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Sample records for higher brain centers

  1. Parallel neural pathways in higher visual centers of the Drosophila brain that mediate wavelength-specific behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo eOtsuna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared with connections between the retinae and primary visual centers, relatively less is known in both mammals and insects about the functional segregation of neural pathways connecting primary and higher centers of the visual processing cascade. Here, using the Drosophila visual system as a model, we demonstrate two levels of parallel computation in the pathways that connect primary visual centers of the optic lobe to computational circuits embedded within deeper centers in the central brain. We show that a seemingly simple achromatic behavior, namely phototaxis, is under the control of several independent pathways, each of which is responsible for navigation towards unique wavelengths. Silencing just one pathway is enough to disturb phototaxis towards one characteristic monochromatic source, whereas phototactic behavior towards white light is not affected. The response spectrum of each demonstrable pathway is different from that of individual photoreceptors, suggesting subtractive computations. A choice assay between two colors showed that these pathways are responsible for navigation towards, but not for the detection itself of, the monochromatic light. The present study provides novel insights about how visual information is separated and processed in parallel to achieve robust control of an innate behavior.

  2. Nonsomatotopic organization of the higher motor centers in octopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Letizia; Sumbre, German; Agnisola, Claudio; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2009-10-13

    Hyperredundant limbs with a virtually unlimited number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) pose a challenge for both biological and computational systems of motor control. In the flexible arms of the octopus, simplification strategies have evolved to reduce the number of controlled DOFs. Motor control in the octopus nervous system is hierarchically organized. A relatively small central brain integrates a huge amount of visual and tactile information from the large optic lobes and the peripheral nervous system of the arms and issues commands to lower motor centers controlling the elaborated neuromuscular system of the arms. This unique organization raises new questions on the organization of the octopus brain and whether and how it represents the rich movement repertoire. We developed a method of brain microstimulation in freely behaving animals and stimulated the higher motor centers-the basal lobes-thus inducing discrete and complex sets of movements. As stimulation strength increased, complex movements were recruited from basic components shared by different types of movement. We found no stimulation site where movements of a single arm or body part could be elicited. Discrete and complex components have no central topographical organization but are distributed over wide regions.

  3. Problems in accurately diagnosing and follow-up for a higher brain dysfunction after traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Mineji; Ikoma, Katsunori; Oshiro, Akiko; Hoshino, Hirokatsu; Gando, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the occurrence of a higher brain dysfunction after brain injury has been socially noticed and epidemiological investigations have thus been performed. However, most of these previous investigations tended to be based on populations in a chronic stage after brain trauma. We hypothesized that some patients with a higher brain dysfunction were socially in extreme distress after being discharged from our hospital due to a lack of any follow-up treatment. We investigated this problem to identify possible problems in diagnosing and follow-up for a higher brain dysfunction after blunt traumatic brain injury at a tertiary emergency center. A questionnaire survey was performed for 204 blunt trauma patients who had been admitted during the period from January 2000 thorough December 2003. Clinical examinations were performed for patients suspected of having a higher brain dysfunction based on this questionnaire survey. Three patients had been already diagnosed to have a higher brain dysfunction while other 3 patients were newly diagnosed in this investigation. The newly diagnosed patients discharged from departments other than the neurosurgery department. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 82% patients (65 patients) to diagnose major brain injury or bone fracture. No magnetic resonance image was performed to detect any minor brain injury in alert patients. Overlooking the occurrence of a higher brain dysfunction may result from an insufficient recognition of higher brain dysfunction and an insufficient sensitivity of the present diagnostic methods available for minor brain injury. An increased awareness regarding the potential of a higher brain dysfunction existing in such patients is therefore needed by the entire medical staff and the general public. (author)

  4. A Review of the Chinese Higher Education Evaluation Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Laura Pan; Dehai, Wang

    2007-01-01

    The authors discuss the Higher Education Evaluation Center, the administrative body under the auspices of the Chinese Ministry of Education responsible for organizing and conducting evaluation of baccalaureate and associate degree programs offered at different universities and colleges in China. The Center also conducts research on regulations and…

  5. Functional brain imaging to investigate the higher brain dysfunction induced by diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Tadashi; Inaji, Motoki; Ohno, Kikuo; Hiura, Mikio; Ishii, Kenji; Hosoda, Chihiro

    2011-01-01

    Higher brain dysfunction is the major problem of patients who recover from neurotrauma the prevents them from returning to their previous social life. Many such patients do not have focal brain damage detected with morphological imaging. We focused on studying the focal brain dysfunction that can be detected only with functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) in relation to the score of various cognition batteries. Patients who complain of higher brain dysfunction without apparent morphological cortical damage were recruited for this study. Thirteen patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) or cerebral concussion was included. They underwent a PET study to image glucose metabolism by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and central benodiazepine receptor (cBZD-R) (marker of neuronal body) by 11 C-flumazenil, together with cognition measurement by WAIS-R, WMS-R, and WCST etc. PET data were compared with age matched normal controls using statistical parametric mapping (SPM)2. DAI patients had a significant decrease in glucose matabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the cingulated cortex than normal controls. Patients diagnosed with concussion because of shorter consciousness disturbance also had abnormal FDG uptake and cBZD-R distribution. Cognition test scores were variable among patients. Degree of decreased glucose metabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the dominant hemishphere corresponded well to the severity of cognitive disturbance. PET molecular imaging was useful to depict focal cortical dysfunction of neurotrauma patients even when morphological change was not apparent. This method may be promising to clarify the pathophysiology of higher brain dysfunction of patients with diffuse axonal injury or chronic traumatic encephalopathy. (author)

  6. Disaster risk assessment pattern in higher education centers

    OpenAIRE

    M. Omidvari; J. Nouri; M. Mapar

    2015-01-01

    Disasters are one of the most important challenges which must be considered by every management system. Higher education centers have high disaster risk because of their risk factors (existence of historical and scientific documents and resources and expensive laboratory equipment in these centers emphasizes the importance of disaster management). Moreover, the existence of young volunteers of human resources in universities urges the necessity of making these people familiar with disaster ma...

  7. Regulation of Central Nervous System Myelination in Higher Brain Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Nickel, Mara; Gu, Chen

    2018-01-01

    The hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex are interconnected brain regions, playing central roles in higher brain functions, including learning and memory, planning complex cognitive behavior, and moderating social behavior. The axons in these regions continue to be myelinated into adulthood in humans, which coincides with maturation of personality and decision-making. Myelin consists of dense layers of lipid membranes wrapping around the axons to provide electrical insulation and trophic sup...

  8. Expensive Brains: “Brainy” Rodents have Higher Metabolic Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrero, Raúl; May-Collado, Laura J.; Agnarsson, Ingi; Hernández, Cristián E.

    2011-01-01

    Brains are the centers of the nervous system of animals, controlling the organ systems of the body and coordinating responses to changes in the ecological and social environment. The evolution of traits that correlate with cognitive ability, such as relative brain size is thus of broad interest. Brain mass relative to body mass (BM) varies among mammals, and diverse factors have been proposed to explain this variation. A recent study provided evidence that energetics play an important role in brain evolution (Isler and van Schaik, 2006). Using composite phylogenies and data drawn from multiple sources, these authors showed that basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlates with brain mass across mammals. However, no such relationship was found within rodents. Here we re-examined the relationship between BMR and brain mass within Rodentia using a novel species-level phylogeny. Our results are sensitive to parameter evaluation; in particular how species mass is estimated. We detect no pattern when applying an approach used by previous studies, where each species BM is represented by two different numbers, one being the individual that happened to be used for BMR estimates of that species. However, this approach may compromise the analysis. When using a single value of BM for each species, whether representing a single individual, or available species mean, our findings provide evidence that brain mass (independent of BM) and BMR are correlated. These findings are thus consistent with the hypothesis that large brains evolve when the payoff for increased brain mass is greater than the energetic cost they incur. PMID:21811456

  9. Disaster risk assessment pattern in higher education centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Omidvari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disasters are one of the most important challenges which must be considered by every management system. Higher education centers have high disaster risk because of their risk factors (existence of historical and scientific documents and resources and expensive laboratory equipment in these centers emphasizes the importance of disaster management. Moreover, the existence of young volunteers of human resources in universities urges the necessity of making these people familiar with disaster management rules and responses in emergency conditions. Creating appropriate tools for disaster management assessment makes it correct and precise in higher education systems using the presented conceptual model. The present model was planned so as to cover three phases which exist before, during, and after disaster. Studies were performed in one of the largest higher education centers in Tehran: Science and Research Branch of Islamic Azad University Campus. Results showed high-risk disasters in these centers which must be taken into consideration continuously. The objective of this study was to create appropriate patterns of disaster risk management in these centers.

  10. Regulation of Central Nervous System Myelination in Higher Brain Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Nickel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex are interconnected brain regions, playing central roles in higher brain functions, including learning and memory, planning complex cognitive behavior, and moderating social behavior. The axons in these regions continue to be myelinated into adulthood in humans, which coincides with maturation of personality and decision-making. Myelin consists of dense layers of lipid membranes wrapping around the axons to provide electrical insulation and trophic support and can profoundly affect neural circuit computation. Recent studies have revealed that long-lasting changes of myelination can be induced in these brain regions by experience, such as social isolation, stress, and alcohol abuse, as well as by neurological and psychiatric abnormalities. However, the mechanism and function of these changes remain poorly understood. Myelin regulation represents a new form of neural plasticity. Some progress has been made to provide new mechanistic insights into activity-independent and activity-dependent regulations of myelination in different experimental systems. More extensive investigations are needed in this important but underexplored research field, in order to shed light on how higher brain functions and myelination interplay in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

  11. The Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (Cimbi) database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte M.; Jensen, Peter S.; Erritzoe, David

    2016-01-01

    We here describe a multimodality neuroimaging containing data from healthy volunteers and patients, acquired within the Lundbeck Foundation Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (Cimbi) in Copenhagen, Denmark. The data is of particular relevance for neurobiological research questions rela...... currently contains blood and in some instances saliva samples from about 500 healthy volunteers and 300 patients with e.g., major depression, dementia, substance abuse, obesity, and impulsive aggression. Data continue to be added to the Cimbi database and biobank....

  12. Extensions of guiding center motion to higher order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northrop, T.G.; Rome, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    In a static magnetic field, some well-known guiding center equations maintain their form when extended to next order in gyroradius. In these cases, it is only necessary to include the next order term in the magnetic moment series. The differential equation for guiding center motion which describes both the parallel and perpendicular velocities correctly through first order in gyroradius is given. The question of how to define the guiding center position through second order arises and is discussed, and second order drifts are derived for one usual definition. The toroidal canonical angular momentum, P/sub phi/, of the guiding center in an axisymmetric field is shown to be conserved using the guiding center velocity correct through first order. When second-order motion is included, P/sub phi/ is no longer a constant. The above extensions of guiding center theory help to resolve the different tokamak orbits obtained either by using the guiding center equations of motion or by using conservation of P/sub phi/

  13. Extensions of guiding center motion to higher order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northrop, T.G.; Rome, J.A.

    1977-07-01

    In a static magnetic field, some well-known guiding center equations maintain their form when extended to next order in gyroradius. In these cases, it is only necessary to include the next order term in the magnetic moment series. The differential equation for guiding center motion which describes both the parallel and perpendicular velocities correctly through first order in gyroradius is given. The question of how to define the guiding center position through second order arises and is discussed, and second order drifts are derived for one usual definition. The toroidal canonical angular momentum, P/sub phi/, of the guiding center in an axisymmetric field is shown to be conserved using the guiding center velocity correct through first order. When second order motion is included, P/sub phi/ is no longer a constant. The above extensions of guiding center theory help to resolve the different tokamak orbits obtained either by using the guiding center equations of motion or by using conservation of P/sub phi/

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of higher brain activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui He; Wang Yunjiu; Chen Runsheng; Tang Xiaowei.

    1996-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs) exhibit small differences in the magnetic resonance signal intensity in positions corresponding to focal areas of brain activation. These signal are caused by variation in the oxygenation state of the venous vasculature. Using this non-invasive and dynamic method, it is possible to localize functional brain activation, in vivo, in normal individuals, with an accuracy of millimeters and a temporal resolution of seconds. Though a series of technical difficulties remain, fMRI is increasingly becoming a key method for visualizing the working brain, and uncovering the topographical organization of the human brain, and understanding the relationship between brain and the mind

  15. Brain Drain in Higher Education: Lost Hope or Opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, George

    2012-01-01

    The flight of human capital is a phenomenon that has been of concern to academics and development practitioners for decades but unfortunately, there is no systematic record of the number of skilled professionals that many African countries have continued to lose to the developed world. Termed the "brain drain", it represents the loss of…

  16. A distinct boundary between the higher brain's susceptibility to ischemia and the lower brain's resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Devin Brisson

    Full Text Available Higher brain regions are more susceptible to global ischemia than the brainstem, but is there a gradual increase in vulnerability in the caudal-rostral direction or is there a discrete boundary? We examined the interface between `higher` thalamus and the hypothalamus the using live brain slices where variation in blood flow is not a factor. Whole-cell current clamp recording of 18 thalamic neurons in response to 10 min O2/glucose deprivation (OGD revealed a rapid anoxic depolarization (AD from which thalamic neurons do not recover. Newly acquired neurons could not be patched following AD, confirming significant regional thalamic injury. Coinciding with AD, light transmittance (LT imaging during whole-cell recording showed an elevated LT front that initiated in midline thalamus and that propagated into adjacent hypothalamus. However, hypothalamic neurons patched in paraventricular nucleus (PVN, n= 8 magnocellular and 12 parvocellular neurons and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, n= 18 only slowly depolarized as AD passed through these regions. And with return to control aCSF, hypothalamic neurons repolarized and recovered their input resistance and action potential amplitude. Moreover, newly acquired hypothalamic neurons could be readily patched following exposure to OGD, with resting parameters similar to neurons not previously exposed to OGD. Thalamic susceptibility and hypothalamic resilience were also observed following ouabain exposure which blocks the Na(+/K(+ pump, evoking depolarization similar to OGD in all neuronal types tested. Finally, brief exposure to elevated [K(+]o caused spreading depression (SD, a milder, AD-like event only in thalamic neurons so SD generation is regionally correlated with strong AD. Therefore the thalamus-hypothalamus interface represents a discrete boundary where neuronal vulnerability to ischemia is high in thalamus (like more rostral neocortex, striatum, hippocampus. In contrast hypothalamic neurons are

  17. Functional MR mapping of higher cognitive brain functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellemann, M.E.; Spitzer, M.; Brix, G.; Kammer, T.; Loose, R.; Schwartz, A.; Gueckel, F.

