Side effects consisted mainly of dose-dependent flu-like symptoms (FLS, fever, local reactions at the injection site and various mild unspecific effects. Occasionally, allergic reactions were reported. After application of high doses of recombinant ML, reversible hepatotoxicity was observed in some cases. Conclusions Application of higher dosages of VAE or ML is not accompanied by immunosuppression; altogether VAE seems to exhibit low risk but should be monitored by clinicians when applied in high dosages.

  11. The role of research in higher education: implications and challenges for an active future contribution to human and social development

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Mankind is on the brink of a tragic era, in which the anarchic forces of the market and the incessant pressures upon natural resources on the verge of exhaustion will push sovereign states to increasingly dangerous rivalries. What will the role of research in higher education be, in response to the challenge of an active future contribution to human and social development? A good balance must be reached in the basic functions of research in order to avoid governance risks. While focusing on...

  12. Fluorescent probes sensitive to changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posokhov, Yevgen

    2016-09-01

    Environment-sensitive fluorescent probes were used for the spectroscopic visualization of pathological changes in human platelet membranes during cerebral atherosclerosis. It has been estimated that the ratiometric probes 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole and 2-phenyl-phenanthr[9,10]oxazole can detect changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during the disease.

  13. Fluctuations and patterns of desert rodent communities under human disturbance: fluctuating tendency and sensitive response of their population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The four kinds of sites under different kinds of human disturbances, i.e. a farmland area, a rotational-grazing area, an over-grazing area and a prohibited-grazing area, were selected in the typical region of the Alashan Desert of Inner Mongolia from April to October in 2002, 2003 and 2004 respectively. The fluctuating tendency of rodent communities and the sensitive response of their populations were studied using mark-recapture and trap-day methods. The four kinds of mark-recapture samples and line samples were taken in different human disturbance areas. The area of the mark-recapturing sample was 0.95 hm2 and that of the line sample was 10 km2. The samples were collected every month in the mark-recapturing sites for four consecutive days and in line sites in April, July and October every year. The variable matrix was composed of the numbers of captured rodents of the rodent communities. The sensitive response of the populations in the communities was analyzed with principal component analysis (PCA). Results showed that there were different types of rodent communities under different kinds of human disturbance on two scales in three years. In each scale, there were large differences in both the number of species and the number of main population in the rodent communities under different kinds of human disturbance on the farmland area and over-grazing area especially. The results of PCA showed that the sensitive response of the populations of the communities was significantly different under different kinds of human disturbance on the two scales in the three years. Cricetulus barabensis was the most sensitive on the farmland area, there were no differences in sensitive response of the various rodents on the rotational-grazing area, and Dipus sagitta and Phodopus roborovskii were the most sensitive in the over-grazing area.

  14. Widespread divergence of the CEACAM/PSG genes in vertebrates and humans suggests sensitivity to selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Lin Chang

    Full Text Available In mammals, carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs and pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs play important roles in the regulation of pathogen transmission, tumorigenesis, insulin signaling turnover, and fetal-maternal interactions. However, how these genes evolved and to what extent they diverged in humans remain to be investigated specifically. Based on syntenic mapping of chordate genomes, we reveal that diverging homologs with a prototypic CEACAM architecture-including an extracellular domain with immunoglobulin variable and constant domain-like regions, and an intracellular domain containing ITAM motif-are present from cartilaginous fish to humans, but are absent in sea lamprey, cephalochordate or urochordate. Interestingly, the CEACAM/PSG gene inventory underwent radical divergence in various vertebrate lineages: from zero in avian species to dozens in therian mammals. In addition, analyses of genetic variations in human populations showed the presence of various types of copy number variations (CNVs at the CEACAM/PSG locus. These copy number polymorphisms have 3-80% frequency in select populations, and encompass single to more than six PSG genes. Furthermore, we found that CEACAM/PSG genes contain a significantly higher density of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP compared to the chromosome average, and many CEACAM/PSG SNPs exhibit high population differentiation. Taken together, our study suggested that CEACAM/PSG genes have had a more dynamic evolutionary history in vertebrates than previously thought. Given that CEACAM/PSGs play important roles in maternal-fetal interaction and pathogen recognition, these data have laid the groundwork for future analysis of adaptive CEACAM/PSG genotype-phenotypic relationships in normal and complicated pregnancies as well as other etiologies.

  15. Sensitive immunoassay of human chorionic gonadotrophin based on multi-walled carbon nanotube-chitosan matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Chen, Shihong; An, Haizhen

    2008-10-01

    A novel amperometric immunosensor for human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) assay has been fabricated through incorporating toluidine blue (TB) and hemoglobin (Hb) on the multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT)-chitosan (CS) modified glassy carbon electrode, followed by electrostatic adsorption of a conducting gold nanoparticles (nanogold) film as sensing interface. The MWNT-CS matrix provided a congenial microenvironment for the immobilization of biomolecules and promoted the electron transfer to enhance the sensitivity of the immunosensor. Due to the strong electrocatalytic properties of Hb and MWNT toward H(2)O(2), the Hb and MWNT significantly amplified the current signal of the antigen-antibody reaction. The immobilized toluidine blue as an electron transfer mediator exhibited excellent electrochemical redox property. After the immunosensor was incubated with HCG solution, the access of activity center of the Hb to toluidine blue was partly inhibited, which leaded to a linear decrease in the catalytic efficiency of the Hb to the oxidation of immobilized toluidine blue by H(2)O(2) over HCG concentration ranges from 0.8 to 500 mIU/mL. Under optimal condition, the detection limit for the HCG immunoassay was 0.3 mIU/mL estimated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Moreover, the proposed immunosensor displayed a satisfactory stability and reproducibility.

  16. Sensitivity of PCR assays for murine gammaretroviruses and mouse contamination in human blood samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling Lee

    Full Text Available Gammaretroviruses related to murine leukemia virus (MLV have variously been reported to be present or absent in blood from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME patients and healthy controls. Using subjects from New York State, we have investigated by PCR methods whether MLV-related sequences can be identified in nucleic acids isolated from whole blood or from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or following PBMC culture. We have also passaged the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP following incubation with plasma from patients and controls and assayed nucleic acids for viral sequences. We have used 15 sets of primers that can effectively amplify conserved regions of murine endogenous and exogenous retrovirus sequences. We demonstrate that our PCR assays for MLV-related gag sequences and for mouse DNA contamination are extremely sensitive. While we have identified MLV-like gag sequences following PCR on human DNA preparations, we are unable to conclude that these sequences originated in the blood samples.

  17. Assessing the sensitivity of human skin hyperspectral responses to increasing anemia severity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoski, Gladimir V. G.; Dey, Ankita; Chen, Tenn F.

    2015-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent medical condition that seriously affects millions of people all over the world. In many regions, not only its initial detection but also its monitoring are hindered by limited access to laboratory facilities. This situation has motivated the development of a wide range of optical devices and procedures to assist physicians in these tasks. Although noticeable progress has been achieved in this area, the search for reliable, low-cost, and risk-free solutions still continues, and the strengthening of the knowledge base about this disorder and its effects is essential for the success of these initiatives. We contribute to these efforts by closely examining the sensitivity of human skin hyperspectral responses (within and outside the visible region of the light spectrum) to reduced hemoglobin concentrations associated with increasing anemia severity levels. This investigation, which involves skin specimens with distinct biophysical and morphological characteristics, is supported by controlled in silico experiments performed using a predictive light transport model and measured data reported in the biomedical literature. We also propose a noninvasive procedure to be employed in the monitoring of this condition at the point-of-care.

  18. Sensitive quantification of omeprazole and its metabolites in human plasma by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ute; Schwab, Matthias; Treiber, Gerd; Klotz, Ulrich

    2006-02-02

    A sensitive method was developed for the simultaneous determination of omeprazole and its major metabolites 5-hydroxyomeprazole and omeprazole sulfone in human plasma by HPLC-electrospray mass spectrometry. Following liquid-liquid extraction HPLC separation was achieved on a ProntoSil AQ, C18 column using a gradient with 10 mM ammonium acetate in water (pH 7.25) and acetonitrile. The mass spectrometer was operated in the selected ion monitoring mode using the respective MH(+) ions, m/z 346 for omeprazole, m/z 362 for 5-hydroxy-omeprazole and omeprazol-sulfone and m/z 300 for the internal standard (2-{[(3,5-dimethylpyridine-2-yl)methyl]thio}-1H-benzimidazole-5-yl)methanol. The limit of quantification (LOQ) achieved with this method was 5 ng/ml for 5-hydroxyomeprazole and 10 ng/ml for omeprazole and omeprazole-sulfone using 0.25 ml of plasma. Intra- and inter-assay variability was below 11% over the whole concentration range from 5 to 250 ng/ml for 5-hydroxyomeprazol and from 10 to 750 ng/ml for omeprazole and omeprazole-sulfone. The method was successfully applied to the determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of esomeprazole and the two major metabolites after a single dose and under steady state conditions.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of Hybrid Propulsion Transportation System for Human Mars Expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Patrick R.; Joyce, Ryan T.; Kessler, Paul D.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Qu, Min

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration continues to develop and refine various transportation options to successfully field a human Mars campaign. One of these transportation options is the Hybrid Transportation System which utilizes both solar electric propulsion and chemical propulsion. The Hybrid propulsion system utilizes chemical propulsion to perform high thrust maneuvers, where the delta-V is most optimal when ap- plied to save time and to leverage the Oberth effect. It then utilizes solar electric propulsion to augment the chemical burns throughout the interplanetary trajectory. This eliminates the need for the development of two separate vehicles for crew and cargo missions. Previous studies considered single point designs of the architecture, with fixed payload mass and propulsion system performance parameters. As the architecture matures, it is inevitable that the payload mass and the performance of the propulsion system will change. It is desirable to understand how these changes will impact the in-space transportation system's mass and power requirements. This study presents an in-depth sensitivity analysis of the Hybrid crew transportation system to payload mass growth and solar electric propulsion performance. This analysis is used to identify the breakpoints of the current architecture and to inform future architecture and campaign design decisions.

  20. Systems Biology Strategy Reveals PKC-delta is Key for Sensitizing TRAIL-Resistant Human Fibrosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro eHayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are highly variable and resistant to therapeutic intervention. Recently, the use of the tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL induced treatment is gaining momentum, due to TRAIL’s ability to specifically target cancers with limited effect on normal cells. However, several malignant cancer types still remain non-sensitive to TRAIL. Previously, we developed a dynamic computational model, based on perturbation-response approach, and predicted protein kinase C (PKC as the most effective target, with over 95% capacity to kill human fibrosarcoma (HT1080 in TRAIL stimulation (Piras, V. et al. 2011, Scientific Reports. Here, to validate the model prediction, which has significant implications for cancer treatment, we conducted experiments on two TRAIL-resistant cancer cell lines (HT1080 and HT29. Using PKC inhibitor Bisindolylmaleimide I, we first demonstrate, as predicted by our previous model, cell viability is significantly impaired with over 95% death of both cancer types. Next, to identify crucial PKC isoform from 10 known members, we analyzed their mRNA expressions in HT1080 cells and shortlisted 4 isoforms for siRNA knock-down (KD experiments. From these KDs, PKC-delta produced the most cancer cell death in conjunction with TRAIL. Overall, systems biology approach, combining model prediction with experimental validation, holds promise for TRAIL-based cancer therapy.

  1. [Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells reduce the sensitivity of HL-60 cells to cytarabine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jun-Jie; Chi, Ying; Du, Wen-Jing; Yang, Shao-Guang; Li, Xue; Chen, Fang; Ma, Feng-Xia; Lu, Shi-Hong; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2013-06-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the impact of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSC) on the sensitivity of HL-60 cells to therapeutic drugs so as to provide more information for exploring the regulatory effect of hUC-MSC on leukemia cells. Transwell and direct co-culture systems of HL-60 and hUC-MSC were established. The apoptosis and cell cycle of HL-60 cells were detected by flow cytometry. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of Caspase 3, respectively. The results showed that the apoptosis of HL-60 induced by cytarabine (Ara-C) decreased significantly after direct co-cultured with hUC-MSC cycle mRNA (P HL-60 cells were arrested at G0/G1 phase and did not enter into S phase (P HL-60 cells were reduced (P HL-60 from Arc-C induced apoptosis through regulating the cell cycle and down-regulating expression of Caspase 3 in HL-60 cells. In addition, this effect is caused by the soluble factors from hUC-MSC.

  2. A novel BCI based on ERP components sensitive to configural processing of human faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Qibin; Jing, Jin; Wang, Xingyu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2012-04-01

    This study introduces a novel brain-computer interface (BCI) based on an oddball paradigm using stimuli of facial images with loss of configural face information (e.g., inversion of face). To the best of our knowledge, till now the configural processing of human faces has not been applied to BCI but widely studied in cognitive neuroscience research. Our experiments confirm that the face-sensitive event-related potential (ERP) components N170 and vertex positive potential (VPP) have reflected early structural encoding of faces and can be modulated by the configural processing of faces. With the proposed novel paradigm, we investigate the effects of ERP components N170, VPP and P300 on target detection for BCI. An eight-class BCI platform is developed to analyze ERPs and evaluate the target detection performance using linear discriminant analysis without complicated feature extraction processing. The online classification accuracy of 88.7% and information transfer rate of 38.7 bits min-1 using stimuli of inverted faces with only single trial suggest that the proposed paradigm based on the configural processing of faces is very promising for visual stimuli-driven BCI applications.

  3. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy. PMID:25992773

  4. Blastocystis sp. subtype 3 triggers higher proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells, HCT116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, Vinoth; Kuppusamy, Umah R; Samudi, Chandramathi; Kumar, Suresh

    2013-10-01

    Blastocystis sp. is a commonly found intestinal microorganism and was reported to cause many nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. Various subtypes have been previously reported, and the pathogenicity of different subtypes of Blastocystis is unclear and remains as a controversial issue. A recent study has shown that the Blastocystis antigen isolated from an unknown subtype could facilitate the proliferation of colon cancer cells. Current study was conducted to compare the effect of solubilized antigen isolated from five different subtypes of Blastocystis on colon cancer cells, HCT116. A statistically significant proliferation of these cells was observed when exposed to 1.0 μg/ml solubilized antigen isolated from subtype 3 Blastocystis (37.22%, p Blastocystis antigen also caused a significantly higher upregulation of cathepsin B (subtypes 1 and 2, p Blastocystis as a proponent of carcinogenesis. Therefore, it is very likely for subtype 3 Blastocystis to have higher pathogenic potential as it caused an increased propagation of cancer cells and substantial amount of inflammatory reaction compared to other subtypes.

  5. A new process to develop a cocoa powder with higher flavonoid monomer content and enhanced bioavailability in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas-Barberan, Francisco A; Cienfuegos-Jovellanos, Elena; Marín, Alicia; Muguerza, Begoña; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Cerda, Begoña; Zafrilla, Pilar; Morillas, Juana; Mulero, Juana; Ibarra, Alvin; Pasamar, María A; Ramón, Daniel; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2007-05-16

    Cocoa is a food rich in polyphenols, mainly the flavonoid procyanidins and flavan-3-ols. The improvement of the cardiovascular function in humans upon cocoa consumption has been specifically linked to the presence of flavan-3-ol derived metabolites in plasma, especially epicatechin glucuronide. In this context, a flavonoid-enriched cocoa-derived product could potentially exert stronger health benefits. The aim of the present study was to obtain a cocoa powder with a higher flavonoid content (mainly enriched in monomer compounds) and assess its flavonoid bioavailability in humans. For this purpose, an unfermented, nonroasted, and blanch-treated cocoa powder (A) was obtained. The powder contained four times more procyanidins than a conventional (B) cocoa powder. Powder A contained eight times more epicatechin and procyanidin B2 than powder B. Cocoa milk drinks were prepared with powder A (MDA) and B (MDB). The bioavailability of flavonoids in both drinks was assessed in a crossover intervention with healthy volunteers. The content of epicatechin glucuronide, the main metabolite detected in plasma, was five-fold higher upon consumption of MDA as compared with MDB. The urinary excretion of metabolites, mainly methyl epicatechin sulfate, was higher upon MDA consumption as compared with MDB, ranging from two- to 12-fold higher depending on the metabolite. These results, together with previous reports regarding the cardiovascular benefits linked to the presence of procyanidin metabolites in plasma, suggest that further clinical trials to validate the health benefits of a flavonoid-enriched cocoa powder are warranted.

  6. An ultra-sensitive monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosobent assay for dibutyl phthalate in human urinary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lifang [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Lei, Yajing [Hangzhou EPIE Bio-detection Technology Limited, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Zhang, Dai; Ahmed, Shabbir [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Shuqing, E-mail: chenshuqing@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) has been extensively used as a plasticizer in many daily products, which is highly toxic to human, notably affecting the reproductive and developmental function. As the previous method is expensive, time-consuming, low sensitivity and just focused on the environment. Present study was aimed to establish an ultra-sensitive and simple method based on good quality monoclonal antibody, applying to evaluate excretion level of DBP in urine samples of Chinese population directly. A monoclonal antibody was generated and characterized after fusion of myeloma cells with spleen cells isolated from BALB/c mouse. The mouse was previously immunized using a specially designed amino derivative of DBP conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as immunogen. Cross-reactivity values of the monoclonal antibody against DBP, di-isobutyl phthalate (DIBP) were observed 100% and 1.25%, while for dimethyl phthalate (DMP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and didecyl phthalate (DDP) the values were < 0.06%. The standard curve was constructed at 0–50 ng mL{sup −1} and good linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.994) was achieved. The observed IC{sub 50} (7.34 ng mL{sup −1}) and LOD (0.06 ng mL{sup −1}) values was improved 1000-fold to polyclonal antibody and 5-fold to other monoclonal antibodies. A total 1246 urine samples were analyzed and the detection frequency of DBP was observed 72.87% by ic-ELISA. The 95th percentile and mean concentration of DBP were 12.07 and 3.00 ng mL{sup −1}. Acceptable recovery rates of DBP were 97.8–114.3% and coefficients variation 5.93–11.09%. The concentrations of DBP in females were found significantly higher (p < 0.05) than males. Similarly, the DBP in middle aged and low educated individuals was found higher (p < 0.001) than the others. Considering the adverse health effects, DBP internal exposure in the Chinese population should be reduced. The ic-ELISA method has been proved as a cost effective, specific, and highly sensitive screening

  7. Increased sensitivity of an adriamycin-resistant human small cell lung carcinoma cell line to mitochondrial inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Holtrop, M; de Vries, H; de Vries, Liesbeth; Mulder, N H

    1992-01-01

    The energy metabolism of an atypical multidrug resistant human small cell lung carcinoma cell line (GLC4/ADR) was studied. The glycolytic rate was 30% reduced and the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity 2-fold increased in GLC4/ADR compared to the parental sensitive line (GLC4). Although mito

  8. Sensitive and simultaneous quantification of zinc pyrithione and climbazole deposition from anti-dandruff shampoos onto human scalp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, G.; Miao, M.; Hoptroff, M.; Fei, X.; Collins, L.Z.; Jones, A.; Janssen, H.G.

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of zinc pyrithione (ZPT) and climbazole (CBZ) deposited onto human scalp from anti-dandruff (AD) shampoos. Scrubbing with a buffer so

  9. Sensitive and simultaneous quantification of zinc pyrithione and climbazole deposition from anti-dandruff shampoos onto human scalp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Chen; M. Miao; M. Hoptroff; X. Fei; L.Z. Collins; A. Jones; H.G. Janssen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of zinc pyrithione (ZPT) and climbazole (CBZ) deposited onto human scalp from anti-dandruff (AD) shampoos. Scrubbing with a buffer so

  10. Changes in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity following 2 weeks of daily cinnamon ingestion in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Blannin, Andrew K

    2009-01-01

    Cinnamon can improve fasting glucose in humans yet data on insulin sensitivity are limited and controversial. Eight male volunteers (aged 25 +/- 1 years, body mass 76.5 +/- 3.0 kg, BMI 24.0 +/- 0.7 kg m(-2); mean +/- SEM) underwent two 14-day interventions involving cinnamon or placebo supplement...

  11. A simple and sensitive flow cytometric assay for determination of the cytotoxic activity of human natural killer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radosevic, Katarina; Radosevic, K.; Garritsen, Henk S.P.; Garritsen, H.S.P.; van Graft, M.; van Graft, Marja; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1990-01-01

    A new, simple and sensitive flow cytometric assay for the determination of the cytotoxic activity of human natural killer cells is described. The assay is based on the use of two fluorochromes. The target cell population is stained with one fluorochrome (octadecylamine-fluorescein isothiocyanate,

  12. Highly sensitive detection of human IgG using a novel bio-barcode assay combined with DNA chip technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenbao; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Haiqing; Lu, Feng; Liu, Tianjun; Song, Cunxian; Leng, Xigang

    2013-09-01

    A simple and ultrasensitive detection of human IgG based on signal amplification using a novel bio-barcode assay and DNA chip technology was developed. The sensing platform was a sandwich system made up of antibody-modified magnetic microparticles (Ab-MMPs)/human IgG/Cy3-labeled single-stranded DNA and antibody-modified gold nanoparticles (Cy3-ssDNA-Ab-AuNPs). The MMPs (2.5 μm in diameter) modified with mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal-antibodies could capture human IgG and further be separated and enriched via a magnetic field. The AuNPs (13 nm in diameter) conjugated with goat anti-human IgG polyclonal-antibodies and Cy3-ssDNA could further combine with the human IgG/Ab-MMP complex. The Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs was then released by TCEP to hybridize with the DNA chip, thus generating a detectable signal by the fluorescence intensity of Cy3. In order to improve detection sensitivity, a three-level cascaded signal amplification was developed: (1) The MMP enrichment as the first-level; (2) Large quantities of Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs as the second-level; (3) The Cy3-ssDNA conjugate with DNA chip as the third-level. The highly sensitive technique showed an increased response of the fluorescence intensity to the increased concentration of human IgG through a detection range from 1 pg mL-1 to 10 ng mL-1. This sensing technique could not only improve the detection sensitivity for the low concentration of human IgG but also present a robust and efficient signal amplification model. The detection method has good stability, specificity, and reproducibility and could be applied in the detection of human IgG in the real samples.

  13. Highly sensitive detection of human IgG using a novel bio-barcode assay combined with DNA chip technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhenbao [Central South University, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Zhou, Bo, E-mail: zhoubo1771@163.com [The Affiliated Zhongda Hospital of Southeast University, Department of Gerontology (China); Wang, Haiqing; Lu, Feng; Liu, Tianjun; Song, Cunxian; Leng, Xigang, E-mail: lengxigyky@163.com [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College (China)

    2013-09-15

    A simple and ultrasensitive detection of human IgG based on signal amplification using a novel bio-barcode assay and DNA chip technology was developed. The sensing platform was a sandwich system made up of antibody-modified magnetic microparticles (Ab-MMPs)/human IgG/Cy3-labeled single-stranded DNA and antibody-modified gold nanoparticles (Cy3-ssDNA-Ab-AuNPs). The MMPs (2.5 {mu}m in diameter) modified with mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal-antibodies could capture human IgG and further be separated and enriched via a magnetic field. The AuNPs (13 nm in diameter) conjugated with goat anti-human IgG polyclonal-antibodies and Cy3-ssDNA could further combine with the human IgG/Ab-MMP complex. The Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs was then released by TCEP to hybridize with the DNA chip, thus generating a detectable signal by the fluorescence intensity of Cy3. In order to improve detection sensitivity, a three-level cascaded signal amplification was developed: (1) The MMP enrichment as the first-level; (2) Large quantities of Cy3-ssDNA on AuNPs as the second-level; (3) The Cy3-ssDNA conjugate with DNA chip as the third-level. The highly sensitive technique showed an increased response of the fluorescence intensity to the increased concentration of human IgG through a detection range from 1 pg mL{sup -1} to 10 ng mL{sup -1}. This sensing technique could not only improve the detection sensitivity for the low concentration of human IgG but also present a robust and efficient signal amplification model. The detection method has good stability, specificity, and reproducibility and could be applied in the detection of human IgG in the real samples.

  14. Inclusion of human mineralized exometabolites and fish wastes as a source of higher plant mineral nutrition in BTLSS mass exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Ushakova, Sofya; Anischenko, Olesya; Trifonov, Sergey V.

    Human exometabolites inclusion into an intrasystem mass exchange will allow increasing of a closure level of a biological-technical life support system (BTLSS). Previously at the IBP SB RAS it was shown that human mineralized exometabolites could be incorporated in the BTLSS mass exchange as a mineral nutrition source for higher plants. However, it is not known how that combined use of human mineralized exometabolites and fish wastes in the capacity of nutrient medium, being a part of the BTLSS consumer wastes, will affect the plant productivity. Several wheat vegetations were grown in an uneven-aged conveyor on a neutral substrate. A mixture of human mineralized exometabolites and fish wastes was used as a nutrient solution in the experiment treatment and human mineralized exometabolites were used in the control. Consequently, a high wheat yield in the experiment treatment practically equal to the control yield was obtained. Thus, mineralized fish wastes can be an additional source of macro-and micronutrients for plants, and use of such wastes for the plant mineral nutrition allows increasing of BTLSS closure level.

  15. Personal competencies from the perspective of human resource management and the business programmes of higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Varga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper is centred on the research problem whether competencies are really essential as they play a significant role in human resource management and also enhance competitiveness. It wishes to highlight what competencies (can enhance the success of employees and their competitiveness in the labour market together with certain personality traits that have a powerful impact on decision making mechanisms. An answer is also sought to the question of how competencies have been transformed and how their role was appreciated and re-evaluated. To this end, we applied both primary and secondary research with qualitative (focus group interviews and quantitative (standardised questionnaires phases. One of our further objectives was to create and test a competency structure tailored to the Hungarian labour market situation on the basis of the professional literature and our research. Based on the literature review we have supposed that it is not practical to talk about competencies in general, rather the adequate competency profile and portfolio has to be reviewed in a certain job or profession. As a conclusion, our research has underlined the importance of competencies in the labour market and justified their existence mostly in selection. Both parties, i.e. the employers and employees have pointed out the significance of developing them in training and practice and see competencies as a factor of future growth. Furthermore, they regard the role that competencies play indispensable in improving the dialogue between the labour market and education.

  16. Pursuit tracking and higher levels of skill development in the human pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the human pilot is offered for pursuit tracking tasks; the model encompasses an existing model for compensatory tracking. The central hypothesis in the development of this model states that those primary structural elements in the compensatory model responsible for the pilot's equalization capabilities remain intact in the pursuit model. In this latter case, effective low-frequency inversion of the controlled-element dynamics occurs by feeding-forward derived input rate through the equalization dynamics, with low-frequency phase droop minimized. The sharp reduction in low-frequency phase lag beyond that associated with the disappearance of phase droop is seen to accompany relatively low-gain feedback of vehicle output. The results of some recent motion cue research are discussed and interpreted in terms of the compensatory-pursuit display dichotomy. Tracking with input preview is discussed in a qualitative way. In terms of the model, preview is shown to demand no fundamental changes in structure or equalization and to allow the pilot to eliminate the effective time delays that accrue in the inversion of the controlled-element dynamics. Precognitive behavior is discussed, and a model that encompasses all the levels of skill development outlined in the successive organizations of perception theory is finally proposed.

  17. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambavi Kugananthan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human milk (HM contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p < 0.0001, n = 287. No association was found between whole HM leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287, supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89. These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  18. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Huntley, Miriam H; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K; Durand, Neva C; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P; Lander, Eric S; Chadwick, Brian P; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-08-02

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the "Barr body." Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called "superdomains," such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called "superloops." DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4 We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging.

  19. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugananthan, Sambavi; Lai, Ching Tat; Gridneva, Zoya; Mark, Peter J; Geddes, Donna T; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-11-08

    Human milk (HM) contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287), supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89). These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  20. Muscle contractile properties as an explanation of the higher mean power output in marmosets than humans during jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plas, Rogier L C; Degens, Hans; Meijer, J Peter; de Wit, Gerard M J; Philippens, Ingrid H C H M; Bobbert, Maarten F; Jaspers, Richard T

    2015-07-01

    The muscle mass-specific mean power output (PMMS,mean) during push-off in jumping in marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) is more than twice that in humans. In the present study it was tested whether this is attributable to differences in muscle contractile properties. In biopsies of marmoset m. vastus lateralis (VL) and m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM) (N=4), fibre-type distribution was assessed using fluorescent immunohistochemistry. In single fibres from four marmoset and nine human VL biopsies, the force-velocity characteristics were determined. Marmoset VL contained almost exclusively fast muscle fibres (>99.0%), of which 63% were type IIB and 37% were hybrid fibres, fibres containing multiple myosin heavy chains. GM contained 9% type I fibres, 44% type IIB and 47% hybrid muscle fibres. The proportions of fast muscle fibres in marmoset VL and GM were substantially larger than those reported in the corresponding human muscles. The curvature of the force-velocity relationships of marmoset type IIB and hybrid fibres was substantially flatter than that of human type I, IIA, IIX and hybrid fibres, resulting in substantially higher muscle fibre mass-specific peak power (PFMS,peak). Muscle mass-specific peak power output (PMMS,peak) values of marmoset whole VL and GM, estimated from their fibre-type distributions and force-velocity characteristics, were more than twice the estimates for the corresponding human muscles. As the relative difference in estimated PMMS,peak between marmosets and humans is similar to that of PMMS,mean during push-off in jumping, it is likely that the difference in in vivo mechanical output between humans and marmosets is attributable to differences in muscle contractile properties.

