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Sample records for higher hospital mortality

  1. Comorbidity burden is not associated with higher mortality after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Nielsen, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    at either 33 or 36 °C with no difference regarding mortality and neurological outcome. This post-hoc study of the TTM-trial formed a modified comorbidity index (mCI), based on available comorbidities from the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). RESULTS: Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreased...... was associated with higher mortality following OHCA, but when adjusting for confounders, the influence was no longer significant. The association between mCI and mortality was not modified by TTM. Comorbidity burden is associated with lower rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation after OHCA....

  2. The effects of higher hemoglobin levels on mortality and hospitalization in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofsthun, Norma; Labrecque, John; Lacson, Eduardo; Keen, Marcia; Lazarus, J Michael

    2003-05-01

    The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin for the treatment of anemia of chronic renal failure provided the opportunity to correct anemia in this patient population. The optimal target hemoglobin for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains controversial. A large database of hemodialysis patients was analyzed to determine whether increasing hemoglobin level above the current Kidney Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) recommendations was associated with increased risk of mortality and hospitalization. A longitudinal study of hemodialysis patients in Fresenius Medical Care-North America facilities was performed. Selection was restricted to patients in the census for 6 consecutive months from July 1, 1998 through June 30, 2000. Patient mean hemoglobin and other covariates measured during the initial 6 months were related to survival, number of hospitalizations, and length of stay over the subsequent 6 months of follow-up. Patients with hemoglobin /=13 g/dL had an adjusted length of stay of 9.6 days compared to 10.9 days for those with 11 12 g/dL.

  3. Minor Postoperative Increases of Creatinine Are Associated with Higher Mortality and Longer Hospital Length of Stay in Surgical Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kork, Felix; Balzer, Felix; Spies, Claudia D.; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Ginde, Adit A.; Jankowski, Joachim; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical patients frequently experience postoperative increases in creatinine levels. The authors hypothesized that even small increases in postoperative creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Methods The authors examined the association of postoperative changes from preoperative baseline creatinine with all-cause in-hospital mortality and hospital length of stay (HLOS) in a retrospective analysis of surgical patients at a single tertiary care center between January 2006 and June 2012. Results The data of 39,369 surgical patients (noncardiac surgery n = 37,345; cardiac surgery n = 2,024) were analyzed. Acute kidney injury (AKI)—by definition of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome group—was associated with a five-fold higher mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.8; 95% CI, 4.1 to 5.7; P creatinine, exposure to radiocontrast agent, type of surgery, and surgical AKI risk factors. Importantly, even minor creatinine increases (Δcreatinine 25 to 49% above baseline but creatinine increases had a five-fold risk of death (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 20.3; P creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. These results emphasize the importance to find effective therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat even mild forms of postoperative kidney dysfunction to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26492475

  4. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence—Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared with non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor's degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (odds ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.98; P = 0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.01; P = 0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions The lower mortality we find in Magnet hospitals is largely attributable to measured nursing characteristics but there is a mortality advantage above and beyond what we could measure. Magnet recognition identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:24022082

  5. What is the empirical evidence that hospitals with higher-risk adjusted mortality rates provide poorer quality care? A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mohammed A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite increasing interest and publication of risk-adjusted hospital mortality rates, the relationship with underlying quality of care remains unclear. We undertook a systematic review to ascertain the extent to which variations in risk-adjusted mortality rates were associated with differences in quality of care. Methods We identified studies in which risk-adjusted mortality and quality of care had been reported in more than one hospital. We adopted an iterative search strategy using three databases – Medline, HealthSTAR and CINAHL from 1966, 1975 and 1982 respectively. We identified potentially relevant studies on the basis of the title or abstract. We obtained these papers and included those which met our inclusion criteria. Results From an initial yield of 6,456 papers, 36 studies met the inclusion criteria. Several of these studies considered more than one process-versus-risk-adjusted mortality relationship. In total we found 51 such relationships in a widen range of clinical conditions using a variety of methods. A positive correlation between better quality of care and risk-adjusted mortality was found in under half the relationships (26/51 51% but the remainder showed no correlation (16/51 31% or a paradoxical correlation (9/51 18%. Conclusion The general notion that hospitals with higher risk-adjusted mortality have poorer quality of care is neither consistent nor reliable.

  6. Variability in the measurement of hospital-wide mortality rates.

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    Shahian, David M; Wolf, Robert E; Iezzoni, Lisa I; Kirle, Leslie; Normand, Sharon-Lise T

    2010-12-23

    Several countries use hospital-wide mortality rates to evaluate the quality of hospital care, although the usefulness of this metric has been questioned. Massachusetts policymakers recently requested an assessment of methods to calculate this aggregate mortality metric for use as a measure of hospital quality. The Massachusetts Division of Health Care Finance and Policy provided four vendors with identical information on 2,528,624 discharges from Massachusetts acute care hospitals from October 1, 2004, through September 30, 2007. Vendors applied their risk-adjustment algorithms and provided predicted probabilities of in-hospital death for each discharge and for hospital-level observed and expected mortality rates. We compared the numbers and characteristics of discharges and hospitals included by each of the four methods. We also compared hospitals' standardized mortality ratios and classification of hospitals with mortality rates that were higher or lower than expected, according to each method. The proportions of discharges that were included by each method ranged from 28% to 95%, and the severity of patients' diagnoses varied widely. Because of their discharge-selection criteria, two methods calculated in-hospital mortality rates (4.0% and 5.9%) that were twice the state average (2.1%). Pairwise associations (Pearson correlation coefficients) of discharge-level predicted mortality probabilities ranged from 0.46 to 0.70. Hospital-performance categorizations varied substantially and were sometimes completely discordant. In 2006, a total of 12 of 28 hospitals that had higher-than-expected hospital-wide mortality when classified by one method had lower-than-expected mortality when classified by one or more of the other methods. Four common methods for calculating hospital-wide mortality produced substantially different results. This may have resulted from a lack of standardized national eligibility and exclusion criteria, different statistical methods, or

  7. The Rural Inpatient Mortality Study: Does Urban-Rural County Classification Predict Hospital Mortality in California?

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    Linnen, Daniel T; Kornak, John; Stephens, Caroline

    2018-03-28

    Evidence suggests an association between rurality and decreased life expectancy. To determine whether rural hospitals have higher hospital mortality, given that very sick patients may be transferred to regional hospitals. In this ecologic study, we combined Medicare hospital mortality ratings (N = 1267) with US census data, critical access hospital classification, and National Center for Health Statistics urban-rural county classifications. Ratings included mortality for coronary artery bypass grafting, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia across 277 California hospitals between July 2011 and June 2014. We used generalized estimating equations to evaluate the association of urban-rural county classifications on mortality ratings. Unfavorable Medicare hospital mortality rating "worse than the national rate" compared with "better" or "same." Compared with large central "metro" (metropolitan) counties, hospitals in medium-sized metro counties had 6.4 times the odds of rating "worse than the national rate" for hospital mortality (95% confidence interval = 2.8-14.8, p centers may contribute to these results, a potential factor that future research should examine.

  8. Rural versus urban academic hospital mortality following stroke in Canada.

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    Fleet, Richard; Bussières, Sylvain; Tounkara, Fatoumata Korika; Turcotte, Stéphane; Légaré, France; Plant, Jeff; Poitras, Julien; Archambault, Patrick M; Dupuis, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death in Canada. While stroke care has improved dramatically over the last decade, outcomes following stroke among patients treated in rural hospitals have not yet been reported in Canada. To describe variation in 30-day post-stroke in-hospital mortality rates between rural and urban academic hospitals in Canada. We also examined 24/7 in-hospital access to CT scanners and selected services in rural hospitals. We included Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) data on adjusted 30-day in-hospital mortality following stroke from 2007 to 2011 for all acute care hospitals in Canada excluding Quebec and the Territories. We categorized rural hospitals as those located in rural small towns providing 24/7 emergency physician coverage with inpatient beds. Urban hospitals were academic centres designated as Level 1 or 2 trauma centres. We computed descriptive data on local access to a CT scanner and other services and compared mean 30-day adjusted post-stroke mortality rates for rural and urban hospitals to the overall Canadian rate. A total of 286 rural hospitals (3.4 million emergency department (ED) visits/year) and 24 urban hospitals (1.5 million ED visits/year) met inclusion criteria. From 2007 to 2011, 30-day in-hospital mortality rates following stroke were significantly higher in rural than in urban hospitals and higher than the Canadian average for every year except 2008 (rural average range = 18.26 to 21.04 and urban average range = 14.11 to 16.78). Only 11% of rural hospitals had a CT-scanner, 1% had MRI, 21% had in-hospital ICU, 94% had laboratory and 92% had basic x-ray facilities. Rural hospitals in Canada had higher 30-day in-hospital mortality rates following stroke than urban academic hospitals and the Canadian average. Rural hospitals also have very limited local access to CT scanners and ICUs. These rural/urban discrepancies are cause for concern in the context of Canada's universal health care system.

  9. Variations in the Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratios in Korea

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    Eun-Jung Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR has been widely used because it allows for robust risk adjustment using administrative data and is important for improving the quality of patient care. Methods: All inpatients discharged from hospitals with more than 700 beds (66 hospitals in 2008 were eligible for inclusion. Using the claims data, 29 most responsible diagnosis (MRDx, accounting for 80% of all inpatient deaths among these hospitals, were identified, and inpatients with those MRDx were selected. The final study population included 703 571 inpatients including 27 718 (3.9% of all inpatients in-hospital deaths. Using logistic regression, risk-adjusted models for predicting in-hospital mortality were created for each MRDx. The HSMR of individual hospitals was calculated for each MRDx using the model coefficients. The models included age, gender, income level, urgency of admission, diagnosis codes, disease-specific risk factors, and comorbidities. The Elixhauser comorbidity index was used to adjust for comorbidities. Results: For 26 out of 29 MRDx, the c-statistics of these mortality prediction models were higher than 0.8 indicating excellent discriminative power. The HSMR greatly varied across hospitals and disease groups. The academic status of the hospital was the only factor significantly associated with the HSMR. Conclusions: We found a large variation in HSMR among hospitals; therefore, efforts to reduce these variations including continuous monitoring and regular disclosure of the HSMR are required.

  10. [In-hospital mortality due to stroke].

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    Rodríguez Lucci, Federico; Pujol Lereis, Virginia; Ameriso, Sebastián; Povedano, Guillermo; Díaz, María F; Hlavnicka, Alejandro; Wainsztein, Néstor A; Ameriso, Sebastián F

    2013-01-01

    Overall mortality due to stroke has decreased in the last three decades probable due to a better control of vascular risk factors. In-hospital mortality of stroke patients has been estimated to be between 6 and 14% in most of the series reported. However, data from recent clinical trials suggest that these figures may be substantially lower. Data from FLENI Stroke Data Bank and institutional mortality records between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. Ischemic stroke subtypes were classified according to TOAST criteria and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes were classified as intraparenchymal hematoma, aneurismatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, arterio-venous malformation, and other intraparenchymal hematomas. A total of 1514 patients were studied. Of these, 1079 (71%) were ischemic strokes,39% large vessels, 27% cardioembolic, 9% lacunar, 14% unknown etiology, and 11% others etiologies. There were 435 (29%) hemorrhagic strokes, 27% intraparenchymal hematomas, 30% aneurismatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, 25% arterio-venous malformation, and 18% other intraparenchymal hematomas. Moreover, 38 in-hospital deaths were recorded (17 ischemic strokes and 21 hemorrhagic strokes), accounting for 2.5% overall mortality (1.7% in ischemic strokes and 4.8% in hemorrhagic strokes). No deaths occurred associated with the use of intravenous fibrinolytics occurred. In our Centre in-hospital mortality in patients with stroke was low. Management of these patients in a Centre dedicated to neurological diseases along with a multidisciplinary approach from medical and non-medical staff trained in the care of cerebrovascular diseases could, at least in part, account for these results.

  11. Predictors of in-hospital mortality among older patients

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    Thiago J. A. Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine predictors of in-hospital mortality among older patients admitted to a geriatric care unit. INTRODUCTION: The growing number of older individuals among hospitalized patients demands a thorough investigation of the factors that contribute to their mortality. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study implemented from February 2004 to October 2007 in a tertiary university hospital. A consecutive sample of 922 patients was evaluated for possible inclusion in this study. Patients hospitalized for palliative care, those who declined to participate, and those with incomplete data were excluded, resulting in a group of 856 patients aged 60 to 104 years. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine associations between in-patient mortality and gender, age, length of stay, number of prescribed medications and diagnoses at admission, history of heart failure, neoplastic disease, immobility syndrome, delirium, infectious disease, and laboratory tests at admission (serum albumin and creatinine. RESULTS: The overall mortality rate was 16.4%. The following factors were associated with higher in-hospital mortality: delirium (OR=4.13, CI=2.65-6.44, P1.3mg/dL (OR=2.39, CI=1.53-3.72, P<.001, history of heart failure (OR=1.97, CI=1.20-3.22, P=.007, immobility (OR=1.84, CI=1.16-2.92, P =.009, and advanced age (OR=1.03, CI=1.01-1.06, P=.019. CONCLUSIONS: This study strengthens the perception of delirium as a mortality predictor among older inpatients. Cancer, immobility, low albumin levels, elevated creatinine levels, history of heart failure and advanced age were also related to higher mortality rates in this population.

  12. Multiple sclerosis and alcohol use disorders: In-hospital mortality, extended hospital stays, and overexpenditures.

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    Gili-Miner, M; López-Méndez, J; Vilches-Arenas, A; Ramírez-Ramírez, G; Franco-Fernández, D; Sala-Turrens, J; Béjar-Prado, L

    2016-10-22

    The objective of this study was to analyse the impact of alcohol use disorders (AUD) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in terms of in-hospital mortality, extended hospital stays, and overexpenditures. We conducted a retrospective observational study in a sample of MS patients obtained from minimal basic data sets from 87 Spanish hospitals recorded between 2008 and 2010. Mortality, length of hospital stays, and overexpenditures attributable to AUD were calculated. We used a multivariate analysis of covariance to control for such variables as age and sex, type of hospital, type of admission, other addictions, and comorbidities. The 10,249 patients admitted for MS and aged 18-74 years included 215 patients with AUD. Patients with both MS and AUD were predominantly male, with more emergency admissions, a higher prevalence of tobacco or substance use disorders, and higher scores on the Charlson comorbidity index. Patients with MS and AUD had a very high in-hospital mortality rate (94.1%) and unusually lengthy stays (2.4 days), and they generated overexpenditures (1,116.9euros per patient). According to the results of this study, AUD in patients with MS results in significant increases in-hospital mortality and the length of the hospital stay and results in overexpenditures. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors Affecting Mortality in Elderly Patients Hospitalized for Nonmalignant Reasons

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    Teslime Ayaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elderly population is hospitalized more frequently than young people, and they suffer from more severe diseases that are difficult to diagnose and treat. The present study aimed to investigate the factors affecting mortality in elderly patients hospitalized for nonmalignant reasons. Demographic data, reason for hospitalization, comorbidities, duration of hospital stay, and results of routine blood testing at the time of first hospitalization were obtained from the hospital records of the patients, who were over 65 years of age and hospitalized primarily for nonmalignant reasons. The mean age of 1012 patients included in the study was 77.8 ± 7.6. The most common reason for hospitalization was diabetes mellitus (18.3%. Of the patients, 90.3% had at least a single comorbidity. Whilst 927 (91.6% of the hospitalized patients were discharged, 85 (8.4% died. Comparison of the characteristics of the discharged and dead groups revealed that the dead group was older and had higher rates of poor general status and comorbidity. Differences were observed between the discharged and dead groups in most of the laboratory parameters. Hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypopotassemia, hypernatremia, hyperuricemia, and high TSH level were the predictors of mortality. In order to meet the health necessities of the elderly population, it is necessary to well define the patient profiles and to identify the risk factors.

  14. Performance of in-hospital mortality prediction models for acute hospitalization: Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio in Japan

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    Motomura Noboru

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective In-hospital mortality is an important performance measure for quality improvement, although it requires proper risk adjustment. We set out to develop in-hospital mortality prediction models for acute hospitalization using a nation-wide electronic administrative record system in Japan. Methods Administrative records of 224,207 patients (patients discharged from 82 hospitals in Japan between July 1, 2002 and October 31, 2002 were randomly split into preliminary (179,156 records and test (45,051 records groups. Study variables included Major Diagnostic Category, age, gender, ambulance use, admission status, length of hospital stay, comorbidity, and in-hospital mortality. ICD-10 codes were converted to calculate comorbidity scores based on Quan's methodology. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was then performed using in-hospital mortality as a dependent variable. C-indexes were calculated across risk groups in order to evaluate model performances. Results In-hospital mortality rates were 2.68% and 2.76% for the preliminary and test datasets, respectively. C-index values were 0.869 for the model that excluded length of stay and 0.841 for the model that included length of stay. Conclusion Risk models developed in this study included a set of variables easily accessible from administrative data, and still successfully exhibited a high degree of prediction accuracy. These models can be used to estimate in-hospital mortality rates of various diagnoses and procedures.

  15. [Analysis of hospital mortality at a regional hospital].

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    Sánchez Bisonó, J R; Gómez Rosich, A; Amor Gea, J F; García Sánchez, M J; Campoy Domene, L F; Peña Migallón-Sánchez, P

    1997-02-01

    The hospital mortality rate in our centre es 2.34% (264 deaths from a total of 11,336 discharges between 1991 and 1993). The most frequent causes are acute myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accidents, followed in descending order by pneumonia, chronic bronchitis, congestive heart failure, upper GI haemorrhage, GI tumours, liver cirrhosis, lung tumours and arrhythmias. Our analysis reflects a mortality pattern of a rural population with an age pyramid in which 52% of the patients are older than 45 years. The pattern also reflects the little impact of accidents on our mortality. A 87% of the deaths were older than 65 years with a male to female ratio of 1, 6 and a Swaroop index of 93% and 94% for males and females respectively.

  16. Severe periodontitis and higher cirrhosis mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard Grønkjær, Lea; Holmstrup, Palle; Schou, Søren

    2018-01-01

    Background Periodontitis and edentulism are prevalent in patients with cirrhosis, but their clinical significance is largely unknown. Objective The objective of this article is to determine the association of severe periodontitis and edentulism with mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Methods...... A total of 184 cirrhosis patients underwent an oral examination. All-cause and cirrhosis-related mortality was recorded. The associations of periodontitis and edentulism with mortality were explored by Kaplan–Meier survival plots and Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for age, gender, cirrhosis...... etiology, Child–Pugh score, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, smoker status, present alcohol use, comorbidity, and nutritional risk score. Results The total follow-up time was 74,197 days (203.14 years). At entry, 44% of the patients had severe periodontitis and 18% were edentulous. Forty...

  17. Short Communication - Hospital-Based Mortality in Federal Capital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cause-specific mortality data are important to monitor trends in mortality over time. Medical records provide reliable documentation of the causes of deaths occurring in hospitals. This study describes all causes of mortality reported at hospitals in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) of Nigeria. Methods: Deaths ...

  18. A review of maternal mortality at Jimma Hospital, Southwestern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective review of hospital maternal deaths at Jimma Hospital, Southwestern Ethiopia, covering the period from September 1990 to May 1999 was conducted with the objectives of determining the overall maternal mortality rate, observing trend of maternal mortality during the period, and identifying major causes of ...

  19. Impact of nationwide centralization of pancreaticoduodenectomy on hospital mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilde, R. F.; Besselink, M. G. H.; van der Tweel, I.; de Hingh, I. H. J. T.; van Eijck, C. H. J.; Dejong, C. H. C.; Porte, R. J.; Gouma, D. J.; Busch, O. R. C.; Molenaar, I. Q.

    Background: The impact of nationwide centralization of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) on mortality is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to analyse changes in hospital volumes and in-hospital mortality after PD in the Netherlands between 2004 and 2009. Methods: Nationwide data on International

  20. Impact of nationwide centralization of pancreaticoduodenectomy on hospital mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilde, R. F.; Besselink, M. G. H.; van der Tweel, I.; de Hingh, I. H. J. T.; van Eijck, C. H. J.; Dejong, C. H. C.; Porte, R. J.; Gouma, D. J.; Busch, O. R. C.; Molenaar, I. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The impact of nationwide centralization of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) on mortality is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to analyse changes in hospital volumes and in-hospital mortality after PD in the Netherlands between 2004 and 2009. Methods: Nationwide data on International

  1. Prognostic Factors in Tuberculosis Related Mortalities in Hospitalized Patients

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    Ghazal Haque

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The study was undertaken at the Department of Pulmonology at a public, tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Objectives. To evaluate factors concerned with in-hospital deaths in patients admitted with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB. Design. A retrospective case-control audit was performed for 120 patients hospitalised with pulmonary TB. Sixty of those discharged after treatment were compared to sixty who did not survive. Radiological findings, clinical indicators, and laboratory values were compared between the two groups to identify factors related to poor prognosis. Results. Factors concerned with in-hospital mortality listed late presentation of disease (P<0.01, noncompliance to antituberculosis therapy (P<0.01, smoking (P<0.01, longer duration of illness prior to treatment (P<0.01, and low body weight (P<0.01. Most deaths occurred during the first week of admission (P<0.01 indicating late referrals as significant. Immunocompromised status and multi-drug resistance were not implicated in higher mortality. Conclusions. Poor prognosis was associated with noncompliance to therapy resulting in longer duration of illness, late patient referrals to care centres, and development of complications. Early diagnosis, timely referrals, and monitored compliance may help reduce mortality. Adherence to a more radically effective treatment regimen is required to eliminate TB early during disease onset.

  2. Countries with women inequalities have higher stroke mortality.

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    Kim, Young Dae; Jung, Yo Han; Caso, Valeria; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2017-10-01

    Background Stroke outcomes can differ by women's legal or socioeconomic status. Aim We investigated whether differences in women's rights or gender inequalities were associated with stroke mortality at the country-level. Methods We used age-standardized stroke mortality data from 2008 obtained from the World Health Organization. We compared female-to-male stroke mortality ratio and stroke mortality rates in women and men between countries according to 50 indices of women's rights from Women, Business and the Law 2016 and Gender Inequality Index from the Human Development Report by the United Nations Development Programme. We also compared stroke mortality rate and income at the country-level. Results In our study, 176 countries with data available on stroke mortality rate in 2008 and indices of women's rights were included. There were 46 (26.1%) countries where stroke mortality in women was higher than stroke mortality in men. Among them, 29 (63%) countries were located in Sub-Saharan African region. After adjusting by country income level, higher female-to-male stroke mortality ratio was associated with 14 indices of women's rights, including differences in getting a job or opening a bank account, existence of domestic violence legislation, and inequalities in ownership right to property. Moreover, there was a higher female-to-male stroke mortality ratio among countries with higher Gender Inequality Index (r = 0.397, p Gender Inequality Index was more likely to be associated with stroke mortality rate in women than that in men (p gender inequality status is associated with women's stroke outcomes.

  3. Maternal Mortality in Ribat University Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Maternal death is a tragedy that leaves an enormous negative impact on the family. The objectives of the study were to determine the rate and causes of maternal mortality in Ribat University Hospital Methods: This was a descriptive, hospital-based study conducted in Ribat University Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan ...

  4. In Hospital Stroke Mortality: Rates and Determinants in Southwestern Saudi Arabia

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    Adel A. Alhazzani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study analyzed in-hospital first-time stroke mortality in southwestern Saudi Arabia over one-year to assess the in-hospital stroke case fatality rate, mortality rate and explore the factors associated with in-hospital stroke mortality. Study Design: Hospital based follow-up study. Methods: First-time stroke patients admitted to all hospitals in Asser region over one-year period (January through December 2016 were included in the study. Data about personal characteristics, pre-stroke history and clinical criteria, on admission clinical criteria, in-hospital complications and survival status were collected. The last reported Aseer region population was used to calculate age and sex stroke mortality rate per 100,000 population/year. Hazard ratios (HR and concomitant 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were computed using multivariate Cox regression survival analysis. Kaplan-Meier curve survival analysis for stroke patients were plotted. Results: A total of 121 in-hospital deaths out of 1249 first-time stroke patients giving an overall case fatality rate (CFR of 9.7%. Non-significant difference with gender and age were observed in CFR. Overall, in-hospital stroke mortality rate was 5.58 per 100,000/year. Males and elders showed a significantly higher mortality rates. Multivariable Cox regression analyses revealed pre-stroke smoking (HR = 2.36, pre-stroke hypertension (HR = 1.77, post-stroke disturbed consciousness (HR = 6.86, poor mobility (HR = 2.60 and developing pulmonary embolism (HR = 2.63 as significant predictors of in-hospital stroke mortality. Conclusions: In Southwestern Saudi Arabia, the in-hospital stroke mortality rate is higher in men and increases with aging. The prognosis of acute stroke could be improved by smoking cessation, better control of hypertension and prevention of in hospital complication particularly pulmonary embolism.

  5. Trends in in-hospital mortality among patients with stroke in China.

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    Qian He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The incidence and burden of stroke in China is increasing rapidly. However, little is known about trends in mortality during stroke hospitalization. The objectives of this study were to assess trends of in-hospital mortality among patients with stroke and explore influence factors of in-hospital death after stroke in China. METHODS: 109 grade III class A hospitals were sampled by multistage stratified cluster sampling. All patients admitted to hospitals between 2007 and 2010 with a discharge diagnosis of stroke were included. Trends in in-hospital mortality among patients with stroke were assessed. Influence factors of in-hospital death after stroke were explored using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall stroke hospitalizations increased from 79,894 in 2007 to 85,475 in 2010, and in-hospital mortality of stroke decreased from 3.16% to 2.30% (P<0.0001. The percentage of severe patients increased while odds of mortality (2010 versus 2007 decreased regardless of stroke type: subarachnoid hemorrhage (OR 0.792, 95% CI = 0.636 to 0.987, intracerebral hemorrhage (OR 0.647, 95% CI = 0.591 to 0.708, and ischemic stroke (OR 0.588, 95% CI = 0.532 to 0.649. In multivariable analyses, older age, male, basic health insurance, multiple comorbidities and severity of disease were linked to higher odds of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality of stroke hospitalizations decreased likely reflecting advancements in stroke care and prevention. Decreasing of mortality with increasing of severe stroke patients indicated that we should pay more attention to rehabilitation and life quality of stroke patients. Specific individual and hospital-level characteristics may be targets for facilitating further declines.

  6. In-hospital mortality following acute myocardial infarction in Kosovo: Asingle center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajraktari, G.; Gjoka, S.; Rexhepaj, N.; Daullxhiu, I.; Thaqi, K.; Pacolli, S.; Sylejmani, X.; Elezi, S.

    2008-01-01

    Randomized trials have demonstrated that primary angioplasty is moreeffective than intravenous thrombolysis in reducing mortality and morbidityin patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study wasto assess the in-hospital mortality of patients with AMI admitted to the onlytertiary care center in Kosovo, where coronary percutaneous interventionprocedures are unavailable. We also assessed the impact of age and gender onin-hospital mortality. Consecutive patients with the diagnosis of AMI,admitted in our institution between 1999 and 2007, were included in thisretrospective study. Of 2848 patients (mean age 61+- 1.3 years, 73.4% males)admitted with AMI, 292 (10.25%) died during in-hospital stay. The overallin-hospital mortality was 12.3% for women and 9.5% for men (P<05). Women weresignificantly older than men (64.2+-11 years vs. 59.7+-11.8 years, P<.05).Mean length of stay was 12.0+-94 for women and 10.7+-7.6 for men. From 1999break was detected by the application of thepatients with Ami but themortality rate remained stable. Compared to developed countries, patientswith AMI in Kososvo present at an early age but have a higher mortality rate.Women with AMI had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality rate thanmen. The lack of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures in AMIpatients may have contributed to the high in-hospital mortality in ourpopulation. (auhor)

  7. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyez, L; Biemans, I; Verkroost, M; van Swieten, H

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the Corpus Christi Heart Project questionnaire concerning physical activity (PA). Based on this questionnaire, 1815 patients were classified as active and 1335 patients were classified as sedentary. The endpoints of the study were hospital mortality and early mortality. The study population had a mean age of 69.7 ± 10.1 (19-95) years and a mean logistic EuroSCORE risk of 5.1 ± 5.6 (0.88-73.8). Sedentary patients were significantly older (p = 0.001), obese (p = 0.001), had a higher EuroSCORE risk (p = 0.001), and a higher percentage of complications. Hospital mortality (1.1 % versus 0.4 % (p = 0.014)) and early mortality (1.5 % versus 0.6 % (p = 0.006)) were significantly higher in the sedentary group compared with the active group. However, a sedentary lifestyle was not identified as an independent predictor for hospital mortality (p = 0.61) or early mortality (p = 0.70). Sedentary patients were older, obese and had a higher EuroSCORE risk. They had significantly more postoperative complications, higher hospital mortality and early mortality. Despite these results, sedentary behaviour could not be identified as an independent predictor for hospital or early mortality.

  8. Maternal Mortality At The State Specialist Hospital Bauchi, Northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyse and document our experiences with maternal mortality with the view of finding the trends over the last seven years, common causes and attributing socio-demographic factors. Design: A prospective analysis of maternal mortality. Setting: State Specialists Hospital Bauchi, Bauchi Northeastern Nigeria.

  9. Maternal Mortality in a Nigerian Maternity Hospital | Olopade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite recent focus on maternal mortality in Nigeria, its rates remain unacceptably high in Nigeria. A retrospective case-control study was carried out at Adeoyo Maternity Hospital, Ibadan between January 2003 and December 2004. This was to determine the maternal mortality ratio in a secondary health facility, to identify ...

  10. Is patriarchy the source of men's higher mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanistreet, D; Bambra, C; Scott-Samuel, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relation between levels of patriarchy and male health by comparing female homicide rates with male mortality within countries. Hypothesis: High levels of patriarchy in a society are associated with increased mortality among men. Design: Cross sectional ecological study design. Setting: 51 countries from four continents were represented in the data—America, Europe, Australasia, and Asia. No data were available for Africa. Results: A multivariate stepwise linear regression model was used. Main outcome measure was age standardised male mortality rates for 51 countries for the year 1995. Age standardised female homicide rates and GDP per capita ranking were the explanatory variables in the model. Results were also adjusted for the effects of general rates of homicide. Age standardised female homicide rates and ranking of GDP were strongly correlated with age standardised male mortality rates (Pearson's r = 0.699 and Spearman's 0.744 respectively) and both correlations achieved significance (ppatriarchy, the higher is the rate of mortality among men. Conclusion: These data suggest that oppression and exploitation harm the oppressors as well as those they oppress, and that men's higher mortality is a preventable social condition, which could be tackled through global social policy measures. PMID:16166362

  11. Clinical utility of EMSE and STESS in predicting hospital mortality for status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Deng; Xu, Da; Tan, Ge; Liu, Ling

    2018-05-25

    To explore the applicability of the epidemiology-based mortality score in status epilepticus (EMSE) and the status epilepticus severity score (STESS) in predicting hospital mortality in patients with status epilepticus (SE) in western China. Furthermore, we sought to compare the abilities of the two scales to predict mortality from convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) and non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). Patients with epilepsy (n = 253) were recruited from the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2012 to January 2016. The EMSE and STESS for all patients were calculated immediately after admission. The main outcome was in-hospital death. The predicted values were analysed using SPSS 22.0 receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Of the 253 patients with SE who were included in the study, 39 (15.4%) died in the hospital. Using STESS ≥4 points to predict SE mortality, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.724 (P  0.05), while EMSE ≥90 points gave an AUC of 0.666 (P > 0.05). The hospital mortality rate from SE in this study was 15.4%. Those with STESS ≥4 points or EMSE ≥79 points had higher rates of SE mortality. Both STESS and EMSE are less useful predicting in-hospital mortality in NCSE compared to CSE. Furthermore, the EMSE has some advantages over the STESS. Copyright © 2018 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of profitability of hospital admissions on mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindrooth, Richard C; Konetzka, R Tamara; Navathe, Amol S; Zhu, Jingsan; Chen, Wei; Volpp, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    Fiscal constraints faced by Medicare are leading to policies designed to reduce expenditures. Evidence of the effect of reduced reimbursement on the mortality of Medicare patients discharged from all major hospital service lines is limited. We modeled risk-adjusted 30-day mortality of patients discharged from 21 hospital service lines as a function of service line profitability, service line time trends, and hospital service line and year-fixed effects. We simulated the effect of alternative revenue-neutral reimbursement policies on mortality. Our sample included all Medicare discharges from PPS-eligible hospitals (1997, 2001, and 2005). The results reveal a statistically significant inverse relationship between changes in profitability and mortality. A $0.19 average reduction in profit per $1.00 of costs led to a 0.010-0.020 percentage-point increase in mortality rates (p profitable. Policy simulations that target service line inequities in payment generosity result in lower mortality rates, roughly 700-13,000 fewer deaths nationally. The policy simulations raise questions about the trade-offs implicit in universal reductions in reimbursement. The effect of reduced payment generosity on mortality could be mitigated by targeting highly profitable services only for lower reimbursement. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. The Impact of Profitability of Hospital Admissions on Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindrooth, Richard C; Konetzka, R Tamara; Navathe, Amol S; Zhu, Jingsan; Chen, Wei; Volpp, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Background Fiscal constraints faced by Medicare are leading to policies designed to reduce expenditures. Evidence of the effect of reduced reimbursement on the mortality of Medicare patients discharged from all major hospital service lines is limited. Methods We modeled risk-adjusted 30-day mortality of patients discharged from 21 hospital service lines as a function of service line profitability, service line time trends, and hospital service line and year-fixed effects. We simulated the effect of alternative revenue-neutral reimbursement policies on mortality. Our sample included all Medicare discharges from PPS-eligible hospitals (1997, 2001, and 2005). Results The results reveal a statistically significant inverse relationship between changes in profitability and mortality. A $0.19 average reduction in profit per $1.00 of costs led to a 0.010–0.020 percentage-point increase in mortality rates (p payment generosity than in service lines that remain profitable. Policy simulations that target service line inequities in payment generosity result in lower mortality rates, roughly 700–13,000 fewer deaths nationally. Conclusions The policy simulations raise questions about the trade-offs implicit in universal reductions in reimbursement. The effect of reduced payment generosity on mortality could be mitigated by targeting highly profitable services only for lower reimbursement. PMID:23346946

  14. The effect of hospital volume on mortality in patients admitted with severe sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Shahul

    Full Text Available IMPORTANCE: The association between hospital volume and inpatient mortality for severe sepsis is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of severe sepsis case volume and inpatient mortality. DESIGN SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective cohort study from 646,988 patient discharges with severe sepsis from 3,487 hospitals in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2011. EXPOSURES: The exposure of interest was the mean yearly sepsis case volume per hospital divided into tertiles. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Inpatient mortality. RESULTS: Compared with the highest tertile of severe sepsis volume (>60 cases per year, the odds ratio for inpatient mortality among persons admitted to hospitals in the lowest tertile (≤10 severe sepsis cases per year was 1.188 (95% CI: 1.074-1.315, while the odds ratio was 1.090 (95% CI: 1.031-1.152 for patients admitted to hospitals in the middle tertile. Similarly, improved survival was seen across the tertiles with an adjusted inpatient mortality incidence of 35.81 (95% CI: 33.64-38.03 for hospitals with the lowest volume of severe sepsis cases and a drop to 32.07 (95% CI: 31.51-32.64 for hospitals with the highest volume. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: We demonstrate an association between a higher severe sepsis case volume and decreased mortality. The need for a systems-based approach for improved outcomes may require a high volume of severely septic patients.

  15. [Estimation of the excess of lung cancer mortality risk associated to environmental tobacco smoke exposure of hospitality workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M José; Nebot, Manel; Juárez, Olga; Ariza, Carles; Salles, Joan; Serrahima, Eulàlia

    2006-01-14

    To estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with environmental tobacco (ETS) smoke exposure among hospitality workers. The estimation was done using objective measures in several hospitality settings in Barcelona. Vapour phase nicotine was measured in several hospitality settings. These measurements were used to estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure for a 40 year working life, using the formula developed by Repace and Lowrey. Excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure was higher than 145 deaths per 100,000 workers in all places studied, except for cafeterias in hospitals, where excess lung cancer mortality risk was 22 per 100,000. In discoteques, for comparison, excess lung cancer mortality risk is 1,733 deaths per 100,000 workers. Hospitality workers are exposed to ETS levels related to a very high excess lung cancer mortality risk. These data confirm that ETS control measures are needed to protect hospital workers.

  16. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah R. Brown

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding or improvements to the management of AKI.

  17. In-hospital Mortality from Cerebrovascular Disease in the Province of Cienfuegos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Sánchez Lozano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: cerebrovascular disease is the second leading cause of death in some countries, causing 10 million annual deaths. In-hospital mortality from these diseases is high in our country. Objective: to describe mortality from cerebrovascular disease at the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos during 2006-2010. Methods: a retrospective case series study involving all patients (4449 diagnosed with cerebrovascular disease discharged from the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital from January 1st, 2006 to December 31, 2010 was conducted. The variables analyzed included age, sex, status at discharge, types of cerebrovascular disease and hospital stay. Results: in-hospital mortality from cerebrovascular disease in the study period was 23.8 %. It was higher in men than in women (24.5 % and 22.9 %, respectively. According to the type of cerebrovascular disease, mortality rate of ischemic stroke was 20 %, subarachnoid hemorrhage, 22.4 % and intraparenchymal hemorrhage, 71.2 %. Conclusions: in-hospital mortality from cerebrovascular disease in Cienfuegos shows a downward trend, though it increased in 2010. It was more common in men. Death from stroke tends to decrease and, to a lesser extent, mortality due to brain hemorrhage, which remains high. There is also an increase in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  18. Assessment of hospitalization and mortality of scleroderma in-patients: a thirteen-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Shenavandeh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an uncommon non-hereditary sporadic disease that increases the risk of premature death, especially in diffuse type. We determined the prevalence of SSc in the last 13 years in our rheumatologic hospitals as a referral center for southern Iranian patients, the causes of hospitalization, the average length of stay (LOS, the mortality rate, and the reason for their mortality. Material and methods : A cross-sectional study was performed in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The studied population included all patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis. We calculated the hospitalization rates, in-hospital mortality rates, and mean LOS. Results: There were 446 admissions by 181 patients with SSc. The female to male ratio was about 10.7 : 1. The overall mean LOS was 5.95 days. Digital ulcer and interstitial lung disease (ILD were the most common causes of hospitalizations among the SSc-related events. For those with a non-SSc-related condition, infection was the most prevalent event. Most of the deaths were due to ILD and pulmonary artery hypertension(PAH, and the overall in-hospital mortality rate was 16.5%. Conclusions : Women with SSc had higher rates of hospitalization but lower in-hospital mortality than men.There were some differences between our study and other similar studies in the causes of hospitalization and in-hospital death among SSc patients, especially the lower age of death. The patients with digital ulcers and those with intestinal lung disease or pulmonary hipertension were most commonly admitted to the hospital in our study group. Probably, increasing the skin care of these patients and asking other specialty groups to cooperate will decrease the high rate of hospitalizations in our population.

  19. Observed to expected or logistic regression to identify hospitals with high or low 30-day mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeland, Jon; Clench-Aas, Jocelyne; Laake, Petter; Veierød, Marit B.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction A common quality indicator for monitoring and comparing hospitals is based on death within 30 days of admission. An important use is to determine whether a hospital has higher or lower mortality than other hospitals. Thus, the ability to identify such outliers correctly is essential. Two approaches for detection are: 1) calculating the ratio of observed to expected number of deaths (OE) per hospital and 2) including all hospitals in a logistic regression (LR) comparing each hospital to a form of average over all hospitals. The aim of this study was to compare OE and LR with respect to correctly identifying 30-day mortality outliers. Modifications of the methods, i.e., variance corrected approach of OE (OE-Faris), bias corrected LR (LR-Firth), and trimmed mean variants of LR and LR-Firth were also studied. Materials and methods To study the properties of OE and LR and their variants, we performed a simulation study by generating patient data from hospitals with known outlier status (low mortality, high mortality, non-outlier). Data from simulated scenarios with varying number of hospitals, hospital volume, and mortality outlier status, were analysed by the different methods and compared by level of significance (ability to falsely claim an outlier) and power (ability to reveal an outlier). Moreover, administrative data for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, and hip fracture from Norwegian hospitals for 2012–2014 were analysed. Results None of the methods achieved the nominal (test) level of significance for both low and high mortality outliers. For low mortality outliers, the levels of significance were increased four- to fivefold for OE and OE-Faris. For high mortality outliers, OE and OE-Faris, LR 25% trimmed and LR-Firth 10% and 25% trimmed maintained approximately the nominal level. The methods agreed with respect to outlier status for 94.1% of the AMI hospitals, 98.0% of the stroke, and 97.8% of the hip fracture hospitals

  20. Decentralization and centralization of healthcare resources: investigating the associations of hospital competition and number of cardiologists per hospital with mortality and resource utilization in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungchul; Lee, Jason; Ikai, Hiroshi; Otsubo, Tetsuya; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the associations of hospital competition and number of cardiologists per hospital (indicating the decentralization and centralization of healthcare resources, respectively) with 30-day in-hospital mortality, healthcare spending, and length of stay (LOS) among patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Japan. We collected data from 23,197 AMI patients admitted to 172 hospitals between 2008 and 2011. Hospital competition and number of cardiologists per hospital were analyzed as exposure variables in multilevel regression models for in-hospital mortality, healthcare spending, and LOS. Other covariates included patient, hospital, and regional variables; as well as the use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Hospitals in competitive regions and hospitals with a higher number of cardiologists were both associated lower in-hospital mortality. Additionally, hospitals in competition regions were also associated with longer LOS durations, whereas hospitals with more cardiologists had higher spending. The use of PCI was also associated with reduced mortality, increased spending and increased LOS. Centralization of cardiologists at the hospital level and decentralization of acute hospitals at the regional level may be contributing factors for improving the quality of care in Japan. Policymakers need to strike a balance between these two approaches to improve healthcare provision and quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In-hospital mortality following acute myocardial infarction in Kosovo : A single center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gani Bajraktari

    2010-01-01

    Randomized trials have demonstrated that primary angioplasty is more effective than intravenous thrombolysis in reducing mortality and morbidity in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to assess the in-hospital mortality of patients with AMI admitted to the only tertiary care center in Kosovo, where coronary percutaneous intervention procedures are unavailable. We also assessed the impact of age and gender on in-hospital mortality. Patients and Consecutive patients with the diagnosis of AMI, admitted in our institution between 1999 and 2007, were included in this retrospective study. Of 2848 patients (mean age 61±11.3 years, 73.4% males) admitted with AMI, 292 (10.25%) patients died during in-hospital stay. The overall in-hospital mortality was 12.3% for women and 9.5% for men (P<.05). Women were significantly older than men (64.2±11 years vs 59.7±11.8 years, P<.05). Mean length of stay was 12.0±94 for women and 10.7±7.6 for men. From 1999 to 2007 there was an increase in the age of patients with AMI but the mortality rate remained stable.Compared to developed countries, patients with AMI in Kosovo present at an earlier age but have a higher mortality rate. Women with AMI had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality rate than men. The lack of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures in AMI patients may have contributed to the high in-hospital mortality in our population (Author).

  2. Challenges in assessing hospital-level stroke mortality as a quality measure: comparison of ischemic, intracerebral hemorrhage, and total stroke mortality rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Holloway, Robert G; Pan, Wenqin; Peterson, Eric D

    2012-06-01

    Public reporting efforts currently profile hospitals based on overall stroke mortality rates, yet the "mix" of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke cases may impact this rate. Using the 2005 to 2006 New York state data, we examined the degree to which hospital stroke mortality rankings varied regarding ischemic versus hemorrhagic versus total stroke. Observed/expected ratio was calculated using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Inpatient Quality Indicator software. The observed/expected ratio and outlier status based on stroke types across hospitals were examined using Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and weighted κ. Overall 30-day stroke mortality rates were 15.2% and varied from 11.3% for ischemic stroke and 37.3% for intracerebral hemorrhage. Hospital risk-adjusted ischemic stroke observed/expected ratio was weakly correlated with its own intracerebral hemorrhage observed/expected ratio (r=0.38). When examining hospital performance group (mortality better, worse, or no different than average), disagreement was observed in 35 of 81 hospitals (κ=0.23). Total stroke mortality observed/expected ratio and rankings were correlated with intracerebral hemorrhage (r=0.61 and κ=0.36) and ischemic stroke (r=0.94 and κ=0.71), but many hospitals still switched classification depending on mortality metrics. However, hospitals treating a higher percent of hemorrhagic stroke did not have a statistically significant higher total stroke mortality rate relative to those treating fewer hemorrhagic strokes. Hospital stroke mortality ratings varied considerably depending on whether ischemic, hemorrhagic, or total stroke mortality rates were used. Public reporting of stroke mortality measures should consider providing risk-adjusted outcome on separate stroke types.

  3. The Timing of Early Antibiotics and Hospital Mortality in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Vincent X; Fielding-Singh, Vikram; Greene, John D; Baker, Jennifer M; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Bhattacharya, Jay; Escobar, Gabriel J

    2017-10-01

    Prior sepsis studies evaluating antibiotic timing have shown mixed results. To evaluate the association between antibiotic timing and mortality among patients with sepsis receiving antibiotics within 6 hours of emergency department registration. Retrospective study of 35,000 randomly selected inpatients with sepsis treated at 21 emergency departments between 2010 and 2013 in Northern California. The primary exposure was antibiotics given within 6 hours of emergency department registration. The primary outcome was adjusted in-hospital mortality. We used detailed physiologic data to quantify severity of illness within 1 hour of registration and logistic regression to estimate the odds of hospital mortality based on antibiotic timing and patient factors. The median time to antibiotic administration was 2.1 hours (interquartile range, 1.4-3.1 h). The adjusted odds ratio for hospital mortality based on each hour of delay in antibiotics after registration was 1.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.13) for each elapsed hour between registration and antibiotic administration. The increase in absolute mortality associated with an hour's delay in antibiotic administration was 0.3% (95% CI, 0.01-0.6%; P = 0.04) for sepsis, 0.4% (95% CI, 0.1-0.8%; P = 0.02) for severe sepsis, and 1.8% (95% CI, 0.8-3.0%; P = 0.001) for shock. In a large, contemporary, and multicenter sample of patients with sepsis in the emergency department, hourly delays in antibiotic administration were associated with increased odds of hospital mortality even among patients who received antibiotics within 6 hours. The odds increased within each sepsis severity strata, and the increased odds of mortality were greatest in septic shock.

  4. Delirium symptoms during hospitalization predict long-term mortality in patients with severe pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliberti, Stefano; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Belotti, Mauro; Morandi, Alessandro; Messinesi, Grazia; Annoni, Giorgio; Pesci, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Delirium is common in critically ill patients and impact in-hospital mortality in patients with pneumonia. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of delirium symptoms during hospitalization in patients with severe pneumonia and their impact on one-year mortality. This was an observational, retrospective, cohort study of consecutive patients admitted to the respiratory high dependency unit of the San Gerardo University Hospital, Monza, Italy, between January 2009 and December 2012 with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia. A search through the charts looking for ten key words associated with delirium (confusion, disorientation, altered mental status, delirium, agitation, inappropriate behavior, mental status change, inattention, hallucination, lethargy) was performed by a multidisciplinary team. The primary endpoint was mortality at one-year follow-up. Secondary endpoint was in-hospital mortality. A total of 172 patients were enrolled (78 % males; median age 75 years). At least one delirium symptom was detected in 53 patients (31 %) during hospitalization. The prevalence of delirium symptoms was higher among those who died during hospitalization vs. those who survived (44 vs. 27 %, p = 0.049, respectively). Seventy-one patients (46 %) died during the one-year follow-up. The prevalence of at least one delirium symptom was higher among those who died than those who survived during the one-year follow-up (39 vs. 21 %, p = 0.014, respectively). At the multivariable logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for age, comorbidities and severe sepsis, the presence of at least one delirium symptom during hospitalization was an independent predictor of one-year mortality (OR 2.35; 95 % CI 1.13-4.90; p = 0.023). Delirium symptoms are independent predictors of one-year mortality in hospitalized patients with severe pneumonia. Further studies should confirm our results using prospective methods of collecting data.

  5. Predicting in-hospital mortality after redo cardiac operations: development of a preoperative scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launcelott, Sebastian; Ouzounian, Maral; Buth, Karen J; Légaré, Jean-Francois

    2012-09-01

    The present study generated a risk model and an easy-to-use scorecard for the preoperative prediction of in-hospital mortality for patients undergoing redo cardiac operations. All patients who underwent redo cardiac operations in which the initial and subsequent procedures were performed through a median sternotomy were included. A logistic regression model was created to identify independent preoperative predictors of in-hospital mortality. The results were then used to create a scorecard predicting operative risk. A total of 1,521 patients underwent redo procedures between 1995 and 2010 at a single institution. Coronary bypass procedures were the most common previous (58%) or planned operations (54%). The unadjusted in-hospital mortality for all redo cases was higher than for first-time procedures (9.7% vs. 3.4%; pscorecard was generated using these independent predictors, stratifying patients undergoing redo cardiac operations into 6 risk categories of in-hospital mortality ranging from risk to >40%. Reoperation represents a significant proportion of modern cardiac surgical procedures and is often associated with significantly higher mortality than first-time operations. We created an easy-to-use scorecard to assist clinicians in estimating operative mortality to ensure optimal decision making in the care of patients facing redo cardiac operations. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence for a link between mortality in acute COPD and hospital type and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C M; Barnes, S; Lowe, D; Pearson, M G

    2003-11-01

    The 1997 BTS/RCP national audit of acute care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) found wide variations in mortality between hospitals which were only partially explained by known audit indicators of outcome. It was hypothesised that some of the unexplained variation may result from differences in hospital type, organisation and resources. This pilot study examined the hypothesis as a factor to be included in a future national audit programme. Thirty hospitals in England and Wales were randomly selected by geographical region and hospital type (teaching, large district general hospital (DGH), small DGH). Data on process and outcome of care (death and length of stay) were collected retrospectively at 90 days on all prospectively identified COPD admissions over an 8 week period. Each centre completed a questionnaire relating to organisation and resources available for the care of COPD patients. Eleven teaching hospitals, nine large DGHs, and 10 small DGHs provided data on 1274 cases. Mortality was high (14%) with wide variation between centres (IQR 9-19%). Small DGHs had a higher mortality (17.5%) than teaching hospitals (11.9%) and large DGHs (11.2%). When corrected for confounding factors, an excess of deaths in small DGHs was still observed (OR 1.56 (CI 1.04 to 2.35)) v teaching hospitals. Analysis of resource and organisational factors suggested higher mortality was associated with fewer doctors (OR 1.5) and with fewer patients being under the care of a specialist physician (OR 1.8). Small DGHs had fewest resources. Significant differences in mortality may exist between hospital types. The findings justify further study in a proposed national audit.

  7. Neonatal Morbidity And Mortality In Calabar, Nigeria: A Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The morbidity and mortality pattern amongst neonates admitted into the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital were reviewed from 1st June 2003 to 30th November 2004. Results: The major indications for admission for inborn babies were infections (27.4%), jaundice (21%) and low birth weight (LBW) ...

  8. Neonatal mortality at Leratong Hospital | Moundzika-Kibamba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There has been a high demand for delivery services at Leratong Hospital; however, no study on the causes of neonatal mortality has been conducted. It was therefore essential to identify the causes of newborn deaths so as to implement policies that would advance neonatal care. Objectives. To determine the ...

  9. Association Between Hospitals Caring for a Disproportionately High Percentage of Minority Trauma Patients and Increased Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H.; Ong’uti, Sharon; Efron, David T.; Oyetunji, Tolulope A.; Crandall, Marie L.; Scott, Valerie K.; Haut, Elliott R.; Schneider, Eric B.; Powe, Neil R.; Cooper, Lisa A.; Cornwell, Edward E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is an increased odds of mortality among trauma patients treated at hospitals with higher proportions of minority patients (ie, black and Hispanic patients combined). Design Hospitals were categorized on the basis of the percentage of minority patients admitted with trauma. The adjusted odds of in-hospital mortality were compared between hospitals with less than 25% of patients who were minorities (the reference group) and hospitals with 25% to 50% of patients who were minorities and hospitals with more than 50% of patients who were minorities. Multivariate logistic regression (with generalized linear modeling and a cluster-correlated robust estimate of variance) was used to control for multiple patient and injury severity characteristics. Setting A total of 434 hospitals in the National Trauma Data Bank. Participants Patients aged 18 to 64 years whose medical records were included in the National Trauma Data Bank for the years 2007 and 2008 with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or greater and who were white, black, or Hispanic. Main Outcome Measures Crude mortality and adjusted odds of in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 311 568 patients were examined. Hospitals in which the percentage of minority patients was more than 50% also had younger patients, fewer female patients, more patients with penetrating trauma, and the highest crude mortality. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients treated at hospitals in which the percentage of minority patients was 25% to 50% and at hospitals in which the percentage of minority patients was more than 50% demonstrated increased odds of death (adjusted odds ratio, 1.16 [95% confidence interval, 1.01–1.34] and adjusted odds ratio, 1.37 [95% confidence interval, 1.16–1.61], respectively), compared with the reference group. This disparity increased further on subset analysis of patients with a blunt injury. Uninsured patients had significantly increased odds of mortality within

  10. Prognostic Importance of Low Admission Serum Creatinine Concentration for Mortality in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Harrison, Andrew M; Kashani, Kianoush

    2017-05-01

    The study objective was to assess the association between low serum creatinine value at admission and in-hospital mortality in hospitalized patients. This was a retrospective single-center cohort study conducted at a tertiary referral hospital. All hospitalized adult patients between 2011 and 2013 who had an admission creatinine value available were identified for inclusion in this study. Admission creatinine value was categorized into 7 groups: ≤0.4, 0.5 to 0.6, 0.7 to 0.8, 0.9 to 1.0, 1.1 to 1.2, 1.3 to 1.4, and ≥1.5 mg/dL. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Logistic regression analysis was performed to obtain the odds ratio of in-hospital mortality for the various admission creatinine levels, using a creatinine value of 0.7 to 0.8 mg/dL as the reference group in the analysis of all patients and female patients and of 0.9 to 1.0 mg/dL in the analysis of male patients because it was associated with the lowest in-hospital mortality. Of 73,994 included patients, 973 (1.3%) died in the hospital. The association between different categories of admission creatinine value and in-hospital mortality assumed a U-shaped distribution, with both low and high creatinine values associated with higher in-hospital mortality. After adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, principal diagnosis, and comorbid conditions, very low creatinine value (≤0.4 mg/dL) was significantly associated with increased mortality (odds ratio, 3.29; 95% confidence interval, 2.08-5.00), exceeding the risk related to a markedly increased creatinine value of ≥1.5 mg/dL (odds ratio, 2.56; 95% confidence interval, 2.07-3.17). The association remained significant in the subgroup analysis of male and female patients. Low creatinine value at admission is independently associated with increased in-hospital mortality in hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

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    Ong CT

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cheung-Ter Ong,1,2 Yi-Sin Wong,3 Chi-Shun Wu,1 Yu-Hsiang Su1 1Department of Neurology, Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, 2Department of Nursing, Chung Jen Junior College of Nursing, Health Science and Management, Chiayi, 3Department of Family Medicine, Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan, Republic of China Background/purpose: In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients.Materials and methods: Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed.Results: Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1% died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9% died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01 and stroke severity (P<0.01 were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation. The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications.Conclusion: AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological

  12. Morbidity and mortality of hospitalized hip fractures in chronic hemodialysis

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    Georgios Vlachopanos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal bone architecture contributes to high incidence of hip fractures in chronichemodialysis (HD patients. Their clinical epidemiology is incompletely described. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to assess the implications ofhospitalization with hip fracture in HD patients compared to the nonchronic kidney disease population. Thirty-three chronic HD patients admitted with hip fracture overfiveyears were age- and sex-matched on a 1:1 ratio with controls that had hip fracture and normal renal function. Demographic characteristics, deaths, and readmissions atsixmonths,hospitalization length, time to operation, and laboratory resultswere recorded from electronic health files. Datawere compared betweenthe two groups usingpairedt-test for continuous variables and McNemar's test for categoricalvariables. The compositeendpoint of deathand/or readmission at6 months was higher in HD patients (12.1% vs. 6.2%, P<0.001. Furthermore, mean time tooperationwas more delayed due to comorbidities (4.7 vs. 2.9 days, p = 0.04. HD patients had anemia more frequently at presentation (hemoglobin below 10 mg/dL, 32.1% vs. 12.5%, P = 0.003. Finally, they were more likely to be considered toofrail for surgery and not be operated (21.2% vs. 6.2%, P<0.001. Hip fractures are associated with increased morbidity and mortality and represent an important health-care burden for chronic HD patients. Future research is needed to identify definite predictors of adverse outcomes and to implement prevention strategies.

  13. Relationship Between Preoperative Anemia and In-Hospital Mortality in Children Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraoni, David; DiNardo, James A; Goobie, Susan M

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between preoperative anemia and in-hospital mortality has not been investigated in the pediatric surgical population. We hypothesized that children with preoperative anemia undergoing noncardiac surgery may have an increased risk of in-hospital mortality. We identified all children between 1 and 18 years of age with a recorded preoperative hematocrit (HCT) in the 2012, 2013, and 2014 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) pediatric databases. The endpoint was defined as the incidence of in-hospital mortality. Children with preoperative anemia were identified based on their preoperative HCT. Demographic and surgical characteristics, as well as comorbidities, were considered potential confounding variables in a multivariable logistic regression analysis. A sensitivity analysis was performed using propensity-matched analysis. Among the 183,833 children included in the 2012, 2013, and 2014 ACS NSQIP database, 74,508 had a preoperative HCT recorded (41%). After exclusion of all children children were anemic, and 39,071 (76%) were nonanemic. The median preoperative HCT was 33% (interquartile range, 31-35) in anemic children, and 39% (interquartile range, 37-42) in nonanemic children (P anemia was associated with higher odds for in-hospital mortality (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.48-3.19; P anemia was also associated with higher odds of in-hospital mortality (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.15-2.65; P = .004). Our study demonstrates that children with preoperative anemia are at increased risk for in-hospital mortality. Further studies are needed to assess whether the correction of preoperative HCT, through the development of a patient blood management program, improves patient outcomes or simply reduces the need for transfusions.

  14. Third delay of maternal mortality in a tertiary hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, N.; Khan, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the magnitude, causes and substandard care factors responsible for the third delay of maternal mortality seen in our unit III, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Civil Hospital, Karachi. This Cross-sectional, retrospective study was carried out on 152 mothers who died over a period of eight years from 1997 to 2004 at Civil Hospital Karachi. Death summaries of all maternal deaths were reviewed from death registers and were studied for substandard care factors which could have been responsible for the third delay of maternal mortality. The frequency of maternal mortality was 1.3 per 100 deliveries. The mean age was 29+-6.49 years and mean parity was 3.24+-3.25. The main causes of death were hypertensive disorders in 52/152 (34.21%), hemorrhage in 40/152 (26.31%), unsafe abortion in 16/152 (10.52%), puerperal sepsis in 14/152 (9.21%) and obstructed labor in 11/152 (7.2%) cases. Substandard care factors were present in 76.7% of patients, which included inappropriate management of pulmonary edema, delay in arranging blood for hemorrhaging patients and delay in surgical intervention. Substandard care factors were present in majority of cases of maternal deaths. Improvement of maternity care services in Civil Hospital Karachi is needed on an urgent basis. (author)

  15. Hospital variation in 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery in denmark: the contribution of hospital volume and patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Borglykke, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals.......This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals....

  16. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-08-01

    similar risk-adjusted 30-day mortality across all tertiles of hospital transfusion rates.Among patients ≥65 years with an indication for intraoperative transfusion, intraoperative transfusion patterns varied widely across hospitals and declined through the 1997 to 2009 study period. Hospitals with higher transfusion rates in these patients have lower risk-adjusted 30-day postoperative mortality rates.

  17. Early mortality and complications in hospitalized adult Californians with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Gwendolyn; Jonas, Brian A; Li, Qian; Brunson, Ann; Wun, Ted; Keegan, Theresa H M

    2017-06-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of complications, sociodemographic and clinical factors on early mortality (death ≤60 days from diagnosis) in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. Using data from the California Cancer Registry linked to hospital discharge records from 1999 to 2012, we identified patients aged ≥15 years with AML who received inpatient treatment (N = 6359). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association of complications with early mortality, adjusting for sociodemographic factors, comorbidities and hospital type. Early mortality decreased over time (25·3%, 1999-2000; 16·8%, 2011-2012) across all age groups, but was higher in older patients (6·9%, 15-39, 11·4%, 40-54, 18·6% 55-65, and 35·8%, >65 years). Major bleeding [Odds ratio (OR) 1·5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·3-1·9], liver failure (OR 1·9, 95% CI 1·1-3·1), renal failure (OR 2·4, 95% CI 2·0-2·9), respiratory failure (OR 7·6, 95% CI 6·2-9·3) and cardiac arrest (OR 15·8, 95% CI 8·7-28·6) were associated with early mortality. Higher early mortality was also associated with single marital status, low neighbourhood socioeconomic status, lack of health insurance and comorbidities. Treatment at National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centres was associated with lower early mortality (OR 0·5, 95% CI 0·4-0·6). In conclusion, organ dysfunction, hospital type and sociodemographic factors impact early mortality. Further studies should investigate how differences in healthcare delivery affect early mortality. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Association of In-Hospital Mortality and Dysglycemia in Septic Patients.

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    Hsiao-Yun Chao

    Full Text Available The associations between dysglycemia and mortality in septic patients with and without diabetes are yet to be confirmed. Our aim was to analyze the association of diabetes and sepsis mortality, and to examine how dysglycemia (hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glucose variability affects in-hospital mortality of patients with suspected sepsis in emergency department (ED and intensive care units.Clinically suspected septic patients admitted to ED were included, and stratified into subgroups according to in-hospital mortality and the presence of diabetes. We analyzed patients' demographics, comorbidities, clinical and laboratory parameters, admission glucose levels and severity of sepsis. Odds ratio of mortality was assessed after adjusting for possible confounders. The correlations of admission glucose and CoV (blood glucose coefficients of variation and mortality in diabetes and non-diabetes were also tested.Diabetes was present in 58.3% of the patients. Diabetic patients were older, more likely to have end-stage renal disease and undergoing hemodialysis, but had fewer malignancies, less sepsis severity (lower Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis Score, less steroid usage in emergency department, and lower in-hospital mortality rate (aOR:0.83, 95% CI 0.65-0.99, p = 0.044. Hyperglycemia at admission (glucose≥200 mg/dL was associated with higher risks of in-hospital mortality among the non-diabetes patients (OR:1.83 vs. diabetes, 95% CI 1.20-2.80, p = 0.005 with the same elevated glucose levels at admission. In addition, CoV>30% resulted in higher risk of death as well (aOR:1.88 vs. CoV between 10 and 30, 95%CI 1.24-2.86 p = 0.003.This study indicates that while diabetes mellitus seems to be a protective factor in sepsis patients, hyper- or hypoglycemia status on admission, and increased blood glucose variation during hospital stays, were independently associated with increased odds ratio of mortality.

  19. Persisting high hospital and community childhood mortality in an urban setting in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Jens Erik; Biai, Sidu; Jakobsen, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To describe paediatric hospitalization in a West African capital in relation to overall childhood mortality in the community and to evaluate the potential impact of improved management at the hospital. METHODS: Hospital data on child admissions in a 6-year period were linked to information...... been hospitalized, and 24% of all deaths in the community occurred in-hospital. Community infant and under-three mortality rates were 110 and 207 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In-hospital mortality remained persistently high from 1991 to 1996 and the overall in-hospital mortality was 12...... minor improvements in acute case management of sick children attending the hospital would be expected to result in substantial reduction in overall childhood mortality. Persistently high acute in-hospital mortality reflects the need of immediate and appropriate care at the hospital. Treatment should...