    1995-01-01

    Fifteen normal subjects were examined on a conventional 1.5-T MR system to visualize cortical activation during the performance of high-level cognitive tasks. A computer-controlled videoprojector was employed to present psychometrically optimized activation paradigms. Reaction times and error rates of the volunteers were acquired online during stimulus presentation. The time course of cortical activation was measured in a series of strongly T 2 *-weighted gradient-echo images from three or four adjacent slices. For anatomical correlation, picture elements showing a stimulus-related significant signal increase were color-coded and superimposed on T 1 -weighted spin-echo images. Analysis of the fMRI data revealed a subtle (range 2-5%), but statistically significant increase in signal intensity during the periods of induced cortical activation. Judgment of semantic relatedness of word pairs, for example, activated selectively cortical areas in left frontal and left temporal brain regions. The strength of cortex activation in the semantic task decreased significantly in the course of stimulus presentation and was paralleled by a decrease in the corresponding reaction times. With its move into the area of cognitive neuroscience, fMRI calls both for the careful design of activation schemes and for the acquisition of behavioral data. For example, brain regions involved in language processing could only be identified clearly when psychometrically matched activation paradigms were employed. The reaction time data correlated well with selective learning and thus helped to facilitate interpretation of the fMRI data sets. (orig.) [de

  18. Consumption of Alcopops During Brain Maturation Period: Higher Impact of Fructose Than Ethanol on Brain Metabolism

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    Dounia El Hamrani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Alcopops are flavored alcoholic beverages sweetened by sodas, known to contain fructose. These drinks have the goal of democratizing alcohol among young consumers (12–17 years old and in the past few years have been considered as fashionable amongst teenagers. Adolescence, however, is a key period for brain maturation, occurring in the prefrontal cortex and limbic system until 21 years old. Therefore, this drinking behavior has become a public health concern. Despite the extensive literature concerning the respective impacts of either fructose or ethanol on brain, the effects following joint consumption of these substrates remains unknown. Our objective was to study the early brain modifications induced by a combined diet of high fructose (20% and moderate amount of alcohol in young rats by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Wistar rats had isocaloric pair-fed diets containing fructose (HF, 20%, ethanol (Et, 0.5 g/day/kg or both substrates at the same time (HFEt. After 6 weeks of diet, the rats were infused with 13C-glucose and brain perchloric acid extracts were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy (1H and 13C. Surprisingly, the most important modifications of brain metabolism were observed under fructose diet. Alterations, observed after only 6 weeks of diet, show that the brain is vulnerable at the metabolic level to fructose consumption during late-adolescence throughout adulthood in rats. The main result was an increase in oxidative metabolism compared to glycolysis, which may impact lactate levels in the brain and may, at least partially, explain memory impairment in teenagers consuming alcopops.

  19. Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative In Pursuit of a Cure The mission of the BTTC is to develop and perform state-of-the-art clinical trials in a collaborative and collegial environment, advancing treatments for patients with brain tumors, merging good scientific method with concern for patient well-being and outcome.

  20. Neuroimaging of post-traumatic higher brain dysfunction using 123I-Iomazenil (IMZ) SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawara, Jyoji; Kamiyama, Kenji; Takahashi, Masaaki; Nakamura, Hirohiko

    2010-01-01

    In patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), higher brain dysfunctions which consist of cognitive impairments such as memory, attention, performance and social behavioral disturbances could be rarely apparent. However, higher brain dysfunctions should be identified by neuropsychological tests and supported by a social welfare for handicapped patients. Acknowledgement of higher brain dysfunctions after MTBI without obvious brain damages on morphological neuroimagings could be a social issue under controversy. An imaging of cortical neuron damages in patients with higher brain dysfunctions after MTBI was studied by functional neuroimaging using 123 I-Iomazenil (IMZ) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Statistical imaging analyses using 3 dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP) for 123 I-IMZ SPECT and 123 I-IMP SPECT as cerebral blood flow (CBF) studies were performed in 11 patients with higher brain dysfunctions after MTBI. In all patients with higher brain dysfunctions defined by neuropsychological tests, cortical neuron damages were observed in bilateral medial frontal lobes, but reduction of CBF in bilateral medial frontal lobes were less obviously showed in 8 patients (apparent in 3 and little in 5). Group comparison of 3D-SSP of 123 I-IMZ SPECT between 11 patients and 18 normal controls demonstrated significant selective loss of cortical neuron in bilateral medial frontal gyrus (MFG). Extent of abnormal pixels on each cortical gyrus using stereotactic extraction estimation (SEE) for 3D-SSP of 123 I-IMZ SPECT confirmed that 8 patients had abnormal pixel extent >10% in bilateral MFG and 5 patients had abnormal pixel extent >10% in bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus. In patients with MTBI, higher brain dysfunctions seems to correlate with selective loss of cortical neuron within bilateral MFG which could be caused by Wallerian degeneration as secondary phenomena after diffuse axonal injury within corpus callosum. Statistical

  1. Strategic Learning in Youth with Traumatic Brain Injury: Evidence for Stall in Higher-Order Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamino, Jacquelyn F.; Chapman, Sandra B.; Cook, Lori G.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about strategic learning ability in preteens and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Strategic learning is the ability to combine and synthesize details to form abstracted gist-based meanings, a higher-order cognitive skill associated with frontal lobe functions and higher classroom performance. Summarization tasks were…

  2. Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury, Annual Report 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    applications for recovering from disaster and trauma Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Develops and delivers advanced TBI-specifi c treatment...specifically aimed at developing cognitive and motor therapy tools using videogame technology, game-based PH outreach tools and support tools for children of...Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Annual Report 2009 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No

  3. The Brain Takes Center Stage at 2014 NIH Research Festival | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer The 2014 NIH Research Festival, Sept. 22–24, focused on the human brain for two, very specific, reasons: to coincide with the White House BRAIN Initiative and to highlight the John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center, which opened earlier this year on the NIH campus.

  4. Higher cortical modulation of pain perception in the human brain: Psychological determinant

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Andrew Cn

    2009-01-01

    Pain perception and its genesis in the human brain have been reviewed recently. In the current article, the reports on pain modulation in the human brain were reviewed from higher cortical regulation, i.e. top-down effect, particularly studied in psychological determinants. Pain modulation can be examined by gene therapy, physical modulation, pharmacological modulation, psychological modulation, and pathophysiological modulation. In psychological modulation, this article examined (a) willed d...

  5. Chronnectome fingerprinting: Identifying individuals and predicting higher cognitive functions using dynamic brain connectivity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Liao, Xuhong; Xia, Mingrui; He, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The human brain is a large, interacting dynamic network, and its architecture of coupling among brain regions varies across time (termed the "chronnectome"). However, very little is known about whether and how the dynamic properties of the chronnectome can characterize individual uniqueness, such as identifying individuals as a "fingerprint" of the brain. Here, we employed multiband resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from the Human Connectome Project (N = 105) and a sliding time-window dynamic network analysis approach to systematically examine individual time-varying properties of the chronnectome. We revealed stable and remarkable individual variability in three dynamic characteristics of brain connectivity (i.e., strength, stability, and variability), which was mainly distributed in three higher order cognitive systems (i.e., default mode, dorsal attention, and fronto-parietal) and in two primary systems (i.e., visual and sensorimotor). Intriguingly, the spatial patterns of these dynamic characteristics of brain connectivity could successfully identify individuals with high accuracy and could further significantly predict individual higher cognitive performance (e.g., fluid intelligence and executive function), which was primarily contributed by the higher order cognitive systems. Together, our findings highlight that the chronnectome captures inherent functional dynamics of individual brain networks and provides implications for individualized characterization of health and disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Higher cortical modulation of pain perception in the human brain: Psychological determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew Cn

    2009-10-01

    Pain perception and its genesis in the human brain have been reviewed recently. In the current article, the reports on pain modulation in the human brain were reviewed from higher cortical regulation, i.e. top-down effect, particularly studied in psychological determinants. Pain modulation can be examined by gene therapy, physical modulation, pharmacological modulation, psychological modulation, and pathophysiological modulation. In psychological modulation, this article examined (a) willed determination, (b) distraction, (c) placebo, (d) hypnosis, (e) meditation, (f) qi-gong, (g) belief, and (h) emotions, respectively, in the brain function for pain modulation. In each, the operational definition, cortical processing, neuroimaging, and pain modulation were systematically deliberated. However, not all studies had featured the brain modulation processing but rather demonstrated potential effects on human pain. In our own studies on the emotional modulation on human pain, we observed that emotions could be induced from music melodies or pictures perception for reduction of tonic human pain, mainly in potentiation of the posterior alpha EEG fields, likely resulted from underneath activities of precuneous in regulation of consciousness, including pain perception. To sum, higher brain functions become the leading edge research in all sciences. How to solve the information bit of thinking and feeling in the brain can be the greatest challenge of human intelligence. Application of higher cortical modulation of human pain and suffering can lead to the progress of social humanity and civilization.

  7. Is there an irony center in the brain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weed, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Many theories of irony are based on the idea that to interpret an ironic utterance, we need to consult a separate cognitive function. This cognitive function, which presumably is seated in a different brain area than the more purely linguistic ones, would allow the hearer to make an informed judg...

  8. CATIE: Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center. http://www.catie.ac.cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applied Environmental Education and Communication, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article features CATIE (Centro Agronomico Tropical de Investigacion y Ensenanza), a tropical agricultural research and higher education center. CATIE's mission is to be instrumental in poverty reduction and rural development in the American tropics, by promoting diversified and competitive agriculture and sustainable management of natural…

  9. From "Brain Drain" to "Brain Bridging": Transnational Higher Education Development and Graduate Employment in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Ka Ho; Han, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, the internationalisation of higher education has become an increasingly popular trend across different parts of the globe. The fierce global competition and the aggravating unemployment rate, coupled with low teaching and research quality revealed by universities in mainland China, have inevitably compelled a growing…

  10. Higher mind-brain development in successful leaders: testing a unified theory of performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harung, Harald S; Travis, Frederick

    2012-05-01

    This study explored mind-brain characteristics of successful leaders as reflected in scores on the Brain Integration Scale, Gibbs's Socio-moral Reasoning questionnaire, and an inventory of peak experiences. These variables, which in previous studies distinguished world-class athletes and professional classical musicians from average-performing controls, were recorded in 20 Norwegian top-level managers and in 20 low-level managers-matched for age, gender, education, and type of organization (private or public). Top-level managers were characterized by higher Brain Integration Scale scores, higher levels of moral reasoning, and more frequent peak experiences. These multilevel measures could be useful tools in selection and recruiting of potential managers and in assessing leadership education and development programs. Future longitudinal research could further investigate the relationship between leadership success and these and other multilevel variables.

  11. Unitizing worker expertise and maximizing the brain reward centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Anthony Bert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    People are experts when it comes to the work they do; unfortunately their expertise is not utilized as frequently as it could be. More opportunities need to be provided that allow people to participate in the design of their work including: accident investigations, job planning, and process improvements. Many employers use some form of job hazard analysis process to identify and document hazards and controls, but the front line worker is rarely involved. This presentation will show the core principles supporting employee involvement, provide examples where workers had brilliant ideas but no one listened, and provide examples where workers were given the opportunity to use their expertise to improve occupational safety. According to Abraham Maslow's Hierarch of Needs model, one essential human need is to be innovative and solve problems. Advances in brain science have proven, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, the brain reward pathway is activated when people are recognized for their intellectual contributions. As people contribute their expertise to improve occupational safety more frequently they will feel a sense of gratification. In addition, safety professionals will have more time to spend on strategic planning of emerging occupational safety issues. One effect of the current global recession is that SH&E professionals are asked to do more with less. Therefore, to be successful it is essential that SH&E professionals incorporate worker expertise in job planning. This will be illustrated in the presentation through an example where a worker had the answer to a difficult decision on appropriate personal protective equipment for a job but no one asked the worker for his idea during the job planning phase. Fortunately the worker was eventually consulted and his recommendation for the appropriate personal protective equipment for the job was implemented before work began. The goal of this presentation is to expand the awareness and

  12. Building Brains, Forging Futures: A Call to Action for the Family-Centered Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    The family-centered medical home describes an approach to providing comprehensive primary care. Research advances in developmental neuroscience, genetics, and epigenetics offer a framework for understanding the dynamic process of brain development. It is this process that sets the life-course trajectory for an individual; in turn, a child's…

  13. 77 FR 13578 - Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project; Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... medical care, those seen only in private doctors' offices, or those treated in military or veteran health... Veterans Brain Injury Center, 2011b). Common disabilities resulting from TBI include problems with cognition, sensory processing, communication, and behavioral or mental health; and some TBI survivors...

  14. Activating whole brain® innovation: A means of nourishing multiple intelligence in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Louise De Boer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The interconnectedness of the constructs ‘whole brain® thinking’ and ‘multiple intelligence’ forms the epicentre of this article. We depart from the premise that when whole brain® thinking is activated multiple intelligence can be nourished. When this becomes evident in a higher education practice it can be claimed that such a practice is innovative. Whole brain® thinking that informs intelligence and vice versa is inevitable when it comes to facilitating learning with a view to promoting quality learning in the context of higher education. If higher education is concerned about the expectations of industry and the world of work there is no other option as to prepare students in such a way that they develo as holistic – whole brained and intelligent – employers, employees and entrepreneurs who take responsibility for maximising their full potential. Becoming a self-regulated professional and being reflexive are some of the attributes of the 21st century which should be cultivated in all students. Research on whole brain® thinking and multiple intelligence shows that these human attributes form an integral part of one’s interaction with life – one’s environment and especially people as integral part of the environment. This focus on people highlights the need for developing soft skills within every curriculum. The epistemological underpinning of our reporting of experience in practice and research of the application of the principals of the constructs is meta- reflective in nature. Instead of a typical traditional stance to research we do not report on the numerous sets of data obtained over a period of more than 15 years. Our approach is that of a meta-reflective narrative as most of the studies we were involved in and still are, are reflective as it is most often than not action research-driven. And action research is a reflective process. We report on evidence-based practice that includes fields of specialisation such as

  15. Processes and Procedures of the Higher Education Programs at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Pamala D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of my research was to investigate the policies, processes, procedures and timelines for the higher education programs at Marshall Space Flight Center. The three higher education programs that comprised this research included: the Graduate Student Researchers Program (GSRP), the National Research Council/Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA) and the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP). The GSRP award fellowships each year to promising U.S. graduate students whose research interest coincides with NASA's mission. Fellowships are awarded for one year and are renewable for up to three years to competitively selected students. Each year, the award provides students the opportunity to spend a period in residence at a NASA center using that installation's unique facilities. This program is renewable for three years, students must reapply. The National Research Council conducts the Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA), a national competition to identify outstanding recent postdoctoral scientists and engineers and experience senior scientists and engineers, for tenure as guest researchers at NASA centers. The Resident Research Associateship Program provides an opportunity for recipients of doctoral degrees to concentrate their research in association with NASA personnel, often as a culmination to formal career preparation. The program also affords established scientists and engineers an opportunity for research without any interruptions and distracting assignments generated from permanent career positions. All opportunities for research at NASA Centers are open to citizens of the U.S. and to legal permanent residents. The Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP) is conducted each summer. NASA awards research fellowships to university faculty through the NASA/American Society for Engineering Education. The program is designed to promote an exchange of ideas between university faculties, NASA scientists and engineers. Selected

  16. A global learning-centered approach to higher education: workplace development in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tasso Eira de Aquino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Competition in the 21st century economy requires corporations, organizations, and professionals to face a common challenge: diverse individuals need consistent motivation towards building competences that increase personal marketability using a combination of higher education and professional development. This article represents an evolving report summary and non-traditional learning-centered approach focusing on adult competences necessary for succeeding in the competitive global marketplace of the 21st century. The purpose of this article is to understand the needs of constantly changing employer demands in the work environment. Exploring contemporary approaches related to skill development, adult education, and learning processes, will be the path towards higher levels of professional success. This article will provide readers with an enlightening discussion focusing on the necessary adult skills and competencies professionals need to succeed in the global marketplace.