  1. Sensitivity of human cells expressing low-fidelity or weak-catalytic-activity variants of DNA polymerase ζ to genotoxic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Grúz, Petr; Honma, Masamitsu; Adachi, Noritaka; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2016-09-01

    Translesion DNA polymerases (TLS pols) play critical roles in defense mechanisms against genotoxic agents. The defects or mutations of TLS pols are predicted to result in hypersensitivity of cells to environmental mutagens. In this study, human cells expressing DNA polymerase ζ (Pol ζ) variants with low fidelity or weak catalytic activity have been established with Nalm-6-MSH+ cells and their sensitivity to mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) and ultraviolet-C light (UV-C) was examined. The low-fidelity mutants were engineered by knocking-in DNA sequences that direct changes of leucine 2618 to either phenylalanine (L2618F) or methionine (L2618M) of Pol ζ. The weak-catalytic-activity mutants were generated by knocking-in DNA sequences that direct changes of either tyrosine 2779 to phenylalanine (Y2779F) or aspartate 2781 to asparagine (D2781N). In addition, a +1 frameshift mutation, i.e., CCC to CCCC, was introduced in the coding region of the TK1 gene to measure the mutant frequencies. Doubling time and spontaneous TK mutant frequencies of the established cell lines were similar to those of the wild-type cells. The low-fidelity mutants displayed, however, higher sensitivity to the mutagenicity of BPDE and UV-C than the wild-type cells although their cytotoxic sensitivity was not changed. In contrast, the weak-catalytic-activity mutants were more sensitive to the cytotoxicity of BPDE and UV-C than the wild-type cells, and displayed much higher sensitivity to the clastogenicity of BPDE than the wild-type cells in an in vitro micronucleus assay. These results indicate that human Pol ζ is involved in TLS across DNA lesions induced by BPDE and UV-C and also that the TLS plays important roles in induction of mutations, clastogenicity and in cellular survival of the damaged human cells. Similarities and differences in in vivo roles of yeast and human Pol ζ in genome integrity are discussed.

  2. DNA synthesis index: higher for human gallbladders with cholesterol gallstones than with pigment gallstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamote, J.; Putz, P.; Francois, M.; Willems, G.

    1983-09-01

    (/sup 3/H)dThd uptake by the gallbladder epithelium was estimated in 33 patients with cholesterol stones, in 13 patients with pigment stones, and in 12 gallbladders without stones. Proliferative parameters were estimated by autoradiography after in vitro incubation with (/sup 3/H)-dThd. Stones were identified by quantitative infrared spectroscopy. The degree of inflammation of the gallbladder wall was estimated by a histologic scoring method. In the gallbladders containing cholesterol stones the DNA synthesis index (1.39 +/- 0.28%) was higher (P less than .01) than in the gallbladders without stones (0.19 +/- 0.04%). No significant increase in proliferative parameters was found in the gallbladders with pigment stones (0.24 +/- 0.06%). No correlation was found between total stone number, weight or volume, and the DNA synthesis index. No evidence was observed that inflammation could influence the epithelial cell proliferation. Something in the bile of patients with cholesterol stones rather than the physical presence of stones may be the cause of the variations observed.

  3. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder, but Not Panic Anxiety Disorder, Are Associated with Higher Sensitivity to Learning from Negative Feedback: Behavioral and Computational Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdour, Hussain Y; Abushalbaq, Oday M; Mughrabi, Ibrahim T; Imam, Aya F; Gluck, Mark A; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic anxiety disorder (PAD), are a group of common psychiatric conditions. They are characterized by excessive worrying, uneasiness, and fear of future events, such that they affect social and occupational functioning. Anxiety disorders can alter behavior and cognition as well, yet little is known about the particular domains they affect. In this study, we tested the cognitive correlates of medication-free patients with GAD, SAD, and PAD, along with matched healthy participants using a probabilistic category-learning task that allows the dissociation between positive and negative feedback learning. We also fitted all participants' data to a Q-learning model and various actor-critic models that examine learning rate parameters from positive and negative feedback to investigate effects of valence vs. action on performance. SAD and GAD patients were more sensitive to negative feedback than either PAD patients or healthy participants. PAD, SAD, and GAD patients did not differ in positive-feedback learning compared to healthy participants. We found that Q-learning models provide the simplest fit of the data in comparison to other models. However, computational analysis revealed that groups did not differ in terms of learning rate or exploration values. These findings argue that (a) not all anxiety spectrum disorders share similar cognitive correlates, but are rather different in ways that do not link them to the hallmark of anxiety (higher sensitivity to negative feedback); and (b) perception of negative consequences is the core feature of GAD and SAD, but not PAD. Further research is needed to examine the similarities and differences between anxiety spectrum disorders in other cognitive domains and potential implementation of behavioral therapy to remediate cognitive deficits.

  4. Sensitivity of nuclear c-myc levels and induction to differentiation-inducing agents in human colon tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C W; Kim, Y S; Childress-Fields, K E; Yeoman, L C

    1992-02-29

    Six human colon tumor cell lines were analyzed for their constitutive levels of the c-myc protein. The nuclear proto-oncogene, c-myc, was detected as an expressed product in all of the human colon tumor cell lines analyzed. The poorly differentiated cell lines HCT116, RKO and C showed c-myc levels that averaged 2-fold greater than their well-differentiated counterparts, i.e., GEO, CBS and FET. When c-myc levels and responses to serum induction were analyzed in the presence of inducers of differentiation, i.e., dimethylformamide, retinoic acid, sodium butyrate and TGF-beta, distinct patterns of sensitivity and resistance emerged. Nuclear c-myc levels were reduced in all the colon cell phenotypes treated with dimethylformamide or sodium butyrate. Only the well-differentiated human colon tumor cell lines were responsive to transforming growth factor-beta. Only one of the human colon tumor cell lines (GEO) responded to retinoic acid. Increased levels of c-myc protein were found to correlate well with greater growth rates and with poor differentiation class. Similarly, a parallel sensitivity to down-regulation of c-myc levels and attenuation of c-myc induction curves for inducers of differentiation were observed in growth sensitive human colon tumor cell lines.

  5. In vitro sensitivity of oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria to the bactericidal activity of human neutrophil defensins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I

    1990-12-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in defending the periodontium against infection by oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria, such as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. We examined the sensitivity of these bacteria to a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and highly purified individual defensin peptides (HNP-1, HNP-2, and HNP-3) isolated from human neutrophils. Whereas the Capnocytophaga spp. strains were killed significantly by the mixed human neutrophil peptides, the A. actinomycetemcomitans and E. corrodens strains were resistant. Killing was attributable to the defensins. The bactericidal activities of purified defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2 were equal, and both of these activities were greater than HNP-3 activity against strains of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. The strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea was more sensitive to defensin-mediated bactericidal activity than either C. sputigena or C. gingivalis was. The three human defensins were equipotent in killing C. ochracea. C. ochracea was killed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and over a broad pH range. Killing was most effective under hypotonic conditions but also occurred at physiologic salt concentrations. We concluded that Capnocytophaga spp. are sensitive to oxygen-independent killing by human defensins. Additional studies will be required to identify other components that may equip human neutrophils to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens, and other oral gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Insulin sensitivity is independent of lipid binding protein trafficking at the plasma membrane in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Serup, Annette Karen; Karstoft, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate lipid-induced regulation of lipid binding proteins in human skeletal muscle and the impact hereof on insulin sensitivity. Eleven healthy male subjects underwent a 3-day hyper-caloric and high-fat diet regime. Muscle biopsies were taken before......-regulated by increased fatty acid availability. This suggests a time dependency in the up-regulation of FAT/CD36 and FABPpm protein during high availability of plasma fatty acids. Furthermore, we did not detect FATP1 and FATP4 protein in giant sarcolemmal vesicles obtained from human skeletal muscle. In conclusion......, this study shows that a short-term lipid-load increases mRNA content of key lipid handling proteins in human muscle. However, decreased insulin sensitivity after high-fat diet is not accompanied with relocation of FAT/CD36 or FABPpm protein to the sarcolemma. Finally, FATP1 and FATP4 protein could...

  7. Human mesenchymal stem cells are sensitive to abnormal gravity and exhibit classic apoptotic features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Meng; Hui-yun Xu; Sheng-meng Di; Dong-yan Shi; Ai-rong Qian; Jin-fu Wang; Peng Shang

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of abnormal gravity on human mesenchymal stem cells(hMSCs).Strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient generate a magnetic force that can add to or subtract from the gravitational force.In this study,this is defined as a high-magneto-gravitational environment(HMGE).The HMGE provides three apparent gravity levels,i.e.hypogravity(μg),hypergravity(2g)and normal gravity with strong magnetic field(1g)conditions.After hMSCs were subject to HMGE for 12 h,the proliferation,morphology,structure and apoptosis were investigated.Results showed that the proliferation of hMSCs was inhibited under μg condition The abnormal gravity induced morphologic characterishcs of apoptosis cells,such as cell shrinkage,membrane blebbing,nuclear chromatin condensation and margination,decreased cell viability,and increased caspase-3/7 activity.The rate of apoptosis underμg condition is up to 56.95%.The F-actin stress fibers and microtubules were disrupted under abnormal gravity condition.Under μg-condition,the expression of p53 at mRNA and protein levels was up-regulated more than 9-and 6 folds,respectively.The Pifithrin-a,an specific inhibitor of p53,inhibited the apoptosis and prevented the disruption of cytoskeleton induced by abnormal gravity.These results implied that hMSCs were sensitive to abnormal gravity and exhibited classic apoptotic features,which might be associated with p53 signaling.

  8. Systems Biology Strategy Reveals PKCδ is Key for Sensitizing TRAIL-Resistant Human Fibrosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Tabata, Sho; Piras, Vincent; Tomita, Masaru; Selvarajoo, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells are highly variable and largely resistant to therapeutic intervention. Recently, the use of the tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induced treatment is gaining momentum due to TRAIL’s ability to specifically target cancers with limited effect on normal cells. Nevertheless, several malignant cancer types still remain non-sensitive to TRAIL. Previously, we developed a dynamic computational model, based on perturbation-response differential equations approach, and predicted protein kinase C (PKC) as the most effective target, with over 95% capacity to kill human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) in TRAIL stimulation (1). Here, to validate the model prediction, which has significant implications for cancer treatment, we conducted experiments on two TRAIL-resistant cancer cell lines (HT1080 and HT29). Using PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I, we demonstrated that cell viability is significantly impaired with over 95% death of both cancer types, in consistency with our previous model. Next, we measured caspase-3, Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), p38, and JNK activations in HT1080, and confirmed cell death occurs through apoptosis with significant increment in caspase-3 and PARP activations. Finally, to identify a crucial PKC isoform, from 10 known members, we analyzed each isoform mRNA expressions in HT1080 cells and shortlisted the highest 4 for further siRNA knock-down (KD) experiments. From these KDs, PKCδ produced the most cancer cell death in conjunction with TRAIL. Overall, our approach combining model predictions with experimental validation holds promise for systems biology based cancer therapy. PMID:25601862

  9. Sensitive spectrophotometric determination of metoclopramide hydrochloride in dosage forms and spiked human urine using vanillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zenita Devi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new spectrophotometric method which is simple, sensitive, selective and rapid is described for the determination of metoclopramide hydrochloride (MCP in bulk drug and in dosage forms using vanillin as the chromogenic agent. The method is based on the condensation reaction between primary aromatic amine group present in MCP with aromatic aldehyde, vanillin to produce an intense yellow colored product. The resulting Schiff’s base shows an absorption maximum at 410 nm and the reaction product is stable for more than one day. The reaction was carried out in acetic acid and perchloric acid medium. Beer’s law was obeyed in the concentration range 1.5–15.0 μg ml−1 MCP with a molar absorptivity of 1.89 × 104 l mol−1 cm−1. The limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ were found to be 0.51 and 1.55 μg ml−1, respectively. The method was statistically evaluated by calculating percent relative error (% RE for accuracy and percent relative standard deviation (% RSD for precision, and was applied successfully to the determination of MCP in tablets, in injection and also in spiked human urine. No interference was observed from common additives found in pharmaceutical preparations. The results obtained by the proposed method were validated statistically by comparing the results with those of the reference method by applying the Student’s t-test and F-test. The accuracy and reliability of the method were further ascertained by performing recovery tests via standard-addition technique.

  10. Inhibition of the canonical IKK/NF kappa B pathway sensitizes human cancer cells to doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Maria A; González-Navarrete, Irene; Dalmases, Alba; Bosch, Marta; Rodriguez-Fanjul, Vanesa; Rolfe, Mark; Ross, Jeffrey S; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristobal; Bachs, Oriol; Gascón, Pere; Rojo, Federico; Perona, Rosario; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan

    2007-09-15

    The NF kappa B family is composed by five subunits (p65/RelA, c-Rel, RelB, p105-p50/NF kappa B(1), p100-p52/NF kappa B(2)) and controls the expression of many genes that participate in cell cycle, apoptosis, and other key cellular processes. In a canonical pathway, NF kappa B activation depends on the IKK complex activity, which is formed by three subunits (IKKalpha and IKKbeta and IKKgamma/NEMO). There is an alternative NF kappa B activation pathway that does not require IKKbeta or IKKgamma/NEMO, in which RelB is a major player. We report in a panel of human breast cancer cells that the IKK/NF kappa B system is generally overexpressed in breast cancer cells and there is heterogeneity in expression levels of individual members between different cell lines. Doxorubicin, an anticancer agent used in patients with breast cancer, activated NF kappa B and appeared to be less effective in cells expressing predominantly members of the canonical IKK/NF kappa B. Two NF kappa B inhibitors, bortezomib and NEMO-Binding Domain Inhibitory Peptide, prevented doxorubicin-induced NF kappa B activation and increased doxorubicin antitumor effects in BT-474 cells. Transient down-regulation of members of the canonical pathway (p65, p52, c-Rel and IKKgamma/NEMO) by siRNA in HeLa cells increased doxorubicin cytotoxicity. In contrast, silencing of RelB, a key subunit of the alternative pathway, had no evident effects on doxorubicin cytotoxicity. To conclude, NF kappa B inhibition sensitized cells to doxorubicin, implying directly p65, p52, c-Rel and IKKgamma/NEMO subunits in chemoresistance, but not RelB. These findings suggest that selective inhibition of the canonical NF kappa B pathway is sufficient to improve doxorubicin antitumor effects.

  11. DIFFERENCES IN SENSITIVITY BUT NOT SELECTIVITY OF XENOESTROGEN BINDING TO ALLIGATOR VERSUS HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Cynthia V.; Hartig, Phillip C.; Cardon, Mary C.; Lambright, Christy R.; Bobseine, Kathy L.; Guillette, Louis J.; Gray, L. Earl; Wilson, Vickie S.

    2010-01-01

    Reproductive abnormalities in alligators exposed to contaminants in Lake Apopka, Florida, USA represent a clear example of endocrine disruption in wildlife. Several of these contaminants that are not able to bind to mammalian estrogen receptors (such as atrazine and cyanazine) have previously been reported to bind to the alligator estrogen receptor from oviductal tissue. Binding of known Lake Apopka contaminants to full length estrogen receptors alpha from human (hERα) and alligator (aERα) was assessed in a side-by-side comparison within the same assay system. Baculovirus-expressed recombinant hERα and aERα were used in a competitive binding assay. Atrazine and cyanazine were not able to bind to either receptor. p,p′-Dicofol was able to bind to aERα with a concentration inhibiting 50% of binding (IC50) of 4 μM, while only partially displacing 17β-estradiol (E2) from hERα and yielding a projected IC50 of 45 μM. Chemicals that only partially displaced E2 from either receptor, including some dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) metabolites and trans-nonachlor, appeared to have higher affinity for aERα than hERα. p,p′-Dicofol-mediated transcriptional activation through aERα and hERα was assessed to further explore the preferential binding of p,p′-dicofol to aERα over hERα. p,p′-Dicofol was able to stimulate transcriptional activation in a similar manner with both receptors. However, the in vitro results obtained with p,p′-dicofol were not reflected in an in vivo mammalian model, where Kelthane™ (mixed o,p′-and p,p′-dicofol isomers) did not elicit estrogenic effects. In conclusion, although there was no evidence of exclusively species-specific estrogen receptor binders, some xenoestrogens, especially p,p′-dicofol, had a higher affinity for aERα than for hERα. PMID:20821664

  12. Central sensitization in spinal cord injured humans assessed by reflex receptive fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biurrun Manresa, José Alberto; Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Johannesen, Inger Lauge

    2014-01-01

    after an intramuscular injection of capsaicin in the foot sole in order to induce central sensitization. RESULTS: Both groups presented RRF expansion and lowered NWR thresholds immediately after capsaicin injection, reflected by the enlargement of RRF sensitivity areas and RRF probability areas....... Moreover, the topography of the RRF sensitivity and probability areas were significantly different in SCI volunteers compared to NI volunteers in terms of size and shape. CONCLUSIONS: SCI volunteers can develop central sensitization, despite adaptive/maladaptive changes in synaptic plasticity and lack...

  13. Higher-efficiency photoelectrochemical electrodes of titanium dioxide-based nanoarrays sensitized simultaneously with plasmonic silver nanoparticles and multiple metal sulfides photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Keying; Liu, Zhifeng; Han, Jianhua; Zhang, Xueqi; Li, Yajun; Hong, Tiantian; Zhou, Cailou

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes a novel design of high-efficiency photoelectrochemical water splitting electrode, i.e., ordered TiO2 nanorod arrays (NRs) sensitized simultaneously with noble metal (Ag), binary metal sulfides (Ag2S) and ternary metal sulfides (Ag3CuS2) multiple photosensitizers for the first time. The TiO2/Ag/Ag2S/Ag3CuS2 NRs heterostructure is successfully synthesized through successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) and a simple ion-exchange process based on ionic reaction mechanism. On the basis of an optimal quantity of Ag, Ag2S and Ag3CuS2 nanoparticles, such TiO2/Ag/Ag2S/Ag3CuS2 NRs exhibit a higher photoelectrochemical activity ever reported for TiO2-based nanoarrays in PEC water splitting, the photocurrent density is up to 9.82 mA cm-2 at 0.47 V versus Ag/AgCl, respectively. This novel architecture is able to increase electron collection efficiency and suppress carrier recombination via (i) a higher efficiency of light-harvesting through these multiple photosensitizers (Ag, Ag2S and Ag3CuS2); (ii) the efficient separation of photo-induced electrons and holes due to the direct electrical pathways; (iii) the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of Ag nanoparticles, which enhances the efficient charge separation and high carrier mobility. This work is useful to explore feasible routes to further enhance the performance of oxide semiconductors for PEC water splitting to produce clean H2 energy.

  14. The role of potassium channels in the nitric oxide-induced relaxation of human airway smooth muscle of passively sensitization by serum from allergic asthmatic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Ye; Yongjian Xu; Zhenxiang Zhang; Xiansheng Liu; Zhao Yang; Baoan Gao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of large Ca2+-activated, delayed-rectifier and ATP-sensitive potassium channel in regulating the relaxation induced by nitric oxide (NO) in normal and passively sensitized human airway smooth muscle (HASM) with serum from asthmatic patients. Methods: The effects of NO or/and potassium channel blockers on the tensions of normal and passively sensitized HASM were measured by using nitric oxide donor and potassium blockers, with the isometric tension recording technique. Results: Showed that (1)In the control group and passively sensitized group, Kv blocker (4-AP) cause concentration-dependent augmentation in the contraction induced by histamine (1 ×10-4 mol/L), (P < 0.05), but Glib (1 × 10-2 mol/L)and TEA (1×10-3 mol/L) have no significant effects on the contraction induced by histamine (1×10-4 mol/L). The maximum tension induced by histamine in passively sensitized group is higher than that in the control group (P < 0.05). (2) NO-donor Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) bring about significant relaxation in normal and passively sensitized HASM rings (P < 0.05). Relaxations of passively sensitized airway rings [ (29.4 ± 3.3)% ] were significant less than those of normal HASM rings [ (44.1 ± 10.2)% ], (P <0.05).(3) Glib(1×10-2 mol/L)have no significant effect on the relaxations induced by SNP(1×10-4 mol/L). 4-AP(1×10-2 mol/L) inhibited relaxation induced by SNP (1×10-4 mol/L), (P < 0.01). TEA (1×10-3 mol/L) inhibited relaxation induced by SNP (1×10-4mol/L) (P < 0.05), and the inhibiting effect in passively sensitized HASM rings were significant less than in normal HASM, (P <0.05). Conclusion: It was concluded that SNP(NO-donor) relaxed the contraction of HASM partly via BKca channel opening. In passively sensitized HASM in vitro, the relaxation of SNP decreased compared with control group, which might be associated with the down-regulating activity of BKca in passively sensitized HASM.

  15. Could periodic patterns in human mortality be sensitive to solar activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Díaz-Sandoval

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal behaviour of human diseases have been observed and reported in the literature for years. Although the Sun plays an essential role in the origin and evolution of life on Earth, it is barely taken into account in biological processes for the development of a specific disease. Higher mortality rates occur during the winter season in the Northern Hemisphere for several diseases, particularly diseases of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. This increment has been associated with seasonal and social causes. However, is there more behind these correlations, in particular in terms of solar variability? In this paper we attempt to make a first step towards answering this question. A detailed wavelet analysis of periodicities for diseases from England and Wales seem to reveal that mortality periodicities (3 days to half a year could be due to the Earth's position around the Sun. Moreover, crosswavelet and wavelet coherence analysis show common features between medical diseases and solar proxies around solar maximum activity suggesting that this relation, if any, has to be searched in times of high solar activity.

  16. Feasibility study to support a threshold of sensitization concern concept in risk assessment based on human data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Detlef; Krauledat, Matthias; Scheel, Julia

    2009-12-01

    In analogy to the Threshold of Toxicological Concern concept, a Threshold of Sensitization Concern (TSC) concept is proposed for chemicals with respect to their ability to induce an allergic contact dermatitis. Recently, the derivation of a dermal sensitization threshold was suggested based on an evaluation of animal data. In order to establish the concept with human data, we conducted a meta-analysis taking into account No Expected Sensitization Induction Levels for fragrance ingredients from the IFRA/RIFM dataset. Based on a statistical analysis by applying Sensitization Assessment Factors that account for interindividual variability and different exposure conditions, TSC values of 0.91 or 0.30 lg/cm2 can be derived in terms of amount per skin area. TSC values are compared with typical exposure levels of cosmetic products. A substance can be considered to be virtually safe if the quotient of exposure level and TSC is < 1. The findings derived from human data include several conservative assumptions and largely support the dermal sensitization thresholds previously derived from animal data. The TSC concept might in principle be used for any untested chemical and therefore help in some cases to waive animal testing.

  17. Higher detection sensitivity of anxiolytic effects of diazepam by ledge-free open arm with opaque walled closed arm elevated plus maze in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Yasuyuki; Kawaguchi, Maiko

    2015-11-01

    The elevated plus maze (EPM) is an established method for testing animal anxiety. However, EPM apparatuses and their features can differ among laboratories, most notably in the presence/absence of ledges on the open arm and/or the transparency/opaqueness of walls on the closed arm. The combined effects of these variable arm features on EPM behavior are not yet fully understood. In the present study, we prepared four types of EPM apparatus - open arms with (0.5 cm) or without (0 cm) ledges×closed arms with transparent or opaque walls - and compared the maze-exploration behavior of male Sprague-Dawley rats. We found that the presence of open arm ledges significantly increased the incidence of open arm exploration. Furthermore, time spent in the distal segment of the open arm was shortest in the apparatus that had open arms with no ledges and opaque closed arms (No-Ledges/Opaque), and was longest in the apparatus that had open arms with ledges and transparent closed arms (Ledges/Transparent). Additionally, the No-Ledges/Opaque apparatus could detect the effect of 0.5mg/kg diazepam, an anxiolytic drug, whereas the Ledges/Transparent apparatus could not. These results indicate that arm structure (features of both open and closed arms) significantly influences maze-exploratory behavior in rats, and that No-Ledges/Opaque apparatuses have higher detection sensitivity for anxiolytic effects of diazepam than that of Ledges/Transparent apparatuses.

  18. Variability in Human Bitter Taste Sensitivity to Chemically Diverse Compounds Can Be Accounted for by Differential TAS2R Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roura, Eugeni; Aldayyani, Asya; Thavaraj, Pridhuvi; Prakash, Sangeeta; Greenway, Delma; Thomas, Walter G; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Roudnitzky, Natacha; Foster, Simon R

    2015-07-01

    The human population displays high variation in taste perception. Differences in individual taste sensitivity may also impact on nutrient intake and overall appetite. A well-characterized example is the variable perception of bitter compounds such as 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), which can be accounted for at the molecular level by polymorphic variants in the specific type 2 taste receptor (TAS2R38). This phenotypic variation has been associated with influencing dietary preference and other behaviors, although the generalization of PROP/PTC taster status as a predictor of sensitivity to other tastes is controversial. Here, we proposed that the taste sensitivities of different bitter compounds would be correlated only when they activate the same bitter taste receptor. Thirty-four volunteers were exposed to 8 bitter compounds that were selected based on their potential to activate overlapping and distinct repertoires of TAS2Rs. Taste intensity ratings were evaluated using the general Labeled Magnitude Scale. Our data demonstrate a strong interaction between the intensity for bitter substances when they activate common TAS2Rs. Consequently, PROP/PTC sensitivity was not a reliable predictor of general bitter sensitivity. In addition, our findings provide a novel framework to predict taste sensitivity based on their specific T2R activation profile.

  19. De novo epidermal regeneration using human eccrine sweat gland cells: higher competence of secretory over absorptive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontiggia, Luca; Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Oliveira, Carol; Braziulis, Erik; Klar, Agnieszka S; Meuli-Simmen, Claudia; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2014-06-01

    In our previous work, we showed that human sweat gland-derived epithelial cells represent an alternative source of keratinocytes to grow a near normal autologous epidermis. The role of subtypes of sweat gland cells in epidermal regeneration and maintenance remained unclear. In this study, we compare the regenerative potential of both secretory and absorptive sweat gland cell subpopulations. We demonstrate the superiority of secretory over absorptive cells in forming a new epidermis on two levels: first, the proliferative and colony-forming efficiencies in vitro are significantly higher for secretory cells (SCs), and second, SCs show a higher frequency of successful epidermis formation as well as an increase in the thickness of the formed epidermis in the in vitro and in vivo functional analyses using a 3D dermo-epidermal skin model. However, the ability of forming functional skin substitutes is not limited to SCs, which supports the hypothesis that multiple subtypes of sweat gland epithelial cells hold regenerative properties, while the existence and exact localization of a keratinocyte stem cell population in the human eccrine sweat gland remain elusive.

  20. Higher seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in dogs than in humans in an urban area of Campeche, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Luis Ucan; Yerbes, Isai Medina; Piña, Miguel Angel Novelo; Balmes, Javier; Pascual, Alberto; Hernández, Oscar; Lopez, Ruth; Monteón, Victor

    2011-07-01

    The reservoir capacity of dogs for Trypanosoma cruzi infection was analyzed in the city of Campeche, an urban town located in the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico. The city is inhabited by ~96,000 dogs and ~168,000 humans; Triatoma dimidiata is the only recognized vector. In the present study, we sampled 262 dogs (148 stray dogs and 114 pet dogs) and 2800 young people (ranging in age between 15 and 20 years old) and tested for T. cruzi antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Indirect Immunofluorescence, and Western blotting serological assays. Seroprevalence in stray dogs was twice higher than in pet dogs (9.5% vs. 5.3%) with general seroprevalence of 7.6%. In humans, the observed seroprevalence was 76 times lower than in dogs (0.1% vs. 7.6%, respectively). Western blotting analysis showed that dogs' antibodies recognized different T. cruzi antigenic patterns than those for humans. In conclusion, T. cruzi infection in Campeche, Mexico, represents a low potential risk to inhabitants but deserves vigilance.

  1. C6-pyridinium ceramide sensitizes SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Nithin B; Stochaj, Ursula; Kodiha, Mohamed; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Pierce, Jason S; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2015-02-01

    Combining photodynamic therapy (PDT) with another anticancer treatment modality is an important strategy for improved efficacy. PDT with Pc4, a silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer, was combined with C6-pyridinium ceramide (LCL29) to determine their potential to promote death of SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells. PDT+LCL29-induced enhanced cell death was inhibited by zVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, and fumonisin B1 (FB), a ceramide synthase inhibitor. Quantitative confocal microscopy showed that combining PDT with LCL29 enhanced FB-sensitive ceramide accumulation in the mitochondria. Furthermore, PDT+LCL29 induced enhanced FB-sensitive redistribution of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation. Overall, the data indicate that PDT+LCL29 enhanced cell death via FB-sensitive, mitochondrial ceramide accumulation and apoptosis.