  20. Maternal mortality ratio in Lebanon in 2008: a hospital-based reproductive age mortality study (RAMOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobeika, Elie; Abi Chaker, Samer; Harb, Hilda; Rahbany Saad, Rita; Ammar, Walid; Adib, Salim

    2014-01-01

    International agencies have recently assigned Lebanon to the group H of countries with "no national data on maternal mortality," and estimated a corresponding maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 150 per 100,000 live births. The Ministry of Public Health addressed the discrepancy perceived between the reality of the maternal mortality ratio experience in Lebanon and the international report by facilitating a hospital-based reproductive age mortality study, sponsored by the World Health Organization Representative Office in Lebanon, aiming at providing an accurate estimate of a maternal mortality ratio for 2008. The survey allowed a detailed analysis of maternal causes of deaths. Reproductive age deaths (15-49 years) were initially identified through hospital records. A trained MD traveled to each hospital to ascertain whether recorded deaths were in fact maternal deaths or not. ICD10 codes were provided by the medical controller for each confirmed maternal deaths. There were 384 RA death cases, of which 13 were confirmed maternal deaths (339%) (numerator). In 2008, there were 84823 live births in Lebanon (denominator). The MMR in Lebanon in 2008 was thus officially estimated at 23/100,000 live births, with an "uncertainty range" from 153 to 30.6. Hemorrhage was the leading cause of death, with double the frequency of all other causes (pregnancy-induced hypertension, eclampsia, infection, and embolism). This specific enquiry responded to a punctual need to correct a clearly inadequate report, and it should be relayed by an on-going valid surveillance system. Results indicate that special attention has to be devoted to the management of peri-partum hemorrhage cases. Arab, postpartum hemorrhage, development, pregnancy management, verbal autopsy

  1. Evaluation of hospital outcomes: the relation between length-of-stay, readmission, and mortality in a large international administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingsma, Hester F; Bottle, Alex; Middleton, Steve; Kievit, Job; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J

    2018-02-14

    Hospital mortality, readmission and length of stay (LOS) are commonly used measures for quality of care. We aimed to disentangle the correlations between these interrelated measures and propose a new way of combining them to evaluate the quality of hospital care. We analyzed administrative data from the Global Comparators Project from 26 hospitals on patients discharged between 2007 and 2012. We correlated standardized and risk-adjusted hospital outcomes on mortality, readmission and long LOS. We constructed a composite measure with 5 levels, based on literature review and expert advice, from survival without readmission and normal LOS (best) to mortality (worst outcome). This composite measure was analyzed using ordinal regression, to obtain a standardized outcome measure to compare hospitals. Overall, we observed a 3.1% mortality rate, 7.8% readmission rate (in survivors) and 20.8% long LOS rate among 4,327,105 admissions. Mortality and LOS were correlated at the patient and the hospital level. A patient in the upper quartile LOS had higher odds of mortality (odds ratio = 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.43-1.47) than those in the lowest quartile. Hospitals with a high standardized mortality had higher proportions of long LOS (r = 0.79, p < 0.01). Readmission rates did not correlate with either mortality or long LOS rates. The interquartile range of the standardized ordinal composite outcome was 74-117. The composite outcome had similar or better reliability in ranking hospitals than individual outcomes. Correlations between different outcome measures are complex and differ between hospital- and patient-level. The proposed composite measure combines three outcomes in an ordinal fashion for a more comprehensive and reliable view of hospital performance than its component indicators.

  2. Hospital staff education on severe sepsis/septic shock and hospital mortality: an original hypothesis

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    Capuzzo Maurizia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signs of serious clinical events overlap with those of sepsis. We hypothesised that any education on severe sepsis/septic shock may affect the outcome of all hospital patients. We designed this study to assess the trend of the mortality rate of adults admitted to hospital for at least one night in relationship with a hospital staff educational program dedicated to severe sepsis/septic shock. Methods This study was performed in six Italian hospitals in the same region. Multidisciplinary Sepsis Teams members were selected by each hospital management among senior staff. The education included the following steps: i the Teams were taught about adult learning, problem based learning, and Surviving Sepsis guidelines, and provided with educational material (literature, electronic presentations, scenarios of clinical cases for training and booklets; ii they started delivering courses and seminars each to their own hospital staff in the last quarter of 2007. To analyse mortality, we selected adult patients, admitted for at least one night to the wards or units present in all the study hospitals and responsible for 80% of hospital deaths. We fitted a Poisson model with monthly hospital mortality rates from December 2003 to August 2009 as dependent variable. The effect of the educational program on hospital mortality was measured as two dummy variables identifying a first (November 2007 to December 2008 and a second (January to August 2009 education period. The analysis was adjusted for a linear time trend, seasonality and monthly average values of age, Charlson score, length of stay in hospital and urgent/non-urgent admission. Results The hospital staff educated reached 30.6% at the end of June 2009. In comparison with the pre-education period, the Relative Risk of death of the patient population considered was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-0.99; p 0.025 for in-patients in the first, and 0.89 (95% CI 0.81-0.98; p 0.012 for

  3. Impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality, length of hospitalization and rates of re-hospitalization in a general hospital setting in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Silmara AO

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients is known to be related to a higher incidence of clinical and surgical complications and poorer outcomes. Adequate glycemic control and earlier diagnosis of type 2 diabetes during hospitalization are cost-effective measures. Methods This prospective cohort study was designed to determine the impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality in a general hospital setting during a 3-month period by reviewing patients' records. The primary purposes of this trial were to verify that hyperglycemia was diagnosed properly and sufficiently early and that it was managed during the hospital stay; we also aimed to evaluate the relationship between in-hospital hyperglycemia control and outcomes such as complications during the hospital stay, extent of hospitalization, frequency of re-hospitalization, death rates and number of days in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit after admission. Statistical analyses utilized the Kruskall-Wallis complemented by the "a posteriori" d.m.s. test, Spearman correlation and Chi-squared test, with a level of significance of 5% (p Results We reviewed 779 patient records that fulfilled inclusion criteria. The patients were divided into 5 groups: group (1 diabetic with normal glycemic levels according to American Diabetes Association criteria for in-hospital patients (n = 123; group (2 diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 76; group (3 non-diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 225; group (4diabetics and non-diabetics with persistent hyperglycemia during 3 consecutive days (n = 57 and group (5 those with normal glucose control (n = 298. Compared to patients in groups 1 and 5, patients in groups 2, 3 and 4 had significantly higher mortality rates (17.7% vs. 2.8% and Intensive Care Unit admissions with complications (23.3% vs. 4.5%. Patients in group 4 had the longest hospitalizations (mean 15.5 days, and group 5 had the lowest re-hospitalization rate (mean of 1.28 hospitalizations. Only

  4. Mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures among hospitalized elderly

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    Telma M. R Assis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy and epileptic seizures are common brain disorders in the elderly and are associated with increased mortality that may be ascribed to the underlying disease or epilepsy-related causes.Objective To describe mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures in elderly inpatients.Method Retrospective analysis was performed on hospitalized elderly who had epilepsy or epileptic seizures, from January 2009 to December 2010. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled.Results The most common etiology was ischemic stroke (37%, followed by neoplasias (13%, hemorrhagic stroke (12%, dementias (11.4% and metabolic disturbances (5.5%. In a univariate analysis, disease duration (p = 0.04, status epilepticus (p < 0.001 and metabolic etiology (p = 0.005 were associated with mortality. However after adjustment by logistic regression, only status epilepticus remained an independent predictor of death (odds ratio = 13; 95%CI = 2.3 to 72; p = 0.004.Conclusion In this study status epilepticus was an independent risk factor for death during hospitalization.

  5. Interleukin-6 and procalcitonin as biomarkers in mortality prediction of hospitalized patients with community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija Andrijevic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community acquired pneumonia (CAP may present as life-threatening infection with uncertain progression and outcome of treatment. Primary aim of the trial was determination of the cut-off value of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6 and procalcitonin (PCT above which, 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with CAP, could be predicted with high sensitivity and specificity. We investigated correlation between serum levels of IL-6 and PCT at admission and available scoring systems of CAP (pneumonia severity index-PSI, modified early warning score-MEWS and (Confusion, Urea nitrogen, respiratory rate, Blood pressure, ≥65 years of age-CURB65. Methods: This was prospective, non-randomized trial which included 101 patients with diagnosed CAP. PSI, MEWS and CURB65 were assessed on first day of hospitalization. IL-6 and PCT were also sampled on the first day of hospitalization. Results: Based on ROC curve analysis (AUC ± SE = 0.934 ± 0.035; 95%CI(0.864-1.0; P = 0.000 hospitalized CAP patients with elevated IL-6 level have 93.4% higher risk level for lethal outcome. Cut-off value of 20.2 pg/ml IL-6 shows sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 87% in mortality prediction. ROC curve analysis confirmed significant role of procalcitonin as a mortality predictor in CAP patients (AUC ± SE = 0.667 ± 0.062; 95%CI(0.546-0.789; P = 0.012. Patients with elevated PCT level have 66.7% higher risk level for lethal outcome. As a predictor of mortality at the cut-off value of 2.56 ng/ml PCT shows sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 61.8%. Conclusions: Both IL-6 and PCI are significant for prediction of 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with CAP. Serum levels of IL6 correlate with major CAP scoring systems.

  6. Association of Changing Hospital Readmission Rates With Mortality Rates After Hospital Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfei; Lin, Zhenqiu; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Ross, Joseph S.; Horwitz, Leora I.; Desai, Nihar R.; Suter, Lisa G.; Drye, Elizabeth E.; Bernheim, Susannah M.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2017-01-01

    Importance The Affordable Care Act has led to US national reductions in hospital 30-day readmission rates for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and pneumonia. Whether readmission reductions have had the unintended consequence of increasing mortality after hospitalization is unknown. Objective To examine the correlation of paired trends in hospital 30-day readmission rates and hospital 30-day mortality rates after discharge. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective study of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 65 years or older hospitalized with HF, AMI, or pneumonia from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2014. Exposure Thirty-day risk-adjusted readmission rate (RARR). Main Outcomes and Measures Thirty-day RARRs and 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rates (RAMRs) after discharge were calculated for each condition in each month at each hospital in 2008 through 2014. Monthly trends in each hospital’s 30-day RARRs and 30-day RAMRs after discharge were examined for each condition. The weighted Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated for hospitals’ paired monthly trends in 30-day RARRs and 30-day RAMRs after discharge for each condition. Results In 2008 through 2014, 2 962 554 hospitalizations for HF, 1 229 939 for AMI, and 2 544 530 for pneumonia were identified at 5016, 4772, and 5057 hospitals, respectively. In January 2008, mean hospital 30-day RARRs and 30-day RAMRs after discharge were 24.6% and 8.4% for HF, 19.3% and 7.6% for AMI, and 18.3% and 8.5% for pneumonia. Hospital 30-day RARRs declined in the aggregate across hospitals from 2008 through 2014; monthly changes in RARRs were −0.053% (95% CI, −0.055% to −0.051%) for HF, −0.044% (95% CI, −0.047% to −0.041%) for AMI, and −0.033% (95% CI, −0.035% to −0.031%) for pneumonia. In contrast, monthly aggregate changes across hospitals in hospital 30-day RAMRs after discharge varied by condition: HF, 0.008% (95% CI, 0.007% to 0.010%); AMI, −0

  7. Bentall procedure in ascending aortic aneurysm: hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia-Tornell, Matilde Myriam; Marín-Solís, Bertha; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Martínez-Martínez, Manuel; Villalpando-Mendoza, Esteban; Ramírez-Orozco, Fermín

    2010-01-01

    Ascending aortic aneurysm disease (AAAD) shows a low frequency, heterogeneous behavior, high risk of rupture, dissection and mortality, making elective surgery necessary. Several procedures have been developed, and the Bentall technique is considered as the reference standard. The objective was to describe the hospital mortality of AAAD surgically treated using the Bentall procedure. We carried out a descriptive study. Included were 23 patients with AAAD who were operated on between March 1, 2005 and September 30, 2008 at our hospital. Data were obtained from clinical files, and descriptive statistics were selected for analysis. The study population was comprised of 23 patients with an average age of 46 years; 83% were males. Etiology was nonspecific degeneration of the middle layer with valve implication in 43%, bivalve aorta in 22%, Marfan syndrome, Turner's syndrome and poststenotic aneurysms each represented 9%, and Takayasu disease and ankylosing spondylitis 4% each. Associated heart disease was reported in six (26%) patients as follows: aortic coarctation (2), ischemic cardiopathy (1), atrial septal defect (1), severe mitral insufficiency (1) and subaortic membrane (1). Procedures carried out were Bentall surgery in 20 (87%) patients and aortoplasty with valve prosthesis in three (13%) patients. Complications reported were abnormal bleeding with mediastinal exploration (17%), nosocomial pneumonia (13%), arrhythmia (13%), and septic shock (9%). Mortality was reported in three (13%) patients due to septic shock and ventricular fibrillation. Surgical mortality with the Bentall procedure is similar to published results by other specialized centers. Events related to the basic aortic pathology, surgical technique, aortic valve prosthesis and left ventricular dysfunction encourage longterm studies with follow-up.

  8. The impact of pharmaceutical innovation on premature mortality, cancer mortality, and hospitalization in Slovenia, 1997-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Frank R

    2015-04-01

    In Slovenia during the period 2000-2010, the number of years of potential life lost before the age of 70 years per 100,000 population under 70 years of age declined 25 %. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that pharmaceutical innovation played a key role in reducing premature mortality from all diseases in Slovenia, and to examine the effects of pharmaceutical innovation on the age-standardized number of cancer deaths and on hospitalization from all diseases. Estimates and other data were used to calculate the incremental cost effectiveness of pharmaceutical innovation in Slovenia. Longitudinal disease-level data was analyzed to determine whether diseases for which there was greater pharmaceutical innovation-a larger increase in the number of new chemical entities (NCEs) previously launched-had larger declines in premature mortality, the age-standardized number of cancer deaths, and the number of hospital discharges. My methodology controls for the effects of macroeconomic trends and overall changes in the healthcare system. Premature mortality from a disease is inversely related to the number of NCEs launched more than 5 years earlier. On average, the introduction of an additional NCE for a disease reduced premature mortality from the disease by 2.4 % 7 years later. The age-standardized number of cancer deaths is inversely related to the number of NCEs launched 1-6 years earlier, conditional on the age-standardized number of new cancer cases diagnosed 0-2 years earlier. On average, the launch of an NCE reduced the number of hospital discharges 1 year later by approximately 1.5 %. The estimates imply that approximately two-thirds of the 2000-2010 decline in premature mortality was due to pharmaceutical innovation. If no NCEs had been launched in Slovenia during 1992-2003, the age-standardized number of cancer deaths in 2008 would have been 12.2 % higher. The NCEs launched in Slovenia during 2003-2009 are estimated to have reduced the number of

  9. Waiting list paradox: Danish cancer patients diagnosed fast have higher mortality after diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Marie Louise; Frydenberg, Morten; Hansen, Rikke Pilegaard

    on hospital discharge diagnoses for the 2004-2005 period, extracted from population-based healthcare databases in the former County of Aarhus, Denmark, and subsequently validated in the National Danish Cancer Registry. All patients with a first-time diagnosis of colon, rectal, lung, skin, breast, or prostate...... with longer diagnostic interval until the reference point of 30 days. For colon, rectal, skin, and breast cancer mortality seemed to increase with diagnostic interval longer than 30 days. The waiting list paradox is manifest in Denmark. We speculate that medical professionals organise the diagnostic pathway......Studies often show that cancer patients diagnosed more rapidly have higher mortality rates than patients with longer waits in the primary and secondary health care sector. Our aim was to examine whether this paradox is manifest in the Danish health care system. The study was based on data...

  10. Mortality, readmission and length of stay have different relationships using hospital-level versus patient-level data: an example of the ecological fallacy affecting hospital performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Kringos, Dionne S; Steyerberg, Ewout; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J

    2018-06-01

    Ecological fallacy refers to an erroneous inference about individuals on the basis of findings for the group to which those individuals belong. Suppose analysis of a large database shows that hospitals with a high proportion of long length of stay (LOS) patients also have higher than average in-hospital mortality. This may prompt efforts to reduce mortality among patients with long LOS. But patients with long LOS may not be the ones at higher risk of death. It may be that hospitals with higher mortality (regardless of LOS) also have more long LOS patients-either because of quality problems on both counts or because of unaccounted differences in case mix. To provide more insight how the ecological fallacy influences the evaluation of hospital performance indicators, we assessed whether hospital-level associations between in-hospital mortality, readmission and long LOS reflect patient-level associations. Patient admissions from the Dutch National Medical Registration (2007-2012) for specific diseases (stroke, colorectal carcinoma, heart failure, acute myocardial infarction and hip/knee replacements in patients with osteoarthritis) were analysed, as well as all admissions. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess patient-level associations. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quantify hospital-level associations. Overall, we observed 2.2% in-hospital mortality, 8.1% readmissions and a mean LOS of 5.9 days among 8 478 884 admissions in 95 hospitals. Of the 10 disease-specific associations tested, 2 were reversed at hospital-level, 3 were consistent and 5 were only significant at either hospital-level or patient-level. A reversed association was found for stroke: patients with long LOS had 58% lower in-hospital mortality (OR 0.42 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.44)), whereas the hospital-level association was reversed (r=0.30, plevel associations were found for each hospital, but LOS varied across hospitals, thereby resulting in a positive hospital-level association

  11. A low body temperature on arrival at hospital following out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest is associated with increased mortality in the TTM-study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovdenes, Jan; Røysland, Kjetil; Nielsen, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    categorized according to their recorded body temperature on arrival and also categorized to groups of patients being actively cooled or passively rewarmed. RESULTS: OHCA patients having a temperature ≤34.0°C on arrival at hospital had a significantly higher mortality compared to the OHCA patients...... with a higher temperature on arrival. A low body temperature on arrival was associated with a longer time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and duration of transport time to hospital. Patients who were actively cooled or passively rewarmed during the first 4h had similar mortality. In a multivariate......AIM: To investigate the association of temperature on arrival to hospital after out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest (OHCA) with the primary outcome of mortality, in the targeted temperature management (TTM) trial. METHODS: The TTM trial randomized 939 patients to TTM at 33 or 36°C for 24h. Patients were...

  12. Age-related in-hospital mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, A.R.; Rafique, S.; Ahmed, R.Z.; Anjum, A.H.; Tarin, S.M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in-hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction among different age groups. Subjects and Methods: The subjects were 460 admitted patients of acute myocardial infarction who fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Patients were divided into four age groups. Group-I included patients in 20-40 years, group-II (41-50 years), group-III (51-60 years) and group-IV (>60 years). Mortality was compared between different age groups by Chi-square and linear-regression models. Results: The total in-hospital mortality was 16.7%. It gradually increased from 5.6% in group-I (20-40 years) patients to 21% in group-IV (>60 years) patients. While mortality in groups group-II (41-50 years) and group-III (51-60 years) patients was 16.7% and 18.6% respectively. A marked increase in mortality was noted with increase in age. Group- IV (>60 years) patients presented 2 hours late to the hospital than the group-I (20-40 years) patients. There was no statistical difference in site of infarction in different age groups. Old age (group-IV i.e. >60 years old) was more associated with heart failure (higher Killip class) on presentation. Lesser number of patients in group-IV received thrombolytic therapy than group-I. Only 31.09% patients in group-IV and 62.5% patients in group-I received streptokinase therapy respectively. Conclusion: In patients with acute myocardial infarction age was a powerful independent predictor of in-hospital mortality and complications. (author)

  13. Mortality among inpatients of a psychiatric hospital: Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Shireesh Shatwaji; Nagarajaiah; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Viswanath, Biju; Kumar, Naveen C; Gangadhar, B N; Math, Suresh Bada

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to assess mortality and its correlates among psychiatric inpatients of a tertiary care neuropsychiatric hospital. Given the background that such a study has never been undertaken in India, the findings would have a large bearing on policy making from a mental health-care perspective. The medical records of those psychiatric inpatients (n = 333) who died during their stay at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences in past 26 years (January 1983 to December 2008) constituted the study population. During the 26 years, there were a total of 103,252 psychiatric in-patient admissions, out of which 333 people died during their inpatient stay. Majority (n = 135, 44.6%) of the mortality was seen in the age group of 21-40 years. Most of the subjects were males (n = 202, 67%), married (n = 172, 56.8%) and from urban areas (n = 191, 63%). About, 54% of the subjects had short inpatient stay (history of physical illness. Leading cause of death were cardiovascular system disorders (n = 132, 43.6%), followed by respiratory system disorders (n = 45, 14.9%), nervous system disorders (n = 30, 9.9%) and infections (n = 31, 10.1%). In 21 (7%), cause of death was suicide. Identifying the factors associated with the death of inpatients is of utmost importance in assessing the care in a neuropsychiatric hospital and in formulating better treatment plan and policy in mental health. The discussion focuses on the analysis of different factors associated with inpatient mortality.

  14. Causes and predictors of mortality in hospitalized lupus patient in Sarawak General Hospital, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, C L; Ling, G R

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a serious autoimmune disease that can be life threatening and fatal if left untreated. Causes and prognostic indicators of death in SLE have been well studied in developed countries but lacking in developing countries. We aimed to investigate the causes of mortality in hospitalized patients with SLE and determine the prognostic indicators of mortality during hospitalization in our center. All SLE patients who were admitted to Sarawak General Hospital from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010, were followed up in a prospective study using a standard protocol. Demographic data, clinical features, disease activities and damage indices were collected. Logistic regression and Cox regression analysis were used to determine the prognostic indicators of mortality in our patients. There were a total of 251 patients in our study, with the female to male ratio 10 to 1. Our study patients were of multiethnic origins. They had a mean age of 30.5 ± 12.2 years and a mean duration of illness of 36.5 ± 51.6 months. The main involvements were hematologic (73.3%), renal (70.9%) and mucocutaneous (67.3%). There were 26 deaths (10.4%), with the main causes being: infection and flare (50%), infection alone (19%), flare alone (19%) and others (12%). Independent predictors of mortality in our cohort of SLE patients were the presence of both infection and flare of disease (hazard ratio (HR) 5.56) and high damage indices at the time of admission (HR 1.91). Infection and flare were the main causes of death in hospitalized Asian patients with SLE. The presence of infection with flare and high damage indices at the time of admission were independent prognostic indicators of mortality.

  15. Higher Mortality in Surgically Managed Diverticulitis is Associated with Asian Ethnicity and Right-Sided Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Christine S; Koltun, Walter A; Hollenbeak, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    Although right-sided diverticulitis is perceived to have a higher incidence among Asians and infrequently requires surgical management in comparison with sigmoid diverticulitis, it is unknown whether differences in outcomes are due to ethnic disparity or disease pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to determine the surgical outcomes for Asian and non-Asian patients with diverticulitis who underwent colectomy. Patients identifiable by ethnicity in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample with diverticulitis and colectomy between 2004 and 2010 were included. Univariate comparisons were made between Asian and non-Asian patients by using t tests for continuous variables and χ tests for categorical variables. Propensity score matching analysis was performed to compare Asian patients with otherwise similar non-Asian patients. Included were 58,142 non-Asian and 335 Asian patients with diverticulitis who underwent a colectomy. The primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality, hospital length of stay, and total costs. Asian patients were younger (56.1 vs. 59.2 years, p ethnicity variable was not uniformly collected by all states within the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Among patients undergoing a colectomy for diverticulitis, a higher mortality was observed in Asian patients and right-sided disease. Future longitudinal studies comparing the natural history and outcomes of management between right- and left-sided diverticulitis are necessary to investigate whether a true ethnic disparity exists.

  16. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in European hospitals: excess mortality and length of hospital stay related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    de Kraker, Marlieke E A

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening the successful management of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite the therapeutic limitations imposed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), its clinical impact is still debated. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS) associated with MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI) in European hospitals. Between July 2007 and June 2008, a multicenter, prospective, parallel matched-cohort study was carried out in 13 tertiary care hospitals in as many European countries. Cohort I consisted of patients with MRSA BSI and cohort II of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI. The patients in both cohorts were matched for LOS prior to the onset of BSI with patients free of the respective BSI. Cohort I consisted of 248 MRSA patients and 453 controls and cohort II of 618 MSSA patients and 1,170 controls. Compared to the controls, MRSA patients had higher 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.4) and higher hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.5). Their excess LOS was 9.2 days. MSSA patients also had higher 30-day (aOR = 2.4) and hospital (aHR = 3.1) mortality and an excess LOS of 8.6 days. When the outcomes from the two cohorts were compared, an effect attributable to methicillin resistance was found for 30-day mortality (OR = 1.8; P = 0.04), but not for hospital mortality (HR = 1.1; P = 0.63) or LOS (difference = 0.6 days; P = 0.96). Irrespective of methicillin susceptibility, S. aureus BSI has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. In addition, MRSA BSI leads to a fatal outcome more frequently than MSSA BSI. Infection control efforts in hospitals should aim to contain infections caused by both resistant and susceptible S. aureus.

  17. In-hospital Mortality due to Respiratory Diseases in the Provincial Hospital of Cienfuegos. 2010-2014

    OpenAIRE

    Liuva Leyva Rodríguez; Orlando Morera Álvarez; Daylin Madruga Jiménez; Heidy Caridad Cordero Cabrera; Reinaldo José Pino Blanco

    2016-01-01

    Background: in-hospital mortality is a health indicator commonly used as a measure of quality of care. Respiratory diseases are a major cause of deaths in hospitals. Objective: to describe mortality from respiratory diseases at the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos. Methods: a descriptive study of all patients over 18 years old who died from respiratory diseases in the hospital of Cienfuegos from 2010 to 2014 was conducted. The variables analyzed were: age,...

  18. Using Hospitalization and Mortality Data to Identify Areas at Risk for Adolescent Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Aseltine, Robert H

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to use statewide data on inpatient hospitalizations for suicide attempts and suicide mortality to identify communities and school districts at risk for adolescent suicide. Five years of data (2010-2014) from the Office of the Connecticut Medical Examiner and the Connecticut Hospital Inpatient Discharge Database were analyzed. A mixed-effects Poisson regression model was used to assess whether suicide attempt/mortality rates in the state's 119 school districts were significantly better or worse than expected after adjusting for 10 community-level characteristics. Ten districts were at significantly higher risk for suicidal behavior, with suicide mortality/hospitalization rates ranging from 154% to 241% of their expected rates, after accounting for their community characteristics. Four districts were identified as having significantly lower risk for suicide attempts than expected after accounting for community-level advantages and disadvantages. Data capturing hospitalization for suicide attempts and suicide deaths can inform prevention activities by identifying high-risk areas to which resources should be allocated, as well as low-risk areas that may provide insight into the best practices in suicide prevention. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer Mortality Pattern in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinde, O. R.; Phillips, A. A.; Oguntunde, O. A.; Afolayan, O. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and about 70% of all cancer deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries. The cancer mortality pattern is quite different in Africa compared to other parts of the world. Extensive literature research showed little or no information about the overall deaths attributable to cancer in Nigeria. Aims and Objectives. This study aims at providing data on the patterns of cancer deaths in our center using the hospital and autopsy death registers. Methodology. Demographic, clinical data of patients who died of cancer were extracted from death registers in the wards and mortuary over a period of 14 years (2000-2013). Results. A total of 1436 (4.74%) cancer deaths out of 30287 deaths recorded during the period. The male to female ratio was 1:2.2 and the peak age of death was between 51 and 60 years. Overall, breast cancer was responsible for most of the deaths. Conclusion. The study shows that the cancers that accounted for majority of death occurred in organs that were accessible to screening procedures and not necessary for survival. We advise regular screening for precancerous lesions in these organs so as to reduce the mortality rate and burden of cancer.Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and about 70% of all cancer deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries. The cancer mortality pattern is quite different in Africa compared to other parts of the world. Extensive literature research showed little or no information about the overall deaths attributable to cancer in Nigeria. Aims and Objectives. This study aims at providing data on the patterns of cancer deaths in our center using the hospital and autopsy death registers. Methodology. Demographic, clinical data of patients who died of cancer were extracted from death registers in the wards and mortuary over a period of 14 years (2000-2013). Results. A total of 1436 (4.74%) cancer deaths out of 30287 deaths recorded during the period. The male to female

  20. Using In-Hospital Mortality as an Indicator of Quality Care and Hospital Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badia BISBIS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The in-hospital mortality (MIH is used as a performance indicator and quality healthcare in hospital. However, the majority of deaths resulted from an inevitable disease process (severity of cases and / or co-morbidity, and not medical errors or changes in the quality of care. This work aims to make a distribution of deaths in the Regional Hospital of Eastern, Al Farabi hospital and to highlight that more studies on the MIH are required consistently with detailed clinical data at the admission. The MIH showed its limitation as a health care  indicator. The overall rate of in-hospital deaths within the Al Farabi hospital has averaged 2.4%, with 8.4% in the emergency unit, 28% in intensive care unit, 22% Neonatology unit, 1.6% in pediatric unit. The MIH may depend, firstly, on the condition of patients before hospitalization and secondly, on the conditions of their transfer from one institution to another that supports them as a last resort. Al Farabi hospital supports patients transferred from the provinces of the eastern region. Thus, 6% of patients who died in 2014 come from Berkane, 2% from  Nador, 2% from Bouarfa, 4% from  Taourirt and 2% from Jerrada. One might question about  the procedures and the conditions of such transfers. In conclusion, the overall MIH measured from routine data do not allow proper comparison between hospitals or the assessment of the quality of care and patient safety in the hospital. To do so, we should ideally have detailed clinical data on admission (e.g. type of admission, age of patient, sex, comorbidity, .... The MIH is however an important indicator to consider as a tool to detect potential  problems related to admission procedures and to suspect an area of "non-quality" in healthcare . The MIH is interesting for the patient and for the hospital because it serves the improvement of quality healthcare.

  1. Black/white differences in very low birth weight neonatal mortality rates among New York City hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Elizabeth A; Hebert, Paul; Chatterjee, Samprit; Kleinman, Lawrence C; Chassin, Mark R

    2008-03-01

    We sought to determine whether differences in the hospitals at which black and white infants are born contribute to black/white disparities in very low birth weight neonatal mortality rates in New York City. We performed a population-based cohort study using New York City vital statistics records on all live births and deaths of infants weighing 500 to 1499 g who were born in 45 hospitals between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2001 (N = 11 781). We measured very low birth weight risk-adjusted neonatal mortality rates for each New York City hospital and assessed differences in the distributions of non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white very low birth weight births among these hospitals. Risk-adjusted neonatal mortality rates for very low birth weight infants in New York City hospitals ranged from 9.6 to 27.2 deaths per 1000 births. White very low birth weight infants were more likely to be born in the lowest mortality tertile of hospitals (49%), compared with black very low birth weight infants (29%). We estimated that, if black women delivered in the same hospitals as white women, then black very low birth weight mortality rates would be reduced by 6.7 deaths per 1000 very low birth weight births, removing 34.5% of the black/white disparity in very low birth weight neonatal mortality rates in New York City. Volume of very low birth weight deliveries was modestly associated with very low birth weight mortality rates but explained little of the racial disparity. Black very low birth weight infants more likely to be born in New York City hospitals with higher risk-adjusted neonatal mortality rates than were very low birth weight infants, contributing substantially to black-white disparities.

  2. A Review Of In-Hospital Surgical Mortality At The Nnamdi Azikiwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and Objectives: A retrospective study to determine In-hospital surgical mortality rate, gender and age distribution of cases and operations associated with In-hospital surgical mortality at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi. Patients and Methods: Data was collected from the theatre operation ...

  3. Designated Stroke Center Status and Hospital Characteristics as Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality among Hemorrhagic Stroke Patients in New York, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatollari, Hajere J; Colello, Anna; Eisenberg, Bonnie; Brissette, Ian; Luna, Jorge; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Willey, Joshua Z

    2017-01-01

    Although designated stroke centers (DSCs) improve the quality of care and clinical outcomes for ischemic stroke patients, less is known about the benefits of DSCs for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Compared to non-DSCs, hospitals with the DSC status have lower in-hospital mortality rates for hemorrhagic stroke patients. We believed these effects would sustain over a period of time after adjusting for hospital-level characteristics, including hospital size, urban location, and teaching status. We evaluated ICH (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision; ICD-9: 431) and SAH (ICD-9: 430) hospitalizations documented in the 2008-2012 New York State Department of Health Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System inpatient sample database. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between DSC status and in-hospital mortality. We calculated ORs and 95% CIs adjusted for clustering of patients within facilities, other hospital characteristics, and individual level characteristics. Planned secondary analyses explored other hospital characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality. In 6,352 ICH and 3,369 SAH patients in the study sample, in-hospital mortality was higher among those with ICH compared to SAH (23.7 vs. 18.5%). Unadjusted analyses revealed that DSC status was related with reduced mortality for both ICH (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.8) and SAH patients (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.7). DSC remained a significant predictor of lower in-hospital mortality for SAH patients (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-0.9) but not for ICH patients (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.6-1.0) after adjusting for patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, hospital size, teaching status and location. Admission to a DSC was independently associated with reduced in-hospital mortality for SAH patients but not for those with ICH. Other patient and hospital characteristics may explain the benefits of DSC

  4. A Retrospective Audit of In-Hospital 30-day Mortality from Acute Myocardial Infarction in Connolly Hospital Blanchardstown

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hensey, M

    2017-09-01

    In 2015, The Department of Health published the first annual report of the “National Healthcare Quality Reporting System.” Connolly Hospital was reported to a mortality rate within 30 days post-Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) of 9.87 per 100 cases which was statistically significantly higher than the national rate. We carried out a retrospective audit of patients who were HIPE-coded as having died within 30 days of AMI from 2011-2013 and identified 42 patients. On review, only 23 patients (54.8%) were confirmed as having had an AMI. We identified 12 patients who had AMI included on death certificate without any evidence for same. If the 22 patients incorrectly coded were excluded, the mortality rate within 30 days post-AMI in CHB would fall to 4.14 deaths per 100 cases, well below the national average. Inaccuracies of data collection can lead to erroneous conclusions when examining healthcare data.

  5. [Hospital morbidity and mortality of acute opiate intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larpin, R; Vincent, A; Perret, C

    1990-09-22

    The records of 188 consecutive patients admitted for acute opiate intoxication were analyzed retrospectively to evaluate the morbidity and mortality of opiates. The most frequently used of these drugs were heroin (127 cases) and methadone (41 cases). In 79 cases the opiate was associated with another psychodepressant, usually benzodiazepines, alcohol or barbiturates. Forty-seven percent of the patients were admitted in deep coma, with respiratory arrest in almost every case. The complications observed in 49 patients were: aspiration of gastric contents (n = 24), rhabdomyolysis (n = 22), often associated with myocarditis (n = 13), pulmonary edema (n = 16), convulsions (n = 10), left ventricular dysfunction (n = 5) and lesions of the peripheral nervous system (n = 4). All patients survived, except one who died of cardiac arrest before admission. It is concluded that acute opiate intoxication treated in hospital has an excellent prognosis for life provided no cardiac arrest occurs prior to admission. One quarter of the patients require prolonged stay in an intensive care unit because of complications. The other patients, even when deeply comatose on admission, spend less than 1 day in hospital owing to the specific antagonist available.

  6. Hospitals with higher nurse staffing had lower odds of readmissions penalties than hospitals with lower staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Matthew D; Berez, Julie; Small, Dylan S

    2013-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act's Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) penalizes hospitals based on excess readmission rates among Medicare beneficiaries. The aim of the program is to reduce readmissions while aligning hospitals' financial incentives with payers' and patients' quality goals. Many evidence-based interventions that reduce readmissions, such as discharge preparation, care coordination, and patient education, are grounded in the fundamentals of basic nursing care. Yet inadequate staffing can hinder nurses' efforts to carry out these processes of care. We estimated the effect that nurse staffing had on the likelihood that a hospital was penalized under the HRRP. Hospitals with higher nurse staffing had 25 percent lower odds of being penalized compared to otherwise similar hospitals with lower staffing. Investment in nursing is a potential system-level intervention to reduce readmissions that policy makers and hospital administrators should consider in the new regulatory environment as they examine the quality of care delivered to US hospital patients.

  7. Mortality Analysis of Trauma Patients in General Intensive Care Unit of a State Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İskender Kara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate and factors affecting the mortality of trauma patients in general intensive care unit (ICU of a state hospital. Material and Method: Data of trauma patients hospitalized between January 2012 and March 2013 in ICU of Konya Numune Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic characteristics and clinical data of patients were recorded. Patients were divided into two groups as survivors and dead. Mortality rate and factors affectin mortality were examined. Results: A total of 108 trauma patients were included in the study. The mortality rate of overall group was 19.4%. Median age of the patients was 44.5 years and 75.9% of them were males. Median Glasgow Coma Scale of death group was lower (5 (3-8 vs. 15 (13-15, p<0.0001, median APACHE II score was higher (20 (15-26 vs. 10 (8-13, p<0.0001 and median duration of ICU stay was longer (27 (5-62,5 vs. 2 (1-5, p<0.0001 than those in the survival group. The most common etiology of trauma was traffic accidents (47.2% and 52.7% of patients had head trauma. The rate of patients with any fracture was significantly higher in the survival group (66.7% vs. 33.3%, p=0.007. The rate of erythrocyte suspension, fresh frozen plasma, trombocyte suspension and albumin were 38.9%, 27.8%, 0.9% and 8.3%, respectively in all group. The number of patients invasive mechanically ventilated was 27.8% and median length of stay of these patients were 5 (1.75-33.5 days. The rate of operated patients was 42.6%. The rate of tracheostomy, renal replacement therapy, bronchoscopy and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy enforcements were higher in the death group. The advanced age (p=0.016, OR: 1.054; 95% CI: 1.010-1100 and low GCS (p<0.0001, OR: 0.583; 95% CI: 0.456-0.745 were found to be independent risk factors the ICU mortality of trauma patients in logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: We believe that the determination of these risk factors affecting

  8. Patterns of malaria-related hospital admissions and mortality among Malawian children: an example of spatial modelling of hospital register data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinschmidt Immo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a leading cause of hospitalization and in-hospital mortality among children in Africa, yet, few studies have described the spatial distribution of the two outcomes. Here spatial regression models were applied, aimed at quantifying spatial variation and risk factors associated with malaria hospitalization and in-hospital mortality. Methods Paediatric ward register data from Zomba district, Malawi, between 2002 and 2003 were used, as a case study. Two spatial models were developed. The first was a Poisson model applied to analyse hospitalization and minimum mortality rates, with age and sex as covariates. The second was a logistic model applied to individual level data to analyse case-fatality rate, adjusting for individual covariates. Results and conclusion Rates of malaria hospitalization and in-hospital mortality decreased with age. Case fatality rate was associated with distance, age, wet season and increased if the patient was referred to the hospital. Furthermore, death rate was high on first day, followed by relatively low rate as length of hospital stay increased. Both outcomes showed substantial spatial heterogeneity, which may be attributed to the varying determinants of malaria risk, health services availability and accessibility, and health seeking behaviour. The increased risk of mortality of children referred from primary health facilities may imply inadequate care being available at the referring facility, or the referring facility are referring the more severe cases which are expected to have a higher case fatality rate. Improved prognosis as the length of hospital stay increased suggest that appropriate care when available can save lives. Reducing malaria burden may require integrated strategies encompassing availability of adequate care at primary facilities, introducing home or community case management as well as encouraging early referral, and reinforcing interventions to interrupt malaria

  9. Patterns of injury, outcomes, and predictors of in-hospital and 1-year mortality in nonagenarian and centenarian trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwabejire, John O; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Lee, Jarone; Yeh, Daniel D; Fagenholz, Peter; King, David R; de Moya, Marc A; Velmahos, George C

    2014-10-01

    higher and to 78.7% if mechanical ventilation was required. Most NCTPs required rehabilitation; only 8.9% were discharged to home. Despite low in-hospital mortality, the cumulative mortality rate among NCTPs at 1 year after discharge is significant, particularly in the presence of head injury, spine injury, mechanical ventilation, high injury severity, or prolonged length of hospital stay. These considerations can help guide clinical decisions and family discussions.

  10. Early interdisciplinary hospital intervention for elderly patients with hip fractures : functional outcome and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Tarazona-Santabalbina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hip fractures are associated with high levels of co-morbidity and mortality. Orthogeriatric units have been shown to be effective with respect to functional recovery and mortality reduction. The aim of this study is to document the natural history of early multidisciplinary intervention in elderly patients with hip fractures and to establish the prognostic factors of mortality and walking ability after discharge. METHODS: This observational, retrospective study was performed in an orthogeriatric care unit on patients aged >70 years with a diagnosis of hip fracture between 2004 and 2008. This study included 1363 patients with a mean age of 82.7 + 6.4 years. RESULTS: On admission to the unit, the average Barthel score of these patients was 77.2 + 27.8 points, and the average Charlson index score was 2.14 + 2.05. The mean length of stay was 8.9 + 4.26 days, and the readmission rate was 2.3%. The in-hospital mortality rate was 4.7%, and the mortality rates at one, six, and 12 months after discharge were 8.7%, 16.9%, and 25.9%, respectively. The Cox proportional hazards model estimated that male sex, Barthel scale, heart failure, and cognitive impairment were associated with an increased risk of death. With regard to functionality, 63.7% of the patients were able to walk at the time of discharge, whereas 77.4% and 80.1% were able to walk at one month and six months post-discharge, respectively. The factors associated with a worse functional recovery included cognitive impairment, performance status, age, stroke, Charlson score, and delirium during the hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Early multidisciplinary intervention appears to be effective for the management of hip fracture. Age, male sex, baseline function, cognitive impairment and previous comorbidities are associated with a higher mortality rate and worse functional recovery.

  11. "Folk" Understandings of Quality in UK Higher Hospitality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the evolution of "folk" understandings of quality in higher hospitality education and the consequent implications of these understandings for current quality concerns in the field. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines a historical survey of the stated topic…

  12. Changes in the in-hospital mortality and 30-day post-discharge mortality in acutely admitted older patients: retrospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Marjon; Buurman, Bianca M.; MacNeil-Vroomen, Janet L.; Suijker, Jacqueline J.; ter Riet, Gerben; van Charante, Eric P. Moll; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2016-01-01

    to compare changes over time in the in-hospital mortality and the mortality from discharge to 30 days post-discharge for six highly prevalent discharge diagnoses in acutely admitted older patients as well as to assess the effect of separately analysing the in-hospital mortality and the mortality

  13. Impact of structural and economic factors on hospitalization costs, inpatient mortality, and treatment type of traumatic hip fractures in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Tarun; Moos, Rudolf M; Seifert, Burkhardt; Bopp, Matthias; Senn, Oliver; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Neuhaus, Valentin; Ciritsis, Bernhard

    2017-12-01

    The assessment of structural and potentially economic factors determining cost, treatment type, and inpatient mortality of traumatic hip fractures are important health policy issues. We showed that insurance status and treatment in university hospitals were significantly associated with treatment type (i.e., primary hip replacement), cost, and lower inpatient mortality respectively. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the structural level of hospital care and patient insurance type on treatment, hospitalization cost, and inpatient mortality in cases with traumatic hip fractures in Switzerland. The Swiss national medical statistic 2011-2012 was screened for adults with hip fracture as primary diagnosis. Gender, age, insurance type, year of discharge, hospital infrastructure level, length-of-stay, case weight, reason for discharge, and all coded diagnoses and procedures were extracted. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression with treatment by primary hip replacement as well as inpatient mortality as dependent variables were performed. We obtained 24,678 inpatient case records from the medical statistic. Hospitalization costs were calculated from a second dataset, the Swiss national cost statistic (7528 cases with hip fractures, discharged in 2012). Average inpatient costs per case were the highest for discharges from university hospitals (US$21,471, SD US$17,015) and the lowest in basic coverage hospitals (US$18,291, SD US$12,635). Controlling for other variables, higher costs for hip fracture treatment at university hospitals were significant in multivariate regression (p < 0.001). University hospitals had a lower inpatient mortality rate than full and basic care providers (2.8% vs. both 4.0%); results confirmed in our multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio (OR) 1.434, 95% CI 1.127-1.824 and OR 1.459, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.139-1.870 for full and basic coverage hospitals vs. university hospitals

  14. Performance of Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 In Predicting Hospital Mortality In Emergency Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Bian Ma

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The SAPS 3 score system exhibited satisfactory performance even superior to APACHE II in discrimination. In predicting hospital mortality, SAPS 3 did not exhibit good calibration and overestimated hospital mortality, which demonstrated that SAPS 3 needs improvement in the future.

  15. High Rates of All-cause and Gastroenteritis-related Hospitalization Morbidity and Mortality among HIV-exposed Indian Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Srikanth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected and HIV-exposed, uninfected infants experience a high burden of infectious morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization is an important metric for morbidity and is associated with high mortality, yet, little is known about rates and causes of hospitalization among these infants in the first 12 months of life. Methods Using data from a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT trial (India SWEN, where HIV-exposed breastfed infants were given extended nevirapine, we measured 12-month infant all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates and hospitalization risk factors. Results Among 737 HIV-exposed Indian infants, 93 (13% were HIV-infected, 15 (16% were on HAART, and 260 (35% were hospitalized 381 times by 12 months of life. Fifty-six percent of the hospitalizations were attributed to infections; gastroenteritis was most common accounting for 31% of infectious hospitalizations. Gastrointestinal-related hospitalizations steadily increased over time, peaking around 9 months. The 12-month all-cause hospitalization, gastroenteritis-related hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality rates were 906/1000 PY, 229/1000 PY, and 35/1000 PY respectively among HIV-infected infants and 497/1000 PY, 107/1000 PY, and 3/1000 PY respectively among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Advanced maternal age, infant HIV infection, gestational age, and male sex were associated with higher all-cause hospitalization risk while shorter duration of breastfeeding and abrupt weaning were associated with gastroenteritis-related hospitalization. Conclusions HIV-exposed Indian infants experience high rates of all-cause and infectious hospitalization (particularly gastroenteritis and in-hospital mortality. HIV-infected infants are nearly 2-fold more likely to experience hospitalization and 10-fold more likely to die compared to HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. The combination of scaling up HIV PMTCT programs and implementing proven health

  16. Seasonal variation and trends in stroke hospitalizations and mortality in a South American community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Alejandro; Gerschcovich, Eliana Roldan; Díaz, Adriana A; Antía, Fabiana; Gonorazky, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    Numerous studies have reported the presence of temporal variations in biological processes. Seasonal variation (SV) in stroke has been widely studied, but little data have been published on this phenomenon in the Southern Hemisphere, and there have been no studies reported from Argentina. The goals of the present study were to describe the SV of admissions and deaths for stroke and examine trends in stroke morbidity and mortality over a 3-year period in a community hospital in Argentina. Hospital discharge reports from the electronic database of vital statistics between 1999 and 2001 were examined retrospectively. Patients who had a main discharge diagnosis of stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) or cerebrovascular accident (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes 431, 432, 434, and 436) were selected. The study sample included 1382 hospitalizations by stroke (3.5% of all admissions). In-hospital mortality demonstrated a winter peak (25.5% vs 17% in summer; P = .001). The crude seasonal stroke attack rate (ischemic and hemorrhagic) was highest in winter (164 per 100,000 population; 95% CI, 159-169 per 100,000) and lowest in summer (124 per 100,000; 95% CI, 120-127 per 100,000; P = .008). Stroke admissions followed a seasonal pattern, with a winter-spring predominance (P = .008). Our data indicate a clear SV in stroke deaths and admissions in this region of Argentina. The existence of SV in stroke raises a different hypothesis about the rationale of HF admissions and provides information for the organization of care and resource allocation. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Maternal Mortality In Imo State University Teaching Hospital, Orlu: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A maternal death is a calamity particularly for the immediate family members. Maternal mortality ratio is high in most developing countries. Although many studies have been carried out on maternal mortality in many parts of Nigeria there is a dearth of information on maternal mortality ratio in Imo State.

  18. Surgical inpatient mortality in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-10

    Sep 10, 2015 ... Aim: The determination of the pattern of mortality in a surgical unit helps in ... Methods: This is a retrospective study of all patients who died during ... and cancer constitute a great deal of health burden in our region. ... 2011. 2012 mortality rate. Figure 1: Yearly mortality trends. 0. 10. 20 .... in the population.

  19. Early tracheostomy in severe traumatic brain injury: evidence for decreased mechanical ventilation and increased hospital mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, C Michael; Cutrona, Anthony F; Gruber, Brian S; Calderon, Javier E; Ransom, Kenneth J; Flowers, Laurie L

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the past, the authors performed a comprehensive literature review to identify all randomized controlled trials assessing the impact of early tracheostomy on severe brain injury outcomes. The search produced only two trials, one by Sugerman and another by Bouderka. Subjects and methods: The current authors initiated an Institutional Review Board-approved severe brain injury randomized trial to evaluate the impact of early tracheostomy on ventilator-associated pneumonia rates, intensive care unit (ICU)/ventilator days, and hospital mortality. Current study results were compared with the other randomized trials and a meta-analysis was performed. Results: Early tracheostomy pneumonia rates were Sugerman-48.6%, Bouderka-58.1%, and current study-46.7%. No early tracheostomy pneumonia rates were Sugerman-53.1%, Bouderka-61.3%, and current study-44.4%. Pneumonia rate meta-analysis showed no difference for early tracheostomy and no early tracheostomy (OR 0.89; p = 0.71). Early tracheostomy ICU/ventilator days were Sugerman-16 ± 5.9, Bouderka-14.5 ± 7.3, and current study-14.1 ± 5.7. No early tracheostomy ICU/ventilator days were Sugerman-19 ± 11.3, Bouderka-17.5 ± 10.6, and current study-17 ± 5.4. ICU/ventilator day meta-analysis showed 2.9 fewer days with early tracheostomy (p = 0.02). Early tracheostomy mortality rates were Sugerman-14.3%, Bouderka-38.7%, and current study-0%. No early tracheostomy mortality rates were Sugerman-3.2%, Bouderka-22.6%, and current study-0%. Randomized trial mortality rate meta-analysis showed a higher rate for early tracheostomy (OR 2.68; p = 0.05). Because the randomized trials were small, a literature assessment was undertaken to find all retrospective studies describing the association of early tracheostomy on severe brain injury hospital mortality. The review produced five retrospective studies, with a total of 3,356 patients. Retrospective study mortality rate meta-analysis demonstrated a larger mortality for early

  20. Size matters: a meta-analysis on the impact of hospital size on patient mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Naleef

    2012-06-01

    This paper seeks to understand the relationship between hospital size and patient mortality. Patient mortality has been used by several studies in the health services research field as a proxy for measuring healthcare quality. A systematic review is conducted to identify studies that investigate the impact of hospital size on patient mortality. Using the findings of 21 effect sizes from 10 eligible studies, a meta-analysis is performed using a random effects model. Subgroup analyses using three factors--the measure used for hospital size, type of mortality measure used and whether mortality was adjusted or unadjusted--were utilised to investigate their moderating influence on the study's primary relationship. Results from this analysis indicate that big hospitals have lower odds of patient mortality versus small hospitals. Specifically, the probability of patient mortality in a big hospital, in reference to a small hospital, is 11% less. Subgroup analyses show that studies with unadjusted mortality rates have an even lower overall odds ratio of mortality versus studies with adjusted mortality rates. Aside from some limitations in data reporting, the findings of this paper support theoretical notions that big hospitals have lower mortality rates than small hospitals. Guidelines for better data reporting and future research are provided to further explore the phenomenon. Policy implications of this paper's findings are underscored and a sense of urgency is called for in an effort to help improve the state of a healthcare system that struggles with advancing healthcare quality. © 2012 The Author. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2012 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  1. Factors related to mortality after osteoporotic hip fracture treatment at Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand, during 2006 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaysri, Rathasart; Leerapun, Taninnit; Klunklin, Kasisin; Chiewchantanakit, Siripong; Luevitoonvechkij, Sirichai; Rojanasthien, Sattaya

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the one-year mortality rate after osteoporotic hip fracture and to identify factors associated with that mortality rate. A retrospective review of 275 osteoporotic patients who sustained a low-trauma hip fracture and were admitted in Chiang Mai University Hospital during January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2007 was accomplished. Eligibility criteria were defined as age over 50 years, fracture caused by a simple fall and not apathologicalfracture caused by cancer or infection. Results of this one-year mortality rate study were compared to studies of hip fracture patient mortality in 1997 and the period 1998-2003. The average one-year mortality rate in 2006-2007 was 21.1%. Factors correlated with higher mortality were non-operative treatment, delayed surgical treatment, and absence of medical treatment for osteoporosis. The 2006-2007 mortality rate was slightly higher than for the 1997 and 1998-2003 periods. The one-year mortality rate after osteoporotic hip fracture of 21.1% was approximately 9.3 times the mortality rate for the same age group in the general population, indicating that treatment of osteoporosis as a means of helping prevent hip fracture is very important for the individual, the family, and society as a whole.

  2. Assessment of hospital performance with a case-mix standardized mortality model using an existing administrative database in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Matsuda, Shinya

    2010-05-19

    Few studies have examined whether risk adjustment is evenly applicable to hospitals with various characteristics and case-mix. In this study, we applied a generic prediction model to nationwide discharge data from hospitals with various characteristics. We used standardized data of 1,878,767 discharged patients provided by 469 hospitals from July 1 to October 31, 2006. We generated and validated a case-mix in-hospital mortality prediction model using 50/50 split sample validation. We classified hospitals into two groups based on c-index value (hospitals with c-index > or = 0.8; hospitals with c-index /=0.8 and were classified as the higher c-index group. A significantly higher proportion of hospitals in the lower c-index group were specialized hospitals and hospitals with convalescent wards. The model fits well to a group of hospitals with a wide variety of acute care events, though model fit is less satisfactory for specialized hospitals and those with convalescent wards. Further sophistication of the generic prediction model would be recommended to obtain optimal indices to region specific conditions.

  3. Testosterone Deficiency Increases Hospital Readmission and Mortality Rates in Male Patients with Heart Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues dos; Sayegh, Ana Luiza Carrari; Groehs, Raphaela Vilar Ramalho; Fonseca, Guilherme; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Barretto, Antônio Carlos Pereira; Arap, Marco Antônio; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Middlekauff, Holly R.; Alves, Maria-Janieire de Nazaré Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with decreased exercise capacity and mortality; however, its impact on hospital readmission rate is uncertain. Furthermore, the relationship between testosterone deficiency and sympathetic activation is unknown. We investigated the role of testosterone level on hospital readmission and mortality rates as well as sympathetic nerve activity in patients with HF. Total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were measured in 110 hospitalized male patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 45% and New York Heart Association classification IV. The patients were placed into low testosterone (LT; n = 66) and normal testosterone (NT; n = 44) groups. Hypogonadism was defined as TT < 300 ng/dL and FT < 131 pmol/L. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded by microneurography in a subpopulation of 27 patients. Length of hospital stay was longer in the LT group compared to in the NT group (37 ± 4 vs. 25 ± 4 days; p = 0.008). Similarly, the cumulative hazard of readmission within 1 year was greater in the LT group compared to in the NT group (44% vs. 22%, p = 0.001). In the single-predictor analysis, TT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58–4.85; p = 0.02) predicted hospital readmission within 90 days. In addition, TT (HR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.67–8.10; p = 0.009) and readmission within 90 days (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.23–8.69; p = 0.02) predicted increased mortality. Neurohumoral activation, as estimated by MSNA, was significantly higher in the LT group compared to in the NT group (65 ± 3 vs. 51 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats; p < 0.001). These results support the concept that LT is an independent risk factor for hospital readmission within 90 days and increased mortality in patients with HF. Furthermore, increased MSNA was observed in patients with LT

  4. Testosterone Deficiency Increases Hospital Readmission and Mortality Rates in Male Patients with Heart Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues dos; Sayegh, Ana Luiza Carrari; Groehs, Raphaela Vilar Ramalho; Fonseca, Guilherme [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Trombetta, Ivani Credidio [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE) (Brazil); Barretto, Antônio Carlos Pereira [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Arap, Marco Antônio [Faculdade de medicina da Universidade de São Paulo - Urologia (Brazil); Negrão, Carlos Eduardo [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Escola de Educação Física e Esporte da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Middlekauff, Holly R. [Division of Cardiology - David Geffen School of Medicine - University of California (United States); Alves, Maria-Janieire de Nazaré Nunes, E-mail: janieire.alves@incor.usp.br [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Testosterone deficiency in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with decreased exercise capacity and mortality; however, its impact on hospital readmission rate is uncertain. Furthermore, the relationship between testosterone deficiency and sympathetic activation is unknown. We investigated the role of testosterone level on hospital readmission and mortality rates as well as sympathetic nerve activity in patients with HF. Total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were measured in 110 hospitalized male patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 45% and New York Heart Association classification IV. The patients were placed into low testosterone (LT; n = 66) and normal testosterone (NT; n = 44) groups. Hypogonadism was defined as TT < 300 ng/dL and FT < 131 pmol/L. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded by microneurography in a subpopulation of 27 patients. Length of hospital stay was longer in the LT group compared to in the NT group (37 ± 4 vs. 25 ± 4 days; p = 0.008). Similarly, the cumulative hazard of readmission within 1 year was greater in the LT group compared to in the NT group (44% vs. 22%, p = 0.001). In the single-predictor analysis, TT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58–4.85; p = 0.02) predicted hospital readmission within 90 days. In addition, TT (HR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.67–8.10; p = 0.009) and readmission within 90 days (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.23–8.69; p = 0.02) predicted increased mortality. Neurohumoral activation, as estimated by MSNA, was significantly higher in the LT group compared to in the NT group (65 ± 3 vs. 51 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats; p < 0.001). These results support the concept that LT is an independent risk factor for hospital readmission within 90 days and increased mortality in patients with HF. Furthermore, increased MSNA was observed in patients with LT.

  5. Testosterone Deficiency Increases Hospital Readmission and Mortality Rates in Male Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testosterone deficiency in patients with heart failure (HF is associated with decreased exercise capacity and mortality; however, its impact on hospital readmission rate is uncertain. Furthermore, the relationship between testosterone deficiency and sympathetic activation is unknown. Objective: We investigated the role of testosterone level on hospital readmission and mortality rates as well as sympathetic nerve activity in patients with HF. Methods: Total testosterone (TT and free testosterone (FT were measured in 110 hospitalized male patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 45% and New York Heart Association classification IV. The patients were placed into low testosterone (LT; n = 66 and normal testosterone (NT; n = 44 groups. Hypogonadism was defined as TT < 300 ng/dL and FT < 131 pmol/L. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA was recorded by microneurography in a subpopulation of 27 patients. Results: Length of hospital stay was longer in the LT group compared to in the NT group (37 ± 4 vs. 25 ± 4 days; p = 0.008. Similarly, the cumulative hazard of readmission within 1 year was greater in the LT group compared to in the NT group (44% vs. 22%, p = 0.001. In the single-predictor analysis, TT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58–4.85; p = 0.02 predicted hospital readmission within 90 days. In addition, TT (HR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.67–8.10; p = 0.009 and readmission within 90 days (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.23–8.69; p = 0.02 predicted increased mortality. Neurohumoral activation, as estimated by MSNA, was significantly higher in the LT group compared to in the NT group (65 ± 3 vs. 51 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats; p < 0.001. Conclusion: These results support the concept that LT is an independent risk factor for hospital readmission within 90 days and increased mortality in patients with HF. Furthermore, increased MSNA was observed in patients with LT.

  6. Morbidity and mortality pattern of hospitalized children with measles at mayo hospital, lahore (epidemic 2013)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, T.; Bibi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Major outbreak of measles took place in Punjab recently (2013), leading on to increase in hospitalized cases of measles in children wards, with unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to find out morbidity and mortality pattern of hospitalized cases of measles and associated factors. Design: Prospective case series conducted at Pediatric Department Mayo Hospital, Lahore for 7 months, i.e. from 1st Jan to 31st Jul 2013 Methods:A total of 628 cases of measles were admitted in the children ward, Unit II, Mayo Hospital, Lahore from Jan-Jul 2013. The diagnosis was assigned using WHO criteria. Cases were admitted through emergency on 24 hour basis and managed in HDU and Measles isolation section. Chest X-Ray and blood complete examination was done in all cases. Complications were noted and managed along with eye consultations where necessary. Data was recorded in a predesigned proforma and entered in computer. Results: 628 admitted cases were enrolled, with comparable sex distribution, having mean age 30.8+-26.25 months and mean weight 9.69+-4.14 Kg. Eighty three percent cases were below 6 years of age (33% <1 year), 71% cases were under weight and 68% were wasted (WHO classification). Sixty six percent cases had not received measles vaccination, 144 (23%) cases had received a single dose and 71 cases (12.2%) had received two doses before admission. Majority of cases belonged to Lahore city and its peri-urban areas (83%). Pneumonia (80%), diarrhea (37%), and encephalitis (7.7%) were common complications. Eye complications (corneal ulcers, keratitis, perforation and blindness) were seen in 7.3% cases. Being under weight, H/O improper measles immunization, presence of anemia, pneumonia and encephalitis were statistically significant risk factors for mortality. The case fatality rate was 8.76%. Conclusion:Recent Measles outbreak further highlights the importance of strengthening the need for routine and mass vaccination for all children. In a

  7. Scholarly Activities in Hospitality and Tourism Higher Education among Private Higher Institutions in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the notion of scholarship and develop research and scholarship strategies among Private Higher Institutions delivering Tourism and Hospitality degree programs in Australia. In doing so, this paper confronts the traditional view of research publications as the only form of scholarship by traditional…

  8. Trends in hospital discharges, management and in-hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction in Switzerland between 1998 and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the late nineties, no study has assessed the trends in management and in-hospital outcome of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Switzerland. Our objective was to fill this gap. Methods Swiss hospital discharge database for years 1998 to 2008. AMI was defined as a primary discharge diagnosis code I21 according to the ICD10 classification. Invasive treatments and overall in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Overall, 102,729 hospital discharges with a diagnosis of AMI were analyzed. The percentage of hospitalizations with a stay in an Intensive Care Unit decreased from 38.0% in 1998 to 36.2% in 2008 (p for trend Switzerland, a steep rise in hospital discharges and in revascularization procedures for AMI occurred between 1998 and 2008. The increase in revascularization procedures could explain the decrease in in-hospital mortality rates. PMID:23530470

  9. In-hospital mortality, 30-day readmission, and length of hospital stay after surgery for primary colorectal cancer: A national population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciarelli, S; Zorzi, M; Gennaro, N; Gagliardi, G; Restivo, A; Saugo, M; Barina, A; Rugge, M; Zuin, M; Maretto, I; Nitti, D

    2017-07-01

    The simultaneous assessment of multiple indicators for quality of care is essential for comparisons of performance between hospitals and health care systems. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of in-hospital mortality and 30-day readmission and length of hospital stay (LOS) in patients who underwent surgical procedures for colorectal cancer between 2005 and 2014 in Italy. All patients in the National Italian Hospital Discharge Dataset who underwent a surgical procedure for colorectal cancer during the study period were included. The adjusted odd ratios for risk factors for in-hospital mortality, 30-day readmission, and LOS were calculated using multilevel multivariable logistic regression. Among the 353 941 patients, rates of in-hospital mortality and 30-day readmission were 2.5% and 6%, respectively, and the median LOS was 13 days. High comorbidity, emergent/urgent admission, male gender, creation of a stoma, and an open approach increased the risks of all the outcomes at multivariable analysis. Age, hospital volume, hospital geographic location, and discharge to home/non-home produced different effects depending on the outcome considered. The most frequent causes of readmission were infection (19%) and bowel obstruction (14.6%). We assessed national averages for mortality, LOS and readmission and related trends over a 10-year time. Laparoscopic surgery was the only one that could be modified by improving surgical education. Higher hospital volume was associated with a LOS reduction, but our findings only partially support a policy of centralization for colorectal cancer procedures. Surgical site infection was identified as the most preventable cause of readmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  10. National Trends in Patients Hospitalized for Stroke and Stroke Mortality in France, 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoffre, Camille; de Peretti, Christine; Gabet, Amélie; Grimaud, Olivier; Woimant, France; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick; Olié, Valérie

    2017-11-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of death in women and the third leading cause in men in France. In young adults (ie, stroke was observed at a local scale between 1985 and 2011. After the implementation of the 2010 to 2014 National Stroke Action Plan, this study investigates national trends in patients hospitalized by stroke subtypes, in-hospital mortality, and stroke mortality between 2008 and 2014. Hospitalization data were extracted from the French national hospital discharge databases and mortality data from the French national medical causes of death database. Time trends were tested using a Poisson regression model. From 2008 to 2014, the age-standardized rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke increased by 14.3% in patients hemorrhagic stroke was stable (+2.0%), irrespective of age and sex. The proportion of patients hospitalized in stroke units substantially increased. In-hospital mortality decreased by 17.1% in patients with ischemic stroke. From 2008 to 2013, stroke mortality decreased, except for women between 45 and 64 years old and for people aged ≥85 years. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors and improved stroke management may explain the increase in the rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke. The decrease observed for in-hospital stroke mortality may be because of recent improvements in acute-phase management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. ANALYSIS OF PREVALENCE, HOSPITALIZATION RATE AND MORTALITY LEVELS RELATED TO GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN THE MOSCOW REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Gurov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: According to prognosis made by World Health Organization experts, by mid-21st century gastrointestinal disorders will be among the leaders, partially due to lifestyle of a modern man (stress, unhealthy diet, lack of physical exercise, unhealthy habits, environmental pollution, genetically modified and low quality foods.Aim: To provide informational support of activities aimed at improvement of organization of medical care to patients with gastrointestinal disorders and at further development of specialized gastroenterological care to the population of the Moscow Region, its better availability and higher efficacy and quality.Materials and methods: We calculated and analyzed gastrointestinal morbidity in 2014 (according to referrals among the main age categories (children, adolescents, adults of the population of the Moscow Region, as well as hospitalization rates and in-hospital mortality. The information was taken from the Federal Statistical Surveillance report forms # 12 and # 14.Results: In 2014, the highest prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders was registered in adolescents, being by 42.7% higher than that in adults and by 11.7% higher than that in children. The leading causes of referrals in all age categories were gastritis and duodenitis, as well as gall bladder and bile tract disorders. The structure of morbidity was characterized by a high proportion of pancreatic disorders, stomach and duodenal ulcers in adults. The rate of hospitalizations due to gastrointestinal disorders was 17.8 cases per 1000 patients, being 17.4‰ in adults and 19.8‰ in children and adolescents. The main reasons for hospitalization in adults were diseases of pancreas (23.9% of all hospitalization due to gastrointestinal disorders, gall bladder and bile tract disorders (16.3%. In children and adolescents, the main reasons for hospitalizations were intestinal disorders (36.4%, gastritis and duodenitis (17.9%. In-hospital mortality from

  12. Long-term mortality and causes of death among hospitalized Swedish drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugelstad, Anna; Annell, Anders; Ågren, Gunnar

    2014-06-01

    To study long-term mortality and causes of death in a cohort of drug users in relation to main type of drug use and HIV-status. A total of 1640 hospitalized drug users in Stockholm was followed up from 1985 to the end of 2007. The mortality was compared with the general Swedish population and hazard ratios (HR) for the main risk indicators were calculated. The causes of death were studied, using information from death certificates. 630 persons died during the observation period. The Standard Mortality Ratio (SMR) was 16.1 (males 13.8, females 18.5). The crude mortality rate was 2.0 % (males 2.2% and females 1.5%). The mortality rate was higher in heroin users than among amphetamine users, HR 1.96, controlled for age and other risk factors. The mortality rate among individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was high (4.9 %), HR 2.64, compared with HIV-negative individuals. Most of the deaths were from other causes than acquired immune deficiency syndrome. One-third of deaths (227) were caused by heroin intoxication. The number of deaths from HIV-related causes decreased after 1996, when highly active anti-retroviral therapy was introduced. In all, there were 92 HIV-related deaths. Deaths from natural causes increased during the observation period. The SMR was highest for cardiovascular and gastrointestinal diseases. The results indicate a correlation between amphetamine use and death from cerebral haemorrhage. A high proportion of natural deaths were alcohol-related. The death rate among illicit drug users was persistently high. Alcohol consumption was a contributing factor to premature death. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  13. A Risk Prediction Model for In-hospital Mortality in Patients with Suspected Myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duo; Zhao, Ruo-Chi; Gao, Wen-Hui; Cui, Han-Bin

    2017-04-05

    Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium that may lead to cardiac death in some patients. However, little is known about the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis by establishing a risk prediction model. A retrospective study was performed to analyze the clinical medical records of 403 consecutive patients with suspected myocarditis who were admitted to Ningbo First Hospital between January 2003 and December 2013. A total of 238 males (59%) and 165 females (41%) were enrolled in this study. We divided the above patients into two subgroups (survival and nonsurvival), according to their clinical in-hospital outcomes. To maximize the effectiveness of the prediction model, we first identified the potential risk factors for in-hospital mortality among patients with suspected myocarditis, based on data pertaining to previously established risk factors and basic patient characteristics. We subsequently established a regression model for predicting in-hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Finally, we identified the independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality using our risk prediction model. The following prediction model for in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis, including creatinine clearance rate (Ccr), age, ventricular tachycardia (VT), New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification, gender and cardiac troponin T (cTnT), was established in the study: P = ea/(1 + ea) (where e is the exponential function, P is the probability of in-hospital death, and a = -7.34 + 2.99 × [Ccr model demonstrated that a Ccr prediction model for in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis. In addition, sufficient life support during the early stage of the disease might improve the prognoses of patients with

  14. Influence of Obesity Diagnosis With Organ Dysfunction, Mortality, and Resource Use Among Children Hospitalized With Infection in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Nidhi; Gebremariam, Achamyeleh; Odetola, Folafoluwa; Singer, Kanakadurga

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis induces inflammation in response to infection and is a major cause of mortality and hospitalization in children. Obesity induces chronic inflammation leading to many clinical manifestations. Our understanding of the impact of obesity on diseases, such as infection and sepsis, is limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of obesity with organ dysfunction, mortality, duration, and charges during among US children hospitalized with infection. Retrospective study of hospitalizations in children with infection aged 0 to 20 years, using the 2009 Kids' Inpatient Database. Of 3.4 million hospitalizations, 357 701 were for infection, 5685 of which were reported as obese children. Obese patients had higher rates of organ dysfunction (7.35% vs 5.5%, P obesity status (odds ratio: 0.56, 95% confidence interval: 0.23-1.34), however severity of illness modified the association between obesity status and the other outcomes. While there was no difference in in-hospital mortality by obesity diagnosis, variation in organ dysfunction, hospital stay, and hospital charges according to obesity status was mediated by illness severity. Findings from this study have significant implications for targeted approaches to mitigate the burden of obesity on infection and sepsis.