  17. Recurrent activity in higher order, modality non-specific brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Hans Olav Christensen; Joensson, Morten; Biermann-Ruben, Katja

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that the workings of the brain are mainly intrinsically generated recurrent neuronal activity, with sensory inputs as modifiers of such activity in both sensory and higher order modality non-specific regions. This is supported by the demonstration of recurrent neuronal activity...... in the visual system as a response to visual stimulation. In contrast recurrent activity has never been demonstrated before in higher order modality non-specific regions. Using magneto-encephalography and Granger causality analysis, we tested in a paralimbic network the hypothesis that stimulation may enhance...... causal recurrent interaction between higher-order, modality non-specific regions. The network includes anterior cingulate/medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate/medial parietal cortices together with pulvinar thalami, a network known to be effective in autobiographic memory retrieval and self...

  18. Developing a Family-Centered Care Model for Critical Care After Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan; Robinson, Gabrielle; Mink, Richard; Hudson, Kimberly; Dotolo, Danae; Gooding, Tracy; Ramirez, Alma; Zatzick, Douglas; Giordano, Jessica; Crawley, Deborah; Vavilala, Monica S

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the family experience of critical care after pediatric traumatic brain injury in order to develop a model of specific factors associated with family-centered care. Qualitative methods with semi-structured interviews were used. Two level 1 trauma centers. Fifteen mothers of children who had an acute hospital stay after traumatic brain injury within the last 5 years were interviewed about their experience of critical care and discharge planning. Participants who were primarily English, Spanish, or Cantonese speaking were included. None. Content analysis was used to code the transcribed interviews and develop the family-centered care model. Three major themes emerged: 1) thorough, timely, compassionate communication, 2) capacity building for families, providers, and facilities, and 3) coordination of care transitions. Participants reported valuing detailed, frequent communication that set realistic expectations and prepared them for decision making and outcomes. Areas for capacity building included strategies to increase provider cultural humility, parent participation in care, and institutional flexibility. Coordinated care transitions, including continuity of information and maintenance of partnerships with families and care teams, were highlighted. Participants who were not primarily English speaking reported particular difficulty with communication, cultural understanding, and coordinated transitions. This study presents a family-centered traumatic brain injury care model based on family perspectives. In addition to communication and coordination strategies, the model offers methods to address cultural and structural barriers to meeting the needs of non-English-speaking families. Given the stress experienced by families of children with traumatic brain injury, careful consideration of the model themes identified here may assist in improving overall quality of care to families of hospitalized children with traumatic brain injury.

  19. Variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury: A survey in 66 neurotrauma centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); Huijben, J.A. (Jilske A.); van der Jagt, M. (Mathieu); Volovici, V. (Victor); van Essen, T. (Thomas); S. Polinder (Suzanne); D. Nelson (David); Ercole, A. (Ari); Stocchetti, N. (Nino); Citerio, G. (Giuseppe); W.C. Peul (Wilco); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); D.K. Menon (David ); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout W.); Lingsma, H.F. (Hester F.); Adams, H. (Hadie); Alessandro, M. (Masala); J.E. Allanson (Judith); Amrein, K. (Krisztina); Andaluz, N. (Norberto); N. Andelic (Nada); Andrea, N. (Nanni); L. Andreassen (Lasse); Anke, A. (Audny); Antoni, A. (Anna); Ardon, H. (Hilko); Audibert, G. (Gérard); Auslands, K. (Kaspars); Azouvi, P. (Philippe); Baciu, C. (Camelia); Bacon, A. (Andrew); Badenes, R. (Rafael); Baglin, T. (Trevor); R.H.M.A. Bartels (Ronald); P. Barzo (P.); Bauerfeind, U. (Ursula); R. Beer (Ronny); Belda, F.J. (Francisco Javier); B.-M. Bellander (Bo-Michael); A. Belli (Antonio); Bellier, R. (Rémy); H. Benali (Habib); Benard, T. (Thierry); M. Berardino (Maurizio); L. Beretta (Luigi); Beynon, C. (Christopher); Bilotta, F. (Federico); H. Binder (Harald); Biqiri, E. (Erta); Blaabjerg, M. (Morten); Lund, S.B. (Stine Borgen); Bouzat, P. (Pierre); Bragge, P. (Peter); Brazinova, A. (Alexandra); F. Brehar (Felix); Brorsson, C. (Camilla); Buki, A. (Andras); M. Bullinger (Monika); Bucková, V. (Veronika); Calappi, E. (Emiliana); P. Cameron (Peter); Carbayo, L.G. (Lozano Guillermo); Carise, E. (Elsa); K.L.H. Carpenter (Keri L.H.); Castaño-León, A.M. (Ana M.); Causin, F. (Francesco); Chevallard, G. (Giorgio); A. Chieregato (Arturo); G. Citerio (Giuseppe); Cnossen, M. (Maryse); M. Coburn (Mark); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Cooper, J.D. (Jamie D.); Correia, M. (Marta); A. Covic (Amra); N. Curry (Nicola); E. Czeiter (Endre); M. Czosnyka (Marek); Dahyot-Fizelier, C. (Claire); F. Damas (François); P. Damas (Pierre); H. Dawes (Helen); De Keyser, V. (Véronique); F.D. Corte (Francesco); B. Depreitere (Bart); Ding, S. (Shenghao); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K. Dizdarevic (Kemal); Dulière, G.-L. (Guy-Loup); Dzeko, A. (Adelaida); G. Eapen (George); Engemann, H. (Heiko); A. Ercole (Ari); P. Esser (Patrick); Ezer, E. (Erzsébet); M. Fabricius (Martin); V.L. Feigin (V.); Feng, J. (Junfeng); Foks, K. (Kelly); F. Fossi (Francesca); Francony, G. (Gilles); J. Frantzén (Janek); Freo, U. (Ulderico); S.K. Frisvold (Shirin Kordasti); Furmanov, A. (Alex); Gagliardo, P. (Pablo); D. Galanaud (Damien); G. Gao (Guoyi); K. Geleijns (Karin); A. Ghuysen (Alexandre); Giraud, B. (Benoit); Glocker, B. (Ben); Gomez, P.A. (Pedro A.); Grossi, F. (Francesca); R.L. Gruen (Russell); Gupta, D. (Deepak); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Hadzic (Ermin); I. Haitsma (Iain); J.A. Hartings (Jed); R. Helbok (Raimund); E. Helseth (Eirik); Hertle, D. (Daniel); S. Hill (Sean); Hoedemaekers, A. (Astrid); S. Hoefer (Stefan); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); Håberg, K.A. (Kristine Asta); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); Janciak, I. (Ivan); K. Janssens (Koen); Jiang, J.-Y. (Ji-Yao); Jones, K. (Kelly); Kalala, J.-P. (Jean-Pierre); Kamnitsas, K. (Konstantinos); Karan, M. (Mladen); Karau, J. (Jana); A. Katila (Ari); M. Kaukonen (Maija); Keeling, D. (David); Kerforne, T. (Thomas); N. Ketharanathan (Naomi); Kettunen, J. (Johannes); Kivisaari, R. (Riku); A.G. Kolias (Angelos G.); Kolumbán, B. (Bálint); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin); D. Kondziella (Daniel); L.-O. Koskinen (Lars-Owe); Kovács, N. (Noémi); F. Kalovits (Ferenc); A. Lagares (Alfonso); L. Lanyon (Linda); S. Laureys (Steven); Lauritzen, M. (Martin); F.E. Lecky (Fiona); C. Ledig (Christian); R. Lefering; V. Legrand (Valerie); Lei, J. (Jin); L. Levi (Leon); R. Lightfoot (Roger); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Loeckx (Dirk); Lozano, A. (Angels); Luddington, R. (Roger); Luijten-Arts, C. (Chantal); Maas, A.I.R. (Andrew I.R.); MacDonald, S. (Stephen); MacFayden, C. (Charles); M. Maegele (Marc); M. Majdan (Marek); Major, S. (Sebastian); A. Manara (Alex); Manhes, P. (Pauline); G. Manley (Geoffrey); Martin, D. (Didier); C. Martino (Costanza); Maruenda, A. (Armando); H. Maréchal (Hugues); Mastelova, D. (Dagmara); Mattern, J. (Julia); McMahon, C. (Catherine); Melegh, B. (Béla); Menon, D. (David); T. Menovsky (Tomas); Morganti-Kossmann, C. (Cristina); Mulazzi, D. (Davide); Mutschler, M. (Manuel); H. Mühlan (Holger); Negru, A. (Ancuta); Nelson, D. (David); E. Neugebauer (Eddy); V.F. Newcombe (Virginia F.); Noirhomme, Q. (Quentin); Nyirádi, J. (József); M. Oddo (Mauro); A.W. Oldenbeuving; M. Oresic (Matej); Ortolano, F. (Fabrizio); A. Palotie (Aarno); P.M. Parizel; Patruno, A. (Adriana); J.-F. Payen (Jean-François); Perera, N. (Natascha); V. Perlbarg (Vincent); Persona, P. (Paolo); Peul, W. (Wilco); N. Pichon (Nicolas); Piilgaard, H. (Henning); A. Piippo (Anna); S.P. Floury (Sébastien Pili); M. Pirinen (Matti); H. Ples (Horia); Polinder, S. (Suzanne); Pomposo, I. (Inigo); M. Psota (Marek); P. Pullens (Pim); L. Puybasset (Louis); A. Ragauskas (Arminas); R. Raj (Rahul); Rambadagalla, M. (Malinka); Rehorcíková, V. (Veronika); J.K.J. Rhodes (Jonathan K.J.); S. Richardson (Sylvia); S. Ripatti (Samuli); S. Rocka (Saulius); Rodier, N. (Nicolas); Roe, C. (Cecilie); Roise, O. (Olav); C.M.A.A. Roks (Gerwin); Romegoux, P. (Pauline); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Rosenfeld, J. (Jeffrey); C. Rosenlund (Christina); G. Rosenthal (Guy); R. Rossaint (Rolf); S. Rossi (Sandra); Rostalski, T. (Tim); D. Rueckert (Daniel); de Ruiz, A.F. (Arcaute Felix); M. Rusnák (Martin); Sacchi, M. (Marco); Sahakian, B. (Barbara); J. Sahuquillo (Juan); O. Sakowitz (Oliver); Sala, F. (Francesca); Sanchez-Pena, P. (Paola); Sanchez-Porras, R. (Renan); Sandor, J. (Janos); Santos, E. (Edgar); N. Sasse (Nadine); Sasu, L. (Luminita); Savo, D. (Davide); I.B. Schipper (Inger); Schlößer, B. (Barbara); S. Schmidt (Silke); Schneider, A. (Annette); H. Schoechl (Herbert); G.G. Schoonman; Rico, F.S. (Frederik Schou); E. Schwendenwein (Elisabeth); Schöll, M. (Michael); Sir, O. (özcan); T. Skandsen (Toril); Smakman, L. (Lidwien); D. Smeets (Dominique); Smielewski, P. (Peter); Sorinola, A. (Abayomi); E. Stamatakis (Emmanuel); S. Stanworth (Simon); Stegemann, K. (Katrin); Steinbüchel, N. (Nicole); R. Stevens (Robert); W. Stewart (William); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); N. Stocchetti (Nino); Sundström, N. (Nina); Synnot, A. (Anneliese); J. Szabó (József); J. Söderberg (Jeannette); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Tamás, V. (Viktória); Tanskanen, P. (Päivi); A. Tascu (Alexandru); Taylor, M.S. (Mark Steven); Te, A.B. (Ao Braden); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Teodorani, G. (Guido); A. Theadom (Alice); Thomas, M. (Matt); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.M. Tolias (Christos M.); Tshibanda, J.-F.L. (Jean-Flory Luaba); Tudora, C.M. (Cristina Maria); P. Vajkoczy (Peter); Valeinis, E. (Egils); Hecke, W.V. (Wim Van); Praag, D.V. (Dominique Van); Dirk, V.R. (Van Roost); Vlierberghe, E.V. (Eline Van); Vyvere, T.V. (Thijs vande); Vanhaudenhuyse, A. (Audrey); A. Vargiolu (Alessia); E. Vega (Emmanuel); J. Verheyden (Jan); Vespa, P.M. (Paul M.); A. Vik (Anne); R. Vilcinis (Rimantas); Vizzino, G. (Giacinta); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); V. Volovici (Victor); P. Vulekovic (Peter); Vámos, Z. (Zoltán); Wade, D. (Derick); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); Wang, L. (Lei); E.D. Wildschut (Enno); G. Williams (Guy); Willumsen, L. (Lisette); Wilson, A. (Adam); Wilson, L. (Lindsay); Winkler, M.K.L. (Maren K.L.); P. Ylén (Peter); Younsi, A. (Alexander); M. Zaaroor (Menashe); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); Zheng, Z. (Zelong); Zumbo, F. (Fabrizio); de Lange, S. (Stefanie); G.C.W. De Ruiter (Godard C.W.); den Boogert, H. (Hugo); van Dijck, J. (Jeroen); T.A. van Essen (T.); C.M. van Heugten (Caroline M.); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. van der Naalt (Joukje)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: No definitive evidence exists on how intracranial hypertension should be treated in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is therefore likely that centers and practitioners individually balance potential benefits and risks of different intracranial pressure (ICP)

  20. Through the patient's eyes: the value of a comprehensive brain tumor center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Adam M; Walbert, Tobias; Mikkelsen, Tom; Kalkanis, Steven N; Rock, Jack; Lee, Ian; Rosenblum, Mark L

    2014-09-01

    Since the founding of the Tumor Section of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) in 1984 much in neurosurgical oncology has changed. More than 40,000 papers have been published on glioma since the arrival of the AANS/CNS Tumor Section. Increasingly, research is focusing on more patient-centered care and quality of life. Preliminary work suggests that a greater emphasis on the patient and caregiver's experience of disease is crucial. Also, the provision of hope and appropriate information and communication with health care providers helps to lessen anxiety and promote improved quality of life. Lastly, our patients need a mechanism for continued symptom control and psychosocial support throughout their experience of this disease. An excellent venue for providing these facets of neurooncological patient care is the multidisciplinary brain tumor board and symptom management team. Herein, we present the philosophy and practice of the Hermelin Brain Tumor Center at the Henry Ford Health System as one type of approach to caring for the patient with a malignant glioma. The authors are aware of several brain tumor centers that share our philosophy and approach to patient care. Our comments are not meant to be exclusive to our experience and should be interpreted as representative of the growing movement in neurosurgery to provide comprehensive, multidisciplinary, patient-centered care.

  1. Academic Mobility as “Brain Drain” Phenomenon of Modern Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svyrydenko Denys

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors examined the challenges of “brain drain” in the context of implementing the ideas of academic mobility in the Ukrainian higher education area. The problem was examined from the point of view of two methodological positions: firstly, in the context of the global trend of globalization, it actualizes the problem globally; secondly, in the context of the contradictions of post-colonial (post-totalitarian, etc. sociocultural landscape of Ukraine, which gives the problem under study a specific nature. The authors proposed a methodological tool for the further study of the problem of social capital loss as a result of the implementation of academic mobility programs.