  2. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As(III)) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As(III) on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As(III) on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As(III) were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As(III) than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As(III) in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As(III) cytotoxicity between these cells.

  3. Positional cloning of the human quantitative trait locus underlying taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un-kyung; Jorgenson, Eric; Coon, Hilary; Leppert, Mark; Risch, Neil; Drayna, Dennis

    2003-02-21

    The ability to taste the substance phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) has been widely used for genetic and anthropological studies, but genetic studies have produced conflicting results and demonstrated complex inheritance for this trait. We have identified a small region on chromosome 7q that shows strong linkage disequilibrium between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and PTC taste sensitivity in unrelated subjects. This region contains a single gene that encodes a member of the TAS2R bitter taste receptor family. We identified three coding SNPs giving rise to five haplotypes in this gene worldwide. These haplotypes completely explain the bimodal distribution of PTC taste sensitivity, thus accounting for the inheritance of the classically defined taste insensitivity and for 55 to 85% of the variance in PTC sensitivity. Distinct phenotypes were associated with specific haplotypes, which demonstrates that this gene has a direct influence on PTC taste sensitivity and that sequence variants at different sites interact with each other within the encoded gene product.

  4. Spread spectrum time-resolved diffuse optical measurement system for enhanced sensitivity in detecting human brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalpesh; Hasnain, Ali; Zhou, Xiaowei; Luo, Jianwen; Penney, Trevor B.; Chen, Nanguang

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging methods have been widely applied to noninvasive detection of brain activity. We have designed and implemented a low cost, portable, real-time one-channel time-resolved DOS system for neuroscience studies. Phantom experiments were carried out to test the performance of the system. We further conducted preliminary human experiments and demonstrated that enhanced sensitivity in detecting neural activity in the cortex could be achieved by the use of late arriving photons.

  5. Differential sensitivities of trastuzumab (Herceptin)-resistant human breast cancer cells to phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Carmel T; Metz, Marianne Z; Kane, Susan E

    2005-05-01

    Her2 (erbB2/neu) is overexpressed in 25-30% of human breast cancers. Herceptin is a recombinant humanized Her2 antibody used to treat breast cancer patients with Her2 overexpression. Over a 5-month selection process, we isolated clones of BT474 (BT) human breast carcinoma cells (BT/Her(R)) that were resistant to Herceptin in vitro. In BT/Her(R) subclones, cell-surface, phosphorylated and total cellular Her2 protein remained high in the continuous presence of Herceptin. Likewise, the levels of cell-surface, phosphorylated, and total cellular Her3 and EGFR were either unchanged or only slightly elevated in BT/Her(R) subclones relative to BT cells. One BT/Her(R) subclone had substantially upregulated cell-surface EGFR, but this did not correlate with a higher relative resistance to Herceptin. In looking at the downstream PI-3K/Akt signaling pathway, phosphorylated and total Akt levels and Akt kinase activities were all sustained in BT/Her(R) subclones in the presence of Herceptin, but significantly downregulated in BT cells exposed to Herceptin. Whereas BT cells lost sensitivity to the PI-3K inhibitor LY294002 in the presence of Herceptin, BT/Her(R) subclones were equally sensitive to this agent in the presence and absence of Herceptin. This suggests that BT/Her(R) subclones acquired a Herceptin-resistant mechanism of PI-3K signaling. BT/Her(R) subclones were also sensitive to the EGFR kinase inhibitor AG1478 in the presence of Herceptin, to the same extent as BT cells. The BT/Her(R) subclones provide new insights into mechanisms of Herceptin resistance and suggest new treatment strategies in combination with other inhibitors targeted to signal transduction pathways.

  6. Differentiated human midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells express excitatory strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors containing α2β subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wegner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human fetal midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs may deliver a tissue source for drug screening and regenerative cell therapy to treat Parkinson's disease. While glutamate and GABA(A receptors play an important role in neurogenesis, the involvement of glycine receptors during human neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation as well as their molecular and functional characteristics in NPCs are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated NPCs in respect to their glycine receptor function and subunit expression using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate the ability of NPCs to express functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors after differentiation for 3 weeks in vitro. Pharmacological and molecular analyses indicate a predominance of glycine receptor heteromers containing α2β subunits. Intracellular calcium measurements of differentiated NPCs suggest that glycine evokes depolarisations mediated by strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and not by D-serine-sensitive excitatory glycine receptors. Culturing NPCs with additional glycine, the glycine-receptor antagonist strychnine, or the Na(+-K(+-Cl(- co-transporter 1 (NKCC1-inhibitor bumetanide did not significantly influence cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that NPCs derived from human fetal midbrain tissue acquire essential glycine receptor properties during neuronal maturation. However, glycine receptors seem to have a limited functional impact on neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation of NPCs in vitro.

  7. Differentiated human midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells express excitatory strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors containing α2β subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Florian; Kraft, Robert; Busse, Kathy; Härtig, Wolfgang; Ahrens, Jörg; Leffler, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Schwarz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Human fetal midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) may deliver a tissue source for drug screening and regenerative cell therapy to treat Parkinson's disease. While glutamate and GABA(A) receptors play an important role in neurogenesis, the involvement of glycine receptors during human neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation as well as their molecular and functional characteristics in NPCs are largely unknown. Here we investigated NPCs in respect to their glycine receptor function and subunit expression using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate the ability of NPCs to express functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors after differentiation for 3 weeks in vitro. Pharmacological and molecular analyses indicate a predominance of glycine receptor heteromers containing α2β subunits. Intracellular calcium measurements of differentiated NPCs suggest that glycine evokes depolarisations mediated by strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and not by D-serine-sensitive excitatory glycine receptors. Culturing NPCs with additional glycine, the glycine-receptor antagonist strychnine, or the Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1)-inhibitor bumetanide did not significantly influence cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. These data indicate that NPCs derived from human fetal midbrain tissue acquire essential glycine receptor properties during neuronal maturation. However, glycine receptors seem to have a limited functional impact on neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation of NPCs in vitro.

  8. Growth Hormone Receptor Knockdown Sensitizes Human Melanoma Cells to Chemotherapy by Attenuating Expression of ABC Drug Efflux Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Reetobrata; Baumgaertel, Nicholas; Wu, Shiyong; Kopchick, John J

    2017-03-14

    Melanoma remains one of the most therapy-resistant forms of human cancer despite recent introductions of highly efficacious targeted therapies. The intrinsic therapy resistance of human melanoma is largely due to abundant expression of a repertoire of xenobiotic efflux pumps of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Here, we report that GH action is a key mediator of chemotherapeutic resistance in human melanoma cells. We investigated multiple ABC efflux pumps (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCB8, ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCG1, and ABCG2) reportedly associated with melanoma drug resistance in different human melanoma cells and tested the efficacy of five different anti-cancer compounds (cisplatin, doxorubicin, oridonin, paclitaxel, vemurafenib) with decreased GH action. We found that GH treatment of human melanoma cells upregulates expression of multiple ABC transporters and increases the EC50 of melanoma drug vemurafenib. Also, vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cells had upregulated levels of GH receptor (GHR) expression as well as ABC efflux pumps. GHR knockdown (KD) using siRNA in human melanoma cells treated with sub-EC50 doses of anti-tumor compounds resulted in significantly increased drug retention, decreased cell proliferation and increased drug efficacy, compared to mock-transfected controls. Our set of findings identify an unknown mechanism of GH regulation in mediating melanoma drug resistance and validates GHR as a unique therapeutic target for sensitizing highly therapy-resistant human melanoma cells to lower doses of anti-cancer drugs.

  9. Color Tuning in Short Wavelength-Sensitive Human and Mouse Visual Pigments: Ab initio Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Ahmet; Yokoyama, Shozo; Morokuma, Keiji

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the protonation state and photoabsorption spectrum of Schiff-base (SB) nitrogen bound 11-cis-retinal in human blue and mouse UV cone visual pigments as well as in bovine rhodopsin by hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. We have employed both multireference (MRCISD+Q, MR-SORCI+Q, and MR-DDCI2+Q) and single reference (TD-B3LYP and RI-CC2) QM methods. The calculated ground-state and vertical excitation energies show that UV-sensitive pigments have deprotonated SB nitrogen, while violet-sensitive pigments have protonated SB nitrogen, in agreement with some indirect experimental evidence. A significant blue shift of the absorption maxima of violet-sensitive pigments relative to rhodopsins arises from the increase in bond length alternation of the polyene chain of 11-cis-retinal induced by polarizing fields of these pigments. The main counterion is Glu113 in both violet-sensitive vertebrate pigments and bovine rhodopsin. Neither Glu113 nor the remaining pigment has a significant influence on the first excitation energy of 11-cis-retinal in the UV-sensitive pigments that have deprotonated SB nitrogen. There is no charge transfer between the SB and β-ionone terminals of 11-cis-retinal in the ground and first excited states. PMID:19630373

  10. Aging of non-visual spectral sensitivity to light in humans: compensatory mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond P Najjar

    Full Text Available The deterioration of sleep in the older population is a prevalent feature that contributes to a decrease in quality of life. Inappropriate entrainment of the circadian clock by light is considered to contribute to the alteration of sleep structure and circadian rhythms in the elderly. The present study investigates the effects of aging on non-visual spectral sensitivity to light and tests the hypothesis that circadian disturbances are related to a decreased light transmittance. In a within-subject design, eight aged and five young subjects were exposed at night to 60 minute monochromatic light stimulations at 9 different wavelengths (420-620 nm. Individual sensitivity spectra were derived from measures of melatonin suppression. Lens density was assessed using a validated psychophysical technique. Although lens transmittance was decreased for short wavelength light in the older participants, melatonin suppression was not reduced. Peak of non-visual sensitivity was, however, shifted to longer wavelengths in the aged participants (494 nm compared to young (484 nm. Our results indicate that increased lens filtering does not necessarily lead to a decreased non-visual sensitivity to light. The lack of age-related decrease in non-visual sensitivity to light may involve as yet undefined adaptive mechanisms.

  11. Properties of recombinant human N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase (hPAO): potential role in determining drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlin; Hacker, Amy; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Frydman, Benjamin; Valasinas, Aldonia; Fraser, Alison V; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2005-07-01

    The recent cloning of the mammalian gene coding for N(1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase (PAO) provides the opportunity to directly examine the role of human PAO (hPAO) in polyamine homeostasis as well as its potential role in determining cellular response to antitumor polyamine analogues. To facilitate the study of this enzyme, the production, purification, and characterization of the recombinant hPAO is reported. hPAO oxidizes N(1)-acetylspermidine (K(m)=2.1 microM, K(cat)=15.0 s(-1)) and has very high affinity for N(1)-acetylspermine (K(m)=0.85 microM, K(cat)=31.7 s(-1)). The recombinant hPAO does not efficiently oxidize spermine, thereby demonstrating a significant difference in substrate specificity from the previously described human spermine oxidase PAOh1/SMO. Importantly, hPAO demonstrates the ability to oxidize a subset of antitumor polyamine analogues, suggesting that this oxidase activity could have a significant effect on determining tumor sensitivity to these or similar agents. Transfection of A549 human lung cancer cells with an hPAO-expressing plasmid leads to a profound decrease in sensitivity to those analogues which act as substrates, confirming its potential to alter drug response. One similarity that hPAO shares with human PAOh1/SMO, is that certain oligoamine analogues are potent inhibitors of its oxidase activity. The results of these studies demonstrate how changes in polyamine catabolism may affect drug response.

  12. [EVALUATION OF THE HUMAN SENSITIVITY TO SMALLPOX VIRUS BY THE PRIMARY CULTURES OF THE MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamedyanskaya, A S; Titova, K A; Sergeev, Al A; Kabanov, A S; Bulychev, L E; Sergeev, Ar A; Galakhova, D O; Nesterov, A E; Nosareva, O V; Shishkina, L N; Taranov, O S; Omigov, V V; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the primary cultures of granulocytes, mononuclear, and monocyte-macrophage cells derived from human blood were performed using variola virus (VARV) in the doses of 0.001-0.021 PFU/cell (plaques-forming units per cell). Positive dynamics of the virus accumulation was observed only in the monocyte-macrophages with maximum values of virus concentration (5.0-5.5 Ig PFU/ml) mainly within six days after the infection. The fact of VARV replication in the monocyte-macrophages was confirmed by the data of electron microscopy. At the same time, virus vaccines when tested in doses 3.3 and 4.2 Ig PFU/ml did not show the ability to reproduce in these human cells. The people sensitivity to VARV as assessed from the data obtained on human monocyte-macrophages corresponded to -1 PFU (taking into account the smooth interaction of the virus in the body to the cells of this type), which is consistent to previously found theoretical data on the virus sensitivity. The human susceptibility to VARV assessed experimentally can be used to predict the adequacy of developed smallpox models (in vivo) based on susceptible animals. This is necessary for reliable assessment of the efficiency of development of drugs for treatment and prophylaxis of the smallpox.

  13. A sensitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for the bioanalysis of carboxyl-terminal B-chain analogues of human insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Smith, W C; Bowsher, R R

    2001-08-01

    Quantification of analogues of human insulin in biological matrices is complicated by differences in their immunoreactivity and the presence of both the analogue and endogenous concentrations of insulin in test samples. To facilitate pharmacokinetic comparisons of carboxyl-terminal B-chain analogues of human insulin, we undertook development of a sensitive ELISA. The ELISA detection method was optimized systematically to permit routine analysis of 10-microl serum samples. Accordingly, a noncompetitive 'sandwich' chemiluminescent ELISA was validated for the quantification of carboxyl-terminal B-chain insulin analogues in human serum over a concentration range from 5 to 3125 pM. The mean bias (RE%) within the validated range varied from -10.3 to 4.3%, with an intermediate precision (inter-assay CV%) from 4.2 to 11.5%. The two-sided 90% expectation tolerance interval for total measurement error was within +/-25% of the nominal concentration for all levels of validation samples. Insulin lispro, human insulin, proinsulin, despentapeptide insulin (DPI) and porcine insulin displayed comparable crossreactivity in the ELISA. Potential utility of the new assay for insulin bioanalysis in nonhuman species was investigated by assessing the pharmacokinetic profile of DPI in rats following administration of a single subcutaneous dose. The sensitive chemiluminescent detection method is simple to perform and should be readily adaptable for ELISAs of other therapeutic proteins.

  14. Characterization of lipid metabolism in insulin-sensitive adipocytes differentiated from immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prawitt, Janne; Niemeier, Andreas; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    There is a great demand for cell models to study human adipocyte function. Here we describe the adipogenic differentiation of a telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell line (hMSC-Tert) that maintains numerous features of terminally differentiated adipocytes even after prolonged...

  15. Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on insulin sensitivity and the systemic inflammatory response in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Larsen, Nadja; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis

    2010-01-01

    According to animal studies, intake of probiotic bacteria may improve glucose homeostasis. We hypothesised that probiotic bacteria improve insulin sensitivity by attenuating systemic inflammation. Therefore, the effects of oral supplementation with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus...... course with either L. acidophilus NCFM or placebo. L. acidophilus was detected in stool samples by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR. Separated by the 4-week intervention period, two hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps were performed to estimate insulin sensitivity. Furthermore......, the systemic inflammatory response was evaluated by subjecting the participants to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide injection (0·3 ng/kg) before and after the treatment course. L. acidophilus NCFM was detected in 75 % of the faecal samples after treatment with the probiotic bacterium. Insulin sensitivity...

  16. Space mutagenesis of genetically engineered bacteria expressing recombinant human interferon α1b and screening of higher yielding strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Changting; Liu, Jinyi; Fang, Xiangqun; Xu, Chen; Guo, Yinghua; Chang, De; Su, Longxiang

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the space mutagenesis of genetically engineered bacteria expressing recombinant human interferon α1b. The genetically engineered bacteria expressing the recombinant interferon α1b were sent into outer space on the Chinese Shenzhou VIII spacecraft. After the 17 day space flight, mutant strains that highly expressed the target gene were identified. After a series of screening of spaceflight-treated bacteria and the quantitative comparison of the mutant strains and original strain, we found five strains that showed a significantly higher production of target proteins, compared with the original strain. Our results support the notion that the outer space environment has unique effects on the mutation breeding of microorganisms, including genetically engineered strains. Mutant strains that highly express the target protein could be obtained through spaceflight-induced mutagenesis.

  17. Concentrations of persistent organochlorine compounds in human milk and placenta are higher in Denmark than in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, H.; Main, K.M.; Andersson, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    in human milk samples from Finland (n = 65) and Denmark (n = 65) and in placentas from Finland (n = 112) and Denmark (n = 168). RESULTS: 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDE) was the dominant pollutant. beta-Hexa-chloro-cyclohexane (beta-HCH), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), endosulfan-I, dieldrin......, oxychlordane (OXC), cis-heptachloroepoxide (c-HE) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDT) were the other main organochlorines detected. Danish samples had significantly higher concentrations of p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, beta-HCH, HCB, dieldrin, c-HE and OXC than did the Finnish samples. Levels...

  18. Carvacrol and rosemary oil at higher concentrations induce apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melušová, Martina; Jantová, Soňa; Horváthová, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Natural essential oils are volatile herbal complex compounds which manifest cytotoxic effects on living cells depending on their type and concentration but usually they are not genotoxic. Our previous studies showed that carvacrol (CA) and rosemary essential oil (RO) induced growth inhibition of both human cell lines HepG2 and BHNF-1, with hepatoma HepG2 cells being more sensitive to either compound tested. Cytotoxic concentrations of CA and RO induced the formation of DNA strand breaks. Further ex vivo studies showed that extracts prepared from hepatocytes of CA- and RO-supplemented rats did not increase incision repair activity compared to extracts from liver cells of control animals. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of cytotoxic concentrations of CA and RO on the cell cycle and the ability of both natural volatiles to induce DNA fragmentation and apoptotic death of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. These effects were measured after 24 h incubation of HepG2 cells with CA and RO using three independent methods - flow cytometry, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation (electrophoresis) and micronucleus assay. Evaluation of morphological changes and formation of micronuclei in HepG2 cells showed no increase in the number of micronuclei in cells treated by CA and RO compared to control cells. On the other hand, CA and RO induced morphological changes typical for apoptosis in concentration-dependent manner. The presence of necrosis was negligible. Both natural compounds caused shrinking of cytoplasmic membrane and formation of apoptotic bodies. In addition, the highest concentrations of CA and RO induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation (formation of DNA ladder) in HepG2 cells. Cell cycle analysis revealed the accumulation of cells in the G1 phase, which was accompanied by a reduction in the number of cells in the S phase after 24 h exposure to the substances tested. The cell division was thus slowed down or stopped and this process resulted in cell

  19. Suppression of homologous recombination sensitizes human tumor cells to IGF-1R inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhia, Kunal A; Gao, Shan; Aleksic, Tamara; Esashi, Fumiko; Macaulay, Valentine M

    2015-06-15

    Inhibition of type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) sensitizes to DNA-damaging cancer treatments, and delays repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination (HR). In a recent screen for mediators of resistance to IGF-1R inhibitor AZ12253801, we identified RAD51, required for the strand invasion step of HR. These findings prompted us to test the hypothesis that IGF-1R-inhibited cells accumulate DSBs formed at endogenous DNA lesions, and depend on residual HR for their repair. Indeed, initial experiments showed time-dependent accumulation of γH2AX foci in IGF-1R -inhibited or -depleted prostate cancer cells. We then tested effects of suppressing HR, and found that RAD51 depletion enhanced AZ12253801 sensitivity in PTEN wild-type prostate cancer cells but not in cells lacking functional PTEN. Similar sensitization was induced in prostate cancer cells by depletion of BRCA2, required for RAD51 loading onto DNA, and in BRCA2(-/-) colorectal cancer cells, compared with isogenic BRCA2(+/-) cells. We also assessed chemical HR inhibitors, finding that RAD51 inhibitor BO2 blocked RAD51 focus formation and sensitized to AZ12253801. Finally, we tested CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306, which impairs HR by inhibiting CDK1-mediated BRCA1 phosphorylation. R0-3306 suppressed RAD51 focus formation consistent with HR attenuation, and sensitized prostate cancer cells to IGF-1R inhibition, with 2.4-fold reduction in AZ12253801 GI50 and 13-fold reduction in GI80. These data suggest that responses to IGF-1R inhibition are enhanced by genetic and chemical approaches to suppress HR, defining a population of cancers (PTEN wild-type, BRCA mutant) that may be intrinsically sensitive to IGF-1R inhibitory drugs. © 2014 UICC.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA detection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by polymerase chain reaction: enhanced sensitivity after mitogenic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetali, S K; Oyaizu, N; Paul, M; Pahwa, S

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stimulus-induced up-regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could enhance the diagnostic sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PBMC derived from 11 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic adults were cultured with a stimulus of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) plus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) for 36 h prior to lysing the cells for PCR. In all 11 patients studied, the intensity of PCR-assisted HIV RNA amplification (RNA-PCR) performed on stimulated cells was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than that obtained on unstimulated cells. A comparison of conventional PCR-assisted DNA amplification (DNA-PCR) with that of RNA-PCR was made on seven patients. The sensitivity of DNA-PCR was also increased by prior stimulation of cells, although not to the same extent as was observed for RNA-PCR. The results of our study indicate that the sensitivity of PCR can be significantly enhanced by prior activation of cells with PHA and PMA.

  1. Human cancer cells with stem cell-like phenotype exhibit enhanced sensitivity to the cytotoxicity of IL-2 and IL-15 activated natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; Wang, Guoping; He, Sisi; Liu, Qin; Sun, Jianhong; Wang, Yongsheng

    2016-02-01

    Tumors harbor a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) which can drive tumor progression and therapeutical resistance. Nature killer (NK) cells are best known for their ability to directly recognize and kill malignant cells. However, the susceptibility of cancer stem cells to NK cells is not fully understood. Here we demonstrated that human CD44+CD24- breast CSCs were shown enhanced sensitivity to IL-2 and IL-15 activated NK cells. CD44+CD24- CSCs expressed higher levels of NKG2D ligands ULBP1, ULBP2 and MICA. Blockade assay showed that the sensitivity of CSCs to NK cells-mediated lysis was mainly dependent on NKG2D. Furthermore, redox oxygen species (ROS)-low tumor cells were more sensitive to NK cells. The presence of antioxidant enzymes inhibitor L-S,R-buthionine sulfoximine or H2O2 retarded the cytotoxicity of NK cells to CD44+CD24- CSCs. In addition, NK cells could readily target CD133+ colonal CSCs. Our findings provide novel targets for NK cells-based immunotherapy and are of great importance for translational medicine.

  2. Is Cytox 3522 (10% methylene-bis-thiocyanate) a human skin sensitizer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1983-01-01

    Methylene-bis-thiocyanate is an antimicrobial agent in Cytox 3522 (American Cyanamid Corporation) and Nalco 206 (Nalco Chemical Company). Both are wide-spectrum industrial biocides. Cytox 3522 showed a strong sensitization potential in guineau pigs using the Guinea Pig Maximization Test and the O......Methylene-bis-thiocyanate is an antimicrobial agent in Cytox 3522 (American Cyanamid Corporation) and Nalco 206 (Nalco Chemical Company). Both are wide-spectrum industrial biocides. Cytox 3522 showed a strong sensitization potential in guineau pigs using the Guinea Pig Maximization Test...

  3. Sensitive Tumorigenic Potential Evaluation of Adult Human Multipotent Neural Cells Immortalized by hTERT Gene Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Hang Lee

    Full Text Available Stem cells and therapeutic genes are emerging as a new therapeutic approach to treat various neurodegenerative diseases with few effective treatment options. However, potential formation of tumors by stem cells has hampered their clinical application. Moreover, adequate preclinical platforms to precisely test tumorigenic potential of stem cells are controversial. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of various animal models for in vivo stem cell tumorigenicity testing to identify the most sensitive platform. Then, tumorigenic potential of adult human multipotent neural cells (ahMNCs immortalized by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene was examined as a stem cell model with therapeutic genes. When human glioblastoma (GBM cells were injected into adult (4-6-week-old Balb/c-nu, adult NOD/SCID, adult NOG, or neonate (1-2-week-old NOG mice, the neonate NOG mice showed significantly faster tumorigenesis than that of the other groups regardless of intracranial or subcutaneous injection route. Two kinds of ahMNCs (682TL and 779TL were primary cultured from surgical samples of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Although the ahMNCs were immortalized by lentiviral hTERT gene delivery (hTERT-682TL and hTERT-779TL, they did not form any detectable masses, even in the most sensitive neonate NOG mouse platform. Moreover, the hTERT-ahMNCs had no gross chromosomal abnormalities on a karyotype analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that neonate NOG mice could be a sensitive animal platform to test tumorigenic potential of stem cell therapeutics and that ahMNCs could be a genetically stable stem cell source with little tumorigenic activity to develop regenerative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are sensitive to low dose cyclophosphamide: implications for the immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Heylmann

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Treg play a pivotal role in the immune system since they inhibit the T cell response. It is well known that cyclophosphamide applied at low dose is able to stimulate the immune response while high dose cyclophosphamide exerts inhibitory activity. Data obtained in mice indicate that cyclophosphamide provokes a reduction in the number of Treg and impairs their suppressive activity, resulting in immune stimulation. Here, we addressed the question of the sensitivity of human Treg to cyclophosphamide, comparing Treg with cytotoxic T cells (CTL and T helper cells (Th. We show that Treg are more sensitive than CTL and Th to mafosfamide, which is an active derivative of cyclophosphamide, which does not need metabolic activation. The high sensitivity of Treg was due to the induction of apoptosis. Treg compared to CTL and Th were not more sensitive to the alkylating drugs temozolomide and nimustine and also not to mitomycin C, indicating a specific Treg response to mafosfamide. The high sensitivity of Treg to mafosfamide resulted not only in enhanced cell death, but also in impaired Treg function as demonstrated by a decline in the suppressor activity of Treg in a co-culture model with Th and Helios positive Treg. Treatment of Treg with mafosfamide gave rise to a high level of DNA crosslinks, which were not repaired to the same extent as observed in Th and CTL. Also, Treg showed a low level of γH2AX foci up to 6 h and a high level 24 h after treatment, indicating alterations in the DNA damage response. Overall, this is the first demonstration that human Treg are, in comparison with Th and CTL, hypersensitive to cyclophosphamide, which is presumably due to a DNA repair defect.

  5. Radio-sensitization by Piper longumine of human breast adenoma MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jian-Xin; Yao, Zhi-Feng; Li, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Yong-Biao

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of Piper longumine on radio-sensitization of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells and underlying mechanisms. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were cultured in vitro and those in logarithmic growth phase were selected for experiments divided into four groups: control, X-ray exposed, Piper longumine, and Piper longumine combined with X-rays. Conogenic assays were performed to determine the radio-sensitizing effects. Cell survival curves were fitted by single-hit multi-target model and then the survival fraction (SF), average lethal dose (D0), quasi-threshold dose (Dq) and sensitive enhancement ratio (SER) were calculated. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM).Western blot assays were employed for expression of apoptosis-related proteins (Bc1-2 and Bax) after treatment with Piper longumine and/or X-ray radiation. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was detected by FCM with a DCFH-DA probe. The cloning formation capacity was decreased in the group of piperlongumine plus radiation, which displayed the values of SF2, D0, Dq significantly lower than those of radiation alone group and the sensitive enhancement ratio (SER) of D0 was1.22 and 1.29, respectively. The cell apoptosis rate was increased by the combination treatment of Piper longumine and radiation. Piper longumine increased the radiation-induced intracellular levels of ROS. Compared with the control group and individual group, the combination group demonstrated significantly decreased expression of Bcl-2 with increased Bax. Piper longumine at a non-cytotoxic concentration can enhance the radio-sensitivity of MDA- MB-231cells, which may be related to its regulation of apoptosis-related protein expression and the increase of intracellular ROS level, thus increasing radiation-induced apoptosis.

  6. Reach-scale channel sensitivity to multiple human activities and natural events: Lower Santa Clara River, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Peter W.; Dusterhoff, Scott R.; Sears, William A.