  15. Macroecology of parental care in arthropods: higher mortality risk leads to higher benefits of offspring protection in tropical climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eduardo S A; Bueno, Pedro P; Gilbert, James D J; Machado, Glauco

    2017-08-01

    The intensity of biotic interactions varies around the world, in such a way that mortality risk imposed by natural enemies is usually higher in the tropics. A major role of offspring attendance is protection against natural enemies, so the benefits of this behaviour should be higher in tropical regions. We tested this macroecological prediction with a meta-regression of field experiments in which the mortality of guarded and unguarded broods was compared in arthropods. Mortality of unguarded broods was higher, and parental care was more beneficial, in warmer, less seasonal environments. Moreover, in these same environments, additional lines of defence further reduced offspring mortality, implying that offspring attendance alone is not enough to deter natural enemies in tropical regions. These results help to explain the high frequency of parental care among tropical species and how biotic interactions influence the occurrence of parental care over large geographic scales. Finally, our findings reveal that additional lines of defences - an oftentimes neglected component of parental care - have an important effect on the covariation between the benefits of parental care and the climate-mediated mortality risk imposed by natural enemies. © 2016 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  16. Is excess mortality higher in depressed men than in depressed women? A meta-analytic comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Vogelzangs, N.; Twisk, J.; Kleiboer, A.M.; Li, J.; Penninx, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is not well-established whether excess mortality associated with depression is higher in men than in women. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies in which depression was measured at baseline, where mortality rates were reported at follow-up, and in which separate

  17. Early Hospital Readmission is a Predictor of One-Year Mortality in Community-Dwelling Older Medicare Beneficiaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lum, H.D.; Studenski, S.A.; Degenholtz, H.B.; Hardy, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital readmission within thirty days is common among Medicare beneficiaries, but the relationship between rehospitalization and subsequent mortality in older adults is not known. OBJECTIVE: To compare one-year mortality rates among community-dwelling elderly hospitalized Medicare

  18. Investigating Maternal Mortality in a Public Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Maternal mortality in sub.Saharan Africa has remained high and this is a reflection of the poor quality of maternal services. Aim: To determine the causes, trends, and level of maternal mortality rate in Abakaliki, Ebonyi. Materials and Methods: This was a review of the records of all maternal deaths related to ...

  19. Incidence and hospital mortality of vascular surgery patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Perioperative myocardial infarction (PMI) and prognostically relevant myocardial injury following non-cardiac surgery (MINS) increases perioperative mortality. Studies in vascular patients show an increased incidence and mortality from PMI. However, there remains limited data on the relative prognostic ...

  20. Changes in the in-hospital mortality and 30-day post-discharge mortality in acutely admitted older patients : retrospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Marjon; Buurman, Bianca M.; Vroomen, Janet L. Macneil; Suijker, Jacqueline J.; ter Riet, Gerben; van Charante, Eric P. Moll; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    Objectives: to compare changes over time in the in-hospital mortality and the mortality from discharge to 30 days postdischarge for six highly prevalent discharge diagnoses in acutely admitted older patients as well as to assess the effect of separately analysing the in-hospital mortality and the

  1. Mortality after hospitalization for pneumonia among individuals with HIV, 1995-2008: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, O.S.; Lohse, N.; Gerstoft, J.

    2009-01-01

    -based cohort of individuals with HIV, we included persons hospitalized with pneumonia from the Danish National Hospital Registry and obtained mortality data from the Danish Civil Registration System. Comparing individuals with and without pneumonia, we used Poisson regression to estimate relative mortality....... The following variables predicted mortality within 90 days following hospitalization for pneumonia (adjusted Odds Ratios): male sex (3.77, 95% CI: 1.37-10.4), Charlson Comorbidity Index score > or = 2 (3.86, 95% CI: 2.19-6.78); no current HAART (3.58, 95% CI: 1.83-6.99); history of AIDS (2.46, 95% CI: 1...

  2. Colorectal Surgery Fellowship Improves In-hospital Mortality After Colectomy and Proctectomy Irrespective of Hospital and Surgeon Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraidaridis, Julia T; Hashimoto, Daniel A; Chang, David C; Bordeianou, Liliana G; Kunitake, Hiroko

    2018-03-01

    General surgery residents are increasingly pursuing sub-specialty training in colorectal (CR) surgery. However, the majority of operations performed by CR surgeons are also performed by general surgeons. This study aimed to assess in-hospital mortality stratified by CR training status after adjusting for surgeon and hospital volume. The Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative system database was used to identify all patients who underwent colectomy/proctectomy from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2014, in the state of New York. Operations performed by board-certified CR surgeons were identified. The relationships between CR board certification and in-hospital mortality, in-hospital complications, length of stay, and ostomy were assessed using multivariate regression models. Two hundred seventy thousand six hundred eighty-four patients underwent colectomy/proctectomy over the study period. Seventy-two thousand two hundred seventy-nine (26.7%) of operations were performed by CR surgeons. Without adjusting for hospital and surgeon volume, in-hospital mortality was lower for those undergoing colectomy/proctectomy by a CR surgeon (OR 0.49, CI 0.44-0.54, p = 0.001). After controlling for hospital and surgeon volume, the odds of inpatient mortality after colectomy/proctectomy for those operated on by CR surgeons weakened to 0.76 (CI 0.68-0.86, p = 0.001). Hospital and surgeon volume accounted for 53% of the reduction in in-hospital mortality when CR surgeons performed colectomy/proctectomy. Patients who underwent surgery by a CR surgeon had a shorter inpatient stay (0.8 days, p = 0.001) and a decreased chance of colostomy (OR 0.86, CI 0.78-0.95, p accounting for hospital and surgeon volume.

  3. Sex differences in hospital mortality following acute myocardial infarction in China: findings from a study of 45 852 patients in the COMMIT/CCS-2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiping; Jiang, Lixin; Smith, Margaret; Pan, Hongchao; Collins, Rory; Peto, Richard; Chen, Zhengming

    2011-01-01

    To assess the sex difference in hospital mortality following ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in China. Observational study of patients enrolled into a large trial, adjusting for age, presenting characteristics and hospital treatments using logistic regression. 1250 hospitals in China during 1999-2005. 42 683 STEMI patients, including 31 309 men and 11 374 women. In the original trial, all patients received 162 mg of aspirin plus 75 mg of clopidogrel daily or matching placebo and metoprolol (15 mg intravenous then 200 mg oral daily) or matching placebo. All other aspects of patients' treatments were at the discretion of responsible doctors. Hospital mortality from any cause during the scheduled trial treatment period (ie, up to 4 weeks in hospital). Overall, 8% of the patients died in hospital, with the crude hospital mortality being twice as high in women as in men (12.6% vs 6.3%). After adjusting for age, the sex difference in hospital mortality attenuated but remained highly significant (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1.43 to 1.66). Further adjustment for other baseline characteristics and for the treatments given in hospital had little effect on the sex difference in hospital mortality (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.62). The difference in hospital mortality was greater at a younger age, with the adjusted ORs being 2.14, 1.70, 1.48 and 1.18, respectively, for ages <55, 55-64, 65-74 and ≥75 years (p=0.0001 for trend). Compared with men of the same age, women had approximately a 50% higher mortality following hospital admission for STEMI, with a particularly higher excess risk at age <55 years.

  4. A new casemix adjustment index for hospital mortality among patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanczyk, C A; Rohde, L E; Philbin, E A; Di Salvo, T G

    1998-10-01

    Comparative analysis of hospital outcomes requires reliable adjustment for casemix. Although congestive heart failure is one of the most common indications for hospitalization, congestive heart failure casemix adjustment has not been widely studied. The purposes of this study were (1) to describe and validate a new congestive heart failure-specific casemix adjustment index to predict in-hospital mortality and (2) to compare its performance to the Charlson comorbidity index. Data from all 4,608 admissions to the Massachusetts General Hospital from January 1990 to July 1996 with a principal ICD-9-CM discharge diagnosis of congestive heart failure were evaluated. Massachusetts General Hospital patients were randomly divided in a derivation and a validation set. By logistic regression, odds ratios for in-hospital death were computed and weights were assigned to construct a new predictive index in the derivation set. The performance of the index was tested in an internal Massachusetts General Hospital validation set and in a non-Massachusetts General Hospital external validation set incorporating data from all 1995 New York state hospital discharges with a primary discharge diagnosis of congestive heart failure. Overall in-hospital mortality was 6.4%. Based on the new index, patients were assigned to six categories with incrementally increasing hospital mortality rates ranging from 0.5% to 31%. By logistic regression, "c" statistics of the congestive heart failure-specific index (0.83 and 0.78, derivation and validation set) were significantly superior to the Charlson index (0.66). Similar incrementally increasing hospital mortality rates were observed in the New York database with the congestive heart failure-specific index ("c" statistics 0.75). In an administrative database, this congestive heart failure-specific index may be a more adequate casemix adjustment tool to predict hospital mortality in patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure.

  5. Retrospective analysis of mortality and Candida isolates of 75 patients with candidemia: a single hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirano R

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ryuichi Hirano,1 Yuichi Sakamoto,2 Kumiko Kudo,1 Motoki Ohnishi31Department of Pharmacy, Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Aomori, Japan; 2Laboratory Medicine and Blood transfusion, Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Aomori, Japan; 3General Medicine, Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Aomori, JapanAbstract: The mortality rate for candidemia is approximately 30%–60%. However, prognostic factors in patients with candidemia have not yet been elucidated in detail. The aim of the present study was to analyze prognostic factors for candidemia using the mortality rate and Candida isolates of patients with candidemia. Seventy-five patients with candidemia were analyzed between January 2007 and December 2013. The main outcome of this study was the 30-day mortality rate after the diagnosis of candidemia. The acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II score was measured in 34 patients (45.3%. Odds ratios (ORs for death due to candidemia were analyzed using a multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis. Twenty (26.6% patients died within 30 days of being diagnosed with candidemia. Non-survivors had a significantly higher APACHE II score (n=7, mean; 18.9±4.5 than that of survivors (n=27, mean; 14.0±5.0. Advanced age (OR =1.1, 95% confidence interval =1.01–1.23, P=0.04 was a significant risk factor for a high mortality rate, whereas removal of a central venous catheter (OR =0.03, 95% confidence interval =0.002–0.3, P=0.01 was associated with a lower mortality rate. Seventy-six Candida spp. were isolated from blood cultures: Candida albicans 28 (36.8%, Candida parapsilosis 23 (30.2%, Candida guilliermondii 16 (21.0%, Candida glabrata four (5.2%, Candida tropicalis two (2.6%, and Candida spp. three (3.9% that could not be identified. C. parapsilosis was the most frequently isolated species in younger patients (<65 years, whereas C. albicans was the most frequently isolated in elderly patients (≥65 years

  6. Impact of Sarcopenia on One-Year Mortality among Older Hospitalized Patients with Impaired Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhassan, M; Norman, K; Müller, M J; Dziewas, R; Wirth, R

    2018-01-01

    However, the information regarding the impact of sarcopenia on mortality in older individuals is rising, there is a lack of knowledge concerning this issue among geriatric hospitalized patients. Therefore, aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between sarcopenia and 1-year mortality in a prospectively recruited sample of geriatric inpatients with different mobility and dependency status. Sarcopenia was diagnosed using the criteria of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP). Hand grip strength and skeletal muscle mass were measured using Jamar dynamometer and bioelectrical impedance analysis, respectively. Physical function was assessed with the Short Physical Performance Battery. Dependency status was defined by Barthel-Index (BI). Mobility limitation was defined according to walking ability as described in BI. The survival status was ascertained by telephone interview. The recruited population comprised 198 patients from a geriatric acute ward with a mean age of 82.8 ± 5.9 (70.2% females). 50 (25.3%) patients had sarcopenia, while 148 (74.7%) had no sarcopenia. 14 (28%) patients died among sarcopenic subjects compared with 28 (19%) non-sarcopenic subjects (P=0.229). After adjustment for potential confounders, sarcopenia was associated with increased mortality among patients with limited mobility prior to admission (n=138, hazard ratio, HR: 2.52, 95% CI: 1.17-5.44) and at time of discharge (n=162, HR: 1.93, 95% CI: 0.67-3.22). In a sub-group of patients with pre-admission BIsarcopenia and mortality across the different scores of BI during admission and at time of discharge. Sarcopenia is significantly associated with higher risk of mortality among sub-groups of older patients with limited mobility and impaired functional status, independently of age and other clinical variables.

  7. a review of maternal mortality at the kenyatta national hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... Main outcome measures: Determination of maternal mortality rates of all patients admitted to the ... complications of pregnancy and childbirth, majority of who come from ... Yearly distribution of maternal deaths. Year. Deaths.

  8. Demographic epidemiology of unstable pelvic fracture in the United States from 2000 to 2009: trends and in-hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Hiroyuki; Yoneoka, Daisuke

    2014-02-01

    Unstable pelvic fracture is predominantly caused by high-energy blunt trauma and is associated with a high risk of mortality. The epidemiology in the United States is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the epidemiology of unstable pelvic fracture based on patient and hospital demographics in the United States during the last decade. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify patients who were hospitalized with unstable pelvic fracture from 2000 to 2009, using the International Classification of Diseases--9th Rev.--Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. The primary outcome parameter consisted of analyzing the temporal trends of in-hospital admissions for unstable pelvic fracture and the associated in-hospital mortality. The data were stratified by demographic variables, including age, sex, race, and hospital region in the United States. From 2000 to 2009, there were 24,059 patients in total; among these, 1,823 (7.6%) had open fractures, and 22,236 (92.4%) had closed fractures. The population growth-adjusted incidence was stable over time (p = 0.431). The incidence was the lowest in the northeastern region. The in-hospital mortality rate in patients with unstable pelvic fracture was 8.3% (21.3% for open fracture, 7.2% for closed fracture) and remained stable over time (p = 0.089). The in-hospital mortality rate was higher in several subgroups of patients, such as older patients, male patients, African-American patients, and patients in the northeastern region. During the last decade, the incidence of unstable pelvic fracture has remained stable over time in the United States. The in-hospital mortality rate in patients with unstable pelvic fracture was 8.3% and remained stable over time. The rate in patients with an open fracture was approximately three times higher than that in patients with a closed fracture. The incidence was the lowest, but the in-hospital mortality rate was the highest in the northeastern region compared with the

  9. Lipid paradox in acute myocardial infarction-the association with 30-day in-hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai-Hung; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Kun-Tai; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2015-06-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are major risk factors for coronary artery disease. However, fatty acids from triglycerides are a major energy source, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is critical for cell membrane synthesis, and both are critical for cell survival. This study was designed to clarify the relationship between lipid profile, morbidity as assessed by Killip classification, and 30-day mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. A noninterventional observational study. Coronary care unit in a university hospital. Seven hundred twenty-four patients with acute myocardial infarction in the coronary care program of the Bureau of Health Promotion were analyzed. None. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly lower in high-Killip (III+IV) patients compared with low-Killip (I+II) patients and in those who died compared with those who survived beyond 30 days (both pvalues for predicting 30-day mortality and were associated with hazard ratios of 1.65 (95% CI, 1.18-2.30) and 5.05 (95% CI, 1.75-14.54), and the actual mortality rates were 23% in low low-density lipoprotein, 6% in high low-density lipoprotein, 14% in low triglycerides, and 3% in high triglycerides groups, respectively. To test the synergistic effect, high-Killip patients with triglycerides less than 62.5 mg/dL and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol less than 110 mg/dL had a 10.9-fold higher adjusted risk of mortality than low-Killip patients with triglycerides greater than or equal to 62.5 mg/dL and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol greater than or equal to 110 mg/dL (pparadox also improved acute myocardial infarction short-term outcomes prediction on original Killip and thrombolytic in myocardial infarction scores. Low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low triglycerides, and high Killip severity were associated with significantly higher 30-day in-hospital mortality in patients presenting with acute myocardial

  10. The Use of Pediatric Ventricular Assist Devices in Children's Hospitals From 2000 to 2010: Morbidity, Mortality, and Hospital Charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Robert T; Lin, Kimberly Y; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Mott, Antonio R; Mohamad, Zeinab; Luan, Xianqun; Kaufman, Beth D; Ravishankar, Chitra; Gaynor, J William; Shaddy, Robert E; Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-07-01

    The use of ventricular assist devices has increased dramatically in adult heart failure patients. However, the overall use, outcome, comorbidities, and resource utilization of ventricular assist devices in pediatric patients have not been well described. We sought to demonstrate that the use of ventricular assist devices in pediatric patients has increased over time and that mortality has decreased. A retrospective study of the Pediatric Health Information System database was performed for patients 20 years old or younger undergoing ventricular assist device placement from 2000 to 2010. None. Four hundred seventy-five pediatric patients were implanted with ventricular assist devices during the study period: 69 in 2000-2003 (era 1), 135 in 2004-2006 (era 2), and 271 in 2007-2010 (era 3). Median age at ventricular assist device implantation was 6.0 years (interquartile range, 0.5-13.8), and the proportion of children who were 1-12 years old increased from 29% in era 1 to 47% in era 3 (p = 0.002). The majority of patients had a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy; this increased from 52% in era 1 to 72% in era 3 (p = 0.003). Comorbidities included arrhythmias (48%), pulmonary hypertension (16%), acute renal failure (34%), cerebrovascular disease (28%), and sepsis/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (34%). Two hundred forty-seven patients (52%) underwent heart transplantation and 327 (69%) survived to hospital discharge. Hospital mortality decreased from 42% in era 1 to 25% in era 3 (p = 0.004). Median hospital length of stay increased (37 d [interquartile range, 12-64 d] in era 1 vs 69 d [interquartile range, 35-130] in era 3; p interquartile range, $227,052-$853,318] in era 1 vs $1,577,983 [interquartile range, $874,463-$2,280,435] in era 3; p < 0.001). Factors associated with increased mortality include age less than 1 year (odds ratio, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.01-3.83), acute renal failure (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.26-3.65), cerebrovascular disease (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% CI, 1

  11. Length of stay, hospitalization cost, and in-hospital mortality in US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ruopeng; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examined the length of stay, hospitalization cost, and risk of in-hospital mortality among US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). We analyzed nationally representative data obtained from Nationwide/National Inpatient Sample database of discharges from 2006 to 2012. In the US, there were an estimated 296,870 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 284,831-308,909) patient discharges recorded for ITP from 2006 to 2012, during which ITP-related hospitalizations had increased steadily by nearly 30%. The average length of stay for an ITP-related hospitalization was found to be 6.02 days (95% CI: 5.93-6.10), which is 28% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (4.70 days, 95% CI: 4.66-4.74). The average cost of ITP-related hospitalizations was found to be US$16,594 (95% CI: US$16,257-US$16,931), which is 48% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (US$11,200; 95% CI: US$11,033-US$11,368). Gender- and age-adjusted mortality risk in inpatients with ITP was 22% (95% CI: 19%-24%) higher than that of the overall US discharge population. Across diagnosis related groups, length of stay for ITP-related hospitalizations was longest for septicemia (7.97 days, 95% CI: 7.55-8.39) and splenectomy (7.40 days, 95% CI: 6.94-7.86). Splenectomy (US$25,262; 95% CI: US$24,044-US$26,481) and septicemia (US$18,430; 95% CI: US$17,353-US$19,507) were associated with the highest cost of hospitalization. The prevalence of mortality in ITP-related hospitalizations was highest for septicemia (11.11%, 95% CI: 9.60%-12.63%) and intracranial hemorrhage (9.71%, 95% CI: 7.65%-11.77%). Inpatients with ITP had longer hospital stay, bore higher costs, and faced greater risk of mortality than the overall US discharge population.

  12. Infant mortality in a very low birth weight cohort from a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Coeli Azeredo Cardoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate infant mortality in very low birth weight newborns from a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (2002-2006. METHODS: a retrospective cohort study was performed using the probabilistic linkage method to identify infant mortality. Mortality proportions were calculated according to birth weight intervals and period of death. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate overall cumulative survival probability. The association between maternal schooling and survival of very low birth weight infants was evaluated by means of Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for: prenatal care, birth weight, and gestational age. RESULTS: the study included 782 very low birth weight newborns. Of these, (28.6% died before one year of age. Neonatal mortality was 19.5%, and earlyneonatal mortality was 14.9%. Mortality was highest in the lowest weight group (71.6%. Newborns whose mothers had less than four years of schooling had 2.5 times higher risk of death than those whose mothers had eight years of schooling or more, even after adjusting for intermediate factors. CONCLUSIONS: the results showed higher mortality among very low birth weight infants. Low schooling was an independent predictor of infant death in this low-income population sample.

  13. Prevalence of Anemia and Its Impact on Mortality and Hospitalization Rate in Predialysis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormolen, N.; Grootendorst, D. C.; Urlings, T. A. J.; Boeschoten, E. W.; Sijpkens, Y. W.; Huisman, R. M.; Krediet, R. T.; Dekker, F. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim: Anemia is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in both early and very late stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to assess whether anemia is a risk factor for mortality or hospitalization in CKD stage 4-5 predialysis patients not yet on

  14. The effects of price competition and reduced subsidies for uncompensated care on hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpp, Kevin G M; Ketcham, Jonathan D; Epstein, Andrew J; Williams, Sankey V

    2005-08-01

    To determine whether hospital mortality rates changed in New Jersey after implementation of a law that changed hospital payment from a regulated system based on hospital cost to price competition with reduced subsidies for uncompensated care and whether changes in mortality rates were affected by hospital market conditions. State discharge data for New Jersey and New York from 1990 to 1996. Study Design. We used an interrupted time series design to compare risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality rates between states over time. We compared the effect sizes in markets with different levels of health maintenance organization penetration and hospital market concentration and tested the sensitivity of our results to different approaches to defining hospital markets. The study sample included all patients under age 65 admitted to New Jersey or New York hospitals with stroke, hip fracture, pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure, hip fracture, or acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Mortality among patients in New Jersey improved less than in New York by 0.4 percentage points among the insured (p=.07) and 0.5 percentage points among the uninsured (p=.37). There was a relative increase in mortality for patients with AMI, congestive heart failure, and stroke, especially for uninsured patients with these conditions, but not for patients with the other four conditions we studied. Less competitive hospital markets were significantly associated with a relative decrease in mortality among insured patients. Market-based reforms may adversely affect mortality for some conditions but it appears the effects are not universal. Insured patients in less competitive markets fared better in the transition to price competition.

  15. The contribution of hospital nursing leadership styles to 30-day patient mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta G; Midodzi, William K; Wong, Carol A; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2010-01-01

    Nursing work environment characteristics, in particular nurse and physician staffing, have been linked to patient outcomes (adverse events and patient mortality). Researchers have stressed the need for nursing leadership to advance change in healthcare organizations to create safer practice environments for patients. The relationship between styles of nursing leadership in hospitals and patient outcomes has not been well examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of hospital nursing leadership styles to 30-day mortality after controlling for patient demographics, comorbidities, and hospital factors. Ninety acute care hospitals in Alberta, Canada, were categorized into five styles of nursing leadership: high resonant, moderately resonant, mixed, moderately dissonant, and high dissonant. In the secondary analysis, existing data from three sources (nurses, patients, and institutions) were used to test a hypothesis that the styles of nursing leadership at the hospital level contribute to patient mortality rates. Thirty-day mortality was 7.8% in the study sample of 21,570 medical patients; rates varied across hospital categories: high resonant (5.2%), moderately resonant (7.4%), mixed (8.1%), moderately dissonant (8.8%), and high dissonant (4.3%). After controlling for patient demographics, comorbidities, and institutional and hospital nursing characteristics, nursing leadership styles explained 5.1% of 72.2% of total variance in mortality across hospitals, and high-resonant leadership was related significantly to lower mortality. Hospital nursing leadership styles may contribute to 30-day mortality of patients. This relationship may be moderated by homogeneity of leadership styles, clarity of communication among leaders and healthcare providers, and work environment characteristics.

  16. Association of Admission to Veterans Affairs Hospitals vs Non-Veterans Affairs Hospitals With Mortality and Readmission Rates Among Older Men Hospitalized With Acute Myocardial Infarction, Heart Failure, or Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, Sudhakar V; Qin, Li; Rumsfeld, John S; Ross, Joseph S; Masoudi, Frederick A; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Murugiah, Karthik; Bernheim, Susannah M; Suter, Lisa G; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2016-02-09

    Little contemporary information is available about comparative performance between Veterans Affairs (VA) and non-VA hospitals, particularly related to mortality and readmission rates, 2 important outcomes of care. To assess and compare mortality and readmission rates among men in VA and non-VA hospitals. Cross-sectional analysis involving male Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 65 years or older hospitalized between 2010 and 2013 in VA and non-VA acute care hospitals for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), or pneumonia using the Medicare Standard Analytic Files and Enrollment Database together with VA administrative claims data. To avoid confounding geographic effects with health care system effects, we studied VA and non-VA hospitals within the same metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Hospitalization in a VA or non-VA hospital in MSAs that contained at least 1 VA and non-VA hospital. For each condition, 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates and risk-standardized readmission rates for VA and non-VA hospitals. Mean aggregated within-MSA differences in mortality and readmission rates were also assessed. We studied 104 VA and 1513 non-VA hospitals, with each condition-outcome analysis cohort for VA and non-VA hospitals containing at least 7900 patients (men; ≥65 years), in 92 MSAs. Mortality rates were lower in VA hospitals than non-VA hospitals for AMI (13.5% vs 13.7%, P = .02; -0.2 percentage-point difference) and HF (11.4% vs 11.9%, P = .008; -0.5 percentage-point difference), but higher for pneumonia (12.6% vs 12.2%, P = .045; 0.4 percentage-point difference). In contrast, readmission rates were higher in VA hospitals for all 3 conditions (AMI, 17.8% vs 17.2%, 0.6 percentage-point difference; HF, 24.7% vs 23.5%, 1.2 percentage-point difference; pneumonia, 19.4% vs 18.7%, 0.7 percentage-point difference, all P percentage-point difference, -0.22; 95% CI, -0.40 to -0.04) and HF (-0.63; 95% CI, -0.95 to -0.31), and

  17. Incidence and hospital mortality of vascular surgery patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Central Hospital (IALCH) intensive care unit (ICU) following vascular surgery between 1 January ... patients have a perioperative myocardial infarction (PMI) and 4.6 .... Emergency surgery was performed in 17.8% of the ..... area is needed.

  18. Heart rate at admission is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes: Results from 58 European hospitals: The European Hospital Benchmarking by Outcomes in acute coronary syndrome Processes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Magnus T; Pereira, Marta; Araujo, Carla; Malmivaara, Anti; Ferrieres, Jean; Degano, Irene R; Kirchberger, Inge; Farmakis, Dimitrios; Garel, Pascal; Torre, Marina; Marrugat, Jaume; Azevedo, Ana

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between heart rate at admission and in-hospital mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). Consecutive ACS patients admitted in 2008-2010 across 58 hospitals in six participant countries of the European Hospital Benchmarking by Outcomes in ACS Processes (EURHOBOP) project (Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Portugal and Spain). Cardiogenic shock patients were excluded. Associations between heart rate at admission in categories of 10 beats per min (bpm) and in-hospital mortality were estimated by logistic regression in crude models and adjusting for age, sex, obesity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, known heart failure, renal failure, previous stroke and ischaemic heart disease. In total 10,374 patients were included. In both STEMI and NSTE-ACS patients, a U-shaped relationship between admission heart rate and in-hospital mortality was found. The lowest risk was observed for heart rates between 70-79 bpm in STEMI and 60-69 bpm in NSTE-ACS; risk of mortality progressively increased with lower or higher heart rates. In multivariable models, the relationship persisted but was significant only for heart rates >80 bpm. A similar relationship was present in both patients with or without diabetes, above or below age 75 years, and irrespective of the presence of atrial fibrillation or use of beta-blockers. Heart rate at admission is significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in patients with both STEMI and NSTE-ACS. ACS patients with admission heart rate above 80 bpm are at highest risk of in-hospital mortality.

  19. Prediction of mortality 1 year after hospital admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, J

    2012-09-01

    Hospital admission, especially for the elderly, can be a seminal event as many patients die within a year. This study reports the prediction of death within a year of admission to hospital of the Simple Clinical Score (SCS) and ECG dispersion mapping (ECG-DM). ECG-DM is a novel technique that analyzes low-amplitude ECG oscillations and reports them as the myocardial micro-alternation index (MMI).

  20. In-hospital mortality pattern of severely injured children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Hien Quoc; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2012-01-01

    the mortality pattern of severely injured children admitted to a Danish level I trauma centre. METHODS: We included trauma patients aged 15 years or less, who subsequent a trauma team activation were admitted during the 9-year period 1999-2007. Data were collected prospectively for subjects who had a length...

  1. Stroke mortality and its predictors in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There have been few studies on stroke mortality and its predictors in Nigeria. This study ... Stroke is one of the major public health problems in the world ... of stroke therefore is arbitrary at its worst. At best, it is ... value (in percentage points) which in actual terms de- ... stroke, past medical history, family and social history.

  2. Medical inpatient mortality at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annual increases in mortality rates were highest during the first 2 days following admission (increasing from 30.1 to 50.3 deaths per 1 000), and were associated with increasing age, non-paying patient status, black population group and male sex, and were greatest in the emergency ward (adjusted MRR 1.73, comparing ...

  3. Comparison of in-hospital versus 30-day mortality assessments for selected medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzecki, Ann M; Christiansen, Cindy L; Chew, Priscilla; Loveland, Susan; Rosen, Amy K

    2010-12-01

    In-hospital mortality measures such as the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Inpatient Quality Indicators (IQIs) are easily derived using hospital discharge abstracts and publicly available software. However, hospital assessments based on a 30-day postadmission interval might be more accurate given potential differences in facility discharge practices. To compare in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates for 6 medical conditions using the AHRQ IQI software. We used IQI software (v3.1) and 2004-2007 Veterans Health Administration (VA) discharge and Vital Status files to derive 4-year facility-level in-hospital and 30-day observed mortality rates and observed/expected ratios (O/Es) for admissions with a principal diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, hip fracture, and pneumonia. We standardized software-calculated O/Es to the VA population and compared O/Es and outlier status across sites using correlation, observed agreement, and kappas. Of 119 facilities, in-hospital versus 30-day mortality O/E correlations were generally high (median: r = 0.78; range: 0.31-0.86). Examining outlier status, observed agreement was high (median: 84.7%, 80.7%-89.1%). Kappas showed at least moderate agreement (k > 0.40) for all indicators except stroke and hip fracture (k ≤ 0.22). Across indicators, few sites changed from a high to nonoutlier or low outlier, or vice versa (median: 10, range: 7-13). The AHRQ IQI software can be easily adapted to generate 30-day mortality rates. Although 30-day mortality has better face validity as a hospital performance measure than in-hospital mortality, site assessments were similar despite the definition used. Thus, the measure selected for internal benchmarking should primarily depend on the healthcare system's data linkage capabilities.

  4. Maternal near miss and mortality in a tertiary care hospital in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rulisa, S.; Umuziranenge, I.; Small, M; van Roosmalen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with severe ('near miss') maternal morbidity and mortality in the University Teaching Hospital of Kigali - Rwanda. Methods: We performed a cross sectional study of all women admitted to the tertiary care University Hospital in Kigali

  5. [Predictive value of the VMS theme 'Frail elderly': delirium, falling and mortality in elderly hospital patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Frederike M M; de Rooij, Sophia E J A; Schuurman, Truus; Duijvelaar, Karlijn M; van Munster, Barbara C

    2015-01-01

    To determine the predictive value of safety management system (VMS) screening questions for falling, delirium, and mortality, as punt down in the VMS theme 'Frail elderly'. Retrospective observational study. We selected all patients ≥ 70 years who were admitted to non-ICU wards at the Deventer Hospital, the Netherlands, for at least 24 hours between 28 March 2011 and 10 June 2011. On admission, patients were screened with the VMS instrument by a researcher. Delirium and falls were recorded during hospitalisation. Six months after hospitalisation, data on mortality were collected. We included 688 patients with a median age of 78.7 (range: 70.0-97.1); 50.7% was male. The sensitivity of the screening for delirium risk was 82%, the specificity 62%. The sensitivity of the screening for risk of falling was 63%, the specificity 65%. Independent predictors for mortality within 6 months were delirium risk (odds ratio (OR): 2.3; 95% CI 1.1-3.2), malnutrition (OR: 2.1; 95% CI 1.3-3.5), admission to a non-surgical ward (OR: 3.0; 95% CI 1.8-5.1), and older age (OR: 1.1; 95%CI 1.0-1.1). Patients classified by the VMS theme 'Frail elderly' as having more risk factors had a higher risk of dying (p instrument for identifying those elderly people with a high risk of developing this condition; the VMS sensitivity for fall risk is moderate. The number of positive VMS risk factors correlates with mortality and may therefore be regarded as a measure of frailty.

  6. A modified Elixhauser score for predicting in-hospital mortality in internal medicine admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbian, Fabio; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Maietti, Elisa; Gallerani, Massimo; Pala, Marco; Cappadona, Rosaria; Manfredini, Roberto; Fedeli, Ugo

    2017-05-01

    In-hospital mortality (IHM) is an indicator of the quality of care provided. The two most widely used scores for predicting IHM by International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes are the Elixhauser (EI) and the Charlson Comorbidity indexes. Our aim was to obtain new measures based on internal medicine ICD codes for the original EI, to detect risk for IHM. This single-center retrospective study included hospital admissions for any cause in the department of internal medicine between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013, recorded in the hospital database. The EI was calculated for evaluation of comorbidity, then we added age, gender and diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. IHM was our outcome. Only predictors positively associated with IHM were taken into consideration and the Sullivan's method was applied in order to modify the parameter estimates of the regression model into an index. We analyzed 75,586 admissions (53.4% females) and mean age was 72.7±16.3years. IHM was 7.9% and mean score was 12.1±7.6. The points assigned to each condition ranged from 0 to 16, and the possible range of the score varied between 0 and 89. In our population the score ranged from 0 to 54, and it was higher in the deceased group. Receiver operating characteristic curve of the new score was 0.721 (95% CI 0.714-0.727, pInternal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [in-hospital mortality in patient with acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadamasa, Nobutake; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Narumi, Osamu; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of evidence to compare in-hospital mortality with different types of stroke. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the in-hospital mortality after acute ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke and compare the factors associated with the mortality among stroke subtypes. All patients admitted to Kurashiki Central Hospital in Japan between January 2009 and December 2009, and diagnosed with acute ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke were included in this study. Demographics and clinical data pertaining to the patients were obtained from their medical records. Out of 738 patients who had an acute stroke, 53 (7.2%) died in the hospital. The in-hospital mortality was significantly lower in the cerebral infarction group than in the intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage group (3.5%, 15.1%, and 17.9%, respectively; Phemorrhage group than in the other 2 groups. With regard to past history, diabetes mellitus was significantly found to be a complication in mortality cases of intracranial hemorrhage. Further investigation is needed to clarify the effect of diabetes on mortality after intracranial hemorrhage.

  8. Quality of Care at Hospitals Identified as Outliers in Publicly Reported Mortality Statistics for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Stephen W; McCabe, James M; Kennedy, Kevin F; Zigler, Corwin M; Pinto, Duane S; Yeh, Robert W

    2017-05-16

    Public reporting of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) outcomes may create disincentives for physicians to provide care for critically ill patients, particularly at institutions with worse clinical outcomes. We thus sought to evaluate the procedural management and in-hospital outcomes of patients treated for acute myocardial infarction before and after a hospital had been publicly identified as a negative outlier. Using state reports, we identified hospitals that were recognized as negative PCI outliers in 2 states (Massachusetts and New York) from 2002 to 2012. State hospitalization files were used to identify all patients with an acute myocardial infarction within these states. Procedural management and in-hospital outcomes were compared among patients treated at outlier hospitals before and after public report of outlier status. Patients at nonoutlier institutions were used to control for temporal trends. Among 86 hospitals, 31 were reported as outliers for excess mortality. Outlier facilities were larger, treating more patients with acute myocardial infarction and performing more PCIs than nonoutlier hospitals ( P fashion (interaction P =0.50) after public report of outlier status. The likelihood of in-hospital mortality decreased at outlier institutions (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.81-0.85) after public report, and to a lesser degree at nonoutlier institutions (RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.87-0.92; interaction P <0.001). Among patients that underwent PCI, in-hospital mortality decreased at outlier institutions after public recognition of outlier status in comparison with prior (RR, 0.72; 9% CI, 0.66-0.79), a decline that exceeded the reduction at nonoutlier institutions (RR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80-0.96; interaction P <0.001). Large hospitals with higher clinical volume are more likely to be designated as negative outliers. The rates of percutaneous revascularization increased similarly at outlier and nonoutlier institutions after report of outlier status. After outlier

  9. Scholarly activities in hospitality and tourism higher education among private higher institutions in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund Goh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the notion of scholarship and develop research and scholarship strategies among Private Higher Institutions delivering Tourism and Hospitality degree programs in Australia. In doing so, this paper confronts the traditional view of research publications as the only form of scholarship by traditional universities. This paper argues that the purpose of scholarship should be focused towards improving a teacher’s teaching and learning process. These new knowledge need not be limited through peer reviewed journals only, but can be achieved through less formal means of communication such as fieldtrips to industry and attending conferences. This paper utilizes the six Scholarship key points as defined on P. 19 of the National Protocols for Higher Education Approval Processes in Australia by MCEETYA  to investigate methods to capture scholarship beyond traditional research publications. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v3i2.108

  10. Impact of type 2 diabetes mellitus on in-hospital-mortality after major cardiovascular events in Spain (2002-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel-Yanes, José M; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; de Miguel-Díez, Javier; Lopez-de-Andrés, Ana

    2017-10-10

    Diabetes mellitus has long been associated with cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, the higher burden of traditional cardiovascular risk factors reported in high-income countries is offset by a more widespread use of preventive measures and revascularization or other invasive procedures. The aim of this investigation is to describe trends in number of cases and outcomes, in-hospital mortality (IHM) and length of hospital stay (LHS), of hospital admissions for major cardiovascular events between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and matched non-diabetes patients. Retrospective study using National Hospital Discharge Database, analyzed in 4 years 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, in Spain. We included patients (≥ 40 years old) with a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, aortic aneurysm and dissection and acute lower limb ischemia in people with T2DM. Cases were matched with controls (without T2DM) by ICD-9-CM codes, sex, age, province of residence and year. We selected 130,011 matched couples (50,427 with myocardial infarction, 60,236 with stroke, 2599 with aortic aneurysm and dissection and 16,749 with acute lower limb ischemia. Among T2DM patients we found increasing numbers of admissions overtime for stroke (10,794 in 2002 vs 17,559 in 2014), aortic aneurysm and dissection (390 vs 841) and acute lower limb ischemia (3854 vs. 4548). People were progressively older (except for myocardial infarction), had more comorbidities (especially T2DM patients), and were more frequently coded overtime for cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, obesity, hypertension, lipid disorders) and renal diseases. LHS and IHM declined overtime, though IHM only did it significantly in T2DM patients. Multivariable adjustment showed that T2DM patients had a significantly 15% higher mortality rate during admission for myocardial infarction, a 6% higher mortality for stroke, and a 6% higher mortality rate for "all cardiovascular events combined", than non

  11. Suicidal behaviour characteristics and factors associated with mortality in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Esteban-Vasallo, María; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas

    2016-04-29

    Suicide is a major public health problem worldwide, and an approach is necessary due to its high potential for prevention. This paper examines the main characteristics of people admitted to hospitals in the Community of Madrid (Spain) with suicidal behaviour, and the factors associated with their hospital mortality. A study was conducted on patients with E950-E959 codes of suicide and self-inflicted injuries of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, contained in any diagnostic field of the minimum basic data set at hospital discharge between 2003 and 2013. Sociodemographic, clinical and health care variables were assessed by uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis in the evaluation of factors associated with hospital mortality. Hospital suicidal behaviour predominates in women (58.7%) and in middle-age. Hospital mortality is 2.2% (1.6% in women and 3.2% in men), increasing with age. Mental disorders are detected 3-4 times more in secondary diagnoses. The main primary diagnosis (>74%) is poisoning with substances, with lower mortality (∼1%) than injury by hanging and jumping from high places (≥12%), which have the highest numbers. Other factors associated with increased mortality include different medical comorbidities and severity of the injury, while length of stay and mental disorders are protective factors. Type of hospital, poisoning, and Charlson index are associated differently with mortality in men and women. Hospitalised suicidal acts show a low mortality, mainly related to comorbidities and the severity of injuries. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk factors for mortality in fournier's gangrene in a general hospital: use of simplified founier gangrene severe index score (SFGSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eugênio Lira Tenório

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate risk factors for mortality in patients with Fournier's gangrene (FG, with emphasis in the Simplified Fournier Gangrene Severe Index Score (SFGSI. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study that was carried out from January 2010 to December 2014, with 124 patients treated for FG in a General Hospital. Several clinical and laboratory variables, including SFGSI, were evaluated and correlated with mortality through univariate analysis and logistic regression. Results Of the 124 patients, 99 were men (79.8%, the mean age was 50.8±19.5 years and the main comorbidity was diabetes mellitus (51.6%. The mortality rate was 25.8%. Variables that presented independent correlation with mortality were the extension of the lesion to the abdomen (OR=4.0, CI=1.10-14.68, p=0.03, hematocrit (OR=0.81, CI=0.73-0.90, p2 result was the largest of the independent predictors of mortality (OR=50.2; CI=13.18-191.47; p2 presented a higher correlation with mortality than any variable tested alone. It seems to be a promising alternative to evaluate predictors of mortality in Fournier's gangrene. The main advantage is easy applicability because it contains only three parameters and can be used immediately after patient's admission.

  13. Risk factors for mortality in fournier's gangrene in a general hospital: use of simplified founier gangrene severe index score (SFGSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Carlos Eugênio Lira; Lima, Salvador Vilar Correia; Albuquerque, Amanda Vasconcelos de; Cavalcanti, Mariana Pauferro; Teles, Flávio

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate risk factors for mortality in patients with Fournier's gangrene (FG), with emphasis in the Simplified Fournier Gangrene Severe Index Score (SFGSI). This was a cross-sectional study that was carried out from January 2010 to December 2014, with 124 patients treated for FG in a General Hospital. Several clinical and laboratory variables, including SFGSI, were evaluated and correlated with mortality through univariate analysis and logistic regression. Of the 124 patients, 99 were men (79.8%), the mean age was 50.8±19.5 years and the main comorbidity was diabetes mellitus (51.6%). The mortality rate was 25.8%. Variables that presented independent correlation with mortality were the extension of the lesion to the abdomen (OR=4.0, CI=1.10-14.68, p=0.03), hematocrit (OR=0.81, CI=0.73-0.90, p2 result was the largest of the independent predictors of mortality (OR=50.2; CI=13.18-191.47; p2 presented a higher correlation with mortality than any variable tested alone. It seems to be a promising alternative to evaluate predictors of mortality in Fournier's gangrene. The main advantage is easy applicability because it contains only three parameters and can be used immediately after patient's admission. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  14. Can better infrastructure and quality reduce hospital infant mortality rates in Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Nelly; Marrufo, Grecia M

    2007-02-01

    Preliminary evidence from hospital discharges hints enormous disparities in infant hospital mortality rates. At the same time, public health agencies acknowledge severe deficiencies and variations in the quality of medical services across public hospitals. Despite these concerns, there is limited evidence of the contribution of hospital infrastructure and quality in explaining variations in outcomes among those who have access to medical services provided at public hospitals. This paper provides evidence to address this question. We use probabilistic econometric methods to estimate the impact of material and human resources and hospital quality on the probability that an infant dies controlling for socioeconomic, maternal and reproductive risk factors. As a measure of quality, we calculate for the first time for Mexico patient safety indicators developed by the AHRQ. We find that the probability to die is affected by hospital infrastructure and by quality. In this last regard, having been treated in a hospital with the worse quality incidence doubles the probability to die. This paper also presents evidence on the contribution of other risk factors on perinatal mortality rates. The conclusions of this paper suggest that lower infant mortality rates can be reached by implementing a set of coherent public policy actions including an increase and reorganization of hospital infrastructure, quality improvement, and increasing demand for health by poor families.

  15. Pre-transplant reversible pulmonary hypertension predicts higher risk for mortality after cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Javed; Stankewicz, Mark A; Wu, Jack; Chomsky, Don B; Howser, Renee L; Khadim, Ghazanfar; Davis, Stacy F; Pierson, Richard N; Wilson, John R

    2005-02-01

    Pre-transplant fixed pulmonary hypertension is associated with higher post-transplant mortality. In this study, we assessed the significance of pre-transplant reversible pulmonary hypertension in patients undergoing cardiac transplantation. Overall, we studied 182 patients with baseline normal pulmonary pressures or reversible pulmonary hypertension, defined as a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) to 50 mm Hg had a higher risk of death (odds ratio [OR] 5.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46 to 19.84 as compared with PAS 4.0 WU, but patients with TPG > or =16 had a higher risk of mortality (OR 4.93, 95% CI 1.84 to 13.17). PAS pressure was an independent predictor of mortality (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.06). Recipient body mass index, history of sternotomy; and donor ischemic time were the other independent predictors of mortality. Pre-transplant pulmonary hypertension, even when reversible to a PVR of < or =2.5 WU, is associated with a higher mortality post-transplant.

  16. Inpatient child mortality by travel time to hospital in a rural area of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manongi, Rachel; Mtei, Frank; Mtove, George; Nadjm, Behzad; Muro, Florida; Alegana, Victor; Noor, Abdisalan M; Todd, Jim; Reyburn, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the association, if any, between child mortality and distance to the nearest hospital. The study was based on data from a 1-year study of the cause of illness in febrile paediatric admissions to a district hospital in north-east Tanzania. All villages in the catchment population were geolocated, and travel times were estimated from availability of local transport. Using bands of travel time to hospital, we compared admission rates, inpatient case fatality rates and child mortality rates in the catchment population using inpatient deaths as the numerator. Three thousand hundred and eleven children under the age of 5 years were included of whom 4.6% died; 2307 were admitted from time between admission and death. Assuming uniform mortality in the catchment population, the predicted number of deaths not benefiting from hospital admission prior to death increased by 21.4% per hour of travel time to hospital. If the same admission and death rates that were found at <3 h from the hospital applied to the whole catchment population and if hospital care conferred a 30% survival benefit compared to home care, then 10.3% of childhood deaths due to febrile illness in the catchment population would have been averted. The mortality impact of poor access to hospital care in areas of high paediatric mortality is likely to be substantial although uncertainty over the mortality benefit of inpatient care is the largest constraint in making an accurate estimate. © 2014 The Authors Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Somatic hospital contacts, invasive cardiac procedures, and mortality from heart disease in patients with severe mental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben; Gasse, Christiane; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2009-07-01

    Excess mortality from heart disease is observed in patients with severe mental disorder. This excess mortality may be rooted in adverse effects of pharmacological or psychotropic treatment, lifestyle factors, or inadequate somatic care. To examine whether persons with severe mental disorder, defined as persons admitted to a psychiatric hospital with bipolar affective disorder, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophrenia, are in contact with hospitals and undergoing invasive procedures for heart disease to the same degree as the nonpsychiatric general population, and to determine whether they have higher mortality rates of heart disease. A population-based cohort of 4.6 million persons born in Denmark was followed up from 1994 to 2007. Rates of mortality, somatic contacts, and invasive procedures were estimated by survival analysis. Incidence rate ratios of heart disease admissions and heart disease mortality as well as probability of invasive cardiac procedures. The incidence rate ratio of heart disease contacts in persons with severe mental disorder compared with the rate for the nonpsychiatric general population was only slightly increased, at 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.14). In contrast, their excess mortality rate ratio from heart disease was 2.90 (95% confidence interval, 2.71-3.10). Five years after the first contact for somatic heart disease, the risk of dying of heart disease was 8.26% for persons with severe mental disorder (aged mental disorder as compared with the nonpsychiatric general population (7.04% vs 12.27%, respectively). Individuals with severe mental disorder had only negligible excess rates of contact for heart disease. Given their excess mortality from heart disease and lower rates of invasive procedures after first contact, it would seem that the treatment for heart disease offered to these individuals in Denmark is neither sufficiently efficient nor sufficiently intensive. This undertreatment may explain part of their excess

  18. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and mortality in elderly immunocompromised patients hospitalized with pneumonia: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher S; Frei, Christopher R; Metersky, Mark L; Anzueto, Antonio R; Mortensen, Eric M

    2014-01-27

    Mortality after pneumonia in immunocompromised patients is higher than for immunocompetent patients. The use of non-invasive mechanical ventilation for patients with severe pneumonia may provide beneficial outcomes while circumventing potential complications associated with invasive mechanical ventilation. The aim of our study was to determine if the use of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in elderly immunocompromised patients with pneumonia is associated with higher all-cause mortality. In this retrospective cohort study, data were obtained from the Department of Veterans Affairs administrative databases. We included veterans age ≥65 years who were immunocompromised and hospitalized due to pneumonia. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between the use of invasive versus non-invasive mechanical ventilation and 30-day and 90-day mortality. Of 1,946 patients in our cohort, 717 received non-invasive mechanical ventilation and 1,229 received invasive mechanical ventilation. There was no significant association between all-cause 30-day mortality and non-invasive versus invasive mechanical ventilation in our adjusted model (odds ratio (OR) 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66-1.10). However, those patients who received non-invasive mechanical ventilation had decreased 90-day mortality (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.52-0.84). Additionally, receipt of guideline-concordant antibiotics in our immunocompromised cohort was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day mortality (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.24-0.39) and 90-day mortality (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.31-0.53). Our findings suggest that physicians should consider the use of non-invasive mechanical ventilation, when appropriate, for elderly immunocompromised patients hospitalized with pneumonia.

  19. Hyponatraemia at hospital admission is a predictor of overall mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, L; Gustafsson, F; Goetze, J P

    2015-01-01

    spectrum of medical and surgical diagnoses. METHODS: Consecutive patients >40 years of age admitted to a general district hospital in Greater Copenhagen between 1 April 1998 and 31 March 1999. Median follow-up time was 5.16 years (range 0-4372 days). Plasma sodium measurements were available in 2960...

  20. Causes of maxillofacial patient mortality in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a Lecturer, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Bayero University, Kano and Consultant, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon,. Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria ... craniofacial trauma and stage IV malignancies [2, 3, 4]. Intraoperative deaths may also occur from anesthetic and/.

  1. Maternal mortality ratio in a Tertiary Hospital offering free maternity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: Data were collected from available hospital records from inception on 24th February 2010 to 31st December 2014 and analysed using Microsoft Excel 2010 software. Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics. Categorical variables were expressed as frequency ...

  2. Relationship between polycythemia and in-hospital mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with low-risk pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lu; Chughtai, Aamer Rasheed; Jiang, Hongli; Gao, Lingyun; Yang, Yan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Yuejian

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Pulmonary embolism (PE) is frequent in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and associated with high mortality. This multi-center retrospective study was performed to investigate if secondary polycythemia is associated with in-hospital mortality in COPD patients with low-risk PE. Methods We identified COPD patients with proven PE between October, 2005 and October, 2015. Patients in risk classes III–V on the basis of the PESI score were excluded. We extracted demographic, clinical and laboratory information at the time of admission from medical records. All subjects were followed until hospital discharge to identify all-cause mortality. Results We enrolled 629 consecutive patients with COPD and PE at low risk: 132 of them (21.0%) with and 497 (79.0%) without secondary polycythemia. Compared with those without polycythemia, the polycythemia group had significantly lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) level (0.9±0.3 vs. 1.4±0.5, P=0.000), lower PaO2 and SpO2 as well as higher PaCO2 (P=0.03, P=0.03 and P=0.000, respectively). COPD patients with polycythemia had a higher proportion of arrhythmia in electrocardiogram (ECG) (49.5% vs. 35.7%, P=0.02), a longer hospital duration time (15.3±10.1 vs. 9.7±9.1, P=0.001), a higher mechanical ventilation rate (noninvasive and invasive, 51.7% vs. 30.3%, P=0.04 and 31.0% vs. 7.9%, P=0.04, respectively), and a higher in-hospital mortality (12.1% vs. 6.6%, P=0.04). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that polycythemia was associated with mortality in COPD patients with low-risk PE (adjusted OR 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04–1.66). Conclusions Polycythemia is an independent risk factor for all-cause in-hospital mortality in COPD patients with PE at low risk. PMID:28066591

  3. Ascites Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Identifies Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis and Predicts Mortality in Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullaro, Giuseppe; Kim, Grace; Pereira, Marcus R; Brown, Robert S; Verna, Elizabeth C

    2017-12-01

    Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a marker of both tissue injury and infection. Urine NGAL levels strongly predict acute kidney injury and mortality in patients with cirrhosis, but ascites NGAL is not well characterized. We hypothesized that ascites NGAL level is a marker of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) and mortality risk in patients with cirrhosis. Hospitalized patients with cirrhosis and ascites undergoing diagnostic paracentesis were prospectively enrolled and followed until death or discharge. Patients with secondary peritonitis, prior transplantation, or active colitis were excluded. NGAL was measured in the ascites and serum. Ascites NGAL level was evaluated as a marker of SBP (defined as ascites absolute neutrophil count > 250 cells/mm 3 ) and predictor of in-patient mortality. A total of 146 patients were enrolled, and of these, 29 patients (20%) had SBP. Baseline characteristics were similar between subjects with and without SBP. Median (IQR) ascites NGAL was significantly higher in patients with SBP compared to those without SBP (221.3 [145.9-392.9] vs. 139.2 [73.9-237.2], p peritonitis in hospitalized patient with cirrhosis and an independent predictor of short-term in-hospital mortality, even controlling for SBP and MELD.

  4. Costs, mortality likelihood and outcomes of hospitalized US children with traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Junxin; Xiang, Huiyun; Wheeler, Krista; Smith, Gary A; Stallones, Lorann; Groner, Jonathan; Wang, Zengzhen

    2009-07-01

    To examine the hospitalization costs and discharge outcomes of US children with TBI and to evaluate a severity measure, the predictive mortality likelihood level. Data from the 2006 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) were used to report the national estimates and characteristics of TBI-associated hospitalizations among US children percentage of children with TBI caused by motor vehicle crashes (MVC) and falls was calculated according to the predictive mortality likelihood levels (PMLL), death in hospital and discharge into long-term rehabilitation facilities. Associations with the PMLL, discharge outcomes and average hospital charges were examined. In 2006, there were an estimated 58 900 TBI-associated hospitalizations among US children, accounting for $2.56 billion in hospital charges. MVCs caused 38.9% and falls caused 21.2% of TBI hospitalizations. The PMLL was strongly associated with TBI type, length of hospital stay, hospital charges and discharge disposition. About 4% of children with fall or MVC related TBIs died in hospital and 9% were discharged into long-term facilities. The PMLL may provide a useful tool to assess characteristics and treatment outcomes of hospitalized TBI children, but more research is still needed.

  5. Novel risk stratification with time course assessment of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute heart failure.

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    Takeshi Yagyu

    Full Text Available Patients with acute heart failure (AHF show various clinical courses during hospitalization. We aimed to identify time course predictors of in-hospital mortality and to establish a sequentially assessable risk model.We enrolled 1,035 consecutive AHF patients into derivation (n = 597 and validation (n = 438 cohorts. For risk assessments at admission, we utilized Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure (GWTG-HF risk scores. We examined significant predictors of in-hospital mortality from 11 variables obtained during hospitalization and developed a risk stratification model using multiple logistic regression analysis. Across both cohorts, 86 patients (8.3% died during hospitalization. Using backward stepwise selection, we identified five time-course predictors: catecholamine administration, minimum platelet concentration, maximum blood urea nitrogen, total bilirubin, and C-reactive protein levels; and established a time course risk score that could sequentially assess a patient's risk status. The addition of a time course risk score improved the discriminative ability of the GWTG-HF risk score (c-statistics in derivation and validation cohorts: 0.776 to 0.888 [p = 0.002] and 0.806 to 0.902 [p<0.001], respectively. A calibration plot revealed a good relationship between observed and predicted in-hospital mortalities in both cohorts (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square statistics: 6.049 [p = 0.642] and 5.993 [p = 0.648], respectively. In each group of initial low-intermediate risk (GWTG-HF risk score <47 and initial high risk (GWTG-HF risk score ≥47, in-hospital mortality was about 6- to 9-fold higher in the high time course risk score group than in the low-intermediate time course risk score group (initial low-intermediate risk group: 20.3% versus 2.2% [p<0.001], initial high risk group: 57.6% versus 8.5% [p<0.001].A time course assessment related to in-hospital mortality during the hospitalization of AHF patients can clearly categorize a patient's on

  6. Use of risk-adjusted CUSUM charts to monitor 30-day mortality in Danish hospitals

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    Rasmussen TB

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Bøjer Rasmussen, Sinna Pilgaard Ulrichsen, Mette Nørgaard Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark Background: Monitoring hospital outcomes and clinical processes as a measure of clinical performance is an integral part of modern health care. The risk-adjusted cumulative sum (CUSUM chart is a frequently used sequential analysis technique that can be implemented to monitor a wide range of different types of outcomes.Objective: The aim of this study was to describe how risk-adjusted CUSUM charts based on population-based nationwide medical registers were used to monitor 30-day mortality in Danish hospitals and to give an example on how alarms of increased hospital mortality from the charts can guide further in-depth analyses.Materials and methods: We used routinely collected administrative data from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish Civil Registration System to create risk-adjusted CUSUM charts. We monitored 30-day mortality after hospital admission with one of 77 selected diagnoses in 24 hospital units in Denmark in 2015. The charts were set to detect a 50% increase in 30-day mortality, and control limits were determined by simulations.Results: Among 1,085,576 hospital admissions, 441,352 admissions had one of the 77 selected diagnoses as their primary diagnosis and were included in the risk-adjusted CUSUM charts. The charts yielded a total of eight alarms of increased mortality. The median of the hospitals’ estimated average time to detect a 50% increase in 30-day mortality was 50 days (interquartile interval, 43;54. In the selected example of an alarm, descriptive analyses indicated performance problems with 30-day mortality following hip fracture surgery and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Conclusion: The presented implementation of risk-adjusted CUSUM charts can detect significant increases in 30-day mortality within 2 months, on average, in most

  7. Higher levels of serum lycopene are associated with reduced mortality in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guang-Ming; Meza, Jane L; Soliman, Ghada A; Islam, K M Monirul; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of mortality. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation may play an important role in the high mortality of individuals with metabolic syndrome. Previous studies have suggested that lycopene intake might be related to the reduced oxidative stress and decreased inflammation. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we examined the hypothesis that lycopene is associated with mortality among individuals with metabolic syndrome. A total of 2499 participants 20 years and older with metabolic syndrome were divided into 3 groups based on their serum concentration of lycopene using the tertile rank method. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from years 2001 to 2006 was linked to the mortality file for mortality follow-up data through December 31, 2011, to determine the mortality rate and hazard ratios (HR) for the 3 serum lycopene concentration groups. The mean survival time was significantly higher in the group with the highest serum lycopene concentration (120.6 months; 95% confidence interval [CI], 118.8-122.3) and the medium group (116.3 months; 95% CI, 115.2-117.4), compared with the group with lowest serum lycopene concentration (107.4 months; 95% CI, 106.5-108.3). After adjusting for possible confounding factors, participants in the highest (HR, 0.61; P = .0113) and in the second highest (HR, 0.67; P = .0497) serum lycopene concentration groups showed significantly lower HRs of mortality when compared with participants in the lower serum lycopene concentration. The data suggest that higher serum lycopene concentration has a significant association with the reduced risk of mortality among individuals with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic acidosis as a risk factor for the development of acute kidney injury and hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiachang; Wang, Yimei; Geng, Xuemei; Chen, Rongyi; Xu, Xialian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Lin, Jing; Teng, Jie; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2017-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis has been proved to be a risk factor for the progression of chronic kidney disease, but its relation to acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been investigated. In general, a diagnosis of metabolic acidosis is based on arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis, but the diagnostic role of carbon dioxide combining power (CO 2 CP) in the venous blood may also be valuable to non-respiratory patients. This retrospective study included all adult non-respiratory patients admitted consecutively to our hospital between October 01, 2014 and September 30, 2015. A total of 71,089 non-respiratory patients were included, and only 4,873 patients were evaluated by ABG analysis at admission. In patients with ABG, acidosis, metabolic acidosis, decreased HCO 3 - and hypocapnia at admission was associated with the development of AKI, while acidosis and hypocapnia were independent predictors of hospital mortality. Among non-respiratory patients, decreased CO 2 CP at admission was an independent risk factor for AKI and hospital mortality. ROC curves indicated that CO 2 CP was a reasonable biomarker to exclude metabolic acidosis, dual and triple acid-base disturbances. The effect sizes of decreased CO 2 CP on AKI and hospital mortality varied according to age and different underlying diseases. Metabolic acidosis is an independent risk factor for the development of AKI and hospital mortality. In non-respiratory patient, decreased CO 2 CP is also an independent contributor to AKI and mortality and can be used as an indicator of metabolic acidosis.