  2. Neuropsychological factors related to returning to work in patients with higher brain dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Akiko; Hashimoto, Manabu; Okazaki, Tetsuya; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2008-12-01

    We conducted neuropsychological tests of patients with higher brain dysfunction to examine the characteristics of barriers to employment. We tested 92 patients with higher brain dysfunction (average age of 36.3 +/- 13.8 years old, ranging between 16 and 63 years old, with an average post-injury period of 35.6 +/- 67.8 months) who were hospitalized at the university hospital between February 2002 and June 2007 for further neuropsychological evaluation, conducting the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R), the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (RBMT), Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) and Behavioral Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS). The outcomes after discharge were classified between competitive employment, sheltered employment and non-employment, and the three groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance and the Scheffe test. The WAIS-R subtests were mutually compared based on the standard values of significant differences described in the WAIS-R manual. Verbal performance and full scale Intelligence Quotient (IQ) of WAIS-R were 87.7 +/- 15.6 (mean +/- standard deviation), 78.5 +/- 18.1 and 81.0 +/- 17.2, respectively, and verbal memory, visual memory, general memory, attention/concentration and delayed recall were 74.6 +/- 20.0, 76.6 +/- 21.4, 72.0 +/- 20.4, 89.0 +/- 16.5 and 65.2 +/- 20.8, respectively. The competitive employment group showed significantly higher scores in performance IQ and full IQ on the WAIS-R and verbal memory, visual memory, general memory and delayed recall on the WMS-R and RBMT than the non-employment group. The sheltered employment group showed a significantly higher score in delayed recall than the non-employment group. No difference was observed in the FAB or BADS between the three groups. In the subtests of the WAIS-R, the score for Digit Symbol-Coding was significantly lower than almost all the other subtests. For patients with higher brain dysfunction, IQ (full

  3. Equivalence of two independent calculations of the higher order guiding center Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, F. I.; Calvo, I.; Burby, J. W.; Squire, J.; Qin, H.

    2014-01-01

    The difference between the guiding center phase-space Lagrangians derived in J. W. Burby et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072105 (2013)] and F. I. Parra and I. Calvo [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 045001 (2011)] is due to a different definition of the guiding center coordinates. In this brief communication, the difference between the guiding center coordinates is calculated explicitly

  4. Trauma center designation correlates with functional independence after severe but not moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joshua B; Stassen, Nicole A; Cheng, Julius D; Sangosanya, Ayodele T; Bankey, Paul E; Gestring, Mark L

    2010-08-01

    The mortality of traumatic brain injury (TBI) continues to decline, emphasizing functional outcomes. Trauma center designation has been linked to survival after TBI, but the impact on functional outcomes is unclear. The objective was to determine whether trauma center designation influenced functional outcomes after moderate and severe TBI. Trauma subjects presenting to an American College of Surgeons (ACS) Level I or II trauma center with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) independence (FI) defined as a modified functional independence measure (FIM) of 12, and independent expression (IE) defined as a FIM component of 4. These were compared between Level I and Level II centers in subjects with both moderate (GCS 9-12) and severe (GCS center designation was not associated with FI or IE after moderate TBI. ACS trauma center designation is significantly associated with FI and IE after severe, but not moderate TBI. Prospective study is warranted to verify and explore factors contributing to this discrepancy.

  5. [Effects of diabetes and obesity on the higher brain functions in rodents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asato, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kamei, Junzo

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity, have been indicated to disturb the function of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as several peripheral organs. Clinically, it is well recognized that the prevalence of anxiety and depression is higher in diabetic and obesity patients than in the general population. We have recently indicated that streptozotocin-induced diabetic and diet-induced obesity mice have enhanced fear memory and higher anxiety-like behavior in several tests such as the conditioned fear, tail-suspension, hole-board and elevated open-platform tests. The changes in fear memory and anxiety-like behavior of diabetic and obese mice are due to the dysfunction of central glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, which is mediated by the changes of intracellular signaling. These results suggest that metabolic disorders strongly affect the function of the CNS and disturb the higher brain functions. These dysfunctions of the CNS in diabetes and obesity are involved in the increased prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression. Normalization of these dysfunctions in the CNS will be a new attractive target to treat the metabolic disorders and their complications.

  6. Cognitive profile and disorders affecting higher brain functions in paediatric patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaucheret Paz, E; López Ballent, A; Puga, C; García Basalo, M J; Baliarda, F; Ekonen, C; Ilari, R; Agosta, G

    2017-04-18

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common neurocutaneous syndrome often associated with specific cognitive deficits that are rarely monitored during follow-up of these patients. The purpose of our study is two-fold. First, we aimed to describe the cognitive profile of patients with NF1 and detect disorders in higher brain functions associated with the disease. Second, we identified the reasons for consultation associated with school performance in these patients. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of 24 paediatric patients (ages 5 to 16) with NF1 who underwent neuropsychological assessment. The most frequent reasons for consultation were attention deficits (58.33%), learning disorders (25%), poor motor coordination (25%), and language impairment (0.8%). Although 96% of the patients displayed impairments in at least one of the assessed areas, only 83.34% of the parents had reported such impairments. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was present in 58.33% of the patients, whereas 33.33% had nonverbal learning disabilities, 20.83% had expressive language disorder, 8.33% had borderline intellectual functioning, 4.16% had mental retardation, and only 4.16% showed no cognitive impairment. Higher brain functions are frequently impaired in paediatric patients with NF1. Although many parents report such disorders, they can go undetected in some cases. Neuropsychological assessment is recommended for all paediatric patients with NF1 to detect cognitive impairment and provide early, effective rehabilitation treatment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Higher Control of the Oculomotor System in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Chrystalina A; Rebelo, Pedro; Kennard, Christopher; Aziz, Tipu Z; Green, Alexander L; FitzGerald, James J

    2015-09-23

    The frontal cortex and basal ganglia form a set of parallel but mostly segregated circuits called cortico-basal ganglia loops. The oculomotor loop controls eye movements and can direct relatively simple movements, such as reflexive prosaccades, without external help but needs input from "higher" loops for more complex behaviors. The antisaccade task requires the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which is part of the prefrontal loop. Information flows from prefrontal to oculomotor circuits in the striatum, and directional errors in this task can be considered a measure of failure of prefrontal control over the oculomotor loop. The antisaccadic error rate (AER) is increased in Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has no effect on the AER, but a previous case suggested that DBS of the globus pallidus interna (GPi) might. Our aim was to compare the effects of STN DBS and GPi DBS on the AER. We tested eye movements in 14 human DBS patients and 10 controls. GPi DBS substantially reduced the AER, restoring lost higher control over oculomotor function. Interloop information flow involves striatal neurons that receive cortical input and project to pallidum. They are normally silent when quiescent, but in PD they fire randomly, creating noise that may account for the degradation in interloop control. The reduced AER with GPi DBS could be explained by retrograde stimulation of striatopallidal axons with consequent activation of inhibitory collaterals and reduction in background striatal firing rates. This study may help explain aspects of PD pathophysiology and the mechanism of action of GPi DBS. Significance statement: Parkinson's disease causes symptoms including stiffness, slowness of movement, and tremor. Electrical stimulation of specific areas deep in the brain can effectively treat these symptoms, but exactly how is not fully understood. Part of the cause of such symptoms may be impairments in the way information flows

  8. Initial constructs for patient-centered outcome measures to evaluate brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Elena M; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Peters, Betts; Patrick, Donald L

    2016-10-01

    The authors describe preliminary work toward the creation of patient-centered outcome (PCO) measures to evaluate brain-computer interface (BCI) as an assistive technology (AT) for individuals with severe speech and physical impairments (SSPI). In Phase 1, 591 items from 15 existing measures were mapped to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). In Phase 2, qualitative interviews were conducted with eight people with SSPI and seven caregivers. Resulting text data were coded in an iterative analysis. Most items (79%) were mapped to the ICF environmental domain; over half (53%) were mapped to more than one domain. The ICF framework was well suited for mapping items related to body functions and structures, but less so for items in other areas, including personal factors. Two constructs emerged from qualitative data: quality of life (QOL) and AT. Component domains and themes were identified for each. Preliminary constructs, domains and themes were generated for future PCO measures relevant to BCI. Existing instruments are sufficient for initial items but do not adequately match the values of people with SSPI and their caregivers. Field methods for interviewing people with SSPI were successful, and support the inclusion of these individuals in PCO research. Implications for Rehabilitation Adapted interview methods allow people with severe speech and physical impairments to participate in patient-centered outcomes research. Patient-centered outcome measures are needed to evaluate the clinical implementation of brain-computer interface as an assistive technology.

  9. Degree-based statistic and center persistency for brain connectivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Kwangsun; Lee, Peter; Chung, Moo K; Sohn, William S; Chung, Sun Ju; Na, Duk L; Ju, Daheen; Jeong, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Brain connectivity analyses have been widely performed to investigate the organization and functioning of the brain, or to observe changes in neurological or psychiatric conditions. However, connectivity analysis inevitably introduces the problem of mass-univariate hypothesis testing. Although, several cluster-wise correction methods have been suggested to address this problem and shown to provide high sensitivity, these approaches fundamentally have two drawbacks: the lack of spatial specificity (localization power) and the arbitrariness of an initial cluster-forming threshold. In this study, we propose a novel method, degree-based statistic (DBS), performing cluster-wise inference. DBS is designed to overcome the above-mentioned two shortcomings. From a network perspective, a few brain regions are of critical importance and considered to play pivotal roles in network integration. Regarding this notion, DBS defines a cluster as a set of edges of which one ending node is shared. This definition enables the efficient detection of clusters and their center nodes. Furthermore, a new measure of a cluster, center persistency (CP) was introduced. The efficiency of DBS with a known "ground truth" simulation was demonstrated. Then they applied DBS to two experimental datasets and showed that DBS successfully detects the persistent clusters. In conclusion, by adopting a graph theoretical concept of degrees and borrowing the concept of persistence from algebraic topology, DBS could sensitively identify clusters with centric nodes that would play pivotal roles in an effect of interest. DBS is potentially widely applicable to variable cognitive or clinical situations and allows us to obtain statistically reliable and easily interpretable results. Hum Brain Mapp 38:165-181, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Financing Public Higher Education: The Impact of Responsibility Center Management on a Public Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, David J.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the impacts on public universities of implementing an incentive-based budgeting system, this dissertation focuses on one university's extensive experience with Responsibility Center Management. The financial and non-financial impacts of Responsibility Center Management will be considered by examining the extent to which commonly held…

  11. Whatever works: a systematic user-centered training protocol to optimize brain-computer interfacing individually.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth V C Friedrich

    Full Text Available This study implemented a systematic user-centered training protocol for a 4-class brain-computer interface (BCI. The goal was to optimize the BCI individually in order to achieve high performance within few sessions for all users. Eight able-bodied volunteers, who were initially naïve to the use of a BCI, participated in 10 sessions over a period of about 5 weeks. In an initial screening session, users were asked to perform the following seven mental tasks while multi-channel EEG was recorded: mental rotation, word association, auditory imagery, mental subtraction, spatial navigation, motor imagery of the left hand and motor imagery of both feet. Out of these seven mental tasks, the best 4-class combination as well as most reactive frequency band (between 8-30 Hz was selected individually for online control. Classification was based on common spatial patterns and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis. The number and time of classifier updates varied individually. Selection speed was increased by reducing trial length. To minimize differences in brain activity between sessions with and without feedback, sham feedback was provided in the screening and calibration runs in which usually no real-time feedback is shown. Selected task combinations and frequency ranges differed between users. The tasks that were included in the 4-class combination most often were (1 motor imagery of the left hand (2, one brain-teaser task (word association or mental subtraction (3, mental rotation task and (4 one more dynamic imagery task (auditory imagery, spatial navigation, imagery of the feet. Participants achieved mean performances over sessions of 44-84% and peak performances in single-sessions of 58-93% in this user-centered 4-class BCI protocol. This protocol is highly adjustable to individual users and thus could increase the percentage of users who can gain and maintain BCI control. A high priority for future work is to examine this protocol with severely

  12. Variation in Structure and Process of Care in Traumatic Brain Injury: Provider Profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers Participating in the CENTER-TBI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryse C Cnossen

    Full Text Available The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map the existing variation. The aim of current study is to quantify variation in general structural and process characteristics among centers participating in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI study.We designed a set of 11 provider profiling questionnaires with 321 questions about various aspects of TBI care, chosen based on literature and expert opinion. After pilot testing, questionnaires were disseminated to 71 centers from 20 countries participating in the CENTER-TBI study. Reliability of questionnaires was estimated by calculating a concordance rate among 5% duplicate questions.All 71 centers completed the questionnaires. Median concordance rate among duplicate questions was 0.85. The majority of centers were academic hospitals (n = 65, 92%, designated as a level I trauma center (n = 48, 68% and situated in an urban location (n = 70, 99%. The availability of facilities for neuro-trauma care varied across centers; e.g. 40 (57% had a dedicated neuro-intensive care unit (ICU, 36 (51% had an in-hospital rehabilitation unit and the organization of the ICU was closed in 64% (n = 45 of the centers. In addition, we found wide variation in processes of care, such as the ICU admission policy and intracranial pressure monitoring policy among centers.Even among high-volume, specialized neurotrauma centers there is substantial variation in structures and processes of TBI care. This variation provides an opportunity to study effectiveness of specific aspects of TBI care and to identify best practices with CER approaches.

  13. Culture Centers in Higher Education: Perspectives on Identity, Theory, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Lori D., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This book fills a significant void in the research on ethnic minority cultural centers, offers the historic background to their establishment and development, considers the circumstances that led to their creation, examines the roles they play on campus, explores their impact on retention and campus climate, and provides guidelines for their…

  14. Strategizing for the Future: Evolving Cultural Resource Centers in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Yen Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cultural resource centers have been an ongoing and integral component to creating a more welcoming campus climate for Students of Color since its establishment in the 1960s. While the racial dynamics may have changed, many of the challenges Students of Color faced on predominantly White campuses have not. Interestingly, cultural resource centers…

  15. The Agendas of Distance Teaching Universities: Moving from the Margins to the Center Stage of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri-Rosenblit, Sarah

    1999-01-01

    Examined from a comparative perspective the extent to which the agendas of distance teaching universities have moved from the margins to the center stage of higher education. Demonstrates that the boundaries between distance and campus universities are blurring and converging, and that future relations between them will be marked by competition…

  16. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Preetinder S; Gill, Tejkaran S; Kamath, Ashwini; Whisnant, Billy

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms) are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving health care-related literature and, in turn, promoting health literacy. Based on the comprehensive literature review and assessment of the 40 documents associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury, recommendations have been made for improving the readability, suitability, and usability of health care-related documents. The recommendations are

  17. GeoBrain for Facilitating Earth Science Education in Higher-Education Institutes--Experience and Lessons-learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, M.; di, L.

    2007-12-01

    Data integration and analysis are the foundation for the scientific investigation in Earth science. In the past several decades, huge amounts of Earth science data have been collected mainly through remote sensing. Those data have become the treasure for Earth science research. Training students how to discover and use the huge volume of Earth science data in research become one of the most important trainings for making a student a qualified scientist. Being developed by a NASA funded project, the GeoBrain system has adopted and implemented the latest Web services and knowledge management technologies for providing innovative methods in publishing, accessing, visualizing, and analyzing geospatial data and in building/sharing geoscience knowledge. It provides a data-rich online learning and research environment enabled by wealthy data and information available at NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Students, faculty members, and researchers from institutes worldwide can easily access, analyze, and model with the huge amount of NASA EOS data just like they possess such vast resources locally at their desktops. Although still in development, the GeoBrain system has been operational since 2005. A number of education materials have been developed for facilitating the use of GeoBrain as a powerful education tool for Earth science education at both undergraduate and graduate levels. Thousands of online higher-education users worldwide have used GeoBrain services. A number of faculty members in multiple universities have been funded as GeoBrain education partners to explore the use of GeoBrain in the classroom teaching and student research. By summarizing and analyzing the feedbacks from the online users and the education partners, this presentation presents the user experiences on using GeoBrain in Earth science teaching and research. The feedbacks on classroom use of GeoBrain have demonstrated that GeoBrain is very useful for

  18. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder S Gill,1 Tejkaran S Gill,2 Ashwini Kamath,3 Billy Whisnant41College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI; 2College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 3School of Information, University of Texas, Austin, TX; 4College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USAAbstract: Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving

  19. On the Margins or at the Center? Distance Education in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junhong

    2018-01-01

    This reflection focuses on the position of distance education in today's global higher education. Firstly, it identifies three types of convergence of distance and campus-based education--dual mode, add-on/blended, and full convergence--arguing that the last type has yet to be fully realized due to the complexities involved. It then critiques the…

  20. Academic Brain Drain: Impact and Implications for Public Higher Education Quality in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, George O.