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the cumulative impact of natural and human influences on the sensitivity of channel morphodynamics, a relative measure between the drivers for change and the magnitude of channel response, requires an approach that accommodates spatial and temporal variability in the suite of primary stressors. Multiple historical data sources were assembled to provide a reach-scale analysis of the lower Santa Clara River (LSCR) in Ventura County, California, USA. Sediment supply is naturally high due to tectonic activity, earthquake-generated landslides, wildfires, and high magnitude flow events during El Niño years. Somewhat typically for the region, the catchment has been subject to four reasonably distinct land use and resource management combinations since European-American settlement. When combined with analysis of channel morphological response (quantifiable since ca. 1930), reach-scale and temporal differences in channel sensitivity become apparent. Downstream reaches have incised on average 2.4 m and become narrower by almost 50% with changes focused in a period of highly sensitive response after about 1950 followed by forced insensitivity caused by structural flood embankments and a significant grade control structure. In contrast, the middle reaches have been responsive but are morphologically resilient, and the upstream reaches show a mildly sensitive aggradational trend. Superimposing the natural and human drivers for change reveals that large scale stressors (related to ranching and irrigation) have been replaced over time by a suite of stressors operating at multiple spatial scales. Lower reaches have been sensitive primarily to 'local' scale impacts (urban growth, flood control, and aggregate mining) whereas, upstream, catchment-scale influences still prevail (including flow regulation and climate-driven sediment supply factors). These factors illustrate the complexity inherent to cumulative impact assessment in fluvial systems, provide evidence for a

  7. Evaluation of six channelized Hotelling observers in combination with a contrast sensitivity function to predict human observer performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffi, Marco; Veldkamp, Wouter J. H.; van Engen, Ruben E.; Bouwman, Ramona W.

    2015-03-01

    Standard methods to quantify image quality (IQ) may not be adequate for clinical images since they depend on uniform backgrounds and linearity. Statistical model observers are not restricted to these limitations and might be suitable for IQ evaluation of clinical images. One of these statistical model observers is the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), where the images are filtered by a set of channels. The aim of this study was to evaluate six different channel sets, with an additional filter to simulate the human contrast sensitivity function (CSF), in their ability to predict human observer performance. For this evaluation a two alternative forced choice experiment was performed with two types of background structures (white noise (WN) and clustered lumpy background (CLB)), 5 disk-shaped objects with different diameters and 3 different signal energies. The results show that the correlation between human and model observers have a diameter dependency for some channel sets in combination with CLBs. The addition of the CSF reduces this diameter dependency and in some cases improves the correlation coefficient between human- and model observer. For the CLB the Partial Least Squares channel set shows the highest correlation with the human observer (r2=0.71) and for WN backgrounds it was the Gabor-channel set with CSF (r2=0.72). This study showed that for some channels there is a high correlation between human and model observer, which suggests that the CHO has potential as a tool for IQ analysis of digital mammography systems.

  8. Developing a set of ancestry-sensitive DNA markers reflecting continental origins of humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kersbergen (Paula); K. van Duijn (Kate); A. Kloosterman (Ate); J.T. den Dunnen (Johan); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); P. de Knijff (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The identification and use of Ancestry-Sensitive Markers (ASMs), i.e. genetic polymorphisms facilitating the genetic reconstruction of geographical origins of individuals, is far from straightforward. Results: Here we describe the ascertainment and application of five

  9. Human skeletal muscle perilipin 2 and 3 expression varies with insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Ploug, Thorkil

    2013-01-01

    was obtained from vastus lateralis, and a two-step sequential euglycaemic-hy- perinsulinaemic clamp was performed. Muscle sam- ples were analyzed by Western blot for expression of perilipin 2, 3, 5, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), endothelial lipase (EL) and lipoprotein...

  10. Developing a set of ancestry-sensitive DNA markers reflecting continental origins of humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kersbergen (Paula); K. van Duijn (Kate); A. Kloosterman (Ate); J.T. den Dunnen (Johan); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); P. de Knijff (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The identification and use of Ancestry-Sensitive Markers (ASMs), i.e. genetic polymorphisms facilitating the genetic reconstruction of geographical origins of individuals, is far from straightforward. Results: Here we describe the ascertainment and application of five differe

  11. Sensitivity of Human Choice to Manipulations of Parameters of Positive and Negative Sound Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Joseph Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether altering parameters of positive and negative reinforcement in identical ways could influence behavior maintained by each in different ways. Three undergraduate students participated in a series of assessments designed to identify preferred and aversive sounds with similar reinforcing values. Following reinforcer identification, we conducted parameter sensitivity assessments for both positive and negative reinforcers. Parameter manipulation...

  12. Acute ozone exposure increases plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha in ozone-sensitive human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.; Giri, S.N.; Siefkin, A.D.

    1989-07-01

    Twenty O/sub 3/-sensitive and /sup 2/O O/sub 3/-nonsensitive subjects participated in a study to investigate the effects of disparate O/sub 3/ sensitivity on plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha responses consequent to exposure to ambient O3 concentrations. Subjects were selected from a pool of 75 normal healthy college-aged males who had been previously exposed to 0.35 ppm O3 for 1 h at an exercising VE of 60 L/min. The selection criterion used was the observed decrement in FEV1 after the O/sub 3/ exposure: O/sub 3/-sensitive, FEV1 decrement greater than 24%; O/sub 3/-nonsensitive, FEV1 decrement less than 11%. Each subject was exposed to filtered air and to 0.20 and 0.35 ppm O/sub 3/ for 80 min while exercising at a VE of 50 L/min. These experimental protocols were divided into two 40-min sessions separated by a period of 4 to 10 min. PGF2 alpha, FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 were evaluated before, during, and after each protocol. SGaw and Vtg were measured before and after each protocol. Plasma PGF2 alpha was significantly increased in the O/sub 3/-sensitive group during and after the 0.35-ppm O/sub 3/ exposure.

  13. Integrative mRNA-microRNA analyses reveal novel interactions related to insulin sensitivity in human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Tyler J; Walton, R Grace; Finlin, Brian; Zhu, Beibei; Unal, Resat; Rasouli, Neda; Peterson, Charlotte A; Kern, Philip A

    2016-02-01

    Adipose tissue has profound effects on whole-body insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying biological processes are quite complex and likely multifactorial. For instance, the adipose transcriptome is posttranscriptionally modulated by microRNAs, but the relationship between microRNAs and insulin sensitivity in humans remains to be determined. To this end, we utilized an integrative mRNA-microRNA microarray approach to identify putative molecular interactions that regulate the transcriptome in subcutaneous adipose tissue of insulin-sensitive (IS) and insulin-resistant (IR) individuals. Using the NanoString nCounter Human v1 microRNA Expression Assay, we show that 17 microRNAs are differentially expressed in IR vs. IS. Of these, 16 microRNAs (94%) are downregulated in IR vs. IS, including miR-26b, miR-30b, and miR-145. Using Agilent Human Whole Genome arrays, we identified genes that were predicted targets of miR-26b, miR-30b, and miR-145 and were upregulated in IR subjects. This analysis produced ADAM22, MYO5A, LOX, and GM2A as predicted gene targets of these microRNAs. We then validated that miR-145 and miR-30b regulate these mRNAs in differentiated human adipose stem cells. We suggest that use of bioinformatic integration of mRNA and microRNA arrays yields verifiable mRNA-microRNA pairs that are associated with insulin resistance and can be validated in vitro. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Higher Ratios of Hyaluronic Acid Enhance Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human MSCs in a Hyaluronic Acid–Gelatin Composite Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Pfeifer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs seeded on specific carrier materials are a promising source for the repair of traumatic cartilage injuries. The best supportive carrier material has not yet been determined. As natural components of cartilage’s extracellular matrix, hyaluronic acid and collagen are the focus of biomaterial research. In order to optimize chondrogenic support, we investigated three different scaffold compositions of a hyaluronic acid (HA-gelatin based biomaterial. Methods: Human MSCs (hMSCs were seeded under vacuum on composite scaffolds of three different HA-gelatin ratios and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 21 days. Cell-scaffold constructs were assessed at different time points for cell viability, gene expression patterns, production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM and for (immuno-histological appearance. The intrinsic transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta uptake of empty scaffolds was evaluated by determination of the TGF-beta concentrations in the medium over time. Results: No significant differences were found for cell seeding densities and cell viability. hMSCs seeded on scaffolds with higher ratios of HA showed better cartilage-like differentiation in all evaluated parameters. TGF-beta uptake did not differ between empty scaffolds. Conclusion: Higher ratios of HA support the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs seeded on a HA-gelatin composite scaffold.

  15. Micronuclei frequency induced by bleomycin in human peripheral lymphocytes: correlating BLHX polymorphism with mutagen sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Francesca; Carbone, Fabio; Angelini, Sabrina; Forti, Giorgio Cantelli; Norppa, Hannu; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2008-03-01

    Mutagen sensitivity assay, by measuring chromosome damage induced by an in vitro treatment of peripheral lymphocytes with bleomycin, has been proposed as a biomarker for assessing cancer susceptibility. Recently, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP A1450G) of the gene for bleomycin hydrolase (BLHX), a specific neutral cysteine protease able to metabolise bleomycin, was proposed as a plausible candidate to variation in mutagen sensitivity. To shed more light on the effect of BLHX genotype on the expression of chromosome damage induced in vitro by bleomycin, we determined mutagen sensitivity for 45 non-smoker healthy volunteers. The level of bleomycin-induced chromosome damage was assessed as frequencies of micronuclei (MN) in cytokinesis-blocked lymphocytes. The subjects were genotyped for the BLHX gene, to determine the possible effect of this polymorphism on mutagen sensitivity. No difference in the spontaneous value of MN was detected between the homozygotes wild-type (A/A) and the carriers of variant alleles A/G heterozygotes or G/G homozygotes (MN/1000 binucleated (BN) cells: 6.69+/-2.53 and 6.37+/-4.87, respectively). A substantial effect of BLHX polymorphism in predetermining individual mutagen sensitivity status was observed: subjects with the BLHX A/A genotype displayed significantly lower mean levels of bleomycin-induced MN frequency than the carriers of A/G or G/G variant alleles combined (12.00+/-3.76 MN/1000 BN vs. 16.37+/-8.86 MN/1000 BN, respectively; P=0.029). The multiple regression analysis, including BLHX genotype and age, confirmed the significant effect of BLHX variant alleles (A/G, G/G) on the chromosome damage induced by bleomycin (P=0.01), whereas age correlated only with the spontaneous MN frequency.

  16. Sensitive and rapid detection of Paragonimus westermani infection in humans and animals by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M X; Ai, L; Zhang, R L; Xia, J J; Wang, K; Chen, S H; Zhang, Y N; Xu, M J; Li, X; Zhu, X Q; Chen, J X

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and validated for the detection of Paragonimus westermani adults, metacercariae, and eggs in human and animal samples. The LAMP amplification can be finished in 45 min under isothermal condition at 60°C by employing a set of four species-specific primer mixtures and the results can be checked by naked-eye visualization. No amplification products were detected with deoxyribunucleic acid (DNA) of related trematode species including Fasciola hepatica, Fasciola gigantica, Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini, Schistosoma mansoni, and Schistosoma japonicum. The method was further validated by examining P. westermani DNA in intermediate hosts including freshwater crabs and crayfish, as well as in sputum and pleural fluid samples from patients of paragonimiasis. These results indicated that the LAMP assay was highly specific, sensitive, and rapid, and it was approximately 100 times more sensitive than conventional specific PCR. The LAMP assay established in this study provides a rapid and sensitive tool for the detection of P. westermani DNA in freshwater crabs, crayfish, sputum, and pleural fluid samples, which has important implications for effective control of human paragonimiasis.

  17. A sensitive RNase protection assay to detect transcripts from potentially functional human endogenous L1 retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodcock, D M; Williamson, M R; Doherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    A high background of read-through transcripts from degenerate human L1 retrotransposons is present in almost all human cell types. This prevents the detection of RNA transcripts from potentially functional elements. To overcome this, we have developed an RNase protection assay based on the recons...... transcripts from divergent L1 families but are either discrete shorter transcripts or specifically processed products from longer initial transcripts....

  18. Essential Oil from Berries of Lebanese Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb Displays Similar Antibacterial Activity to Chlorhexidine but Higher Cytocompatibility with Human Oral Primary Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Azzimonti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorhexidine (CHX, one of the most effective drugs administered for periodontal treatment, presents collateral effects including toxicity when used for prolonged periods; here, we have evaluated the bactericidal potency and the cytocompatibility of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb essential oil (EO in comparison with 0.05% CHX. The EO was extracted from berries by hydrodistillation and components identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Bacterial inhibition halo analysis, quantitative cell viability 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl-5-[(phenyl amino carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide assay (XTT, and colony forming unit (CFU count were evaluated against the two biofilm formers Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans. Finally, cytocompatibility was assessed with human primary gingival fibroblasts (HGF and mucosal keratinocytes (HK. The resulting EO was mainly composed of monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes. An inhibition halo test demonstrated that both bacteria were sensitive to the EO; XTT analysis and CFU counts confirmed that 10-fold-diluted EO determined a statistically significant (p < 0.05 reduction in bacteria count and viability towards both biofilm and planktonic forms in a comparable manner to those obtained with CHX. Moreover, EO displayed higher cytocompatibility than CHX (p < 0.05. In conclusion, EO exhibited bactericidal activity similar to CHX, but a superior cytocompatibility, making it a promising antiseptic alternative to CHX.

  19. Essential Oil from Berries of Lebanese Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb Displays Similar Antibacterial Activity to Chlorhexidine but Higher Cytocompatibility with Human Oral Primary Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Cochis, Andrea; Beyrouthy, Marc El; Iriti, Marcello; Uberti, Francesca; Sorrentino, Rita; Landini, Manuela Miriam; Rimondini, Lia; Varoni, Elena Maria

    2015-05-21

    Chlorhexidine (CHX), one of the most effective drugs administered for periodontal treatment, presents collateral effects including toxicity when used for prolonged periods; here, we have evaluated the bactericidal potency and the cytocompatibility of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb essential oil (EO) in comparison with 0.05% CHX. The EO was extracted from berries by hydrodistillation and components identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Bacterial inhibition halo analysis, quantitative cell viability 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide assay (XTT), and colony forming unit (CFU) count were evaluated against the two biofilm formers Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans. Finally, cytocompatibility was assessed with human primary gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and mucosal keratinocytes (HK). The resulting EO was mainly composed of monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes. An inhibition halo test demonstrated that both bacteria were sensitive to the EO; XTT analysis and CFU counts confirmed that 10-fold-diluted EO determined a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction in bacteria count and viability towards both biofilm and planktonic forms in a comparable manner to those obtained with CHX. Moreover, EO displayed higher cytocompatibility than CHX (p < 0.05). In conclusion, EO exhibited bactericidal activity similar to CHX, but a superior cytocompatibility, making it a promising antiseptic alternative to CHX.

  20. Emotional expectations influence neural sensitivity to fearful faces in humans:An event-related potential study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The present study tested whether neural sensitivity to salient emotional facial expressions was influenced by emotional expectations induced by a cue that validly predicted the expression of a subsequently presented target face. Event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by fearful and neutral faces were recorded while participants performed a gender discrimination task under cued (‘expected’) and uncued (‘unexpected’) conditions. The behavioral results revealed that accuracy was lower for fearful compared with neutral faces in the unexpected condition, while accuracy was similar for fearful and neutral faces in the expected condition. ERP data revealed increased amplitudes in the P2 component and 200–250 ms interval for unexpected fearful versus neutral faces. By contrast, ERP responses were similar for fearful and neutral faces in the expected condition. These findings indicate that human neural sensitivity to fearful faces is modulated by emotional expectations. Although the neural system is sensitive to unpredictable emotionally salient stimuli, sensitivity to salient stimuli is reduced when these stimuli are predictable.

  1. Demethylation restores SN38 sensitivity in cells with acquired resistance to SN38 derived from human cervical squamous cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    TANAKA, TETSUJI; BAI, TAO; TOUJIMA, SAORI; UTSUNOMIYA, TOMOKO; MATSUOKA, TOSHIHIDE; KOBAYASHI, AYA; YAMAMOTO, MADOKA; SASAKI, NORIYUKI; TANIZAKI, YUKO; UTSUNOMIYA, HIROTOSHI; TANAKA, JUNKO; YUKAWA, KAZUNORI

    2012-01-01

    Using seven monoclonal SN38-resistant subclones established from ME180 human cervical squamous cell carcinoma cells, we examined the demethylation effects of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) on the SN38-sensitivity of the cells as well as the expression of death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) in the SN38-resistant cells. The DAPK expression levels were evaluated among parent ME180 cells, SN38-resistant ME180 cells and cisplatin-resistant ME180 cells by methylation-specific DAPK-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The SN38-resistant cells co-treated with SN38 and 5-aza-CdR strongly exhibited enhanced SN38-sensitivities resembling those found in the parent cells. In the SN38-resistant subclones, no relationships were found between the restored SN38 sensitivity and hypermethylation of the DAPK promoter, DAPK mRNA expression, DAPK protein expression and induction of DAPK protein after 5-aza-CdR treatment, unlike the strong suppression of 5-aza-CdR-induced DAPK protein expression in the cisplatin-resistant subclones. These findings indicate that reversibly methylated molecules, but not DAPK, may regulate SN38 resistance, and that demethylating agents can be strong sensitizing anticancer chemotherapeutic drugs for SN38-resistant cancers. PMID:22246465

  2. Specific, sensitive, and quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human immunoglobulin G antibodies to anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Conrad P; Semenova, Vera A; Elie, Cheryl M; Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Greene, Carolyn; Li, Han; Stamey, Karen; Steward-Clark, Evelene; Schmidt, Daniel S; Mothershed, Elizabeth; Pruckler, Janet; Schwartz, Stephanie; Benson, Robert F; Helsel, Leta O; Holder, Patricia F; Johnson, Scott E; Kellum, Molly; Messmer, Trudy; Thacker, W Lanier; Besser, Lilah; Plikaytis, Brian D; Taylor, Thomas H; Freeman, Alison E; Wallace, Kelly J; Dull, Peter; Sejvar, Jim; Bruce, Erica; Moreno, Rosa; Schuchat, Anne; Lingappa, Jairam R; Martin, Sandra K; Walls, John; Bronsdon, Melinda; Carlone, George M; Bajani-Ari, Mary; Ashford, David A; Stephens, David S; Perkins, Bradley A

    2002-10-01

    The bioterrorism-associated human anthrax epidemic in the fall of 2001 highlighted the need for a sensitive, reproducible, and specific laboratory test for the confirmatory diagnosis of human anthrax. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed, optimized, and rapidly qualified an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in human serum. The qualified ELISA had a minimum detection limit of 0.06 micro g/mL, a reliable lower limit of detection of 0.09 micro g/mL, and a lower limit of quantification in undiluted serum specimens of 3.0 micro g/mL anti-PA IgG. The diagnostic sensitivity of the assay was 97.8%, and the diagnostic specificity was 97.6%. A competitive inhibition anti-PA IgG ELISA was also developed to enhance diagnostic specificity to 100%. The anti-PA ELISAs proved valuable for the confirmation of cases of cutaneous and inhalational anthrax and evaluation of patients in whom the diagnosis of anthrax was being considered.

  3. Rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic determination of zonisamide in human serum application to a pharmacokinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M B Majnooni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate and very rapid method for determination of zonisamide an antiepileptic drug, in human serum is described. The analytical procedure involves liquid-liquid extraction of the analyte and an internal standard (vanillin from human serum by ethyl acetate as extracting solvent. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a monolithic C18 analytical column and a mixture of 0.05 M phosphate buffer containing triethylamine (1 ml/l; pH 2.7 and methanol (83:17 v/v was used as the mobile phase. The detection wavelength was set at 240 nm. The calibration curve was linear over a concentration range of 0.015-6.4 μg/ml of zonisamide in human serum. The total run time of analysis was 3.5 min and the lower limits of detection and quantification were 0.005 and 0.015 μg/ml, respectively. The method validation was carried out in terms of specificity, sensitivity, linearity, precision, accuracy and stability. The validated method was applied in a randomised crossover bioequivalence study of two different zonisamide preparations in 24 healthy volunteers, and the assay was sensitive enough to measure drug levels up to 8 days following a single dose administration of zonisamide.

  4. Enhancement of cisplatin sensitivity of cisplatin-resistant human cervical carcinoma cells by bryostatin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Huang, Jie; Basu, Alakananda

    2005-09-15

    Bryostatin 1, a unique protein kinase C (PKC) activator, is already in the clinical trials. An understanding of complex regulation of PKC by bryostatin 1 is essential for effective use of bryostatin 1 in the clinic. We have previously shown that the ability of bryostatin 1 to enhance cisplatin sensitivity correlated with its ability to down-regulate PKCdelta in HeLa cells. We have investigated how bryostatin 1 influences PKCdelta regulation in cisplatin-resistant HeLa (HeLa/CP) cells, and if bryostatin 1 could be used to reverse cisplatin resistance. Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), bryostatin 1, and small interfering RNA were used to manipulate PKC level/activation status. Cell death was monitored by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, Annexin V dye-binding assay, and analysis of hypodiploid peak in a flow cytometer. Bryostatin 1 elicited a biphasic concentration response on PKCdelta down-regulation and cisplatin-induced cell death in HeLa/CP cells; the maximum effect was achieved with 1 nmol/L bryostatin 1. Down-regulation of PKCalpha increased with increasing concentrations of bryostatin 1. PDBu induced down-regulation of PKCalpha in HeLa and HeLa/CP cells but it had little effect on PKCdelta down-regulation in HeLa/CP cells. However, both PDBu and bryostatin 1 enhanced the sensitivity of HeLa/CP cells to cisplatin. Knockdown of PKCdelta by small interfering RNA inhibited cisplatin-induced apoptosis but knockdown of PKCalpha enhanced cisplatin-induced cell death. These results suggest that although PKCdelta acts as a proapoptotic protein, full-length PKCdelta may inhibit cisplatin-induced cell death. Thus, persistent activation/down-regulation of PKCdelta by bryostatin 1 was associated with cisplatin sensitization. Furthermore, PKCalpha acts as an antiapoptotic protein and down-regulation of PKCalpha by PDBu was associated with cellular sensitization to cisplatin.

  5. Sensitive Assay of Human Alpha-fetoprotein by Time-resolved Fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) produced mainly in the yolk sac and the liver is the major protein in the fetal circulation during early postnatal life. AFP measurements are used in the diagnosis and monitoring AFP producing tumors in the liver, germ cells and the gastrointestinal. In addition, AFP marked increases are found in fetal illness, such as neural tube defects. In this study, a sensitive

  6. Environment-Sensitive Fluorescent Probe for the Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene Potassium Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Beilei; Ke, Bowen; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-02-02

    A novel environment-sensitive probe S2 with turn-on switch for Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel was developed herein. After careful evaluation, this fluorescent probe showed high binding affinity with hERG potassium channel with an IC50 value of 41.65 nM and can be well applied to hERG channel imaging or cellular distribution study for hERG channel blockers. Compared with other imaging techniques, such as immunofluorescence and fluorescent protein-based approaches, this method is convenient and affordable, especially since a washing procedure is not needed. Meanwhile, this environment-sensitive turn-on design strategy may provide a good example for the probe development for these targets that have no reactive or catalytic activity.

  7. A sensitive LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination of amygdalin and paeoniflorin in human plasma and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobing; Shi, Fuguo; Gu, Pan; Liu, Lingye; He, Hua; Ding, Li

    2014-04-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and fully validated for the simultaneous determination of amygdalin (AD) and paeoniflorin (PF) in human plasma. For both analytes, the method exhibited high sensitivity (LLOQs of 0.6ng/mL) by selecting the ammonium adduct ions ([M+NH4](+)) as the precursor ions and good linearity over the concentration range of 0.6-2000ng/mL with the correlation coefficients>0.9972. The intra- and inter-day precision was lower than 10% in relation to relative standard deviation, while accuracy was within ±2.3% in terms of relative error for both analytes. The developed method was successfully applied to a pilot pharmacokinetic study of AD and PF in healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion administration of Huoxue-Tongluo lyophilized powder for injection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrophysiological characterization of human and mouse sodium-dependent citrate transporters (NaCT/SLC13A5) reveal species differences with respect to substrate sensitivity and cation dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Ruud; Peeva, Polina M; Rong, James X; Sher, Emanuele

    2015-11-01

    The citric acid cycle intermediate citrate plays a crucial role in metabolic processes such as fatty acid synthesis, glucose metabolism, and β-oxidation. Citrate is imported from the circulation across the plasma membrane into liver cells mainly by the sodium-dependent citrate transporter (NaCT; SLC13A5). Deletion of NaCT from mice led to metabolic changes similar to caloric restriction; therefore, NaCT has been proposed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we expressed mouse and human NaCT into Xenopus oocytes and examined some basic functional properties of those transporters. Interestingly, striking differences were found between mouse and human NaCT with respect to their sensitivities to citric acid cycle intermediates as substrates for these transporters. Mouse NaCT had at least 20- to 800-fold higher affinity for these intermediates than human NaCT. Mouse NaCT is fully active at physiologic plasma levels of citrate, but its human counterpart is not. Replacement of extracellular sodium by other monovalent cations revealed that human NaCT was markedly less dependent on extracellular sodium than mouse NaCT. The low sensitivity of human NaCT for citrate raises questions about the translatability of this target from the mouse to the human situation and raises doubts about the validity of this transporter as a therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic diseases in humans.

  9. Lipidomic evidence that lowering the typical dietary palmitate to oleate ratio in humans decreases the leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kien, C Lawrence; Bunn, Janice Y; Fukagawa, Naomi K; Anathy, Vikas; Matthews, Dwight E; Crain, Karen I; Ebenstein, David B; Tarleton, Emily K; Pratley, Richard E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported that lowering the high, habitual palmitic acid (PA) intake in ovulating women improved insulin sensitivity and both inflammatory and oxidative stress. In vitro studies indicate that PA can activate both cell membrane toll-like receptor-4 and the intracellular nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptor protein (NLRP3). To gain further insight into the relevance to human metabolic disease of dietary PA, we studied healthy, lean and obese adults enrolled in a randomized, crossover trial comparing 3-week, high-PA (HPA) and low-PA/high-oleic-acid (HOA) diets. After each diet, both hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivities were measured, and we assessed cytokine concentrations in plasma and in supernatants derived from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as well as proinflammatory gene expression in skeletal muscle. Insulin sensitivity was unaffected by diet. Plasma concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α was higher during the HPA diet. Lowering the habitually high PA intake by feeding the HOA diet resulted in lower secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α by PBMCs, as well as lower relative mRNA expression of cJun and NLRP3 in muscle. Principal components analysis of 156 total variables coupled to analysis of covariance indicated that the mechanistic pathway for the differential dietary effects on PBMCs involved changes in the PA/OA ratio of tissue lipids. Our results indicate that lowering the dietary and tissue lipid PA/OA ratio resulted in lower leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes, but the relevance to diabetes risk is uncertain.

  10. Dataset for human sensitivity to chemicals during development of motor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Z. Ingber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors reviewed human data related to motor development following exposure to a subset of chemicals thoroughly reviewed in Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR Toxicological Profiles and Addenda. The resulting dataset includes the following variables and confounders: chemical name, exposure route, exposure duration and frequency, study design, cohort name and/or geographic location, sex of cohort subjects, NOAEL, and LOAEL. This data summary can help validate motor development outcomes observed in animal exposure studies; it can also aid in determining whether these outcomes and corresponding exposure windows are relevant to humans.

  11. Environment-Sensitive Fluorescent Probe for the Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene Potassium Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Beilei; Ke, Bowen; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-01-01

    A novel environment-sensitive probe S2 with turn-on switch for Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel was developed herein. After careful evaluation, this fluorescent probe showed high binding affinity with hERG potassium channel with an IC50 value of 41.65 nM and can be well applied to hERG channel imaging or cellular distribution study for hERG channel blockers. Compared with other imaging techniques, such as immunofluorescence and fluorescent protein-based approaches, th...

  12. GABRB1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Associated with Altered Brain Responses (but not Performance) during Measures of Impulsivity and Reward Sensitivity in Human Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duka, Theodora; Nikolaou, Kyriaki; King, Sarah L.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Büchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana M.; Conrod, Patricia J.; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Jia, Tianye; Gowland, Penny; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paus, Tomáš; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael; Schumann, Gunter; Stephens, David N.

    2017-01-01

    Variations in genes encoding several GABAA receptors have been associated with human drug and alcohol abuse. Among these, a number of human studies have suggested an association between GABRB1, the gene encoding GABAA receptor β1 subunits, with Alcohol dependence (AD), both on its own and comorbid with other substance dependence and psychiatric illnesses. In the present study, we hypothesized that the GABRB1 genetically-associated increased risk for developing alcoholism may be associated with impaired behavioral control and altered sensitivity to reward, as a consequence of altered brain function. Exploiting the IMAGEN database (Schumann et al., 2010), we explored in a human adolescent population whether possession of the minor (T) variant of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2044081 is associated with performance of tasks measuring aspects of impulsivity, and reward sensitivity that are implicated in drug and alcohol abuse. Allelic variation did not associate with altered performance in either a stop-signal task (SST), measuring one aspect of impulsivity, or a monetary incentive delay (MID) task assessing reward anticipation. However, increased functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response in the right hemisphere inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), left hemisphere caudate/insula and left hemisphere inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) during MID performance was higher in the minor (T) allelic group. In contrast, during SST performance, the BOLD response found in the right hemisphere supramarginal gyrus, right hemisphere lingual and left hemisphere inferior parietal gyrus indicated reduced responses in the minor genotype. We suggest that β1-containing GABAA receptors may play a role in excitability of brain regions important in controlling reward-related behavior, which may contribute to susceptibility to addictive behavior. PMID:28261068

  13. Predicting Risk Sensitivity in Humans and Lower Animals: Risk as Variance or Coefficient of Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Elke U.; Shafir, Sharoni; Blais, Ann-Renee

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the statistical determinants of risk preference. In a meta-analysis of animal risk preference (foraging birds and insects), the coefficient of variation (CV), a measure of risk per unit of return, predicts choices far better than outcome variance, the risk measure of normative models. In a meta-analysis of human risk…

  14. ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENICALS SENSITIZE HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lungs are a target organ for arsenic carcinogenesis, however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that inorganic arsenic (iAs) can potentiate DNA damage induced by other agents. Once inside the human body iAs generally undergoes two ...