  9. Celiac disease and alcohol use disorders: increased length of hospital stay, overexpenditures and attributable mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gili

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: alcohol use disorders are associated with a greater incidence of certain comorbidities in patients with celiac disease. Currently there is no available information about the impact that these disorders may have on length of hospital stays, overexpenditures during hospital stays, and excess mortality in these patients. Methods: a case-control study was conducted with a selection of patients 18 years and older hospitalized during 2008-2010 in 87 hospitals in Spain. Estimations of excess length of stays, costs, and attributable mortality were calculated using a multivariate analysis of covariance, which included age, gender, hospital group, alcohol use disorders, tobacco related disease and 30 other comorbidities. Results: patients who had both celiac disease and alcohol use disorders had an increased length of hospital stay, an average of 3.1 days longer in women, and 1.7 days longer in men. Excess costs per stay ranged from 838.7 euros in female patients, to 389.1 euros in male patients. Excess attributable mortality was 15.1% in women, 12.2% in men. Conclusions: apart from a gluten-free diet and other medical measures, the prevention of alcohol abuse is indicated in these patients. Patients hospitalized who present these disorders should receive specialized attention after leaving the hospital. Early detection and treatment should be used to prevent the appearance of organic lesions and should not be solely focused on male patients.

  10. Trend and Seasonal Patterns of Injuries and Mortality Due to Motorcyclists Traffic Accidents; A Hospital-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Marjan; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Esmaeilpour Aghdam, Mohammad; Mohammadian, Mahdi; Maleki, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    To investigate trend and seasonal pattern of occurrence and mortality of motorcycle accidents in patients referred to hospitals of Isfahan. This cross-sectional study was carried out using traffic accidents data of Isfahan province, extracted from Ministry of Health (MOH) database from 2006 to 2010. During the study period, 83648 people injured due to motorcycle traffic accidents were referred to hospitals, all of them entered in the study. Logistic regression model was used to calculate the hospital mortality odds ratio, and Cochrane-Armitage test was used for assessment of linear trend. During the study period, the hospital admission for motorcycle accident was 83,648 and 89.3% (74743) of them were men. Mean age in accidents time was 26.41±14.3 years. The injuries and death sex ratio were 8.4 and 16.9, respectively. Lowest admission rate was during autumn and highest during summer. The injury mortality odds ratio was 1.01 (CI 95% 0.73-1.39) in the Spring, 1.34 (CI95% 1.01-1.79) in summer and 1.17 (CI95% 0.83-1.63). It was also calculated to be 2.51 (CI95% 1.36-4.64) in age group 40-49, 2.39 (CI95% 1.51-5.68) in 50-59 and 4.79 (CI95% 2.49-9.22) in 60-69 years. The mortality odds ratio was 3.53 (CI95% 2.77-4.5) in rural place, 1.33 (CI95% 1.15-1.54) in men, and 2.44 (CI95% 2.09-2.85) in the road out of town and village. In addition, trend of motorcycle accidents mortality was increasing ( p accidents injuries are more common in men, summer, young age and rural roads. These high risk groups need more attention, care and higher training.

  11. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality following open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanpin; Wang, Yan; Yao, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Open surgical repair (OSR) is a conventional surgical method used in the repair a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however, OSR results in high perioperative mortality rates. The level of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been reported to be an independent risk factor for postoperative in-hospital mortality following major cardiopulmonary surgery. In the present study, the association of serum ACE2 levels with postoperative in-hospital mortality was investigated in patients undergoing OSR for ruptured AAA. The study enrolled 84 consecutive patients underwent OSR for ruptured AAA and were subsequently treated in the intensive care unit. Patients who succumbed postoperatively during hospitalization were defined as non-survivors. Serum ACE2 levels were measured in all patients prior to and following the surgery using ELISA kits. The results indicated that non-survivors showed significantly lower mean preoperative and postoperative serum ACE2 levels when compared with those in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that, subsequent to adjusting for potential confounders, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 showed a significant negative association with the postoperative in-hospital mortality. This was confirmed by multivariate hazard ratio analysis, which showed that, subsequent to adjusting for the various potential confounders, the risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality remained significantly higher in the two lowest serum ACE2 level quartiles compared with that in the highest quartile on preoperative day 1. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence supporting that the serum ACE2 level is an independent risk factor for the in-hospital mortality following OSR for ruptured AAA. Furthermore, low serum ACE2 levels on preoperative day 1 were found to be associated with increased postoperative in-hospital mortality. Therefore, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 may be a potential

  12. Quality of life in hemodialysis patients and the relationship with mortality, hospitalizations and poor treatment adherence

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    Araiê Prado Berger Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD causes sudden changes in the daily lives of patients, creates limitations to perform activities of daily life and creates a great impact on emotions and quality of life (QOL of patients. Objective: To understand the relationship between QOL of patients on dialysis and mortality rates, hospitalization and absences. Methods: A prospective descriptive study with 286 patients on hemodialysis, by applying demographic questionnaire, KDQOL SF-36 and electronic medical record analysis Dialsist. Results: The mean age was 54.71 ± 14.12 years, with a mean score of QOL 60.53 having as higher factor encouraging the support team (85.03 and lowest in work status (21.11. The days of hospitalization is negatively correlated to the compounds of the instrument, particularly in physical functioning (p = 0.000, mean score (p = 0.001 and emotional well-being (p = 0.005. Women had lower QOL in physical role scores, symptoms/problems, physical functioning, emotional well-being, energy and fatigue mean score (p ≤ 0.05. The lowest score was found to be related to treatment of patients in 1 year and 7 months and 5 years (59.93 and higher in patients with more than five years and one month (61.39. Conclusion: Hospitalizations decrease QV emotional and physical scores and absences are directly related to social support and age. The study looked through the data raise subsidies for the work of the aspects that need stimulation and adaptation in the lives of patients, providing a better balance in the individual's life.

  13. Quality of life in hemodialysis patients and the relationship with mortality, hospitalizations and poor treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Araiê Prado Berger; Schmidt, Debora Berger; Amatneeks, Thaís Malucelli; Santos, Jéssica Caroline Dos; Cavallet, Luiza Helena Raittz; Michel, Renate Brigitte

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) causes sudden changes in the daily lives of patients, creates limitations to perform activities of daily life and creates a great impact on emotions and quality of life (QOL) of patients. To understand the relationship between QOL of patients on dialysis and mortality rates, hospitalization and absences. A prospective descriptive study with 286 patients on hemodialysis, by applying demographic questionnaire, KDQOL SF-36 and electronic medical record analysis Dialsist. The mean age was 54.71 ± 14.12 years, with a mean score of QOL 60.53 having as higher factor encouraging the support team (85.03) and lowest in work status (21.11). The days of hospitalization is negatively correlated to the compounds of the instrument, particularly in physical functioning (p = 0.000), mean score (p = 0.001) and emotional well-being (p = 0.005). Women had lower QOL in physical role scores, symptoms/problems, physical functioning, emotional well-being, energy and fatigue mean score (p ≤ 0.05). The lowest score was found to be related to treatment of patients in 1 year and 7 months and 5 years (59.93) and higher in patients with more than five years and one month (61.39). Hospitalizations decrease QV emotional and physical scores and absences are directly related to social support and age. The study looked through the data raise subsidies for the work of the aspects that need stimulation and adaptation in the lives of patients, providing a better balance in the individual's life.

  14. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

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    Matute-Cruz Petra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848 diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72% of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93. Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality.

  15. Obesity and Mortality, Length of Stay and Hospital Cost among Patients with Sepsis: A Nationwide Inpatient Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    Anh Tuan Nguyen

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the association between obesity and all-cause mortality, length of stay and hospital cost among patients with sepsis 20 years of age or older.It was a retrospective cohort study. The dataset was the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2011, the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. Hospitalizations of sepsis patients 20 years of age or older were included. All 25 primary and secondary diagnosis fields were screened to identify patients with sepsis using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Obesity was the exposure of interest. It was one of the 29 standardized Elixhauser comorbidity measures and readily available in the dataset as a dichotomized variable. The outcome measures were all-cause in-hospital death, length of stay and hospital cost.After weighting, our sample projected to a population size of 1,763,000, providing an approximation for the number of hospital discharges of all sepsis patients 20 years of age or older in the US in 2011. The overall all-cause mortality rate was 14.8%, the median hospital length of stay was 7 days and the median hospital cost was $15,917. After adjustment, the all-cause mortality was lower (adjusted OR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.88; the average hospital length of stay was longer (adjusted difference = 0.65 day; 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.86 and the hospital cost per stay was higher (adjusted difference = $2,927; 95% CI = $1,606 to $4,247 for obese sepsis patients as compared to non-obese ones.With this large and nationally representative sample of over 1,000 hospitals in the US, we found that obesity was significantly associated with a 16% decrease in the odds of dying among hospitalized sepsis patients; however it was also associated with greater duration and cost of hospitalization.

  16. Decreasing incidence and mortality among hospitalized patients suffering a ventilator-associated pneumonia: Analysis of the Spanish national hospital discharge database from 2010 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel-Díez, Javier; López-de-Andrés, Ana; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; Miguel-Yanes, José M de; Del Rio-Lopez, Benito; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe trends in the incidence and outcomes of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) among hospitalized patients in Spain (2010-2014).This is a retrospective study using the Spanish national hospital discharge database from year 2010 to 2014. We selected all hospital admissions that had an ICD-9-CM code: 997.31 for VAP in any diagnosis position. We analyzed incidence, sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, procedures, pathogen isolations, and hospital outcomes.We identified 9336 admissions with patients suffering a VAP. Incidence rates of VAP decreased significantly over time (from 41.7 cases/100,000 inhabitants in 2010 to 40.55 in 2014). The mean Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) was 1.08 ± 0.98 and it did not change significantly during the study period. The most frequent causative agent was Pseudomonas and there were not significant differences in the isolation of this microorganism over time. Time trend analyses showed a significant decrease in in-hospital mortality (IHM), from 35.74% in 2010 to 32.81% in 2014. Factor associated with higher IHM included male sex, older age, higher CCI, vein or artery occlusion, pulmonary disease, cancer, undergone surgery, emergency room admission, and readmission.This study shows that the incidence of VAP among hospitalized patients has decreased in Spain from 2010 to 2014. The IHM has also decreased over the study period. Further investigations are needed to improve the prevention and control of VAP.

  17. Variation in Annual Volume at a University Hospital Does Not Predict Mortality for Pancreatic Resections

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    Rita A. Mukhtar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Annual volume of pancreatic resections has been shown to affect mortality rates, prompting recommendations to regionalize these procedures to high-volume hospitals. Implementation has been difficult, given the paucity of high-volume centers and the logistical hardships facing patients. Some studies have shown that low-volume hospitals achieve good outcomes as well, suggesting that other factors are involved. We sought to determine whether variations in annual volume affected patient outcomes in 511 patients who underwent pancreatic resections at the University of California, San Francisco between 1990 and 2005. We compared postoperative mortality and complication rates between low, medium, or high volume years, designated by the number of resections performed, adjusting for patient characteristics. Postoperative mortality rates did not differ between high volume years and medium/low volume years. As annual hospital volume of pancreatic resections may not predict outcome, identification of actual predictive factors may allow low-volume centers to achieve excellent outcomes.

  18. Cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations and mortality among users of tiotropium in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Luise, Cynthia; Lanes, Stephan F; Jacobsen, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    .17). Compared to periods of non-use, tiotropium was associated with reduced respiratory and overall mortality and was not associated with increased cardiac mortality. An increase in COPD hospitalization is inconsistent with clinical trial data and suggests preferential prescribing due to disease severity.......Tiotropium (Spiriva is an inhaled, once-daily anticholinergic medication for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a population-based cohort study to examine the risk of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations and mortality with tiotropium. Using the Danish healthcare...... registries, we identified persons >/=40 years old in three counties who were hospitalized for COPD from 1/1/1977 to 12/31/2003. Respiratory and cardiovascular medications were assessed from dispensing records. Cox regression was used to compute incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI...

  19. Tracheostomy is associated with decreased hospital mortality after moderate or severe isolated traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, David Marek; Hochrieser, Helene; Metnitz, Philipp G H; Mauritz, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Data regarding the impact and timing of tracheostomy in patients with isolated traumatic brain injury (TBI) are ambiguous. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of tracheostomy on hospital mortality in patients with moderate or severe isolated TBI. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of data prospectively collected at 87 Austrian intensive care units (ICUs). All patients continuously admitted between 1998 and 2010 were evaluated for the study. In total, 4,735 patients were admitted to ICUs with isolated TBI. Of these patients, 2,156 had a moderate or severe TBI (1,603 patients were endotracheally intubated only, 553 patients underwent tracheostomy). Epidemiological data (trauma severity, treatment, and outcome) of the two groups were compared. Patients with moderate or severe isolated TBI undergoing tracheostomy had a similar Glasgow Coma Scale score, median (interquartile range): 6 (3-8) vs 6 (3-8); p = 0.90, and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, 45 (37-54) vs 45 (35-56); p = 0.86, compared with intubated patients not undergoing tracheostomy. Furthermore, patients undergoing tracheostomy exhibited higher Abbreviated Injury Scale Head scores and had a longer ICU stay for survivors, 30 (22-42) vs 9 (3-17) days; p tracheostomy compared with patients who remained intubated, observed-to-expected mortality ratio (95 % confidence interval): 0.62 (0.53-0.72) vs 1.00 (0.95-1.05) respectively. Despite the greater severity of head injury, patients with isolated TBI who underwent tracheostomy had a lower risk-adjusted mortality than patients who remained intubated. Reasons for this difference in outcome may be multifactorial and require further investigation.

  20. Association of Sarcopenia With Nutritional Parameters, Quality of Life, Hospitalization, and Mortality Rates of Elderly Patients on Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Juliana; Kamimura, Maria Ayako; Lamarca, Fernando; Rodrigues, Juliana; Santin, Fernanda; Avesani, Carla Maria

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to assess whether diminished muscle mass, diminished muscle strength, or both conditions (sarcopenia) are associated with worse nutritional status, poor quality of life (QoL), and hard outcomes, such as hospitalization and mortality, in elderly patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). This is a multicenter observational longitudinal study that included 170 patients on MHD (age 70 ± 7 years, 65% male) from 6 dialysis centers. The European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People defines sarcopenia as the presence of both low muscle mass by appendicular skeletal + low muscle function by handgrip strength. This study evaluated the clinical and nutritional status (laboratory, anthropometry, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, 7-point subjective global assessment) and QoL (Kidney Disease Quality of Life) at baseline. Hospitalization and mortality were recorded during 36 months. Reduced muscle mass was observed in 64% of the patients, reduced muscle strength in 52%, and sarcopenia in 37%. The group with sarcopenia was older, had a higher proportion of men and showed worse clinical and nutritional conditions when compared with patients without sarcopenia. Although reduced muscle mass was strongly associated with poor nutritional status, low muscle strength was associated with worse QoL domains. In the multivariate Cox analyses adjusted by age, gender, dialysis vintage, and diabetes mellitus, low muscle strength alone and sarcopenia were associated with higher hospitalization, and sarcopenia was a predictor of mortality. In conclusion, in this sample, comprised of elderly patients on MHD, sarcopenia was associated with worse nutritional and clinical conditions and was a predictor of hospitalization and mortality. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Planned home compared with planned hospital births: mode of delivery and Perinatal mortality rates, an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooy, Jacoba; Birnie, Erwin; Denktas, Semiha; Steegers, Eric A P; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2017-06-08

    To compare the mode of delivery between planned home versus planned hospital births and to determine if differences in intervention rates could be interpreted as over- or undertreatment. Intervention and perinatal mortality rates were obtained for 679,952 low-risk women from the Dutch Perinatal Registry (2000-2007). Intervention was defined as operative vaginal delivery and/or caesarean section. Perinatal mortality was defined as the intrapartum and early neonatal mortality rate up to 7 days postpartum. Besides adjustment for maternal and care factors, we included for additional casemix adjustment: presence of congenital abnormality, small for gestational age, preterm birth, or low Apgar score. The techniques used were nested multiple stepwise logistic regression, and stratified analysis for separate risk groups. An intention-to-treat like analysis was performed. The intervention rate was lower in planned home compared to planned hospital births (10.9% 95% CI 10.8-11.0 vs. 13.8% 95% CI 13.6-13.9). Intended place of birth had significant impact on the likelihood to intervene after adjustment (planned homebirth (OR 0.77 95% CI. 0.75-0.78)). The mortality rate was lower in planned home births (0.15% vs. 0.18%). After adjustment, the interaction term home- intervention was significant (OR1.51 95% CI 1.25-1.84). In risk groups, a higher perinatal mortality rate was observed in planned home births. The potential presence of over- or under treatment as expressed by adjusted perinatal mortality differs per risk group. In planned home births especially multiparous women showed universally lower intervention rates. However, the benefit of substantially fewer interventions in the planned home group seems to be counterbalanced by substantially increased mortality if intervention occurs.

  2. [Evaluation of the capacity of the APR-DRG classification system to predict hospital mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Maria Francesca; Lorenzoni, Luca; Addari, Piero; Nante, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Inpatient mortality has increasingly been used as an hospital outcome measure. Comparing mortality rates across hospitals requires adjustment for patient risks before making inferences about quality of care based on patient outcomes. Therefore it is essential to dispose of well performing severity measures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of the All Patient Refined DRG system to predict inpatient mortality for congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, pneumonia and ischemic stroke. Administrative records were used in this analysis. We used two statistics methods to assess the ability of the APR-DRG to predict mortality: the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (referred to as the c-statistic) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. The database for the study included 19,212 discharges for stroke, pneumonia, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure from fifteen hospital participating in the Italian APR-DRG Project. A multivariate analysis was performed to predict mortality for each condition in study using age, sex and APR-DRG risk mortality subclass as independent variables. Inpatient mortality rate ranges from 9.7% (pneumonia) to 16.7% (stroke). Model discrimination, calculated using the c-statistic, was 0.91 for myocardial infarction, 0.68 for stroke, 0.78 for pneumonia and 0.71 for congestive heart failure. The model calibration assessed using the Hosmer-Leme-show test was quite good. The performance of the APR-DRG scheme when used on Italian hospital activity records is similar to that reported in literature and it seems to improve by adding age and sex to the model. The APR-DRG system does not completely capture the effects of these variables. In some cases, the better performance might be due to the inclusion of specific complications in the risk-of-mortality subclass assignment.

  3. Estimating population cause-specific mortality fractions from in-hospital mortality: validation of a new method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J L Murray

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Cause-of-death data for many developing countries are not available. Information on deaths in hospital by cause is available in many low- and middle-income countries but is not a representative sample of deaths in the population. We propose a method to estimate population cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs using data already collected in many middle-income and some low-income developing nations, yet rarely used: in-hospital death records.For a given cause of death, a community's hospital deaths are equal to total community deaths multiplied by the proportion of deaths occurring in hospital. If we can estimate the proportion dying in hospital, we can estimate the proportion dying in the population using deaths in hospital. We propose to estimate the proportion of deaths for an age, sex, and cause group that die in hospital from the subset of the population where vital registration systems function or from another population. We evaluated our method using nearly complete vital registration (VR data from Mexico 1998-2005, which records whether a death occurred in a hospital. In this validation test, we used 45 disease categories. We validated our method in two ways: nationally and between communities. First, we investigated how the method's accuracy changes as we decrease the amount of Mexican VR used to estimate the proportion of each age, sex, and cause group dying in hospital. Decreasing VR data used for this first step from 100% to 9% produces only a 12% maximum relative error between estimated and true CSMFs. Even if Mexico collected full VR information only in its capital city with 9% of its population, our estimation method would produce an average relative error in CSMFs across the 45 causes of just over 10%. Second, we used VR data for the capital zone (Distrito Federal and Estado de Mexico and estimated CSMFs for the three lowest-development states. Our estimation method gave an average relative error of 20%, 23%, and 31% for

  4. Causes of Neonatal Mortality in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Taleghani Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hossein Zeinalzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal survival is one of the most important challenges today. Over 99% of neonatal mortalities occur in the developing countries, and epidemiologic studies emphasize on this issue in the developed countries, as well. In this study, we attempted to investigate the causes of neonatal mortality in Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we studied causes of neonatal mortality in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, during 2013-2014. Data collection was performed by the head nurse and treating physician using a pre-designed questionnaire. Most of the data were extracted from the neonatal records. Information regarding maternal underlying diseases and health care during pregnancy was extracted from mothers' records.Results: A total of 891 neonates were admitted to NICU of Taleghani Hospital of Tabriz, Iran, during 2013-2014, 68 (7.5% of whom died. Among these cases, 37 (%54.4 were male, 29 (29.4% were extremely low birth weight, and 16 (23.5% weighed more than 2.5 kg. The main causes of mortality were congenital anomalies (35.3%, prematurity (26.5%, and sepsis (10.3%, respectively.Conclusion: Congenital anomaly is the most common cause of mortality, and the pattern of death is changing from preventable diseases to unavoidable mortalities

  5. Increased mortality in patients hospitalized with primary hyperparathyroidism during the period 1977-1993 in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øgard, Christina G; Engholm, Gerda; Almdal, Thomas P

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with the incident hospital diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in Denmark during the period 1977-1993 had an increased mortality from cardiovascular disease and cancer compared to the rest of the Danish population. In a ra......The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with the incident hospital diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in Denmark during the period 1977-1993 had an increased mortality from cardiovascular disease and cancer compared to the rest of the Danish population...

  6. Alcohol dependence and physical comorbidity: Increased prevalence but reduced relevance of individual comorbidities for hospital-based mortality during a 12.5-year observation period in general hospital admissions in urban North-West England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, D; Heun, R

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is associated with an increase in physical comorbidities. The effects of these diseases on general hospital-based mortality are unclear. Consequently, we conducted a mortality study in which we investigated if the burden of physical comorbidities and their relevance on general hospital-based mortality differs between individuals with and without AD during a 12.5-year observation period in general hospital admissions. During 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2012, 23,371 individuals with AD were admitted at least once to seven General Manchester Hospitals. Their physical comorbidities with a prevalence≥1% were compared to those of 233,710 randomly selected hospital controls, group-matched for age and gender (regardless of primary admission diagnosis or specialized treatments). Physical comorbidities that increased the risk of hospital-based mortality (but not outside of the hospital) during the observation period were identified using multiple logistic regression analyses. Hospital-based mortality rates were 20.4% in the AD sample and 8.3% in the control sample. Individuals with AD compared to controls had a higher burden of physical comorbidities, i.e. alcoholic liver and pancreatic diseases, diseases of the conducting airways, neurological and circulatory diseases, diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, renal diseases, cellulitis, iron deficiency anemia, fracture neck of femur, and peripheral vascular disease. In contrast, coronary heart related diseases, risk factors of cardiovascular disease, diverticular disease and cataracts were less frequent in individuals with AD than in controls. Thirty-two individual physical comorbidities contributed to the prediction of hospital-based mortality in univariate analyses in the AD sample; alcoholic liver disease (33.7%), hypertension (16.9%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (14.1%), and pneumonia (13.3%) were the most frequent diagnoses in deceased individuals with AD. Multiple forward

  7. Temporal Trends of Reperfusion Strategies and Hospital Mortality for Patients With STEMI in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention-Capable Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dat T; Welsh, Robert C; Ohinmaa, Arto; Thanh, Nguyen X; Kaul, Padma

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine temporal trends and provincial variations in reperfusion strategies and in-hospital mortality among patients presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at hospitals in Canada capable of performing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We included patients aged ≥ 20 years who were hospitalized between fiscal years 2009 and 2013 in all provinces except Quebec. We categorized patients as receiving fibrinolysis (lysis), primary PCI (pPCI), or no reperfusion. Patients undergoing lysis were further categorized as (1) lysis + PCI ≤ 90 minutes, (2) lysis + PCI > 90 minutes, and (3) lysis only. Patients undergoing pPCI were further categorized as (1) pPCI ≤ 90 minutes and (2) pPCI > 90 minutes. We used logistic regression to examine the baseline-adjusted association between reperfusion strategy and in-hospital mortality. Among 44,650 STEMI episodes in 44,373 patients, 66.3% received pPCI (annual increase of 7.8%; P 90 minutes (adjusted odds ratio of 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.55 compared with pPCI ≤ 90 minutes). The use of pPCI in STEMI has increased significantly in Canada; however, significant interprovincial variation remains. Changes in reperfusion strategies do not appear to have had an impact on in-hospital mortality rates. Patients who underwent lysis followed by PCI in a systematic fashion had the lowest mortality. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Morbidity, Mortality, and Seasonality of Influenza Hospitalizations in Egypt, November 2007-November 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Kandeel, Amr; Dawson, Patrick; Labib, Manal; Said, Mayar; El-Refai, Samir; El-Gohari, Amani; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza typically comprises a substantial portion of acute respiratory infections, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. However, influenza epidemiology data are lacking in Egypt. We describe seven years of Egypt?s influenza hospitalizations from a multi-site influenza surveillance system. Methods Syndromic case definitions identified individuals with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to eight hospitals in Egypt. Standardized demographic and clinical data were ...

  9. Evidence for a link between mortality in acute COPD and hospital type and resources

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, C; Barnes, S; Lowe, D; Pearson, M

    2003-01-01

    Background: The 1997 BTS/RCP national audit of acute care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) found wide variations in mortality between hospitals which were only partially explained by known audit indicators of outcome. It was hypothesised that some of the unexplained variation may result from differences in hospital type, organisation and resources. This pilot study examined the hypothesis as a factor to be included in a future national audit programme.

  10. Mortality is higher in patients with leptomeningeal metastasis in spinal cord tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Amoreira Gepp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord tumors are a rare neoplasm of the central nervous system (CNS. The occurrence of metastases is related to poor prognosis. The authors analyzed one series of metastasis cases and their associated mortality. METHODS: Clinical characteristics were studied in six patients with intramedullary tumors with metastases in a series of 71 surgical cases. RESULTS: Five patients had ependymomas of which two were WHO grade III. The patient with astrocytoma had a grade II histopathological classification. Two patients required shunts for hydrocephalus. The survival curve showed a higher mortality than the general group of patients with no metastases in the CNS (p<0.0001. CONCLUSION: Mortality is elevated in patients with metastasis and greater than in patients with only primary lesions. The ependymomas, regardless of their degree of anaplasia, are more likely to cause metastasis than spinal cord astrocytomas.

  11. Acute kidney injury is independently associated with higher mortality after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Jensen, Mathias E; Nilsson, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the incidence of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery and its association with mortality in a patient population receiving ibuprofen and gentamicin perioperatively. DESIGN: Retrospective study with Cox regression analysis to control for possible preoperative......, intraoperative and postoperative confounders. SETTING: University hospital-based single-center study. PARTICIPANTS: All patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting ± valve surgery during 2012. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: Acute surgery within 24 hours of coronary angiography.......21-4.51, p = 0.011) and 5.62 (95% CI: 2.42-13.06), psurgery developed AKI in this contemporary cohort. Furthermore, acute kidney injury was an independent...

  12. Association of Hospitalization for Neurosurgical Operations in Magnet Hospitals With Mortality and Length of Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon

    2018-03-01

    The association of Magnet hospital status with improved surgical outcomes remains an issue of debate. To investigate whether hospitalization in a Magnet hospital is associated with improved outcomes for patients undergoing neurosurgical operations. A cohort study was executed using all patients undergoing neurosurgical operations in New York registered in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database from 2009 to 2013. We examined the association of Magnet status hospitalization after neurosurgical operations with inpatient case fatality and length of stay (LOS). We employed an instrumental variable analysis to simulate a randomized trial. Overall, 190 787 patients underwent neurosurgical operations. Of these, 68 046 (35.7%) were hospitalized in Magnet hospitals, and 122 741 (64.3%) in non-Magnet institutions. Instrumental variable analysis demonstrated that hospitalization in Magnet hospitals was associated with decreased case fatality (adjusted difference, -0.8%; -95% confidence interval, -0.7% to -0.6%), and LOS (adjusted difference, -1.9; 95% confidence interval, -2.2 to -1.5) in comparison to non-Magnet hospitals. These associations were also observed in propensity score adjusted mixed effects models. These associations persisted in prespecified subgroups of patients undergoing spine surgery, craniotomy for tumor resection, or neurovascular interventions. We identified an association of Magnet hospitals with lower case fatality, and shorter LOS in a comprehensive New York State patient cohort undergoing neurosurgical procedures. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  13. In-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents or oral anticoagulants and hematoma evacuation of intracerebral hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Marco; Misselwitz, Björn; Hamann, Gerhard F; Kolodziej, Malgorzata; Reinges, Marcus H T; Uhl, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    Pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents is described to be a risk factor for mortality after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the impact of antithrombotic agents on mortality in patients who undergo hematoma evacuation compared to conservatively treated patients with ICH remains controversial. This analysis is based on a prospective registry for quality assurance in stroke care in the State of Hesse, Germany. Patients' data were collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Only patients with the diagnosis of spontaneous ICH were included (International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision codes I61.0-I61.9). Predictors of in-hospital mortality were determined by univariate analysis. Predictors with Phematoma evacuation (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-4.97; P=0.010) compared to patients without antiplatelet pre-treatment treatment (OR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.79-1.09; P=0.376). In conclusion a higher rate of in-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents in combination with hematoma evacuation after spontaneous ICH was observed in the presented cohort. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of perioperative liver dysfunction on in-hospital mortality and long-term survival in infective endocarditis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, M; Sponholz, C; von Loeffelholz, C; Scheffel, P; Bauer, M; Kortgen, A; Lehmann, T; Färber, G; Pletz, M W; Doenst, T

    2017-12-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is often associated with multiorgan dysfunction and mortality. The impact of perioperative liver dysfunction (LD) on outcome remains unclear and little is known about factors leading to postoperative LD. We performed a retrospective, single-center analysis on 285 patients with left-sided IE without pre-existing chronic liver disease referred to our center between 2007 and 2013 for valve surgery. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was used to evaluate organ dysfunction. Chi-square, Cox regression, and multivariate analyses were used for evaluation. Preoperative LD (Bilirubin >20 μmol/L) was present in 68 of 285 patients. New, postoperative LD occurred in 54 patients. Hypoxic hepatitis presented the most common origin of LD, accompanied with high short-term mortality. In-hospital mortality was higher in patients with preoperative and postoperative LD compared to patients without LD (51.5, 24.1, and 10.4%, respectively, p endocarditis is an independent predictor of short- and long-term mortalities. After surviving the hospital stay, 5-year prognosis is not different and quality of life is not affected by LD. S. aureus and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass represent risk factors for postoperative LD.

  15. Risk factors and mortality from hospital acquired pneumonia in the Stroke Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Carnesoltas Suarez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stroke is the third leading cause of death. Hospital acquired pneumonia is an ongoing challenge due to the current microbiological spectrum, antimicrobial resistance, high mortality and associated costs. Objetive. To describe risk factors and their relationship to hospital stay and mortality of patients admitted to the Stroke ICU with hospital acquired pneumonia from 2007 to 2009. Methods. Prospective descriptive study. Variables: age, sex, risk factors, time of onset, stay and discharge status. We used chi square (X2 of homogeneity to determine the possible association between variables and the Fisher test probabilities. Results. 61 patients developed hospital acquired pneumonia (34.07%. We found a predominance of 60-80 year-old males. Among the risk factors we found major neurological damage in 21 (34.4%, smoking in 15 (24.5%, heart failure in 11 (18.0%, diabetes mellitus in 6 (9.8%, COPD in 4 (6.5%. Mechanical ventilation was used in 14 (38.4%, endotracheal intubation in 16 (29.2%, prolonged bedridden condition in 11 (18% and nasogastric tube placement in 7 (11.5%. The infection appeared between the third and sixth day in 57.4%; hospital stay was prolonged in 54% and 25 patients died (40.92%. Conclusions. Hospital acquired pneumonia was more common patients with mechanical ventilation, which prolonged stay and increased mortality. The microbiological environment was dominated by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanni.

  16. Mortality Rates of Traumatic Traffic Accident Patients at the University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla Senih MAYDA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to estimate hospitalization and mortality rates in patients admitted to the University Hospital due to traffic accidents, and to determine the mean cost of the applicants in the hospital due to traffic accident. In this retrospective study data were obtained from the records of a university research and practice hospital. There were 802 patients admitted to emergency and other outpatient clinics of the University Hospital because of traffic accidents throughout the year 2012. Out of these patients, 166 (20.7% were hospitalized, and the annual mortality rate was 0.87%. The total cost was 322,545.2 euro and 402.2 euro per patient. Road traffic accident detection reports covered only the numbers of fatal injuries and injuries that happened at the scene of accidents. Determination of the number of the dead and wounded with overall mortality rate would be supposed to reveal the magnitude of public health problem caused by traffic accidents.

  17. Fasting Hyperglycemia Increases In-Hospital Mortality Risk in Nondiabetic Female Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojing Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies had shown that elevated admission plasma glucose (APG could increase mortality rate and serious complications of acute myocardial infarction (AMI, but whether fasting plasma glucose (FPG had the same role remains controversial. In this retrospective study, 253 cases of AMI patients were divided into diabetic (n=87 and nondiabetic group (n=166. Our results showed that: compared with the nondiabetic patients, diabetic patients had higher APG, FPG, higher plasma triglyceride, higher rates of painless AMI (P0.05. While nondiabetic patients were subgrouped in terms of APG and FPG (cut points were 11.1 mmol/L and 7.0 mmol/L, resp., the mortality rate had significant difference (P<0.01, whereas glucose level lost significance in diabetic group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that FPG (OR: 2.014; 95% confidence interval: 1.296–3.131; p<0.01 but not APG was independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for nondiabetic patients. These results indicate that FPG can be an independent predictor for mortality in nondiabetic female patients with AMI.

  18. Timing of surgery for hip fracture and in-hospital mortality: a retrospective population-based cohort study in the Spanish National Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Librero Julián

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the benefits or otherwise of early hip fracture repair is a long-running controversy with studies showing contradictory results, this practice is being adopted as a quality indicator in several health care organizations. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between early hip fracture repair and in-hospital mortality in elderly people attending public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System and, additionally, to explore factors associated with the decision to perform early hip fracture repair. Methods A cohort of 56,500 patients of 60-years-old and over, hospitalized for hip fracture during the period 2002 to 2005 in all the public hospitals in 8 Spanish regions, were followed up using administrative databases to identify the time to surgical repair and in-hospital mortality. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to analyze the relationship between the timing of surgery ( Results Early surgery was performed on 25% of the patients. In the unadjusted analysis early surgery showed an absolute difference in risk of mortality of 0.57 (from 4.42% to 3.85%. However, patients undergoing delayed surgery were older and had higher comorbidity and severity of illness. Timeliness for surgery was not found to be related to in-hospital mortality once confounding factors such as age, sex, chronic comorbidities as well as the severity of illness were controlled for in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Older age, male gender, higher chronic comorbidity and higher severity measured by the Risk Mortality Index were associated with higher mortality, but the time to surgery was not.

  19. Relationships of daily mortality and hospital admissions to air pollution in Castilla-Leon, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pablo, F.; Lopez, A.; Rivas Soriano, L.; Tomas, C. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain)]. E-mail: fpd123@usal.es; Diego, L.; Gonzalez, M. [Instituto Regional de Salud Publica, SACYL Castilla-Leon (Spain); Barrueco, M. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    We examined the possible relationships between pollutant concentrations and mortality at seven different locations of Castilla-Leon, Spain, and the relationships between such concentration levels and emergency admissions (morbidity) at four hospitals in the region, taking into account the possible masking effect of other atmospheric variables. The study was based on daily mortality and morbidity data from 1995 to 1997 (ICD-9 codes: 390-459 cardiovascular; 460-519 respiratory; 520-579 digestive causes); moreover, data for meteorological variables (air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, atmospheric pressure and wind velocity) and air pollution data (SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, NO, NO{sub 2} and CO) were used. A minimum set of weather and pollutant predictors was selected using forward inclusion stepwise linear regression methods and these were used to produce a multivariate model of the different causes of mortality and morbidity. For the whole period, the mortality attributable to cardiovascular causes had an incidence higher than the mortality due to respiratory and digestive causes. The frequency distributions corresponding to the different diseases as classified by ages revealed that the population older than 69 is the most affected, the proportion of cardiovascular disease related deaths in this age sector being 7-fold higher than for the rest of the groups. Mortality and morbidity due to respiratory and cardiovascular-related diseases showed a high correlation coefficient with temperature, solar radiation and ozone, and in general significant correlations were also seen with SO{sub 2}. [Spanish] Se analizan las posibles relaciones existentes entre la mortalidad de la poblacion, el numero de admisiones hospitalarias (morbilidad) y los niveles de concentracion de contaminantes medidos en siete localidades y cuatro hospitales de Castilla-Leon, Espana, respectivamente, teniendo en cuenta el posible efecto de enmascaramiento que ejercen las variables

  20. Weekend specialist intensity and admission mortality in acute hospital trusts in England: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Cassie; Bion, Julian; Boyal, Amunpreet; Chen, Yen-Fu; Clancy, Mike; Evans, Tim; Girling, Alan; Lord, Joanne; Mannion, Russell; Rees, Peter; Roseveare, Chris; Rudge, Gavin; Sun, Jianxia; Tarrant, Carolyn; Temple, Mark; Watson, Sam; Lilford, Richard

    2016-07-09

    admitted at weekends was higher than among those admitted on weekdays (adjusted odds ratio 1·10, 95% CI 1·08-1·11; pspecialist intensity ratios and weekend to weekday mortality ratios (r -0·042; p=0·654). This cross-sectional analysis did not detect a correlation between weekend staffing of hospital specialists and mortality risk for emergency admissions. Further investigation is needed to evaluate whole-system secular change during the implementation of 7 day services. Policy makers should exercise caution before attributing the weekend effect mainly to differences in specialist staffing. National Institute for Health Research Health Services and Delivery Research Programme. Copyright © 2016 Aldridge et al. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Reductions in 28-Day Mortality Following Hospital Admission for Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Colin; Card, Tim; West, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims It is unclear whether mortality from upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is changing: any differences observed might result from changes in age or comorbidity of patient populations. We estimated trends in 28-day mortality in England following hospital admission for gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Methods We used a case-control study design to analyze data from all adults administered to a National Health Service hospital, for upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, from 1999 to 2007 (n = 516,153). Cases were deaths within 28 days of admission (n = 74,992), and controls were survivors to 28 days. The 28-day mortality was derived from the linked national death register. A logistic regression model was used to adjust trends in nonvariceal and variceal hemorrhage mortality for age, sex, and comorbidities and to investigate potential interactions. Results During the study period, the unadjusted, overall, 28-day mortality following nonvariceal hemorrhage was reduced from 14.7% to 13.1% (unadjusted odds ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval: 0.84–0.90). The mortality following variceal hemorrhage was reduced from 24.6% to 20.9% (unadjusted odds ratio, 0.8; 95% confidence interval: 0.69–0.95). Adjustments for age and comorbidity partly accounted for the observed trends in mortality. Different mortality trends were identified for different age groups following nonvariceal hemorrhage. Conclusions The 28-day mortality in England following both nonvariceal and variceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage decreased from 1999 to 2007, and the reduction had been partly obscured by changes in patient age and comorbidities. Our findings indicate that the overall management of bleeding has improved within the first 4 weeks of admission. PMID:21447331

  2. Higher glucocorticoid replacement doses are associated with increased mortality in patients with pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrand, Casper; Ragnarsson, Oskar; Hallén, Tobias; Andersson, Eva; Skoglund, Thomas; Nilsson, Anna G; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Olsson, Daniel S

    2017-09-01

    Patients with secondary adrenal insufficiency (AI) have an excess mortality. The objective was to investigate the impact of the daily glucocorticoid replacement dose on mortality in patients with hypopituitarism due to non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA). Patients with NFPA were followed between years 1997 and 2014 and cross-referenced with the National Swedish Death Register. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated with the general population as reference and Cox-regression was used to analyse the mortality. The analysis included 392 patients (140 women) with NFPA. Mean ± s.d. age at diagnosis was 58.7 ± 14.6 years and mean follow-up was 12.7 ± 7.2 years. AI was present in 193 patients, receiving a mean daily hydrocortisone equivalent (HCeq) dose of 20 ± 6 mg. SMR (95% confidence interval (CI)) for patients with AI was similar to that for patients without, 0.88 (0.68-1.12) and 0.87 (0.63-1.18) respectively. SMR was higher for patients with a daily HCeq dose of >20 mg (1.42 (0.88-2.17)) than that in patients with a daily HCeq dose of 20 mg (0.71 (0.49-0.99)), P  = 0.017. In a Cox-regression analysis, a daily HCeq dose of >20 mg was independently associated with a higher mortality (HR: 1.88 (1.06-3.33)). Patients with daily HCeq doses of ≤20 mg had a mortality risk comparable to patients without glucocorticoid replacement and to the general population. Patients with NFPA and AI receiving more than 20 mg HCeq per day have an increased mortality. Our data also show that mortality in patients substituted with 20 mg HCeq per day or less is not increased. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  3. Mortality and hospitalization incidence among employees of the Thule air-base 1963-1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juel, K.

    1987-01-01

    January 21th 1968 an American B52 bomber with nuclear weapons aboard crashed close to the Thule air-base on Greenland. This report considers mortality and hospitalization incidence among the 4322 persons employed at the air-base. (EG)

  4. Hospital finds nutrition care pays off on all counts, cutting costs, complications, mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Identifying and treating malnutrition early reduces hospital stays, complications, and mortality. St. Francis Healthcare Services in Wilmington, DE, reports a two-year cost avoidance of $2.4 million from the reduced length of stay attributed to its malnutrition program. The program includes a screen to identify patients at high-risk of developing malnutrition and an algorithm for aggressive restorative care.

  5. High mortality among patients with bacterial meningitis in a rural hospital in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. J.; van Dellen, Q. M.; Spanjaard, L.; van Kan, H. J. M.; Groen, A. L.; Wetsteyn, J. C. F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Although the disease is an important cause of mortality in the region, most published reports on bacterial meningitis in East Africa are from urban referral hospitals. Poor laboratory facilities make diagnosis difficult in the area and treatment is limited to inexpensive antibiotics. The

  6. Variability in Very Preterm Stillbirth and In-Hospital Mortality Across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draper, Elizabeth S; Manktelow, Bradley N; Cuttini, Marina

    2017-01-01

    to determine what proportion of the variation in stillbirth and in-hospital VPT mortality rates persists after adjusting for population demographics, case-mix, and timing of death. METHODS: Standardized data collection for a geographically defined prospective cohort of VPTs (22(+0)-31(+6) weeks gestation...

  7. Mortality in COPD patients discharged from hospital: the role of treatment and co-morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, G; Gislason, T; Lindberg, E

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyse mortality and associated risk factors, with special emphasis on health status, medications and co-morbidity, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that had been hospitalized for acute exacerbation. METHODS: This prospective ...

  8. Review of six year cardiovascular mortality at a tertiary hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review of six year cardiovascular mortality at a tertiary hospital in south-east Nigeria. ... E Iheanyi, OM Oghale, K Uwanuruochi, CO Odigwe, A Chuku ... The mean age at death was highest for stroke, 65.0years, likewise the mean duration of ...

  9. Development and validation of multivariable models to predict mortality and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, Adriaan A.; Ouwerkerk, Wouter; Zannad, Faiez; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ng, Leong L.; Metra, Marco; ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Lang, Chim C.; Hillege, Hans L.; van der Harst, Pim; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Dickstein, Kenneth; Cleland, John G.; Anker, Stefan D.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    Introduction From a prospective multicentre multicountry clinical trial, we developed and validated risk models to predict prospective all-cause mortality and hospitalizations because of heart failure (HF) in patients with HF. Methods and results BIOSTAT-CHF is a research programme designed to

  10. Development and validation of multivariable models to predict mortality and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, Adriaan A.; Ouwerkerk, Wouter; Zannad, Faiez; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ng, Leong L.; Metra, Marco; ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Lang, Chim C.; Hillege, Hans L.; van der Harst, Pim; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Dickstein, Kenneth; Cleland, John G.; Anker, Stefan D.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction From a prospective multicentre multicountry clinical trial, we developed and validated risk models to predict prospective all-cause mortality and hospitalizations because of heart failure (HF) in patients with HF. Methods and results BIOSTAT-CHF is a research programme designed to

  11. Predicting hospital mortality among frequently readmitted patients: HSMR biased by readmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, W.F.; Kelder, J.C.; Wagner, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Casemix adjusted in-hospital mortality is one of the measures used to improve quality of care. The adjustment currently used does not take into account the effects of readmission, because reliable data on readmission is not readily available through routinely collected databases. We have

  12. Predicting hospital mortality among frequently readmitted patients: HSMR biased by readmission.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.F. van den; Kelder, J.C.; Wagner, C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Casemix adjusted in-hospital mortality is one of the measures used to improve quality of care. The adjustment currently used does not take into account the effects of readmission, because reliable data on readmission is not readily available through routinely collected databases. We have

  13. Risk Factors for In-Hospital Mortality among Ischemic Stroke Patients in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung-Ter Ong

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Nearly 30% of in-hospital mortality is associated with preventable factors. The prognosis of acute stroke can be improved by increased focus on reducing serious complications after stroke, particularly on the prevention of infection, heart disease, and increased intracranial pressure.

  14. Assessment of malnutrition in hip fracture patients: effects on surgical delay, hospital stay and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonidis, Panagiotis D; Clark, David

    2006-08-01

    The importance of malnutrition in elderly hip fracture patients has long been recognised. All patients operated upon for a hip fracture over a five-year period were assessed according to two nutritional markers : a) serum albumin levels and b) peripheral blood total lymphocyte count. Patients were subdivided into groups according to the four possible combinations of these results. Outcomes according to four clinical outcome parameters were validated: a) waiting time to operation b) length of hospitalisation, c) in-hospital mortality, and d) one-year postoperative mortality. Significant differences were found between malnourished patients and those with normal laboratory values with regard to surgical delay and one year postoperative mortality. Malnourished patients were also more likely to be hospitalised longer than a month and to die during their hospital stay, but the difference was not significant. The combination of serum albumin level and total lymphocyte count can be used as an independent prognostic factor in hip fracture patients.

  15. Gender differences in in-hospital mortality and mechanisms of death after the first acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabijanic, D.; Culic, V.; Bozic, I; Miric, D.; Stipic, S.S.; Radic, M.; Vucinovic, Z.

    2006-01-01

    There are conflicting data about gender differences in short-term mortality after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after adjusting for age and other prognostic factors. Therefore, we investigated the risk profile, clinical presentation, in-hospital mortality and mechanisms of death in women and men after the first AMI. The data was obtained from a chart review of 3382 consecutive patients, 1184 (35%) women (69.7+-10.9 years) and 2198 (65%) men (63.5+-11.8 years) with first AMI. The effect of gender and its interaction with age, risk factors and thrombolytic therapy on overall mortality and mechanisms of death were examined using logistic regression. Unadjusted in-hospital mortalty was higher in women (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.47-2.15). Adjustment that included both age only and age and other base-line differences (Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, AMI type, AMI site, mean peak CK value, thrombolytic therapy)decreased the magnitude of the relative risk of women to men but did not eliminate it (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.54 and OR 1.31 95% CI 1.03-1.66, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that female gender was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality after the first AMI. Women were dying more often because of mechanical complications-refractory pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock (P=0.02) or electromechanical dissociation (P=0.03), and men were dying mostly by arrhythmic death, primary ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (P=0.002). Female gender was independently associated with mechanical death (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.35-2.58; P=0.01) and anterior AMI was independently associated with arrhythmic death (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.86; P=0.01). Our result demonstrate significant differences in mechanisms of in-hospital death after the first AMI in women, and men, suggesting the possibility that higher in-hospital mortality in women exists primarily because of the postponing AMI death due to the gender-related differences in

  16. Single living predicts a higher mortality in both women and men with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mard, Shan; Nielsen, Finn Erland

    2016-09-01

    We examined the impact of single living on all-cause mortality in patients with chronic heart failure and determined if this association was modified by gender. This historical cohort study included 637 patients who were admitted to the Department of Cardiology, Herlev Hospital, Denmark, between 1 July 2005 and 30 June 2007. Baseline clinical data were obtained from patient records. Data on survival rates were obtained from the Danish Civil Registration System. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to compute the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality, controlling for confounding factors. The median follow-up time was 2.8 years. A total of 323 (50.7%) patients died during the follow-up period. After adjustment for confounding factors, risk of death was associated with being single (HR = 1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.19-1.96)). In a gender-stratified analysis, the risk of death did not differ among single-living women and men. Single living is a prognostic determinant of all-cause mortality in men and women with chronic heart failure. none. not relevant.

  17. Gender, TIMI risk score and in-hospital mortality in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI: results from the Belgian STEMI registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Sofie A; De Bacquer, Dirk; Evrard, Patrick; Convens, Carl; Dubois, Philippe; Boland, Jean; Renard, Marc; Beauloye, Christophe; Coussement, Patrick; De Raedt, Herbert; de Meester, Antoine; Vandecasteele, Els; Vranckx, Pascal; Sinnaeve, Peter R; Claeys, Marc J

    2014-01-22

    The relationship between the predictive performance of the TIMI risk score for STEMI and gender has not been evaluated in the setting of primary PCI (pPCI). Here, we compared in-hospital mortality and predictive performance of the TIMI risk score between Belgian women and men undergoing pPCI. In-hospital mortality was analysed in 8,073 (1,920 [23.8%] female and 6,153 [76.2%] male patients) consecutive pPCI-treated STEMI patients, included in the prospective, observational Belgian STEMI registry (January 2007 to February 2011). A multivariable logistic regression model, including TIMI risk score variables and gender, evaluated differences in in-hospital mortality between men and women. The predictive performance of the TIMI risk score according to gender was evaluated in terms of discrimination and calibration. Mortality rates for TIMI scores in women and men were compared. Female patients were older, had more comorbidities and longer ischaemic times. Crude in-hospital mortality was 10.1% in women vs. 4.9% in men (OR 2.2; 95% CI: 1.82-2.66, pdiscrimination and calibration in women as well as in men (c-statistic=0.84 [95% CI: 0.809-0.866], goodness-of-fit p=0.53 and c-statistic=0.89 [95% CI: 0.873-0.907], goodness-of-fit p=0.13, respectively), but mortality prediction for TIMI scores was better in men (p=0.02 for TIMI score x gender interaction). In the Belgian STEMI registry, pPCI-treated women had a higher in-hospital mortality rate even after correcting for TIMI risk score variables. The TIMI risk score was effective in predicting in-hospital mortality but performed slightly better in men. The database was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00727623).

  18. [Influence of malnutrition on childhood mortality in a rural hospital in Rwanda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngirabega, J-d-D; Munyanshongore, C; Donnen, P; Dramaix, M

    2011-10-01

    Recent estimates of the role of malnutrition on childhood mortality have led to a call for action by decision makers in the fight against child malnutrition. Further evaluation is needed to assess the burden of malnutrition in terms of morbidity and mortality, as well as to assess the impact of various interventions. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of malnutrition on mortality in a pediatric service of a rural hospital in Rwanda. A prospective cohort study included children aged 6-59 months coming from the catchment area of the hospital and admitted to the pediatric ward between January 2008 and June 2009. Anthropometric, clinical and biological data were gathered at the time of admission. The effect of malnutrition at the time of admission on mortality during hospitalization was analyzed by using logistic regression. At the time of admission, the prevalences of wasting, underweight and stunting among children was 14.2%, 37.5% and 57.3% respectively. Fifty-six children died during hospitalization. The period mortality rate was 6.9%. After adjustment for age, sex, malaria thick smear and breathing with chest retractions, death was associated with underweight and stunting with adjusted odds rations of 4.6 (IC95% 2.5-8.4) and 4.0 (IC95% 2.0-8.2) respectively. The study confirmed the influence of malnutrition on child mortality in pediatrics wards. These results can be of great help for improving the awareness of the community decision-makers in the fight to prevent malnutrition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A Swiss paradox? Higher income inequality of municipalities is associated with lower mortality in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough-Gorr, Kerri M; Egger, Matthias; Spoerri, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    It has long been surmised that income inequality within a society negatively affects public health. However, more recent studies suggest there is no association, especially when analyzing small areas. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of income inequality on mortality in Switzerland using the Gini index on municipality level. The study population included all individuals >30 years at the 2000 Swiss census (N = 4,689,545) living in 2,740 municipalities with 35.5 million person-years of follow-up and 456,211 deaths over follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression models were adjusted for age, gender, marital status, nationality, urbanization, and language region. Results were reported as hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals. The mean Gini index across all municipalities was 0.377 (standard deviation 0.062, range 0.202-0.785). Larger cities, high-income municipalities and tourist areas had higher Gini indices. Higher income inequality was consistently associated with lower mortality risk, except for death from external causes. Adjusting for sex, marital status, nationality, urbanization and language region only slightly attenuated effects. In fully adjusted models, hazards of all-cause mortality by increasing Gini index quintile were HR = 0.99 (0.98-1.00), HR = 0.98 (0.97-0.99), HR = 0.95 (0.94-0.96), HR = 0.91 (0.90-0.92) compared to the lowest quintile. The relationship of income inequality with mortality in Switzerland is contradictory to what has been found in other developed high-income countries. Our results challenge current beliefs about the effect of income inequality on mortality on small area level. Further investigation is required to expose the underlying relationship between income inequality and population health.

  20. The Relationship between Serum Hemoglobin and Creatinine Levels and Intra-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Fazlinezhad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR and Hemoglobin (Hb concentrations are two predictive values for ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (MI mortality.. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between GFR and Hb concentrations and intra-hospital mortality and electrocardiographic (ECG and echocardiographic abnormalities in ST-elevation MI patients admitted to a highly equipped hospital in Mashhad. The results will help define some factors to manage these patients more efficiently.. Patients and Methods: This descriptive study aimed to assess the relationship between Hb and GFR concentrations and mortality and morbidity among 294 randomly selected patients with ST-elevation MI. Echocardiography, ECG, and routine laboratory tests, including Hb and creatinine, were performed for all the patients. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software, version 16 and were analyzed using chi-square, t-test, and ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant.. Results: Intra-hospital mortality rate was 10.5%. Besides, the results showed higher levels of serum blood sugar (P < 0.001, higher levels of creatinine (P < 0.001, lower levels of GFR (P < 0.001, lower ejection fraction (P < 0.001, higher grades of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (P = 0.002, and lower mean Hb concentration (P = 0.022 in the dead compared to the alive cases. Besides, the patients with mechanical complications had lower Hb levels (P = 0.008. The results showed no significant relationship between creatinine level and mechanical and electrical complications (P = 0.430 and P = 0.095, respectively. However, ejection fraction was significantly associated with GFR (P = 0.016.. Conclusions: According to the results, low levels of Hb and GFR could predict mortality caused by ST-elevation MI and ECG abnormalities could notify intra-hospital death. Moreover, lower Hb levels were associated with mechanical

  1. Making hospital mortality measurement more meaningful: incorporating advance directives and palliative care designations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroch, Eugene A; Johnson, Mark; Martin, John; Duan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Accounting for patients admitted to hospitals at the end of a terminal disease process is key to signaling care quality and identifying opportunities for improvement. This study evaluates the benefits and caveats of incorporating care-limiting orders, such as do not resuscitate (DNR) and palliative care (PC) information, in a general multivariate model of mortality risk, wherein the unit of observation is the patient hospital encounter. In a model of the mortality gap (observed - expected from the baseline model), DNR explains 8% to 24% of the gap variation. PC provides additional explanatory power to some disease groupings, especially heart and digestive diseases. One caveat is that DNR information, especially if associated with the later stages of hospital care, may mask opportunities to improve care for certain types of patients. But that is not a danger for PC, which is unequivocally valuable in accounting for patient risk, especially for certain subpopulations and disease groupings.

  2. Common causes of morbidity and mortality amongst diabetic admissions at the university of Benin teaching hospital, Benin city, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eregie, A.; Unadike, B.C.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide and Nigeria is no exception. To determine the morbidity and mortality in patients admitted with Diabetes Mellitus in a tertiary teaching hospital of Nigeria, through retrospective analysis of admission and death records. Admission and death certificate records from the medical wards of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, were retrospectively analysed from 1, August 2003 to 31, July 2004. Data included age, gender, total numbers of admissions and those due to Diabetes Mellitus, the indications for admissions, presenting symptoms and method of diagnoses in diabetic patients, mortality rates and causes of death. Data obtained were analysed using chi square. Out of 1567 medical admissions, 852(54.4%) were males and 715(45.6%) females. Diabetes was detected in 145(9.3%) patients [81(55.9%) males, 64(44.1%) females]. The mean age of diabetic patients was 53.6+16.1 years (range 18 - 94 years). Poor glycaemic control (29%) and diabetic foot syndrome (23.4%) were the most common reasons for admission in diabetic cases. The overall mortality rate among medical admissions was 21.8%, with diabetes accounting for 6.7% deaths. Within the cohort of diabetic cases, mortality was 15.9%, with significantly higher mortality in those aged > 65 years (p < 0.05). The most common causes of death in diabetic cases were Cerebrovascular disease and complications associated with the foot syndrome, accounting for 26.1% and 21.7% of deaths respectively; the least common causes of death in diabetic patients were Malaria, Hepatic Encephalopathy, and Carcinoma of the Cervix, accounting for 4.4% of deaths. Cerebrovascular disease was the most frequent cause of mortality among admitted diabetic patients with diabetic foot syndrome (a preventable complication) as the second most frequent cause of mortality. Increased screening for diabetes mellitus morbidities in the clinic and community

  3. The effect of serum potassium level on in-hospital and long-term mortality in ST elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Muhammed; Kaya, Adnan; Tatlısu, Mustafa Adem; Hayıroğlu, Mert İlker; Uzman, Osman; Börklü, Edibe Betül; Çinier, Göksel; Çakıllı, Yasin; Yaylak, Barış; Eren, Mehmet

    2016-10-15

    Current studies evaluating the effect of serum potassium levels on mortality in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are lacking. We analyzed retrospectively 3760 patients diagnosed with STEMI. Mean serum potassium levels were categorized accordingly: <3.0, 3.0 to <3.5, 3.5 to <4.0, 4.0 to <4.5, 4.5 to <5.0, 5.0 to <5.5, and ≥5.5mEq/L. The lowest mortality was determined in patients with serum potassium level of 4 to <4.5mEq/L whereas mortality was higher in patients with serum potassium levels of ≥5.0 and <3.5mEq/L. In a multivariable Cox-proportional regression analysis, the mortality risk was higher for patients with serum potassium levels of ≥5mEq/L [hazard ratio (HR), 2.11; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-4.74 and HR, 4.20; 95% CI 1.08-8.23, for patients with potassium levels of 5 to <5.5mEq/L and ≥5.5mEq/L, respectively]. In-hospital and long-term mortality risks were also higher for patients with serum potassium levels of ≤3.5mEq/L. Conversely, ventricular arrhythmias were higher only for patients with serum potassium level of ≤3.5mEq/L. Furthermore, a significant relationship was found between the patient with serum potassium levels of ≤3.5mEq/L and ventricular arrhythmias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pathway from Delirium to Death: Potential In-Hospital Mediators of Excess Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmarajan, Kumar; Swami, Sunil; Gou, Ray Y; Jones, Richard N; Inouye, Sharon K

    2017-05-01

    (1) To determine the relationship of incident delirium during hospitalization with 90-day mortality; (2) to identify potential in-hospital mediators through which delirium increases 90-day mortality. Analysis of data from Project Recovery, a controlled clinical trial of a delirium prevention intervention from 1995 to 1998 with follow-up through 2000. Large academic hospital. Patients ≥70 years old without delirium at hospital admission who were at intermediate-to-high risk of developing delirium and received usual care only. (1) Incident delirium; (2) potential mediators of delirium on death including use of restraining devices (physical restraints, urinary catheters), development of hospital acquired conditions (HACs) (falls, pressure ulcers), and exposure to other noxious insults (sleep deprivation, acute malnutrition, dehydration, aspiration pneumonia); (3) death within 90 days of admission. Among 469 patients, 70 (15%) developed incident delirium. These patients were more likely to experience restraining devices (37% vs 16%, P delirium was 4.2 (95% CI = 2.8-6.3) in bivariable analyses, increased in a graded manner with additional exposures to restraining devices, HACs, and other noxious insults, and declined by 10.9% after addition of these potential mediator categories, providing evidence of mediation. Restraining devices, HACs, and additional noxious insults were more frequent among patients with delirium, increased mortality in a graded manner, and were responsible for a significant percentage of the association of delirium with death. Additional efforts to prevent potential downstream mediators through which delirium increases mortality may help to improve outcomes among hospitalized older adults. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Blood lactate as a predictor for in-hospital mortality in patients admitted acutely to hospital: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Ole; Grunnet, Niels; Barfod, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    to the hospital, or serial lactate measurements. Furthermore there is no consensus whether the sample should be drawn from arterial, peripheral venous, or capillary blood. The aim of this review was: 1) To examine whether blood lactate levels are predictive for in-hospital mortality in patients in the acute...... setting, i.e. patients assessed pre-hospitally, in the trauma centre, emergency department, or intensive care unit. 2) To examine the agreement between arterial, peripheral venous, and capillary blood lactate levels in patients in the acute setting. METHODS: We performed a systematic search using Pub......Med, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and CINAHL up to April 2011. 66 articles were considered potentially relevant and evaluated in full text, of these ultimately 33 articles were selected. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The literature reviewed supported blood...

  6. Reduced in-hospital mortality after improved management of children under 5 years admitted to hospital with malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biai, Sidu; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Gomes, Melba

    2007-01-01

    in the use of the standardised guidelines for the management of malaria, including strict follow-up procedures. Nurses and doctors were randomised to work on intervention or control wards. Personnel in the intervention ward received a small financial incentive ($50 (25 pounds sterling; 35 euros......OBJECTIVE: To test whether strict implementation of a standardised protocol for the management of malaria and provision of a financial incentive for health workers reduced mortality. DESIGN: Randomised controlled intervention trial. SETTING: Paediatric ward at the national hospital in Guinea......-Bissau. All children admitted to hospital with severe malaria received free drug kits. PARTICIPANTS: 951 children aged 3 months to 5 years admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of malaria randomised to normal or intervention wards. INTERVENTIONS: Before the start of the study, all personnel were trained...

  7. Excess morbidity and mortality in patients with craniopharyngioma: a hospital-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, Mark; Olsson, Daniel S; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Hammarstrand, Casper; Janssen, Joseph A M J L; van der Lely, Aart J; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M

    2018-01-01

    Most studies in patients with craniopharyngioma did not investigate morbidity and mortality relative to the general population nor evaluated risk factors for excess morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine excess morbidity and mortality, as well as their determinants in patients with craniopharyngioma. Hospital-based retrospective cohort study conducted between 1987 and 2014. We included 144 Dutch and 80 Swedish patients with craniopharyngioma identified by a computer-based search in the medical records (105 females (47%), 112 patients with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma (50%), 3153 person-years of follow-up). Excess morbidity and mortality were analysed using standardized incidence and mortality ratios (SIRs and SMRs). Risk factors were evaluated univariably by comparing SIRs and SMRs between non-overlapping subgroups. Patients with craniopharyngioma experienced excess morbidity due to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (SIR: 4.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.8-6.8) and cerebral infarction (SIR: 4.9, 95% CI: 3.1-8.0) compared to the general population. Risks for malignant neoplasms, myocardial infarctions and fractures were not increased. Patients with craniopharyngioma also had excessive total mortality (SMR: 2.7, 95% CI: 2.0-3.8), and mortality due to circulatory (SMR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.1-4.5) and respiratory (SMR: 6.0, 95% CI: 2.5-14.5) diseases. Female sex, childhood-onset craniopharyngioma, hydrocephalus and tumour recurrence were identified as risk factors for excess T2DM, cerebral infarction and total mortality. Patients with craniopharyngioma are at an increased risk for T2DM, cerebral infarction, total mortality and mortality due to circulatory and respiratory diseases. Female sex, childhood-onset craniopharyngioma, hydrocephalus and tumour recurrence are important risk factors. © 2018 European Society of Endocrinology.