    2013-01-01

    The flight of human capital is a phenomenon that has been of concern to academics and development practitioners for decades. Unfortunately, there is no systematic record of the number of skilled professionals that many African countries have continued to lose to the developed world. Termed the "brain drain", it represents the loss of…

  1. Heart transplant centers with multidisciplinary team show a higher level of chronic illness management - Findings from the International BRIGHT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajita, Maan Isabella; Baumgartner, Eva; Berben, Lut; Denhaerynck, Kris; Helmy, Remon; Schönfeld, Sandra; Berger, Gabriele; Vetter, Christine; Dobbels, Fabienne; Russell, Cynthia L; De Geest, Sabina

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) explore the proportion of HTx centers that have a multidisciplinary team and (2) assess the relationship between multidisciplinarity and the level of chronic illness management (CIM). The International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) recommends a multidisciplinary approach in heart transplant (HTx) follow-up care but little is known regarding the proportion of HTx centers that meet this recommendation and the impact on patient care. HTx centers with a multidisciplinary team may offer higher levels of CIM, a care model that has the potential to improve outcomes after HTx. We conducted a secondary analysis of the BRIGHT study, a cross-sectional study in 11 countries. Multidisciplinarity in the 36 HTx centers was assessed through HTx director reports and was defined as having a team that was composed of physician(s), nurse(s), and another healthcare professional (either a social worker, psychiatrist, psychologist, pharmacist, dietician, physical therapist, or occupational therapist). CIM was assessed with the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC). Multiple linear regression assessed the relationship between multidisciplinarity and the level of CIM. Twenty-nine (80.6%) of the HTx centers had a multidisciplinary team. Furthermore, multidisciplinarity was significantly associated with higher levels of CIM (β = 5.2, P = 0.042). Majority of the HTx centers follows the ISHLT recommendation for a multidisciplinary approach. Multidisciplinarity was associated with CIM and point toward a structural factor that needs to be in place for moving toward CIM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term memory shapes the primary olfactory center of an insect brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourcade, Benoît; Perisse, Emmanuel; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2009-10-01

    The storage of stable memories is generally considered to rely on changes in the functional properties and/or the synaptic connectivity of neural networks. However, these changes are not easily tractable given the complexity of the learning procedures and brain circuits studied. Such a search can be narrowed down by studying memories of specific stimuli in a given sensory modality and by working on networks with a modular and relatively simple organization. We have therefore focused on associative memories of individual odors and the possible related changes in the honeybee primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL). As this brain structure is organized in well-identified morpho-functional units, the glomeruli, we looked for evidence of structural and functional plasticity in these units in relation with the bees' ability to store long-term memories (LTMs) of specific odors. Restrained bees were trained to form an odor-specific LTM in an appetitive Pavlovian conditioning protocol. The stability and specificity of this memory was tested behaviorally 3 d after conditioning. At that time, we performed both a structural and a functional analysis on a subset of 17 identified glomeruli by measuring glomerular volume under confocal microscopy, and odor-evoked activity, using in vivo calcium imaging. We show that long-term olfactory memory for a given odor is associated with volume increases in a subset of glomeruli. Independent of these structural changes, odor-evoked activity was not modified. Lastly, we show that structural glomerular plasticity can be predicted based on a putative model of interglomerular connections.

  3. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V.; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A.; Obukhov, Dmitry K.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  4. Evaluation of higher brain function by MRI. Flow measurement in the superior sagittal sinus using phase contrast method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Mototsugu

    1997-01-01

    To assess the higher brain function, flow measurement in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) was performed noninvasively using a phase contrast MRI in 76 patients with suspicious of impaired higher brain function including dementias (senile dementia of Alzheimer type; SDAT and multi-infarct dementia; MID), strokes, and others. Thirty-one normal controls were consisted of 18 healthy volunteers and 13 patients with tension headache whose higher brain function was proved be normal. Mean flow velocity was measured in the distal portion of the SSS adjoining to the occipital lobes and was multiplied by cross-sectional area of the SSS at the measuring point to obtain mean flow volume. For intellectual index, cross-cultural cognitive examination (CCCE) was applied to all cases excluding volunteers. Normal value of SSS flow volume measured by MRI was 6.92±0.66 ml/s. Significant differences in both SSS flow and CCCE score from normal controls were found in SDAT group, MID group, and non-dementia group. No substantial differences between SDAT group and MID group were noted in both CCCE score and SSS flow. In normal controls, there was no correlation between SSS flow and age, whereas, significant inverse correlation of SSS flow with age was found in all cases. Between CCCE score and SSS flow, there were nearly linear relationships in all cases, SDAT group, MID group, and non-dementia group. Significant but relatively poor correlation was found in normals. (K.H.)

  5. Connecting Learning: Brain-Based Strategies for Linking Prior Knowledge in the Library Media Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Kathi L.

    2005-01-01

    The brain is a complex organ and learning is a complex process. While there is not complete agreement among researchers about brain-based learning and its direct connection to neuroscience, knowledge about the brain as well as the examination of cognitive psychology, anthropology, professional experience, and educational research can provide…

  6. User-centered design in brain-computer interfaces-a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Martijn; Riccio, Angela; Risetti, Monica; Dähne, Sven; Ramsay, Andrew; Williamson, John; Mattia, Donatella; Tangermann, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The array of available brain-computer interface (BCI) paradigms has continued to grow, and so has the corresponding set of machine learning methods which are at the core of BCI systems. The latter have evolved to provide more robust data analysis solutions, and as a consequence the proportion of healthy BCI users who can use a BCI successfully is growing. With this development the chances have increased that the needs and abilities of specific patients, the end-users, can be covered by an existing BCI approach. However, most end-users who have experienced the use of a BCI system at all have encountered a single paradigm only. This paradigm is typically the one that is being tested in the study that the end-user happens to be enrolled in, along with other end-users. Though this corresponds to the preferred study arrangement for basic research, it does not ensure that the end-user experiences a working BCI. In this study, a different approach was taken; that of a user-centered design. It is the prevailing process in traditional assistive technology. Given an individual user with a particular clinical profile, several available BCI approaches are tested and - if necessary - adapted to him/her until a suitable BCI system is found. Described is the case of a 48-year-old woman who suffered from an ischemic brain stem stroke, leading to a severe motor- and communication deficit. She was enrolled in studies with two different BCI systems before a suitable system was found. The first was an auditory event-related potential (ERP) paradigm and the second a visual ERP paradigm, both of which are established in literature. The auditory paradigm did not work successfully, despite favorable preconditions. The visual paradigm worked flawlessly, as found over several sessions. This discrepancy in performance can possibly be explained by the user's clinical deficit in several key neuropsychological indicators, such as attention and working memory. While the auditory paradigm relies

  7. Three-dimensional inversion recovery manganese-enhanced MRI of mouse brain using super-resolution reconstruction to visualize nuclei involved in higher brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Dana S; Plenge, Esben; Poot, Dirk H J; Lakke, Egbert A J F; Niessen, Wiro J; Meijering, Erik; van der Weerd, Louise

    2014-07-01

    The visualization of activity in mouse brain using inversion recovery spin echo (IR-SE) manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides unique contrast, but suffers from poor resolution in the slice-encoding direction. Super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) is a resolution-enhancing post-processing technique in which multiple low-resolution slice stacks are combined into a single volume of high isotropic resolution using computational methods. In this study, we investigated, first, whether SRR can improve the three-dimensional resolution of IR-SE MEMRI in the slice selection direction, whilst maintaining or improving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the two-dimensional slice stacks. Second, the contrast-to-noise ratio of SRR IR-SE MEMRI was compared with a conventional three-dimensional gradient echo (GE) acquisition. Quantitative experiments were performed on a phantom containing compartments of various manganese concentrations. The results showed that, with comparable scan times, the signal-to-noise ratio of three-dimensional GE acquisition is higher than that of SRR IR-SE MEMRI. However, the contrast-to-noise ratio between different compartments can be superior with SRR IR-SE MEMRI, depending on the chosen inversion time. In vivo experiments were performed in mice receiving manganese using an implanted osmotic pump. The results showed that SRR works well as a resolution-enhancing technique in IR-SE MEMRI experiments. In addition, the SRR image also shows a number of brain structures that are more clearly discernible from the surrounding tissues than in three-dimensional GE acquisition, including a number of nuclei with specific higher brain functions, such as memory, stress, anxiety and reward behavior. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Detecting Brain State Changes via Fiber-Centered Functional Connectivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Lim, Chulwoo; Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been widely used to study structural and functional brain connectivity in recent years. A common assumption used in many previous functional brain connectivity studies is the temporal stationarity. However, accumulating literature evidence has suggested that functional brain connectivity is under temporal dynamic changes in different time scales. In this paper, a novel and intuitive approach is proposed to model and detect dynamic changes of functional brain states based on multimodal fMRI/DTI data. The basic idea is that functional connectivity patterns of all fiber-connected cortical voxels are concatenated into a descriptive functional feature vector to represent the brain’s state, and the temporal change points of brain states are decided by detecting the abrupt changes of the functional vector patterns via the sliding window approach. Our extensive experimental results have shown that meaningful brain state change points can be detected in task-based fMRI/DTI, resting state fMRI/DTI, and natural stimulus fMRI/DTI data sets. Particularly, the detected change points of functional brain states in task-based fMRI corresponded well to the external stimulus paradigm administered to the participating subjects, thus partially validating the proposed brain state change detection approach. The work in this paper provides novel perspective on the dynamic behaviors of functional brain connectivity and offers a starting point for future elucidation of the complex patterns of functional brain interactions and dynamics. PMID:22941508

  9. Complications of Impulse Generator Exchange Surgery for Deep Brain Stimulation: A Single-Center, Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmers, Ann-Kristin; Lübbing, Isabel; Birkenfeld, Falk; Witt, Karsten; Synowitz, Michael; Mehdorn, Hubertus Maximilian; Falk, Daniela

    2018-05-01

    Nonrechargeable deep brain stimulation impulse generators (IGs) with low or empty battery status require surgical IG exchange several years after initial implantation. The aim of this study was to investigate complication rates after IG exchange surgery and identify risk factors. We retrospectively analyzed complications following IG exchange surgery from 2008 to 2015 in our department. Medical records of all patients who underwent IG exchange surgery were systematically reviewed. The shortest follow-up time was 19 months. From 2008 to 2015, 438 IGs were exchanged in 319 patients. Overall complication rate was 8.90%. Infection developed in 12 patients (2.74%). Six patients (1.37%) experienced local wound erosions. Hardware malfunctions were present in 11 patients (2.51%), and local hemorrhage was observed in 3 cases (0.68%). Repeated fixation of the IG was required in 2 patients (0.46%). Traction of the connecting cables necessitated surgical revision in 2 patients (0.46%). In 2 cases (0.46%), the IG was placed abdominally or exchanged for a smaller device owing to patient discomfort resulting from the initial positioning. One 80-year-old patient (0.23%) had severely worsening heart failure and died 4 days after IG exchange surgery. IG exchange surgery, although often considered a minor surgery, was associated with a complication rate of approximately 9% in our center. Patients and physicians should understand the complication rates associated with IG exchange surgery because this information might facilitate selection of a rechargeable IG. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. BRAIN METASTASES OF GERM CELL TUMORS. THE RUSSIAN CANCER RESEARCH CENTER'S EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tryakin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the experience in treating 20 patients with nonseminomatous germ cell tumors metastasizing to the brain. It presents brain metastasis-associated factors: multiple lung metastases; IGCCCG poor prognosis; and a baseline human chorionic gonadotropin level of > 50000 mIU/ml. The authors have identified a group to be screened for brain metastasis, which includes patients with intermediate/poor prognosis and multiple lung metastases. Long-term survival was achieved in 45 % of patients with baseline brain damage and in 22 % of those with metastases revealed after first-line chemotherapy. The positive prognostic factors associated with long-term survival were a single brain lesion, no neurological symptoms, and achievement of clinical complete personse in the brain.

  11. Brain Drain and the Disenchantment of Being a Higher Education Student in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeira, Luísa; Machado-Taylor, Maria de Lourdes; Cabrito, Belmiro; Patrocínio, Tomás; Brites, Rui; Gomes, Rui; Lopes, João Teixeira; Vaz, Henrique; Peixoto, Paulo; Magalhães, Dulce; Silva, Sílvia; Ganga, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    The efforts made by most countries to accelerate economic development have included a significant investment in education. It has been argued that investment in education, particularly higher education, was itself a potential factor in economic development. Education has become a relatively easy means of improving access to the labour market.…

  12. A qualitative study adopting a user-centered approach to design and validate a brain computer interface for cognitive rehabilitation for people with brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Armstrong, Elaine; Thomson, Eileen; Vargiu, Eloisa; Solà, Marc; Dauwalder, Stefan; Miralles, Felip; Daly Lynn, Jean

    2017-07-14

    Cognitive rehabilitation is established as a core intervention within rehabilitation programs following a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Digitally enabled assistive technologies offer opportunities for clinicians to increase remote access to rehabilitation supporting transition into home. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) systems can harness the residual abilities of individuals with limited function to gain control over computers through their brain waves. This paper presents an online cognitive rehabilitation application developed with therapists, to work remotely with people who have TBI, who will use BCI at home to engage in the therapy. A qualitative research study was completed with people who are community dwellers post brain injury (end users), and a cohort of therapists involved in cognitive rehabilitation. A user-centered approach over three phases in the development, design and feasibility testing of this cognitive rehabilitation application included two tasks (Find-a-Category and a Memory Card task). The therapist could remotely prescribe activity with different levels of difficulty. The service user had a home interface which would present the therapy activities. This novel work was achieved by an international consortium of academics, business partners and service users.

  13. Adult sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important public health concern estimated to affect 300,000 to 3.8 million people annually in the United States. Although injuries to professional athletes dominate the media, this group represents only a small proportion of the overall population. Here, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in adults from a community-based trauma population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from adults (age ≥ 18 years) across 5 sporting categories-fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were documented in the NTDB, which represented 18,310 incidents nationally. Equestrian sports were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (45.2%). Mild TBI represented nearly 86% of injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) were 4.25 ± 0.09 days and 1.60 ± 0.06 days, respectively. The mortality rate was 3.0% across all patients, but was statistically higher in TBI from roller sports (4.1%) and aquatic sports (7.7%). Age, hypotension on admission to the emergency department (ED), and the severity of head and extracranial injuries were statistically significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Traumatic brain injury during aquatic sports was similarly associated with prolonged ICU and hospital LOSs, medical complications, and failure to be discharged to

  14. Maternal obesity reprograms offspring's executive brain centers in a sex-specific manner?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plucińska, Kaja; Barger, Steven W

    2018-01-01

    . The group found that high-fat diet feeding in utero increases weight gain in offspring and dynamically alters DNA methylation in the PFC of male but not female brains. These epigenetic marks were associated with a shift in brain one-carbon metabolism (folate and methionine) intermediates and were normalized...