  15. Predicting Risk Sensitivity in Humans and Lower Animals: Risk as Variance or Coefficient of Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Elke U.; Shafir, Sharoni; Blais, Ann-Renee

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the statistical determinants of risk preference. In a meta-analysis of animal risk preference (foraging birds and insects), the coefficient of variation (CV), a measure of risk per unit of return, predicts choices far better than outcome variance, the risk measure of normative models. In a meta-analysis of human risk…

  16. Accuracy of diagnostic methods and surveillance sensitivity for human enterovirus, South Korea, 1999-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeon, Ji-Yeon; Hwang, Seoyeon; Kim, Hyejin; Song, Jaehyoung; Ahn, Jeongbae; Kang, Byunghak; Kim, Kisoon; Choi, Wooyoung; Chung, Jae Keun; Kim, Cheon-Hyun; Cho, Kyungsoon; Jee, Youngmee; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Kisang; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Min-Ji; Cheon, Doo-Sung

    2013-08-01

    The epidemiology of enteroviral infection in South Korea during 1999-2011 chronicles nationwide outbreaks and changing detection and subtyping methods used over the 13-year period. Of 14,657 patients whose samples were tested, 4,762 (32.5%) samples were positive for human enterovirus (human EV); as diagnostic methods improved, the rate of positive results increased. A seasonal trend of outbreaks was documented. Genotypes enterovirus 71, echovirus 30, coxsackievirus B5, enterovirus 6, and coxsackievirus B2 were the most common genotypes identified. Accurate test results correlated clinical syndromes to enterovirus genotypes: aseptic meningitis to echovirus 30, enterovirus 6, and coxsackievirus B5; hand, foot and mouth disease to coxsackievirus A16; and hand, foot and mouth disease with neurologic complications to enterovirus 71. There are currently no treatments specific to human EV infections; surveillance of enterovirus infections such as this study provides may assist with evaluating the need to research and develop treatments for infections caused by virulent human EV genotypes.

  17. mTOR inhibition sensitizes human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to resminostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Xingang, E-mail: pengxinggang26@sina.com [Department of Emergency General Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao (China); Zhang, Donghui, E-mail: zhangdonghuiyx@sina.com [Department of Infectious Disease, Linyi People’s Hospital, Linyi (China); Li, Zhengling, E-mail: lizhenglingzz@sina.com [Department of Nursing, Tengzhou Central People’s Hospital, Tengzhou (China); Fu, Meili, E-mail: fumeilidrlinyi@tom.com [Department of Infectious Disease, Linyi People’s Hospital, Linyi (China); Liu, Haiyan, E-mail: liuhaiyanlinyi5@sina.com [Department of Nursing, Linyi People’s Hospital, Linyi (China)

    2016-09-02

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) hyper-activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often associated with patients’ poor prognosis. Our previous study has shown that resminostat, a novel HDAC inhibitor (HDACi), activated mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP)-dependent apoptosis pathway in HCC cells. Here we explored the potential resminostat resistance factor by focusing on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We showed that AZD-2014, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, potentiated resminostat-induced cytotoxicity and proliferation inhibition in HCC cells. Molecularly, AZD-2014 enhanced resminostat-induced mPTP apoptosis pathway activation in HCC cells. Inhibition of this apoptosis pathway, by the caspase-9 specific inhibitor Ac-LEHD-CHO, the mPTP blockers (sanglifehrin A/cyclosporine A), or by shRNA-mediated knockdown of mPTP component cyclophilin-D (Cyp-D), significantly attenuated resminostat plus AZD-2014-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCC cells. Significantly, mTOR shRNA knockdown or kinase-dead mutation (Asp-2338-Ala) also sensitized HCC cells to resminostat, causing profound cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction. Together, these results suggest that mTOR could be a primary resistance factor of resminostat. Targeted inhibition of mTOR may thus significantly sensitize HCC cells to resminostat. - Highlights: • AZD-2014 potentiates resminostat’s cytotoxicity against HCC cells. • AZD-2014 facilitates resminostat-induced HCC cell apoptosis. • AZD-2014 augments resminostat-induced mitochondrial apoptosis pathway activation. • mTOR shRNA or kinase-dead mutation significantly sensitizes HCC cells to resminostat.

  18. A selective historical review of congener-specific human tissue measurements as sensitive and specific biomarkers of exposure to dioxins and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schecter, A

    1998-04-01

    Estimating internal exposure or dose of dioxins and related chemicals such as dibenzofurans and dioxinlike polychlorinated biphenyls is relatively straightforward in laboratory animals because a known dose is given and the amount absorbed can be measured. In wildlife, direct tissue measurement and measurement of environmental samples have both recently been used to estimate exposure. Until recently, human studies used only indirect indicators such as skin lesions to qualitatively estimate exposure to these chlorinated organic compounds. Environmental measurements have also sometimes been used to estimate human exposure. Dioxins in human tissue were not measured until the 1970s, when 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin was measured in mothers' milk; congener-specific measurement of dioxins and dibenzofurans in tissues (blood, milk, and adipose tissue) of the general population and exposed workers was first performed in the United States in the 1980s. Measurement in a sensitive and specific fashion of the 17 toxic dioxin and dibenzofuran congeners currently found in human tissue from industrial countries began in the 1980s. The use of known chemical standards, capillary columns, high resolution gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has now become relatively common. GC-MS analysis of blood is currently accepted as the gold standard for estimating human exposure to dioxins. However, analyses are still costly and time consuming, and worldwide there are few qualified laboratories. There is currently a lack of knowledge concerning kinetics at higher and lower exposure levels for most of the toxic dioxin congeners and of levels in target tissues of concern.

  19. Human-related factors regulate the spatial ecology of domestic cats in sensitive areas for conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim P Ferreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Domestic cats ranging freely in natural areas are a conservation concern due to competition, predation, disease transmission or hybridization with wildcats. In order to improve our ability to design effective control policies, we investigate the factors affecting their numbers and space use in natural areas of continental Europe. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the patterns of cat presence, abundance and space use and analyse the associated environmental and human constraints in a well-preserved Mediterranean natural area with small scattered local farms. We failed in detecting cats in areas away from human settlements (trapping effort above 4000 trap-nights, while we captured 30 individuals near inhabited farms. We identified 130 cats, all of them in farms still in use by people (30% of 128 farms. All cats were free-ranging and very wary of people. The main factor explaining the presence of cats was the presence of people, while the number of cats per farm was mostly affected by the occasional food provisioning with human refuse and the presence of people. The home ranges of eight radio tagged cats were centred at inhabited farms. Males went furthest away from the farms during the mating season (3.8 km on average, maximum 6.3 km, using inhabited farms as stepping-stones in their mating displacements (2.2 km of maximum inter-farm distance moved. In their daily movements, cats notably avoided entering in areas with high fox density. CONCLUSIONS: The presence, abundance and space use of cats were heavily dependent on human settlements. Any strategy aiming at reducing their impact in areas of conservation concern should aim at the presence of settlements and their spatial spread and avoid any access to human refuse. The movements of domestic cats would be limited in areas with large patches of natural vegetation providing good conditions for other carnivore mammals such as red foxes.

  20. Extraction and Refinement Strategy for Detection of Autism in 18-Month-Olds: A Guarantee of Higher Sensitivity and Specificity in the Process of Mass Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hideo; Shimizu, Yasuo; Nitto, Yukari; Imai, Miho; Ozawa, Takeshi; Iwasa, Mitsuaki; Shiga, Keiko; Hira, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    Background: For early detection of autism, it is difficult to maintain an efficient level of sensitivity and specificity based on observational data from a single screening. The Extraction and Refinement (E&R) Strategy utilizes a public children's health surveillance program to produce maximum efficacy in early detection of autism. In the…

  1. Extraction and Refinement Strategy for Detection of Autism in 18-Month-Olds: A Guarantee of Higher Sensitivity and Specificity in the Process of Mass Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hideo; Shimizu, Yasuo; Nitto, Yukari; Imai, Miho; Ozawa, Takeshi; Iwasa, Mitsuaki; Shiga, Keiko; Hira, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    Background: For early detection of autism, it is difficult to maintain an efficient level of sensitivity and specificity based on observational data from a single screening. The Extraction and Refinement (E&R) Strategy utilizes a public children's health surveillance program to produce maximum efficacy in early detection of autism. In the…

  2. Calcineurin inhibitors acutely improve insulin sensitivity without affecting insulin secretion in healthy human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øzbay, Aygen; Møller, Niels; Juhl, Claus

    2012-01-01

    of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) ciclosporin (CsA) and tacrolimus (Tac) has improved the outcome of organ transplants, but complications such as new onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation (NODAT) cause impairment of survival rates. The relative contribution of each CNI to the pathogenesis and development.......047), whereas first phase and pulsatile insulin secretion were unaffected. Coinciding with the CNI induced improved insulin sensitivity, glucose oxidation rates increased, while insulin clearance rates decreased, only non-significantly. Tac singularly lowered hsCRP concentrations, otherwise no changes were...

  3. Clemastine Potentiates the Human P2X7 Receptor by Sensitizing It to Lower ATP Concentrations*

    OpenAIRE

    Nörenberg, Wolfgang; Hempel, Christoph; Urban, Nicole; Sobottka, Helga; Illes, Peter; Schaefer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    P2X7 receptors have emerged as potential drug targets for the treatment of medical conditions such as e.g. rheumatoid arthritis and neuropathic pain. To assess the impact of pharmaceuticals on P2X7, we screened a compound library comprising approved or clinically tested drugs and identified several compounds that augment the ATP-triggered P2X7 activity in a stably transfected HEK293 cell line. Of these, clemastine markedly sensitized Ca2+ entry through P2X7 to lower ATP concentrations. Extrac...

  4. Identification of human papillomavirus type 156, the prototype of a new human gammapapillomavirus species, by a generic and highly sensitive PCR strategy for long DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhy, Diego; Bolatti, Elisa M; Piccirilli, Gustavo; Sánchez, Adriana; Fernandez Bussy, Ramón; Giri, Adriana A

    2013-03-01

    This study developed a hanging-droplet long PCR, a generic and highly sensitive strategy to facilitate the identification of new human papillomavirus (HPV) genomes. This novel procedure used for the first time the hanging-droplet PCR technique for the amplification of long DNA fragments with generic primers targeting the L1 and E1 regions. It was first applied to the amplification of types belonging to the highly divergent genus Gammapapillovirus (γ-PV). The hanging-droplet long PCR was 100-fold more sensitive than a simple long PCR procedure, detecting as few as ten copies of HPV-4. Nineteen skin samples, potentially containing putative HPV types from the γ-PV genus, were also screened. The method identified four γ-PV genomic halves from new and previously described putative types, and made the full characterization of HPV-156 possible. This novel virus meets the criteria for a new species within the γ-PV genus, with nucleotide identities in the L1 ORF ranging from 58.3 to 67.3 % compared with representative types of the current γ-PV species. HPV-156 showed the highest identity to HPV-60 (67.3 %) from species γ-4, and was consistently closely related to it in both late- and early-gene-derived phylogenies. In conclusion, this report provides a versatile and highly sensitive approach that allowed identification of the prototype of a new species within the γ-PV genus. Its application with primers targeting the different genera in which both human and non-human PVs are distributed may facilitate characterization of the missing members of the family Papillomaviridae.

  5. Absence of p53 enhances growth defects and etoposide sensitivity of human cells lacking the Bloom syndrome helicase BLM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Sairei; Adachi, Noritaka; Koyama, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    The Bloom syndrome helicase BLM and the tumor-suppressor protein p53 play important roles in preserving genome integrity. Here, we knock out the genes for BLM and p53 in a human pre-B-cell line, Nalm-6. We show that p53 plays an important role in cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, when BLM is absent. Intriguingly, despite the apoptotic function of p53, BLM(/)TP53(/) cells were more sensitive than either single mutant to etoposide, an anticancer agent that poisons DNA topoisomerase II. Our results suggest a direct, BLM-independent role for p53 in etoposide-induced, topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage in human cells.

  6. Rapid and Sensitive Method for Quantitative Determination of Lopinavir and Ritonavir in Human Plasma by Liquid Chromatography- Tandem Mass Specrtometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Temghare

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (LC-MS-MS method for the simultaneous determination of lopinavir and ritonavir in human plasma using abacavir as internal standard has been developed and validated. Sample preparation of plasma involved solid phase extraction. Detection was performed using an Applied Biosystems Sciex API 2000 Mass spectrometer. The assay of lopinavir and ritonavir was linear over the range of 50 ng mL-1 to 20000 ng mL -1 and 20 ng mL -1 to 3000 ng mL-1 respectively with a precision of <15% and accuracy in the range of 85-115%. The limit of quantification in plasma for lopinavir and ritonavir was 50 ng mL -1 and 20 ng mL -1 respectively. The described method has the advantage of being rapid and easy and it could be applied in therapeutic monitoring of these drugs in human plasma

  7. Imaging of skin birefringence for human scar assessment using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography aided by vascular masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijun; Chin, Lixin; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Liew, Yih Miin; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the in vivo assessment of human scars by parametric imaging of birefringence using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Such in vivo assessment is subject to artifacts in the detected birefringence caused by scattering from blood vessels. To reduce these artifacts, we preprocessed the PS-OCT data using a vascular masking technique. The birefringence of the remaining tissue regions was then automatically quantified. Results from the scars and contralateral or adjacent normal skin of 13 patients show a correspondence of birefringence with scar type: the ratio of birefringence of hypertrophic scars to corresponding normal skin is 2.2±0.2 (mean±standard deviation), while the ratio of birefringence of normotrophic scars to normal skin is 1.1±0.4. This method represents a new clinically applicable means for objective, quantitative human scar assessment.

  8. Ultra-high-sensitive optical micro-angiography provides depth resolved visualization of microcirculations within human skin under psoriatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jia; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang

    2011-03-01

    Adequate functioning of the peripheral micro vascular in human skin is necessary to maintain optimal tissue perfusion and preserve normal hemodynamic function. There is a growing body of evidence suggests that vascular abnormalities may directly related to several dermatologic diseases, such as psoriasis, port-wine stain, skin cancer, etc. New in vivo imaging modalities to aid volumetric microvascular blood perfusion imaging are there for highly desirable. To address this need, we demonstrate the capability of ultra-high sensitive optical micro angiography to allow blood flow visualization and quantification of vascular densities of lesional psoriasis area in human subject in vivo. The microcirculation networks of lesion and non-lesion skin were obtained after post processing the data sets captured by the system. With our image resolution (~20 μm), we could compare these two types of microcirculation networks both qualitatively and quantitatively. The B-scan (lateral or x direction) cross section images, en-face (x-y plane) images and the volumetric in vivo perfusion map of lesion and non-lesion skin areas were obtained using UHS-OMAG. Characteristic perfusion map features were identified between lesional and non-lesional skin area. A statistically significant difference between vascular densities of lesion and non-lesion skin area was also found using a histogram based analysis. UHS-OMAG has the potential to differentiate the normal skin microcirculation from abnormal human skin microcirculation non-invasively with high speed and sensitivity. The presented data demonstrates the great potential of UHS-OMAG for detecting and diagnosing skin disease such as psoriasis in human subjects.

  9. BLOOD VESSELS IN GANGLIA IN HUMAN ESOPHAGUS MIGHT EXPLAIN THE HIGHER FREQUENCY OF MEGAESOPHAGUS COMPARED WITH MEGACOLON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Jorge Adad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the existence of blood vessels within ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the human esophagus and colon. At necropsy, 15 stillborns, newborns and children up to two years of age, with no gastrointestinal disorders, were examined. Rings of the esophagus and colon were analyzed and then fixed in formalin and processed for paraffin. Histological sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin, Giemsa and immunohistochemistry for the characterization of endothelial cells, using antibodies for anti-factor VIII and CD31. Blood vessels were identified within the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus, and no blood vessels were found in any ganglia of the colon. It was concluded that the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus are vascularized, while the ganglia of the colon are avascular. Vascularization within the esophageal ganglia could facilitate the entrance of infectious agents, as well as the development of inflammatory responses (ganglionitis and denervation, as found in Chagas disease and idiopathic achalasia. This could explain the higher frequency of megaesophagus compared with megacolon.

  10. When sounds become actions: higher-order representation of newly learned action sounds in the human motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticini, Luca F; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone; Weiss, Carmen; Casile, Antonino; Waszak, Florian

    2012-02-01

    In the absence of visual information, our brain is able to recognize the actions of others by representing their sounds as a motor event. Previous studies have provided evidence for a somatotopic activation of the listener's motor cortex during perception of the sound of highly familiar motor acts. The present experiments studied (a) how the motor system is activated by action-related sounds that are newly acquired and (b) whether these sounds are represented with reference to extrinsic features related to action goals rather than with respect to lower-level intrinsic parameters related to the specific movements. TMS was used to measure the correspondence between auditory and motor codes in the listener's motor system. We compared the corticomotor excitability in response to the presentation of auditory stimuli void of previous motor meaning before and after a short training period in which these stimuli were associated with voluntary actions. Novel cross-modal representations became manifest very rapidly. By disentangling the representation of the muscle from that of the action's goal, we further showed that passive listening to newly learnt action-related sounds activated a precise motor representation that depended on the variable contexts to which the individual was exposed during testing. Our results suggest that the human brain embodies a higher-order audio-visuo-motor representation of perceived actions, which is muscle-independent and corresponds to the goals of the action.

  11. Chemical stress sensitive luminescent human cells: molecular biology approach using inducible Drosophila melanogaster hsp22 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandon, C A; Diaz, C; Arrigo, A-P; Blum, L J

    2005-09-23

    A whole-cell bioassay has been developed for the total toxicity testing of liquid samples. The method is based on the induction of the bioluminescent activity of genetically manipulated mammalian cells. For that purpose, transfection was used to introduce, in HeLa cells, a DNA sensing element that responds to chemical stress agents (heavy metals, genotoxic agents, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals). Such element was designed to direct the expression of a reporting gene (firefly luciferase) through the activation of Drosophila melanogaster hsp22 promoter. A molecular approach was conducted to optimize hsp22 promoter element in order to decrease the background expression level of the reporting gene and to increase the sensitivity of the bioassay for testing endocrine disruptors. As a result, in the presence of 20-100 microM cadmium chloride, a 6-fold increase in luciferase expression was obtained using a specially designed truncated hsp22 promoter construction. The following chemicals known to be found in the polluted samples were tested: CdCl2, Cd(NO3)2, NaAsO2, alachlore, fentine acetate, thiram, and maneb. The stressing effect of each of them was sensitively detected by the present bioassay in the 0.05-50 microM concentration range.

  12. Non-human primate and rodent embryonic stem cells are differentially sensitive to embryotoxic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Walker

    2015-01-01

    First, osteogenic capacity was compared between ESCs from the mouse and a New World monkey, the common marmoset. Then, cells were treated with compounds that have been previously reported to induce bone teratogenicity. Calcification and MTT assays evaluated effects on osteogenesis and cell viability, respectively. Our data indicated that marmoset ESCs responded differently than mouse ESCs in such embryotoxicity screens with no obvious dependency on chemical or compound classes and thus suggest that embryotoxicity screening results could be affected by species-driven response variation. In addition, ESCs derived from rhesus monkey, an Old World monkey, and phylogenetically closer to humans than the marmoset, were observed to respond differently to test compounds than marmoset ESCs. Together these results indicate that there are significant differences in the responses of non-human primate and mouse ESC to embryotoxic agents.

  13. Gap-junction coupling and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in human β -cell clusters: Effects on emergent dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loppini, A.; Pedersen, M. G.; Braun, M.; Filippi, S.

    2017-09-01

    The importance of gap-junction coupling between β cells in pancreatic islets is well established in mouse. Such ultrastructural connections synchronize cellular activity, confine biological heterogeneity, and enhance insulin pulsatility. Dysfunction of coupling has been associated with diabetes and altered β -cell function. However, the role of gap junctions between human β cells is still largely unexplored. By using patch-clamp recordings of β cells from human donors, we previously estimated electrical properties of these channels by mathematical modeling of pairs of human β cells. In this work we revise our estimate by modeling triplet configurations and larger heterogeneous clusters. We find that a coupling conductance in the range 0.005 -0.020 nS/pF can reproduce experiments in almost all the simulated arrangements. We finally explore the consequence of gap-junction coupling of this magnitude between β cells with mutant variants of the ATP-sensitive potassium channels involved in some metabolic disorders and diabetic conditions, translating studies performed on rodents to the human case. Our results are finally discussed from the perspective of therapeutic strategies. In summary, modeling of more realistic clusters with more than two β cells slightly lowers our previous estimate of gap-junction conductance and gives rise to patterns that more closely resemble experimental traces.

  14. Dataset for human sensitivity to chemicals during development of motor function

    OpenAIRE

    Ingber, Susan Z.; Pohl, Hana R.

    2016-01-01

    The authors reviewed human data related to motor development following exposure to a subset of chemicals thoroughly reviewed in Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Toxicological Profiles and Addenda. The resulting dataset includes the following variables and confounders: chemical name, exposure route, exposure duration and frequency, study design, cohort name and/or geographic location, sex of cohort subjects, NOAEL, and LOAEL. This data summary can help validate motor de...

  15. Determination of diclofenac concentrations in human plasma using a sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry method

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background A gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) method for the determination of diclofenac in human plasma has been developed and validated. Results This method utilizes hexane which is a relatively less toxic extraction solvent compared to heptane and benzene. In addition, phosphoric acid and acetone were added to the samples as deproteination agents, which increased the recovery of diclofenac. These revised processes allow clean extraction and near-quantitative recovery of analyte ...

  16. Determination of diclofenac concentrations in human plasma using a sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry method

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Iltaf; Barker, James; Naughton, Declan P; Barton, Stephen J.; Ashraf, Syed Salman

    2016-01-01

    Background\\ud A gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) method for the determination of diclofenac in human plasma has been developed and validated.\\ud \\ud Results\\ud This method utilizes hexane which is a relatively less toxic extraction solvent compared to heptane and benzene. In addition, phosphoric acid and acetone were added to the samples as deproteination agents, which increased the recovery of diclofenac. These revised processes allow clean extraction and near-quantitative recover...

  17. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/..mu..m to over 1000 keV/..mu..m. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/..mu..m. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  18. HMGB1-mediated autophagy decreases sensitivity to oxymatrine in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongsong; Xu, Peng; Yang, Le; Xu, Ke; Zhu, Jialin; Wu, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Congshan; Yuan, Qiling; Wang, Bo; Li, Yuanbo; Qiu, Yusheng

    2016-11-29

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is a type of alkaloid extracted from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, Sophora flavescens. Although the antitumor activities of OMT have been observed in various cancers, there are no reports regarding the effects of OMT on human synovial sarcoma. In the present study, we analyzed the antitumor activities of OMT in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells and determine whether high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1)-mediated autophagy was associated with its therapeutic effects. We found that OMT exhibited antitumor activity in SW982 cells and facilitated increases in autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA or ATG7 siRNA increased the level of apoptosis, which indicated that OMT-induced autophagy protected cells from the cytotoxicity of OMT. Administration of OMT to SW982 cells increased the expression of HMGB1. When HMGB1 was inhibited via HMGB1-siRNA, OMT-induced autophagy was decreased, and apoptosis was increased. Furthermore, we found that HMGB1-siRNA significantly increased the expression of p-Akt and p-mTOR. OMT-induced autophagy may be mediated by the Akt/mTOR pathway, and HMGB1 plays a vital role in the regulation of autophagy. Therefore, we believe that combining OMT with an inhibitor of autophagy or HMGB1 may make OMT more effective in the treatment of human synovial sarcoma.

  19. Identification of proteins sensitive to thermal stress in human neuroblastoma and glioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guilian; Stevens, Stanley M; Kobeissy, Firas; Kobiessy, Firas; Brown, Hilda; McClung, Scott; Gold, Mark S; Borchelt, David R

    2012-01-01

    Heat-shock is an acute insult to the mammalian proteome. The sudden elevation in temperature has far-reaching effects on protein metabolism, leads to a rapid inhibition of most protein synthesis, and the induction of protein chaperones. Using heat-shock in cells of neuronal (SH-SY5Y) and glial (CCF-STTG1) lineage, in conjunction with detergent extraction and sedimentation followed by LC-MS/MS proteomic approaches, we sought to identify human proteins that lose solubility upon heat-shock. The two cell lines showed largely overlapping profiles of proteins detected by LC-MS/MS. We identified 58 proteins in detergent insoluble fractions as losing solubility in after heat shock; 10 were common between the 2 cell lines. A subset of the proteins identified by LC-MS/MS was validated by immunoblotting of similarly prepared fractions. Ultimately, we were able to definitively identify 3 proteins as putatively metastable neural proteins; FEN1, CDK1, and TDP-43. We also determined that after heat-shock these cells accumulate insoluble polyubiquitin chains largely linked via lysine 48 (K-48) residues. Collectively, this study identifies human neural proteins that lose solubility upon heat-shock. These proteins may represent components of the human proteome that are vulnerable to misfolding in settings of proteostasis stress.

  20. Identification of proteins sensitive to thermal stress in human neuroblastoma and glioma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilian Xu

    Full Text Available Heat-shock is an acute insult to the mammalian proteome. The sudden elevation in temperature has far-reaching effects on protein metabolism, leads to a rapid inhibition of most protein synthesis, and the induction of protein chaperones. Using heat-shock in cells of neuronal (SH-SY5Y and glial (CCF-STTG1 lineage, in conjunction with detergent extraction and sedimentation followed by LC-MS/MS proteomic approaches, we sought to identify human proteins that lose solubility upon heat-shock. The two cell lines showed largely overlapping profiles of proteins detected by LC-MS/MS. We identified 58 proteins in detergent insoluble fractions as losing solubility in after heat shock; 10 were common between the 2 cell lines. A subset of the proteins identified by LC-MS/MS was validated by immunoblotting of similarly prepared fractions. Ultimately, we were able to definitively identify 3 proteins as putatively metastable neural proteins; FEN1, CDK1, and TDP-43. We also determined that after heat-shock these cells accumulate insoluble polyubiquitin chains largely linked via lysine 48 (K-48 residues. Collectively, this study identifies human neural proteins that lose solubility upon heat-shock. These proteins may represent components of the human proteome that are vulnerable to misfolding in settings of proteostasis stress.

  1. High sensitive and selective electrochemical biosensor: Label-free detection of human norovirus using affinity peptide as molecular binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Jin; Ryu, Myung Yi; Park, Chan Young; Ahn, Junki; Park, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Changsun; Ha, Sang-Do; Park, Tae Jung; Park, Jong Pil

    2017-01-15

    Norovirus is known as the major cause of highly infection for gastrointestinal tracts. In this study, robust and highly sensitive biosensors for detecting human norovirus by employing a recognition affinity peptide-based electrochemical platform were described. A series of amino acid-substituted and cysteine-incorporated recognition peptides isolated from evolutionary phage display technique was chemically synthesized and immobilized to a gold sensor layer, the detection performance of the gold-immobilized synthetic peptide-based sensor system was assessed using QCM, CV and EIS. Using EIS, the limit of detection with Noro-1 as a molecular binder was found to be 99.8nM for recombinant noroviral capsid proteins (rP2) and 7.8copies/mL for human norovirus, thereby demonstrating a high degree of sensitivity for their corresponding targets. These results suggest that a biosensor which consists of affinity peptides as a molecular binder and miniaturized microdevices as diagnostic tool could be served as a new type of biosensing platform for point-of-care testing.