  8. Mortality and hospitalization at the end of life in newly admitted nursing home residents with and without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allers, Katharina; Hoffmann, Falk

    2018-05-02

    The proportion of deaths occurring in nursing homes is increasing and end of life hospitalizations in residents are common. This study aimed to obtain the time from nursing home admission to death and the frequency of hospitalizations prior to death among residents with and without dementia. This retrospective cohort study analyzed claims data of 127,227 nursing home residents aged 65 years and older newly admitted to a nursing home between 2010 and 2014. We analyzed hospitalizations during the last year of life and assessed mortality rates per 100 person-years. Factors potentially associated with time to death were analyzed in Cox proportional hazard models. The median time from nursing home admission to death was 777 and 635 days in residents with and without dementia, respectively. Being male, older age and a higher level of care decreased the survival time. Sex and age had a higher influence on survival time in residents with dementia, whereas level of care was found to have a higher influence in residents without dementia. Half of the residents of both groups were hospitalized during the last month and about 37% during the last week before death. Leading causes of hospitalizations were infections (with dementia: 20.6% vs. without dementia: 17.2%) and cardiovascular diseases (with dementia: 16.6% vs. without dementia: 19.0%). A high proportion of residents with and without dementia are hospitalized shortly before death. There should be an open debate about the appropriateness of hospitalizing nursing home residents especially those with dementia near death.

  9. Recent age- and gender-specific trends in mortality during stroke hospitalization in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovbiagele, Bruce; Markovic, Daniela; Towfighi, Amytis

    2011-10-01

    Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have resulted in better clinical outcomes after stroke; however, the influence of age and gender on recent trends in death during stroke hospitalization has not been specifically investigated. We assessed the impact of age and gender on nationwide patterns of in-hospital mortality after stroke. Data were obtained from all US states that contributed to the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. All patients admitted to hospitals between 1997 and 1998 (n=1 351 293) and 2005 and 2006 (n=1 202 449), with a discharge diagnosis of stroke (identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision procedure codes), were included. Time trends for in-hospital mortality after stroke were evaluated by gender and age group based on 10-year age increments (84) using multivariable logistic regression. Between 1997 and 2006, in-hospital mortality rates decreased across time in all sub-groups (all P84 years. In unadjusted analysis, men aged >84 years in 1997-1998 had poorer mortality outcomes than similarly aged women (odds ratio 0·93, 95% confidence interval=0·88-0·98). This disparity worsened by 2005-2006 (odds ratio 0·88, 95% confidence interval=0·84-0·93). After adjusting for confounders, compared with similarly aged women, the mortality outcomes among men aged >84 years were poorer in 1997-1998 (odds ratio 0·97, 95% confidence interval=0·92-1·02) and were poorer in 2005-2006 (odds ratio 0·92, 95% confidence interval=0·87-0·96), P=0·04, for gender × time trend. Over the last decade, in-hospital mortality rates after stroke in the United States have declined for every age/gender group, except men aged >84 years. Given the rapidly ageing US population, avenues for boosting in-hospital survival among very elderly men with stroke need to be explored. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  10. Early hospital mortality prediction of intensive care unit patients using an ensemble learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Aya; Bader-El-Den, Mohamed; McNicholas, James; Briggs, Jim

    2017-12-01

    Mortality prediction of hospitalized patients is an important problem. Over the past few decades, several severity scoring systems and machine learning mortality prediction models have been developed for predicting hospital mortality. By contrast, early mortality prediction for intensive care unit patients remains an open challenge. Most research has focused on severity of illness scoring systems or data mining (DM) models designed for risk estimation at least 24 or 48h after ICU admission. This study highlights the main data challenges in early mortality prediction in ICU patients and introduces a new machine learning based framework for Early Mortality Prediction for Intensive Care Unit patients (EMPICU). The proposed method is evaluated on the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) database. Mortality prediction models are developed for patients at the age of 16 or above in Medical ICU (MICU), Surgical ICU (SICU) or Cardiac Surgery Recovery Unit (CSRU). We employ the ensemble learning Random Forest (RF), the predictive Decision Trees (DT), the probabilistic Naive Bayes (NB) and the rule-based Projective Adaptive Resonance Theory (PART) models. The primary outcome was hospital mortality. The explanatory variables included demographic, physiological, vital signs and laboratory test variables. Performance measures were calculated using cross-validated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) to minimize bias. 11,722 patients with single ICU stays are considered. Only patients at the age of 16 years old and above in Medical ICU (MICU), Surgical ICU (SICU) or Cardiac Surgery Recovery Unit (CSRU) are considered in this study. The proposed EMPICU framework outperformed standard scoring systems (SOFA, SAPS-I, APACHE-II, NEWS and qSOFA) in terms of AUROC and time (i.e. at 6h compared to 48h or more after admission). The results show that although there are many values missing in the first few hour of ICU admission

  11. Predicting hospital mortality among frequently readmitted patients: HSMR biased by readmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelder Johannes C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Casemix adjusted in-hospital mortality is one of the measures used to improve quality of care. The adjustment currently used does not take into account the effects of readmission, because reliable data on readmission is not readily available through routinely collected databases. We have studied the impact of readmissions by linking admissions of the same patient, and as a result were able to compare hospital mortality among frequently, as opposed to, non-frequently readmitted patients. We also formulated a method to adjust for readmission for the calculation of hospital standardised mortality ratios (HSMRs. Methods We conducted a longitudinal retrospective analysis of routinely collected hospital data of six large non-university teaching hospitals in the Netherlands with casemix adjusted standardised mortality ratios ranging from 65 to 114 and a combined value of 93 over a five-year period. Participants concerned 240662 patients admitted 418566 times in total during the years 2003 - 2007. Predicted deaths by the HSMR model 2008 over a five-year period were compared with observed deaths. Results Numbers of readmissions per patient differ substantially between the six hospitals, up to a factor of 2. A large interaction was found between numbers of admissions per patient and HSMR-predicted risks. Observed deaths for frequently admitted patients were significantly lower than HSMR-predicted deaths, which could be explained by uncorrected factors surrounding readmissions. Conclusions Patients admitted more frequently show lower risks of dying on average per admission. This decline in risk is only partly detected by the current HSMR. Comparing frequently admitted patients to non-frequently admitted patients commits the constant risk fallacy and potentially lowers HSMRs of hospitals treating many frequently admitted patients and increases HSMRs of hospitals treating many non-frequently admitted patients. This misleading effect can

  12. Predicting hospital mortality among frequently readmitted patients: HSMR biased by readmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Casemix adjusted in-hospital mortality is one of the measures used to improve quality of care. The adjustment currently used does not take into account the effects of readmission, because reliable data on readmission is not readily available through routinely collected databases. We have studied the impact of readmissions by linking admissions of the same patient, and as a result were able to compare hospital mortality among frequently, as opposed to, non-frequently readmitted patients. We also formulated a method to adjust for readmission for the calculation of hospital standardised mortality ratios (HSMRs). Methods We conducted a longitudinal retrospective analysis of routinely collected hospital data of six large non-university teaching hospitals in the Netherlands with casemix adjusted standardised mortality ratios ranging from 65 to 114 and a combined value of 93 over a five-year period. Participants concerned 240662 patients admitted 418566 times in total during the years 2003 - 2007. Predicted deaths by the HSMR model 2008 over a five-year period were compared with observed deaths. Results Numbers of readmissions per patient differ substantially between the six hospitals, up to a factor of 2. A large interaction was found between numbers of admissions per patient and HSMR-predicted risks. Observed deaths for frequently admitted patients were significantly lower than HSMR-predicted deaths, which could be explained by uncorrected factors surrounding readmissions. Conclusions Patients admitted more frequently show lower risks of dying on average per admission. This decline in risk is only partly detected by the current HSMR. Comparing frequently admitted patients to non-frequently admitted patients commits the constant risk fallacy and potentially lowers HSMRs of hospitals treating many frequently admitted patients and increases HSMRs of hospitals treating many non-frequently admitted patients. This misleading effect can only be demonstrated by an

  13. Winter excess in hospital admissions, in-patient mortality and length of acute hospital stay in stroke: a hospital database study over six seasonal years in Norfolk, UK.

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    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Woodhouse, Peter R; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have examined the incidence and mortality of stroke in relation to season. However, the evidence is conflicting partly due to variation in the populations (community vs. hospital-based), and in climatic conditions between studies. Moreover, they may not have been able to take into account the age, sex and stroke type of the study population. We hypothesized that the age, sex and type of stroke are major determinants of the presence or absence of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. We analyzed a hospital-based stroke register from Norfolk, UK to examine our prior hypothesis. Using Curwen's method, we performed stratified sex-specific analyses by (1) seasonal year and (2) quartiles of patients' age and stroke subtype and calculated the winter excess for the number of admissions, in-patient deaths and length of acute hospital stay. There were 5,481 patients (men=45%). Their ages ranged from 17 to 105 years (median=78 years). There appeared to be winter excess in hospital admissions, deaths and length of acute hospital stay overall accounting for 3/100,000 extra admissions (winter excess index of 3.4% in men and 7.6% in women) and 1/100,000 deaths (winter excess index of 4.7 and 8.6% in women) due to stroke in winter compared to non-winter periods. Older patients with non-haemorrhagic stroke mainly contribute to this excess. If our findings are replicated throughout England and Wales, it is estimated that there are 1,700 excess admissions, 600 excess in-patient deaths and 24,500 extra acute hospital bed days each winter, related to stroke within the current population of approximately 60 million. Further research should be focused on the determinants of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. This may subsequently reduce the morbidity and mortality by providing effective preventive strategies in future. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Scored patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment: Length of hospital stay and mortality in cancer patients

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    Alexsandro Ferreira dos SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To determine the association of a scored patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment with mortality and length of hospital stay in cancer patients. Methods Cross-sectional study carried out between July and September 2014 using secondary data collection using data from 366 medical records of patients admitted to a hospital recognized as a cancer center of excellence. The present study included patients with hospital stay over than or equal three days and minimum age of 20 years. The patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment scores were calculated and compared with the patients’ clinical and anthropometric characteristics and outcomes (death and long length of stay in hospital. Results Of the 366 patients evaluated, 36.0% were malnourished. The presence of malnutrition, according to the scored patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment, was statistically associated with the presence of metastasis (52.4%. On the other hand, malnutrition, according to the body mass index in adults (55.8% and in older elderly patients (54.2%, was associated with death (55.0%. The adjusted logistic regression model showed that the following factors were associated with prolonged hospitalization: early nutritional screening, presence of severe malnutrition, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and surgical procedures. As for mortality, the associated factors were: male reproductive system tumor, presence of metastasis, clinical treatment, prolonged hospitalization, and the presence of some degree of malnutrition. Conclusion The patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment score is an important risk marker of prolonged hospitalization and mortality rates. It is a useful tool capable of circumventing significant biases in the nutritional evaluation of cancer patients.

  15. Reductions in inpatient mortality following interventions to improve emergency hospital care in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

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    Matthew Clark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The demand for high quality hospital care for children in low resource countries is not being met. This paper describes a number of strategies to improve emergency care at a children's hospital and evaluates the impact of these on inpatient mortality. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of improving emergency care is estimated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A team of local and international staff developed a plan to improve emergency care for children arriving at The Ola During Children's Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone. Following focus group discussions, five priority areas were identified to improve emergency care; staff training, hospital layout, staff allocation, medical equipment, and medical record keeping. A team of international volunteers worked with local staff for six months to design and implement improvements in these five priority areas. The improvements were evaluated collectively rather than individually. Before the intervention, the inpatient mortality rate was 12.4%. After the intervention this improved to 5.9%. The relative risk of dying was 47% (95% CI 0.369-0.607 lower after the intervention. The estimated number of lives saved in the first two months after the intervention was 103. The total cost of the intervention was USD 29 714, the estimated cost per death averted was USD 148. There are two main limitation of the study. Firstly, the brevity of the study and secondly, the assumed homogeneity of the clinical cases that presented to the hospital before and after the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstarted a signficant reductuion in inpatient mortality rate after an intervention to improve emergency hospital care If the findings of this paper could be reproduced in a larger more rigorous study, improving the quality of care in hospitals would be a very cost effective strategy to save children's lives in low resource settings.

  16. Predicting mortality among hospitalized children with respiratory illness in Western Kenya, 2009-2012.

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    Gideon O Emukule

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pediatric respiratory disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. We evaluated a modified respiratory index of severity in children (mRISC scoring system as a standard tool to identify children at greater risk of death from respiratory illness in Kenya. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed data from children <5 years old who were hospitalized with respiratory illness at Siaya District Hospital from 2009-2012. We used a multivariable logistic regression model to identify patient characteristics predictive for in-hospital mortality. Model discrimination was evaluated using the concordance statistic. Using bootstrap samples, we re-estimated the coefficients and the optimism of the model. The mRISC score for each child was developed by adding up the points assigned to each factor associated with mortality based on the coefficients in the multivariable model. RESULTS: We analyzed data from 3,581 children hospitalized with respiratory illness; including 218 (6% who died. Low weight-for-age [adjusted odds ratio (aOR = 2.1; 95% CI 1.3-3.2], very low weight-for-age (aOR = 3.8; 95% CI 2.7-5.4, caretaker-reported history of unconsciousness (aOR = 2.3; 95% CI 1.6-3.4, inability to drink or breastfeed (aOR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.8, chest wall in-drawing (aOR = 2.2; 95% CI 1.5-3.1, and being not fully conscious on physical exam (aOR = 8.0; 95% CI 5.1-12.6 were independently associated with mortality. The positive predictive value for mortality increased with increasing mRISC scores. CONCLUSIONS: A modified RISC scoring system based on a set of easily measurable clinical features at admission was able to identify children at greater risk of death from respiratory illness in Kenya.

  17. Association Between Treatment by Locum Tenens Internal Medicine Physicians and 30-Day Mortality Among Hospitalized Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Daniel M; Olenski, Andrew R; Tsugawa, Yusuke; Jena, Anupam B

    2017-12-05

    Use of locum tenens physicians has increased in the United States, but information about their quality and costs of care is lacking. To evaluate quality and costs of care among hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries treated by locum tenens vs non-locum tenens physicians. A random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries hospitalized during 2009-2014 was used to compare quality and costs of hospital care delivered by locum tenens and non-locum tenens internal medicine physicians. Treatment by locum tenens general internal medicine physicians. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included inpatient Medicare Part B spending, length of stay, and 30-day readmissions. Differences between locum tenens and non-locum tenens physicians were estimated using multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for beneficiary clinical and demographic characteristics and hospital fixed effects, which enabled comparisons of clinical outcomes between physicians practicing within the same hospital. In prespecified subgroup analyses, outcomes were reevaluated among hospitals with different levels of intensity of locum tenens physician use. Of 1 818 873 Medicare admissions treated by general internists, 38 475 (2.1%) received care from a locum tenens physician; 9.3% (4123/44 520) of general internists were temporarily covered by a locum tenens physician at some point. Differences in patient characteristics, demographics, comorbidities, and reason for admission between locum tenens and non-locum tenens physicians were not clinically relevant. Treatment by locum tenens physicians, compared with treatment by non-locum tenens physicians (n = 44 520 physicians), was not associated with a significant difference in 30-day mortality (8.83% vs 8.70%; adjusted difference, 0.14%; 95% CI, -0.18% to 0.45%). Patients treated by locum tenens physicians had significantly higher Part B spending ($1836 vs $1712; adjusted difference, $124; 95% CI, $93 to $154

  18. Trends in Red Blood Cell Transfusion and 30-Day Mortality among Hospitalized Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinian, Nareg H; Escobar, Gabriel J; Liu, Vincent; Swain, Bix E; Gardner, Marla N; Kipnis, Patricia; Triulzi, Darrell J; Gottschall, Jerome L; Wu, Yan; Carson, Jeffrey L; Kleinman, Steven H; Murphy, Edward L

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood conservation strategies have been shown to be effective in decreasing red blood cell (RBC) utilization in specific patient groups. However, few data exist describing the extent of RBC transfusion reduction or their impact on transfusion practice and mortality in a diverse inpatient population. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using comprehensive electronic medical record data from 21 medical facilities in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC). We examined unadjusted and risk-adjusted RBC transfusion and 30-day mortality coincident with implementation of RBC conservation strategies. Findings The inpatient study cohort included 391,958 patients who experienced 685,753 hospitalizations. From 2009 to 2013, the incidence of RBC transfusion decreased from 14.0% to 10.8% of hospitalizations; this change coincided with a decline in pre-transfusion hemoglobin levels from 8.1 to 7.6 g/dL. Decreased RBC utilization affected broad groups of admission diagnoses and was most pronounced in patients with a nadir hemoglobin level between 8 and 9 g/dL (n=73,057; 50.8% to 19.3%). During the study period, the standard deviation of risk adjusted RBC transfusion incidence across hospitals decreased by 44% (p blood conservation strategies, RBC transfusion incidence and pre-transfusion hemoglobin levels decreased broadly across medical and surgical patients. Variation in RBC transfusion incidence across hospitals decreased from 2010 to 2013. Consistent with clinical trial data, more restrictive transfusion practice did not appear to impact 30-day mortality. PMID:25135770

  19. Reduced Time in Therapeutic Range and Higher Mortality in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Taking Acenocoumarol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Caravaca, José Miguel; Roldán, Vanessa; Esteve-Pastor, María Asunción; Valdés, Mariano; Vicente, Vicente; Marín, Francisco; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) depends on the quality of anticoagulant control, reflected by the mean time in therapeutic range (TTR) of international normalized ratio 2.0 to 3.0. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the association between TTR and change in TTR (ΔTTR) with the risk of mortality and clinically significant events in a consecutive cohort of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. We included 1361 AF patients stable on VKAs (international normalized ratio 2.0-3.0) during at least the previous 6 months. After 6 months of follow-up we recalculated TTR, calculated ΔTTR (ie, the difference between baseline and 6-month TTRs) and investigated the association of both with the risk of mortality and "clinically significant events" (defined as the composite of stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, acute coronary syndrome, acute heart failure, and all-cause deaths). The median ΔTTR at 6 months of entry was 20% (interquartile range 0-34%), 796 (58.5%) patients had a TTR reduction of at least 20%, while 330 (24.2%) had a TTR <65%. During follow-up, 34 (2.5% [4.16% per year]) patients died and 61 (4.5% [7.47% per year]) had a clinically significant event. Median ΔTTR was significantly higher in patients who died (35.5% vs 20%; P = 0.002) or sustained clinically significant events (28% vs 20%; P = 0.022). Based on Cox regression analyses, the overall risk of mortality at 6 months for each decrease point in TTR was 1.02 (95% CI, 1.01-1.04; P = 0.003), and the risk of clinically significant events was 1.01 (95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P = 0.028). Patients with TTR <65% at 6 months had higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio = 2.96; 95% CI, 1.51-5.81; P = 0.002) and clinically significant events (hazard ratio = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.01-2.88; P = 0.046). Our findings suggest that in AF patients anticoagulated with VKAs, a change in TTR over 6 months (ie, ΔTTR) is an independent risk factor for mortality and clinically significant events

  20. Association between delirium superimposed on dementia and mortality in hospitalized older adults: A prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago J Avelino-Silva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalized older adults with preexisting dementia have increased risk of having delirium, but little is known regarding the effect of delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD on the outcomes of these patients. Our aim was to investigate the association between DSD and hospital mortality and 12-mo mortality in hospitalized older adults.This was a prospective cohort study completed in the geriatric ward of a university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. We included 1,409 hospitalizations of acutely ill patients aged 60 y and over from January 2009 to June 2015. Main variables and measures included dementia and dementia severity (Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly, Clinical Dementia Rating and delirium (Confusion Assessment Method. Primary outcomes were time to death in the hospital and time to death in 12 mo (for the discharged sample. Comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed at admission, and additional clinical data were documented upon death or discharge. Cases were categorized into four groups (no delirium or dementia, dementia alone, delirium alone, and DSD. The no delirium/dementia group was defined as the referent category for comparisons, and multivariate analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for possible confounders (sociodemographic information, medical history and physical examination data, functional and nutritional status, polypharmacy, and laboratory covariates. Overall, 61% were women and 39% had dementia, with a mean age of 80 y. Dementia alone was observed in 13% of the cases, with delirium alone in 21% and DSD in 26% of the cases. In-hospital mortality was 8% for patients without delirium or dementia, 12% for patients with dementia alone, 29% for patients with delirium alone, and 32% for DSD patients (Pearson Chi-square = 112, p < 0.001. DSD and delirium alone were independently associated with in-hospital mortality, with respective hazard ratios (HRs of 2.14 (95% CI

  1. Factors Impacting Mortality in the Pre-Hospital Period After Road Traffic Accidents in Urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Ananthnarayan; Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Sandhya; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    India currently has the dubious distinction of experiencing the highest number of road traffic accidents in the world. We believe that this study on road traffic accidents may help to identify factors in the pre-hospital setting that may influence mortality rates. A prospective observational study was carried out in a metro area in India over a period of one year. The study included consecutive patients admitted to the trauma service after road traffic accidents. Demographic information, time and place of accident, and details regarding the vehicle and the events leading up to the hospital admission were recorded. Injury severity, management in the hospital, and final outcomes in terms of mortality were noted. The data were analyzed with SPSS software. A total of 773 patients were enrolled. Of these, there were 197 deaths and 576 survivors. The majority of patients were aged 15 - 40 years (67%) and were male (87.84%). More accidents occurred at night (58.2%) than during the day (41.8%). Mortality was not significantly associated with age, sex, or time of accident. City roads (38.9%) saw more accidents than highways (26.13%), but highway accidents were more likely to be fatal. Two-wheeler riders (37.65%) and pedestrians (35.75%) formed the majority of our study population. Mortality was significantly associated with crossing the road on foot (P = 0.004). Pillion riders on two-wheeler vehicles were more likely to experience poor outcomes (relative risk [RR] = 1.9, P = 0.001). Front-seat occupants in four-wheeler vehicles were at an increased risk of not surviving the accident (61.98%; RR=2.56, P = 0.01). Lack of safety gear, such as helmets, seat belts, and airbags, was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.05). Delays in transfers of patients to the hospital and a lack of pre-hospital emergency services was significantly associated with increased mortality (P = 0.000). A lack of respect for the law, weak legislation and law enforcement, disregard for

  2. Basic geriatric assessment does not predict in-hospital mortality after PEG placement

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    Smoliner Christine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is an established procedure for long-term nutrition. However, studies have underlined the importance of proper patient selection as mortality has been shown to be relatively high in acute illness and certain patient groups, amongst others geriatric patients. Objective of the study was to gather information about geriatric patients receiving PEG and to identify risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality after PEG placement. Methods All patients from the GEMIDAS database undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in acute geriatric wards from 2006 to 2010 were included in a retrospective database analysis. Data on age, gender, main diagnosis leading to hospital admission, death in hospital, care level, and legal incapacitation were extracted from the main database of the Geriatric Minimum Data Set. Self-care capacity was assessed by the Barthel index, and cognitive status was rated with the Mini Mental State Examination or subjectively judged by the clinician. Descriptive statistics and group comparisons were chosen according to data distribution and scale of measurement, logistic regression analysis was performed to examine influence of various factors on hospital mortality. Results A total of 1232 patients (60.4% women with a median age of 82 years (range 60 to 99 years were included. The mean Barthel index at admission was 9.5 ± 14.0 points. Assessment of cognitive status was available in about half of the patients (n = 664, with 20% being mildly impaired and almost 70% being moderately to severely impaired. Stroke was the most common main diagnosis (55.2%. In-hospital mortality was 12.8%. In a logistic regression analysis, old age (odds ratio (OR 1.030, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.003-1.056, male sex (OR 1.741, 95% CI 1.216-2.493, and pneumonia (OR 2.641, 95% CI 1.457-4.792 or the diagnosis group ‘miscellaneous disease’ (OR 1.864, 95% CI 1

  3. Height loss with advancing age in a hospitalized population of Polish men and women: magnitude, pattern and associations with mortality

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    Chmielewski Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The connection between the rate of height loss in older people and their general health status has been well documented in the medical literature. Our study was aimed at furthering the characterization of this interrelationship in the context of health indices and mortality in a hospitalized population of Polish adults. Data were collated from a literature review and from a longitudinal study of aging carried out in the Polish population which followed 142 physically healthy inmates, including 68 men and 74 women, for at least 25 years from the age of 45 onwards. Moreover, cross-sectional data were available from 225 inmates, including 113 men and 112 women. These subjects were confined at the same hospital. ANOVA, t-test, and regression analysis were employed. The results indicate that the onset of height loss emerges in the fourth and five decade of life and there is a gradual acceleration of reduction of height at later stages of ontogeny in both sexes. Postmenopausal women experience a more rapid loss of height compared with men. The individuals who had higher rate of loss of height (≥3 cm/decade tend to be at greater risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In conclusion, our findings suggest that a systematic assessment of the rate of loss of height can be useful for clinicians caring for elderly people because of its prognostic value in terms of morbidity and mortality.

  4. Early hospital readmission for gastrointestinal-related complications predicts long-term mortality after pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Craig-Schapiro, Rebecca; Valero, Vicente; Cameron, John L; Eckhauser, Frederic E; Hirose, Kenzo; Makary, Martin A; Pawlik, Timothy M; Ahuja, Nita; Weiss, Matthew J; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of early (30-day) hospital readmission (EHR) on mortality after pancreatectomy. Using a prospectively collected institutional database linked with a statewide dataset, we evaluated the association between EHR and overall mortality in all patients undergoing pancreatectomy at our tertiary institution (2005 to 2010). Of 595 pancreatectomy patients, EHR occurred in 21.5%. Overall mortality was 29.4% (median follow-up 22.7 months). Patients with EHR had decreased survival compared with those who were not readmitted (P = .011). On multivariate analysis adjusting for baseline group differences, EHR for gastrointestinal-related complications was a significant independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 2.30, P = .001). In addition to known risk factors, 30-day readmission for gastrointestinal-related complications following pancreatectomy independently predicts increased mortality. Additional studies are necessary to identify surgical, medical, and social factors contributing to EHR, as well as interventions aimed at decreasing postpancreatectomy morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Surgical Safety Checklist on Mortality of Surgical Patients in the α University Hospitals

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    R. Mohebbifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Patient safety is one of the indicators of risk management in clinical governance system. Surgical care is one of the most sophisticated medical care in the hospitals. So it is not surprising that nearly half of the adverse events, 66% were related to surgery. Pre-flight aircraft Inspection model is starting point for designing surgical safety checklist that use for audit procedure. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the use of surgical safety checklist on surgical patients mortality and complications. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective descriptive study. This study was conducted in 2012 in the North West of Iran. The population consisted of patients who had undergoing surgery in α university of medical science`s hospital which have surgical department. In this study, 1125 patients underwent surgery within 3 months were studied. Data collection tool was designed based on WHO model and Surgcical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program(SCOAP. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS-20 statistical software and logistic regression analysis was used to calculate P values for each comparison. Results: No significant differences between patients in the two periods (before and after There was. All complications rate reduced from 11 percent to 4 percent after the intervention by checklist (p<0.001. In the all hospitals mortality rate was decreased from 3.44% to 1.3% (p <0.003. Overall rate of surgical site infection and unplanned return to the operating room was reduced (p<0.001 and p<0.046. Conclusion: Many people every year due to lack of safety in hospitals, lose their lives. Despite the risks, such as leaving surgery sets in patient body and wrong surgery is due to lack of proper safety programs during surgery. By using safety checklist in all hospitals mortality rate and complications was reduced but this reduction was extremely in α3 hospital (from 5.2% to 1.48%.

  6. A European benchmarking system to evaluate in-hospital mortality rates in acute coronary syndrome: the EURHOBOP project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégano, Irene R; Subirana, Isaac; Torre, Marina; Grau, María; Vila, Joan; Fusco, Danilo; Kirchberger, Inge; Ferrières, Jean; Malmivaara, Antti; Azevedo, Ana; Meisinger, Christa; Bongard, Vanina; Farmakis, Dimitros; Davoli, Marina; Häkkinen, Unto; Araújo, Carla; Lekakis, John; Elosua, Roberto; Marrugat, Jaume

    2015-03-01

    Hospital performance models in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are useful to assess patient management. While models are available for individual countries, mainly US, cross-European performance models are lacking. Thus, we aimed to develop a system to benchmark European hospitals in AMI and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), based on predicted in-hospital mortality. We used the EURopean HOspital Benchmarking by Outcomes in ACS Processes (EURHOBOP) cohort to develop the models, which included 11,631 AMI patients and 8276 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients who underwent PCI. Models were validated with a cohort of 55,955 European ACS patients. Multilevel logistic regression was used to predict in-hospital mortality in European hospitals for AMI and PCI. Administrative and clinical models were constructed with patient- and hospital-level covariates, as well as hospital- and country-based random effects. Internal cross-validation and external validation showed good discrimination at the patient level and good calibration at the hospital level, based on the C-index (0.736-0.819) and the concordance correlation coefficient (55.4%-80.3%). Mortality ratios (MRs) showed excellent concordance between administrative and clinical models (97.5% for AMI and 91.6% for PCI). Exclusion of transfers and hospital stays ≤1day did not affect in-hospital mortality prediction in sensitivity analyses, as shown by MR concordance (80.9%-85.4%). Models were used to develop a benchmarking system to compare in-hospital mortality rates of European hospitals with similar characteristics. The developed system, based on the EURHOBOP models, is a simple and reliable tool to compare in-hospital mortality rates between European hospitals in AMI and PCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nurse staffing and education and hospital mortality in nine European countries: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas M; Bruyneel, Luk; Van den Heede, Koen; Griffiths, Peter; Busse, Reinhard; Diomidous, Marianna; Kinnunen, Juha; Kózka, Maria; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; McHugh, Matthew D; Moreno-Casbas, M T; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Schwendimann, Rene; Scott, P Anne; Tishelman, Carol; van Achterberg, Theo; Sermeus, Walter

    2014-05-24

    Austerity measures and health-system redesign to minimise hospital expenditures risk adversely affecting patient outcomes. The RN4CAST study was designed to inform decision making about nursing, one of the largest components of hospital operating expenses. We aimed to assess whether differences in patient to nurse ratios and nurses' educational qualifications in nine of the 12 RN4CAST countries with similar patient discharge data were associated with variation in hospital mortality after common surgical procedures. For this observational study, we obtained discharge data for 422,730 patients aged 50 years or older who underwent common surgeries in 300 hospitals in nine European countries. Administrative data were coded with a standard protocol (variants of the ninth or tenth versions of the International Classification of Diseases) to estimate 30 day in-hospital mortality by use of risk adjustment measures including age, sex, admission type, 43 dummy variables suggesting surgery type, and 17 dummy variables suggesting comorbidities present at admission. Surveys of 26,516 nurses practising in study hospitals were used to measure nurse staffing and nurse education. We used generalised estimating equations to assess the effects of nursing factors on the likelihood of surgical patients dying within 30 days of admission, before and after adjusting for other hospital and patient characteristics. An increase in a nurses' workload by one patient increased the likelihood of an inpatient dying within 30 days of admission by 7% (odds ratio 1·068, 95% CI 1·031-1·106), and every 10% increase in bachelor's degree nurses was associated with a decrease in this likelihood by 7% (0·929, 0·886-0·973). These associations imply that patients in hospitals in which 60% of nurses had bachelor's degrees and nurses cared for an average of six patients would have almost 30% lower mortality than patients in hospitals in which only 30% of nurses had bachelor's degrees and nurses cared

  8. Global Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination on Childhood Hospitalizations and Mortality From Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Eleanor; Jonesteller, Christine L; Tate, Jacqueline E; Yen, Catherine; Parashar, Umesh D

    2017-06-01

    In 2006, 2 rotavirus vaccines were licensed. We summarize the impact of rotavirus vaccination on hospitalizations and deaths from rotavirus and all-cause acute gastroenteritis (AGE) during the first 10 years since vaccine licensure, including recent evidence from countries with high child mortality. We used standardized guidelines (PRISMA) to identify observational evaluations of rotavirus vaccine impact among children rotavirus AGE were reduced by a median of 67% overall and 71%, 59%, and 60% in countries with low, medium, and high child mortality, respectively. Implementation of rotavirus vaccines has substantially decreased hospitalizations from rotavirus and all-cause AGE. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Trends in maternal mortality at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Nigeria, 1999–2009

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    TU Agan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available TU Agan1, EI Archibong1, JE Ekabua1, EI Ekanem1, S E Abeshi1, TA Edentekhe2, EE Bassey21Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and 2Department of Anesthesia, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, NigeriaBackground: Maternal mortality remains a major public health challenge, not only at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, but in the developing world in general.Objective: The objective of this study was to assess trends in maternal mortality in a tertiary health facility, the maternal mortality ratio, the impact of sociodemographic factors in the deaths, and common medical and social causes of these deaths at the hospital.Methodology: This was a retrospective review of obstetric service delivery records of all maternal deaths over an 11-year period (01 January 1999 to 31 December 2009. All pregnancy-related deaths of patients managed at the hospital were included in the study.Results: A total of 15,264 live births and 231 maternal deaths were recorded during the period under review, giving a maternal mortality ratio of 1513.4 per 100,000 live births. In the last two years, there was a downward trend in maternal deaths of about 69.0% from the 1999 value. Most (63.3% of the deaths were in women aged 20–34 years, 33.33% had completed at least primary education, and about 55.41% were unemployed. Eight had tertiary education. Two-thirds of the women were married. Obstetric hemorrhage was the leading cause of death (32.23%, followed by hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Type III delay accounted for 48.48% of the deaths, followed by Type I delay (35.5%. About 69.26% of these women had no antenatal care. The majority (61.04% died within the first 48 hours of admission.Conclusion: Although there was a downward trend in maternal mortality over the study period, the extent of the reduction is deemed inadequate. The medical and social causes of maternal deaths identified in this study are preventable, especially

  10. Standard assessments of frailty are validated predictors of mortality in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tapper, Elliot B

    2015-04-04

    The risk of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients with cirrhosis is high and incompletely captured by conventional indices. We sought to evaluate the predictive role of frailty in an observational cohort study of inpatients with decompensated cirrhosis between 2010 and 2013. The primary outcome was 90-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included discharge to a rehabilitation hospital, 30-day readmission, and length of stay. Frailty was assessed with three metrics: activities of daily living (ADL), the Braden Scale, and the Morse fall risk score. A predictive model was validated by randomly dividing the population into training and validation cohorts: 734 patients were admitted 1358 times in the study period. The overall 90-day mortality was 18.3%. The 30-day readmission rate was 26.6%, and the rate of discharge to a rehabilitation facility was 14.3%. Adjusting for sex, age, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease, sodium, and Charlson index, the odds ratio for the effect of an ADL score of less than 12 of 15 on mortality is 1.83 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-3.20). A predictive model for 90-day mortality including ADL and Braden Scale yielded C statistics of 0.83 (95% CI 0.80-0.86) and 0.77 (95% CI 0.71-0.83) in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. Discharge to a rehabilitation hospital is predicted by both the ADL (<12) and Braden Scale (<16), with respective adjusted odds ratios of 3.78 (95% CI 1.97-7.29) and 6.23 (95% CI 2.53-15.4). Length of stay was associated with the Braden Scale (<16) (hazard ratio = 0.63, 95% CI 0.44-0.91). No frailty measure was associated with 30-day readmission.

  11. Survival curves to support quality improvement in hospitals with excess 30-day mortality after acute myocardial infarction, cerebral stroke and hip fracture: a before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Helgeland, Jon; Waage, Halfrid Persdatter; Thalamus, Jacob; Clemens, Dirk; Lindman, Anja Schou; Rygh, Liv Helen; Tjomsland, Ole

    2015-03-25

    To evaluate survival curves (Kaplan-Meier) as a means of identifying areas in the clinical pathway amenable to quality improvement. Observational before-after study. In Norway, annual public reporting of nationwide 30-day in-and-out-of-hospital mortality (30D) for three medical conditions started in 2011: first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and hip fracture; reported for 2009. 12 of 61 hospitals had statistically significant lower/higher mortality compared with the hospital mean. Three hospitals with significantly higher mortality requested detailed analyses for quality improvement purposes: Telemark Hospital Trust Skien (AMI and stroke), Østfold Hospital Trust Fredrikstad (stroke), Innlandet Hospital Trust Gjøvik (hip fracture). Survival curves, crude and risk-adjusted 30D before (2008-2009) and after (2012-2013). Unadjusted survival curves for the outlier hospitals were compared to curves based on pooled data from the other hospitals for the 30-day period 2008-2009. For patients admitted with AMI (Skien), stroke (Fredrikstad) and hip fracture (Gjøvik), the curves suggested increased mortality from the initial part of the clinical pathway. For stroke (Skien), increased mortality appeared after about 8 days. The curve profiles were thought to reflect suboptimal care in various phases in the clinical pathway. This informed improvement efforts. For 2008-2009, hospital-specific curves differed from other hospitals: borderline significant for AMI (p=0.064), highly significant (p≤0.005) for the remainder. After intervention, no difference was found (p>0.188). Before-after comparison of the curves within each hospital revealed a significant change for Fredrikstad (p=0.006). For the three hospitals, crude 30D declined and they were non-outliers for risk-adjusted 30D for 2013. Survival curves as a supplement to 30D may be useful for identifying suboptimal care in the clinical pathway, and thus informing design of quality improvement projects

  12. Obstetric near-miss and maternal mortality in maternity university hospital, Damascus, Syria: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almerie, Yara; Almerie, Muhammad Q; Matar, Hosam E; Shahrour, Yasser; Al Chamat, Ahmad Abo; Abdulsalam, Asmaa

    2010-10-19

    Investigating severe maternal morbidity (near-miss) is a newly recognised tool that identifies women at highest risk of maternal death and helps allocate resources especially in low income countries. This study aims to i. document the frequency and nature of maternal near-miss at hospital level in Damascus, Capital of Syria, ii. evaluate the level of care at maternal life-saving emergency services by comparatively analysing near-misses and maternal mortalities. Retrospective facility-based review of cases of near-miss and maternal mortality that took place in the years 2006-2007 at Damascus Maternity University Hospital, Syria. Near-miss cases were defined based on disease-specific criteria (Filippi 2005) including: haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, dystocia, infection and anaemia. Main outcomes included maternal mortality ratio (MMR), maternal near miss ratio (MNMR), mortality indices and proportion of near-miss cases and mortality cases to hospital admissions. There were 28,025 deliveries, 15 maternal deaths and 901 near-miss cases. The study showed a MNMR of 32.9/1000 live births, a MMR of 54.8/100,000 live births and a relatively low mortality index of 1.7%. Hypertensive disorders (52%) and haemorrhage (34%) were the top causes of near-misses. Late pregnancy haemorrhage was the leading cause of maternal mortality (60%) while sepsis had the highest mortality index (7.4%). Most cases (93%) were referred in critical conditions from other facilities; namely traditional birth attendants homes (67%), primary (5%) and secondary (10%) healthcare unites and private practices (11%). 26% of near-miss cases were admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Near-miss analyses provide valuable information on obstetric care. The study highlights the need to improve antenatal care which would help early identification of high risk pregnancies. It also emphasises the importance of both: developing protocols to prevent/manage post-partum haemorrhage and training health

  13. Obstetric near-miss and maternal mortality in maternity university hospital, Damascus, Syria: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Chamat Ahmad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigating severe maternal morbidity (near-miss is a newly recognised tool that identifies women at highest risk of maternal death and helps allocate resources especially in low income countries. This study aims to i. document the frequency and nature of maternal near-miss at hospital level in Damascus, Capital of Syria, ii. evaluate the level of care at maternal life-saving emergency services by comparatively analysing near-misses and maternal mortalities. Methods Retrospective facility-based review of cases of near-miss and maternal mortality that took place in the years 2006-2007 at Damascus Maternity University Hospital, Syria. Near-miss cases were defined based on disease-specific criteria (Filippi 2005 including: haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, dystocia, infection and anaemia. Main outcomes included maternal mortality ratio (MMR, maternal near miss ratio (MNMR, mortality indices and proportion of near-miss cases and mortality cases to hospital admissions. Results There were 28 025 deliveries, 15 maternal deaths and 901 near-miss cases. The study showed a MNMR of 32.9/1000 live births, a MMR of 54.8/100 000 live births and a relatively low mortality index of 1.7%. Hypertensive disorders (52% and haemorrhage (34% were the top causes of near-misses. Late pregnancy haemorrhage was the leading cause of maternal mortality (60% while sepsis had the highest mortality index (7.4%. Most cases (93% were referred in critical conditions from other facilities; namely traditional birth attendants homes (67%, primary (5% and secondary (10% healthcare unites and private practices (11%. 26% of near-miss cases were admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Conclusion Near-miss analyses provide valuable information on obstetric care. The study highlights the need to improve antenatal care which would help early identification of high risk pregnancies. It also emphasises the importance of both: developing protocols to

  14. Patient-prosthesis mismatch has no influence on in-hospital mortality after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yottasurodom, Chaiwut; Namthaisong, Kriengkrai; Porapakkham, Pramote; Kasemsarn, Choosak; Chotivatanapong, Taweesak; Chaiseri, Pradistchai; Wongdit, Suwannee; Yasotarin, Suwanna

    2012-08-01

    To analyze the relationship between prosthetic aortic valve orifice and body surface area (Effective Orifice Area Index, EOAI) and in-hospital mortality after aortic valve replacement. A prospective study was conducted between October 2007 to September 2010, 536 patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) was recorded on preoperative, operative and postoperative data. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch (PPM) was classified by Effective Orifice Area Indexed (EOAI) by prosthetic valve area divided by body surface area as mild or no significance if the EOAI is greater than 0.85 cm2/m2, moderate if between 0.65 cm2/m2 and 0.85 cm2/m2, and severe if less than 0.65 cm2/m2. Statistical differences were analyzed by Chi-square and student t-test with p-value less than 0.05 considered significant. There were 304 men, mean age was 60.98 years, mean valve orifice area 1.69 cm2, body surface area 1.60 m2, cross clamp time 1.13 hrs., bypass time 1.67 hrs. Mechanical valves were used in 274 patients (51.2%) and Bioprosthesis were used in 181 patients (48.8%). PPM was found in 33.7%, 6.7% was severe PPM, 27% was moderate PPM and 66.3% has no significant PPM Over all in-hospital mortality was 1.5%. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality between no PPM group, moderate PPM and severe PPM group (1.4% vs. 1.4% vs. 5.4%, p-value = 0.86). In a large aortic valve surgery population, moderate and severe patient prosthesis mismatch occurred in 35.6% of patients but had no influence on in-hospital mortality.

  15. Prognostic importance of glycaemic variability on hospital mortality in patients hospitalised in Internal Medicine Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz-Abad, D; Gimeno-Orna, J A; Pérez-Calvo, J I

    2015-12-01

    The objective was to assess the prognostic importance of various glycaemic control measures on hospital mortality. Retrospective, analytical cohort study that included patients hospitalised in internal medicine departments with a diagnosis related to diabetes mellitus (DM), excluding acute decompensations. The clinical endpoint was hospital mortality. We recorded clinical, analytical and glycaemic control-related variables (scheduled insulin administration, plasma glycaemia at admission, HbA1c, mean glycaemia (MG) and in-hospital glycaemic variability and hypoglycaemia). The measurement of hospital mortality predictors was performed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. A total of 384 patients (50.3% men) were included. The mean age was 78.5 (SD, 10.3) years. The DM-related diagnoses were type 2 diabetes (83.6%) and stress hyperglycaemia (6.8%). Thirty-one (8.1%) patients died while in hospital. In the multivariate analysis, the best model for predicting mortality (R(2)=0.326; P<.0001) consisted, in order of importance, of age (χ(2)=8.19; OR=1.094; 95% CI 1.020-1.174; P=.004), Charlson index (χ(2)=7.28; OR=1.48; 95% CI 1.11-1.99; P=.007), initial glycaemia (χ(2)=6.05; OR=1.007; 95% CI 1.001-1.014; P=.014), HbA1c (χ(2)=5.76; OR=0.59; 95% CI 0.33-1; P=.016), glycaemic variability (χ(2)=4.41; OR=1.031; 95% CI 1-1.062; P=.036), need for corticosteroid treatment (χ(2)=4.03; OR=3.1; 95% CI 1-9.64; P=.045), administration of scheduled insulin (χ(2)=3.98; OR=0.26; 95% CI 0.066-1; P=.046) and systolic blood pressure (χ(2)=2.92; OR=0.985; 95% CI 0.97-1.003; P=.088). An increase in initial glycaemia and in-hospital glycaemic variability predict the risk of mortality for hospitalised patients with DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  16. A health partnership to reduce neonatal mortality in four hospitals in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntigurirwa, Placide; Mellor, Kathy; Langer, Daniel; Evans, Mari; Robertson, Emily; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Groves, Alan; Lissauer, Tom

    2017-06-01

    A health partnership to improve hospital based neonatal care in Rwanda to reduce neonatal mortality was requested by the Rwandan Ministry of Health. Although many health system improvements have been made, there is a severe shortage of health professionals with neonatal training. Following a needs assessment, a health partnership grant for 2 years was obtained. A team of volunteer neonatologists and paediatricians, neonatal nurses, lactation consultants and technicians with experience in Rwanda or low-income countries was assembled. A neonatal training program was provided in four hospitals (the 2 University hospitals and 2 district hospitals), which focused on nutrition, provision of basic respiratory support with nasal CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure), enhanced record keeping, thermoregulation, vital signs monitoring and infection control. To identify if care delivery improved, audits of nutritional support, CPAP use and its complications, and documentation in newly developed neonatal medical records were conducted. Mortality data of neonatal admissions was obtained. Intensive neonatal training was provided on 27 short-term visits by 10 specialist health professionals. In addition, a paediatric doctor spent 3 months and two spent 6 months each providing training. A total of 472 training days was conducted in the neonatal units. For nutritional support, significant improvements were demonstrated in reduction in time to initiation of enteral feeds and to achieve full milk feeds, in reduction in maximum postnatal weight loss, but not in days for regaining birth weight. Respiratory support with bubble CPAP was applied to 365 infants in the first 18 months. There were no significant technical problems, but tissue damage, usually transient, to the nose and face was recorded in 13%. New medical records improved documentation by doctors, but nursing staff were reluctant to use them. Mortality for University teaching hospital admissions was reduced from 23

  17. Predicting the cumulative risk of death during hospitalization by modeling weekend, weekday and diurnal mortality risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiera, Enrico; Wang, Ying; Magrabi, Farah; Concha, Oscar Perez; Gallego, Blanca; Runciman, William

    2014-05-21

    Current prognostic models factor in patient and disease specific variables but do not consider cumulative risks of hospitalization over time. We developed risk models of the likelihood of death associated with cumulative exposure to hospitalization, based on time-varying risks of hospitalization over any given day, as well as day of the week. Model performance was evaluated alone, and in combination with simple disease-specific models. Patients admitted between 2000 and 2006 from 501 public and private hospitals in NSW, Australia were used for training and 2007 data for evaluation. The impact of hospital care delivered over different days of the week and or times of the day was modeled by separating hospitalization risk into 21 separate time periods (morning, day, night across the days of the week). Three models were developed to predict death up to 7-days post-discharge: 1/a simple background risk model using age, gender; 2/a time-varying risk model for exposure to hospitalization (admission time, days in hospital); 3/disease specific models (Charlson co-morbidity index, DRG). Combining these three generated a full model. Models were evaluated by accuracy, AUC, Akaike and Bayesian information criteria. There was a clear diurnal rhythm to hospital mortality in the data set, peaking in the evening, as well as the well-known 'weekend-effect' where mortality peaks with weekend admissions. Individual models had modest performance on the test data set (AUC 0.71, 0.79 and 0.79 respectively). The combined model which included time-varying risk however yielded an average AUC of 0.92. This model performed best for stays up to 7-days (93% of admissions), peaking at days 3 to 5 (AUC 0.94). Risks of hospitalization vary not just with the day of the week but also time of the day, and can be used to make predictions about the cumulative risk of death associated with an individual's hospitalization. Combining disease specific models with such time varying- estimates appears to

  18. Perfil de morbidade e de mortalidade de pacientes idosos hospitalizados Morbidity and mortality profile of hospitalized elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Santos Amaral

    2004-12-01

    cataract (7.8% was the most frequent cause of hospitalization, followed by prostate hyperplasia (4.7%, congestive heart failure (2.9%, and complete atrioventricular block (2.8%. Non-teaching hospitals presented in-hospital mortality rates higher than teaching hospitals even after adjusting for case profile differences with regard to age and primary diagnosis. The use of SIH/SUS databases and the risk adjustment methodology represent an alternative for exploratory analysis of healthcare outcomes.

  19. Inter-Arm Blood Pressure Difference in Hospitalized Elderly Patients Is Not Associated With Excess Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Avraham; Grossman, Alon; Beloosesky, Yichayaou; Koren-Morag, Nira; Green, Hefziba; Grossman, Ehud

    2015-10-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure difference (IAD) has been found to be associated with cardiovascular mortality. Its clinical significance and association with mortality in the elderly is not well defined. This study evaluated the association of IAD with mortality in a cohort of hospitalized elderly individuals. Blood pressure (BP) was measured simultaneously in both arms in elderly individuals (older than 65 years) hospitalized in a geriatric ward from October 2012 to July 2014. During the study period, 445 patients, mostly women (54.8%) with a mean age of 85±5 years, were recruited. Systolic and diastolic IAD were >10 mm Hg in 102 (22.9%) and 76 (17.1%) patients, respectively. Patients were followed for an average of 342±201 days. During follow-up, 102 patients (22.9%) died. Mortality was not associated with systolic or diastolic IAD. It is therefore questionable whether BP should be routinely measured in both arms in the elderly. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  1. Delirium after lung transplantation: Association with recipient characteristics, hospital resource utilization, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yelizaveta; Mooney, Joshua; Dhillon, Gundeep; Lee, Roy; Maldonado, José R

    2017-05-01

    Delirium is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The factors associated with post-lung transplant delirium and its impact on outcomes are under characterized. The medical records of 163 consecutive adult lung transplant recipients were reviewed for delirium within 5 days (early-onset) and 30 hospital days (ever-onset) post-transplantation. A multivariable logistic regression model assessed factors associated with delirium. Multivariable negative binomial regression and Cox proportional hazards models assessed the association of delirium with ventilator duration, intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, and one-year mortality. Thirty-six percent of patients developed early-onset, and 44% developed ever-onset delirium. Obesity (OR 6.35, 95% CI 1.61-24.98) and bolused benzodiazepines within the first postoperative day (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.07-4.89) were associated with early-onset delirium. Early-onset delirium was associated with longer adjusted mechanical ventilation duration (P=.001), ICU LOS (Pdelirium was associated with longer ICU (Pdelirium was not significantly associated with one-year mortality (early-onset HR 1.65, 95% CI 0.67-4.03; ever-onset HR 1.70, 95% CI 0.63-4.55). Delirium is common after lung transplant surgery and associated with increased hospital resources. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Hospital treatment, mortality and healthcare costs in relation to socioeconomic status among people with bipolar affective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chun; Kuo, Kuei-Hong; Chang, Chin-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding the relationships between the socioeconomic status and long-term outcomes of individuals with bipolar affective disorder (BPD) is lacking. Aims We aimed to estimate the effects of baseline socioeconomic status on longitudinal outcomes. Method A national cohort of adult participants with newly diagnosed BPD was identified in 2008. The effects of personal and household socioeconomic status were explored on outcomes of hospital treatment, mortality and healthcare costs, over a 3-year follow-up period (2008–2011). Results A total of 7987 participants were recruited. The relative risks of hospital treatment and mortality were found elevated for the ones from low-income households who also had higher healthcare costs. Low premium levels did not correlate with future healthcare costs. Conclusions Socioeconomic deprivation is associated with poorer outcome and higher healthcare costs in BPD patients. Special care should be given to those with lower socioeconomic status to improve outcomes with potential benefits of cost savings in the following years. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © 2016 The Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703748

  3. Higher cardiovascular disease prevalence and mortality among younger blacks compared to whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Stacey; Vittinghoff, Eric; Chattopadhyay, Arpita; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2010-09-01

    Blacks have higher rates of cardiovascular disease than whites. The age at which these differential rates emerge has not been fully examined. We examined cardiovascular disease prevalence and mortality among black and white adults across the adult age spectrum and explored potential mediators of these differential disease prevalence rates. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 1999-2006. We estimated age-adjusted and age-specific prevalence ratios (PR) for cardiovascular disease (heart failure, stroke, or myocardial infarction) for blacks versus whites in adults aged 35 years and older and examined potential explanatory factors. From the National Compressed Mortality File 5-year aggregate file of 1999-2003, we determined age-specific cardiovascular disease mortality rates. In young adulthood, cardiovascular disease prevalence was higher in blacks than whites (35-44 years PR 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-3.4). The black-white PR decreased with each decade of advancing age (P for trend=.04), leading to a narrowing of the racial gap at older ages (65-74 years PR 1.2; 95% CI, 0.8-1.6; > or =75 years PR 1.0; 95% CI, 0.7-1.4). Clinical and socioeconomic factors mediated some, but not all, of the excess cardiovascular disease prevalence among young to middle-aged blacks. Over a quarter (28%) of all cardiovascular disease deaths among blacks occurred in those aged <65 years, compared with 13% among whites. Reducing black/white disparities in cardiovascular disease will require a focus on young and middle-aged blacks.

  4. Improving maternal mortality at a university teaching hospital in Nnewi, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igwegbe, Anthony O; Eleje, George U; Ugboaja, Joseph O; Ofiaeli, Robinson O

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of the introduction of the Service Compact with all Nigerians (SERVICOM) contract on maternal health at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria. A retrospective and comparative study of maternal deaths between 2004 and 2010 was carried out. The main outcome measures were yearly maternal mortality ratio (MMR), relative risk (RR) of maternal mortality, and presentation-intervention interval. The yearly MMR and the RR of maternal mortality were compared with the figures from 2004, which represented the pre-SERVICOM era. There were 4916 live births and 54 maternal deaths during the study period, giving an MMR of 1098 per 100,000 live births. Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia was the most common direct cause (25.0%), followed by hemorrhage (18.8%) and sepsis (8.3%). Anemia (12.5%) was the most common indirect cause. There was a progressive reduction in MMR and RR of maternal mortality, with a corresponding increase in live births. The presentation-intervention interval improved significantly from 2006. A positive change in the attitude of health workers and the elimination of fee-for-service in emergency obstetric care would reduce type 3 delays in public health facilities, and consequently reduce maternal mortality. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratios: Sensitivity Analyses on the Impact of Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottle, Alex; Jarman, Brian; Aylin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hospital standardized mortality ratios (HSMRs) are derived from administrative databases and cover 80 percent of in-hospital deaths with adjustment for available case mix variables. They have been criticized for being sensitive to issues such as clinical coding but on the basis of limited quantitative evidence. Methods In a set of sensitivity analyses, we compared regular HSMRs with HSMRs resulting from a variety of changes, such as a patient-based measure, not adjusting for comorbidity, not adjusting for palliative care, excluding unplanned zero-day stays ending in live discharge, and using more or fewer diagnoses. Results Overall, regular and variant HSMRs were highly correlated (ρ > 0.8), but differences of up to 10 points were common. Two hospitals were particularly affected when palliative care was excluded from the risk models. Excluding unplanned stays ending in same-day live discharge had the least impact despite their high frequency. The largest impacts were seen when capturing postdischarge deaths and using just five high-mortality diagnosis groups. Conclusions HSMRs in most hospitals changed by only small amounts from the various adjustment methods tried here, though small-to-medium changes were not uncommon. However, the position relative to funnel plot control limits could move in a significant minority even with modest changes in the HSMR. PMID:21790587

  6. Morbidity, Mortality, and Seasonality of Influenza Hospitalizations in Egypt, November 2007-November 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeel, Amr; Labib, Manal; Said, Mayar; El-Refai, Samir; El-Gohari, Amani; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza typically comprises a substantial portion of acute respiratory infections, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. However, influenza epidemiology data are lacking in Egypt. We describe seven years of Egypt’s influenza hospitalizations from a multi-site influenza surveillance system. Methods Syndromic case definitions identified individuals with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to eight hospitals in Egypt. Standardized demographic and clinical data were collected. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were tested for influenza using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and typed as influenza A or B, and influenza A specimens subtyped. Results From November 2007–November 2014, 2,936/17,441 (17%) SARI cases were influenza-positive. Influenza-positive patients were more likely to be older, female, pregnant, and have chronic condition(s) (all p<0.05). Among them, 53 (2%) died, and death was associated with older age, five or more days from symptom onset to hospitalization, chronic condition(s), and influenza A (all p<0.05). An annual seasonal influenza pattern occurred from July–June. Each season, the proportion of the season’s influenza-positive cases peaked during November–May (19–41%). Conclusions In Egypt, influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality and influenza SARI hospitalization patterns mirror those of the Northern Hemisphere. Additional assessment of influenza epidemiology in Egypt may better guide disease control activities and vaccine policy. PMID:27607330

  7. Morbidity, Mortality, and Seasonality of Influenza Hospitalizations in Egypt, November 2007-November 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Kandeel

    Full Text Available Influenza typically comprises a substantial portion of acute respiratory infections, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. However, influenza epidemiology data are lacking in Egypt. We describe seven years of Egypt's influenza hospitalizations from a multi-site influenza surveillance system.Syndromic case definitions identified individuals with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI admitted to eight hospitals in Egypt. Standardized demographic and clinical data were collected. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were tested for influenza using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and typed as influenza A or B, and influenza A specimens subtyped.From November 2007-November 2014, 2,936/17,441 (17% SARI cases were influenza-positive. Influenza-positive patients were more likely to be older, female, pregnant, and have chronic condition(s (all p<0.05. Among them, 53 (2% died, and death was associated with older age, five or more days from symptom onset to hospitalization, chronic condition(s, and influenza A (all p<0.05. An annual seasonal influenza pattern occurred from July-June. Each season, the proportion of the season's influenza-positive cases peaked during November-May (19-41%.In Egypt, influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality and influenza SARI hospitalization patterns mirror those of the Northern Hemisphere. Additional assessment of influenza epidemiology in Egypt may better guide disease control activities and vaccine policy.

  8. Comparison of artificial neural network and logistic regression models for predicting in-hospital mortality after primary liver cancer surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon-Yi Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since most published articles comparing the performance of artificial neural network (ANN models and logistic regression (LR models for predicting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC outcomes used only a single dataset, the essential issue of internal validity (reproducibility of the models has not been addressed. The study purposes to validate the use of ANN model for predicting in-hospital mortality in HCC surgery patients in Taiwan and to compare the predictive accuracy of ANN with that of LR model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients who underwent a HCC surgery during the period from 1998 to 2009 were included in the study. This study retrospectively compared 1,000 pairs of LR and ANN models based on initial clinical data for 22,926 HCC surgery patients. For each pair of ANN and LR models, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC curves, Hosmer-Lemeshow (H-L statistics and accuracy rate were calculated and compared using paired T-tests. A global sensitivity analysis was also performed to assess the relative significance of input parameters in the system model and the relative importance of variables. Compared to the LR models, the ANN models had a better accuracy rate in 97.28% of cases, a better H-L statistic in 41.18% of cases, and a better AUROC curve in 84.67% of cases. Surgeon volume was the most influential (sensitive parameter affecting in-hospital mortality followed by age and lengths of stay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In comparison with the conventional LR model, the ANN model in the study was more accurate in predicting in-hospital mortality and had higher overall performance indices. Further studies of this model may consider the effect of a more detailed database that includes complications and clinical examination findings as well as more detailed outcome data.

  9. The Absence of Fever Is Associated With Higher Mortality and Decreased Antibiotic and IV Fluid Administration in Emergency Department Patients With Suspected Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Daniel J; Carey, Jeremy R; Oedorf, Kimie; Day, Danielle E; Redfield, Colby S; Huguenel, Colin J; Roberts, Jonathan C; Sanchez, Leon D; Wolfe, Richard E; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluates whether emergency department septic shock patients without a fever (reported or measured) receive less IV fluids, have decreased antibiotic administration, and suffer increased in-hospital mortality. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective, observational study of patients with shock. The study was conducted in an urban, academic emergency department. The original study enrolled consecutive adult (aged 18 yr or older) emergency department patients from November 11, 2012, to September 23, 2013, who met one of the following shock criteria: 1) systolic blood pressure less than 90 mm Hg after at least 1L IV fluids, 2) new vasopressor requirement, or 3) systolic blood pressure less than 90 mm Hg and IV fluids held for concern of fluid overload. The current study is limited to patients with septic shock. Patients were grouped as febrile if they had a subjective fever or a measured temperature >100.4°F documented in the emergency department; afebrile patients lacked both. Among 378 patients with septic shock, 207 of 378 (55%; 50-60%) were febrile by history or measurement. Afebrile patients had lower rates of antibiotic administration in the emergency department (81% vs 94%; p < 0.01), lower mean volumes of IV fluids (2,607 vs 3,013 mL; p < 0.01), and higher in-hospital mortality rates (33% vs 11%; p < 0.01). After adjusting for bicarbonate less than 20 mEq/L, lactate concentration, respiratory rate greater than or equal to 24 breaths/min, emergency department antibiotics, and emergency department IV fluids volume, being afebrile remained a significant predictor of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% CI, 2.2-8.2; area under the curve = 0.83). In emergency department patients with septic shock, afebrile patients received lower rates of emergency department antibiotic administration, lower mean IV fluids volume, and suffered higher in-hospital mortality.

  10. The prediction of in-hospital mortality by mid-upper arm circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opio, Martin Otyek; Namujwiga, Teopista; Nakitende, Imaculate

    2018-01-01

    There are few reports of the association of nutritional status with in-hospital mortality of acutely ill medical patients in sub-Saharan Africa. This is a prospective observational study comparing the predictive value of mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) of 899 acutely ill medical patients...... patients in a resource-poor hospital in sub-Saharan Africa....... admitted to a resource-poor sub-Saharan hospital with mental alertness, mobility and vital signs. Mid-upper arm circumference ranged from 15 cm to 42 cm, and 12 (24%) of the 50 patients with a MUAC less than 20 cm died (OR 4.84, 95% CI 2.23-10.37). Of the 237 patients with a MUAC more than 28 cm only six...