  15. Revised and updated recommendations for the establishment of primary stroke centers: a summary statement from the brain attack coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J; Latchaw, Richard E; Jagoda, Andy; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Crocco, Todd; George, Mary G; Connolly, E S; Mancini, Barbara; Prudhomme, Stephen; Gress, Daryl; Jensen, Mary E; Bass, Robert; Ruff, Robert; Foell, Kathy; Armonda, Rocco A; Emr, Marian; Warren, Margo; Baranski, Jim; Walker, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    The formation and certification of Primary Stroke Centers has progressed rapidly since the Brain Attack Coalition's original recommendations in 2000. The purpose of this article is to revise and update our recommendations for Primary Stroke Centers to reflect the latest data and experience. We conducted a literature review using MEDLINE and PubMed from March 2000 to January 2011. The review focused on studies that were relevant for acute stroke diagnosis, treatment, and care. Original references as well as meta-analyses and other care guidelines were also reviewed and included if found to be valid and relevant. Levels of evidence were added to reflect current guideline development practices. Based on the literature review and experience at Primary Stroke Centers, the importance of some elements has been further strengthened, and several new areas have been added. These include (1) the importance of acute stroke teams; (2) the importance of Stroke Units with telemetry monitoring; (3) performance of brain imaging with MRI and diffusion-weighted sequences; (4) assessment of cerebral vasculature with MR angiography or CT angiography; (5) cardiac imaging; (6) early initiation of rehabilitation therapies; and (7) certification by an independent body, including a site visit and disease performance measures. Based on the evidence, several elements of Primary Stroke Centers are particularly important for improving the care of patients with an acute stroke. Additional elements focus on imaging of the brain, the cerebral vasculature, and the heart. These new elements may improve the care and outcomes for patients with stroke cared for at a Primary Stroke Center.

  16. Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    & Development (LDRD) National Security Education Center (NSEC) Office of Science Programs Richard P Databases National Security Education Center (NSEC) Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Scholarships STEM Education Programs Teachers (K-12) Students (K-12) Higher Education Regional Education

  17. The musical centers of the brain: Vladimir E. Larionov (1857-1929) and the functional neuroanatomy of auditory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triarhou, Lazaros C; Verina, Tatyana

    2016-11-01

    In 1899 a landmark paper entitled "On the musical centers of the brain" was published in Pflügers Archiv, based on work carried out in the Anatomo-Physiological Laboratory of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic of Vladimir M. Bekhterev (1857-1927) in St. Petersburg, Imperial Russia. The author of that paper was Vladimir E. Larionov (1857-1929), a military doctor and devoted brain scientist, who pursued the problem of the localization of function in the canine and human auditory cortex. His data detailed the existence of tonotopy in the temporal lobe and further demonstrated centrifugal auditory pathways emanating from the auditory cortex and directed to the opposite hemisphere and lower brain centers. Larionov's discoveries have been largely considered as findings of the Bekhterev school. Perhaps this is why there are limited resources on Larionov, especially keeping in mind his military medical career and the fact that after 1917 he just seems to have practiced otorhinolaryngology in Odessa. Larionov died two years after Bekhterev's mysterious death of 1927. The present study highlights the pioneering contributions of Larionov to auditory neuroscience, trusting that the life and work of Vladimir Efimovich will finally, and deservedly, emerge from the shadow of his celebrated master, Vladimir Mikhailovich. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Higher-order Brain Areas Associated with Real-time Functional MRI Neurofeedback Training of the Somato-motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Tibor; Dewiputri, Wan Ilma; Frahm, Jens; Schweizer, Renate

    2018-05-15

    Neurofeedback (NFB) allows subjects to learn self-regulation of neuronal brain activation based on information about the ongoing activation. The implementation of real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) for NFB training now facilitates the investigation into underlying processes. Our study involved 16 control and 16 training right-handed subjects, the latter performing an extensive rt-fMRI NFB training using motor imagery. A previous analysis focused on the targeted primary somato-motor cortex (SMC). The present study extends the analysis to the supplementary motor area (SMA), the next higher brain area within the hierarchy of the motor system. We also examined transfer-related functional connectivity using a whole-volume psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis to reveal brain areas associated with learning. The ROI analysis of the pre- and post-training fMRI data for motor imagery without NFB (transfer) resulted in a significant training-specific increase in the SMA. It could also be shown that the contralateral SMA exhibited a larger increase than the ipsilateral SMA in the training and the transfer runs, and that the right-hand training elicited a larger increase in the transfer runs than the left-hand training. The PPI analysis revealed a training-specific increase in transfer-related functional connectivity between the left SMA and frontal areas as well as the anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC) for right- and left-hand trainings. Moreover, the transfer success was related with training-specific increase in functional connectivity between the left SMA and the target area SMC. Our study demonstrates that NFB training increases functional connectivity with non-targeted brain areas. These are associated with the training strategy (i.e., SMA) as well as with learning the NFB skill (i.e., aMCC and frontal areas). This detailed description of both the system to be trained and the areas involved in learning can provide valuable information

  19. Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy of brain tissue with higher ranking data classification for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohling, Christoph; Bocklitz, Thomas; Duarte, Alex S.; Emmanuello, Cinzia; Ishikawa, Mariana S.; Dietzeck, Benjamin; Buckup, Tiago; Uckermann, Ortrud; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Motzkus, Marcus

    2017-06-01

    Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) microscopy was carried out to map a solid tumor in mouse brain tissue. The border between normal and tumor tissue was visualized using support vector machines (SVM) as a higher ranking type of data classification. Training data were collected separately in both tissue types, and the image contrast is based on class affiliation of the single spectra. Color coding in the image generated by SVM is then related to pathological information instead of single spectral intensities or spectral differences within the data set. The results show good agreement with the H&E stained reference and spontaneous Raman microscopy, proving the validity of the MCARS approach in combination with SVM.

  20. MRI brain findings in ephedrone encephalopathy associated with manganese abuse: Single-center perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poniatowska, Renata; Lusawa, Małgorzata; Skierczyńska, Agnieszka; Makowicz, Grzegorz; Habrat, Bogusław; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a well-known toxic agent causing symptoms of parkinsonism in employees of certain branches of industry. Home production of a psychostimulant ephedrone (methcathinone), involving the use of potassium permanganate, became a new cause of intoxications in Poland. This article presents clinical symptoms, initial brain MRI findings and characteristics of changes observed in follow-up examinations in 4 patients with manganese intoxication associated with intravenous administration of ephedrone. All patients in our case series presented symptoms of parkinsonism. T1-WI MRI revealed high intensity signal in globi pallidi in all patients; hyperintense lesions in midbrain were observed in three patients, while lesions located in cerebellar hemispheres and pituitary gland in just one patient. The reduction of signal intensity in the affected brain structures was observed in follow-up studies, with no significant improvement in clinical symptoms. Brain MRI is helpful in the assessment of distribution as well as dynamics of changes in ephedrone encephalopathy. Regression of signal intensity changes visible in brain MRI is not associated with clinical condition improvement. Although brain MRI findings are not characteristic for ephedrone encephalopathy, they may contribute to diagnosing this condition

  1. Ghrelin modulates the fMRI BOLD response of homeostatic and hedonic brain centers regulating energy balance in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Sárvári

    Full Text Available The orexigenic gut-brain peptide, ghrelin and its G-protein coupled receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1A are pivotal regulators of hypothalamic feeding centers and reward processing neuronal circuits of the brain. These systems operate in a cooperative manner and receive a wide array of neuronal hormone/transmitter messages and metabolic signals. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed in the current study to map BOLD responses to ghrelin in different brain regions with special reference on homeostatic and hedonic regulatory centers of energy balance. Experimental groups involved male, ovariectomized female and ovariectomized estradiol-replaced rats. Putative modulation of ghrelin signaling by endocannabinoids was also studied. Ghrelin-evoked effects were calculated as mean of the BOLD responses 30 minutes after administration. In the male rat, ghrelin evoked a slowly decreasing BOLD response in all studied regions of interest (ROI within the limbic system. This effect was antagonized by pretreatment with GHS-R1A antagonist JMV2959. The comparison of ghrelin effects in the presence or absence of JMV2959 in individual ROIs revealed significant changes in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens of the telencephalon, and also within hypothalamic centers like the lateral hypothalamus, ventromedial nucleus, paraventricular nucleus and suprachiasmatic nucleus. In the female rat, the ghrelin effects were almost identical to those observed in males. Ovariectomy and chronic estradiol replacement had no effect on the BOLD response. Inhibition of the endocannabinoid signaling by rimonabant significantly attenuated the response of the nucleus accumbens and septum. In summary, ghrelin can modulate hypothalamic and mesolimbic structures controlling energy balance in both sexes. The endocannabinoid signaling system contributes to the manifestation of ghrelin's BOLD effect in a region specific manner. In females, the

  2. Incidence of adult brain cancers is higher in countries where the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is common

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Frédéric; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Brodeur, Jacques; Elguero, Eric; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Missé, Dorothée

    2011-01-01

    We explored associations between the common protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and brain cancers in human populations. We predicted that T. gondii could increase the risk of brain cancer because it is a long-lived parasite that encysts in the brain, where it provokes inflammation and inhibits apoptosis. We used a medical geography approach based on the national incidence of brain cancers and seroprevalence of T. gondii. We corrected reports of incidence for national gross domestic product b...

  3. Long-Term Memory Shapes the Primary Olfactory Center of an Insect Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourcade, Benoit; Perisse, Emmanuel; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2009-01-01

    The storage of stable memories is generally considered to rely on changes in the functional properties and/or the synaptic connectivity of neural networks. However, these changes are not easily tractable given the complexity of the learning procedures and brain circuits studied. Such a search can be narrowed down by studying memories of specific…

  4. Higher frequency of brain abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Li-Na; Zhang, Min; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Jing-Yao

    2016-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder often co-exists with primary Sjögren's syndrome. We compared the clinical features of 16 neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients with ( n = 6) or without primary Sjögren's syndrome ( n = 10). All patients underwent extensive clinical, laboratory, and MRI evaluations. There were no statistical differences in demographics or first neurological involvement at onset between neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients with and without primary Sjögren's syndrome. The laboratory findings of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal banding, serum C-reactive protein, antinuclear autoantibody, anti-Sjögren's-syndrome-related antigen A antibodies, anti-Sjögren's-syndrome-related antigen B antibodies, and anti-Sm antibodies were significantly higher in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome than those without. Anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies were detectable in 67% (4/6) of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and in 60% (6/10) of patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome. More brain abnormalities were observed in patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome than in those with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Segments lesions (> 3 centrum) were noted in 50% (5/10) of patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome and in 67% (4/6) of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. These findings indicate that the clinical characteristics of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients with and without primary Sjögren's syndrome are similar. However, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome have a high frequency of brain abnormalities.

  5. Patients' perspective on awake craniotomy for brain tumors-single center experience in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Rafael Teixeira Magalhaes; da Fonseca, Clovis Orlando; Landeiro, Jose Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Awake craniotomy with brain mapping is the gold standard for eloquent tissue localization. Patients' tolerability and satisfaction have been shown to be high; however, it is a matter of debate whether these findings could be generalized, since patients across the globe have their own cultural backgrounds and may perceive and accept this procedure differently. We conducted a prospective qualitative study about the perception and tolerability of awake craniotomy in a population of consecutive brain tumor patients in Brazil between January 2013 and April 2015. Seventeen patients were interviewed using a semi-structured model with open-ended questions. Patients' thoughts were grouped into five categories: (1) overall perception: no patient considered awake craniotomy a bad experience, and most understood the rationale behind it. They were positively surprised with the surgery; (2) memory: varied from nothing to the entire surgery; (3) negative sensations: in general, it was painless and comfortable. Remarks concerning discomfort on the operating table were made; (4) postoperative recovery: perception of the postoperative period was positive; (5) previous surgical experiences versus awake craniotomy: patients often preferred awake surgery over other surgery under general anesthesia, including craniotomies. Awake craniotomy for brain tumors was well tolerated and yielded high levels of satisfaction in a population of patients in Brazil. This technique should not be avoided under the pretext of compromising patients' well-being.

  6. [A 53-year-old man with herpes encephalitis showing acceleration of improvement in higher brain function after general anesthesia with sevoflurane: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Naohiko; Kaida, Kenichi; Hongo, Yu; Ogawa, Go; Ishikawa, Yukinobu; Takeda, Katsuhiko; Kamakura, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    We experienced a right-handed 53-year-old man who presented with disturbance of consciousness and fever. Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) was diagnosed based on the detection of herpes simplex virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. The administration of acyclovir for 42 days improved his consciousness level. Drowsiness, fever and seizures reappeared 20 days after stopping acyclovir treatment (day 67) and he responded well to vidarabine and methylprednisolone pulse therapy. An assessment of aphasia on day 98 revealed transcortical sensory aphasia. Brain MRI showed lesion in the left temporal lobe, bilateral insular cortexes and bilateral frontal lobe. His higher brain dysfunction continued. On day 156, he underwent hip replacement arthroplasty under general anesthesia sevoflurane. His higher brain dysfunction rapidly improved thereafter. We concluded that the accelerated improvement in our patient's higher brain function was related to the protective effect of sevoflurane. Some reports also show the protective effects of sevoflurane in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis by inhibition of T cell activation. These protective and anti-inflammatory effects may explain the accelerated improvement in higher brain function after general anesthesia.

  7. Embedded Ultrathin Cluster Electrodes for Long-Term Recordings in Deep Brain Centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Etemadi

    Full Text Available Neural interfaces which allow long-term recordings in deep brain structures in awake freely moving animals have the potential of becoming highly valuable tools in neuroscience. However, the recording quality usually deteriorates over time, probably at least partly due to tissue reactions caused by injuries during implantation, and subsequently micro-forces due to a lack of mechanical compliance between the tissue and neural interface. To address this challenge, we developed a gelatin embedded neural interface comprising highly flexible electrodes and evaluated its long term recording properties. Bundles of ultrathin parylene C coated platinum electrodes (N = 29 were embedded in a hard gelatin based matrix shaped like a needle, and coated with Kollicoat™ to retard dissolution of gelatin during the implantation. The implantation parameters were established in an in vitro model of the brain (0.5% agarose. Following a craniotomy in the anesthetized rat, the gelatin embedded electrodes were stereotactically inserted to a pre-target position, and after gelatin dissolution the electrodes were further advanced and spread out in the area of the subthalamic nucleus (STN. The performance of the implanted electrodes was evaluated under anesthesia, during 8 weeks. Apart from an increase in the median-noise level during the first 4 weeks, the electrode impedance and signal-to-noise ratio of single-units remained stable throughout the experiment. Histological postmortem analysis confirmed implantation in the area of STN in most animals. In conclusion, by combining novel biocompatible implantation techniques and ultra-flexible electrodes, long-term neuronal recordings from deep brain structures with no significant deterioration of electrode function were achieved.