  2. Interferon-α enhances sensitivity of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells to doxorubicin by p53-dependent apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-wei YUAN; Xiao-feng ZHU; Xiu-fang HUANG; Pu-yi SHENG; Ai-shan HE; Zi-bo YANG; Rong DENG; Gong-kan FENG; Wei-ming LIAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To determine whether intefferon-α (IFNα) can enhance doxorubicin sensitivity in osteosarcoma cells and its molecular mechanism. Methods:Cell viability was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Apoptosis was studied using Flow cytometry analysis,Hoechst33258 staining,DNA fragmentation assay,as well as the activation of caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Protein expression was detected by Western blotting. The dependence of p53 was determined using p53-siRNA transfection. Results:IFNα increased doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity to a much greater degree through apoptosis in human osteosarcoma p53-wild U2OS cells,but not p53-mutant MG63 cells. IFNoα markedly upregulated p53,Bax,Mdm2,and p21,downregulated Bcl-2,and activated caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in response to doxorubicin in U2OS cells. Moreover,the siRNA-mediated silencing of p53 significantly reduced the IFNoα/doxorubicin combination-induced cytotoxicity and PARP cleavage. Conclusion:IFNtx enhances the sensitivity of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells to doxorubicin by p53-dependent apoptosis. The proper combination with IFNα and conventional chemotherapeutic agents may be a rational strategy for improving the treatment of osteosarcoma with functional p53.

  3. TERRA Expression Levels Do Not Correlate With Telomere Length and Radiation Sensitivity in Human Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eSmirnova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian telomeres are transcribed into long non-coding telomeric RNA molecules (TERRA that seem to play a role in the maintenance of telomere stability. In human cells, CpG island promoters drive TERRA transcription and are regulated by methylation. It was suggested that the amount of TERRA may be related to telomere length. To test this hypothesis we measured telomere length and TERRA levels in single clones isolated from five human cell lines: HeLa (cervical carcinoma, BRC-230 (breast cancer, AKG and GK2 (gastric cancers and GM847 (SV40 immortalized skin fibroblasts. We observed great clonal heterogeneity both in TRF (Terminal Restriction Fragment length and in TERRA levels. However, these two parameters did not correlate with each other. Moreover, cell survival to γ-rays did not show a significant variation among the clones, suggesting that, in this cellular system, the intra-population variability in telomere length and TERRA levels does not influence sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This conclusion was supported by the observation that in a cell line in which telomeres were greatly elongated by the ectopic expression of telomerase, TERRA expression levels and radiation sensitivity were similar to the parental HeLa cell line.

  4. Label-free electrochemical impedance biosensor to detect human interleukin-8 in serum with sub-pg/ml sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R; Deacon, S E; Nowak, D; George, S E; Szymonik, M P; Tang, A A S; Tomlinson, D C; Davies, A G; McPherson, M J; Wälti, C

    2016-06-15

    Biosensors with high sensitivity and short time-to-result that are capable of detecting biomarkers in body fluids such as serum are an important prerequisite for early diagnostics in modern healthcare provision. Here, we report the development of an electrochemical impedance-based sensor for the detection in serum of human interleukin-8 (IL-8), a pro-angiogenic chemokine implicated in a wide range of inflammatory diseases. The sensor employs a small and robust synthetic non-antibody capture protein based on a cystatin scaffold that displays high affinity for human IL-8 with a KD of 35 ± 10 nM and excellent ligand specificity. The change in the phase of the electrochemical impedance from the serum baseline, ∆θ(ƒ), measured at 0.1 Hz, was used as the measure for quantifying IL-8 concentration in the fluid. Optimal sensor signal was observed after 15 min incubation, and the sensor exhibited a linear response versus logarithm of IL-8 concentration from 900 fg/ml to 900 ng/ml. A detection limit of around 90 fg/ml, which is significantly lower than the basal clinical levels of 5-10 pg/ml, was observed. Our results are significant for the development of point-of-care and early diagnostics where high sensitivity and short time-to-results are essential.

  5. Higher temperature sensitivity for stable than for labile soil organic carbon - Evidence from incubations of long-term bare fallow soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefèvre, Romain; Barré, Pierre; Moyano, Fernando E.

    2014-01-01

    soils from LTBF experiments situated at Askov (Denmark), Grignon (France), Ultuna (Sweden), and Versailles (France) and sampled at the start of the experiments and after 25, 50, 52, and 79 years of bare fallow, respectively. Soils were incubated at 4, 12, 20, and 35 °C and the evolved CO2 monitored...... for a general relationship between temperature sensitivity and SOC stability upon which significant improvements in predictive models could be based....

  6. The effects of instructions on the sensitivity of negatively reinforced human behavior to extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri, Jérôme; Cançado, Carlos R X

    2017-03-01

    The effects of instructions on the sensitivity of negatively reinforced (escape) behavior to extinction were studied. Initially, responding produced timeouts from pressing a force cell on a variable-ratio (VR) schedule, which was then discontinued (extinction). Based on extinction data, participants were distributed into two groups. Participants in the Extinction Group (for which response rates were low in extinction) were instructed that the experimenter expected them to continue responding in extinction after a second exposure to the VR schedule. Participants in the Persistence group (for which response rates were high in extinction) were instructed that the experimenter expected them to stop responding in extinction. Relative to the condition in which instructions were absent, extinction-response rates increased and decreased, respectively, for participants in the Persistence and Extinction groups. These results replicate and extend to negatively reinforced responding previous findings that showed behavioral control by instructions formulated as explicit experimenter demands or expectations.

  7. rAd-p53 enhances the sensitivity of human gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Xia Chen; Li-Hong Zheng; Shi-Yu Liu; Xiao-Hua He

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To investigate potential antitumor effects of rAd-p53 by determining if it enhanced sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy.METHODS:Three gastric cancer cell lines with distinct levels of differentiation were treated with various doses of rAd-p53 alone,oxaliplatin (OXA) alone,or a combination of both.Cell growth was assessed with an 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-yl)-3,5-diphenytetrazoli-umromide assay and the expression levels of p53,Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by immunohistochemistry.The presence of apoptosis and the expression of cas-pase-3 were determined using flow cytometry.RESULTS:Treatment with rAd-p53 or OXA alone inhibited gastric cancer cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner;moreover,significant synergistic effects were observed when these treatments were combined.Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that treatment with rAd-p53 alone,OXA alone or combined treatment led to decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased Bax expression in gastric cancer cells.Furthermore,flow cytometry showed that rAd-p53 alone,OXA alone or combination treatment induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells,which was accompanied by increased expression of caspase-3.CONCLUSION:rAd-p53 enhances the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy by promoting apoptosis.Thus,our results suggest that p53 gene therapy combined with chemotherapy represents a novel avenue for gastric cancer treatment.

  8. Effort-reward-imbalance in healthy teachers is associated with higher LPS-stimulated production and lower glucocorticoid sensitivity of interleukin-6 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellingrath, Silja; Rohleder, Nicolas; Kudielka, Brigitte M

    2013-02-01

    According to the effort-reward-imbalance (ERI) model, a lack of reciprocity between costs and gains at work increases the risk for adverse health outcomes. Inflammation has been shown to play a crucial role in a variety of stress-related diseases and alterations in immune system glucocorticoid sensitivity may help to explain the increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression related to chronic work stress. Changes in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin (IL)-6 production and inhibition of IL-6 production by dexamethasone in reaction to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) were assessed in forty-six healthy school teachers to test whether chronic work stress is accompanied by alterations in inflammatory activity and glucocorticoid sensitivity of the innate immune system. High ERI was associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory potential, reflected in elevated IL-6 production before and after stress and with a lower capacity of dexamethasone to suppress IL-6 production in vitro over all measurement time points. ERI was not associated with stress-related changes in GC sensitivity. The present findings suggest a less effective anti-inflammatory regulation by glucocorticoids in teachers suffering from chronic work stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Peripheral erythrocytes decrease upon specific respiratory challenge with grass pollen allergen in sensitized mice and in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galateja Jordakieva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Specific hyper-responsiveness towards an allergen and non-specific airway hyperreactivity both impair quality of life in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We aimed to investigate cellular responses following specific and non-specific airway challenges locally and systemically in i sensitized BALB/c mice challenged with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5, and in ii grass pollen sensitized allergic rhinitis subjects undergoing specific airway challenge in the Vienna Challenge Chamber (VCC. METHODS AND RESULTS: BALB/c mice (n = 20 were intraperitoneally immunized with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 and afterwards aerosol challenged with either the specific allergen Phl p 5 (n = 10 or the non-specific antigen ovalbumin (OVA (n = 10. A protocol for inducing allergic asthma as well as allergic rhinitis, according to the united airway concept, was used. Both groups of exposed mice showed significantly reduced physical activity after airway challenge. Specific airway challenge further resulted in goblet cell hyperplasia, enhanced mucous secretion, intrapulmonary leukocyte infiltration and lymphoid follicle formation, associated with significant expression of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 in splenocytes and also partially in lung tissue. Concerning circulating blood cell dynamics, we observed a significant drop of erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in both mouse groups, challenged with allergen or OVA. A significant decrease in circulating erythrocytes and hematocrit levels after airway challenges with grass pollen allergen was also found in grass pollen sensitized human rhinitis subjects (n = 42 at the VCC. The effects on peripheral leukocyte counts in mice and humans however were opposed, possibly due to the different primary inflammation sites. CONCLUSION: Our data revealed that, besides significant leukocyte dynamics, particularly erythrocytes are involved in acute hypersensitivity reactions to respiratory allergens

  10. Effects of extracellular plaque components on the chlorhexidine sensitivity of strains of Streptococcus mutans and human dental plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolinsky, L.E.; Hume, W.R.

    1985-08-01

    An in vitro study was undertaken to determine the effects of sucrose-derived extracellular plaque components on the sensitivity of selected oral bacteria to chlorhexidine (CX). Cultures of Streptococcus mutans HS-6, OMZ-176, Ingbritt C, 6715-wt13, and pooled human plaque were grown in trypticase soy media with or without 1% sucrose. The sensitivity to CX of bacteria grown in each medium was determined by fixed-time exposure to CX and subsequent measurement of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake. One-hour exposure to CX at concentrations of 10(-4) M (0.01% w/v) or greater substantially inhibited subsequent cellular division among all the S. mutans strains and human plaque samples tested. An IC50 (the CX concentration which depressed /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation to 50% of control level) of close to 10(-4) M was noted for S. mutans strains HS-6, OMZ-176, and 6715-wt13 when grown in the presence of sucrose. The same strains grown in cultures without added sucrose showed about a ten-fold greater sensitivity to CX (IC50 close to 10(-5) M). A three-fold difference was noted for S. mutans Ingbritt C. Only a slight increase in the IC50 was noted for the plaque samples cultured in sucrose-containing media, but their threshold for depression of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake by CX was lower than that for the sucrose-free plaque samples. The study showed that extracellular products confer some protection against CX to the bacteria examined, and provided an explanation for the disparity between clinically-recommended concentrations for plaque suppression and data on in vitro susceptibility.

  11. Simple and sensitive method for the quantification of total bilirubin in human serum using 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone hydrochloride as a chromogenic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Avinash, Krishnegowda; Shivakumar, Anantharaman; Dinesh, Rangappa; Shrestha, Ashwinee Kumar

    2010-11-01

    We here describe a new spectrophotometric method for measuring total bilirubin in serum. The method is based on the cleavage of bilirubin giving formaldehyde which further reacts with diazotized 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone hydrochloride giving blue colored solution with maximum absorbance at 630 nm. Sensitivity of the developed method was compared with Jendrassik-Grof assay procedure and its applicability has been tested with human serum samples. Good correlation was attained between both methods giving slope of 0.994, intercept 0.015, and R2 = 0.997. Beers law obeyed in the range of 0.068-17.2 μM with good linearity, absorbance y = 0.044 Cbil + 0.003. Relative standard deviation was 0.006872, within day precision ranged 0.3-1.2% and day-to-day precision ranged 1-6%. Recovery of the method varied from 97 to 102%. The proposed method has higher sensitivity with less interference. The obtained product was extracted and was spectrally characterized for structural confirmation with FT-IR, 1H NMR.

  12. A Redox-Sensitive Micelle-Like Nanoparticle Self-Assembled from Amphiphilic Adriamycin-Human Serum Albumin Conjugates for Tumor Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Feng; Zhao, Mengxin; Zhu, Xiandi; Ke, Changhong; Yu, Jiangming; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Fulei; Sun, Yun; Chen, Di; Jiang, Cheng; Zhao, Xianxian; Gao, Yong; Guo, Shangjing; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The application of chemotherapeutic drug adriamycin (ADR) in cancer therapy is limited by its side effects like high toxicity and insolubility. Nanomedicine offers new hope for overcoming the shortcomings. But how to increase in vivo stability and to control intracellular drug release is a key issue for nano-based formulations. Herein, the hydrophobic ADR was successfully linked to the biocompatible human serum albumin (HSA) by disulfide bond 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionyl hydrazide (PDPH), resulting in amphiphilic HSA-ADR. The novel ADR-HSA micellar NPs which were thus assembled exhibited a well-defined stable core shell structure with glutathione (GSH) sensitive linkers. The stable PDPH linkers at extracellular level were broken by GSH at intracellular level with a controlled ADR release profile. The in vitro cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells (NCI-N87) was obviously enhanced by such redox-sensitive ADR-HSA NPs. Additionally, as observed by IVIS Lumina II Imaging System (Xenogen), the intratumor accumulation of ADR-HSA NPs was much higher than that of HSA/ADR NPs due to its high stability. Consequently, the in vivo tumor inhibition was significantly promoted after intravenous administration to the Balb/c nude mice bearing gastric tumors. These in vitro/vivo results indicated that disulfide-bond-containing ADR-HSA NPs were an effective nanodrug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:26075280

  13. Implied motion because of instability in Hokusai Manga activates the human motion-sensitive extrastriate visual cortex: an fMRI study of the impact of visual art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Naoyuki; Matsuyoshi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Takashi; Osaka, Mariko

    2010-03-10

    The recent development of cognitive neuroscience has invited inference about the neurosensory events underlying the experience of visual arts involving implied motion. We report functional magnetic resonance imaging study demonstrating activation of the human extrastriate motion-sensitive cortex by static images showing implied motion because of instability. We used static line-drawing cartoons of humans by Hokusai Katsushika (called 'Hokusai Manga'), an outstanding Japanese cartoonist as well as famous Ukiyoe artist. We found 'Hokusai Manga' with implied motion by depicting human bodies that are engaged in challenging tonic posture significantly activated the motion-sensitive visual cortex including MT+ in the human extrastriate cortex, while an illustration that does not imply motion, for either humans or objects, did not activate these areas under the same tasks. We conclude that motion-sensitive extrastriate cortex would be a critical region for perception of implied motion in instability.

  14. A Sensitive Sensor Cell Line for the Detection of Oxidative Stress Responses in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hofmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B’ promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 µM cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ~300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B’. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B’ gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B’ promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 µM cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (µTAS that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings.

  15. A sensitive sensor cell line for the detection of oxidative stress responses in cultured human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ute; Priem, Melanie; Bartzsch, Christine; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2014-06-25

    In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B' promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 µM cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ~300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B'. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B' gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B' promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 µM cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (µTAS) that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings.

  16. Autonomic control of heart rate by metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Hartwich, Doreen

    2010-01-01

    moderate (PEI-M) and high (PEI-H) intensity isometric handgrip performed at 25% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, under control (no drug), parasympathetic blockade (glycopyrrolate) and beta-adrenergic blockade (metoprolol or propranalol) conditions, while beat-to-beat HR and BP were continuously...... was similarly increased from rest during PEI-M and further elevated during PEI-H (P Collectively, these findings suggest that the muscle metaboreflex increases cardiac SNA during PEI in humans; however, it requires a robust muscle metaboreflex activation to offset the influence...

  17. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-01-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its o...

  18. Human T-cell leukemia virus I tax protein sensitizes p53-mutant cells to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylova, Valia T; Green, Allison M; Khurgel, Moshe; Semmes, Oliver J; Kupfer, Gary M

    2008-06-15

    Mutations in p53 are a common cause of resistance of cancers to standard chemotherapy and, thus, treatment failure. Reports have shown that Tax, a human T-cell leukemia virus type I encoded protein that has been associated with genomic instability and perturbation of transcription and cell cycle, sensitizes HeLa cells to UV treatment. The extent to which Tax can sensitize cells and the mechanism by which it exerts its effect are unknown. In this study, we show that Tax sensitizes p53-mutant cells to a broad range of DNA-damaging agents, including mitomycin C, a bifunctional alkylator, etoposide, a topoisomerase II drug, and UV light, but not ionizing radiation, a double-strand break agent, or vinblastine, a tubulin poison. Tax caused hypersensitivity in all p53-deleted cell lines and several, but not all, mutant-expressed p53-containing cell lines, while unexpectedly being protective in p53 wild-type (wt) cells. The effect observed in p53-deleted lines could be reversed for this by transfection of wt p53. We also show that Tax activates a p53-independent proapoptotic program through decreased expression of the retinoblastoma protein and subsequent increased E2F1 expression. The expression of several proapoptotic proteins was also induced by Tax, including Puma and Noxa, culminating in a substantial increase in Bax dimerization. Our results show that Tax can sensitize p53-mutant cells to DNA damage while protecting p53 wt cells, a side benefit that might result in reduced toxicity in normal cells. Such studies hold the promise of a novel adjunctive therapy that could make cancer chemotherapy more effective.

  19. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Yuta [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Yuan, Bo, E-mail: yuanbo@toyaku.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Kaise, Toshikazu [Laboratory of Environmental Chemodynamics, School of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Takeichi, Makoto [Yoneyama Maternity Hospital, 2-12 Shin-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0065 (Japan); Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kroetz, Deanna L. [Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Toyoda, Hiroo [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As{sup III}) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As{sup III} on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As{sup III} were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As{sup III} than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As{sup III} in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As{sup III} cytotoxicity between these cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examination of effect of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion

  20. A contrast-sensitive channelized-Hotelling observer to predict human performance in a detection task using lumpy backgrounds and Gaussian signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subok; Badano, Aldo; Gallas, Brandon D.; Myers, Kyle J.

    2007-03-01

    Previously, a non-prewhitening matched filter (NPWMF) incorporating a model for the contrast sensitivity of the human visual system was introduced for modeling human performance in detection tasks with different viewing angles and white-noise backgrounds by Badano et al. But NPWMF observers do not perform well detection tasks involving complex backgrounds since they do not account for random backgrounds. A channelized-Hotelling observer (CHO) using difference-of-Gaussians (DOG) channels has been shown to track human performance well in detection tasks using lumpy backgrounds. In this work, a CHO with DOG channels, incorporating the model of the human contrast sensitivity, was developed similarly. We call this new observer a contrast-sensitive CHO (CS-CHO). The Barten model was the basis of our human contrast sensitivity model. A scalar was multiplied to the Barten model and varied to control the thresholding effect of the contrast sensitivity on luminance-valued images and hence the performance-prediction ability of the CS-CHO. The performance of the CS-CHO was compared to the average human performance from the psychophysical study by Park et al., where the task was to detect a known Gaussian signal in non-Gaussian distributed lumpy backgrounds. Six different signal-intensity values were used in this study. We chose the free parameter of our model to match the mean human performance in the detection experiment at the strongest signal intensity. Then we compared the model to the human at five different signal-intensity values in order to see if the performance of the CS-CHO matched human performance. Our results indicate that the CS-CHO with the chosen scalar for the contrast sensitivity predicts human performance closely as a function of signal intensity.

  1. Human cytomegalovirus increases HUVEC sensitivity to thrombin and modulates expression of thrombin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Milan; Paskas, Svetlana; Zivković, Maja; Burysek, Ladislav; Laumonnier, Yves

    2010-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a life-long persistent infection. HCMV infection could be associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Here we observed that in HCMV (AD-169) pre-exposed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), thrombin-induced expression of IL-1alpha and M-CSF is markedly enhanced compared to the un-exposed cells. Study of the expression of thrombin receptor genes in HUVEC showed that HCMV triggered a time- and concentration-dependent expression of the thrombin receptors PAR1, PAR3 and PAR4 at the mRNA level. Induction of PAR1 and PAR3 mRNA expression is due to transcriptional activation of their promoters as shown by gene reporter assay. Furthermore, the virus induced expression of PAR1 and PAR3 but not PAR4 proteins, as analyzed by Western immunoblotting. However, flow cytometric analysis revealed that only PAR3, expressed at very low level in control HUVEC, is induced at the surface during the exposure to the virus. Our data suggest that although exposure to HCMV induces a minor increase of cell-surface receptors expression, it does make endothelial cells more responsive to additional thrombin stimulation.

  2. Conserved epigenetic sensitivity to early life experience in the rat and human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suderman, Matthew; McGowan, Patrick O; Sasaki, Aya; Huang, Tony C T; Hallett, Michael T; Meaney, Michael J; Turecki, Gustavo; Szyf, Moshe

    2012-10-16

    Early life experience is associated with long-term effects on behavior and epigenetic programming of the NR3C1 (GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR) gene in the hippocampus of both rats and humans. However, it is unlikely that such effects completely capture the evolutionarily conserved epigenetic mechanisms of early adaptation to environment. Here we present DNA methylation profiles spanning 6.5 million base pairs centered at the NR3C1 gene in the hippocampus of humans who experienced abuse as children and nonabused controls. We compare these profiles to corresponding DNA methylation profiles in rats that received differential levels of maternal care. The profiles of both species reveal hundreds of DNA methylation differences associated with early life experience distributed across the entire region in nonrandom patterns. For instance, methylation differences tend to cluster by genomic location, forming clusters covering as many as 1 million bases. Even more surprisingly, these differences seem to specifically target regulatory regions such as gene promoters, particularly those of the protocadherin α, β, and γ gene families. Beyond these high-level similarities, more detailed analyses reveal methylation differences likely stemming from the significant biological and environmental differences between species. These results provide support for an analogous cross-species epigenetic regulatory response at the level of the genomic region to early life experience.

  3. Human bone marrow cell culture: a sensitive method for determination of the biocompatibility of implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, A; Landgraff, M; Orth, J; Poenitz, H; Kienapfel, H; Boelte, K; Griss, P; Franke, R P

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a test method for determining the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of various biomaterials that are used in orthopaedic surgery. This method is based on the use of a human bone marrow cell culture and was developed as an alternative to animal experiments. Human bone marrow cell culture has certain advantages over other cell culture models, as its results show a greater conformity with animal experimental results and clinical studies. Primary cell adherence, cell number, cell proliferation, production of extracellular matrix, cell viability and cell differentiation were used as indicative parameters of biocompatibility. After 2 weeks in culture, differences could be observed between the biomaterials with respect to these parameters. Cell numbers were greatest on the hydroxyapatite ceramic specimens, but were decreased on the titanium alloy specimens. Extracellular matrix hydroxyapatite production was high for ceramics, but reduced for titanium specimens. The polymers allowed only a few cells to adhere, and there were no signs of extracellular matrix production. The influence of biomaterials on differentiation of large numbers of cells was analysed by using flow cytophotometry. There were similar populations of T cells and monocytes on all specimens. However, extended B cell and granulocyte populations were observed with titanium and polyethylene.

  4. A fast and sensitive method for the determination of nitrite in human plasma by capillary electrophoresis with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Adams, Erwin; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2012-08-15

    Analysis of nitrite, the indicator of nitric oxide (NO) generation in vivo, provides a useful tool to study NO synthesis in vivo. A fast and sensitive fluorometric CE method was developed for determination of nitrite in human plasma through its derivatization with 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (DAN). Nitrite in human plasma was easily reacted with DAN under acid conditions to yield the highly fluorescent 2,3-naphthotriazole (NAT). Fluorescence detection was optimized to achieve subnanomolar detection which allows a direct analysis of plasma samples unlike most CE-UV methods using sample stacking. Acetonitrile was used to remove the protein. Short-end injection and a high voltage (-30 kV) were used to shorten the analysis time. The good separation was achieved with 20 mM borate buffer at pH 9.23. The separation of NAT was obtained within 1.4 min. The deproteinized plasma sample was injected hydrodynamically for 5s at -50 mbar into a 60 cm × 75 μm internal diameter uncoated fused-silica capillary. Excitation wavelength was selected with a broad-band filter (240-400 nm), and the emitted light was measured at 418 nm by the use of a cutoff filter. A good linearity (R(2)=0.9975) was obtained in the range from 2 to 500 nM. The detection limit of nitrite was 0.6 nM in original plasma samples, which is 750 times lower than our previous CE-UV method. The developed fluorometric CE method offers the advantages of more simple system and lower cost compared with the current fluorometric HPLC methods without losing sensitivity. The detected mean nitrite concentration in human plasma by this method was consistent with the most frequently reported values.

  5. Capacitive DNA sensor for rapid and sensitive detection of whole genome human herpesvirus-1 dsDNA in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Oueslati, Rania; Wu, Jayne; Chen, Jiangang; Eda, Shigetoshi

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a rapid, highly sensitive, low-cost, and specific capacitive DNA sensor for detection of whole genome human herpesvirus-1 DNA. This sensor is capable of direct DNA detection with a response time of 30 s, and it can be used to test standard buffer or serum samples. The sensing approach for DNA detection is based on alternating current (AC) electrokinetics. By applying an inhomogeneous AC electric field on sensor electrodes, positive dielectrophoresis is induced to accelerate DNA hybridization. The same applied AC signal also directly measures the hybridization of target with the probe on the sensor surface. Experiments are conducted to optimize the AC signal, as well as the buffers for probe immobilization and target DNA hybridization. The assay is highly sensitive and specific, with no response to human herpesvirus-2 DNA at 5 ng/mL and a LOD of 1.0 pg/mL (6.5 copies/μL or 10.7 aM) in standard buffer. When testing the double stranded (ds) DNA spiked in human serum samples, the sensor yields a LOD of 20.0 pg/mL (129.5 copies/μL or 0.21 femtomolar (fM)) in neat serum. In this work, the target is whole genome dsDNA, consequently the test can be performed without the use of enzyme or amplification, which considerably simplifies the sensor operation and is highly suitable for point of care disease diagnosis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Context-dependent mutation rates may cause spurious signatures of a fixation bias favoring higher GC-content in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Ryan D; Williamson, Scott H; Zhu, Lan; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2007-10-01

    Understanding the proximate and ultimate causes underlying the evolution of nucleotide composition in mammalian genomes is of fundamental interest to the study of molecular evolution. Comparative genomics studies have revealed that many more substitutions occur from G and C nucleotides to A and T nucleotides than the reverse, suggesting that mammalian genomes are not at equilibrium for base composition. Analysis of human polymorphism data suggests that mutations that increase GC-content tend to be at much higher frequencies than those that decrease or preserve GC-content when the ancestral allele is inferred via parsimony using the chimpanzee genome. These observations have been interpreted as evidence for a fixation bias in favor of G and C alleles due to either positive natural selection or biased gene conversion. Here, we test the robustness of this interpretation to violations of the parsimony assumption using a data set of 21,488 noncoding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) discovered by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) SNPs project via direct resequencing of n = 95 individuals. Applying standard nonparametric and parametric population genetic approaches, we replicate the signatures of a fixation bias in favor of G and C alleles when the ancestral base is assumed to be the base found in the chimpanzee outgroup. However, upon taking into account the probability of misidentifying the ancestral state of each SNP using a context-dependent mutation model, the corrected distribution of SNP frequencies for GC-content increasing SNPs are nearly indistinguishable from the patterns observed for other types of mutations, suggesting that the signature of fixation bias is a spurious artifact of the parsimony assumption.

  7. Retinal nerve fiber bundle tracing and analysis in human eye by polarization sensitive OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Mitsuro; Pircher, Michael; Zotter, Stefan; Baumann, Bernhard; Roberts, Philipp; Makihira, Tomoyuki; Tomatsu, Nobuhiro; Sato, Makoto; Vass, Clemens; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new semi-automatic processing method for retinal nerve fiber bundle tracing based on polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) data sets. The method for tracing is based on a nerve fiber orientation map that covers the fovea and optic nerve head (ONH) regions. In order to generate the orientation map, two types of information are used: optic axis orientation based on polarization data, and complementary information obtained from nerve fiber layer (NFL) local thickness variation to reveal fiber bundle structures around the fovea. The corresponding two orientation maps are fused into a combined fiber orientation map. En face maps of NFL retardation, thickness, and unit-depth-retardation (UDR, equivalent to birefringence) are transformed into “along-trace” maps by using the obtained traces of the nerve fiber bundles. The method is demonstrated in the eyes of healthy volunteers, and as an example of further analyses utilizing this method, maps illustrating the gradients of NFL retardation, thickness, and UDR are demonstrated. PMID:25798324

  8. Knockdown of long noncoding RNA H19 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pengfei; Wang, Ping; Sun, Xiaoling; Yuan, Zhongshun; Zhan, Rucai; Ma, Xiangyu; Li, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is commonly used in glioma chemotherapy. However, a great clinical challenge for TMZ is chemoresistance. H19 transcripts are recognized as long noncoding RNAs, which potentially interact with chromatin-modifying complexes to regulate gene expression via epigenetic changes. Our data based on glioma patients showed that the expression of H19 was significantly upregulated in TMZ-resistant tumors compared with the TMZ-sensitive tumors. To determine the function of H19 in glioma, cell lines U87 and U251 were exposed to TMZ to establish TMZ-resistant clones U87TMZ and U251TMZ. In U87TMZ and U251TMZ, the expression level of H19 transcripts was increased compared to wild-type or nonresistant clones, as determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Concomitant treatment with small interfering RNA specifically targeting H19 and TMZ in resistant glioma clones resulted in decreased IC50 values for TMZ, and increased apoptotic rates than control small interfering RNA-treated cells. This was also evident by the increased PARP cleavage in resistant cells exposed to TMZ + si-H19. Furthermore, the reduced expression of H19 altered major drug resistance genes, such as MDR, MRP, and ABCG2, both at the mRNA and protein levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that H19 plays an important role in the development of TMZ resistance, and may represent a novel therapeutic target for TMZ-resistant gliomas. PMID:27366087

  9. Differentially expressed proteins in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells sensitive and resistant to paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlíková, Nela; Bartoňová, Irena; Balušíková, Kamila; Kopperova, Dana; Halada, Petr; Kovář, Jan

    2015-04-10

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents is one of the main causes of treatment failure. In order to detect proteins potentially involved in the mechanism of resistance to taxanes, we assessed differences in protein expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells that are sensitive to paclitaxel and in the same cells with acquired resistance to paclitaxel (established in our lab). Proteins were separated using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Changes in their expression were determined and proteins with altered expression were identified using mass spectrometry. Changes in their expression were confirmed using western blot analysis. With these techniques, we found three proteins expressed differently in resistant MCF-7 cells, i.e., thyroid hormone-interacting protein 6 (TRIP6; upregulated to 650%), heat shock protein 27 (HSP27; downregulated to 50%) and cathepsin D (downregulated to 28%). Silencing of TRIP6 expression by specific siRNA leads to decreased number of grown resistant MCF-7 cells. In the present study we have pointed at some new directions in the studies of the mechanism of resistance to paclitaxel in breast cancer cells.