  11. Outpatient treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo: poisoning pattern, factors associated with hospitalization, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Cathrine; Vallersnes, Odd M; Jacobsen, Dag; Ekeberg, Oivind; Hovda, Knut E

    2012-01-04

    Most patients with acute poisoning are treated as outpatients worldwide. In Oslo, these patients are treated in a physician-led outpatient clinic with limited diagnostic and treatment resources, which reduces both the costs and emergency department overcrowding. We describe the poisoning patterns, treatment, mortality, factors associated with hospitalization and follow-up at this Emergency Medical Agency (EMA, "Oslo Legevakt"), and we evaluate the safety of this current practice. All acute poisonings in adults (> or = 16 years) treated at the EMA during one year (April 2008 to April 2009) were included consecutively in an observational study design. The treating physicians completed a standardized form comprising information needed to address the study's aims. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with hospitalization. There were 2348 contacts for 1856 individuals; 1157 (62%) were male, and the median age was 34 years. The most frequent main toxic agents were ethanol (43%), opioids (22%) and CO or fire smoke (10%). The physicians classified 73% as accidental overdoses with substances of abuse taken for recreational purposes, 15% as other accidents (self-inflicted or other) and 11% as suicide attempts. Most (91%) patients were treated with observation only. The median observation time until discharge was 3.8 hours. No patient developed sequelae or died at the EMA. Seventeen per cent were hospitalized. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, respiratory depression, paracetamol, reduced consciousness and suicidal intention were factors associated with hospitalization. Forty-eight per cent were discharged without referral to follow-up. The one-month mortality was 0.6%. Of the nine deaths, five were by new accidental overdose with substances of abuse. More than twice as many patients were treated at the EMA compared with all hospitals in Oslo. Despite more than a doubling of the annual number of poisoned patients treated at the EMA

  12. Outpatient treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo: poisoning pattern, factors associated with hospitalization, and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients with acute poisoning are treated as outpatients worldwide. In Oslo, these patients are treated in a physician-led outpatient clinic with limited diagnostic and treatment resources, which reduces both the costs and emergency department overcrowding. We describe the poisoning patterns, treatment, mortality, factors associated with hospitalization and follow-up at this Emergency Medical Agency (EMA, "Oslo Legevakt", and we evaluate the safety of this current practice. Methods All acute poisonings in adults (> or = 16 years treated at the EMA during one year (April 2008 to April 2009 were included consecutively in an observational study design. The treating physicians completed a standardized form comprising information needed to address the study's aims. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with hospitalization. Results There were 2348 contacts for 1856 individuals; 1157 (62% were male, and the median age was 34 years. The most frequent main toxic agents were ethanol (43%, opioids (22% and CO or fire smoke (10%. The physicians classified 73% as accidental overdoses with substances of abuse taken for recreational purposes, 15% as other accidents (self-inflicted or other and 11% as suicide attempts. Most (91% patients were treated with observation only. The median observation time until discharge was 3.8 hours. No patient developed sequelae or died at the EMA. Seventeen per cent were hospitalized. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, respiratory depression, paracetamol, reduced consciousness and suicidal intention were factors associated with hospitalization. Forty-eight per cent were discharged without referral to follow-up. The one-month mortality was 0.6%. Of the nine deaths, five were by new accidental overdose with substances of abuse. Conclusions More than twice as many patients were treated at the EMA compared with all hospitals in Oslo. Despite more than a doubling of

  13. Applications of Bayesian approach in modelling risk of malaria-related hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simbeye Jupiter S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major public health problem in Malawi, however, quantifying its burden in a population is a challenge. Routine hospital data provide a proxy for measuring the incidence of severe malaria and for crudely estimating morbidity rates. Using such data, this paper proposes a method to describe trends, patterns and factors associated with in-hospital mortality attributed to the disease. Methods We develop semiparametric regression models which allow joint analysis of nonlinear effects of calendar time and continuous covariates, spatially structured variation, unstructured heterogeneity, and other fixed covariates. Modelling and inference use the fully Bayesian approach via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulation techniques. The methodology is applied to analyse data arising from paediatric wards in Zomba district, Malawi, between 2002 and 2003. Results and Conclusion We observe that the risk of dying in hospital is lower in the dry season, and for children who travel a distance of less than 5 kms to the hospital, but increases for those who are referred to the hospital. The results also indicate significant differences in both structured and unstructured spatial effects, and the health facility effects reveal considerable differences by type of facility or practice. More importantly, our approach shows non-linearities in the effect of metrical covariates on the probability of dying in hospital. The study emphasizes that the methodological framework used provides a useful tool for analysing the data at hand and of similar structure.

  14. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics and risk factors for mortality in patients with candidemia in hospitals from Bogotá, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alberto Cortés

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Candidemia is associated with a high mortality rate. Age and shock increase mortality, while the use of fluconazole was shown to be a protective factor. A higher resistance rate with new breakpoints was noted.

  15. Simple Scoring System to Predict In-Hospital Mortality After Surgery for Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Giuseppe; Perrotti, Andrea; Obadia, Jean-François; Duval, Xavier; Iung, Bernard; Alla, François; Chirouze, Catherine; Selton-Suty, Christine; Hoen, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Delahaye, François; Tattevin, Pierre; Le Moing, Vincent; Pappalardo, Aniello; Chocron, Sidney

    2017-07-20

    Aspecific scoring systems are used to predict the risk of death postsurgery in patients with infective endocarditis (IE). The purpose of the present study was both to analyze the risk factors for in-hospital death, which complicates surgery for IE, and to create a mortality risk score based on the results of this analysis. Outcomes of 361 consecutive patients (mean age, 59.1±15.4 years) who had undergone surgery for IE in 8 European centers of cardiac surgery were recorded prospectively, and a risk factor analysis (multivariable logistic regression) for in-hospital death was performed. The discriminatory power of a new predictive scoring system was assessed with the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Score validation procedures were carried out. Fifty-six (15.5%) patients died postsurgery. BMI >27 kg/m 2 (odds ratio [OR], 1.79; P =0.049), estimated glomerular filtration rate 55 mm Hg (OR, 1.78; P =0.032), and critical state (OR, 2.37; P =0.017) were independent predictors of in-hospital death. A scoring system was devised to predict in-hospital death postsurgery for IE (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.780; 95% CI, 0.734-0.822). The score performed better than 5 of 6 scoring systems for in-hospital death after cardiac surgery that were considered. A simple scoring system based on risk factors for in-hospital death was specifically created to predict mortality risk postsurgery in patients with IE. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  16. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in a cohort of elderly Egyptian patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsebaey, Mohamed A; Elashry, Heba; Elbedewy, Tamer A; Elhadidy, Ahmed A; Esheba, Noha E; Ezat, Sherif; Negm, Manal Saad; Abo-Amer, Yousry Esam-Eldin; Abgeegy, Mohamed El; Elsergany, Heba Fadl; Mansour, Loai; Abd-Elsalam, Sherief

    2018-04-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) affects large number of elderly with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Early identification and management of the factors predicting in-hospital mortality might decrease mortality. This study was conducted to identify the causes of acute UGIB and the predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly Egyptian patients.286 elderly patients with acute UGIB were divided into: bleeding variceal group (161 patients) and bleeding nonvariceal group (125 patients). Patients' monitoring was done during hospitalization to identify the risk factors that might predict in-hospital mortality in elderly.Variceal bleeding was the most common cause of acute UGIB in elderly Egyptian patients. In-hospital mortality rate was 8.74%. Increasing age, hemodynamic instability at presentation, co-morbidities (especially liver cirrhosis associated with other co-morbidity) and failure to control bleeding were the predictors of in-hospital mortality.Increasing age, hemodynamic instability at presentation, co-morbidities (especially liver cirrhosis associated with other co-morbidity) and failure to control bleeding should be considered when triaging those patients for immediate resuscitation, close observation, and early treatment.

  17. Extravasation of contrast (Spot Sign) predicts in-hospital mortality in ruptured arteriovenous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zengpanpan; Ai, Xiaolin; Zheng, Jun; Hu, Xin; You, Chao; Andrew M, Faramand; Fang, Fang

    2017-10-09

    The spot sign is a highly specific and sensitive predictor of hematoma expansion in following primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Rare cases of the spot sign have been documented in patients with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The purpose of this retrospective study is to assess the accuracy of spot sign in predicting clinical outcomes in patients with ruptured AVM. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database was performed for patients who presented to West China Hospital with ICH secondary to AVM in the period between January 2009 and September 2016. Two radiologists blinded to the clinical data independently assessed the imaging data, including the presence of spot sign. Statistical analysis using univariate testing, multivariate logistic regression testing, and receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analysis was performed. A total of 116 patients were included. Overall, 18.9% (22/116) of subjects had at least 1 spot sign detected by CT angiography, 7% (8/116) died in hospital, and 27% (31/116) of the patients had a poor outcome after 90 days. The spot sign had a sensitivity of 62.5% and specificity of 84.3% for predicting in-hospital mortality (p = .02, AUC 0.734). No correlation detected between the spot sign and 90-day outcomes under multiple logistic regression (p = .19). The spot sign is an independent predictor for in-hospital mortality. The presence of spot sign did not correlate with the 90 day outcomes in this patient cohort. The results of this report suggest that patients with ruptured AVM with demonstrated the spot sign on imaging must receive aggressive treatment early on due to the high risk of mortality.

  18. Mortality and length of therapy in soft tissue infections, Sina and Amir-Alam Hospitals (1989-99

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geranpaieh L

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing soft tissue infections are one of the most dreaded infections in human and result in a very high rate of mortality. The treatment of these infections must be very aggressive and consists of radical debridement of all necrotic tissue accompanied by appropriate antibiotics. Materials and methods: This study was undertaken to assess the mortality rate, the time from diagnosis to cure, and some of the parameters which may affect mortality in our patients. In this descriptive, retrospective study first files from patients attended by necrotizing soft tissue infections including Fournier's gangrene or disease, gas gangrene, hemolytic streptococcal infections, myonecrosis, necrotizing fascitis and related subjects in Sina and Amir-Alam hospitals from 1989 to 1999 were studied. Data were extracted and analyzed by SPSS. Results: The total number of cases was 36. The median age was 47.69 years. Seven of the patients were female. The median time from onset to cure was 10 days. The most common site affected was the perineum and the most common etiology was perianal abscess. Diabetes mellitus was the underlying disease mostly observed. Half of the patients had received inappropriate treatments. In this group mortality was higher. Conclusion: It is crucial that general practitioners be acquainted with the diagnosis of necrotizing soft tissue infections so that patients are referred immediately to surgical centers. In our referral center the mortality was acceptable but it can be lowered further. The sex, sites of infection, underlying disease and etiologies in our patients were similar to patient in other countries except for alcoholism. It appears that data in foreign texts can be attributed to Iranian patients.

  19. Mortality study of Los Alamos workers with higher exposures to plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, G.L.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Healy, J.W.; McInroy, J.F.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    A group of white male workers with the highest internal depositions of plutonium at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was selected in 1974 for a study of mortality. This group of 224 persons includes all those with an estimated deposition (in 1974) of 10 nanocuries or more of plutonium, principally 239 Pu but also in some cases 238 Pu. Follow-up of these workers is 100% complete through 1980. Smoking histories were obtained on all persons. Exposure histories for external radiation and plutonium were reviewed for each subject. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated using rates for white males in the United States population, adjusted for age and year of death. SMRs are low for all causes of death (56; 95% CI 40, 75) or for all malignant neoplasms (54; 95% CI 23,106). Cancers of interest for plutonium exposures, including cancers of bone, lung, liver, and bone marrow/lymphatic systems, were infrequent or absent. The absence of a detectable excess of cancer deaths is consistent with the low calculated risk to these workers using current radiation risk coefficients. An alternate theory that suggests much higher risk of lung cancer due to synergistic effects of smoking and inhaled insoluble plutonium particles is not supported by this study

  20. Varicella-related Primary Health-care Visits, Hospitalizations and Mortality in Norway, 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirinaviciute, Grazina; Kristensen, Erle; Nakstad, Britt; Flem, Elmira

    2017-11-01

    Norway does not currently implement universal varicella vaccination in childhood. We aimed to characterize health care burden of varicella in Norway in the prevaccine era. We linked individual patient data from different national registries to examine varicella vaccinations and varicella-coded primary care consultations, hospitalizations, outpatient hospital visits, deaths and viral infections of central nervous system in the whole population of Norway during 2008-2014. We estimated health care contact rates and described the epidemiology of medically attended varicella infection. Each year approximately 14,600 varicella-related contacts occurred within primary health care and hospital sector in Norway. The annual contact rate was 221 cases per 100,000 population in primary health care and 7.3 cases per 100,000 in hospital care. Both in primary and hospital care, the highest incidences were observed among children 1 year of age: 2,654 and 78.1 cases per 100,000, respectively. The annual varicella mortality was estimated at 0.06 deaths per 100,000 and in-hospital case-fatality rate at 0.3%. Very few (0.2-0.5%) patients were vaccinated against varicella. Among hospitalized varicella patients, 22% had predisposing conditions, 9% had severe-to-very severe comorbidities and 5.5% were immunocompromised. Varicella-related complications were reported in 29.3% of hospitalized patients. Varicella zoster virus was the third most frequent virus found among 16% of patients with confirmed viral infections of central nervous system. Varicella causes a considerable health care burden in Norway, especially among children. To inform the policy decision on the use of varicella vaccination, a health economic assessment of vaccination and mathematical modeling of vaccination impact are needed.

  1. Depression, not anxiety, is independently associated with 5-year hospitalizations and mortality in patients with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; Hoogwegt, Madelein T; Hansen, Tina B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine whether depression and anxiety are independently associated with 5-year cardiac-related hospitalizations and all-cause mortality in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD)....

  2. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in surgically treated valvular infective endocarditis cases at National Heart Institute, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elmasry

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Surgery for IE continues to be challenging. EuroSCORE II has a good discrimination ability to predict in-hospital mortality in IE surgery. Satisfactory results can be obtained with valve repair in IE.

  3. Is Anesthesia Technique Associated With a Higher Risk of Mortality or Complications Within 90 Days of Surgery for Geriatric Patients With Hip Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Vimal; Chan, Priscilla H; Prentice, Heather A; Zohman, Gary L; Diekmann, Glenn R; Maletis, Gregory B; Fasig, Brian H; Diaz, Diana; Chung, Elena; Qiu, Chunyuan

    2018-06-01

    Postoperative mortality and complications after geriatric hip fracture surgery remain high despite efforts to improve perioperative care for these patients. One factor of particular interest is anesthetic technique, but prior studies on this are limited by sample selection, competing risks, and incomplete followup. (1) Among older patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture, does 90-day mortality differ depending on the type of anesthesia received? (2) Do 90-day emergency department returns and hospital readmissions differ based on anesthetic technique after geriatric hip fracture repairs? (3) Do 90-day Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) outcomes differ according to anesthetic techniques used during hip fracture surgery? We conducted a retrospective study on geriatric patients (65 years or older) with hip fractures between 2009 and 2014 using the Kaiser Permanente Hip Fracture Registry. A total of 1995 (11%) of the surgically treated patients with hip fracture were excluded as a result of missing anesthesia information. The final study sample consisted of 16,695 patients. Of these, 2027 (12%) died and 98 (< 1%) terminated membership during followup, which were handled as competing events and censoring events, respectively. Ninety-day mortality, emergency department returns, hospital readmission, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), myocardial infarction (MI), and pneumonia were evaluated using multivariable competing risk proportional subdistribution hazard regression according to type of anesthesia technique: general anesthesia, regional anesthesia, or conversion from regional to general. Of the 16,695 patients, 58% (N = 9629) received general anesthesia, 40% (N = 6597) received regional anesthesia, and 2.8% (N = 469) patients were converted from regional to general. Compared with regional anesthesia, patients treated with general anesthesia had a higher likelihood of overall 90-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.22; 95

  4. Health literacy and mortality: a cohort study of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-04-29

    More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] for death among patients with LHL was 1.32 (95%confidence interval [CI] 1.05, 1.66, P=0.02) compared to BHLS>9 [corrected].Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality for Stroke in Douala, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Y. Mapoure

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study was to describe complications in hospitalized patients for stroke and to determine the predictive factors of intrahospital mortality from stroke at the Douala General Hospital (DGH in Cameroon. Patients and Methods. A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2012, at the DGH. All the patients who were aged more than 15 years with established diagnosis of stroke were included. A univariate analysis was done to look for factors associated with the risk of death, whilst the predictive factors of death were determined in a multivariate analysis following Cox regression model. Results. Of the 325 patients included patients, 68.1% were males and the mean age was 58.66 ± 13.6 years. Ischaemic stroke accounted for 52% of the cases. Sepsis was the leading complications present in 99 (30.12% cases. Independent predicting factors of in-hospital mortality were Glasgow Coma Scale lower than 8 (HR = 2.17 95% CI 4.86–36.8; P=0.0001, hyperglycaemia at admission (HR = 3.61 95% CI 1.38–9.44; P=0.009, and hemorrhagic stroke (HR = 5.65 95% CI 1.77–18; P=0.003. Conclusion. The clinician should systematically diagnose and treat infectious states and hyperglycaemia in stroke.

  6. Mortality in COPD patients discharged from hospital: the role of treatment and co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieminen Markku M

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to analyse mortality and associated risk factors, with special emphasis on health status, medications and co-morbidity, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD that had been hospitalized for acute exacerbation. Methods This prospective study included 416 patients from each of the five Nordic countries that were followed for 24 months. The St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ was administered. Information on treatment and co-morbidity was obtained. Results During the follow-up 122 (29.3% of the 416 patients died. Patients with diabetes had an increased mortality rate [HR = 2.25 (1.28–3.95]. Other risk factors were advanced age, low FEV1 and lower health status. Patients treated with inhaled corticosteroids and/or long-acting beta-2-agonists had a lower risk of death than patients using neither of these types of treatment. Conclusion Mortality was high after COPD admission, with older age, decreased lung function, lower health status and diabetes the most important risk factors. Treatment with inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting bronchodilators may be associated with lower mortality in patients with COPD.

  7. DTP with or after measles vaccination is associated with increased in-hospital mortality in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Biai, Sidu; Veirum, Jens Erik

    2007-01-01

    The sequence of routine immunisations may be important for childhood mortality. Three doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine (DTP) should be given at 6, 10, and 14 weeks and measles vaccine (MV) at 9 months of age. The sequence is not always respected. We examined in-hospital mortality...... of children having received DTP with or after measles vaccine....

  8. Effect of air pollution control on mortality and hospital admissions in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Douglas W; Rich, David Q; Goodman, Patrick G; Clancy, Luke; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; George, Prethibha; Kotlov, Tania

    2013-07-01

    During the 1980s the Republic of Ireland experienced repeated severe pollution episodes. Domestic coal burning was a major source of this pollution. In 1990 the Irish government introduced a ban on the marketing, sale, and distribution of coal in Dublin. The ban was extended to Cork in 1995 and to 10 other communities in 1998 and 2000. We previously reported decreases in particulate black smoke (BS*) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations, measured as total gaseous acidity, in Dublin after the 1990 coal ban (Clancy et al. 2002). In the current study we explored and compared the effectiveness of the sequential 1990, 1995, and 1998 bans in reducing community air pollution and in improving public health. We compiled records of daily BS, total gaseous acidity (SO2), and counts of cause-specific deaths from 1981 to 2004 for Dublin County Borough (1990 ban), county Cork (1995 ban), and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1998 ban). We also compiled daily counts of hospital admissions for cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive diagnoses for Cork County Borough (1991 to 2004) and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1993 to 2004). We compared pre-ban and post-ban BS and SO2 concentrations for each city. Using interrupted time-series methods, we estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized mortality rates in each city or county after the corresponding local coal ban. We regressed weekly age- and sex-standardized mortality rates against an indicator of the post- versus pre-ban period, adjusting for influenza epidemics, weekly mean temperature, and a season smooth of the standardized mortality rates in Coastal counties presumably not affected by the bans. We compared these results with similar analyses in Midlands counties also presumably unaffected by the bans. We also estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized, weekly hospital admissions rates normalized for underreporting in each city or county after the 1995

  9. Excess mortality in general hospital patients with delirium: A 5-year follow-up of 519 patients seen in psychiatric consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Hemert (Bert); R.C. van der Mast (Roos); M.W. Hengeveld (Michiel); M. Vorstenbosch (Marielle)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractMortality was determined in 519 patients with delirium who were seen in psychiatric consultation in two general hospitals. Among 419 patients with simple delirium (DSM-III: 293.00) in-hospital mortality was 26%. As compared to average hospital patients the age adjusted in-hospital excess

  10. Does diabetes mellitus comorbidity affect in-hospital mortality and length of stay? Analysis of administrative data in an Italian Academic Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Francesca; Tonutti, Laura; Grimaldi, Franco

    2017-12-01

    Hospitalized patients with comorbid diabetes mellitus may have worse outcomes than the others. We conducted a study to assess whether comorbid diabetes affects in-hospital mortality and length of stay. For this population-based study, we analyzed the administrative databases of the Regional Health Information System of the Region Friuli Venezia Giulia, where the Hospital of Udine is located. Hospital discharge data were linked at the individual patient level with the regional Diabetes Mellitus Registry to identify diabetic patients. For each 3-digit ICD-9-CM discharge diagnosis code, we assessed the difference in length of stay and in-hospital mortality between diabetic and non-diabetic patients. We conducted both univariate and multivariate analyses, adjusted for age, sex, Charlson's comorbidity score, and urgency of hospitalization, through linear and logistic regression models. After adjusting for potential confounders, diabetes significantly increased the risk of in-hospital death among patients hospitalized for bacterial pneumonia (OR = 1.94) and intestinal obstruction (OR = 4.23) and length of stay among those admitted for several diagnoses, including acute myocardial infarction and acute renal failure. Admission glucose blood level was associated with in-hospital death in patients with pneumonia and intestinal obstruction, and increased length of stay for several conditions. Patients with diabetes mellitus who are hospitalized for other health problems may have increased risk of in-hospital death and longer hospital stay. For this reason, diabetes should be promptly recognized upon admission and properly managed.

  11. Mortality, hospital days and expenditures attributable to ambient air pollution from particulate matter in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Gary M; Kaliner, Ehud; Grotto, Itamar

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, ambient air pollution accounts for around 3.7 million deaths annually. Measuring the burden of disease is important not just for advocacy but also is a first step towards carrying out a full cost-utility analysis in order to prioritise technological interventions that are available to reduce air pollution (and subsequent morbidity and mortality) from industrial, power generating and vehicular sources. We calculated the average national exposure to particulate matter particles less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) in diameter by weighting readings from 52 (non-roadside) monitoring stations by the population of the catchment area around the station. The PM2.5 exposure level was then multiplied by the gender and cause specific (Acute Lower Respiratory Infections, Asthma, Circulatory Diseases, Coronary Heart Failure, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Diabetes, Ischemic Heart Disease, Lung Cancer, Low Birth Weight, Respiratory Diseases and Stroke) relative risks and the national age, cause and gender specific mortality (and hospital utilisation which included neuro-degenerative disorders) rates to arrive at the estimated mortality and hospital days attributable to ambient PM2.5 pollution in Israel in 2015. We utilised a WHO spread-sheet model, which was expanded to include relative risks (based on more recent meta-analyses) of sub-sets of other diagnoses in two additional models. Mortality estimates from the three models were 1609, 1908 and 2253 respectively in addition to 184,000, 348,000 and 542,000 days hospitalisation in general hospitals. Total costs from PM2.5 pollution (including premature burial costs) amounted to $544 million, $1030 million and $1749 million respectively (or 0.18 %, 0.35 % and 0.59 % of GNP). Subject to the caveat that our estimates were based on a limited number of non-randomly sited stations exposure data. The mortality, morbidity and monetary burden of disease attributable to air pollution from particulate matter in Israel is of

  12. Right ventricular stroke work index as a negative predictor of mortality and initial hospital stay after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Hilary F; Schulze, P Christian; Kato, Tomoko S; Bacchetta, Matthew; Thirapatarapong, Wilawan; Bartels, Matthew N

    2013-06-01

    Studies have shown that patients with poor pre-lung transplant (LTx) right ventricular (RV) function have prolonged post-operative ventilation time and intensive care stay as well as a higher risk of in-hospital death. RV stroke work index (RVSWI) calculates RV workload and contractility. We hypothesized that patients with higher RV workload capacity, indicated by higher RVSWI, would have better outcomes after LTx. A retrospective record review was performed on all LTx patients between 2005 and 2011 who had right heart catheterizations (RHC) 1-year before LTx. In addition, results for echocardiograms and cardiopulmonary exercise testing within 1-year of RHCs were gathered. Mean RVSWI was 9.36 ± 3.59 for 115 patients. There was a significant relation between mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), RVSWI, RV end-diastolic diameter (RVEDd), left atrial dimension (LAD), peak and resting pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide, minute ventilation /volume of carbon dioxide production, and 1-year mortality after LTx. Contrary to our hypothesis, those who survived had lower RVSWI than those who died within 1 year (8.99 ± 3.38 vs 11.6 ± 4.1, p = 0.026). Hospital length of stay significantly correlated with mPAP, RVSWI, left ventricular ejection fraction, percentage of fractional shortening, RVEDd, RV fractional area change, LAD, and RV wall thickness in diastole. Intensive care length of stay also significantly correlated with these variables and with body mass index. RVSWI was significantly different between groups of different RV function, indicating that increased RVSWI is associated with impairment of RV structure and function in patients undergoing LTx evaluation. This study demonstrates an association between 1-year mortality, initial hospital and intensive care length of stay, and pre-LTx RVSWI. Increased mPAP is a known risk for outcomes in LTx patients. Our findings support this fact and also show increased mortality with elevation of RVSWI, demonstrating the value

  13. Mortality and treatment patterns among patients hospitalized with acute cardiovascular conditions during dates of national cardiology meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Anupam B; Prasad, Vinay; Goldman, Dana P; Romley, John

    2015-02-01

    Thousands of physicians attend scientific meetings annually. Although hospital physician staffing and composition may be affected by meetings, patient outcomes and treatment patterns during meeting dates are unknown. To analyze mortality and treatment differences among patients admitted with acute cardiovascular conditions during dates of national cardiology meetings compared with nonmeeting dates. Retrospective analysis of 30-day mortality among Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or cardiac arrest from 2002 through 2011 during dates of 2 national cardiology meetings compared with identical nonmeeting days in the 3 weeks before and after conferences (AMI, 8570 hospitalizations during 82 meeting days and 57,471 during 492 nonmeeting days; heart failure, 19,282 during meeting days and 11,4591 during nonmeeting days; cardiac arrest, 1564 during meeting days and 9580 during nonmeeting days). Multivariable analyses were conducted separately for major teaching hospitals and nonteaching hospitals and for low- and high-risk patients. Differences in treatment utilization were assessed. Hospitalization during cardiology meeting dates. Thirty-day mortality, procedure rates, charges, length of stay. Patient characteristics were similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates. In teaching hospitals, adjusted 30-day mortality was lower among high-risk patients with heart failure or cardiac arrest admitted during meeting vs nonmeeting dates (heart failure, 17.5% [95% CI, 13.7%-21.2%] vs 24.8% [95% CI, 22.9%-26.6%]; P cardiology meetings. High-risk patients with heart failure and cardiac arrest hospitalized in teaching hospitals had lower 30-day mortality when admitted during dates of national cardiology meetings. High-risk patients with AMI admitted to teaching hospitals during meetings were less likely to receive PCI, without any mortality effect.

  14. Risk factors for three-month mortality after discharge in a cohort of non-oncologic hospitalized elderly patients: Results from the REPOSI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasina, Luca; Cortesi, Laura; Tiraboschi, Mara; Nobili, Alessandro; Lanzo, Giovanna; Tettamanti, Mauro; Franchi, Carlotta; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Ghidoni, Silvia; Assolari, Andrea; Brucato, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Short-term prognosis, e.g. mortality at three months, has many important implications in planning the overall management of patients, particularly non-oncologic patients in order to avoid futile practices. The aims of this study were: i) to investigate the risk of three-month mortality after discharge from internal medicine and geriatric wards of non-oncologic patients with at least one of the following conditions: permanent bedridden status during the hospital stay; severely reduced kidney function; hypoalbuminemia; hospital admissions in the previous six months; severe dementia; ii) to establish the absolute risk difference of three-month mortality of bedridden compared to non-bedridden patients. This prospective cohort study was run in 102 Italian internal medicine and geriatric hospital wards. The sample included all patients with three-months follow-up data. Bedridden condition was defined as the inability to walk or stand upright during the whole hospital stay. The following parameters were also recorded: estimated GFR≤29mL/min/1.73m 2 ; severe dementia; albuminemia ≪2.5g/dL; hospital admissions in the six months before the index admission. Of 3915 patients eligible for the analysis, three-month follow-up were available for 2058, who were included in the study. Bedridden patients were 112 and the absolute risk difference of mortality at three months was 0.13 (CI 95% 0.08-0.19, p≪0.0001). Logistic regression analysis also adjusted for age, sex, number of drugs and comorbidity index found that bedridden condition (OR 2.10, CI 95% 1.12-3.94), severely reduced kidney function (OR 2.27, CI 95% 1.22-4.21), hospital admission in the previous six months (OR 1.96, CI 95% 1.22-3.14), severe dementia (with total or severe physical dependence) (OR 4.16, CI 95% 2.39-7.25) and hypoalbuminemia (OR 2.47, CI 95% 1.12-5.44) were significantly associated with higher risk of three-month mortality. Bedridden status, severely reduced kidney function, recent hospital

  15. Clostridium difficile infection in patients hospitalized with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its impact on morbidity, mortality, and the costs of inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanipekun, Titilope O; Salemi, Jason L; Mejia de Grubb, Maria C; Gonzalez, Sandra J; Zoorob, Roger J

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is often complicated by infections leading to hospitalization, increased morbidity, and mortality. Not much is known about the impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) on health outcomes in hospitalized patients with T2DM. We estimated the prevalence and temporal trends of CDI; evaluated the associations between CDI and in-hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and the costs of inpatient care; and compared the impact of CDI with that of other infections commonly seen in patients with T2DM. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample among patients ⩾18years with T2DM and generalized linear regression was used to analyze associations and jointpoint regression for trends. The prevalence of CDI was 6.8 per 1000 hospital discharges. Patients with T2DM and CDI had increased odds of in-hospital mortality (OR, 3.63; 95% CI 3.16, 4.17). The adjusted mean LOS was higher in patients with CDI than without CDI (11.9 vs. 4.7days). That translated to average hospital costs of $23,000 and $9100 for patients with and without CDI, respectively. The adjusted risk of mortality in patients who had CDI alone (OR 3.75; 95% CI 3.18, 4.41) was similar to patients who had CDI in addition to other common infections (OR 3.25; 95% CI 2.58, 4.10). CDI is independently associated with poorer health outcomes in patients with T2DM. We recommend close surveillance for CDI in hospitalized patients and further studies to determine the cost effectiveness of screening for CDI among patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of hospital care environment on patient mortality and nurse outcomes.

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    Aiken, Linda H; Clarke, Sean P; Sloane, Douglas M; Lake, Eileen T; Cheney, Timothy

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the net effects of nurse practice environments on nurse and patient outcomes after accounting for nurse staffing and education. Staffing and education have well-documented associations with patient outcomes, but evidence on the effect of care environments on outcomes has been more limited. Data from 10,184 nurses and 232,342 surgical patients in 168 Pennsylvania hospitals were analyzed. Care environments were measured using the practice environment scales of the Nursing Work Index. Outcomes included nurse job satisfaction, burnout, intent to leave, and reports of quality of care, as well as mortality and failure to rescue in patients. Nurses reported more positive job experiences and fewer concerns with care quality, and patients had significantly lower risks of death and failure to rescue in hospitals with better care environments. Care environment elements must be optimized alongside nurse staffing and education to achieve high quality of care.

  17. [Prenatal care and hospital maternal mortality in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga-Soriano, María Rode; Zonana-Nacach, Abraham; Anzaldo-Campos, María Cecilia; Olazarán-Gutiérrez, Asbeidi

    2014-01-01

    To describe the prenatal care (PC) received in women with maternal hospital deaths from 2005 to 2011 in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. Were reviewed the medical chars and registrations of the maternal deaths by the local Committees of Maternal Mortality. There were 44 maternal hospital deaths. Thirty (68%) women assisted to PC appointments during pregnancy, the average number of PC visits was 3.8 and 18 (41%) had an adequate PC (≥ 5 visits). Six (14%) women didn't know they were pregnant; 19 (43%), 21 (48%) y 4 (9%) maternal deaths were due to direct, indirect obstetric cause or non-obstetric causes. Eighteen (18%), 2 (4 %) and 34 (77%) of the maternal deaths occurred during pregnancy, delivery or puerperium. It is necessary pregnancy women have an early, periodic and systematic PC to identify opportunely risk factors associated with pregnancy complications.

  18. Higher Mortality in registrants with sudden model for end-stage liver disease increase: Disadvantaged by the current allocation policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Allan B; Luo, Xun; Alejo, Jennifer L; Poon, Anna K; Cameron, Andrew M; Segev, Dorry L

    2015-05-01

    Liver allocation is based on current Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores, with priority in the case of a tie being given to those waiting the longest with a given MELD score. We hypothesized that this priority might not reflect risk: registrants whose MELD score has recently increased receive lower priority but might have higher wait-list mortality. We studied wait-list and posttransplant mortality in 69,643 adult registrants from 2002 to 2013. By likelihood maximization, we empirically defined a MELD spike as a MELD increase ≥ 30% over the previous 7 days. At any given time, only 0.6% of wait-list patients experienced a spike; however, these patients accounted for 25% of all wait-list deaths. Registrants who reached a given MELD score after a spike had higher wait-list mortality in the ensuing 7 days than those with the same resulting MELD score who did not spike, but they had no difference in posttransplant mortality. The spike-associated wait-list mortality increase was highest for registrants with medium MELD scores: specifically, 2.3-fold higher (spike versus no spike) for a MELD score of 10, 4.0-fold higher for a MELD score of 20, and 2.5-fold higher for a MELD score of 30. A model incorporating the MELD score and spikes predicted wait-list mortality risk much better than a model incorporating only the MELD score. Registrants with a sudden MELD increase have a higher risk of short-term wait-list mortality than is indicated by their current MELD score but have no increased risk of posttransplant mortality; allocation policy should be adjusted accordingly. © 2015 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  19. Mortality and Incidence of Hospital Admissions for Stroke among Brazilians Aged 15 to 49 Years between 2008 and 2012.

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    Fernando Adami

    Full Text Available The objective was to analyze rates of stroke-related mortality and incidence of hospital admissions in Brazilians aged 15 to 49 years according to region and age group between 2008 and 2012.Secondary analysis was performed in 2014 using data from the Hospital and Mortality Information Systems and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Stroke was defined by ICD, 10th revision (I60-I64. Crude and standardized mortality (WHO reference and incidence of hospital admissions per 100,000 inhabitants, stratified by region and age group, were estimated. Absolute and relative frequencies; and linear regression were also used. The software used was Stata 11.0.There were 35,005 deaths and 131,344 hospital admissions for stroke in Brazilians aged 15-49 years old between 2008 and 2012. Mortality decreased from 7.54 (95% CI 7.53; 7.54 in 2008 to 6.32 (95% CI 6.31; 6.32 in 2012 (β = -0.27, p = 0.013, r2 = 0.90. During the same time, incidence of hospital admissions stabilized: 24.67 (95% CI 24.66; 24.67 in 2008 and 25.11 (95% CI 25.10; 25.11 in 2012 (β = 0.09, p = 0.692, r2 = 0.05. There was a reduction in mortality in all Brazilian regions and in the age group between 30 and 49 years. Incidence of hospitalizations decreased in the South, but no significant decrease was observed in any age group.We observed a decrease in stroke-related mortality, particularly in individuals over 30 years old, and stability of the incidence of hospitalizations; and also regional variation in stroke-related hospital admission incidence and mortality among Brazilian young adults.

  20. Assessment of hospital performance with a case-mix standardized mortality model using an existing administrative database in Japan

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    Fushimi Kiyohide

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined whether risk adjustment is evenly applicable to hospitals with various characteristics and case-mix. In this study, we applied a generic prediction model to nationwide discharge data from hospitals with various characteristics. Method We used standardized data of 1,878,767 discharged patients provided by 469 hospitals from July 1 to October 31, 2006. We generated and validated a case-mix in-hospital mortality prediction model using 50/50 split sample validation. We classified hospitals into two groups based on c-index value (hospitals with c-index ≥ 0.8; hospitals with c-index Results The model demonstrated excellent discrimination as indicated by the high average c-index and small standard deviation (c-index = 0.88 ± 0.04. Expected mortality rate of each hospital was highly correlated with observed mortality rate (r = 0.693, p Conclusion The model fits well to a group of hospitals with a wide variety of acute care events, though model fit is less satisfactory for specialized hospitals and those with convalescent wards. Further sophistication of the generic prediction model would be recommended to obtain optimal indices to region specific conditions.

  1. Incidence, hospital costs and in-hospital mortality rates of surgically treated patients with traumatic cranial epidural hematoma

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    Atci Ibrahim Burak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, the patients who were operated in two clinics due to traumatic cranial epidural hematoma (EDH were assessed retrospectively and the factors that increase the costs were tried to be revealed through conducting cost analyses. Methods: The patients who were operated between 2010 and 2016 with the diagnosis of EDH were assessed in terms of age, sex, trauma etiology, Glasgow coma scale (GCS at admission, the period from trauma to hospital arrival, trauma-related injury in other organs, the localization of hematoma, the size of hematoma, length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU, length of antibiotherapy administration, number of consultations conducted, total cost of in-hospital treatments of the patients and prognosis. Results: Distribution of GCS were, between 13-15 in 18 (36% patients, 9-13 in 23 (46% patients and 3-8 in 9 (18% patients. The reasons for emergency department admissions were fall from high in 29 (58% patients, assault in 11 (22% patients and motor vehicle accident in 10 (20% patients. The average cost per ICU stay was 2838 $ (range=343-20571 $. The average cost per surgical treatment was 314 $. ICU care was approximately 9 times more expensive than surgical treatment costs. The mortality rate of the study cohort was 14% (7 patients. Conclusion: The prolonged period of stay in the ICU, antibiotherapy and repeat head CTs increase the costs for patients who are surgically treated for EDH.

  2. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on child mortality, morbidity, and rotavirus-related hospitalizations in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchauste, Lucia; Patzi, Maritza; Halvorsen, Kjetil; Solano, Susana; Montesano, Raul; Iñiguez, Volga

    2017-08-01

    The public health impact of rotavirus vaccination in countries with high child mortality rates remains to be established. The RV1 rotavirus vaccine was introduced in Bolivia in August 2008. This study describes the trends in deaths, hospitalizations, and healthcare visits due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and in rotavirus-related hospitalizations, among children rotavirus-related AGE was assessed using data from the active surveillance hospitals. Compared with the 2001-2008 pre-vaccine baseline, the mean number of rotavirus-related hospitalizations was reduced by 40.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 21.7-66.4%) among children rotavirus disease. Over the post-vaccine period, changes in rotavirus epidemiology were observed, manifested by variations in seasonality and by a shift in the mean age of those with rotavirus infection. The significant decrease in main AGE-related health indicators in children rotavirus vaccine provides evidence of a substantial public health impact of rotavirus vaccination in Bolivia, as a measure for protecting children against AGE. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Klebsiella variicola is a frequent cause of bloodstream infection in the stockholm area, and associated with higher mortality compared to K. pneumoniae.

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    Makaoui Maatallah

    Full Text Available Clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae are divided into three phylogroups and differ in their virulence factor contents. The aim of this study was to determine an association between phylogroup, virulence factors and mortality following bloodstream infection (BSI caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates from all adult patients with BSI caused by K. pneumoniae admitted to Karolinska University Hospital, Solna between 2007 and 2009 (n = 139 were included in the study. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST data. Testing for mucoid phenotype, multiplex PCR determining serotypes K1, K2, K5, K20, K54 and K57, and testing for virulence factors connected to more severe disease in previous studies, was also performed. Data was retrieved from medical records including age, sex, comorbidity, central and urinary catheters, time to adequate treatment, hospital-acquired infection, and mortality, to identify risk factors. The primary end-point was 30- day mortality. The three K. pneumoniae phylogroups were represented: KpI (n = 96, KpII (corresponding to K. quasipneumoniae, n = 9 and KpIII (corresponding to K. variicola, n = 34. Phylogroups were not significantly different in baseline characteristics. Overall, the 30-day mortality was 24/139 (17.3%. Isolates belonging to KpIII were associated with the highest 30-day mortality (10/34 cases, 29.4%, whereas KpI isolates were associated with mortality in 13/96 cases (13.5%. This difference was significant both in univariate statistical analysis (P = 0.037 and in multivariate analysis adjusting for age and comorbidity (OR 3.03 (95% CI: 1.10-8.36. Only three of the isolates causing mortality within 30 days belonged to any of the virulent serotypes (K54, n = 1, had a mucoid phenotype (n = 1 and/or contained virulence genes (wcaG n = 1 and wcaG/allS n = 1. In conclusion, the results indicate higher mortality among patients infected with

  4. Klebsiella variicola Is a Frequent Cause of Bloodstream Infection in the Stockholm Area, and Associated with Higher Mortality Compared to K. pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Muhammad Humaun; Bakhrouf, Amina; Kalin, Mats; Nauclér, Pontus; Brisse, Sylvain; Giske, Christian G.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae are divided into three phylogroups and differ in their virulence factor contents. The aim of this study was to determine an association between phylogroup, virulence factors and mortality following bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates from all adult patients with BSI caused by K. pneumoniae admitted to Karolinska University Hospital, Solna between 2007 and 2009 (n = 139) were included in the study. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data. Testing for mucoid phenotype, multiplex PCR determining serotypes K1, K2, K5, K20, K54 and K57, and testing for virulence factors connected to more severe disease in previous studies, was also performed. Data was retrieved from medical records including age, sex, comorbidity, central and urinary catheters, time to adequate treatment, hospital-acquired infection, and mortality, to identify risk factors. The primary end-point was 30- day mortality. The three K. pneumoniae phylogroups were represented: KpI (n = 96), KpII (corresponding to K. quasipneumoniae, n = 9) and KpIII (corresponding to K. variicola, n = 34). Phylogroups were not significantly different in baseline characteristics. Overall, the 30-day mortality was 24/139 (17.3%). Isolates belonging to KpIII were associated with the highest 30-day mortality (10/34 cases, 29.4%), whereas KpI isolates were associated with mortality in 13/96 cases (13.5%). This difference was significant both in univariate statistical analysis (P = 0.037) and in multivariate analysis adjusting for age and comorbidity (OR 3.03 (95% CI: 1.10–8.36). Only three of the isolates causing mortality within 30 days belonged to any of the virulent serotypes (K54, n = 1), had a mucoid phenotype (n = 1) and/or contained virulence genes (wcaG n = 1 and wcaG/allS n = 1). In conclusion, the results indicate higher mortality among patients infected with

  5. Quality of care, risk management, and technology in obstetrics to reduce hospital-based maternal mortality in Senegal and Mali (QUARITE): a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Alexandre; Fournier, Pierre; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Traoré, Mamadou; Haddad, Slim; Fraser, William D

    2013-07-13

    Maternal mortality is higher in west Africa than in most industrialised countries, so the development and validation of effective interventions is essential. We did a trial to assess the effect of a multifaceted intervention to promote maternity death reviews and onsite training in emergency obstetric care in referral hospitals with high maternal mortality rates in Senegal and Mali. We did a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial, with hospitals as the units of randomisation and patients as the unit of analysis. 46 public first-level and second-level referral hospitals with more than 800 deliveries a year were enrolled, stratified by country and hospital type, and randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n=23) or the control group with no external intervention (n=23). All women who delivered in each of the participating facilities during the baseline and post-intervention periods were included. The intervention, implemented over a period of 2 years at the hospital level, consisted of an initial interactive workshop and quarterly educational clinically-oriented and evidence-based outreach visits focused on maternal death reviews and best practices implementation. The primary outcome was reduction of risk of hospital-based mortality. Analysis was by intention-to-treat and relied on the generalised estimating equations extension of the logistic regression model to account for clustering of women within hospitals. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number ISRCTN46950658. 191,167 patients who delivered in the participating hospitals were analysed (95,931 in the intervention groups and 95,236 in the control groups). Overall, mortality reduction in intervention hospitals was significantly higher than in control hospitals (odds ratio [OR] 0·85, 95% CI 0·73-0·98, p=0·0299), but this effect was limited to capital and district hospitals, which mainly acted as first-level referral hospitals in this trial. There was no effect in second

  6. [Mortality of psychiatric patients. A retrospective cohort study of in-patients at the Psychiatric Hospital of Reggio Emilia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballone, E; Contini, G

    1992-03-01

    The authors report the results of historical cohort study in long-term patients of psychiatric hospitals in Reggio Emilia. The cohort was formed by 790 patients hospitalized before 1978, and has been followed-up until 31/12/'89. The results of the study are: 269 subjects deceased (34%); 117 discharges (14.8%) and 411 (52.1%) still in hospital on 1/1/'90. An excess mortality was observed in the cohort. Mortality appears to be particularly high among young patient and females.

  7. Hospital variability in postoperative mortality after rectal cancer surgery in the Spanish Association of Surgeons project: The impact of hospital volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Héctor; Biondo, Sebastiano; Codina, Antonio; Ciga, Miguel Á; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Espín, Eloy; García-Granero, Eduardo; Roig, José Vicente

    2016-01-01

    This multicentre observational study examines variation between hospitals in postoperative mortality after elective surgery in the Rectal Cancer Project of the Spanish Society of Surgeons and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals. Hospital variation was quantified using a multilevel approach on prospective data derived from the multicentre database of all rectal adenocarcinomas operated by an anterior resection or an abdominoperineal excision at 84 surgical departments from 2006 to 2013. The following variables were included in the analysis; demographics, American Society of Anaesthesiologists classification, tumour location and stage, administration of neoadjuvant treatment, and annual volume of surgical procedures. A total of 9809 consecutive patients were included. The rate of 30-day postoperative mortality was 1.8% Stratified by annual surgical volume hospitals varied from 1.4 to 2.0 in 30-day mortality. In the multilevel regression analysis, male gender (OR 1.623 [1.143; 2.348]; P<.008), increased age (OR: 5.811 [3.479; 10.087]; P<.001), and ASA score (OR 10.046 [3.390; 43.185]; P<.001) were associated with 30-day mortality. However, annual surgical volume was not associated with mortality (OR 1.309 [0.483; 4.238]; P=.619). Besides, there was a statistically significant variation in mortality between all departments (MOR 1.588 [1.293; 2.015]; P<.001). Postoperative mortality varies significantly among hospitals included in the project and this difference cannot be attributed to the annual surgical volume. Copyright © 2015 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Mortality predictors of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy in Debre Tabor General Hospital and Woreta Health Center, South Gondar Zone, Northwest Ethiopia

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    Mekonnen Assefa Ahunie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the mortality predictors of HIV-infected individuals who were receiving antiretroviral treatment. Methods: Data were extracted from medical records of 698 antiretroviral therapy (ART users enrolled at Debre Tabor General Hospital and Woreta Health Center from January 2005 to June 2014 and sociodemographic, clinical and ART-related data were collected. Mortality was compared by using time-to-event Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test and Cox regression analysis were used to identify the predictors of mortality. Results: The overall mortality rate was 1.5 per 100 persons per year. Ambulatory and bedridden patients had four- and seven-fold higher risk of death [adjusted hazard ratio (HR = 4.2, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.7–10.7 and adjusted HR = 6.5, 95% CI: 2.0–20.7, respectively] as compared to those patients who had worked functional status. Patients who had poor antiretroviral drug adherence had five times higher risk of death (adjusted HR = 5.1, 95% CI: 1.6–16.3 than patients who had good antiretroviral adherence. Conclusions: Mortality rate was highly observed in the early phase of antiretroviral treatment. Poor ART adherence, being ambulatory and bedridden functional status was independent predictors of mortality.

  9. Nitrates and herbicides cause higher mortality than the traditional organic fertilizers on the grain beetle, Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Aurora M; Dauwe, Tom; Mora, Isabel; Malone, Jim; Guitart, Raimon

    2010-01-01

    We examined experimentally whether fertilizers or herbicides commonly used by farmers affect mortality of the adult grain beetle Tenebrio molitor. After a period of 4 weeks in direct contact with all treatments, a higher percentage of mortality occurred in contact with nitrates than with pig manure or turkey litter. Herbicides (a mixture of glyphosate and 2,4-D: ) caused 100% mortality. Our results also indicate that more beetles escaped from the herbicides and nitrate treatments than from the others, suggesting some kind of behavioural avoidance of toxic environments. The traditional organic fertilizers appear to be less toxic than inorganic fertilizers for Tenebrio molitor.

  10. Using hospital discharge data for determining neonatal morbidity and mortality: a validation study

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    Algert Charles S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite widespread use of neonatal hospital discharge data, there are few published reports on the accuracy of population health data with neonatal diagnostic or procedure codes. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of using routinely collected hospital discharge data in identifying neonatal morbidity during the birth admission compared with data from a statewide audit of selected neonatal intensive care (NICU admissions. Methods Validation study of population-based linked hospital discharge/birth data against neonatal intensive care audit data from New South Wales, Australia for 2,432 babies admitted to NICUs, 1994–1996. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values (PPV with exact binomial confidence intervals were calculated for 12 diagnoses and 6 procedures. Results Sensitivities ranged from 37.0% for drainage of an air leak to 97.7% for very low birthweight, specificities all exceeded 85% and PPVs ranged from 70.9% to 100%. In-hospital mortality, low birthweight (≤1500 g, retinopathy of prematurity, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration, pneumonia, pulmonary hypertension, selected major anomalies, any mechanical ventilation (including CPAP, major surgery and surgery for patent ductus arteriosus or necrotizing enterocolitis were accurately identified with PPVs over 92%. Transient tachypnea of the newborn and drainage of an air leak had the lowest PPVs, 70.9% and 83.6% respectively. Conclusion Although under-ascertained, routinely collected hospital discharge data had high PPVs for most validated items and would be suitable for risk factor analyses of neonatal morbidity. Procedures tended to be more accurately recorded than diagnoses.

  11. Using hospital discharge data for determining neonatal morbidity and mortality: a validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jane B; Roberts, Christine L; Algert, Charles S; Bowen, Jennifer R; Bajuk, Barbara; Henderson-Smart, David J

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite widespread use of neonatal hospital discharge data, there are few published reports on the accuracy of population health data with neonatal diagnostic or procedure codes. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of using routinely collected hospital discharge data in identifying neonatal morbidity during the birth admission compared with data from a statewide audit of selected neonatal intensive care (NICU) admissions. Methods Validation study of population-based linked hospital discharge/birth data against neonatal intensive care audit data from New South Wales, Australia for 2,432 babies admitted to NICUs, 1994–1996. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values (PPV) with exact binomial confidence intervals were calculated for 12 diagnoses and 6 procedures. Results Sensitivities ranged from 37.0% for drainage of an air leak to 97.7% for very low birthweight, specificities all exceeded 85% and PPVs ranged from 70.9% to 100%. In-hospital mortality, low birthweight (≤1500 g), retinopathy of prematurity, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration, pneumonia, pulmonary hypertension, selected major anomalies, any mechanical ventilation (including CPAP), major surgery and surgery for patent ductus arteriosus or necrotizing enterocolitis were accurately identified with PPVs over 92%. Transient tachypnea of the newborn and drainage of an air leak had the lowest PPVs, 70.9% and 83.6% respectively. Conclusion Although under-ascertained, routinely collected hospital discharge data had high PPVs for most validated items and would be suitable for risk factor analyses of neonatal morbidity. Procedures tended to be more accurately recorded than diagnoses. PMID:18021458

  12. Does higher income inequality adversely influence infant mortality rates? Reconciling descriptive patterns and recent research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Arjumand; Jones, Marcella K; Erwin, Paul Campbell

    2015-04-01

    As the struggle continues to explain the relatively high rates of infant mortality (IMR) exhibited in the United States, a renewed emphasis is being placed on the role of possible 'contextual' determinants. Cross-sectional and short time-series studies have found that higher income inequality is associated with higher IMR at the state level. Yet, descriptively, the longer-term trends in income inequality and in IMR seem to call such results into question. To assess whether, over the period 1990-2007, state-level income inequality is associated with state-level IMR; to examine whether the overall effect of income inequality on IMR over this period varies by state; to test whether the association between income inequality and IMR varies across this time period. IMR data--number of deaths per 1000 live births in a given state and year--were obtained from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control Wonder database. Income inequality was measured using the Gini coefficient, which varies from zero (complete equality) to 100 (complete inequality). Covariates included state-level poverty rate, median income, and proportion of high school graduates. Fixed and random effects regressions were conducted to test hypotheses. Fixed effects models suggested that, overall, during the period 1990-2007, income inequality was inversely associated with IMR (β = -0.07, SE (0.01)). Random effects models suggested that when the relationship was allowed to vary at the state-level, it remained inverse (β = -0.05, SE (0.01)). However, an interaction between income inequality and time suggested that, as time increased, the effect of income inequality had an increasingly positive association with total IMR (β = 0.009, SE (0.002)). The influence of state income inequality on IMR is dependent on time, which may proxy for time-dependent aspects of societal context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Studying Hospitalizations and Mortality in the Netherlands: Feasible and Valid Using Two-Step Medical Record Linkage with Nationwide Registers.

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    Elske Sieswerda

    Full Text Available In the Netherlands, the postal code is needed to study hospitalizations of individuals in the nationwide hospitalization register. Studying hospitalizations longitudinally becomes troublesome if individuals change address. We aimed to report on the feasibility and validity of a two-step medical record linkage approach to examine longitudinal trends in hospitalizations and mortality in a study cohort. First, we linked a study cohort of 1564 survivors of childhood cancer with the Municipal Personal Records Database (GBA which has postal code history and mortality data available. Within GBA, we sampled a reference population matched on year of birth, gender and calendar year. Second, we extracted hospitalizations from the Hospital Discharge Register (LMR with a date of discharge during unique follow-up (based on date of birth, gender and postal code in GBA. We calculated the agreement of death and being hospitalized in survivors according to the registers and to available cohort data. We retrieved 1477 (94% survivors from GBA. Median percentages of unique/potential follow-up were 87% (survivors and 83% (reference persons. Characteristics of survivors and reference persons contributing to unique follow-up were comparable. Agreement of hospitalization during unique follow-up was 94% and agreement of death was 98%. In absence of unique identifiers in the Dutch hospitalization register, it is feasible and valid to study hospitalizations and mortality of individuals longitudinally using a two-step medical record linkage approach. Cohort studies in the Netherlands have the opportunity to study mortality and hospitalization rates over time. These outcomes provide insight into the burden of clinical events and healthcare use in studies on patients at risk of long-term morbidities.

  14. Vertical integration: hospital ownership of physician practices is associated with higher prices and spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Laurence C; Bundorf, M Kate; Kessler, Daniel P

    2014-05-01

    We examined the consequences of contractual or ownership relationships between hospitals and physician practices, often described as vertical integration. Such integration can reduce health spending and increase the quality of care by improving communication across care settings, but it can also increase providers' market power and facilitate the payment of what are effectively kickbacks for inappropriate referrals. We investigated the impact of vertical integration on hospital prices, volumes (admissions), and spending for privately insured patients. Using hospital claims from Truven Analytics MarketScan for the nonelderly privately insured in the period 2001-07, we constructed county-level indices of prices, volumes, and spending and adjusted them for enrollees' age and sex. We measured hospital-physician integration using information from the American Hospital Association on the types of relationships hospitals have with physicians. We found that an increase in the market share of hospitals with the tightest vertically integrated relationship with physicians--ownership of physician practices--was associated with higher hospital prices and spending. We found that an increase in contractual integration reduced the frequency of hospital admissions, but this effect was relatively small. Taken together, our results provide a mixed, although somewhat negative, picture of vertical integration from the perspective of the privately insured.

  15. Ways to Reduce In-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Cardiogenic Shock in Acute Coronary Syndrome

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    G. V. Artamonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze a medical care system for acute coronary syndrome (ACS in a large city in terms of in-hospital cardiogenic shock mortality risk management. Materials and methods. The health care facility management system for a risk for cardiogenic shock (CS and its poor outcome (death was a methodological basis of this study. The information from case histories of ACS patients consecutively admitted to the Kemerovo Cardiology Dispensary (Kemerovo, Russia in the period 2006 to 2011 was used to develop an electronic database. Sampling included 19281 patients with ACS, 6537 with myocardial infarction (MI, 493 with CS. Results and discussion. The medical care system for patients with ACS encompasses an emergency team (a prehospital level, a specialized cardiac hospital (an in-hospital level with a multistage therapeutic and diagnostic process in relation the severity of a patient’s status. The management is based on the principle of continuity of care, by applying the well-defined activity algorithms through valid information exchange and risk stratification for poor outcomes of ACS. An antishock team working just in the admission unit of a hospital was set up to treat high CS risk patients. A systems approach allowed the strategy of early specialized medical care to be developed with a priority of primary percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI as reperfusion therapy in patients with ST-elevation MI. In 2006-2011, every three patients with suspected ACS had verified MI that was com_ plicated by CS in 7.5%. In the CS group, the in-hospital mortality rates totaled 88.0% of cases; that after primary Адрес для корреспонденции (Correspondence to: PCI was 62.2%. In the examined period, the introduction of innovation clinical and organizational approaches provided a reduction in this indicator by 17.6 and 37.5%, respectively. Conclusion. The efficiency of risk management for CS and its poor outcomes in patients with ACS is

  16. Assessing the potential impact of increased participation in higher education on mortality: evidence from 21 European populations.

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    Kulhánová, Ivana; Hoffmann, Rasmus; Judge, Ken; Looman, Caspar W N; Eikemo, Terje A; Bopp, Matthias; Deboosere, Patrick; Leinsalu, Mall; Martikainen, Pekka; Rychtaříková, Jitka; Wojtyniak, Bogdan; Menvielle, Gwenn; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2014-09-01

    Although higher education has been associated with lower mortality rates in many studies, the effect of potential improvements in educational distribution on future mortality levels is unknown. We therefore estimated the impact of projected increases in higher education on mortality in European populations. We used mortality and population data according to educational level from 21 European populations and developed counterfactual scenarios. The first scenario represented the improvement in the future distribution of educational attainment as expected on the basis of an assumption of cohort replacement. We estimated the effect of this counterfactual scenario on mortality with a 10-15-year time horizon among men and women aged 30-79 years using a specially developed tool based on population attributable fractions (PAF). We compared this with a second, upward levelling scenario in which everyone has obtained tertiary education. The reduction of mortality in the cohort replacement scenario ranged from 1.9 to 10.1% for men and from 1.7 to 9.0% for women. The reduction of mortality in the upward levelling scenario ranged from 22.0 to 57.0% for men and from 9.6 to 50.0% for women. The cohort replacement scenario was estimated to achieve only part (4-25% (men) and 10-31% (women)) of the potential mortality decrease seen in the upward levelling scenario. We concluded that the effect of on-going improvements in educational attainment on average mortality in the population differs across Europe, and can be substantial. Further investments in education may have important positive side-effects on population health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Global Contribution of Outdoor Air Pollution to the Incidence, Prevalence, Mortality and Hospital Admission for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingkun; Christiani, David C.; Wang, Xiaorong; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the quantitative effects of outdoor air pollution, represented by 10 µg/m3 increment of PM10, on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in China, United States and European Union through systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: Publications in English and Chinese from PubMed and EMBASE were selected. The Cochrane Review Handbook of Generic Inverse Variance was used to synthesize the pooled effects on incidence, prevalence, mortality and hospital admission. Results: Outdoor air pollution contributed to higher incidence and prevalence of COPD. Short-term exposure was associated with COPD mortality increased by 6%, 1% and 1% in the European Union, the United States and China, respectively (p < 0.05). Chronic PM exposure produced a 10% increase in mortality. In a short-term exposure to 10 µg/m3 PM10 increment COPD mortality was elevated by 1% in China (p < 0.05) and hospital admission enrollment was increased by 1% in China, 2% in United States and 1% in European Union (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Outdoor air pollution contributes to the increasing burdens of COPD.10 µg/m3 increase of PM10 produced significant condition of COPD death and exacerbation in China, United States and European Union. Controlling air pollution will have substantial benefit to COPD morbidity and mortality. PMID:25405599

  18. Burden of diarrhea, hospitalization and mortality due to cryptosporidial infections in Indian children.

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    Rajiv Sarkar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium spp. is a common, but under-reported cause of childhood diarrhea throughout the world, especially in developing countries. A comprehensive estimate of the burden of cryptosporidiosis in resource-poor settings is not available.We used published and unpublished studies to estimate the burden of diarrhea, hospitalization and mortality due to cryptosporidial infections in Indian children. Our estimates suggest that annually, one in every 6-11 children <2 years of age will have an episode of cryptosporidial diarrhea, 1 in every 169-633 children will be hospitalized and 1 in every 2890-7247 children will die due to cryptosporidiosis. Since there are approximately 42 million children <2 years of age in India, it is estimated that Cryptosporidium results in 3.9-7.1 million diarrheal episodes, 66.4-249.0 thousand hospitalizations, and 5.8-14.6 thousand deaths each year.The findings of this study suggest a high burden of cryptosporidiosis among children <2 years of age in India and makes a compelling case for further research on transmission and prevention modalities of Cryptosporidium spp. in India and other developing countries.

  19. A cohort study: temporal trends in prevalence of antecedents, comorbidities and mortality in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians with first heart failure hospitalization, 2000-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Tiew-Hwa Katherine; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Hung, Joseph; Knuiman, Matthew; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Geelhoed, Elizabeth; Bessarab, Dawn; Hobbs, Michael; Thompson, Sandra C

    2015-08-12

    Little is known about trends in risk factors and mortality for Aboriginal Australians with heart failure (HF). This population-based study evaluated trends in prevalence of risk factors, 30-day and 1-year all-cause mortality following first HF hospitalization among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Western Australians in the decade 2000-2009. Linked-health data were used to identify patients (20-84 years), with a first-ever HF hospitalization. Trends in demographics, comorbidities, interventions and risk factors were evaluated. Logistic and Cox regression models were fitted to test and compare trends over time in 30-day and 1-year mortality. Of 17,379 HF patients, 1,013 (5.8%) were Aboriginal. Compared with 2000-2002, the prevalence (as history) of myocardial infarction and hypertension increased more markedly in 2006-2009 in Aboriginal (versus non-Aboriginal) patients, while diabetes and chronic kidney disease remained disproportionately higher in Aboriginal patients. Risk factor trends, including the Charlson comorbidity index, increased over time in younger Aboriginal patients. Risk-adjusted 30-day mortality did not change over the decade in either group. Risk-adjusted 1-year mortality (in 30-day survivors) was non-significantly higher in Aboriginal patients in 2006-2008 compared with 2000-2002 (hazard ratio (HR) 1.44; 95% CI 0.85-2.41; p-trend = 0.47) whereas it decreased in non-Aboriginal patients (HR 0.87; 95% CI 0.78-0.97; p-trend = 0.01). Between 2000 and 2009, the prevalence of HF antecedents increased and remained disproportionately higher in Aboriginal (versus non-Aboriginal) HF patients. Risk-adjusted 1-year mortality did not improve in Aboriginal patients over the period in contrast with non-Aboriginal patients. These findings highlight the need for better prevention and post-HF care in Aboriginal Australians.

  20. The New York risk score for in-hospital and 30-day mortality for coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Edward L; Farrell, Louise Szypulski; Wechsler, Andrew; Jordan, Desmond; Lahey, Stephen J; Culliford, Alfred T; Gold, Jeffrey P; Higgins, Robert S D; Smith, Craig R

    2013-01-01

    Simplified risk scores for coronary artery bypass graft surgery are frequently in lieu of more complicated statistical models and are valuable for informed consent and choice of intervention. Previous risk scores have been based on in-hospital mortality, but a substantial number of patients die within 30 days of the procedure. These deaths should also be accounted for, so we have developed a risk score based on in-hospital and 30-day mortality. New York's Cardiac Surgery Reporting System was used to develop an in-hospital and 30-day logistic regression model for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery in 2009, and this model was converted into a simple linear risk score that provides estimated in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates for different values of the score. The accuracy of the risk score in predicting mortality was tested. This score was also validated by applying it to 2008 New York coronary artery bypass graft data. Subsequent analyses evaluated the ability of the risk score to predict complications and length of stay. The overall in-hospital and 30-day mortality rate for the 10,148 patients in the study was 1.79%. There are seven risk factors comprising the score, with risk factor scores ranging from 1 to 5, and the highest possible total score is 23. The score accurately predicted mortality in 2009 as well as in 2008, and was strongly correlated with complications and length of stay. The risk score is a simple way of estimating short-term mortality that accurately predicts mortality in the year the model was developed as well as in the previous year. Perioperative complications and length of stay are also well predicted by the risk score. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biochemical Markers as Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Severe Trauma: A Retrospective Cohort Study

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    Ha Nee Jang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Initial evaluation of injury severity in trauma patients is an important and challenging task. We aimed to assess whether easily measurable biochemical parameters (hemoglobin, pH, and prothrombin time/international normalized ratio [PT/INR] can predict in-hospital mortality in patients with severe trauma. Methods This retrospective study involved review of the medical records of 315 patients with severe trauma and an injury severity score >15 who were managed at Gyeongsang National University Hospital between January 2005 and December 2015. We extracted the following data: in-hospital mortality, injury severity score, and initial hemoglobin level, pH, and PT/INR. The predictive values of these variables were compared using receiver operation characteristic curves. Results Of the 315 patients, 72 (22.9% died. The in-hospital mortality rates of patients with hemoglobin levels <8.4 g/dl and ≥8.4 g/dl were 49.8% and 9.9%, respectively (P < 0.001. At a cutoff hemoglobin level of 8.4 g/dl, the sensitivity and specificity values for mortality were 81.9% and 86.4%, respectively. At a pH cutoff of 7.25, the sensitivity and specificity values for mortality were 66.7% and 77.8%, respectively; 66.7% of patients with a pH <7.25 died versus 22.2% with a pH ≥7.25 (P < 0.001. The in-hospital mortality rates for patients with PT/INR values ≥1.4 and <1.4 were 37.5% and 16%, respectively (P < 0.001; sensitivity, 37.5%; specificity, 84%. Conclusions Using the suggested cutoff values, hemoglobin level, pH, and PT/INR can simply and easily be used to predict in-hospital mortality in patients with severe trauma.