  8. Outcome in Women with Traumatic Brain Injury Admitted to a Level 1 Trauma Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guise, Elaine; Tinawi, Simon; Marcoux, Judith; Maleki, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to compare acute outcome between men and women after sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods. A total of 5,642 patients admitted to the Traumatic Brain Injury Program of the McGill University Health Centre-Montreal General Hospital between 2000 and 2011 and diagnosed with a TBI were included in the study. The overall percentage of women with TBI was 30.6% (n = 1728). Outcome measures included the length of stay (LOS), the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), the functional independence measure instrument (FIM), discharge destination, and mortality rate. Results. LOS, GOSE, the FIM ratings, and discharge destination did not show significant differences between genders once controlling for several confounding variables and running the appropriate diagnostic tests (P < 0.05). However, women had less chance of dying during their acute care hospitalization than men of the same age, with the same TBI severity and following the same mechanism of injury. Although gender was a statistically significant predictor, its contribution in explaining variation in mortality was small. Conclusion. More research is needed to better understand gender differences in mortality; as to date, the research findings remain inconclusive. PMID:27355011

  9. Trauma centers with higher rates of angiography have a lesser incidence of splenectomy in the management of blunt splenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecci, Louis M; Jeremitsky, Elan; Smith, R Stephen; Philp, Frances

    2015-10-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) for blunt splenic injury (BSI) is well-established. Angiography (ANGIO) has been shown to improve success rates with NOM. Protocols for NOM are not standardized and vary widely between centers. We hypothesized that trauma centers that performed ANGIO at a greater rate would demonstrate decreased rates of splenectomy compared with trauma centers that used ANGIO less frequently. A large, multicenter, statewide database (Pennsylvania Trauma Systems Foundation) from 2007 to 2011 was used to generate the study cohort of patients with BSI (age ≥ 13). The cohort was divided into 2 populations based on admission to centers with high (≥13%) or low (Splenectomy rates were then compared between the 2 groups, and multivariable logistic regression for predictors of splenectomy (failed NOM) were also performed. The overall rate of splenectomy in the entire cohort was 21.0% (1,120 of 5,333 BSI patients). The high ANGIO group had a lesser rate of splenectoy compared with the low ANGIO group (19% vs 24%; P splenectomy compared with low ANGIO centers (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI 0.58-0.80; P splenectomy rates compared with centers with lesser rate of ANGIO. Inclusion of angiographic protocols for NOM of BSI should be considered strongly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of Higher Brain Functions in Music Composition Using Models of the Cortex Based on Physical System Analogies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiaodan

    The trion model was developed using the Mountcastle organizational principle for the column as the basic neuronal network in the cortex and the physical system analogy of Fisher's ANNNI spin model. An essential feature is that it is highly structured in time and in spatial connections. Simulations of a network of trions have shown that large numbers of quasi-stable, periodic spatial-temporal firing patterns can be excited. Characteristics of these patterns include the quality of being readily enhanced by only a small change in connection strengths, and that the patterns evolve in certain natural sequences from one to another. With only somewhat different parameters than used for studying memory and pattern recognition, much more flowing and intriguing patterns emerged from the simulations. The results were striking when these probabilistic evolutions were mapped onto pitches and instruments to produce music: For example different simple mappings of the same evolution give music having the "flavor" of a minuet, a waltz, folk music, or styles of specific periods. A theme can be learned so that evolutions have this theme and its variations reoccurring more often. That the trion model is a viable model for the coding of musical structure in human composition and perception is suggested. It is further proposed that model is relevant for examining creativity in the higher cognitive functions of mathematics and chess, which are similar to music. An even higher level of cortical organization was modeled by coupling together several trion networks. Further, one of the crucial features of higher brain function, especially in music composition or appreciation, is the role of emotion and mood as controlled by the many neuromodulators or neuropeptides. The MILA model whose underlying basis is zero-level representation of Kac-Moody algebra is used to modulate periodically the firing threshold of each network. Our preliminary results show that the introduction of "neuromodulation

  11. Enhancing Brain Lesions during Acute Optic Neuritis and/or Longitudinally Extensive Transverse Myelitis May Portend a Higher Relapse Rate in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, G; Wang, K Y; Pekcevik, Y; Thompson, C B; Mealy, M; Levy, M; Izbudak, I

    2017-05-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders are inflammatory demyelinating disorders with optic neuritis and/or longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis episodes. We now know that neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders are associated with antibodies to aquaporin-4, which are highly concentrated on astrocytic end-feet at the blood-brain barrier. Immune-mediated disruption of the blood-brain barrier may manifest as contrast enhancement on brain MR imaging. We aimed to delineate the extent and frequency of contrast enhancement on brain MR imaging within 1 month of optic neuritis and/or longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis attacks and to correlate contrast enhancement with outcome measures. Brain MRIs of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders were evaluated for patterns of contrast enhancement (periependymal, cloudlike, leptomeningeal, and so forth). The Fisher exact test was used to evaluate differences between the proportion of contrast enhancement in patients who were seropositive and seronegative for aquaporin-4 antibodies. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the annualized relapse rate and disease duration between patients with and without contrast enhancement and with and without seropositivity. Brain MRIs of 77 patients were evaluated; 59 patients (10 males, 49 females) were scanned within 1 month of optic neuritis and/or longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis attacks and were included in the analysis. Forty-eight patients were seropositive, 9 were seronegative, and 2 were not tested for aquaporin-4 antibodies. Having brain contrast enhancement of any type during an acute attack was significantly associated with higher annualized relapse rates ( P = .03) and marginally associated with shorter disease duration ( P = .05). Having periependymal contrast enhancement was significantly associated with higher annualized relapse rates ( P = .03). Brain MRIs of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders with contrast

  12. Brain-computer interface signal processing at the Wadsworth Center: mu and sensorimotor beta rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J; Krusienski, Dean J; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2006-01-01

    The Wadsworth brain-computer interface (BCI), based on mu and beta sensorimotor rhythms, uses one- and two-dimensional cursor movement tasks and relies on user training. This is a real-time closed-loop system. Signal processing consists of channel selection, spatial filtering, and spectral analysis. Feature translation uses a regression approach and normalization. Adaptation occurs at several points in this process on the basis of different criteria and methods. It can use either feedforward (e.g., estimating the signal mean for normalization) or feedback control (e.g., estimating feature weights for the prediction equation). We view this process as the interaction between a dynamic user and a dynamic system that coadapt over time. Understanding the dynamics of this interaction and optimizing its performance represent a major challenge for BCI research.

  13. Brain Tumor’s Radioresistance: The Neighborhood Helps | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive form of brain cancer. The primary treatment for GBM is radiation therapy. Unfortunately, while some patients initially respond, the vast majority of GBM patients fail radiotherapy, and the tumor usually grows back within two years. To gain a better understanding of the biological basis for GBM resistance to radiation, researchers initially studied GBM cell lines in vitro. In recent years, the focus has been on so-called tumor stem-like cells (TSCs), which are thought to be responsible for driving and maintaining tumor growth. To the researchers’ surprise, TSCs grown in vitro did not have the same ability to resist radiation as TSCs in the GBM tumors.

  14. Potential brain death organ donors - challenges and prospects: A single center retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Al-Maslamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ donation after brain death (BD is a major source for obtaining transplantable organs for patients with end-stage organ disease (ESOD. This retrospective, descriptive study was carried out on all potential BD patients admitted in different intensive care units (ICUs of the Hamad medical Corporation (HMC, Doha, Qatar during a period from January 2011 to April 2012. Our aim was to evaluate various demographic criteria and challenges of organ donation among potential BD organ donors and plan a strategy to improve the rate of organ donation in Qatar. Various aspects of BD patients in the ICUs and their possible effects on organ donation were studied. The time intervals analyzed to determine the possible causes of delay of organ retrieval were: time of diagnosing fixed dilated pupils in the ICU, to performing the first BD test, then to the second BD test, to family approach, to organ retrieval and/or circulatory death (CD without organ retrieval. There were a total of 116 potential BD organ donors of whom 96 (82.75% were males and 20 (17.25% were females. Brain hemorrhage and head injury contributed to 37 (31.9% and 32 (27.6% BD cases, respectively. Time interval between diagnosing fixed dilated pupil and performing the first test of BD was delayed >24 h in 79% of the cases and between the first and second BD tests was >6 h in 70.8% of the cases. This delay is not compatible with the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC policy for BD diagnosis and resulted in a low number of organs retrieved. BD organ donation, a potential source for organs to save patients with ESOD has several pitfalls and every effort should be made to increase the awareness of the public as well as medical personnel to optimize donation efficacy.

  15. Feasibility and resolution limits of opto-magnetic imaging of neural network activity in brain slices using color centers in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karadas, Mürsel; Wojciechowski, Adam M.; Huck, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We suggest a novel approach for wide-field imaging of the neural network dynamics of brain slices that uses highly sensitivity magnetometry based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. Invitro recordings in brain slices is a proven method for the characterization of electrical neural activi...... cell. Our results suggest that imaging of slice activity will be possible with the upcoming generation of NV magnetic field sensors, while single-shot imaging of planar cell activity remains challenging....

  16. Evaluating Sensory Processing in Fragile X Syndrome: Psychometric Analysis of the Brain Body Center Sensory Scales (BBCSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacz, Jacek; Raspa, Melissa; Heilman, Keri J; Porges, Stephen W

    2018-06-01

    Individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS), especially those co-diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), face many sensory processing challenges. However, sensory processing measures informed by neurophysiology are lacking. This paper describes the development and psychometric properties of a parent/caregiver report, the Brain-Body Center Sensory Scales (BBCSS), based on Polyvagal Theory. Parents/guardians reported on 333 individuals with FXS, 41% with ASD features. Factor structure using a split-sample exploratory-confirmatory design conformed to neurophysiological predictions. Internal consistency, test-retest, and inter-rater reliability were good to excellent. BBCSS subscales converged with the Sensory Profile and Sensory Experiences Questionnaire. However, data also suggest that BBCSS subscales reflect unique features related to sensory processing. Individuals with FXS and ASD features displayed more sensory challenges on most subscales.

  17. Remission of depression following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Thiago Fernando Vasconcelos; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; da Rocha, Neusa Sica

    2016-03-01

    Research on the association between electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels has produced conflicting result. There have been few studies which have evaluated BDNF levels in clinical contexts where there was remission following treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate whether remission of depression following ECT is associated with changes in BDNF levels. Adult inpatients in a psychiatric unit were invited to participate in this naturalistic study. Diagnoses were made using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and symptoms were evaluated at admission and discharge using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS-17). Thirty-one patients who received a diagnosis of depression and were subjected to ECT were included retrospectively. Clinical remission was defined as a score of less than eight on the HDRS-17 at discharge. Serum BDNF levels were measured in blood samples collected at admission and discharge with a commercial kit used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Subjects HDRS-17 scores improved following ECT (t = 13.29; p = 0.00). A generalized estimating equation (GEE) model revealed a remission × time interaction with BDNF levels as a dependent variable in a Wald chi-square test [Wald χ(2) = 5.98; p = 0.01]. A post hoc Bonferroni test revealed that non-remitters had lower BDNF levels at admission than remitters (p = 0.03), but there was no difference at discharge (p = 0.16). ECT remitters had higher serum BDNF levels at admission and the level did not vary during treatment. ECT non-remitters had lower serum BDNF levels at admission, but levels increased during treatment and were similar to those of ECT remitters at discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury. A study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka [Nagoya City Rehabilitation and Sports Center (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerebral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with {sup 15}O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO{sub 2} between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO{sub 2} of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of ''relative luxury perfusion''. Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO{sub 2} of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the

  19. Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury. A study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka

    2002-01-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerebral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with 15 O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO 2 in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO 2 between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO 2 along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO 2 of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of ''relative luxury perfusion''. Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO 2 between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO 2 of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the normal group in the bilateral frontal, temporal, and occipital

  20. Career Counseling Centers in Higher Education: A Study of Cross-Cultural Applications from the United States to Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Michael; Lee, Je-Kyung

    2003-01-01

    Interest in career development and career counseling is growing in Korea. Nevertheless, neither the research nor the literature adequately address the question as to what applications can be cross-culturally transferred from career counseling centers in the United States to Korea. This study qualitatively examines the practice of career counseling…

  1. Learning Resources Centers and Their Effectiveness on Students’ Learning Outcomes: A Case-Study of an Omani Higher Education Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Nouraey

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at investigating the use and effectiveness of a learning resources center, which is generally known as a library. In doing so, eight elements were investigated through an author-designed questionnaire. Each of these elements tended to delve into certain aspects of the afore-mentioned center. These elements included a students’ visits frequency, b availability of books related to modules, c center facilities, d use of discussion rooms, e use of online resources, f staff cooperation, g impact on knowledge enhancement, and, h recommendation to peers. Eighty undergraduate students participated in the study. Participants were then asked to read the statements carefully and choose one of the five responses provided, ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed based on 5-point Likert Scale. Findings of the study revealed that participants were mostly in agreement with all eight statements provided in the questionnaire, which were interpreted as positive feedbacks from the students. Then, the frequencies of responses by the participants were reported. Finally, the results were compared and contrasted and related discussions on the effectiveness of libraries and learning resources centers on students’ learning performances and outcomes were made.

  2. Educational Entrepreneurism in Higher Education: A Comparative Case Study of Two Academic Centers within One Land-Grant University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This research explored the relationship of educational entrepreneurism and organizational culture in the creation and evolution of academic centers within one Midwestern land-grant university facing resource constraints. Particular attention was given to: (a) synthesizing current entrepreneurial and organizational culture and evolution theory as…

  3. Incidence of adult brain cancers is higher in countries where the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is common

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Frédéric; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Brodeur, Jacques; Elguero, Eric; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Missé, Dorothée

    2012-01-01

    We explored associations between the common protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and brain cancers in human populations. We predicted that T. gondii could increase the risk of brain cancer because it is a long-lived parasite that encysts in the brain, where it provokes inflammation and inhibits apoptosis. We used a medical geography approach based on the national incidence of brain cancers and seroprevalence of T. gondii. We corrected reports of incidence for national gross domestic product because wealth probably increases the ability to detect cancer. We also included gender, cell phone use and latitude as variables in our initial models. Prevalence of T. gondii explained 19 per cent of the residual variance in brain cancer incidence after controlling for the positive effects of gross domestic product and latitude among nations. Infection with T. gondii was associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of brain cancers across the range of T. gondii prevalence in our dataset (4–67%). These results, though correlational, suggest that T. gondii should be investigated further as a possible oncogenic pathogen of humans.