  10. Nebivolol, but not metoprolol, lowers blood pressure in nitric oxide-sensitive human hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Luis E; Gamboa, Alfredo; Shibao, Cyndya A; Arnold, Amy C; Choi, Leena; Black, Bonnie K; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo

    2014-12-01

    Nebivolol, unlike other selective β1-receptor blockers, induces vasodilation attributable to increased NO bioavailability. The relative contribution of this mechanism to the blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects of nebivolol is unclear because it is normally masked by baroreflex buffering. Autonomic failure provides a unique model of hypertension devoid of autonomic modulation but sensitive to the hypotensive effects of NO potentiation. We tested the hypothesis that nebivolol would decrease BP in these patients through a mechanism independent of β-blockade. We randomized 20 autonomic failure patients with supine hypertension (14 men; 69±2 years) to receive a single oral dose of placebo, nebivolol 5 mg, metoprolol 50 mg (negative control), and sildenafil 25 mg (positive control) on separate nights in a double-blind, crossover study. Supine BP was monitored every 2 hours from 8:00 pm to 8:00 am. Compared with placebo, sildenafil and nebivolol decreased systolic BP during the night (P20 mm Hg at 4:00 am) and nonresponders. Nebivolol significantly lowered systolic BP in sildenafil responders (-44±13 mm Hg) but not in nonresponders (1±11 mm Hg). Despite lowering nighttime BP, nebivolol did not worsen morning orthostatic tolerance compared with placebo. In conclusion, nebivolol effectively lowered supine hypertension in autonomic failure, independent of β1-blockade. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that NO potentiation contributes significantly to the antihypertensive effect of nebivolol. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Differentially expressed proteins in human breast cancer cells sensitive and resistant to paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Bartonova, Irena; Dincakova, Lucia; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs represents a major problem in cancer treatment. Despite all efforts, mechanisms of resistance have not yet been elucidated. To reveal proteins that could be involved in resistance to taxanes, we compared protein expression in whole cell lysates of SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells sensitive to paclitaxel and in lysates of the same line with acquired resistance to paclitaxel. The resistant SK-BR-3 cell line was established in our lab. Protein separation was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectro-metry. With these techniques we identified four proteins with different expression in resistant SK-BR-3 cells, i.e., serpin B3, serpin B4, heat shock protein 27 (all three upregulated) and cytokeratin 18 (downregulated). Observed changes were confirmed using western blot analysis. This study suggests new directions worthy of further study in the effort to reveal the mechanism of resistance to paclitaxel in breast cancer cells.

  12. Substrate Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity During Fasting in Obese Human Subjects: Impact of GH Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgild; Svart, Mads Vandsted; Lebeck, Janne; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Møller, Niels; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2017-04-01

    Insulin resistance and metabolic inflexibility are features of obesity and are amplified by fasting. Growth hormone (GH) secretion increases during fasting and GH causes insulin resistance. To study the metabolic effects of GH blockade during fasting in obese subjects. Nine obese males were studied thrice in a randomized design: (1) after an overnight fast (control), (2) after 72 hour fasting (fasting), and (3) after 72 hour fasting with GH blockade (pegvisomant) [fasting plus GH antagonist (GHA)]. Each study day consisted of a 4-hour basal period followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry, assessment of glucose and palmitate turnover, and muscle and fat biopsies. GH levels increased with fasting (P fasting-induced reduction of serum insulin-like growth factor I was enhanced by GHA (P Fasting increased lipolysis and lipid oxidation independent of GHA, but fasting plus GHA caused a more pronounced suppression of lipid intermediates in response to hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. Fasting-induced insulin resistance was abrogated by GHA (P Fasting plus GHA also caused elevated glycerol levels and reduced levels of counterregulatory hormones. Fasting significantly reduced the expression of antilipolytic signals in adipose tissue independent of GHA. Suppression of GH activity during fasting in obese subjects reverses insulin resistance and amplifies insulin-stimulated suppression of lipid intermediates, indicating that GH is an important regulator of substrate metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and metabolic flexibility also in obese subjects.

  13. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements.

  14. The drug sensitivity and transmission dynamics of human malaria on Nias Island, North Sumatra, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryauff, D J; Leksana, B; Masbar, S; Wiady, I; Sismadi, P; Susanti, A I; Nagesha, H S; Syafruddin; Atmosoedjono, S; Bangs, M J; Baird, J K

    2002-07-01

    . Night-biting mosquitoes were surveyed by human landing collections and tested for sporozoite infection. Among the five species of human-biting anophelines collected, Anopheles sundaicus was dominant (68%) and the only species found to be infective--two (1.2%) of 167 females being found carrying P. vivax sporozoites. The risk of malarial infection for humans on Nias was considered high because of the abundance of asymptomatic carriers, the reduced effectiveness of the available antimalarial drugs, and the biting and infection 'rates' of the local An. sundaicus.

  15. Isolation of Klebsiella terrigena from human feces: biochemical reactions, capsule types, and antibiotic sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschun, R

    1991-04-01

    Colonization of the human intestinal tract by a newly proposed species, K. terrigena, was investigated. 5377 different stool specimens from healthy persons (food handlers) yielded 50 isolates (0.9%). Biochemically, low frequencies in the degradation of urea, dulcitol, and utilization of citrate at 37 degrees C were found when compared to K. pneumoniae. At 30 degrees C, urea hydrolysis was observed twice as often as at 37 degrees C. Apart from ampicillin, K. terrigena was susceptible to 12 other antimicrobial drugs tested. Multiple drug resistance was rare, few isolates being resistant against 2-4 antibiotic agents. Capsule typing revealed 30 different serotypes, K 70 and K 14 were the most frequent. Six strains expressed capsule types K 2 and K 5, which have been reported to be associated with virulence in K. pneumoniae. A possible pathogenic role of K. terrigena is discussed.

  16. 试论高等教育研究的人学视角%On the Higher Education Research from Perspective of Human Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何淑通

    2015-01-01

    At present,a perspective of human studies is vacant in higher education research,particu-larly in basic theories of higher education construction,which mainly reflected in the inadequate achievements of studying on higher education. The research on ″ Human″ is not based on the ″ Human″ in higher educa-tion research. From the time spirit,disciplinary characteristics and disciplinary development trend,etc. it is necessary to introduce the view of human studies to higher education research. From the view of human studies to research the higher education,the paper attempts to construct the human studies of higher education,and mainly studies the following fields:humanity and higher education,life and higher education,human value and higher,human and higher education.%目前,在高等教育研究尤其是高等教育学的基本理论建构中,人学视角处于缺位状态,主要表现在从本体论和整体人的层面来研究高等教育、建构高等教育理论的成果较少。高等教育研究中关于“人”的研究尚未建立在人学基础上。从时代精神、学科特点和学科发展趋势等角度来看,在高等教育研究中引入人学视角是必要的。从人学视角出发研究高等教育,可尝试建立高等教育人学,重点研究人性与高等教育、生命与高等教育、人的价值与高等教育和人类与高等教育等领域。

  17. Human hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL): expression in white fat corrects the white adipose phenotype of HSL-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Mélanie; Soni, Krishnakant; Laurin, Nancy; Wang, Shu Pei; Mauriège, Pascale; Jirik, Frank R; Mitchell, Grant A

    2005-09-01

    In white adipose tissue (WAT), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) can mediate lipolysis, a central pathway in obesity and diabetes. Gene-targeted HSL-deficient (HSL-/-) mice with no detectable HSL peptide or activity (measured as cholesteryl esterase) have WAT abnormalities, including low mass, marked heterogeneity of cell diameter, increased diacylglycerol content, and low beta-adrenergic stimulation of adipocyte lipolysis. Three transgenic mouse strains preferentially expressing human HSL in WAT were bred to a HSL-/- background. One, HSL-/- N, expresses normal human HSL (41.3 +/- 9.1% of normal activity); two express a serine-to-alanine mutant (S554A) initially hypothesized to be constitutively active: HSL-/- ML, 50.3 +/- 12.3% of normal, and HSL-/- MH, 69.8 +/- 15.8% of normal. In WAT, HSL-/- N mice resembled HSL+/+ controls in WAT mass, histology, diacylglyceride content, and lipolytic response to beta-adrenergic agents. In contrast, HSL-/- ML and HSL-/- MH mice resembled nontransgenic HSL-/- mice, except that diacylglycerol content and perirenal and inguinal WAT masses approached normal in HSL-/- MH mice. Therefore, 1) WAT expression of normal human HSL markedly improves HSL-/- WAT biochemically, physiologically, and morphologically; 2) similar levels of S554A HSL have a low physiological effect despite being active in vitro; and 3) diacylglycerol accumulation is not essential for the development of the characteristic WAT pathology of HSL-/- mice.

  18. Radiation survival parameters of antineoplastic drug-sensitive and -resistant human ovarian cancer cell lines and their modification by buthionine sulfoximine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, K.G.; Behrens, B.C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Hamilton, T.C.; Grotzinger, K.R.; McKoy, W.M.; Winker, M.A.; Ozols, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    The optimum integration of chemotherapy and irradiation is of potential clinical significance in the treatment of ovarian cancer. A series of human ovarian cancer cell lines have been developed in which dose-response relationships to standard anticancer drugs have been determined, and the patterns of cross-resistance between these drugs and irradiation have been established. By stepwise incubation with drugs, sublines of A2780, a drug-sensitive cell line, have been made 100-fold, 10-fold, and 10-fold more resistant to Adriamycin (2780AD), melphalan (2780ME), and cisplatin (2780CP). Two additional cell lines, NIH:OVCAR-3nu(Ag+) and NIH:OVCAR-4(Ag+), were established from drug-refractory patients. 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) are all cross-resistant to irradiation, with DOS of 146, 187, 143, and 203, respectively. However, 2780AD remains sensitive to radiation, with a DO of 111, which is similar to that of A2780 (101). Glutathione (GSH) levels are elevated in 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) to 4.58, 6.13, 12.10, and 15.14 nmol/10(6) cells as compared to A2780, with 1.89 nmol/10(6) cells. However, the GSH level in 2780AD is only minimally higher than that in A2780 (2.94 nmol/10(6) cells). Buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis, significantly increases the radiation sensitivity of 2780ME (changing the DO from 143 to 95) and 2780CP to a lesser extent, suggesting that intracellular GSH levels may play an important role in the radiation response of certain neoplastic cells.

  19. Expression of human hormone-sensitive lipase in white adipose tissue of transgenic mice increases lipase activity but does not enhance in vitro lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Stéphanie; Tavernier, Geneviève; Tiraby, Claire; Mairal, Aline; Langin, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of acylglycerols and cholesteryl esters (CEs). The enzyme is highly expressed in adipose tissues (ATs), where it is thought to play an important role in fat mobilization. The purpose of the present work was to study the effect of a physiological increase of HSL expression in vivo. Transgenic mice were produced with a 21 kb human genomic fragment encompassing the exons encoding the adipocyte form of HSL. hHSL mRNA was expressed at 3-fold higher levels than murine HSL mRNA in white adipocytes. Transgene expression was also observed in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and skeletal muscle. The human protein was detected in ATs of transgenic (Tg) mice. The hydrolytic activities against triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG) analog, and CE were increased in transgenic mouse AT. However, cAMP-inducible adipocyte lipolysis was lower in transgenic animals. In the B6CBA genetic background, transgenic mice up to 14 weeks of age showed lower body weight and fat mass. The phenotype was not observed in older animals and in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). In the OF1 genetic background, there was no difference in fat mass of mice fed ad libitum. However, transgenic mice became leaner than their wild-type (WT) littermates after a 4 day calorie restriction. The data show that overexpression of HSL, despite increased lipase activity, does not lead to enhanced lipolysis.

  20. Reduction of Orc6 expression sensitizes human colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine J Gavin

    Full Text Available Previous studies from our group have shown that the expression levels of Orc6 were highly elevated in colorectal cancer patient specimens and the induction of Orc6 was associated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment. The goal of this study was to investigate the molecular and cellular impact of Orc6 in colon cancer. In this study, we use HCT116 (wt-p53 and HCT116 (null-p53 colon cancer cell lines as a model system to investigate the impact of Orc6 on cell proliferation, chemosensitivity and pathways involved with Orc6. We demonstrated that the down regulation of Orc6 sensitizes colon cancer cells to both 5-FU and cisplatin (cis-pt treatment. Decreased Orc6 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells by RNA interference triggered cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Prolonged inhibition of Orc6 expression resulted in multinucleated cells in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cell line. Western immunoblot analysis showed that down regulation of Orc6 induced p21 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells. The induction of p21 was mediated by increased level of phosphorylated p53 at ser-15. By contrast, there is no elevated expression of p21 in HCT-116 (null-p53 cells. Orc6 down regulation also increased the expression of DNA damaging repair protein GADD45beta and reduced the expression level of JNK1. Orc6 may be a potential novel target for future anti cancer therapeutic development in colon cancer.

  1. SIRT1 inhibition restores apoptotic sensitivity in p53-mutated human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Cook, Anthony L., E-mail: Anthony.Cook@utas.edu.au; Snow, Elizabeth T., E-mail: elizabeth.snow@utas.edu.au

    2014-06-15

    Mutations to the p53 gene are common in UV-exposed keratinocytes and contribute to apoptotic resistance in skin cancer. P53-dependent activity is modulated, in part, by a complex, self-limiting feedback loop imposed by miR-34a-mediated regulation of the lysine deacetylase, SIRT1. Expression of numerous microRNAs is dysregulated in squamous and basal cell carcinomas; however the contribution of specific microRNAs to the pathogenesis of skin cancer remains untested. Through use of RNAi, miRNA target site blocking oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors, this study explored the influence of p53 mutational status, SIRT1 activity and miR-34a levels on apoptotic sensitivity in primary (NHEK) and p53-mutated (HaCaT) keratinocyte cell lines. SIRT1 and p53 are overexpressed in p53-mutated keratinocytes, whilst miR-34a levels are 90% less in HaCaT cells. HaCaTs have impaired responses to p53/SIRT1/miR-34a axis manipulation which enhanced survival during exposure to the chemotherapeutic agent, camptothecin. Inhibition of SIRT1 activity in this cell line increased p53 acetylation and doubled camptothecin-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that p53 mutations increase apoptotic resistance in keratinocytes by interfering with miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. Thus, SIRT1 inhibitors may have a therapeutic potential for overcoming apoptotic resistance during skin cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Impaired microRNA biogenesis promotes apoptotic resistance in HaCaT keratinocytes. • TP53 mutations suppress miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. • SIRT1 inhibition increases p53 acetylation in HaCaTs, restoring apoptosis.

  2. Glutamine deprivation sensitizes human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells to TRIAL-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Prasad Tharanga Jayasooriya, Rajapaksha Gedara; Neelaka Molagoda, Ilandarage Menu; Lee, Seungheon; Park, Sang Rul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young

    2017-02-13

    Tumor cell metabolism is a promising target for various cancer treatments. Apart from aerobic glycolysis, cancer cell growth is dependent on glutamine (Gln) supply, leading to their survival and differentiation. Therefore, we examined whether treatment with TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) sensitizes MDA-MB-231 cells to apoptosis under Gln deprivation condition (TRAIL/Gln deprivation). Gln deprivation decreased cell proliferation as expected, but did not induce remarkable cell death. TRAIL/Gln deprivation, however, significantly increased growth inhibition and morphological shrinkage of MDA-MB-231 cells compared to those induced by treatment with either Gln deprivation or TRAIL alone. Moreover, TRAIL/Gln deprivation upregulated the apoptotic sub-G1 phase accompanied with a remarkable decrease of pro-caspase-3, pro-caspase-9, and anti-apoptotic xIAP, and Bcl-2. Increased cleavage of PARP and pro-apoptotic Bid protein expression suggests that TRAIL/Gln deprivation triggers mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. Additionally, TRAIL/Gln deprivation upregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers such as ATF4 and phosphorylated eIF2α, thereby enhancing the C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) protein level. Transient knockdown of CHOP partically reversed TRAIL/Gln deprivation-mediated apoptosis. Accordingly, TRAIL/Gln deprivation enhanced the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5) and transient knockdown of DR5 completely restored TRAIL/Gln deprivation-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that Gln deprivation conditions can be used for the development of new therapies for TRAIL-resistant cancers.

  3. A Paleolithic diet confers higher insulin sensitivity, lower C-reactive protein and lower blood pressure than a cereal-based diet in domestic pig

    OpenAIRE

    Ugander Martin; Sjöberg Trygve; Steen Stig; Wierup Nils; Sundler Frank; Pacini Giovanni; Ahrén Bo; Jönsson Tommy; Frostegård Johan; Göransson Leif; Lindeberg Staffan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background A Paleolithic diet has been suggested to be more in concordance with human evolutionary legacy than a cereal based diet. This might explain the lower incidence among hunter-gatherers of diseases of affluence such as type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to experimentally study the long-term effect of a Paleolithic diet on risk factors for these diseases in domestic pigs. We examined glucose tolerance, post-challenge insulin response...

  4. Influence of glucocorticoids and growth hormone on insulin sensitivity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, K C J; Chong, L E; Riddle, M C

    2013-06-01

    The seminal concept proposed by Sir Harold Himsworth more than 75 years ago that a large number of patients with diabetes were 'insulin insensitive', now termed insulin resistance, has now expanded to include several endocrine syndromes, namely those of glucocorticoid excess, and growth hormone excess and deficiency. Synthetic glucocorticoids are increasingly used to treat a wide variety of chronic diseases, whereas the beneficial effects of recombinant growth hormone replacement therapy in children and adults with growth hormone deficiency have now been well-recognized for over 25 years. However, clinical and experimental studies have established that increased circulating levels of glucocorticoids and growth hormone can also lead to worsening of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, overt diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Improved understanding of the physiological 24-h rhythmicity of glucocorticoid and growth hormone secretion and its influence on the dawn phenomenon and the Staub-Trauggot effect has therefore led to renewed interest in studies on the mechanisms of insulin resistance induced by exogenous administration of glucocorticoids and growth hormone in humans. In this review, we describe the physiological events that result from the presence of resistance to insulin action at the level of skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver, describe the known mechanisms of glucocorticoid- and growth hormone-mediated insulin resistance, and provide an update of the contributions of glucocorticoids and growth hormone to understanding the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and its effects on several endocrine syndromes. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  5. Human Sarcoma growth is sensitive to small-molecule mediated AXIN stabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra De Robertis

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are mesenchymal tumors showing high molecular heterogeneity, reflected at the histological level by the existence of more than fifty different subtypes. Genetic and epigenetic evidences link aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling to growth and progression of human sarcomas. This phenomenon, mainly accomplished by autocrine loop activity, is sustained by gene amplification, over-expression of Wnt ligands and co-receptors or epigenetic silencing of endogenous Wnt antagonists. We previously showed that pharmacological inhibition of Wnt signaling mediated by Axin stabilization produced in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in glioblastoma tumors. Here, we report that targeting different sarcoma cell lines with the Wnt inhibitor/Axin stabilizer SEN461 produces a less transformed phenotype, as supported by modulation of anchorage-independent growth in vitro. At the molecular level, SEN461 treatment enhanced the stability of the scaffold protein Axin1, a key negative regulator of the Wnt signaling with tumor suppressor function, resulting in downstream effects coherent with inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling. Genetic phenocopy of small molecule Axin stabilization, through Axin1 over-expression, coherently resulted in strong impairment of soft-agar growth. Importantly, sarcoma growth inhibition through pharmacological Axin stabilization was also observed in a xenograft model in vivo in female CD-1 nude mice. Our findings suggest the usefulness of Wnt inhibitors with Axin stabilization activity as a potentialyl clinical relevant strategy for certain types of sarcomas.

  6. Phentolamine relaxes human corpus cavernosum by a nonadrenergic mechanism activating ATP-sensitive K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L F G; Nascimento, N R F; Fonteles, M C; de Nucci, G; Moraes, M E; Vasconcelos, P R L; Moraes, M O

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the pharmacodynamics of phentolamine in human corpus cavernosum (HCC) with special attention to the role of the K+ channels. Strips of HCC precontracted with nonadrenergic stimuli and kept in isometric organ bath immersed in a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution enriched with guanethidine and indomethacine were used in order to study the mechanism of the phentolamine-induced relaxation. Phentolamine caused relaxation (approximately 50%) in HCC strips precontracted with K+ 40 mM. This effect was not blocked by tetrodotoxin (1 microM) (54.6+/-4.6 vs 48.9+/-6.4%) or (atropine (10 microM) (52.7+/-6.5 vs 58.6+/-5.6%). However, this relaxation was significantly attenuated by L-NAME (100 microM) (59.7+/-5.8 vs 27.8+/-7.1%; Pphentolamine relaxations (54.6+/-4.6 vs 59.3+/-5.2%). Glibenclamide (100 microM), an inhibitor of K(ATP)-channel, caused a significant inhibition (56.7+/-6.3 vs 11.3+/-2.3%; Pphentolamine-induced relaxation. In addition, the association of glibenclamide and L-NAME almost abolished the phentolamine-mediated relaxation (54.6+/-5.6 vs 5.7+/-1.4%; Pphentolamine relaxes HCC by a nonadrenergic-noncholinergic mechanism dependent on nitric oxide synthase activity and activation of K(ATP)-channel.

  7. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-09-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its own, but upon being presented with PPD was able to instruct monocytes to increase their expression of PCA. Antigen presentation could be performed only by autologous monocytes; allogeneic monocytes from donors unrelated to the donor of the reactive clone could not present antigen to cells of the clone in a way that would initiate the procoagulant response. Cells of the reactive clone did not mediate increased monocyte PCA in response to Candida, even though peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the donor demonstrated increased PCA to both Candida and PPD. Thus, the PCA response to specific antigen can be mediated by a single clone of cells that shows specificity in the recognition of both antigen and antigen presenting cell.

  8. A Rapid and Sensitive Method to Measure the Functional Activity of Shiga Toxins in Human Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Arfilli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxins (Stx have a definite role in the development of hemolytic uremic syndrome in children with hemorrhagic colitis caused by pathogenic Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains. The dramatic effects of these toxins on the microvasculature of different organs, particularly of the kidney, are well known, whereas there is no consensus on the mechanism by which Stx reach the endothelia of target organs and/or indirectly injure these body sites. We hereby describe a quick (4 h, radioactive, Raji cell-based method designed for the detection of Stx in human sera. The assay monitors the translation impairment induced by these powerful inhibitors of protein synthesis, which are identified properly by neutralizing their activity with specific monoclonal antibodies. By this method, we detected for the first time the functional activity of Stx in sera of STEC-infected patients during hemorrhagic colitis. Recent research has pointed to a dynamic process of Stx-induced renal intoxication in which concurrent and interactive steps are involved. Our rapid and specific method could be useful for studying the kinetics of Stx during the natural course of STEC infection and the interplay between Stx activity in serum and Stx presence in different blood fractions (neutrophils, monocytes, platelets, leukocyte-platelet aggregates, microvesicles, lipoproteins.

  9. Analysis of human knee osteoarthritic cartilage using polarization sensitive second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Grønhaug, Kirsten M.; Romijn, Elisabeth I.; Drogset, Jon O.; Lilledahl, Magnus B.

    2014-05-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most prevalent joint diseases in the world. Although the cause of osteoarthritis is not exactly clear, the disease results in a degradation of the quality of the articular cartilage including collagen and other extracellular matrix components. We have investigated alterations in the structure of collagen fibers in the cartilage tissue of the human knee using mulitphoton microscopy. Due to inherent high nonlinear susceptibility, ordered collagen fibers present in the cartilage tissue matrix produces strong second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. Significant morphological differences are found in different Osteoarthritic grades of cartilage by SHG microscopy. Based on the polarization analysis of the SHG signal, we find that a few locations of hyaline cartilage (mainly type II collagen) is being replaced by fibrocartilage (mainly type I cartilage), in agreement with earlier literature. To locate the different types and quantify the alteration in the structure of collagen fiber, we employ polarization-SHG microscopic analysis, also referred to as _-tensor imaging. The image analysis of p-SHG image obtained by excitation polarization measurements would represent different tissue constituents with different numerical values at pixel level resolution.

  10. A Rapid and Sensitive Method to Measure the Functional Activity of Shiga Toxins in Human Serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfilli, Valentina; Carnicelli, Domenica; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Torresani, Erminio; Scavia, Gaia; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) have a definite role in the development of hemolytic uremic syndrome in children with hemorrhagic colitis caused by pathogenic Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. The dramatic effects of these toxins on the microvasculature of different organs, particularly of the kidney, are well known, whereas there is no consensus on the mechanism by which Stx reach the endothelia of target organs and/or indirectly injure these body sites. We hereby describe a quick (4 h), radioactive, Raji cell-based method designed for the detection of Stx in human sera. The assay monitors the translation impairment induced by these powerful inhibitors of protein synthesis, which are identified properly by neutralizing their activity with specific monoclonal antibodies. By this method, we detected for the first time the functional activity of Stx in sera of STEC-infected patients during hemorrhagic colitis. Recent research has pointed to a dynamic process of Stx-induced renal intoxication in which concurrent and interactive steps are involved. Our rapid and specific method could be useful for studying the kinetics of Stx during the natural course of STEC infection and the interplay between Stx activity in serum and Stx presence in different blood fractions (neutrophils, monocytes, platelets, leukocyte-platelet aggregates, microvesicles, lipoproteins). PMID:26556372

  11. A Role for REM Sleep in Recalibrating the Sensitivity of the Human Brain to Specific Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujar, Ninad; McDonald, Steven Andrew; Nishida, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Although the impact of sleep on cognitive function is increasingly well established, the role of sleep in modulating affective brain processes remains largely uncharacterized. Using a face recognition task, here we demonstrate an amplified reactivity to anger and fear emotions across the day, without sleep. However, an intervening nap blocked and even reversed this negative emotional reactivity to anger and fear while conversely enhancing ratings of positive (happy) expressions. Most interestingly, only those subjects who obtained rapid eye movement (REM) sleep displayed this remodulation of affective reactivity for the latter 2 emotion categories. Together, these results suggest that the evaluation of specific human emotions is not static across a daytime waking interval, showing a progressive reactivity toward threat-related negative expressions. However, an episode of sleep can reverse this predisposition, with REM sleep depotentiating negative reactivity toward fearful expressions while concomitantly facilitating recognition and ratings of reward-relevant positive expressions. These findings support the view that sleep, and specifically REM neurophysiology, may represent an important factor governing the optimal homeostasis of emotional brain regulation. PMID:20421251

  12. Toward Higher Energy Conversion Efficiency for Solid Polymer Electrolyte Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Ionic Conductivity and TiO2 Pore-Filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Donghoon; Cho, Woohyung; Lee, Jung Hyun; Kang, Yong Soo

    2014-04-03

    Even though the solid polymer electrolyte has many intrinsic advantages over the liquid electrolyte, its ionic conductivity and mesopore-filling are much poorer than those of the liquid electrolyte, limiting its practical application to electrochemical devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Two major shortcomings associated with utilizing solid polymer electrolytes in DSCs are first discussed, low ionic conductivity and poor pore-filling in mesoporous photoanodes for DSCs. In addition, future directions for the successful utilization of solid polymer electrolytes toward improving the performance of DSCs are proposed. For instance, the facilitated mass-transport concept could be applied to increase the ionic conductivity. Modified biphasic and triple-phasic structures for the photoanode are suggested to take advantage of both the liquid- and solid-state properties of electrolytes.