  2. Effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on inpatient mortality and hospital length of stay: a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyomard, Veronique; Fulcher, Robert A; Redmayne, Oliver; Metcalf, Anthony K; Potter, John F; Myint, Phyo K

    2009-11-01

    To examine the effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on stroke outcome. Retrospective database study. Norfolk, United Kingdom. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three men and women with stroke admitted to the hospital between 1997 and 2001. Inpatient mortality and likelihood of longer length of hospital stay, defined as longer than median length of stay (LOS). Dysphagia was defined as difficulty swallowing any liquid (including saliva) or solid material. Dysphasia was defined as speech disorders in which there was impairment of the power of expression by speech, writing, or signs or impairment of the power of comprehension of spoken or written language. An experienced team assessed dysphagia and dysphasia using explicit criteria. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three patients (1,330 (44.6%) male), median age 78 (range 17-105), were included, of whom 77.7% had ischemic, 10.5% had hemorrhagic, and 11.8% had undetermined stroke types. Dysphasia was present in 41.2% (1,230) and dysphagia in 50.5% (1,506), and 27.7% (827) had both conditions. Having either or both conditions was associated with greater mortality and longer LOS (P<.001 for all). Using multiple logistic regression models controlling for age, sex, premorbid Rankin score, previous disabling stroke, and stroke type, corresponding odds ratios for death and longer LOS were 2.2 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.8-2.7) and 1.4 (95% CI=1.2-1.6) for dysphasia; 12.5 (95% CI=8.9-17.3) and 3.9 (95% CI=3.3-4.6) for dysphagia, 5.5 (95% CI=3.7-8.2), 1.9 (95% CI=1.6-2.3) for either, and 13.8 (95% CI=9.4-20.4) and 3.7 (95% CI=3.1-4.6) if they had both, versus having no dysphasia, no dysphagia, or none of these conditions, respectively. Patients with dysphagia have worse outcome in terms of inpatient mortality and length of hospital stay than those with dysphasia. When both conditions are present, the presence of dysphagia appears to determine the likelihood of poor outcome. Whether this effect is related just to stroke severity

  3. Mortality and morbidity pattern in small-for gestational age and appropriate-for-gestational age very preterm babies: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, T.; Khattak, A.A.; Rehman, S.U.

    2009-01-01

    Very preterm babies are important group of paediatric babies who require special attention. These babies are known to have increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Studying the morbidity and mortality pattern for this important paediatric group can help in better understanding of their care in the hospital settings. Objective of the study was to compare the mortality and morbidity pattern in Small-for-gestational age and appropriate-for-gestational age very preterm babies. This hospital based prospective (cohort) study was conducted at the department of Paediatrics, Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar from March 2008 to April 2009. One hundred Small-for-gestational age (SGA) live born very preterm babies were compared with 100 appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) very preterm babies having similar gestational ages. Information regarding gestational age, birth weight, mortality, and morbidity (in terms of various biochemical and clinical markers) were recorded on a pre-designed questionnaire. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 15. Results were interpreted in terms of descriptive (mean, proportions, standard deviation) and inferential statistical tests (with p-values). There was no difference between the two groups (SGA Vs AGA) with regards to gestational age and gender of the babies The mean weight of SGA babies was significantly lower as compared to AGA babies (1.1+-0.16 Kg Vs 1.5+-0.2 Kg; p=0.001). As compared to AGA babies, the SGA babies had a higher mortality (40% Vs 22%, p=0.006), and higher morbidity in terms of hyperbilirubinaemia (67% Vs 51%, p=0.02) and hypocalcaemia (24% Vs 10%, p=0.02). The difference in the mortality between the two groups was more prominent in babies with gestational age < 31 weeks (71.4% for SGA as compared to 39.3 % for AGA very preterm babies with gestational age < 31 weeks). Very preterm SGA infants have significantly higher mortality and morbidity in comparison to the AGA babies. In deciding

  4. The effect of systematic pediatric care on neonatal mortality and hospitalizations of infants born with oral clefts

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    Wehby George L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P increase mortality and morbidity risks for affected infants especially in less developed countries. This study aimed at assessing the effects of systematic pediatric care on neonatal mortality and hospitalizations of infants with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P in South America. Methods The intervention group included live-born infants with isolated or associated CL/P in 47 hospitals between 2003 and 2005. The control group included live-born infants with CL/P between 2001 and 2002 in the same hospitals. The intervention group received systematic pediatric care between the 7th and 28th day of life. The primary outcomes were mortality between the 7th and 28th day of life and hospitalization days in this period among survivors adjusted for relevant baseline covariates. Results There were no significant mortality differences between the intervention and control groups. However, surviving infants with associated CL/P in the intervention group had fewer hospitalization days by about six days compared to the associated control group. Conclusions Early systematic pediatric care may significantly reduce neonatal hospitalizations of infants with CL/P and additional birth defects in South America. Given the large healthcare and financial burden of CL/P on affected families and the relatively low cost of systematic pediatric care, improving access to such care may be a cost-effective public policy intervention. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00097149

  5. Higher mortality of adults with asthma: A 15-year follow-up of a population-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmetyinen, R E; Karjalainen, J V; But, A; Renkonen, R L O; Pekkanen, J R; Toppila-Salmi, S K; Haukka, J K

    2018-02-20

    Higher all-cause mortality in asthmatics has been shown previously. Polysensitization is associated with higher morbidity among asthmatic children, and allergic rhinitis and/or allergic conjunctivitis (AR/AC) are associated with higher morbidity in adult asthmatics. Little is known about the effect of AR/AC and other factors on mortality among adult asthmatics. The aim was to study mortality and its risk factors in adults with and without asthma. We randomly selected 1648 asthmatics with age over 30 years from national registers and matched the asthma sample with one or two controls. Baseline information was obtained by a questionnaire in 1997, and the study population was linked with the death certificate information of Statistics Finland from 1997 to 2013. Overall and cause-specific survival between the groups was compared in several adjusted models. During a mean follow-up period of 15.6 years, 221 deaths among 1052 asthma patients and 335 deaths among 1889 nonasthmatics were observed. Cardiovascular diseases were the main cause of death in both groups. Asthma was associated with increased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 1.25; 95% CI 1.05-1.49, P = .011) as well as mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR 12.0, 4.18-34.2, P < .001) and malignant neoplasms of respiratory organs (HR 2.33, 1.25-4.42, P = .008). Among asthmatics, smoking was associated with increased all-cause mortality, and self-reported AR/AC was associated with decreased mortality. Among nonasthmatics, smoking, and obesity were associated with increased all-cause mortality, whereas female gender showed an association with a decreased risk. Increased mortality among adult asthmatics was largely explained by the development of COPD, malignant respiratory tract neoplasms, and cardiovascular diseases. Smoking cessation is important for reduction in total mortality in both asthmatic and nonasthmatic adults. AR/AC was associated with decreased mortality only in asthmatics. Thus

  6. Living the good life? Mortality and hospital utilization patterns in the Old Order Amish.

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    Braxton D Mitchell

    Full Text Available Lifespan increases observed in the United States and elsewhere throughout the developed world, have been attributed in part to improvements in medical care access and technology and to healthier lifestyles. To differentiate the relative contributions of these two factors, we have compared lifespan in the Old Order Amish (OOA, a population with historically low use of medical care, with that of Caucasian participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS, focusing on individuals who have reached at least age 30 years.Analyses were based on 2,108 OOA individuals from the Lancaster County, PA community born between 1890 and 1921 and 5,079 FHS participants born approximately the same time. Vital status was ascertained on 96.9% of the OOA cohort through 2011 and through systematic follow-up of the FHS cohort. The lifespan part of the study included an enlargement of the Anabaptist Genealogy Database to 539,822 individuals, which will be of use in other studies of the Amish. Mortality comparisons revealed that OOA men experienced better longevity (p<0.001 and OOA women comparable longevity than their FHS counterparts.We further documented all OOA hospital discharges in Lancaster County, PA during 2002-2004 and compared OOA discharge rates to Caucasian national rates obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Survey for the same time period. Both OOA men and women experienced markedly lower rates of hospital discharges than their non-Amish counterparts, despite the increased lifespan.We speculate that lifestyle factors may predispose the OOA to greater longevity and perhaps to lesser hospital use. Identifying these factors, which might include behaviors such as lesser tobacco use, greater physical activity, and/or enhanced community assimilation, and assessing their transferability to non-Amish communities may produce significant gains to the public health.

  7. Mortality pattern of burn patients admitted in S. G. M. Hospital Rewa: A teaching institute of central India

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    S Lal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burn injuries rank among the most severe types of injuries suffered by the human body with an attendant high mortality and morbidity rate. In previous studies, incidence, severity and deaths due to burn were found higher in young married women in India. Study to find out mortality pattern in burn patient was not carried out in this part of country. Objective: To identify demographic and sociocultural factors, type, modes, causes and risk factors for burn injuries and their gender-wise association. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study. Data were collected from all burn patients who admitted and died while on the treatment from 2004 to 2009. A total of 586 patients were included in this study. Data were gathered from hospital records and entered in the excel sheet. Analysis of data was done by using SPSS version 17 statistical software. Results: The mean age of patients was 22.66 years (range 1 m to 80 years. Episodes of burn were 4.63 times common in female (82.25% than in male (17.75%. It was statistically significant in females of age group 21-30 years (93.93% vs. 15.33% P < 0.0001. Married females (86.80% burned more commonly than married males (13.19% P < 0.0001. Flame burn was the major cause of death (95.56%. Kerosene was the most common (69% source of flame burn. Clothes caught fire while working on Chullha were 25% cases ( P < 0.0001. Accidental (86.44% burn was the most common intention of injury. The majority of burn deaths (68% occurred within one week of the incident due to septicemia (57%. Conclusion: Factors associated with an increase in mortality were accidental burns, burn size, young age, married women, and flame burns. For planning and implementing prevention programs, the approach has to be multidisciplinary and coordinated.

  8. Maternal mortality and morbidity of unsafe abortion in a university teaching hospital of Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, N.; Hossain, N.; Khan, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the mortality and morbidity of unsafe abortion in a University Teaching Hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit III, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital Karachi from January 2005 to December 2009. Data regarding the socio demographic characteristics, reasons and methods of abortion, nature of provider, complications and treatment were collected for 43 women, who were admitted with complications of unsafe abortion, and an analysis was done. Results: The frequency of unsafe abortion was 1.35% and the case fatality rate was 34.9%. Most of the women belonged to a very poor socioeconomic group (22/43; 51.2%) and were illiterate (27/43; 62.8%). Unsafe abortion followed an induced abortion in 29 women and other miscarriages in 14 women. The majority of women who had an induced abortion were married (19/29, 65.5%). A completed family was the main reason for induced abortion (14/29; 48.2%) followed by being unmarried (8/29, 27.5%) and domestic violence in 5/29 cases (17.2%). Instruments were the commonest method used for unsafe abortion (26/43;68.4%).The most frequent complication was septicaemia (34; 79%) followed by uterine perforation with or without bowel perforation (13, 30.2%) and haemorrhage (9; 20.9%). Majority of induced abortions were performed by untrained providers (22/26; 84.6%) compared to only 3/14 cases (21.4%) of other miscarriages (p=0.0001). Conclusion: The high maternal mortality and morbidity of unsafe abortion in our study highlights the need for improving contraceptive and safe abortion services in Pakistan. (author)

  9. Maternal mortality at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Southeast Nigeria: a 10-year review (2003?2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Obiechina, NJ; Okolie, VE; Okechukwu, ZC; Oguejiofor, CF; Udegbunam, OI; Nwajiaku, LSA; Ogbuokiri, C; Egeonu, R

    2013-01-01

    NJ Obiechina, VE Okolie, ZC Okechukwu, CF Oguejiofor, OI Udegbunam, LSA Nwajiaku, C Ogbuokiri, R Egeonu Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria Background: Maternal mortality is high the world over, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria. Nigeria has consistently demonstrated one of the most abysmally poor reproductive health indices in the world, maternal mortality inclusive. This is a sad reminder that, unless thing...

  10. Association of ventricular arrhythmia and in-hospital mortality in stroke patients in Florida: A nonconcurrent prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Arielle A; Parsons, Chase C; Barengo, Noël C; Ruiz, Juan Gabriel; Ward-Peterson, Melissa; Zevallos, Juan Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Stroke remains one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Current evidence identified electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in 50% of patients with an acute stroke. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the presence of ventricular arrhythmia (VA) in adult patients hospitalized in Florida with acute stroke increased the risk of in-hospital mortality.Secondary data analysis of 215,150 patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke hospitalized in the state of Florida collected by the Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration from 2008 to 2012. The main outcome for this study was in-hospital mortality. The main exposure of this study was defined as the presence of VA. VA included the ICD-9 CM codes: paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia (427.1), ventricular fibrillation (427.41), ventricular flutter (427.42), ventricular fibrillation and flutter (427.4), and other - includes premature ventricular beats, contractions, or systoles (427.69). Differences in demographic and clinical characteristics and hospital outcomes were assessed between patients who developed versus did not develop VA during hospitalization (χ and t tests). Binary logistic regression was used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between VA and in-hospital mortality.VA was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality after adjusting for all covariates (odds ratio [OR]: 1.75; 95% CI: 1.6-1.2). There was an increased in-hospital mortality in women compared to men (OR: 1.1; 95% CI: 1.1-1.14), age greater than 85 years (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 3.5-4.3), African Americans compared to Whites (OR: 1.1; 95% CI: 1.04-1.2), diagnosis of congestive heart failure (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 2.0-2.3), and atrial arrhythmias (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 2.0-2.2). Patients with hemorrhagic stroke had increased odds of in-hospital mortality (OR: 9.0; 95% CI: 8.6-9.4) compared to ischemic stroke.Identifying VAs in stroke patients may help in

  11. Index to Predict In-hospital Mortality in Older Adults after Non-traumatic Emergency Department Intubations

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    Kei Ouchi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our goal was to develop and validate an index to predict in-hospital mortality in older adults after non-traumatic emergency department (ED intubations. Methods: We used Vizient administrative data from hospitalizations of 22,374 adults ≥75 years who underwent non-traumatic ED intubation from 2008–2015 at nearly 300 U.S. hospitals to develop and validate an index to predict in-hospital mortality. We randomly selected one half of participants for the development cohort and one half for the validation cohort. Considering 25 potential predictors, we developed a multivariable logistic regression model using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method to determine factors associated with in-hospital mortality. We calculated risk scores using points derived from the final model’s beta coefficients. To evaluate calibration and discrimination of the final model, we used Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square test and receiver-operating characteristic analysis and compared mortality by risk groups in the development and validation cohorts. Results: Death during the index hospitalization occurred in 40% of cases. The final model included six variables: history of myocardial infarction, history of cerebrovascular disease, history of metastatic cancer, age, admission diagnosis of sepsis, and admission diagnosis of stroke/ intracranial hemorrhage. Those with low-risk scores (10 had 58% risk of in-hospital mortality. The Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square of the model was 6.47 (p=0.09, and the c-statistic was 0.62 in the validation cohort. Conclusion: The model may be useful in identifying older adults at high risk of death after ED intubation.

  12. Intermediate-term and long-term mortality among acute medical patients hospitalized with community-acquired sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel P; Pottegård, Anton; Laursen, Christian B

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Admission with severe sepsis is associated with an increased short-term mortality, but it is unestablished whether sepsis severity has an impact on intermediate-term and long-term mortality following admission to an acute medical admission unit. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a populat......OBJECTIVE: Admission with severe sepsis is associated with an increased short-term mortality, but it is unestablished whether sepsis severity has an impact on intermediate-term and long-term mortality following admission to an acute medical admission unit. PATIENTS AND METHODS......: This was a population-based study of all adults admitted to an acute medical admission unit, Odense University Hospital, Denmark, from September 2010 to August 2011, identified by symptoms and clinical findings. We categorized the mortality periods into intermediate-term (31-180 days) and long-term (181-365, 366...

  13. Prediction of hospital mortality by changes in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Berzan, E

    2015-03-01

    Deterioration of physiological or laboratory variables may provide important prognostic information. We have studied whether a change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) value calculated using the (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula) over the hospital admission, would have predictive value. An analysis was performed on all emergency medical hospital episodes (N = 61964) admitted between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2011. A stepwise logistic regression model examined the relationship between mortality and change in renal function from admission to discharge. The fully adjusted Odds Ratios (OR) for 5 classes of GFR deterioration showed a stepwise increased risk of 30-day death with OR\\'s of 1.42 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.68), 1.59 (1.27, 1.99), 2.71 (2.24, 3.27), 5.56 (4.54, 6.81) and 11.9 (9.0, 15.6) respectively. The change in eGFR during a clinical episode, following an emergency medical admission, powerfully predicts the outcome.

  14. Determinants of maternal mortality: a hospital based study from south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, P; Agrawal, A; Swain, S

    1995-01-01

    During 1981-1986, 86 maternal deaths transpired at the obstetrics department of the Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research in Pondicherry, India. The maternal mortality rate stood at 5.8/1000 births. 31.4% were primigravidae. The percentage of maternal deaths characterized as gravidae 2-4, 5, and multigravidae was 42.9%, 9.3%, and 16.4%, respectively. The leading causes of death were sepsis (41.9%), especially septic abortion (30.2%); eclampsia-severe preeclampsia (10.5%); ruptured uterus (9.3%); and hemorrhage and prolonged labor (8.1% each). Direct obstetric causes of death accounted for 81.4% of all maternal deaths. Indirect obstetric causes of death were hepatitis (5.8%), heart disease (4.7%), and severe anemia (2.3%). Most of the women who died were illiterate (97.6%), poor (98.8%), and had received no prenatal care (94.2%). 47.7% traveled more than 60 km to the hospital. Quacks or untrained traditional birth attendants had excessively interfered with about 33% before they reached the hospital, especially the septic induced abortion, obstructed labor, and ruptured uterus cases. Among the 48 women who delivered before dying, there were 24 live births (5 of whom died during the early neonatal period) and 24 still births. These findings indicate a need for a cooperative effort to improve and expand maternal and child health care in the community.

  15. Effects of age, comorbidity and adherence to current antimicrobial guidelines on mortality in hospitalized elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiudi; Zhou, Fei; Li, Hui; Xing, Xiqian; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yimin; Zhang, Chunxiao; Liu, Xuedong; Suo, Lijun; Wang, Jinxiang; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Guangqiang; Yao, Xuexin; Yu, Hongxia; Wang, Lei; Liu, Meng; Xue, Chunxue; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Yanli; Xiao, Ying; Cui, Xiaojing; Li, Lijuan; Purdy, Jay E; Cao, Bin

    2018-04-24

    Limited information exists on the clinical characteristics predictive of mortality in patients aged ≥65 years in many countries. The impact of adherence to current antimicrobial guidelines on the mortality of hospitalized elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has never been assessed. A total of 3131 patients aged ≥65 years were enrolled from a multi-center, retrospective, observational study initiated by the CAP-China network. Risk factors for death were screened with multivariable logistic regression analysis, with emphasis on the evaluation of age, comorbidities and antimicrobial treatment regimen with regard to the current Chinese CAP guidelines. The mean age of the study population was 77.4 ± 7.4 years. Overall in-hospital and 60-day mortality were 5.7% and 7.6%, respectively; these rates were three-fold higher in those aged ≥85 years than in the 65-74 group (11.9% versus 3.2% for in-hospital mortality and 14.1% versus 4.7% for 60-day mortality, respectively). The mortality was significantly higher among patients with comorbidities compared with those who were otherwise healthy. According to the 2016 Chinese CAP guidelines, 62.1% of patients (1907/3073) received non-adherent treatment. For general-ward patients without risk factors for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection (n = 2258), 52.3% (1094/2090) were over-treated, characterized by monotherapy with an anti-pseudomonal β-lactam or combination with fluoroquinolone + β-lactam; while 71.4% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients (120/168) were undertreated, without coverage of atypical bacteria. Among patients with risk factors for PA infection (n = 815), 22.9% (165/722) of those in the general ward and 74.2% of those in the ICU (69/93) were undertreated, using regimens without anti-pseudomonal activity. The independent predictors of 60-day mortality were age, long-term bedridden status, congestive heart failure, CURB-65, glucose, heart rate, arterial oxygen

  16. Predictive score for mortality in patients with COPD exacerbations attending hospital emergency departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information is available about predictors of short-term outcomes in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (eCOPD) attending an emergency department (ED). Such information could help stratify these patients and guide medical decision-making. The aim of this study was to develop a clinical prediction rule for short-term mortality during hospital admission or within a week after the index ED visit. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of patients with eCOPD attending the EDs of 16 participating hospitals. Recruitment started in June 2008 and ended in September 2010. Information on possible predictor variables was recorded during the time the patient was evaluated in the ED, at the time a decision was made to admit the patient to the hospital or discharge home, and during follow-up. Main short-term outcomes were death during hospital admission or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED, as well as at death within 1 month of the index ED visit. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed in a derivation sample and validated in a validation sample. The score was compared with other published prediction rules for patients with stable COPD. Results In total, 2,487 patients were included in the study. Predictors of death during hospital admission, or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED were patient age, baseline dyspnea, previous need for long-term home oxygen therapy or non-invasive mechanical ventilation, altered mental status, and use of inspiratory accessory muscles or paradoxical breathing upon ED arrival (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85). Addition of arterial blood gas parameters (oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures (PO2 and PCO2)) and pH) did not improve the model. The same variables were predictors of death at 1 month (AUC = 0.85). Compared with other commonly used tools for predicting the severity of COPD in stable patients, our rule was significantly better

  17. In-hospital mortality and treatment patterns in acute myocardial infarction patients admitted during national cardiology meeting dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Seiko; Kunisawa, Susumu; Sasaki, Noriko; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2016-10-01

    Many hospitals experience a reduction in the number of available physicians on days when national scientific meetings are conducted. This study investigates the relationship between in-hospital mortality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients and admission during national cardiology meeting dates. Using an administrative database, we analyzed patients with AMI admitted to acute care hospitals in Japan from 2011 to 2013. There were 3 major national cardiology meetings held each year. A hierarchical logistic regression model was used to compare in-hospital mortality and treatment patterns between patients admitted on meeting dates and those admitted on identical days during the week before and after the meeting dates. We identified 6,332 eligible patients, with 1,985 patients admitted during 26 meeting days and 4,347 patients admitted during 52 non-meeting days. No significant differences between meeting and non-meeting dates were observed for in-hospital mortality (7.4% vs. 8.5%, respectively; p=0.151, unadjusted odds ratio: 0.861, 95% confidence interval: 0.704-1.054) and the proportion of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) performed on the day of admission (75.9% vs. 76.2%, respectively; p=0.824). We also found that some low-staffed hospitals did not treat AMI patients during meeting dates. Little or no "national meeting effect" was observed on in-hospital mortality in AMI patients, and PCI rates were similar for both meeting and non-meeting dates. Our findings also indicated that during meeting dates, AMI patients may have been consolidated to high-performance and sufficiently staffed hospitals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reduction of operative mortality after implementation of Surgical Outcomes Monitoring and Improvement Programme by Hong Kong Hospital Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, W C; Wong, K; Cheung, Y S; Lai, P Bs

    2018-04-01

    Since 2008, the Hong Kong Hospital Authority has implemented a Surgical Outcomes Monitoring and Improvement Programme (SOMIP) at 17 public hospitals with surgical departments. This study aimed to assess the change in operative mortality rate after implementation of SOMIP. The SOMIP included all Hospital Authority patients undergoing major/ultra-major procedures in general surgery, urology, plastic surgery, and paediatric surgery. Patients undergoing liver or renal transplantation or who had multiple trauma or massive bowel ischaemia were excluded. In SOMIP, data retrieval from the Hospital Authority patient database was performed by six full-time nurse reviewers following a set of precise data definitions. A total of 230 variables were collected for each patient, on demographics, preoperative and operative variables, laboratory test results, and postoperative complications up to 30 days after surgery. In this study, we used SOMIP cumulative 5-year data to generate risk-adjusted 30-day mortality models by hierarchical logistic regression for both emergency and elective operations. The models expressed overall performance as an annual observed-to-expected mortality ratio. From 2009/2010 to 2015/2016, the overall crude mortality rate decreased from 10.8% to 5.6% for emergency procedures and from 0.9% to 0.4% for elective procedures. From 2011/2012 to 2015/2016, the risk-adjusted observed-to-expected mortality ratios showed a significant downward trend for both emergency and elective operations: from 1.126 to 0.796 and from 1.150 to 0.859, respectively (Mann- Kendall statistic = -0.8; PAuthority's overall crude mortality rates and risk-adjusted observed-to-expected mortality ratios for emergency and elective operations significantly declined after SOMIP was implemented.

  19. The New York State risk score for predicting in-hospital/30-day mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Edward L; Farrell, Louise Szypulski; Walford, Gary; Jacobs, Alice K; Berger, Peter B; Holmes, David R; Stamato, Nicholas J; Sharma, Samin; King, Spencer B

    2013-06-01

    This study sought to develop a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) risk score for in-hospital/30-day mortality. Risk scores are simplified linear scores that provide clinicians with quick estimates of patients' short-term mortality rates for informed consent and to determine the appropriate intervention. Earlier PCI risk scores were based on in-hospital mortality. However, for PCI, a substantial percentage of patients die within 30 days of the procedure after discharge. New York's Percutaneous Coronary Interventions Reporting System was used to develop an in-hospital/30-day logistic regression model for patients undergoing PCI in 2010, and this model was converted into a simple linear risk score that estimates mortality rates. The score was validated by applying it to 2009 New York PCI data. Subsequent analyses evaluated the ability of the score to predict complications and length of stay. A total of 54,223 patients were used to develop the risk score. There are 11 risk factors that make up the score, with risk factor scores ranging from 1 to 9, and the highest total score is 34. The score was validated based on patients undergoing PCI in the previous year, and accurately predicted mortality for all patients as well as patients who recently suffered a myocardial infarction (MI). The PCI risk score developed here enables clinicians to estimate in-hospital/30-day mortality very quickly and quite accurately. It accurately predicts mortality for patients undergoing PCI in the previous year and for MI patients, and is also moderately related to perioperative complications and length of stay. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictors of in-hospital mortality after mitral valve surgery for post-myocardial infarction papillary muscle rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Wijdh-den Hamer, Inez J; Koene, Bart M; Kuijpers, Michiel; Natour, Ehsan; Erasmus, Michiel E; van der Horst, Iwan C C; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Mariani, Massimo A

    2014-10-18

    Papillary muscle rupture (PMR) is a rare, but often life-threatening mechanical complication of myocardial infarction (MI). Immediate surgical intervention is considered the optimal and most rational treatment for acute PMR, but carries high risks. At this point it is not entirely clear which patients are at highest risk. In this study we sought to determine in-hospital mortality and its predictors for patients who underwent mitral valve surgery for post-MI PMR. Between January 1990 and December 2012, 48 consecutive patients (mean age 64.9 ± 10.8 years) underwent mitral valve repair (n = 10) or replacement (n = 38) for post-MI PMR. Clinical data, echocardiographic data, catheterization data, and surgical reports were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality. Intraoperative mortality was 4.2% and in-hospital mortality was 25.0%. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed the logistic EuroSCORE and EuroSCORE II as independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Receiver operating characteristics curves showed an optimal cutoff value of 40% for the logistic EuroSCORE (area under the curve 0.85, 95% CI 0.71-1.00, P optimal cutoff ≥ 40%), EuroSCORE II (optimal cutoff ≥ 25%), complete PMR, and intraoperative IABP requirement are strong independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery for post-MI PMR. These predictors may aid in surgical decision making and they may help improve the quality of informed consent.

  1. In-hospital mortality risk factors in community acquired pneumonia: evaluation of immunocompetent adult patients without comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Hernan Vicco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: several scores were developed in order to improve the determination of community acquired pneumonia (CAP severity and its management, mainly CURB-65 and SACP score. However, none of them were evaluated for risk assessment of in-hospital mortality, particularly in individuals who were non-immunosuppressed and/or without any comorbidity. In this regard, the present study was carried out. Methods: we performed a cross-sectional study in 272 immunocompetent patients without comorbidities and with a diagnosis of CAP. Performance of CURB- 65 and SCAP scores in predicting in-hospital mortality was evaluated. Also, variables related to death were assessed. Furthermore, in order to design a model of in-hospital mortality prediction, sampled individuals were randomly divided in two groups. The association of the variables with mortality was weighed and, by multiple binary regression, a model was constructed in one of the subgroups. Then, it was validated in the other subgroup. Results: both scores yielded a fair strength of agreement, and CURB-65 showed a better performance in predicting in-hospital mortality. In our casuistry, age, white blood cell counts, serum urea and diastolic blood pressure were related to death. The model constructed with these variables showed a good performance in predicting in-hospital mortality; moreover, only one patient with fatal outcome was not correctly classified in the group where the model was constructed and in the group where it was validated. Conclusion: our findings suggest that a simple model that uses only 4 variables, which are easily accessible and interpretable, can identify seriously ill patients with CAP

  2. Understanding Personal Learning Environment Perspectives of Thai International Tourism and Hospitality Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyong, Siriwan; Sharafuddin, Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of a periodic research conducted in developing a personal learning environment for Thailand's higher education students with English as medium of instruction. The objective of the first phase in this research was to understand the personal learning environment perspectives of Thai International tourism and hospitality higher…

  3. The ratio of CRP to prealbumin levels predict mortality in patients with hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chuanming

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal and human studies suggest that inflammation and malnutrition are common in acute kidney injury (AKI patients. However, only a few studies reported CRP, a marker of inflammation, albumin, prealbumin and cholesterol, markers of nutritional status were associated with the prognosis of AKI patients. No study examined whether the combination of inflammatory and nutritional markers could predict the mortality of AKI patients. Methods 155 patients with hospital-acquired AKI were recruited to this prospective cohort study according to RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Lost or End Stage Kidney criteria. C-reactive protein (CRP, and the nutritional markers (albumin, prealbumin and cholesterol measured at nephrology consultation were analyzed in relation to all cause mortality of these patients. In addition, CRP and prealbumin were also measured in healthy controls (n = 45, maintenance hemodialysis (n = 70 and peritoneal dialysis patients (n = 50 and then compared with AKI patients. Results Compared with healthy controls and end-stage renal disease patients on maintenance hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, patients with AKI had significantly higher levels of CRP/prealbumin (p 28 days. Similarly, the combined factors including the ratio of CRP to albumin (CRP/albumin, CRP/prealbumin and CRP/cholesterol were also significantly higher in the former group (p p = 0.027 while the others (CRP, albumin, prealbumin, cholesterol, CRP/albumin and CRP/cholesterol became non-significantly associated. The hazard ratio was 1.00 (reference, 1.85, 2.25 and 3.89 for CRP/prealbumin increasing according to quartiles (p = 0.01 for the trend. Conclusions Inflammation and malnutrition were common in patients with AKI. Higher level of the ratio of CRP to prealbumin was associated with mortality of AKI patients independent of the severity of illness and it may be a valuable addition to SOFA score to independent of the severity of illness and it may be a

  4. Decline in Cognitive Functioning Is Associated with a Higher Mortality Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, van B.M.; Tijhuis, M.A.R.; Kalmijn, S.; Giampaoli, S.; Kromhout, D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the association between 5-year change in cognitive functioning and subsequent mortality. Methods:Four hundred and ninety-three Dutch and Italian men from the Finland, Italy, and the Netherlands Elderly (FINE) Study, born between 1900 and 1920, participated in the

  5. Effect of Pre-Hospital Red Blood Cell Transfusion on Mortality and Time of Death in Civilian Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Marius; Weaver, Anne; Brohi, Karim; Eshelby, Sarah; Green, Laura; Røislien, Jo; Lockey, David J

    2018-04-16

    Current management principles of haemorrhagic shock after trauma emphasize earlier transfusion therapy to prevent dilution of clotting factors and correct coagulopathy. London's air ambulance (LAA) was the first UK civilian pre-hospital service to routinely offer pre-hospital red blood cell (RBC) transfusion (phRTx). We investigated the effect of phRTx on mortality. Retrospective trauma database study comparing mortality before-implementation with after-implementation of phRTx in exsanguinating trauma patients. Univariate logistic regression was performed for the unadjusted association between phRTx and mortality was performed, and multiple logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders. We identified 623 subjects with suspected major haemorrhage. We excluded 84 (13.5%) patients due to missing data on survival status. Overall 187 (62.3%) patients died in the before phRTx period and 143 (59.8%) died in the after phRTx group. There was no significant improvement in overall survival after the introduction of phRTx (p = 0.554). Examination of pre-hospital mortality demonstrated 126 deaths in the pre-phRTx group (42.2%) and 66 deaths in the RBC administered group (27.6%) There was a significant reduction in pre-hospital mortality in the group who received RBC (p < 0.001). phRTx was associated with increased survival to hospital, but not overall survival. The "delay death" effect of phRTx carries an impetus to further develop in-hospital strategies to improve survival in severely bleeding patients.

  6. Reduced in-hospital mortality for heart failure with clinical pathways: the results of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panella, M; Marchisio, S; Demarchi, M L; Manzoli, L; Di Stanislao, F

    2009-10-01

    Hospital treatment of heart failure (HF) frequently does not follow published guidelines, potentially contributing to HF high morbidity, mortality and economic cost. The Experimental Prospective Study on the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Implementation of Clinical Pathways was undertaken to determine how clinical pathways (CP) for hospital treatment of HF affected care variability, guidelines adherence, in-hospital mortality and outcomes at discharge. Methods/ Two-arm, cluster-randomised trial. Fourteen community hospitals were randomised either to the experimental arm (CP: appropriate therapeutic guidelines use, new organisation and procedures, patient education) or to the control arm (usual care). The main outcome was in-hospital mortality; secondary outcomes were length and appropriateness of the stay, rate of unscheduled readmissions, customer satisfaction, usage of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures during hospital stay and quality indicators at discharge. All outcomes were measured using validated instruments available in literature. In-hospital mortality was 5.6% in the experimental arm (n = 12); 15.4% in controls (n = 33, p = 0.001). In CP and usual care groups, the mean rates of unscheduled readmissions were 7.9% and 13.9%, respectively. Adjusting for age, smoking, New York Heart Association score, hypertension and source of referral, patients in the CP group, as compared to controls, had a significantly lower risk of in-hospital death (OR 0.18; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.46) and unscheduled readmissions (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.20 to 0.87). No differences were found between CP and control with respect to the appropriateness of the stay, costs and patient's satisfaction. Except for electrocardiography, all recommended diagnostic procedures were used more in the CP group. Similarly, pharmaceuticals use was significantly greater in CP, with the exception of diuretics and anti-platelets agents. The introduction of a specifically tailored CP for the hospital

  7. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing...... adjusted for age, sex, residential and health status, the disease that caused the amputation, and the index amputation level showed that 30-day and 1-year mortality risk was reduced by 52% (HR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.25-0.91) and by 46% (HR =0.54, 95% CI: 0.35-0.86), respectively, in the intervention group...

  8. Clinical characteristics, angiographic profile and in hospital mortality in acute coronary syndrome patients in south indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajni Sharma

    2014-01-01

    risk factor. Diabetic patients had more of multivessel disease. Complications and in hospital mortality was higher in females and elderly population.

  9. Neonatal mortality in a referral hospital in Cameroon over a seven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The fourth Millennium Development Goals targets reduction of the mortality rate of under-fives by 2/3 by the year 2015. This reduction starts with that of neonatal mortality representing 40% of childhood mortality. In Cameroon neonatal mortality was 31% in 2011. Objectives: We assessed the trends, associated ...

  10. Facility-Level Variation in Hospitalization, Mortality, and Costs in the 30 Days After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Insights on Short-Term Healthcare Value From the Veterans Affairs Clinical Assessment, Reporting, and Tracking System (VA CART) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Steven M; O'Donnell, Colin I; Grunwald, Gary K; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Hebert, Paul L; Maddox, Thomas M; Jesse, Robert L; Fihn, Stephan D; Rumsfeld, John S; Ho, P Michael

    2015-07-14

    Policies to reduce unnecessary hospitalizations after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are intended to improve healthcare value by reducing costs while maintaining patient outcomes. Whether facility-level hospitalization rates after PCI are associated with cost of care is unknown. We studied 32,080 patients who received PCI at any 1 of 62 Veterans Affairs hospitals from 2008 to 2011. We identified facility outliers for 30-day risk-standardized hospitalization, mortality, and cost. Compared with the risk-standardized average, 2 hospitals (3.2%) had a lower-than-expected hospitalization rate, and 2 hospitals (3.2%) had a higher-than-expected hospitalization rate. We observed no statistically significant variation in facility-level risk-standardized mortality. The facility-level unadjusted median per patient 30-day total cost was $23,820 (interquartile range, $19,604-$29,958). Compared with the risk-standardized average, 17 hospitals (27.4%) had lower-than-expected costs, and 14 hospitals (22.6%) had higher-than-expected costs. At the facility level, the index PCI accounted for 83.1% of the total cost (range, 60.3%-92.2%), whereas hospitalization after PCI accounted for only 5.8% (range, 2.0%-12.7%) of the 30-day total cost. Facilities with higher hospitalization rates were not more expensive (Spearman ρ=0.16; 95% confidence interval, -0.09 to 0.39; P=0.21). In this national study, hospitalizations in the 30 day after PCI accounted for only 5.8% of 30-day cost, and facility-level cost was not correlated with hospitalization rates. This challenges the focus on reducing hospitalizations after PCI as an effective means of improving healthcare value. Opportunities remain to improve PCI value by reducing the variation in total cost of PCI without compromising patient outcomes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Admission factors associated with hospital mortality in patients with haematological malignancy admitted to UK adult, general critical care units: a secondary analysis of the ICNARC Case Mix Programme Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampshire, Peter A; Welch, Catherine A; McCrossan, Lawrence A; Francis, Katharine; Harrison, David A

    2009-01-01

    of the three scores analysed, as assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.78, but all scores were poorly calibrated. APACHE II had the highest accuracy at predicting hospital mortality, with a standardised mortality ratio of 1.01. SAPS II and the ICNARC score both underestimated hospital mortality. Increased hospital mortality is associated with the length of hospital stay prior to ICU admission and with severe sepsis, suggesting that, if appropriate, such patients should be treated aggressively with early ICU admission. A low haematocrit was associated with higher mortality and this relationship requires further investigation. The severity-of-illness scores assessed in this study had reasonable discriminative power, but none showed good calibration.

  12. Admission factors associated with hospital mortality in patients with haematological malignancy admitted to UK adult, general critical care units: a secondary analysis of the ICNARC Case Mix Programme Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    model had the best discrimination of the three scores analysed, as assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.78, but all scores were poorly calibrated. APACHE II had the highest accuracy at predicting hospital mortality, with a standardised mortality ratio of 1.01. SAPS II and the ICNARC score both underestimated hospital mortality. Conclusions Increased hospital mortality is associated with the length of hospital stay prior to ICU admission and with severe sepsis, suggesting that, if appropriate, such patients should be treated aggressively with early ICU admission. A low haematocrit was associated with higher mortality and this relationship requires further investigation. The severity-of-illness scores assessed in this study had reasonable discriminative power, but none showed good calibration. PMID:19706163

  13. Diagnostic performance of initial serum albumin level for predicting in-hospital mortality among aspiration pneumonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosun; Jo, Sion; Lee, Jae Baek; Jin, Youngho; Jeong, Taeoh; Yoon, Jaechol; Lee, Jeong Moon; Park, Boyoung

    2018-01-01

    The predictive value of serum albumin in adult aspiration pneumonia patients remains unknown. Using data collected during a 3-year retrospective cohort of hospitalized adult patients with aspiration pneumonia, we evaluated the predictive value of serum albumin level at ED presentation for in-hospital mortality. 248 Patients were enrolled; of these, 51 cases died (20.6%). The mean serum albumin level was 3.4±0.7g/dL and serum albumin levels were significantly lower in the non-survivor group than in the survivor group (3.0±0.6g/dL vs. 3.5±0.6g/dL). In the multivariable logistic regression model, albumin was associated with in-hospital mortality significantly (adjusted odds ratio 0.30, 95% confidential interval (CI) 0.16-0.57). The area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) for in-hospital survival was 0.72 (95% CI 0.64-0.80). The Youden index was 3.2g/dL and corresponding sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive and negative likelihood ratio were 68.6%, 66.5%, 34.7%, 89.1%, 2.05 and 0.47, respectively. High sensitivity (98.0%) was shown at albumin level of 4.0g/dL and high specificity (94.9%) was shown at level of 2.5g/dL. Initial serum albumin levels were independently associated with in-hospital mortality among adult patients hospitalized with aspiration pneumonia and demonstrated fair discriminative performance in the prediction of in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Out-of-hospital mortality among patients receiving methadone for noncancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Wayne A; Chung, Cecilia P; Murray, Katherine T; Cooper, William O; Hall, Kathi; Stein, C Michael

    2015-03-01

    Growing methadone use in pain management has raised concerns regarding its safety relative to other long-acting opioids. Methadone hydrochloride may increase the risk for lethal respiratory depression related to accidental overdose and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. To compare the risk of out-of-hospital death in patients receiving methadone for noncancer pain with that in comparable patients receiving sustained-release (SR) morphine sulfate. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Tennessee Medicaid records from 1997 through 2009. The cohort included patients receiving morphine SR or methadone who were aged 30 to 74 years, did not have cancer or another life-threatening illness, and were not in a hospital or nursing home. At cohort entry, 32 742 and 6014 patients had filled a prescription for morphine SR or methadone, respectively. The patients' median age was 48 years, 57.9% were female, and comparable proportions had received cardiovascular, psychotropic, and other musculoskeletal medications. Nearly 90% of the patients received the opioid for back pain or other musculoskeletal pain. The median doses prescribed for morphine SR and methadone were 90 mg/d and 40 mg/d, respectively. The primary study end point was out-of-hospital mortality, given that opioid-related deaths typically occur outside the hospital. There were 477 deaths during 28 699 person-years of follow-up (ie, 166 deaths per 10 000 person-years). After control for study covariates, patients receiving methadone had a 46% increased risk of death during the follow-up period, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.46 (95% CI, 1.17-1.83; P Methadone doses of 20 mg/d or less, the lowest dose quartile, were associated with an increased risk of death (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.01-2.51, P = .046) relative to a comparable dose of morphine SR (methadone in this retrospective cohort study, even for low doses, supports recommendations that it should not be a drug of first choice for

  15. Anesthesia-related and perioperative mortality: An audit of 8493 cases at a tertiary pediatric teaching hospital in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Heidi M; Thomas, Jenny; Wilson, Graeme S; de Kock, Marianna

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to quantify the incidence of anesthesia-related and perioperative mortality at a large tertiary pediatric hospital in South Africa. This study included all children aged anesthesia caused the death; (ii) anesthesia may have contributed to or influenced the timing of death; or (iii) anesthesia was entirely unrelated to the death. There were 47 deaths within 30 days of anesthesia prior to discharge from hospital during this 12-month period. The in-hospital mortality within 24 h of administration of anesthesia was 16.5 per 10 000 cases (95% confidence intervals [CI]=7.8-25.1) and within 30 days of administration of anesthesia was 55.3 per 10 000 cases (95% CI=39.5-71.2). Age under 1 year (OR 4.5; 95% CI=2.5-8.0, P=.012) and cardiac surgery and interventional cardiology procedures (OR 2.5; 95% CI=1.2-5.2, Prisk of perioperative mortality. The overall 24-h and 30-day anesthesia-related and in-hospital perioperative mortality rates in our study are comparable with other similar studies from tertiary pediatric centers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Depression as an independent prognostic factor for all-cause mortality after a hospital admission for worsening heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokoreli, I; de Vries, J J G; Riistama, J M; Pauws, S C; Steyerberg, E W; Tesanovic, A; Geleijnse, G; Goode, K M; Crundall-Goode, A; Kazmi, S; Cleland, J G; Clark, A L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is associated with increased mortality amongst patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Whether depression is an independent predictor of outcome in patients admitted for worsening of HF is unclear. METHODS: OPERA-HF is an observational study enrolling patients hospitalized

  17. Planned home compared with planned hospital births: Mode of delivery and Perinatal mortality rates, an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooy, J. (Jacoba); E. Birnie (Erwin); S. Denktaş (Semiha); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); G.J. Bonsel (Gouke)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To compare the mode of delivery between planned home versus planned hospital births and to determine if differences in intervention rates could be interpreted as over- or undertreatment. Methods: Intervention and perinatal mortality rates were obtained for 679,952 low-risk

  18. Perinatal mortality and morbidity in a nationwide cohort of 529,688 low-risk planned home and hospital births

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de jonge, A.; van der Goes, B. Y.; Ravelli, A. C. J.; Amelink-Verburg, M. P.; Mol, B. W.; Nijhuis, J. G.; Bennebroek Gravenhorst, J.; Buitendijk, S. E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare perinatal mortality and severe perinatal morbidity between planned home and planned hospital births, among low-risk women who started their labour in primary care. DESIGN: A nationwide cohort study. SETTING: The entire Netherlands. POPULATION: A total of 529,688 low-risk women

  19. Gender-associated factors for frailty and their impact on hospitalization and mortality among community-dwelling older adults: a cross-sectional population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Frailty associated with aging increases the risk of falls, disability, and death. We investigated gender-associated factors for frailty. Methods Data of 3,079 geriatric subjects were retrieved from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2007–2010 database. After excluding 1,126 subjects with missing data on frailty, medical history and survival, data of 1,953 patients were analyzed. Main endpoints were frailty prevalence, mortality rates and causes of death. Results Frailty prevalence was 5.4% in males, 8.8% in females. Significant risk factors for geriatric frailty in males were being widowed/divorced/separated, low daily total calorie intake, physical inactivity, sleeping >9 h, smoking and hospitalization history; and in females were obesity, physical inactivity, sleeping <6 h, family history of diabetes and heart attack, and hospitalization history. Frail subjects had higher mortality rates (22.5% male; 8.5% female than pre-frail (8.7% male; 6.4% female and non-frail (5.4% male; 2.5% female. Main causes of death were heart diseases (41% and chronic lower respiratory diseases (23.0% in males and nephritis/nephrosis (32.3% and chronic lower respiratory diseases (17.6% in females. Discussion Factors associated with frailty differ by gender, with higher frailty prevalence in females and higher mortality in males. Gender-associated factors for frailty identified in this study may be useful in evaluating frailty and guiding development of public health measures for prevention. Key Message Common predictive factors for frailty among older adults of both genders, including more frequent previous hospitalizations, physical inactivity, and certain gender-associated factors for frailty, are consistent with results of other NHANES studies in which self-reported higher levels of illness and sedentary behavior were directly associated with frailty.

  20. Satellite telemetry reveals higher fishing mortality rates than previously estimated, suggesting overfishing of an apex marine predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michael E; Cortés, Enric; Vaudo, Jeremy J; Harvey, Guy C McN; Sampson, Mark; Wetherbee, Bradley M; Shivji, Mahmood

    2017-08-16

    Overfishing is a primary cause of population declines for many shark species of conservation concern. However, means of obtaining information on fishery interactions and mortality, necessary for the development of successful conservation strategies, are often fisheries-dependent and of questionable quality for many species of commercially exploited pelagic sharks. We used satellite telemetry as a fisheries-independent tool to document fisheries interactions, and quantify fishing mortality of the highly migratory shortfin mako shark ( Isurus oxyrinchus ) in the western North Atlantic Ocean. Forty satellite-tagged shortfin mako sharks tracked over 3 years entered the Exclusive Economic Zones of 19 countries and were harvested in fisheries of five countries, with 30% of tagged sharks harvested. Our tagging-derived estimates of instantaneous fishing mortality rates ( F = 0.19-0.56) were 10-fold higher than previous estimates from fisheries-dependent data (approx. 0.015-0.024), suggesting data used in stock assessments may considerably underestimate fishing mortality. Additionally, our estimates of F were greater than those associated with maximum sustainable yield, suggesting a state of overfishing. This information has direct application to evaluations of stock status and for effective management of populations, and thus satellite tagging studies have potential to provide more accurate estimates of fishing mortality and survival than traditional fisheries-dependent methodology. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. [Hospital mortality associated with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to ruptured esophageal varices at the Lomé Campus Hospital in Togo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouglouga, O; Bagny, A; Lawson-Ananissoh, L; Djibril, M

    2014-01-01

    To study hospital mortality associated with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhages due to variceal bleeding in the department of hepatology and gastroenterology at the Lome Campus University Hospital. This retrospective cross-sectional and analytic study examined the 55 patients admitted for variceal bleeding on upper endoscopies during the 3-year period from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2010. These patients accounted for 4.1% of all hospitalizations during the study period in the department. Their average age was 35 years, and their sex-ratio 4. A history of chronic liver disease was found in 65.5%. Liver cirrhosis was the principal cause of the esophageal varices, complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma in 30.9% of them. The mortality rate was 25.5% and was not related to the cause of portal hypertension. All the patients with a recurrence of bleeding died. Mortality was associated with jaundice. Blood transfusion did not significantly improve the prognosis. the mortality rate among patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage linked to variceal bleeding is high in our unit. The prevention of hepatitis virus B is important because it is the main cause of chronic liver disease causing portal hypertension in our department.

  2. Bed-side inferior vena cava diameter and mean arterial pressure predict long-term mortality in hospitalized patients with heart failure: 36 months of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Daniele; Cuttitta, Francesco; Paterna, Salvatore; Garofano, Alessandro; Conti, Giosafat; Pinto, Antonio; Parrinello, Gaspare

    2016-03-01

    In discharged patients with heart failure (HF), diverse conditions can intervene to worsen outcome. We would investigate whether such factors present on hospital admission can affect long-term mortality in subjects hospitalized for acute HF. One hundred twenty-three consecutive patients hospitalized for acute HF (mean age 74.8 years; 57% female) were recruited and followed for 36 months after hospitalization. At multivariate Cox model, only inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter and mean arterial pressure (MAP) registered bed-side on admission, resulted, after correction for all confounders factors, the sole factors significantly associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality in long-term (HR 1.06, p=0.0057; HR 0.97, p=0.0218; respectively). Study population was subdivided according to median values of IVC diameter (23 mm) and MAP (93.3 mm Hg). The Kaplan–Meier curve showed that HF patients with both IVC ≥ 23 mm and MAP b93.3 mm Hg on admission had reduced probability of survival free from all-cause death (log rank p = 0.0070 and log rank p = 0.0028, respectively). In patients hospitalized for acute HF, IVC diameter, measured by hand-carried ultrasound (HCU), and MAP detected on admission are strong predictors of long-term all-cause mortality. The data suggest the need for a careful clinical-therapeutic surveillance on these patients during the post-discharge period. IVC diameter and MAP can be utilized as parameters to stratify prognosis on admission and to be supervised during follow-up. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Decreased mortality in patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases after installation of an intensive care unit in a secondary hospital in the interior of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Luciano Passamani; Bahlis, Laura Fuchs; Wajner, André; Waldemar, Fernando Starosta

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the association between the in-hospital mortality of patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases and the availability of intensive care units. This retrospective cohort study evaluated a database from a hospital medicine service involving patients hospitalized due to respiratory non-terminal diseases. Data on clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with mortality, such as Charlson score and length of hospital stay, were collected. The following analyses were performed: univariate analysis with simple stratification using the Mantel Haenszel test, chi squared test, Student's t test, Mann-Whitney test, and logistic regression. Three hundred thirteen patients were selected, including 98 (31.3%) before installation of the intensive care unit and 215 (68.7%) after installation of the intensive care unit. No significant differences in the clinical and anthropometric characteristics or risk factors were observed between the groups. The mortality rate was 18/95 (18.9%) before the installation of the intensive care unit and 21/206 (10.2%) after the installation of the intensive care unit. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the probability of death after the installation of the intensive care unit decreased by 58% (OR: 0.42; 95%CI 0.205 -0.879; p = 0.021). Considering the limitations of the study, the results suggest a benefit, with a decrease of one death per every 11 patients treated for respiratory diseases after the installation of an intensive care unit in our hospital. The results corroborate the benefits of the implementation of intensive care units in secondary hospitals.

  4. Cardiac complications associated with short-term mortality in schizophrenia patients hospitalized for pneumonia: a nationwide case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Tang Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pneumonia is one of most prevalent infectious diseases worldwide and is associated with considerable mortality. In comparison to general population, schizophrenia patients hospitalized for pneumonia have poorer outcomes. We explored the risk factors of short-term mortality in this population because the information is lacking in the literature. METHODS: In a nationwide schizophrenia cohort, derived from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan, that was hospitalized for pneumonia between 2000 and 2008 (n = 1,741, we identified 141 subjects who died during their hospitalizations or shortly after their discharges. Based on risk-set sampling in a 1∶4 ratio, 468 matched controls were selected from the study cohort (i.e., schizophrenia cohort with pneumonia. Physical illnesses were categorized as pre-existing and incident illnesses that developed after pneumonia respectively. Exposures to medications were categorized by type, duration, and defined daily dose. We used stepwise conditional logistic regression to explore the risk factors for short-term mortality. RESULTS: Pre-existing arrhythmia was associated with short-term mortality (adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 4.99, p<0.01. Several variables during hospitalization were associated with increased mortality risk, including incident arrhythmia (RR = 7.44, p<0.01, incident heart failure (RR = 5.49, p = 0.0183 and the use of hypoglycemic drugs (RR = 2.32, p<0.01. Furthermore, individual antipsychotic drugs (such as clozapine known to induce pneumonia were not significantly associated with the risk. CONCLUSIONS: Incident cardiac complications following pneumonia are associated with increased short-term mortality. These findings have broad implications for clinical intervention and future studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms of the risk factors.

  5. Single living predicts a higher mortality in both women and men with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mard, Shan; Nielsen, Finn Erland

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We examined the impact of single living on all-cause mortality in patients with chronic heart failure and determined if this association was modified by gender. METHODS: This historical cohort study included 637 patients who were admitted to the Department of Cardiology, Herlev Hosp......, the risk of death did not differ among single-living women and men. CONCLUSION: Single living is a prognostic determinant of all-cause mortality in men and women with chronic heart failure. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.......INTRODUCTION: We examined the impact of single living on all-cause mortality in patients with chronic heart failure and determined if this association was modified by gender. METHODS: This historical cohort study included 637 patients who were admitted to the Department of Cardiology, Herlev...... for confounding factors. RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 2.8 years. A total of 323 (50.7%) patients died during the follow-up period. After adjustment for confounding factors, risk of death was associated with being single (HR = 1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.19-1.96)). In a gender-stratified analysis...

  6. Association between in-hospital mortality and renal dysfunction in 186,219 patients hospitalized for acute stroke in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbian, Fabio; Gallerani, Massimo; Pala, Marco; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Salmi, Raffaella; Dentali, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Manfredini, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    Using a regional Italian database, we evaluated the relationship between renal dysfunction and in-hospital mortality (IHM) in patients with acute stroke (ischemic/hemorrhagic). Patients were classified on the basis of renal damage: without renal dysfunction, with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Of a total of 186,219 patients with a first episode of stroke, 1626 (0.9%) had CKD and 819 (0.4%) had ESRD. Stroke-related IHM (total cases) was independently associated with CKD, ESRD, atrial fibrillation (AF), age, and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). In patients with ischemic stroke (n=154,026), IHM remained independently associated with CKD, ESRD, AF, and CCI. In patients with hemorrhagic stroke (n=32,189), variables that were independently associated with IHM were CKD, ESRD, and AF. Renal dysfunction is associated with IHM related to stroke, both ischemic and hemorrhagic, with even higher odds ratios than those of other established risk factors, such as age, comorbidities, and AF. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Five-year mortality after acute poisoning treated in ambulances, an emergency outpatient clinic and hospitals in Oslo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Cathrine; Bjornaas, Mari A; Sandvik, Leiv; Ekeberg, Oivind; Jacobsen, Dag; Hovda, Knut E

    2013-08-21

    The long-term mortality after prehospital treatment for acute poisoning has not been studied previously. Thus, we aimed to estimate the five-year mortality and examine the causes of death and predictors of death for all acutely poisoned patients treated in ambulances, the emergency outpatient clinic, and hospitals in Oslo during 2003-2004. A prospective cohort study included all adults (≥16 years; n=2045, median age=35 years, male=58%) who were discharged after treatment for acute poisoning in ambulances, the emergency outpatient clinic, and the four hospitals in Oslo during one year. The patients were observed until the end of 2008. Standardized mortality rates (SMRs) were calculated and multivariate Cox regression analysis was applied. The study comprised 2045 patients; 686 treated in ambulances, 646 treated in the outpatient clinic, and 713 treated in hospitals. After five years, 285 (14%) patients had died (four within one week). The SMRs after ambulance, outpatient, and hospital treatment were 12 (CI 9-14), 10 (CI 8-12), and 6 (CI 5-7), respectively. The overall SMR was 9 (CI 8-10), while the SMR after opioid poisoning was 27 (CI 21-32). The most frequent cause of death was accidents (38%). In the regression analysis, opioids as the main toxic agents (HR 2.3, CI 1.6-3.0), older age (HR 1.6, CI 1.5-1.7), and male sex (HR 1.4, CI 1.1-1.9) predicted death, whereas the treatment level did not predict death. The patients had high mortality compared with the general population. Those treated in hospital had the lowest mortality. Opioids were the major predictor of death.

  8. Effect of Inpatient Dobutamine versus Milrinone on Out-of-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jordan B; Shah, Rashmee U; Sainski-Nguyen, Amy; Biskupiak, Joseph; Munger, Mark A; Bress, Adam P

    2017-06-01

    To determine the effect of dobutamine versus milrinone on out-of-hospital mortality in the treatment of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Propensity score weighted retrospective cohort study with mortality as the primary outcome. An academic health care system. Five hundred adult patients with a prior history of heart failure who survived a hospitalization for ADHF that included treatment with dobutamine or milrinone between January 1, 2006, and April 30, 2014. ADHF events were defined as a hospitalization with receipt of an intravenous loop diuretic or a brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) value greater than 400 pg/ml during the hospitalization. Patients were followed until death or 180 days from hospital discharge. Risk ratios (RRs) for mortality associated with dobutamine compared with milrinone were calculated at 15, 30, and 180 days postdischarge using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Mean age was 62.7 years, 65.4% were male, and 48.2% had a mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 40% or lower. Overall, 55 (18%) of dobutamine-treated versus 23 (12%) of milrinone-treated patients died during follow-up (RR 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76-2.13, p=0.360). For death from cardiovascular causes, the RR for dobutamine was 1.49 (95% CI 0.79-2.82, p=0.214). For death from worsening heart failure, the RR for dobutamine was 2.55 (95% CI 1.07-6.10, p=0.035). A trend toward significance was observed at day 15 after discharge for all mortality analyses (all p values milrinone in patients with ADHF. These results replicate and extend prior associations with mortality and should be confirmed in a prospective study. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  9. Perioperative risk factors for mortality and length of hospitalization in mares with dystocia undergoing general anesthesia: A retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioja, Eva; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Costa, Maria Carolina; Valverde, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated associations between perioperative factors and probability of death and length of hospitalization of mares with dystocia that survived following general anesthesia. Demographics and perioperative characteristics from 65 mares were reviewed retrospectively and used in a risk factor analysis. Mortality rate was 21.5% during the first 24 h post-anesthesia. The mean ± standard deviation number of days of hospitalization of surviving mares was 6.3 ± 5.4 d. Several factors were found in the univariable analysis to be significantly associated (P dystocia, intraoperative hypotension, and drugs used during recovery. Type of delivery and day of the week the surgery was performed were significantly associated with length of hospitalization in the multivariable mixed effects model. The study identified some risk factors that may allow clinicians to better estimate the probability of mortality and morbidity in these mares. PMID:23115362

  10. High Levels Of Bed Occupancy Associated With Increased Inpatient And Thirty-Day Hospital Mortality In Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Ladelund, Steen; Linneberg, Allan

    2014-01-01

    to low bed occupancy rates. Being admitted to a hospital outside of normal working hours or on a weekend or holiday was also significantly associated with increased mortality. The health risks of bed shortages, including mortality, could be better documented as a priority health issue. Resources should......High bed occupancy rates have been considered a matter of reduced patient comfort and privacy and an indicator of high productivity for hospitals. Hospitals with bed occupancy rates of above 85 percent are generally considered to have bed shortages. Little attention has been paid to the impact...... be allocated to researching the causes and effects of bed shortages, with the aim of creating greater interest in exploring new methods to avoid or reduce bed shortages....

  11. Changes in hospitalization rate and mortality after acute myocardial infarction in Denmark after diagnostic criteria and methods changed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell; Rasmussen, Søren; Madsen, Mette

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To analyse the effect of the change in diagnostic criteria for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and the use of troponin as a diagnostic marker on the hospitalization rate and mortality of hospitalized AMI patients from 1994 to 2001. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients (> or =30 years) admitted...... for their first AMI were identified using the National Patient Registry in Denmark. We registered when each hospital introduced troponin as a diagnostic marker. The reported hospitalization rate decreased until 1998 and then increased substantially from 1999 to 2001 from 3472 to 4163 per million inhabitants (19.......9%) for men and from 1648 to 2020 per million inhabitants (22.6%) for women. Troponin use was associated with a significant 14% increase in hospitalization rate in this period [rate ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-1.18]. The effect of troponin was greatest among patients 70 years and older (rate...

  12. Trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and in-hospital mortality among HIV-infected patients between 1993 and 2013: Impact of hepatitis C co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijide, Héctor; Mena, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Osorio, Iria; Pértega, Sonia; Castro-Iglesias, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Martínez, Guillermo; Pedreira, José; Poveda, Eva

    2017-01-01

    New patterns in epidemiological characteristics of people living with HIV infection (PLWH) and the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) have changed the profile of hospital admissions in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and mortality rates in HIV patients and to analyze the role of HCV co-infection. A retrospective cohort study conducted on all hospital admissions of HIV patients between 1993 and 2013. The study time was divided in two periods (1993-2002 and 2003-2013) to be compared by conducting a comparative cross-sectional analysis. A total of 22,901 patient-years were included in the analysis, with 6917 hospital admissions, corresponding to 1937 subjects (75% male, mean age 36±11 years, 37% HIV/HCV co-infected patients). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days (5-16), and the 30-day hospital re-admission rate was 20.1%. A significant decrease in hospital admissions related with infectious and psychiatric diseases was observed in the last period (2003-2013), but there was an increase in those related with malignancies, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality remained high (6.8% in the first period vs. 6.3% in the second one), with a progressive increase of non-AIDS-defining illness deaths (37.9% vs. 68.3%, P<.001). The admission rate significantly dropped after 1996 (4.9% yearly), but it was less pronounced in HCV co-infected patients (1.7% yearly). Hospital admissions due to infectious and psychiatric disorders have decreased, with a significant increase in non-AIDS-defining malignancies, cardiovascular, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality is currently still high, but mainly because of non-AIDS-defining illnesses. HCV co-infection increased the hospital stay and re-admissions during the study period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y

  13. The patterns and causes of neonatal mortality at a tertiary hospital in oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Mohamed; Ahmed, Masood; Bataclan, Maria Flordeliz; Khan, Ashfaq Ahmed; Al Battashi, Abeer; Al Maniri, Abdullah

    2013-11-01

    To report the patterns and causes of neonatal death from a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit over a period of four years. This is a retrospective cohort study where four years data (January 2006 - December 2009) of all inborn neonatal admissions and deaths were collected from the neonatal intensive care unit at Sultan Qaboos University hospital on predesigned forms. All out born admissions and deaths were excluded. The causes of neonatal death were classified using Wigglesworth's classification. The number of inborn live births during the study period was 10064 and the total number of inborn neonatal admissions was 1475. The total deaths (neonatal and post neonatal) at the neonatal intensive care unit was 73 (63 inborn and 10 out born). Among the inborn, five deaths were post neonatal deaths and hence, excluded from analysis. Among the remaining inborn neonatal deaths (n=58), 34 (59%) were males and 24 (41%) were females. The number of neonatal admissions increased over the years during the study period from 248 to 356, while the number of deaths also increased from 10 deaths in 2006, to 20 deaths in 2009. The primary causes of neonatal deaths were prematurity and its complications 52% (n=30). Lethal congenital malformations lead to 17 (29%) newborn deaths, specific diagnosis in 7 newborns (12%), and birth asphyxia in four (7%) of cases. There was an increasing trend of neonatal admissions and deaths among inborn babies. Prematurity, with sepsis as its major complication and congenital malformations were the leading cause of neonatal mortality.

  14. Maternal Mortality Risk Factors in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung in 2009−2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shely Karma Astuti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discover the factors affecting the occurrence of maternal deaths. The high maternal mortality rate (MMR in Indonesia is still a common problem which needs urgent solution. Methods: This is an analytic observational, cross-sectional study using a case control approach Fifty two cases were selected as cases, another 52 were selected as control. The sampling was performed by simple random sampling. The instruments used in this study were the medical records of mothers who gave birth in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung from 1 January 2009–31 December 2013. Data analysis was performed using chi-square test. Results: In this study, the results showed that the risk factors contributing to maternal deaths were pregnancy complication (p<0.001, delivery complication (p<0.001, puerpural complication (p=0.022, age (p=0.030, parity (p=0.427, prior medical history (p<0.001, antenatal care (p=0.007, maternal education (p=0.527, and area of residence (p=0.049. Conclusions: The risk factors that contribute to maternal deaths include pregnancy complication, delivery complication, puerpural complication, maternal age, prior medical history, antenatal care, and area of residence.