  13. Application of a design of experiment approach in the development of a sensitive bioanalytical assay in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Michelle L; Bergum, James S; Schuster, Alan E; Aubry, Anne-Françoise

    2012-11-01

    To support a first-in-human (FIH) clinical study in healthy volunteers, a human plasma assay, a 20-fold more sensitive method than the validated non-clinical LC-MS/MS assays, was requested. For the clinical assay, a LLOQ of 0.050 ng/mL for Compound A and 0.100 ng/mL for Compound B was desired to accurately determine the analyte concentrations in human plasma samples across all treatment groups. A design of experiment (DOE) investigation was performed in an effort to optimize the extraction procedure of the bioanalytical assay used to support the first in human study and future clinical studies. Three factors, extraction buffer pH (two pHs), volume ratio of organic solvent to plasma (two ratios), and extraction shake time (three times), were selected for the DOE. Both analytes were analyzed at a low concentration, 0.150 ng/mL, and a stable isotope label internal standard was used for each analyte. To estimate the recovery of each analyte from the extraction, the response ratio of each analyte over the respective internal standard was used, and to estimate matrix effects, the absolute response (peak area) of each analyte was used. The results of the DOE indicated that the three factors tested had a more significant effect on the extraction of the metabolite, Compound B, compared to that of the parent, Compound A. The extraction buffer pH had the greatest influence on Compound B and the volume of extraction solvent had an influence on both analytes. Unexpectedly, a longer extraction time caused an apparent decrease in the overall recovery for both analytes. This was presumably due to an increased extraction of interfering matrix components. Optimal conditions were achieved for the combined analysis of both compounds using the DOE approach.

  14. A sensitive and robust HPLC assay with fluorescence detection for the quantification of pomalidomide in human plasma for pharmacokinetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Shandiz; Peer, Cody J; Polizzotto, Mark N; Uldrick, Thomas S; Roth, Jeffrey; Wyvill, Kathleen M; Aleman, Karen; Zeldis, Jerome B; Yarchoan, Robert; Figg, William D

    2014-04-01

    Pomalidomide is a second generation IMiD (immunomodulatory agent) that has recently been granted approval by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma after prior treatment with two antimyeloma agents, including lenalidomide and bortezomib. A simple and robust HPLC assay with fluorescence detection for pomalidomide over the range of 1-500ng/mL has been developed for application to pharmacokinetic studies in ongoing clinical trials in various other malignancies. A liquid-liquid extraction from human plasma alone or pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl was performed, using propyl paraben as the internal standard. From plasma either pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl or not, the assay was shown to be selective, sensitive, accurate, precise, and have minimal matrix effects (HPLC-FL assay allows a broader range of laboratories to measure pomalidomide for application to clinical pharmacokinetics.

  15. [The macrophage disappearance reaction in guinea pigs sensitized with bovine gamma globulin or human scrum albumin (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimke, R; Bernstein, B; Ambrosius, H

    1977-01-01

    The macrophage disappearance reaction (MDR) is a suitable test for detection of cell mediated immunity against bovine gamma globulin (BGG) and human serum albumin (HSA) in guinea pigs. The MDR is a technical simple, good manipulable, and quantifiable test. The optimal test conditions for the antigens BGC and HSA are the following: Peritoneal exudat cells (PEC) were stimulated with paraffin oil. On the 5th day after receiving oil the animals were injected with 80 microgram BGG or 30 microgram HSA i.p. 5 hours later the PEC were harvested and counted. With the MDR it is possible to detect differences with respect to degree of cell-mediated immunity. Supernatants of sensitized lymphocytes produces the MDR too.

  16. Sensitivity to cisplatin in primary cell lines derived from human glioma correlates with levels of EGR-1 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponti Donatella

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Less than 30% of malignant gliomas respond to adjuvant chemotherapy. Here, we have asked whether variations in the constitutive expression of early-growth response factor 1 (EGR-1 predicted acute cytotoxicity and clonogenic cell death in vitro, induced by six different chemotherapics. Materials and methods Cytotoxicity assays were performed on cells derived from fresh tumor explants of 18 human cases of malignant glioma. In addition to EGR-1, tumor cultures were investigated for genetic alterations and the expression of cancer regulating factors, related to the p53 pathway. Results We found that sensitivity to cisplatin correlates significantly with levels of EGR-1 expression in tumors with wild-type p53/INK4a/p16 status. Conclusion Increased knowledge of the mechanisms regulating EGR-1 expression in wild-type p53/INK4a/p16 cases of glioma may help in the design of new chemotherapeutic strategies for these tumors.

  17. X-ray sensitivity of fifty-three human diploid fibroblast cell strains from patients with characterized genetic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-03-01

    The in vitro response of 53 human diploid fibroblast strains to x-irradiation was studied using a clonogenic survival assay. The strains, derived from patients with a variety of characterized clinical conditions, most with a genetic component, ranged in Do (a measure of the slope of the survival curve) from 43 to 168 rads. The mean Do's of six strains from normal individuals was 140 to 152 rads, with an overall range, based on the extremes of their standard errors, of 128 to 164 rads. Three-quarters of the strains studied fell within this range. Strains identified as sensitive came from patients with ataxia telangiectasia, progeria, the two genetic forms of retinoblastoma, and partial trisomy of chromosome 13. No marked radiosensitivity was found among strains derived from patients with a number of other conditions associated with a predisposition to malignancy.

  18. Effects of melatonin on prepulse inhibition, habituation and sensitization of the human startle reflex in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, Emilia K; Ucar, Ebru; Glenthøj, Birte Y

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex (PPI) is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating, which is demonstrated to be impaired in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, a disruption of the circadian rhythm together with blunted melatonin secretion is regularly found in patients...... with schizophrenia and it is theorized that these may contribute to their attentional deficits. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute melatonin on healthy human sensorimotor gating. Twenty-one healthy male volunteers were administered melatonin or placebo after which their levels of PPI were...... assessed. Melatonin significantly reduced startle magnitude and ratings of alertness, but did not influence PPI, nor sensitization and habituation. However, when taking baseline scores in consideration, melatonin significantly increased PPI in low scoring individuals while significantly decreasing...

  19. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie M Erzinger

    Full Text Available The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF, derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3, bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues.

  20. Weather and place-based human behavior: recreational preferences and sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the links between biometeorological variables and the behavior of beach recreationists along with their rating of overall weather conditions. To identify and describe significance of on-site atmospheric conditions, two separate forms of response are examined. The first is sensory perception of the immediate atmospheric surround expressed verbally, which was the subject of earlier work. In the research reported here, on-site observations of behavior that reflect the effects of weather and climate are examined. By employing, independently, separate indicators of on-site experience, the reliability of each is examined and interpreted and apparent threshold conditions verified. The study site is King's Beach located on the coast of Queensland, Australia. On-site observations of atmospheric variables and beach user behavior are made for the daylight hours of 45 days spread over a 12-month period. The results show that behavioral data provide reliable and meaningful indications of the significance of the atmospheric environment for leisure. Atmospheric conditions within the zone of acceptability are those that the beach users can readily cope with or modify by a range of minor behavioral adjustments. Optimal weather conditions appear to be those requiring no specific behavioral adjustment. Attendance levels reflect only the outer limits of acceptability of the meteorological environment, while duration of visit enables calibration of levels of approval in so far as it reflects rating of on-site weather within a broad zone of tolerance. In a broad theoretical sense, the results add to an understanding of the relationship between weather and human behavior. This information is potentially useful in effective tourism management and planning.

  1. Weather and place-based human behavior: recreational preferences and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, C R

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the links between biometeorological variables and the behavior of beach recreationists along with their rating of overall weather conditions. To identify and describe significance of on-site atmospheric conditions, two separate forms of response are examined. The first is sensory perception of the immediate atmospheric surround expressed verbally, which was the subject of earlier work. In the research reported here, on-site observations of behavior that reflect the effects of weather and climate are examined. By employing, independently, separate indicators of on-site experience, the reliability of each is examined and interpreted and apparent threshold conditions verified. The study site is King's Beach located on the coast of Queensland, Australia. On-site observations of atmospheric variables and beach user behavior are made for the daylight hours of 45 days spread over a 12-month period. The results show that behavioral data provide reliable and meaningful indications of the significance of the atmospheric environment for leisure. Atmospheric conditions within the zone of acceptability are those that the beach users can readily cope with or modify by a range of minor behavioral adjustments. Optimal weather conditions appear to be those requiring no specific behavioral adjustment. Attendance levels reflect only the outer limits of acceptability of the meteorological environment, while duration of visit enables calibration of levels of approval in so far as it reflects rating of on-site weather within a broad zone of tolerance. In a broad theoretical sense, the results add to an understanding of the relationship between weather and human behavior. This information is potentially useful in effective tourism management and planning.

  2. Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13 inhibitor, Ubenimex, enhances radiation sensitivity in human cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawa Akihiro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy can be used to treat all stages of cervical cancer. For improving local control via radiotherapy, it is important to use additional antitumor agents. Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13, a 150-kDa metalloproteinase, is a multifunctional cell surface aminopeptidase with ubiquitous expression. Recent studies have suggested that APN/CD13 plays an important role in tumor progression in several human malignancies. Methods We investigated whether the suppression of APN/CD13 using Ubenimex, an inhibitor of APN/CD13 activity, may affect tumor radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Cell surface APN/CD13 activity in HeLa cells was calculated using alanine-p-nitroanilido as a substrate. For colony formation assays, single-dose radiation and/or Ubenimex were administered to each dish of HeLa cells, and these dishes were cultured for 14 days. Molecular changes of apoptosis were determined by Western blot. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin-V PI staining (flow cytometry analysis and the Tunel method. Moreover, we investigated the effect of combining Ubenimex and low-dose radiation on tumor growth using nude mice. Results We demonstrated that Ubenimex enhanced the effectiveness of radiotherapy, acting as a radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo. In colony formation assays, a significant decline in clonogenic survival was observed in Ubenimex-treated cells. Mice treated with a combination of radiation and Ubenimex showed a significant prolongation of the tumor-doubling time compared with the control, Ubenimex, or radiation-alone groups. We also showed that ubenimex enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Although further studies are needed, this report suggests that Ubeniemx acts as a radiosensitizer in cervical cancer treatment, and that the inhibition of APN/CD13 activity may represent a new approach for improving the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy for uterine

  3. pH-sensitive nanomicelles for controlled and efficient drug delivery to human colorectal carcinoma LoVo cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Ting Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The triblock copolymers PEG-P(Asp-DIP-P(Lys-Ca (PEALCa of polyethylene glycol (PEG, poly(N-(N',N'-diisopropylaminoethyl aspartamide (P(Asp-DIP, and poly (lysine-cholic acid (P(Lys-Ca were synthesized as a pH-sensitive drug delivery system. In neutral aqueous environment such as physiological environment, PEALCa can self-assemble into stable vesicles with a size around 50-60 nm, avoid uptake by the reticuloendothelial system (RES, and encase the drug in the core. However, the PEALCa micelles disassemble and release drug rapidly in acidic environment that resembles lysosomal compartments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The anticancer drug Paclitaxel (PTX and hydrophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO were encapsulated inside the core of the PEALCa micelles and used for potential cancer therapy. Drug release study revealed that PTX in the micelles was released faster at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.4. Cell culture studies showed that the PTX-SPIO-PEALCa micelle was effectively internalized by human colon carcinoma cell line (LoVo cells, and PTX could be embedded inside lysosomal compartments. Moreover, the human colorectal carcinoma (CRC LoVo cells delivery effect was verified in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histology analysis. Consequently effective suppression of CRC LoVo cell growth was evaluated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicated that the PTX-SPION-loaded pH-sensitive micelles were a promising MRI-visible drug release system for colorectal cancer therapy.

  4. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V; Said, Hamid M

    2014-08-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na(+)-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na(+)-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS.

  5. SiRNA-mediated IGF-1R inhibition sensitizes human colon cancer SW480 cells to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavari, Kamal; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed A. (Dept. of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares Univ., Tehran (Iran)); Maragheh, Mohammad Ghannadi (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research Center, Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Inst., Tehran (Iran)); Babaei, Mohammad Hosein (Radioisotope Quality Control Center, Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Inst., Tehran (Iran)); Arfaee, Ali Jabbary; Madani, Hossein; Mirzaei, Hamid Reza (Radiation Oncology Dept., Shohada Hospital, Shahid Beheshti Medical Sciences Univ., Tehran (Iran))

    2010-01-15

    Purpose. Insulin like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF-1R) is well-documented to play a key role in radiation response and tumor radiosensitivity, thus offering an attractive clinic drug target to enhance tumor sensitivity to anti-cancer radiotherapy. Material and methods. Human colon carcinoma SW480 cells were transfected with the specific small interference RNA (siRNA) expression vector (pkD-shRNA-IGF-1R-V2) designed to target IGF-1R mRNA. The expression of IGF-1R mRNA and its protein among the transfected and untransfected cells were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA assay. The changes in cell radiosensitivity were examined by MTT assay. Results. Transfection of mammalian expression vector pkD containing IGF-1R siRNA was shown to reduce IGF-1R mRNA levels by up to 95%. ELISA assay detected a similar inhibition of IGF-1R protein levels in cells transfected with IGF-1R siRNA. SW480 cells transfected with the expression vector for siRNA significantly rendered cells more sensitive to radiation and the highest radiation enhancement ratio was 2.02 +- 0.08. Conclusion. These data provide the first evidence that specific siRNA fragment (pkD-shRNA-IGF-1R-V2) targeting human IGF-1R mRNA is able to enhance colon cancer radiosensitivity. Also results indicated that, combining IGF-1R siRNA and radiation significantly enhances antitumor efficacy compared with either modality alone

  6. The role of sensitivity of ALA (PpIX)-based PDT on Human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar-e-Alam, M.; Atif, M.; Rehman, T.; Sadia, H.; Firdous, S.

    2011-08-01

    Present study evaluates the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) as photo sensitizer using Human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cell line as an experimental model. Porphyrins derivatives are used as active cytotoxic antitumor agents in PDT. Above mentioned cell line were irradiated with red light (a diode laser, λ = 635 nm) at different doses (0-160 J/cm2) of light. The influence/effectiveness of incubation time, various concentrations of aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and light doses on the cellular viability was studied. HEK293T cells were deliberated by exposing the ALA-PpIX (0-1000 μg/ml) of concentrations. The optimal uptakes of photosensitizer (PS) in cell lines were investigated by means of spectro photo metric measurements. Cells viability was determined by means of neutral red assay (NRA). It was observed that alone, neither photosensitizer nor light dose have significant effect on cells viability, but optimal concentration of PS along with suitable dose of light exhibit effective impact on the viability of cell. Our results showed that light doses of 40 J/cm2 demonstrates effective PDT outcome for HEK293T cell line when incubated with 400 μg/ml, with wrapping up view that HEK293T cell line is very sensitive to ALA-mediated PDT as compared to cell line published in our data. At the end results has been verified by using reactive oxygen species (ROS) measure test.

  7. Osmotic induction of calcium accumulation in human embryonic kidney cells detected with a high sensitivity FRET calcium sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bi-Huei; Takanaga, Hitomi; Griesbeck, Oliver; Frommer, Wolf B

    2009-08-01

    Calcium serves as a second messenger in glucose-triggered insulin secretion of pancreatic cells. Less is known about sugar signaling in non-excitable cells. Here, the high sensitivity FRET calcium sensor TN-XXL was used to characterize glucose-induced calcium responses in non-excitable human embryonic kidney HEK293T cells. HEK293T cells responded to perfusion with glucose with a sustained and concentration-dependent increase in cytosolic calcium levels. Sucrose and mannitol triggered comparable calcium responses, suggesting that the increase of the calcium concentration was caused by osmotic effects. HEK293T cells are characterized by low endogenous glucose uptake capacity as shown with a high sensitivity glucose sensor. Consistently, when glucose influx was artificially increased by co-expression of GLUT glucose transporters, the glucose-induced calcium increase was significantly reduced. Neither calcium depletion, nor gadolinium or thapsigargin were able to inhibit the calcium accumulation. Taken together, membrane impermeable osmolytes such as sucrose and mannitol lead to an increase in calcium levels, while the effect of glucose depends on the cell's glucose uptake capacity and will thus vary between cell types in the body that differ in their glucose uptake capacity.

  8. Sensitive and simultaneous quantification of zinc pyrithione and climbazole deposition from anti-dandruff shampoos onto human scalp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Miao, Miao; Hoptroff, Michael; Fei, Xiaoqing; Collins, Luisa Z; Jones, Andrew; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2015-10-15

    A sensitive ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of zinc pyrithione (ZPT) and climbazole (CBZ) deposited onto human scalp from anti-dandruff (AD) shampoos. Scrubbing with a buffer solution was used as the sampling method for the extraction of ZPT and CBZ from scalp. Derivatization of ZPT was carried out prior to UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. The identification of ZPT and CBZ was performed by examining ratios of selected multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions in combination with UHPLC retention times. The limit of detection for ZPT and CBZ was established to be 1 and 2ng/mL, respectively. This sensitivity enables the quantification of ZPT and CBZ at deposition levels in the low ng/cm(2) range. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of scalp buffer scrub samples from an in vivo study. The levels of ZPT and CBZ deposited on the scalp at different time points after application of the AD shampoo were measured. The results revealed that dual-active AD shampoo delivered more ZPT onto the scalp in a single wash than single active shampoo did. The amount of ZPT and CBZ retained on the scalp after AD shampoo application declined over 72h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations.

  10. Antisense bcl-2 retrovirus vector increases the sensitivity of a human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W G; Ma, L P; Wang, S W; Zhang, Z Y; Cao, G D

    1999-05-01

    The bcl-2 oncoprotein directly prolongs cellular survival by blocking apoptosis and its overexpression is associated with cellular resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic drugs and gamma-irradiation. Meanwhile, it has been shown that bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide can induce apoptosis or increase toxicity of the treatment in tumors in vivo and in vitro. However, it is difficult to obtain stable transfection by this approach and there are no reports about the effect of an antisense bcl-2 on the sensitivity to oxidative stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Here we investigated the effect of an antisense bcl-2 RNA retrovirus vector transfer on the sensitivity of 2-butylamino-2-demethoxy-hypocrellin A (2-BA-2-DMHA) photosensitization in a human gastric adenocarcinoma MGC803 cell line. The results indicate that antisense bcl-2-infected MGC803 cells expressed exogenous antisense bcl-2 mRNA measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and significantly reduced bcl-2 protein determined by western blotting analysis. The decreased expression of bcl-2 protein was accompanied by increased phototoxicity and susceptibility to apoptosis induced by 2-BA-2-DMHA PDT. Our finding suggests that reduction of bcl-2 protein in gastric cancers, and possibly also in a variety of other tumors, may be a novel and rational approach to improve photosensitivity and the treatment outcome.

  11. Capsaicin-sensitive C- and A-fibre nociceptors control long-term potentiation-like pain amplification in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Florian; Magerl, Walter; Klein, Thomas; Greffrath, Wolfgang; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2015-09-01

    Long-term potentiation in the spinal dorsal horn requires peptidergic C-fibre activation in animals. Perceptual correlates of long-term potentiation following high-frequency electrical stimulation in humans include increased sensitivity to electrical stimuli at the high frequency stimulation site (homotopic pain-long-term potentiation) and increased sensitivity to pinprick surrounding the high frequency stimulation site (heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation, equivalent to secondary hyperalgaesia). To characterize the peripheral fibre populations involved in induction of pain-long-term potentiation, we performed two selective nerve block experiments in 30 healthy male volunteers. Functional blockade of TRPV1-positive nociceptors by high-concentration capsaicin (verified by loss of heat pain) significantly reduced pain ratings to high frequency stimulation by 47% (P pain-long-term potentiation by 71% (P pain-long-term potentiation by 92% (P pain to pinprick) significantly reduced pain ratings to high frequency stimulation by 37% (P pain-long-term potentiation (-5%). It had a marginal effect on heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation (-35%, P = 0.059), while the area of secondary hyperalgesia remained unchanged (-2%, P = 0.88). In conclusion, all nociceptor subclasses contribute to high frequency stimulation-induced pain (with a relative contribution of C > Aδ fibres, and an equal contribution of TRPV1-positive and TRPV1-negative fibres). TRPV1-positive C-fibres are the main inducers of both homotopic and heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation. TRPV1-positive A-fibres contribute substantially to the induction of heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation. TRPV1-negative C-fibres induce a component of homotopic self-facilitation but not heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation. TRPV1-negative A-fibres are the main afferents mediating pinprick pain and hyperalgesia, however, they do not appear to contribute to the induction of pain-long-term potentiation. These

  12. A higher sensitively concentration sensor using long-period fiber grating%一种基于LPFG高灵敏度浓度传感器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵洪霞; 丁志群; 王金霞; 鲍吉龙

    2009-01-01

    利用Sagnac光纤环全反射的特性和单根长周期光纤光栅(LPFG)构成Michelson干涉仪,入射光经LPFG后,部分被耦合到包层中传输,经过包层和纤芯传输的光信号经Sagnae光纤环全反射后重新耦合回LPFG,在光栅区域干涉.利用传输矩阵理论分析了干涉结构的光谱特性.用此干涉结构检测了蔗糖溶液浓度,传感灵敏度可达0.065 nmLg-1.%A Miehelson interferometer based on fiber ring and a LPFG is presented. The input signal is partly coupled into the eladding of the fiber by LPFG, both of the transmitted optical signals in the core and cladding are reflected by sagnac fiber ring and coupled simultaneously back to the LPFG and inter-fere. Spectrum characteristics are analyzed using transfer matrix method. The proposed device is experi-mented to serve a sucrose concentration sensor,whose sensitivity is measured to be 0. 065 nmLg-1.

  13. A catalytically and genetically optimized beta-lactamase-matrix based assay for sensitive, specific, and higher throughput analysis of native henipavirus entry characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Mike C; Wang, Yao; Freiberg, Alexander N; Aguilar, Hector C; Holbrook, Michael R; Lee, Benhur

    2009-07-31

    Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are the only paramyxoviruses requiring Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) containment. Thus, study of henipavirus entry at less than BSL-4 conditions necessitates the use of cell-cell fusion or pseudotyped reporter virus assays. Yet, these surrogate assays may not fully emulate the biological properties unique to the virus being studied. Thus, we developed a henipaviral entry assay based on a beta-lactamase-Nipah Matrix (betala-M) fusion protein. We first codon-optimized the bacterial betala and the NiV-M genes to ensure efficient expression in mammalian cells. The betala-M construct was able to bud and form virus-like particles (VLPs) that morphologically resembled paramyxoviruses. betala-M efficiently incorporated both NiV and HeV fusion and attachment glycoproteins. Entry of these VLPs was detected by cytosolic delivery of betala-M, resulting in enzymatic and fluorescent conversion of the pre-loaded CCF2-AM substrate. Soluble henipavirus receptors (ephrinB2) or antibodies against the F and/or G proteins blocked VLP entry. Additionally, a Y105W mutation engineered into the catalytic site of betala increased the sensitivity of our betala-M based infection assays by 2-fold. In toto, these methods will provide a more biologically relevant assay for studying henipavirus entry at less than BSL-4 conditions.

  14. A catalytically and genetically optimized β-lactamase-matrix based assay for sensitive, specific, and higher throughput analysis of native henipavirus entry characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holbrook Michael R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nipah virus (NiV and Hendra virus (HeV are the only paramyxoviruses requiring Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4 containment. Thus, study of henipavirus entry at less than BSL-4 conditions necessitates the use of cell-cell fusion or pseudotyped reporter virus assays. Yet, these surrogate assays may not fully emulate the biological properties unique to the virus being studied. Thus, we developed a henipaviral entry assay based on a β-lactamase-Nipah Matrix (βla-M fusion protein. We first codon-optimized the bacterial βla and the NiV-M genes to ensure efficient expression in mammalian cells. The βla-M construct was able to bud and form virus-like particles (VLPs that morphologically resembled paramyxoviruses. βla-M efficiently incorporated both NiV and HeV fusion and attachment glycoproteins. Entry of these VLPs was detected by cytosolic delivery of βla-M, resulting in enzymatic and fluorescent conversion of the pre-loaded CCF2-AM substrate. Soluble henipavirus receptors (ephrinB2 or antibodies against the F and/or G proteins blocked VLP entry. Additionally, a Y105W mutation engineered into the catalytic site of βla increased the sensitivity of our βla-M based infection assays by 2-fold. In toto, these methods will provide a more biologically relevant assay for studying henipavirus entry at less than BSL-4 conditions.

  15. Decreasing methylation of pectin caused by nitric oxide leads to higher aluminium binding in cell walls and greater aluminium sensitivity of wheat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chengliang; Lu, Lingli; Yu, Yan; Liu, Lijuan; Hu, Yan; Ye, Yiquan; Jin, Chongwei; Lin, Xianyong

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important bioactive molecule involved in cell wall metabolism, which has been recognized as a major target of aluminium (Al) toxicity. We have investigated the effects of Al-induced NO production on cell wall composition and the subsequent Al-binding capacity in roots of an Al-sensitive cultivar of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yang-5). We found that Al exposure induced NO accumulation in the root tips. Eliminating NO production with an NO scavenger (cPTIO) significantly alleviated the Al-induced inhibition of root growth and thus reduced Al accumulation. Elimination of NO, however, did not significantly affect malate efflux or rhizosphere pH changes under Al exposure. Levels of cell wall polysaccharides (pectin, hemicelluloses 1, and hemicelluloses 2) and pectin methylesterase activity, as well as pectin demethylation in the root apex, significantly increased under Al treatment. Exogenous cPTIO application significantly decreased pectin methylesterase activity and increased the degree of methylation of pectin in the root cell wall, thus decreasing the Al-binding capacity of pectin. These results suggest that the Al-induced enhanced production of NO decreases cell wall pectin methylation, thus increasing the Al-binding capacity of pectin and negatively regulating Al tolerance in wheat.

  16. Sleep Deprivation in Young and Healthy Subjects Is More Sensitively Identified by Higher Frequencies of Electrodermal Activity than by Skin Conductance Level Evaluated in the Time Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo F. Posada-Quintero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed multiple measures of the autonomic nervous system (ANS based on electrodermal activity (EDA and heart rate variability (HRV for young healthy subjects undergoing 24-h sleep deprivation. In this study, we have utilized the error awareness test (EAT every 2 h (13 runs total, to evaluate the deterioration of performance. EAT consists of trials where the subject is presented words representing colors. Subjects are instructed to press a button (“Go” trials or withhold the response if the word presented and the color of the word mismatch (“Stroop No-Go” trial, or the screen is repeated (“Repeat No-Go” trials. We measured subjects' (N = 10 reaction time to the “Go” trials, and accuracy to the “Stroop No-Go” and “Repeat No-Go” trials. Simultaneously, changes in EDA and HRV indices were evaluated. Furthermore, the relationship between reactiveness and vigilance measures and indices of sympathetic control based on HRV were analyzed. We found the performance improved to a stable level from 6 through 16 h of deprivation, with a subsequently sustained impairment after 18 h. Indices of higher frequencies of EDA related more to vigilance measures, whereas lower frequencies index (skin conductance leve, SCL measured the reactiveness of the subject. We conclude that indices of EDA, including those of the higher frequencies, termed TVSymp, EDASymp, and NSSCRs, provide information to better understand the effect of sleep deprivation on subjects' autonomic response and performance.

  17. High-sensitivity simultaneous liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry assay of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel in human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Gandhi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive and simultaneous liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for quantification of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel. The analytes were extracted with methyl-tert-butyl ether: n-hexane (50:50, v/v solvent mixture, followed by dansyl derivatization. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Kinetex C18 (50 mm×4.6 mm, 2.6 µm column with a mobile phase of 0.1% (v/v formic acid in water and acetonitrile in gradient composition. The mass transitions were monitored in electrospray positive ionization mode. The assay exhibited a linear range of 0.100–20.0 ng/mL for levonorgestrel and 4.00–500 pg/mL for ethinyl estradiol in human plasma. A run time of 9.0 min for each sample made it possible to analyze a throughput of more than 100 samples per day. The validated method has been successfully used to analyze human plasma samples for application in pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies.

  18. Small protease sensitive oligomers of PrPSc in distinct human prions determine conversion rate of PrP(C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Kim

    Full Text Available The mammalian prions replicate by converting cellular prion protein (PrP(C into pathogenic conformational isoform (PrP(Sc. Variations in prions, which cause different disease phenotypes, are referred to as strains. The mechanism of high-fidelity replication of prion strains in the absence of nucleic acid remains unsolved. We investigated the impact of different conformational characteristics of PrP(Sc on conversion of PrP(C in vitro using PrP(Sc seeds from the most frequent human prion disease worldwide, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. The conversion potency of a broad spectrum of distinct sCJD prions was governed by the level, conformation, and stability of small oligomers of t