  15. Maternal morbidity and mortality due to primary PPH-experience at ayub teaching hospital abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, H.; Sarwar, I.; Nisa, A.U.

    2008-01-01

    Postpartum Haemorrhage (PPH) remains a significant cause of maternal mortality and morbidity like hypovolemic shock, anaemia, multi organ failure, consumptive coagulopathy, disseminated intra vascular coagulation (DIC), blood transfusion related complications and hysterectomy leading to loss of childbearing potential. The present study was conducted to determine the frequency of PPH and the associated maternal morbidity at the Department of Gynaecology Unit B, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad. The study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Unit B of the Ayub teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 18th April 2006 to 17 July 2006. The study population included all cases admitted with primary PPH during the study period. For calculation of frequencies, the total number of deliveries in the setting during the study period was used. All subjects underwent a complete obstetrical clinical workup comprising of history, general physical examination, abdominal and pelvic examination, relevant laboratory investigations. The maternal condition was assessed and managed according to established hospital protocols which included both pharmacological and surgical intervention. All maternal complications were noted and recorded on pre-designed proformas. Data was entered and analyzed by computer. A total of 50 cases of primary PPH were recorded during the study period. The frequency of PPH was calculated as 7.1%. The major cause of PPH was uterine atony found in 29 (58%) cases, followed by cervical, vaginal and perineal tears in 12 (24%) cases. Initially all patients were managed pharmacologically followed by surgical intervention. Subtotal (haemostatic) hysterectomy was performed in 10 (20%) cases. Maternal morbidity was detected in 31 (62%) of cases; the major morbidities were DIC in 3 (6%) cases. Acute renal failure in 3 (6%) patients and shock in 2 (9.9%) cases and anaemia in 20 (90.1%) cases. The study concludes that the frequency of primary PPH in this

  16. Association of admission serum calcium levels and in-hospital mortality in patients with acute ST-elevated myocardial infarction: an eight-year, single-center study in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The relationship between admission serum calcium levels and in-hospital mortality in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI has not been well definitively explored. The objective was to assess the predictive value of serum calcium levels on in-hospital mortality in STEMI patients. METHODS: From 2003 to 2010, 1431 consecutive STEMI patients admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University were enrolled in the present study. Patients were stratified according to quartiles of serum calcium from the blood samples collected in the emergency room after admission. Between the aforementioned groups,the baseline characteristics, in-hospital management, and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. The association of serum calcium level with in-hospital mortality was calculated by a multivariable Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 1431 included patients, 79% were male and the median age was 65 years (range, 55-74. Patients in the lower quartiles of serum calcium, as compared to the upper quartiles of serum calcium, were older, had more cardiovascular risk factors, lower rate of emergency revascularization,and higher in-hospital mortality. According to univariate Cox proportional analysis, patients with lower serum calcium level (hazard ratio 0.267, 95% confidence interval 0.164-0.433, p<0.001 was associated with higher in-hospital mortality. The result of multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analyses showed that the Killip's class≥3 (HR = 2.192, p = 0.026, aspartate aminotransferase (HR = 1.001, p<0.001, neutrophil count (HR = 1.123, p<0.001, serum calcium level (HR = 0.255, p = 0.001, and emergency revascularization (HR = 0.122, p<0.001 were significantly and independently associated with in-hospital mortality in STEMI patients. CONCLUSIONS: Serum calcium was an independent predictor for in-hospital mortality in patients with STEMI. This widely

  17. Which is more useful in predicting hospital mortality--dichotomised blood test results or actual test values? A retrospective study in two hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed A; Rudge, Gavin; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary; Nangalia, Vishal; Prytherch, David; Holder, Roger; Briggs, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Routine blood tests are an integral part of clinical medicine and in interpreting blood test results clinicians have two broad options. (1) Dichotomise the blood tests into normal/abnormal or (2) use the actual values and overlook the reference values. We refer to these as the "binary" and the "non-binary" strategy respectively. We investigate which strategy is better at predicting the risk of death in hospital based on seven routinely undertaken blood tests (albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, potassium, sodium, urea, and white blood cell count) using tree models to implement the two strategies. A retrospective database study of emergency admissions to an acute hospital during April 2009 to March 2010, involving 10,050 emergency admissions with routine blood tests undertaken within 24 hours of admission. We compared the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve for predicting in-hospital mortality using the binary and non-binary strategy. The mortality rate was 6.98% (701/10050). The mean predicted risk of death in those who died was significantly (p-value non-binary strategy (risk = 0.222 95%CI: 0.194 to 0.251), representing a risk difference of 28.74 deaths in the deceased patients (n = 701). The binary strategy had a significantly (p-value non-binary strategy (0.853 95% CI: 0.840 to 0.867). Similar results were obtained using data from another hospital. Dichotomising routine blood test results is less accurate in predicting in-hospital mortality than using actual test values because it underestimates the risk of death in patients who died. Further research into the use of actual blood test values in clinical decision making is required especially as the infrastructure to implement this potentially promising strategy already exists in most hospitals.

  18. Which Is More Useful in Predicting Hospital Mortality -Dichotomised Blood Test Results or Actual Test Values? A Retrospective Study in Two Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Rudge, Gavin; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary; Nangalia, Vishal; Prytherch, David; Holder, Roger; Briggs, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Background Routine blood tests are an integral part of clinical medicine and in interpreting blood test results clinicians have two broad options. (1) Dichotomise the blood tests into normal/abnormal or (2) use the actual values and overlook the reference values. We refer to these as the “binary” and the “non-binary” strategy respectively. We investigate which strategy is better at predicting the risk of death in hospital based on seven routinely undertaken blood tests (albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, potassium, sodium, urea, and white blood cell count) using tree models to implement the two strategies. Methodology A retrospective database study of emergency admissions to an acute hospital during April 2009 to March 2010, involving 10,050 emergency admissions with routine blood tests undertaken within 24 hours of admission. We compared the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve for predicting in-hospital mortality using the binary and non-binary strategy. Results The mortality rate was 6.98% (701/10050). The mean predicted risk of death in those who died was significantly (p-value non-binary strategy (risk = 0.222 95%CI: 0.194 to 0.251), representing a risk difference of 28.74 deaths in the deceased patients (n = 701). The binary strategy had a significantly (p-value non-binary strategy (0.853 95% CI: 0.840 to 0.867). Similar results were obtained using data from another hospital. Conclusions Dichotomising routine blood test results is less accurate in predicting in-hospital mortality than using actual test values because it underestimates the risk of death in patients who died. Further research into the use of actual blood test values in clinical decision making is required especially as the infrastructure to implement this potentially promising strategy already exists in most hospitals. PMID:23077528

  19. Ten-year mortality is increased after hospitalization for atopic dermatitis compared with the general population, but reduced compared with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Skov, Lone; Andersen, Yuki M F

    2017-01-01

    Background Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) are chronic inflammatory skin disorders. Mortality is increased in psoriasis, yet no studies on mortality in AD are currently available.  Objective We investigated 10-year mortality after hospitalization for AD compared with psoriasis and the genera...

  20. Trends in Readmission Rates, Hospital Charges, and Mortality for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in Florida From 2009 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinyi; Xiao, Hong; Segal, Richard; Mobley, William Cary; Park, Haesuk

    2018-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading and costly cause of readmissions to the hospital, with one of the highest rates reported in Florida. From 2009 to 2014, strategies such as readmission reduction programs, as well as updated guidelines for COPD management, were instituted to reduce readmission rates for patients with COPD. Thus, the question has been raised whether COPD-related 30-day hospital readmission rates in Florida have decreased and whether COPD-related readmission costs during this period have changed. In addition, we examined trends in length of stay, hospital charges, and in-hospital mortality associated with COPD, as well as identified patient-level risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions. A retrospective analysis of adult patients (≥18 years of age) with COPD was conducted by using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Florida State Inpatient Database, 2009 to 2014. Weighted least squares regression was used to assess trends in the COPD readmission rate on a yearly basis, as well as other outcomes of interest. A multivariable logistic regression was used to identify patient characteristics that were associated with 30-day COPD readmissions. Overall, 268,084 adults were identified as having COPD. Between 2009 and 2014, more than half of patients aged 65-84 years, most were white, 55% were female, and 73% had Medicare. The unadjusted rate for COPD-related 30-day readmissions did not change (8.04% to 7.85%; P = 0.434). However, the mean total charge for 30-day COPD-related readmissions was significantly higher in 2014 ($40,611) compared with that in 2009 ($36,714) (P = 0.011). The overall unadjusted in-hospital mortality of COPD-related hospitalizations significantly decreased from 1.83% in 2009 to 1.34% in 2014 (P COPD were 2% less likely to be readmitted to the hospital for each additional year (odds ratio [OR], 0.98 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97-0.99]). Factors associated with significantly higher odds of

  1. A One-Year Study of Mortality Due to Drug and Chemical Poisoning in Sina Hospital of Hamadan

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    S. Afzali

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Every year many people refer to emergency department due to poisoning and some of them be threated and some die because of the intensity of adverse effect. Most patients who refer to emergency department are those who commit intentionally for Suicide attempt and another group are those who are poisoned due to drug overdose. In this study we reviewed annual number of death due to drug and chemical poisonings that attend to Sina hospital, Hamadan in the year 2001. This retrospective study was gather based on poisoned file who refer to emergency department and died due to intensity of adverse effects of poisoning. The results show that out of 1079 patients ,47 cases have died because of intensity of adverse effects. Mortality rate in male was 74.5% and in female was 25.5%. 68.1% was seen in those patients who committed suicide and in the second degree was seen in drug abuser(21.3%. The greatest number of death (12 patients was seen between 10-20 year old and also above 50. Poisons mostly used organophosphates – opiates and herbicides successively , and other drugs and chemical came after them. The most common adverse effect leading to death was respiratory depression. In most cases toxicological examinations on dead body were negative, when the results of such examination were positive the majority of reports were about arsenic and methanol. The highest rate of death (55.3% occurred in those patients who referred to the hospital more than 6 hours after poisoning. The results showed that the rate of poisoning due to organophosphate insecticides and opiates are higher than other drugs in Hamadan.

  2. Effects of aspiration pneumonia on the intensive care requirements and in-hospital mortality of hospitalised patients with acute cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngen, Adil Can; Aydemir, Yusuf; Güngen, Belma Dogan; Yazar, Esra Ertan; Yağız, Orhan; Aras, Yeşim Güzey; Gümüş, Hatice; Erkorkmaz, Ünal

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of the development of aspiration pneumonia (AP) on the intensive care unit (ICU) requirements and in-hospital mortality of patients hospitalised in the neurology ward due to an acute cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Five hundred and three patients hospitalised in the neurology ward following an acute CVA were retrospectively analysed. The patients were divided into two groups: those with AP (group 1) and those without AP (group 2). Demographic characteristics and physical and radiological findings, including the localisation, lateralisation and aetiology of the infarction, in addition to ICU requirements and mortality, were evaluated. Aspiration pneumonia was detected in 80 (15.9%) patients during the in-hospital stay. Transfer to the ICU for any reason was required in 37.5% of the patients in group 1 and 4.7% of those in group 2 ( p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality occurred in 7.5% and 1.4% of the patients in group 1 and group 2, respectively ( p = 0.006). The incidence of AP was highest in patients with an infarction of the medial cerebral artery (MCA) ( p < 0.001). The AP was associated with older age ( p < 0.001), hypertension ( p = 0.007), echocardiography findings ( p = 0.032) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ( p < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the requirement rate for transfer to the ICU and the mortality rate appear to be significantly higher in patients with a diagnosis of AP. Precautions should be taken, starting from the first day of hospitalisation, to decrease the incidence of AP in patients with acute CVA, focusing especially on older patients and those with a severe mRS score.

  3. Risk Factors In Malaria Mortality Among Children In Northern Ghana: A Case Study At The Tamale Teaching Hospital

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    A.R. Abdul-Aziz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is hyper-endemic in Ghana, accounting for 44% of outpatient attendance, 13% of all hospital deaths, and 22% of mortality among children less than five years of age. The paper analyzed the risk factors of malaria mortality among children using a logistic regression model and also assessed the interaction effect between age and treatment of malaria patient. Secondary data was obtained from the inpatient morbidity and mortality returns register at Tamale Teaching Hospital, from 1st January 2008 to 31st December 2010. The results showed that risk factors such as referral status, age, distance, treatment and length of stay on admission were important predictors of malaria mortality. However, it was found that the risk factors; sex and season were not good predictors of malaria mortality. Finally, the interaction effect between age and treatment was found to be significant. It was recommended, among other things, that the government should provide more assessable roads and expand ambulance services to the various Districts/communities in and around the Tamale metropolis to facilitate referral cases.

  4. Optimism During Hospitalization for First Acute Myocardial Infarction and Long-Term Mortality Risk: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Faratci, Netanela; Lurie, Ido; Benyamini, Yael; Cohen, Gali; Goldbourt, Uri; Gerber, Yariv

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association between dispositional optimism, defined as generalized positive expectations about the future, and long-term mortality in young survivors of myocardial infarction (MI). A subcohort of 664 patients 65 years and younger, drawn from the longitudinal Israel Study of First Acute Myocardial Infarction, completed an adapted Life Orientation Test (LOT) questionnaire during their index hospitalization between February 15, 1992, and February 15, 1993. Additional sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial variables were assessed at baseline; mortality follow-up lasted through December 31, 2015. Cox proportional hazards regression models were fit to assess the hazard ratios for mortality associated with LOT-derived optimism. The mean age of the participants was 52.4±8.6 years; 98 (15%) were women. The median follow-up period was 22.4 years (25th-75th percentiles, 16.1-22.8 years), during which 284 patients (43%) had died. The mean LOT score was 16.5±4.1. Incidence density rates for mortality in increasing optimism tertiles were 25.4, 25.8, and 16.0 per 1000 person-years, respectively (Poptimism during hospitalization for MI were associated with reduced mortality over a 2-decade follow-up period. Optimism training and positive psychology should be examined as part of psychosocial interventions and rehabilitation after MI. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of a Prognostic Scale to Estimate the Mortality of Children Hospitalized with Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Soraya; Lovera, Dolores; Zarate, Claudia; Apodaca, Silvio; Acuña, Julia; Sanabria, Gabriela; Arbo, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of mortality in children. The objective of this study was to construct a prognostic scale for estimation of mortality applicable to children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This observational study included patients younger than 15 years with a diagnosis of CAP who were hospitalized between 2004 and 2013. A point-based scoring system based on the modification of the PIRO scale used in adults with pneumonia was applied to each child hospitalized with CAP. It included the following variables: predisposition (age pneumonia) and organ dysfunction (kidney failure, liver failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome). One point was given for each feature that was present (range, 0-10 points). The association between the modified PIRO score and mortality was assessed by stratifying patients into 4 levels of risk: low (0-2 points), moderate (3-4 points), high (5-6 points) and very high risk (7-10 points). Eight hundred sixty children hospitalized with CAP were eligible for study. The mean age was 2.8 ± 3.2 years. The observed mortality was 6.5% (56/860). Mortality ranged from 0% for a low PIRO score (0/708 pts), 18% (20/112 pts) for a moderate score, 83% (25/30 pts) for a high score and 100% (10/10 pts) for a very high modified PIRO score (P < 0.001). The present score accurately discriminated the probability of death in children hospitalized with CAP, and it could be a useful tool to select candidates for admission to intensive care unit and for adjunctive therapy in clinical trials.

  6. Mortality prediction to hospitalized patients with influenza pneumonia: PO2 /FiO2 combined lymphocyte count is the answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shu Jing; Li, Hui; Liu, Meng; Liu, Ying Mei; Zhou, Fei; Liu, Bo; Qu, Jiu Xin; Cao, Bin

    2017-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) severity scores perform well in predicting mortality of CAP patients, but their applicability in influenza pneumonia is powerless. The aim of our research was to test the efficiency of PO 2 /FiO 2 and CAP severity scores in predicting mortality and intensive care unit (ICU) admission with influenza pneumonia patients. We reviewed all patients with positive influenza virus RNA detection in Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital during the 2009-2014 influenza seasons. Outpatients, inpatients with no pneumonia and incomplete data were excluded. We used receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs) to verify the accuracy of severity scores or indices as mortality predictors in the study patients. Among 170 hospitalized patients with influenza pneumonia, 30 (17.6%) died. Among those who were classified as low-risk (predicted mortality 0.1%-2.1%) by pneumonia severity index (PSI) or confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age ≥65 year (CURB-65), the actual mortality ranged from 5.9 to 22.1%. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that hypoxia (PO 2 /FiO 2  ≤ 250) and lymphopenia (peripheral blood lymphocyte count pneumonia confirmed a similar pattern and PO 2 /FiO 2 combined lymphocyte count was also the best predictor for predicting ICU admission. In conclusion, we found that PO 2 /FiO 2 combined lymphocyte count is simple and reliable predictor of hospitalized patients with influenza pneumonia in predicting mortality and ICU admission. When PO 2 /FiO 2  ≤ 250 or peripheral blood lymphocyte count pneumonia. © 2015 The Authors. The Clinical Respiratory Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Spironolactone use and higher hospital readmission for Medicare beneficiaries with heart failure, left ventricular ejection fraction 73 m(2.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inampudi, Chakradhari; Parvataneni, Sridivya; Morgan, Charity J; Deedwania, Prakash; Fonarow, Gregg C; Sanders, Paul W; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Butler, Javed; Forman, Daniel E; Aronow, Wilbert S; Allman, Richard M; Ahmed, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Although randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of aldosterone antagonists for patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), they excluded patients with serum creatinine >2.5 mg/dl, and their use is contraindicated in those with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present analysis, we examined the association of spironolactone use with readmission in hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries with HFrEF and advanced CKD. Of the 1,140 patients with HFrEF (EF 73 m(2)), 207 received discharge prescriptions for spironolactone. Using propensity scores (PSs) for the receipt of discharge prescriptions for spironolactone, we estimated PS-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for spironolactone-associated outcomes. Patients (mean age 76 years, 49% women, 25% African-American) had mean EF 28%, mean eGFR 31 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and mean potassium 4.5 mEq/L. Spironolactone use had significant PS-adjusted association with higher risk of 30-day (HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.90) and 1-year (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.63) all-cause readmissions. The risk of 1-year all-cause readmission was higher among 106 patients with eGFR 73 m(2) (HR 4.75, 95% CI 1.84 to 12.28) than among those with eGFR 15 to 45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.61, p for interaction 0.003). Spironolactone use had no association with HF readmission and all-cause mortality. In conclusion, among hospitalized patients with HFrEF and advanced CKD, spironolactone use was associated with higher all-cause readmission but had no association with all-cause mortality or HF readmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The value of arterial blood gas parameters for prediction of mortality in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

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    Katharina Isabel von Auenmueller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sudden cardiac death is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and early prognostication remains challenging. There is a lack of valid parameters for the prediction of survival after cardiac arrest. Aims: This study aims to investigate if arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to our hospital after resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were included in this retrospective study. The patient's survival 5 days after resuscitation defined the study end-point. For the statistical analysis, the mean, standard deviation, Student's t-test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were used (level of significance P< 0.05. Results: Arterial blood gas samples were taken from 170 patients. In particular, pH < 7.0 (odds ratio [OR]: 7.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.11–16.69; P< 0.001 and lactate ≥ 5.0 mmol/L (OR: 6.79; 95% CI: 2.77–16.66; P< 0.001 showed strong and independent correlations with mortality within the first 5 days after hospital admission. Conclusion: Our study results indicate that several arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital resuscitation. The most relevant parameters are pH and lactate because they are strongly and independently associated with mortality within the first 5 days after resuscitation. Despite this correlation, none of these parameters by oneself is strong enough to allow an early prognostication. Still, these parameters can contribute as part of a multimodal approach to assessing the patients' prognosis.

  9. Impact of stroke unit in a public hospital on length of hospitalization and rate of early mortality of ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sheila G. Rocha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We ascertained whether a public health stroke unit reduces the length of hospitalization, the rate of inpatient fatality, and the mortality rate 30 days after the stroke. Methods We compared a cohort of stroke patients managed on a general neurology/medical ward with a similar cohort of stroke patients managed in a str oke unit. The in-patient fatality rates and 30-day mortality rates were analyzed. Results 729 patients were managed in the general ward and 344 were treated at a comprehensive stroke unit. The in-patient fatality rates were 14.7% for the general ward group and 6.9% for the stroke unit group (p<0.001. The overall mortality rate 30 days after stroke was 20.9% for general ward patients and 14.2% for stroke unit patients (p=0.005. Conclusions We observed reduced in-patient fatalities and 30-day mortality rates in patients managed in the stroke unit. There was no impact on the length of hospitalization.

  10. Association of paternal IQ in early adulthood with offspring mortality and hospital admissions for injuries: a cohort study of 503 492 Swedish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenkovic, Aline; Silventoinen, Karri; Tynelius, Per; Rasmussen, Finn

    2014-07-01

    Higher intelligence (IQ) has been related to a lower risk of mortality and hospital admissions for injuries, but little is known about the effect of parental IQ on offspring outcomes. We explored associations of paternal IQ with mortality and hospitalisations for injuries from all external causes in offspring. A cohort of 503 492 Swedish children under 5 years of age with information on paternal IQ was obtained by record linkage of national registers. HR with 95% CIs were estimated using Cox regression. There was some evidence that paternal IQ was inversely associated with total and external-cause mortality in offspring, although the effects were modest and disappeared when controlling for parents' socioeconomic position (SEP). The only robust gradient was found between paternal IQ and hospital admissions for injuries (HRper 1-SD increase in IQ 0.93, 95% CI 0.92 to 0.94; pIQ may have an increased risk of injury by external causes. Messages on family safety and injury prevention might be tailored according to parental cognitive abilities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, systems of care. An urgent need for policies to co-ordinate care in order to decrease in-hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ali Osama; Abela, Oliver; Allenback, Gayle; Devabhaktuni, Subodh; Lui, Calvin; Singh, Aditi; Diep, Jimmy; Yamashita, Takashi; Yoo, Ji Won; Malhotra, Sanjay; Ahsan, Chowdhury

    2017-08-01

    Regional trends for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treatment is not known in the state of Nevada. Great disparity exists for treatment for STEMI in different geographical areas of Nevada. There is a great potential to improve treatment and outcomes of STEMI patients in the State of Nevada. Admissions to non-federal hospitals in the state of Nevada, using 2011 to 2013 discharge data from the Nevada State Inpatient Data Base (acquired from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality), were analyzed. Outpatient-onset STEMI patients were identified. The state of Nevada was divided into three divisions based on population densities, defined as population per square mile. Division A included counties with population density of 200 per square mile. Trends in use of STEMI-related therapies and the impact on in-hospital mortality rates were compared. Almost 20% of the patients with outpatient-onset STEMI do not get any STEMI-related therapy and have significantly higher mortality rate. Patients from Division A do not have direct access to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) centers. These patients receive less STEMI-related therapies. Low-volume PCI centers had equivalent mortality rates for STEMI patients who got PCI, compared to high-volume PCI centers. Policies must be created and processes streamlined so all STEMI patients in Nevada receive appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. [Factors affecting in-hospital mortality in patients with sepsis: Development of a risk-adjusted model based on administrative data from German hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Volker; Kolzter, Olaf; Albuszies, Gerd; Thölen, Frank

    2018-05-01

    Inpatient administrative data from hospitals is already used nationally and internationally in many areas of internal and public quality assurance in healthcare. For sepsis as the principal condition, only a few published approaches are available for Germany. The aim of this investigation is to identify factors influencing hospital mortality by employing appropriate analytical methods in order to improve the internal quality management of sepsis. The analysis was based on data from 754,727 DRG cases of the CLINOTEL hospital network charged in 2015. The association then included 45 hospitals of all supply levels with the exception of university hospitals (range of beds: 100 to 1,172 per hospital). Cases of sepsis were identified via the ICD codes of their principal diagnosis. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors influencing in-hospital lethality for this population. The model was developed using sociodemographic and other potential variables that could be derived from the DRG data set, and taking into account current literature data. The model obtained was validated with inpatient administrative data of 2016 (51 hospitals, 850,776 DRG cases). Following the definition of the inclusion criteria, 5,608 cases of sepsis (2016: 6,384 cases) were identified in 2015. A total of 12 significant and, over both years, stable factors were identified, including age, severity of sepsis, reason for hospital admission and various comorbidities. The AUC value of the model, as a measure of predictability, is above 0.8 (H-L test p>0.05, R 2 value=0.27), which is an excellent result. The CLINOTEL model of risk adjustment for in-hospital lethality can be used to determine the mortality probability of patients with sepsis as principal diagnosis with a very high degree of accuracy, taking into account the case mix. Further studies are needed to confirm whether the model presented here will prove its value in the internal quality assurance of hospitals

  13. The Patterns and Causes of Neonatal Mortality at a Tertiary Hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdellatif

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the patterns and causes of neonatal death from a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit over a period of four years.Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study where four years data (January 2006 - December 2009 of all inborn neonatal admissions and deaths were collected from the neonatal intensive care unit at Sultan Qaboos University hospital on predesigned forms. All out born admissions and deaths were excluded. The causes of neonatal death were classified using Wigglesworth's classification.Results: The number of inborn live births during the study period was 10064 and the total number of inborn neonatal admissions was 1475. The total deaths (neonatal and post neonatal at the neonatal intensive care unit was 73 (63 inborn and 10 out born. Among the inborn, five deaths were post neonatal deaths and hence, excluded from analysis. Among the remaining inborn neonatal deaths (n=58, 34 (59% were males and 24 (41% were females. The number of neonatal admissions increased over the years during the study period from 248 to 356, while the number of deaths also increased from 10 deaths in 2006, to 20 deaths in 2009. The primary causes of neonatal deaths were prematurity and its complications 52% (n=30. Lethal congenital malformations lead to 17 (29% newborn deaths, specific diagnosis in 7 newborns (12%, and birth asphyxia in four (7% of cases.Conclusion: There was an increasing trend of neonatal admissions and deaths among inborn babies. Prematurity, with sepsis as its major complication and congenital malformations were the leading cause of neonatal mortality.

  14. Acute coronary syndrome-related mortality audit in a teaching hospital at Port Blair, India

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    Shiv Shankar Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India has a growing trend of acute myocardial infarction (AMI due to shifting lifestyle. Objective: To study the profile of patients died due to AMI and to find its risk correlates. Methods: A study was conducted on consecutive AMI cases admitted in the teaching hospital at Port Blair from April 2011 to March 2016. During inpatients management, outcomes were followed up from admission till discharge or expiry. Results: Of the total 491 cases, majority (75.99% had ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI; mean age of 73 deaths was 58.01 ± 13.60, mortality probability among females was less; in the age group 41–50 years the case fatality rate was the lowest (7.58%. Mean age of survival was 56.75 ± 10.47; great majorities were males across all age groups in cases and deaths; highest number of cases were in the age group 51–60 (34.21%; reportedly 83.10% had some physical activities; 6.52% were vegetarian; 34.22% were smokers; 10.39% had family history of AMI, majority (59.06% were from white collar profession (teacher, clerical, etc.; 52.95% were diabetics; and 47.45% were hypertensives. Lifestyle-related risk factors, physical activity, and vegetarian diet were not protective; family history and addiction to smoking were significantly associated with AMI deaths. Thrombolytic intervention helped the survival of 73.68%, and the odds ratio of survival showed benefit. Conclusions: Acute STEMI had male and middle-age predominance with a common risk factor of family history, smoking, diabetes, and hypertension.

  15. Relationship Between a Sepsis Intervention Bundle and In-Hospital Mortality Among Hospitalized Patients: A Retrospective Analysis of Real-World Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Priya A; Shea, Erica R; Shiboski, Stephen; Sullivan, Mary C; Gonzales, Ralph; Shimabukuro, David

    2017-08-01

    Sepsis is a systemic response to infection that can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. Efforts have been made to develop evidence-based intervention bundles to identify and manage sepsis early in the course of the disease to decrease sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the relationship between a minimally invasive sepsis intervention bundle and in-hospital mortality using robust methods for observational data. We performed a retrospective cohort study at the University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center among adult patients discharged between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, and who received a diagnosis of severe sepsis/septic shock (SS/SS). Sepsis intervention bundle elements included measurement of blood lactate; drawing of blood cultures before starting antibiotics; initiation of broad spectrum antibiotics within 3 hours of sepsis presentation in the emergency department or 1 hour of presentation on an inpatient unit; administration of intravenous fluid bolus if the patient was hypotensive or had a lactate level >4 mmol/L; and starting intravenous vasopressors if the patient remained hypotensive after fluid bolus administration. Poisson regression for a binary outcome variable was used to estimate an adjusted incidence-rate ratio (IRR) comparing mortality in groups defined by bundle compliance measured as a binary predictor, and to estimate an adjusted number needed to treat (NNT). Complete bundle compliance was associated with a 31% lower risk of mortality (adjusted IRR, 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53-0.91), adjusting for SS/SS presentation in the emergency department, SS/SS present on admission (POA), age, admission severity of illness and risk of mortality, Medicaid/Medicare payor status, immunocompromised host status, and congestive heart failure POA. The adjusted NNT to save one life was 15 (CI, 8-69). Other factors independently associated with mortality included SS/SS POA (adjusted IRR, 0.55; CI, 0

  16. [Efficacy of noninvasive ventilation on in-hospital mortality in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tongwen; Wan, Youdong; Kan, Quancheng; Yang, Fei; Yao, Haimu; Guan, Fangxia; Zhang, Jinying; Li, Ling

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation on in-hospital mortality in adult patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) . We searched PubMed, Embase, Wanfang, CNKI data to find relevant randomized controlled trials of noninvasive ventilation for ACPE, which were reported from January 1980 to December 2012. Meta-analysis was performed with software of RevMan 5.1. According to inclusive criteria and exclusion criteria, 35 randomized controlled trials with 3 204 patients were enrolled for analyses. Meta-analysis of the trials showed that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduced in-hospital mortality by 43% (RR = 0.57, 95%CI 0.43-0.75, P management strategies for these patients.

  17. Major depression and first-time hospitalization with ischemic heart disease, cardiac procedures and mortality in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasse, Christiane; Laursen, Thomas M; Baune, Bernhard T

    2014-01-01

    -59 years of age and during the first weeks following psychiatric admission. Our findings support recent cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines on assessing depression among other psychosocial factors in patients at increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk.......Objective: We investigated the association between unipolar depression and incident hospital admissions due to ischemic heart disease, invasive cardiac procedures and mortality independent of other medical illnesses.Methods: A population-based cohort of 4.6 million persons aged 15 years or older...... with depression (women: IRR: 1.38; MRR: 2.35; men: IRR: 1.42; MRR: 2.67). One-year mortality after new ischemic heart disease was elevated by 34% in women and men. By contrast, overall rates of invasive cardiac procedures following cardiac hospitalizations were significantly decreased by 34% in persons...

  18. Regular physical activity reduces hospital admission and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Aymerich, J; Lange, Peter; Benet, M

    2006-01-01

    .97). Low, moderate and high levels of regular physical activity were associated with an adjusted lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR) 0.76, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.90) and respiratory mortality (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.02). No effect modification was found for sex, age group, COPD severity......BACKGROUND: Information about the influence of regular physical activity on the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is scarce. A study was undertaken to examine the association between regular physical activity and both hospital admissions for COPD and all-cause and specific...... mortality in COPD subjects. METHODS: From a population-based sample recruited in Copenhagen in 1981-3 and 1991-4, 2386 individuals with COPD (according to lung function tests) were identified and followed until 2000. Self-reported regular physical activity at baseline was classified into four categories...

  19. Do More Hospital Beds Lead to Higher Hospitalization Rates? A Spatial Examination of Roemer’s Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, Paul L.; Messina, Joseph P.; Grady, Sue C.; WinklerPrins, Vince; Shortridge, Ashton M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Roemer’s Law, a widely cited principle in health care policy, states that hospital beds that are built tend to be used. This simple but powerful expression has been invoked to justify Certificate of Need regulation of hospital beds in an effort to contain health care costs. Despite its influence, a surprisingly small body of empirical evidence supports its content. Furthermore, known geographic factors influencing health services use and the spatial structure of the relationship between hospital bed availability and hospitalization rates have not been sufficiently explored in past examinations of Roemer’s Law. We pose the question, “Accounting for space in health care access and use, is there an observable association between the availability of hospital beds and hospital utilization?” Methods We employ an ecological research design based upon the Anderson behavioral model of health care utilization. This conceptual model is implemented in an explicitly spatial context. The effect of hospital bed availability on the utilization of hospital services is evaluated, accounting for spatial structure and controlling for other known determinants of hospital utilization. The stability of this relationship is explored by testing across numerous geographic scales of analysis. The case study comprises an entire state system of hospitals and population, evaluating over one million inpatient admissions. Results We find compelling evidence that a positive, statistically significant relationship exists between hospital bed availability and inpatient hospitalization rates. Additionally, the observed relationship is invariant with changes in the geographic scale of analysis. Conclusions This study provides evidence for the effects of Roemer’s Law, thus suggesting that variations in hospitalization rates have origins in the availability of hospital beds. This relationship is found to be robust across geographic scales of analysis. These findings suggest

  20. Maternal mortality at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Southeast Nigeria: a 10-year review (2003-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiechina, Nj; Okolie, Ve; Okechukwu, Zc; Oguejiofor, Cf; Udegbunam, Oi; Nwajiaku, Lsa; Ogbuokiri, C; Egeonu, R

    2013-01-01

    Maternal mortality is high the world over, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria. Nigeria has consistently demonstrated one of the most abysmally poor reproductive health indices in the world, maternal mortality inclusive. This is a sad reminder that, unless things are better organized, Southeast Nigeria, which Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH) represents, may not join other parts of the world in attaining Millennium Development Goal 5 to improve maternal health in 2015. This study was conducted to assess NAUTH'S progress in achieving a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and to identify the major causes of maternal mortality. This was a 10-year retrospective study, conducted between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012 at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Southeast Nigeria. During the study period, there were 8,022 live births and 103 maternal deaths, giving an MMR of 1,284/100,000 live births. The MMR was 1,709 in 2003, reducing to 1,115 in 2012. This is to say that there was a 24.86% reduction over 10 years, hence, in 15 years, the reduction should be 37%. This extrapolated reduction over 15 years is about 38% less than the target of 75% reduction. The major direct causes of maternal mortality in this study were: pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (27%), hemorrhage (22%), and sepsis (12%). The indirect causes were: anemia, anesthesia, and HIV encephalopathy. Most of the maternal deaths occurred in unbooked patients (98%) and within the first 48 hours of admission (76%). MMRs in NAUTH are still very high and the rate of reduction is very slow. At this rate, it will take this health facility 30 years, instead of 15 years, to achieve a 75% reduction in maternal mortality.

  1. Maternal mortality at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Southeast Nigeria: a 10-year review (2003–2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiechina, NJ; Okolie, VE; Okechukwu, ZC; Oguejiofor, CF; Udegbunam, OI; Nwajiaku, LSA; Ogbuokiri, C; Egeonu, R

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality is high the world over, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria. Nigeria has consistently demonstrated one of the most abysmally poor reproductive health indices in the world, maternal mortality inclusive. This is a sad reminder that, unless things are better organized, Southeast Nigeria, which Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH) represents, may not join other parts of the world in attaining Millennium Development Goal 5 to improve maternal health in 2015. Objectives This study was conducted to assess NAUTH’S progress in achieving a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and to identify the major causes of maternal mortality. Materials and methods This was a 10-year retrospective study, conducted between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012 at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Southeast Nigeria. Results During the study period, there were 8,022 live births and 103 maternal deaths, giving an MMR of 1,284/100,000 live births. The MMR was 1,709 in 2003, reducing to 1,115 in 2012. This is to say that there was a 24.86% reduction over 10 years, hence, in 15 years, the reduction should be 37%. This extrapolated reduction over 15 years is about 38% less than the target of 75% reduction. The major direct causes of maternal mortality in this study were: pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (27%), hemorrhage (22%), and sepsis (12%). The indirect causes were: anemia, anesthesia, and HIV encephalopathy. Most of the maternal deaths occurred in unbooked patients (98%) and within the first 48 hours of admission (76%). Conclusion MMRs in NAUTH are still very high and the rate of reduction is very slow. At this rate, it will take this health facility 30 years, instead of 15 years, to achieve a 75% reduction in maternal mortality. PMID:23901299

  2. Medical record weight (MRW): a new reliable predictor of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality in the hip fracture population?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Calpin, P

    2016-11-01

    We sought to compare the weight of patient’s medical records (MRW) to that of standardised surgical risk scoring systems in predicting postoperative hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality in patients with hip fracture. Patients admitted for surgical treatment of a newly diagnosed hip fracture over a 3-month period were enrolled. Patients with documented morbidity or mortality had significantly heavier medical records. The MRW was equivalent to the age-adjusted Charlson co-morbidity index and better than the American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status score (ASA), the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM,) and Portsmouth-POSSUM score (P-POSSUM) in correlation with length of hospital admission, p = .003, 95% CI [.15 to .65]. Using logistic regression analysis MRW was as good as, if not better, than the other scoring systems at predicting postoperative morbidity and 90-day mortality. Medical record weight is as good as, or better than, validated surgical risk scoring methods. Larger, multicentre studies are required to validate its use as a surgical risk prediction tool, and it may in future be supplanted by a digital measure of electronic record size. Given its ease of use and low cost, it could easily be used in trauma units globally.

  3. Higher surgical training opportunities in the general hospital setting; getting the balance right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, I; Traynor, O; Khan, W; Waldron, R; Barry, K

    2013-12-01

    The general hospital can play an important role in training of higher surgical trainees (HSTs) in Ireland and abroad. Training opportunities in such a setting have not been closely analysed to date. The aim of this study was to quantify operative exposure for HSTs over a 5-year period in a single institution. Analysis of electronic training logbooks (over a 5-year period, 2007-2012) was performed for general surgery trainees on the higher surgical training programme in Ireland. The most commonly performed adult and paediatric procedures per trainee, per year were analysed. Standard general surgery operations such as herniae (average 58, range 32-86) and cholecystectomy (average 60, range 49-72) ranked highly in each logbook. The most frequently performed emergency operations were appendicectomy (average 45, range 33-53) and laparotomy for acute abdomen (average 48, range 10-79). Paediatric surgical experience included appendicectomy, circumcision, orchidopexy and hernia/hydrocoele repair. Overall, the procedure most commonly performed in the adult setting was endoscopy, with each trainee recording an average of 116 (range 98-132) oesophagogastroduodenoscopies and 284 (range 227-354) colonoscopies. General hospitals continue to play a major role in the training of higher surgical trainees. Analysis of the electronic logbooks over a 5-year period reveals the high volume of procedures available to trainees in a non-specialist centre. Such training opportunities are invaluable in the context of changing work practices and limited resources.

  4. Effectiveness of the clinical pharmacist in reducing mortality in hospitalized cardiac patients: a propensity score-matched analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhai XB

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-bo Zhai,1 Zhi-chun Gu,2 Xiao-yan Liu2 1Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai East Hospital, Affiliated to Tongji University School of Medicine, 2Department of Pharmacy, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Pharmacist-led medication review services have been assessed in the meta-analyses in hospital. Of the 135 relevant articles located, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria; however, there was no statistically significant difference found between pharmacists’ interventions and usual care for mortality (odds ratio 1.50, 95% confidence interval 0.65, 3.46, P=0.34. These analyses may not have found a statistically significant effect because they did not adequately control the wide variation in the delivery of care and patient selection parameters. Additionally, the investigators did not conduct research on the cases of death specifically and did not identify all possible drug-related problems (DRPs that could cause or contribute to mortality and then convince physicians to correct. So there will be a condition to use a more precise approach to evaluate the effect of clinical pharmacist interventions on the mortality rates of hospitalized cardiac patients. Objective: To evaluate the impact of the clinical pharmacist as a direct patient-care team member on the mortality of all patients admitted to the cardiology unit. Methods: A comparative study was conducted in a cardiology unit of a university-affiliated hospital. The clinical pharmacists did not perform any intervention associated with improper use of medications during Phase I (preintervention and consulted with the physicians to address the DRPs during Phase II (postintervention. The two phases were compared to evaluate the outcome, and propensity score (PS matching was applied to enhance the comparability. The primary endpoint of the study was the composite of all-cause mortality during Phase I and Phase II

  5. Mortality associated with gastrointestinal bleeding events: Comparing short-term clinical outcomes of patients hospitalized for upper GI bleeding and acute myocardial infarction in a US managed care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mel Wilcox

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available C Mel Wilcox1, Byron L Cryer2, Henry J Henk3, Victoria Zarotsky3, Gergana Zlateva41University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX; 3i3 Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 4Pfizer, Inc., New York, NY, USA Objectives: To compare the short-term mortality rates of gastrointestinal (GI bleeding to those of acute myocardial infarction (AMI by estimating the 30-, 60-, and 90-day mortality among hospitalized patients.Methods: United States national health plan claims data (1999–2003 were used to identify patients hospitalized with a GI bleeding event. Patients were propensity-matched to AMI patients with no evidence of GI bleed from the same US health plan.Results: 12,437 upper GI-bleed patients and 22,847 AMI patients were identified. Propensity score matching yielded 6,923 matched pairs. Matched cohorts were found to have a similar Charlson Comorbidity Index score and to be similar on nearly all utilization and cost measures (excepting emergency room costs. A comparison of outcomes among the matched cohorts found that AMI patients had higher rates of 30-day mortality (4.35% vs 2.54%; p < 0.0001 and rehospitalization (2.56% vs 1.79%; p = 0.002, while GI bleed patients were more likely to have a repeat procedure (72.38% vs 44.95%; p < 0.001 following their initial hospitalization. The majority of the difference in overall 30-day mortality between GI bleed and AMI patients was accounted for by mortality during the initial hospitalization (1.91% vs 3.58%.Conclusions: GI bleeding events result in significant mortality similar to that of an AMI after adjusting for the initial hospitalization.Keywords: gastrointestinal, bleeding, mortality, acute myocardial infarction, claims analysis

  6. Risk factors of all-cause in-hospital mortality among Korean elderly bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Bum Sik; Kim, Myung Soo; Han, Sang Hoon; Shin, So Youn; Choi, Hee Kyung; Chae, Yun Tae; Jin, Sung Joon; Baek, Ji-Hyeon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, June Myung

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most frequent cause of bacteremia/sepsis in elderly people and increasing antimicrobial resistance in uropathogens has been observed. To describe the characteristics of bacteremic UTI in elderly patients and to identify the independent risk factors of all-cause in-hospital mortality, a retrospective cohort study of bacteremic UTI patients of age over 65 was performed at a single 2000-bed tertiary hospital. Bacteremic UTI was defined as the isolation of the same organism from both urine and blood within 48 h. Eighty-six elderly bacteremic UTI patients were enrolled. Community-acquired infection was the case for most patients (79.1%), and Escherichia coli accounted for 88.6% (70/79) among Gram-negative organisms. Non-E. coli Gram-negative organisms were more frequent in hospital-acquired cases and male patients while chronic urinary catheter insertion was related with Gram-positive urosepsis. The antibiotic susceptibility among Gram-negative organisms was not different depending on the source of bacteremic UTI, while non-E. coli Gram-negative organisms were less frequently susceptible for cefotaxime, cefoperazone/sulbactam, and aztreonam. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 11.6%, and functional dependency (adjusted hazard ratio=HR=10.9, 95% confidence interval=95%CI=2.2-54.6) and low serum albumin (adjusted HR=27.0, 95%CI=2.0-361.2) were independently related with increased all-cause in-hospital mortality. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Higher isolation of NDM-1 producing Acinetobacter baumannii from the sewage of the hospitals in Beijing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanfu Zhang

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistant microbes present in the environment are a potential public health risk. In this study, we investigate the presence of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1 producing bacteria in the 99 water samples in Beijing City, including river water, treated drinking water, raw water samples from the pools and sewage from 4 comprehensive hospitals. For the bla NDM-1 positive isolate, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was further analyzed, and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE was performed to determine the genetic relationship among the NDM-1 producing isolates from sewage and human, as well as the clinical strains without NDM-1. The results indicate that there was a higher isolation of NDM-1 producing Acinetobacter baumannii from the sewage of the hospitals, while no NDM-1 producing isolates were recovered from samples obtained from the river, drinking, or fishpond water. Surprisingly, these isolates were markedly different from the clinical isolates in drug resistance and pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles, suggesting different evolutionary relationships. Our results showed that the hospital sewage may be one of the diffusion reservoirs of NDM-1 producing bacteria.

  8. Higher isolation of NDM-1 producing Acinetobacter baumannii from the sewage of the hospitals in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanfu; Qiu, Shaofu; Wang, Yong; Qi, Lihua; Hao, Rongzhang; Liu, Xuelin; Shi, Yun; Hu, Xiaofeng; An, Daizhi; Li, Zhenjun; Li, Peng; Wang, Ligui; Cui, Jiajun; Wang, Pan; Huang, Liuyu; Klena, John D; Song, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistant microbes present in the environment are a potential public health risk. In this study, we investigate the presence of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) producing bacteria in the 99 water samples in Beijing City, including river water, treated drinking water, raw water samples from the pools and sewage from 4 comprehensive hospitals. For the bla NDM-1 positive isolate, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was further analyzed, and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to determine the genetic relationship among the NDM-1 producing isolates from sewage and human, as well as the clinical strains without NDM-1. The results indicate that there was a higher isolation of NDM-1 producing Acinetobacter baumannii from the sewage of the hospitals, while no NDM-1 producing isolates were recovered from samples obtained from the river, drinking, or fishpond water. Surprisingly, these isolates were markedly different from the clinical isolates in drug resistance and pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles, suggesting different evolutionary relationships. Our results showed that the hospital sewage may be one of the diffusion reservoirs of NDM-1 producing bacteria.

  9. Association of positive screening for dysphagia with nutritional status and long-term mortality in hospitalized elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañas-Martínez, Ana B; Bucar-Barjud, Marina; Campos-Fernández, Julia; Gimeno-Orna, José Antonio; Pérez-Calvo, Juan; Ocón-Bretón, Julia

    2018-04-24

    To assess the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) using the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and its association with malnutrition and long-term mortality. A retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to the general internal medicine ward. In the first 48hours after hospital admission, OD was assessed using the EAT-10, and presence of malnutrition with the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). Association of OD to malnutrition and long-term mortality was analyzed. Ninety patients with a mean age of 83 (SD: 11.8) years were enrolled. Of these, 56.7% were at risk of OD according to EAT-10. This group of patients had greater prevalence rates of malnutrition (88.2% vs. 48.7%; P=.001) and mortality (70% vs 35.9%; P=.001). During follow-up for 872.71 (SD: 642.89) days, risk of DO according to EAT-10 was an independent predictor of mortality factor in a multivariate analysis (HR: 2.8; 95%CI: 1.49-5.28; P=.001). The EAT-10 is a useful tool for screening OD. Adequate screening for OD is important because of its associated risks of malnutrition and long-term mortality. Copyright © 2018 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Maternal mortality at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Southeast Nigeria: a 10-year review (2003–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obiechina NJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available NJ Obiechina, VE Okolie, ZC Okechukwu, CF Oguejiofor, OI Udegbunam, LSA Nwajiaku, C Ogbuokiri, R Egeonu Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria Background: Maternal mortality is high the world over, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria. Nigeria has consistently demonstrated one of the most abysmally poor reproductive health indices in the world, maternal mortality inclusive. This is a sad reminder that, unless things are better organized, Southeast Nigeria, which Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH represents, may not join other parts of the world in attaining Millennium Development Goal 5 to improve maternal health in 2015. Objectives: This study was conducted to assess NAUTH'S progress in achieving a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR and to identify the major causes of maternal mortality. Materials and methods: This was a 10-year retrospective study, conducted between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012 at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Southeast Nigeria. Results: During the study period, there were 8,022 live births and 103 maternal deaths, giving an MMR of 1,284/100,000 live births. The MMR was 1,709 in 2003, reducing to 1,115 in 2012. This is to say that there was a 24.86% reduction over 10 years, hence, in 15 years, the reduction should be 37%. This extrapolated reduction over 15 years is about 38% less than the target of 75% reduction. The major direct causes of maternal mortality in this study were: pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (27%, hemorrhage (22%, and sepsis (12%. The indirect causes were: anemia, anesthesia, and HIV encephalopathy. Most of the maternal deaths occurred in unbooked patients (98% and within the first 48 hours of admission (76%. Conclusion: MMRs in NAUTH are still very high and the rate of reduction is very slow. At this rate, it will take this health facility 30 years, instead of 15 years, to

  11. Modeling of in hospital mortality determinants in myocardial infarction patients, with and without stroke: A national study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The data and determinants of mortality due to stroke in myocardial infarction (MI patients are unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate the differences in risk factors for hospital mortality among MI patients with and without stroke history. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective, cohort study; 20,750 new patients with MI from April, 2012 to March, 2013 were followed up and their data were analyzed according to having or not having the stroke history. Stroke and MI were defined based on the World Health Organization′s definition. The data were analyzed by logistic regression in STATA software. Results: Of the 20,750 studied patients, 4293 had stroke history. The prevalence of stroke in the studied population was derived 20.96% (confidence interval [CI] 95%: 20.13-21.24. Of the patients, 2537 (59.1% had ST-elevation MI (STEMI. Mortality ratio in patients with and without stroke was obtained 18.8% and 10.3%, respectively. The prevalence of risk factors in MI patients with and without a stroke is various. The adjusted odds ratio of mortality in patients with stroke history was derived 7.02 (95% CI: 5.42-9 for chest pain resistant to treatment, 2.39 (95% CI: 1.97-2.9 for STEMI, 3.02 (95% CI: 2.5-3.64 for lack of thrombolytic therapy, 2.2 (95% CI: 1.66-2.91 for heart failure, and 2.17 (95% CI: 1.6-2.9 for ventricular tachycardia. Conclusion: With regards to the factors associated with mortality in this study, it is particularly necessary to control the mortality in MI patients with stroke history. More emphasis should be placed on the MI patients with the previous stroke over those without in the interventions developed for prevention and treatment, and for the prevention of avoidable mortalities.

  12. Cost-Effective Recruitment need for 24x7 Paediatricians in the State General Hospitals in Relation to the Reduction of Infant Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Ranjana; Chatterjee, Sukanta

    2016-10-01

    According to World Health Organisation (WHO), improvement of hospital based care can have an impact of upto 30% in reducing Infant Mortality Rate (IMR), whereas, strengthening universal outreach and family-community based care is known to have a greater impact. The study intends to assess how far gaps in the public health facilities contribute towards infant mortality, as 2/3 rd of infant mortality is due to suboptimum care seeking and weak health system. To identify cost-effectiveness of employment of additional paediatric manpower to provide round the clock skilled service to reduce IMR in the present state health facilities at the district general hospitals. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital and district hospitals of 2 districts (Hooghly and Howrah in West Bengal). Factors affecting infant mortality and shift wise analysis of proportion of infant deaths were analysed in both tertiary and district level hospitals. Information was gathered in a predesigned proforma for one year period by verifying hospital records and by personal interview with service personnel in the health establishment. SPSS software version 17 (Chicago, IL) was used. The p-value was calculated by Fischer exact t-test. Available hospital beds per 1000 population were 1.1. Percentage of paediatric beds available in comparison to total hospital bed was disproportionately lower (10%). Dearth of skilled medical care provider at odd hours in district hospitals resulted in significantly greater infant death (p based infant mortality and it is cost-effective.

  13. Development and Validation of a Deep Neural Network Model for Prediction of Postoperative In-hospital Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christine K; Hofer, Ira; Gabel, Eilon; Baldi, Pierre; Cannesson, Maxime

    2018-04-17

    The authors tested the hypothesis that deep neural networks trained on intraoperative features can predict postoperative in-hospital mortality. The data used to train and validate the algorithm consists of 59,985 patients with 87 features extracted at the end of surgery. Feed-forward networks with a logistic output were trained using stochastic gradient descent with momentum. The deep neural networks were trained on 80% of the data, with 20% reserved for testing. The authors assessed improvement of the deep neural network by adding American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification and robustness of the deep neural network to a reduced feature set. The networks were then compared to ASA Physical Status, logistic regression, and other published clinical scores including the Surgical Apgar, Preoperative Score to Predict Postoperative Mortality, Risk Quantification Index, and the Risk Stratification Index. In-hospital mortality in the training and test sets were 0.81% and 0.73%. The deep neural network with a reduced feature set and ASA Physical Status classification had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.91 (95% CI, 0.88 to 0.93). The highest logistic regression area under the curve was found with a reduced feature set and ASA Physical Status (0.90, 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.93). The Risk Stratification Index had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristics curve, at 0.97 (95% CI, 0.94 to 0.99). Deep neural networks can predict in-hospital mortality based on automatically extractable intraoperative data, but are not (yet) superior to existing methods.

  14. A prospective cohort study of stroke characteristics, care, and mortality in a hospital stroke registry in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirschwell David L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As low and middle-income countries such as Vietnam experience the health transition from infectious to chronic diseases, the morbidity and mortality from stroke will rise. In line with the recommendation of the Institute of Medicine’s report on “Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World” to “improve local data”, we sought to investigate patient characteristics and clinical predictors of mortality among stroke inpatients at Da Nang Hospital in Vietnam. Methods A stroke registry was developed and implemented at Da Nang Hospital utilizing the World Health Organization’s Stroke STEPS instrument for data collection. Results 754 patients were hospitalized for stroke from March 2010 through February 2011 and admitted to either the intensive care unit or cardiology ward. Mean age was 65 years, and 39% were female. Nearly 50% of strokes were hemorrhagic. At 28-day follow-up, 51.0% of patients with hemorrhagic stroke died whereas 20.3% of patients with ischemic stroke died. A number of factors were independently associated with 28-day mortality; the two strongest independent predictors were depressed level of consciousness on presentation and hemorrhagic stroke type. While virtually all patients completed a CT during the admission, evidence-based processes of care such as anti-thrombotic therapy and carotid ultrasound for ischemic stroke patients were underutilized. Conclusions This cohort study highlights the high mortality due in part to the large proportion of hemorrhagic strokes in Vietnam. Lack of hypertension awareness and standards of care exacerbated clinical outcomes. Numerous opportunities for simple, inexpensive interventions to improve outcomes or reduce recurrent stroke have been identified.

  15. Effects of comprehensive stroke care capabilities on in-hospital mortality of patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke: J-ASPECT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iihara, Koji; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Kada, Akiko; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ono, Junichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Aruga, Toru; Miyachi, Shigeru; Nagata, Izumi; Toyoda, Kazunori; Matsuda, Shinya; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Akifumi; Ishikawa, Koichi B; Kataoka, Hiroharu; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Kamitani, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of comprehensive stroke center (CSC) capabilities on stroke mortality remains uncertain. We performed a nationwide study to examine whether CSC capabilities influenced in-hospital mortality of patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Of the 1,369 certified training institutions in Japan, 749 hospitals responded to a questionnaire survey regarding CSC capabilities that queried the availability of personnel, diagnostic techniques, specific expertise, infrastructure, and educational components recommended for CSCs. Among the institutions that responded, data on patients hospitalized for stroke between April 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011 were obtained from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. In-hospital mortality was analyzed using hierarchical logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, level of consciousness on admission, comorbidities, and the number of fulfilled CSC items in each component and in total. Data from 265 institutions and 53,170 emergency-hospitalized patients were analyzed. Mortality rates were 7.8% for patients with ischemic stroke, 16.8% for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and 28.1% for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Mortality adjusted for age, sex, and level of consciousness was significantly correlated with personnel, infrastructural, educational, and total CSC scores in patients with ischemic stroke. Mortality was significantly correlated with diagnostic, educational, and total CSC scores in patients with ICH and with specific expertise, infrastructural, educational, and total CSC scores in patients with SAH. CSC capabilities were associated with reduced in-hospital mortality rates, and relevant aspects of care were found to be dependent on stroke type.

  16. Comparison of severity of illness scoring systems in the prediction of hospital mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock

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    Crowe Colleen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : New scoring systems, including the Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (REMS, the Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis (MEDS score, and the confusion, urea nitrogen, respiratory rate, blood pressure, 65 years and older (CURB-65 score, have been developed for emergency department (ED use in various patient populations. Increasing use of early goal directed therapy (EGDT for the emergent treatment of sepsis introduces a growing population of patients in which the accuracy of these scoring systems has not been widely examined. Objectives : To evaluate the ability of the REMS, MEDS score, and CURB-65 score to predict mortality in septic patients treated with modified EGDT. Materials and Methods : Secondary analysis of data from prospectively identified patients treated with modified EGDT in a large tertiary care suburban community hospital with over 85,000 ED visits annually and 700 inpatient beds, from May 2007 through May 2008. We included all patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, who were treated with our modified EGDT protocol. Our major outcome was in-hospital mortality. The performance of the scores was compared by area under the ROC curves (AUCs. Results : A total of 216 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock were treated with modified EGDT during the study period. Overall mortality was 32.9%. Calculated AUCs were 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.67-0.81] for the MEDS score, 0.62 (95% CI: 0.54-0.69 for the REMS, and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.51-0.67 for the CURB-65 score. Conclusion : We found that all three ED-based systems for scoring severity of illness had low to moderate predictive capability. The MEDS score demonstrated the largest AUC of the studied scoring systems for the outcome of mortality, although the CIs on point estimates of the AUC of the REMS and CURB-65 scores all overlap.

  17. Use of albumin as a risk factor for hospital mortality among burn patients in Brazil: non-concurrent cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleman, Gilson; Morais, José Fausto de; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Riera, Rachel; Atallah, Alvaro Nagib

    2010-01-01

    among burn patients, it is common to use colloidal substances under the justification that it is necessary to correct the oncotic pressure of the plasma, thereby reducing the edema in the burnt area and the hypotension. The aim here was to assess the risk of hospital mortality, comparing the use of albumin and crystalloid solutions for these patients. non-concurrent historical cohort study at Faculdade de Medicina de Marília; within the Postgraduate program on Internal and Therapeutic Medicine, Universidade Federal de São Paulo; and at the Brazilian Cochrane Center. burn patients hospitalized between 2000 and 2001, with registration in the Hospital Information System, who received albumin, were compared with those who received other types of volume replacement. The primary outcome was the hospital mortality rate. The data were collected from files within the Datasus software. 39,684 patients were included: 24,116 patients with moderate burns and 15,566 patients with major burns. Among the men treated with albumin, the odds ratio for the risk of death was 20.58 (95% confidence interval, CI: 11.28-37.54) for moderate burns and 6.24 (CI 5.22-7.45) for major burns. Among the women, this risk was 40.97 for moderate burns (CI 21.71-77.30) and 7.35 for major burns (CI 5.99-9.01). The strength of the association between the use of albumin and the risk of death was maintained for the other characteristics studied, with statistical significance. the use of albumin among patients with moderate and major burns was associated with considerably increased mortality.

  18. Use of albumin as a risk factor for hospital mortality among burn patients in Brazil: non-concurrent cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Caleman

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Among burn patients, it is common to use colloidal substances under the justification that it is necessary to correct the oncotic pressure of the plasma, thereby reducing the edema in the burnt area and the hypotension. The aim here was to assess the risk of hospital mortality, comparing the use of albumin and crystalloid solutions for these patients. DESIGN AND SETTING: Non-concurrent historical cohort study at Faculdade de Medicina de Marília; within the Postgraduate program on Internal and Therapeutic Medicine, Universidade Federal de São Paulo; and at the Brazilian Cochrane Center. METHODS: Burn patients hospitalized between 2000 and 2001, with registration in the Hospital Information System, who received albumin, were compared with those who received other types of volume replacement. The primary outcome was the hospital mortality rate. The data were collected from files within the Datasus software. RESULTS: 39,684 patients were included: 24,116 patients with moderate burns and 15,566 patients with major burns. Among the men treated with albumin, the odds ratio for the risk of death was 20.58 (95% confidence interval, CI: 11.28-37.54 for moderate burns and 6.24 (CI 5.22-7.45 for major burns. Among the women, this risk was 40.97 for moderate burns (CI 21.71-77.30 and 7.35 for major burns (CI 5.99-9.01. The strength of the association between the use of albumin and the risk of death was maintained for the other characteristics studied, with statistical significance. CONCLUSION: The use of albumin among patients with moderate and major burns was associated with considerably increased mortality.

  19. Mortality Analysis of Patients with Paraquat Poisoning Treated at Two University Hospitals in Shiraz, Iran

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    Fazel Goudarzi

    2014-12-01

    Conlcusion: PQ poisoning is associated with high mortality requiring an immediate assessment of patients and prediction of prognosis. Renal and hepatic failure in addition to respiratory distress can be the strongest risk factors for poor prognosis in acute PQ poisoning.

  20. Meningococcal meningitis: clinical and laboratorial characteristics, fatality rate and variables associated with in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Strelow

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meningococcal meningitis is a public health problem. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with meningococcal meningitis, and to identify associated factors with mortality. This was a retrospective study, between 2006 and 2011, at a referral center in São Paulo, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with mortality. We included 316 patients. The median age was 16 years (IQR: 7–27 and 60% were male. The clinical triad: fever, headache and neck stiffness was observed in 89% of the patients. The cerebrospinal triad: pleocytosis, elevated protein levels and low glucose levels was present in 79% of patients. Factors associated with mortality in the multivariate model were age above 50 years, seizures, tachycardia, hypotension and neck stiffness. The classic clinical and laboratory triads of meningococcal meningitis were variable. The fatality rate was low. Age, seizures and shock signs were independently associated with mortality.

  1. Neonatal mortality in a referral hospital in Cameroon over a seven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The neonatal mortality rate followed a downward trend dropping from12.4% in 2004 to 7.2% in 2010. ... Neonatal sepsis, prematurity, birth asphyxia and congenital malformations were ... cur in developing countries where access to health care.

  2. Neonatal mortality in a referral hospital in Cameroon over a seven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The neonatal mortality rate followed a downward trend dropping from 12.4% in 2004 to 7.2% in 2010. ... Neonatal sepsis, prematurity, birth asphyxia and congenital malformations were ... in developing countries where access to health care.

  3. Influence of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest on hospital mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Greetje; Brinkman, Sylvia; Bisschops, Laurens L. A.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; de Lange, Dylan W.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Following two randomized controlled trials that demonstrated reduced mortality and better neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients, mild therapeutic hypothermia was implemented in many intensive care units. Up to now, no large observational studies have confirmed the beneficial

  4. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noyez, L.; Biemans, I.; Verkroost, M.W.; Swieten, H.A. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. METHODS: Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the

  5. Trends in stroke hospitalisation rates and in-hospital mortality in Aragon, 1998-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Muñoz, A; Ara, J R; Abad Díez, J M; Campello Morer, I; Pérez Trullén, J M

    2018-05-01

    Despite the impact of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) on global health, its morbidity and time trends in Spain are not precisely known. The purpose of our study was to characterise the epidemiology and trends pertaining to stroke in Aragon over the period 1998-2010. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study using the data of the Spanish health system's Minimum Data Set and included all stroke patients admitted to acute care hospitals in Aragon between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2010. We present data globally and broken down by stroke subtype, sex, and age group. The number of cases increased by 13% whereas age- and sex-adjusted hospitalisation rates showed a significant decrease for all types of stroke (mean annual decrease of 1.6%). Men and women in younger age groups showed opposite trends in hospitalisation rates for ischaemic stroke. Case fatality rate at 28 days (17.9%) was higher in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (35.8%) than in those with subarachnoid haemorrhage (26.2%) or ischaemic stroke (13%). CVD case fatality showed a mean annual decline of 2.8%, at the expense of the fatality rate of ischaemic stroke, and it was more pronounced in men than in women. Understanding stroke epidemiology and trends at the regional level will help establish an efficient monitoring system and design appropriate strategies for health planning. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. [Do laymen understand information about hospital quality? An empirical verification using risk-adjusted mortality rates as an example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Uwe; Kolb, Benjamin; Taheri, Fatemeh; Patzelt, Christiane; Emmert, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The effect of public reporting to improve quality in healthcare is reduced by the limited intelligibility of information about the quality of healthcare providers. This may result in worse health-related choices especially for older people and those with lower levels of education. There is, as yet, little information as to whether laymen understand the concepts behind quality comparisons and if this comprehension is correlated with hospital choices. An instrument with 20 items was developed to analyze the intelligibility of five technical terms which were used in German hospital report cards to explain risk-adjusted death rates. Two online presentations of risk-adjusted death rates for five hospitals in the style of hospital report cards were developed. An online survey of 353 volunteers tested the comprehension of the risk-adjusted mortality rates and included an experimental hospital choice. The intelligibility of