  4. Pediatric sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, John K; Winkler, Ethan A; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children is a significant public health concern estimated to result in over 500,000 emergency department (ED) visits and more than 60,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually. Sports activities are one important mechanism leading to pediatric TBI. In this study, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in the pediatric population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and of increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from children (age 0-17 years) across 5 sports categories: fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were recorded in the NTDB, and these injuries represented 11,614 incidents nationally after sample weighting. Fall or interpersonal contact events were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (47.4%). Mild TBI represented 87.1% of the injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital and ICU were 2.68 ± 0.07 days and 2.73 ± 0.12 days, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 0.8%, and the prevalence of medical complications was 2.1% across all patients. Severities of head and extracranial injuries were significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Hypotension on admission to the ED was a significant predictor of failure to discharge to home (OR 0.05, 95% CI 0.03-0.07, p sports was independently associated with prolonged hospital LOS compared with FIC events (mean increase

  5. External radiation of brain metastases from renal carcinoma: a retrospective study of 119 patients from the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronski, Marek; Maor, Moshe H.; Davis, Brian J.; Sawaya, Raymond; Levin, Victor A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 10% of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma are diagnosed with brain metastases. Most of these patients receive palliative radiotherapy and die of progressive brain metastatic disease. This retrospective study examines the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center experience with such patients who received only whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Records of 200 patients with brain metastases from renal carcinoma who were treated at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1976 and 1993 were reviewed. Of these patients, 119 received WBRT only and constitute the basis of this study. Different prognostic factors were analyzed. Results: Overall median survival time from diagnosis of the brain metastases was 4.4 months. Multiple brain tumors were treated in 70 patients (58.8%) who had a survival of 3.0 months compared with 4.4 months for patients having a single brain metastasis (p = 0.043). Among 117 patients the causes of death were neurologic in 90 (76%), systemic cancer in 19 (16%), and unknown in 9 (8%). Survival rates at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years, were 33.6, 16.8, and 5.9%, respectively. Patients in whom brain metastases were diagnosed synchronously with a renal primary (n = 24) had a median survival time of 3.4 months compared with 3.2 months for those 95 who were diagnosed metachronously (p < 0.79, NS). In the Cox multivariate analysis of 13 possible prognostic factors, only a single brain metastasis (p = 0.0329), lack of distant metastases at the time of diagnosis (p = 0.0056), and tumor diameter ≤ 2 cm (p < 0.0016) were statistically significant. Conclusion: These unsatisfactory results with WBRT suggest that more aggressive approaches, such as surgery or radiosurgery should be applied whenever possible

  6. Safety of a DVT chemoprophylaxis protocol following traumatic brain injury: a single center quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickele, Christopher M; Kamps, Timothy K; Medow, Joshua E

    2013-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complication that affects approximately 30 % of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients when pharmacologic prophylaxis is not used. Following TBI, specifically in the case of contusions, the safety and efficacy of pharmacologic thromboembolism prophylaxis (PTP) has been studied only in small sample sizes. In this study, we attempt to assess the safety and efficacy of a PTP protocol for TBI patients, as a quality improvement (QI) initiative, in the neuroscience intensive care unit (NSICU). Between January 1st and December 31st, 2009, consecutive patients discharged from the University of Wisconsin NSICU after >a 48 h minimum stay were evaluated as part of a QI project. A protocol for the initiation of PTP was designed and implemented for NSICU patients. The protocol did not vary based on type of intracranial injury. The rate of VTE was reported as was heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and PTP-related expansion of intracranial hemorrhage (IH) requiring reoperation. The number of patients receiving PTP and the timing of therapy were tracked. Patients were excluded for persistent coagulopathy, other organ system bleeding (such as the gastrointestinal tract), or pregnancy. Faculty could opt out of the protocol without reason. Using the same criteria, patients discharged during the preceding 6 months, from July 1st to December 31st, 2008, were evaluated as controls as the PTP protocol was not in effect during this time. During the control period, there were 48 head trauma admissions who met the inclusion criteria. In 22 patients (45.8 %), PTP was initiated at an average of 4.9 ± 5.4 days after admission. During the protocol period, there were 87 head trauma admissions taken from 1,143 total NSICU stays who met criteria. In 63 patients (72.4 %), the care team in the NSICU successfully initiated PTP, at an average of 3.4 ± 2.8 days after admission. All 87 trauma patients were analyzed, and the rate of clinically

  7. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  8. A Model Formative Assessment Strategy to Promote Student-Centered Self-Regulated Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Jayakumar; Rengel, Zed

    2009-01-01

    Adult learners are already involved in the process of self-regulation; hence, higher education institutions should focus on strengthening students' self-regulatory skills. Self-regulation can be facilitated through formative assessment. This paper proposes a model formative assessment strategy that would complement existing university teaching,…

  9. Evaluation of the Use of Periodicals Collection of the Higher Education Council Documentation and Online Search Center: Arts and Humanities Periodicals

    OpenAIRE

    Elçin Özbudak

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of the use perodicals collections in libraries is important as perodicals report the results of the latest scientific research and they are usually more expensive than other types of library materials. In this study we evaluate the use of Arts and Humanities periodicals in the collection of the Higher Education Council Documentation Center. Although the use of Arts and Humanities periodicals was found to be lower than, say, Biomedical periodicals collection, the number of journal t...

  10. Adapted User-Centered Design: A Strategy for the Higher User Acceptance of Innovative e-Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Dinevski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Being familiar with all the benefits of e-Health and the strategic plan for the Slovenian health sector’s informatization, Telekom Slovenia and the Faculty of Medicine from the University of Maribor, along with other partners, have initiated an e-Health project. The project group is developing various e-Health services that are based on modern ICT (information and communications technology solutions and will be available on several screens. In order to meet the users’ needs and expectations and, consequently, achieve the high acceptance of e-Health services, the user-centered design (UCD approach was employed in the e-Health project. However, during the research it was found that conventional UCD methods are not completely appropriate for older adults: the target population of the e-Health services. That is why the selected UCD methods were modified and adapted for older adults. The modified UCD methods used in the research study are presented in this paper. Using the results of the adapted UCD methods, a prototype for a service named MedReminder was developed. The prototype was evaluated by a group of 12 study participants. The study participants evaluated the MedReminder service as acceptable with a good potential for a high adoption rate among its target population, i.e., older adults.

  11. Probabilistic Matching of Deidentified Data From a Trauma Registry and a Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center: A Follow-up Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj G; Wang, Zhensheng; Kesinger, Matthew R; Newman, Mark; Huynh, Toan T; Niemeier, Janet P; Sperry, Jason L; Wagner, Amy K

    2018-04-01

    In a previous study, individuals from a single Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems and trauma center were matched using a novel probabilistic matching algorithm. The Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems is a multicenter prospective cohort study containing more than 14,000 participants with traumatic brain injury, following them from inpatient rehabilitation to the community over the remainder of their lifetime. The National Trauma Databank is the largest aggregation of trauma data in the United States, including more than 6 million records. Linking these two databases offers a broad range of opportunities to explore research questions not otherwise possible. Our objective was to refine and validate the previous protocol at another independent center. An algorithm generation and validation data set were created, and potential matches were blocked by age, sex, and year of injury; total probabilistic weight was calculated based on of 12 common data fields. Validity metrics were calculated using a minimum probabilistic weight of 3. The positive predictive value was 98.2% and 97.4% and sensitivity was 74.1% and 76.3%, in the algorithm generation and validation set, respectively. These metrics were similar to the previous study. Future work will apply the refined probabilistic matching algorithm to the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems and the National Trauma Databank to generate a merged data set for clinical traumatic brain injury research use.

  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Funding for HIV Testing Associated With Higher State Percentage of Persons Tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Samah; Dietz, Patricia M; Van Handel, Michelle; Zhang, Jun; Shrestha, Ram K; Huang, Ya-Lin A; Wan, Choi; Mermin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    To assess the association between state per capita allocations of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funding for HIV testing and the percentage of persons tested for HIV. We examined data from 2 sources: 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and 2010-2011 State HIV Budget Allocations Reports. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data were used to estimate the percentage of persons aged 18 to 64 years who had reported testing for HIV in the last 2 years in the United States by state. State HIV Budget Allocations Reports were used to calculate the state mean annual per capita allocations for CDC-funded HIV testing reported by state and local health departments in the United States. The association between the state fixed-effect per capita allocations for CDC-funded HIV testing and self-reported HIV testing in the last 2 years among persons aged 18 to 64 years was assessed with a hierarchical logistic regression model adjusting for individual-level characteristics. The percentage of persons tested for HIV in the last 2 years. In 2011, 18.7% (95% confidence interval = 18.4-19.0) of persons reported being tested for HIV in last 2 years (state range, 9.7%-28.2%). During 2010-2011, the state mean annual per capita allocation for CDC-funded HIV testing was $0.34 (state range, $0.04-$1.04). A $0.30 increase in per capita allocation for CDC-funded HIV testing was associated with an increase of 2.4 percentage points (14.0% vs 16.4%) in the percentage of persons tested for HIV per state. Providing HIV testing resources to health departments was associated with an increased percentage of state residents tested for HIV.

  13. Dogs cannot bark: event-related brain responses to true and false negated statements as indicators of higher-order conscious processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Cornelia; Kübler, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated event-related brain potentials elicited by true and false negated statements to evaluate if discrimination of the truth value of negated information relies on conscious processing and requires higher-order cognitive processing in healthy subjects across different levels of stimulus complexity. The stimulus material consisted of true and false negated sentences (sentence level) and prime-target expressions (word level). Stimuli were presented acoustically and no overt behavioral response of the participants was required. Event-related brain potentials to target words preceded by true and false negated expressions were analyzed both within group and at the single subject level. Across the different processing conditions (word pairs and sentences), target words elicited a frontal negativity and a late positivity in the time window from 600-1000 msec post target word onset. Amplitudes of both brain potentials varied as a function of the truth value of the negated expressions. Results were confirmed at the single-subject level. In sum, our results support recent suggestions according to which evaluation of the truth value of a negated expression is a time- and cognitively demanding process that cannot be solved automatically, and thus requires conscious processing. Our paradigm provides insight into higher-order processing related to language comprehension and reasoning in healthy subjects. Future studies are needed to evaluate if our paradigm also proves sensitive for the detection of consciousness in non-responsive patients.

  14. Dogs cannot bark: event-related brain responses to true and false negated statements as indicators of higher-order conscious processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Herbert

    Full Text Available The present study investigated event-related brain potentials elicited by true and false negated statements to evaluate if discrimination of the truth value of negated information relies on conscious processing and requires higher-order cognitive processing in healthy subjects across different levels of stimulus complexity. The stimulus material consisted of true and false negated sentences (sentence level and prime-target expressions (word level. Stimuli were presented acoustically and no overt behavioral response of the participants was required. Event-related brain potentials to target words preceded by true and false negated expressions were analyzed both within group and at the single subject level. Across the different processing conditions (word pairs and sentences, target words elicited a frontal negativity and a late positivity in the time window from 600-1000 msec post target word onset. Amplitudes of both brain potentials varied as a function of the truth value of the negated expressions. Results were confirmed at the single-subject level. In sum, our results support recent suggestions according to which evaluation of the truth value of a negated expression is a time- and cognitively demanding process that cannot be solved automatically, and thus requires conscious processing. Our paradigm provides insight into higher-order processing related to language comprehension and reasoning in healthy subjects. Future studies are needed to evaluate if our paradigm also proves sensitive for the detection of consciousness in non-responsive patients.

  15. Effect of ethanol in utero on higher nervous activity and protein and lipid metabolism in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabbudovskii, A.L.; Zhulin, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The authors study parameters of protein phosphorylation and glycoprotein and phospholipid synthesis in the neocortex and hippocampus of adult rats and compare the findings with the results of an investigation of formation and preservation of defensive conditioned reflexes. The pattern of changes in these metabolic parameters are studied in response to stress. For the biochemical tests, the animals were lightly anesthetized with ether and injected with a mixture of (P 32)-orthophosphate and (H 3)-fucose. Phospholipids were identified with molybdate reagent and radioactivity of the protein digest and lipids was measured in Bray's scintillator. The study shows that the use of stress brought metabolic differences between the brain of the experimental and control rats more clearly to light

  16. Representation of pheromones, interspecific signals, and plant odors in higher olfactory centers; mapping physiologically identified antennal-lobe projection neurons in the male heliothine moth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Cheng eZhao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the primary olfactory centre of the moth brain, for example, a few enlarged glomeruli situated dorsally, at the entrance of the antennal nerve, are devoted to information about female-produced substances whereas a set of more numerous ordinary glomeruli receives input about general odorants. Heliothine moths are particularly suitable for studying central chemosensory mechanisms not only because of their anatomically separated systems for plant odours and pheromones but also due to their use of female-produced substances in communication across the species. Thus, the male-specific system of heliothine moths includes two sub arrangements, one ensuring attraction and mating behavior by carrying information about pheromones released by conspecifics, and the other reproductive isolation via signal information emitted from heterospecifics. Based on previous tracing experiments, a general chemotopic organization of the male-specific glomeruli has been demonstrated in a number of heliothine species. As compared to the well explored organization of the moth antennal lobe, demonstrating a non-overlapping representation of the biologically relevant stimuli, less is known about the neural arrangement residing at the following synaptic level, i.e. the mushroom body calyces and the lateral horn. In the study presented here, we have labelled physiologically characterized antennal-lobe projection neurons in males of the two heliothine species, Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa assulta, for the purpose of mapping their target regions in the protocerebrum. In order to compare the representation of plant odours, pheromones, and interspecific signals in the higher brain regions of each species, we have created standard brain atlases and registered three-dimensional models of distinct uniglomerular projection neuron types into the relevant atlas.

  17. Variation in structure and process of care in traumatic brain injury: Provider profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); S. Polinder (Suzanne); Lingsma, H.F. (Hester F.); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); D.K. Menon (David ); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); Adams, H. (Hadie); Alessandro, M. (Masala); J.E. Allanson (Judith); Amrein, K. (Krisztina); Andaluz, N. (Norberto); N. Andelic (Nada); Andrea, N. (Nanni); L. Andreassen (Lasse); Anke, A. (Audny); Antoni, A. (Anna); Ardon, H. (Hilko); G. Audibert (Gérard); Auslands, K. (Kaspars); Azouvi, P. (Philippe); Baciu, C. (Camelia); Bacon, A. (Andrew); Badenes, R. (Rafael); Baglin, T. (Trevor); Bartels, R. (Ronald); Barzó, P. (Pál); Bauerfeind, U. (Ursula); R. Beer (Ronny); Belda, F.J. (Francisco Javier); B.-M. Bellander (Bo-Michael); A. Belli (Antonio); Bellier, R. (Rémy); H. Benali (Habib); Benard, T. (Thierry); M. Berardino (Maurizio); Beretta, L. (Luigi); Beynon, C. (Christopher); Bilotta, F. (Federico); H. Binder (Harald); Biqiri, E. (Erta); Blaabjerg, M. (Morten); Borgen, L.S. (Lund Stine); Bouzat, P. (Pierre); Bragge, P. (Peter); A. Brazinova (Alexandra); F. Brehar (Felix); Brorsson, C. (Camilla); Buki, A. (Andras); M. Bullinger (Monika); Bučková, V. (Veronika); Calappi, E. (Emiliana); P. Cameron (Peter); Carbayo, L.G. (Lozano Guillermo); Carise, E. (Elsa); Carpenter, C.; Castaño-León, A.M. (Ana M.); Causin, F. (Francesco); Chevallard, G. (Giorgio); A. Chieregato (Arturo); G. Citerio (Giuseppe); M. Coburn (Mark); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Cooper, J.D. (Jamie D.); Correia, M. (Marta); A. Covic (Amra); N. Curry (Nicola); E. Czeiter (Endre); M. Czosnyka (Marek); Dahyot-Fizelier, C. (Claire); F. Damas (François); P. Damas (Pierre); H. Dawes (Helen); De Keyser, V. (Véronique); F. Della Corte (Francesco); B. Depreitere (Bart); Ding, S. (Shenghao); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K. Dizdarevic (Kemal); Dulière, G.-L. (Guy-Loup); Dzeko, A. (Adelaida); G. Eapen (George); Engemann, H. (Heiko); A. Ercole (Ari); P. Esser (Patrick); Ezer, E. (Erzsébet); M. Fabricius (Martin); V.L. Feigin (V.); Feng, J. (Junfeng); Foks, K. (Kelly); F. Fossi (Francesca); Francony, G. (Gilles); J. Frantzén (Janek); Freo, U. (Ulderico); S.K. Frisvold (Shirin Kordasti); Furmanov, A. (Alex); P. Gagliardo (Pablo); D. Galanaud (Damien); G. Gao (Guoyi); K. Geleijns (Karin); A. Ghuysen (Alexandre); Giraud, B. (Benoit); Glocker, B. (Ben); Gomez, P.A. (Pedro A.); Grossi, F. (Francesca); R.L. Gruen (Russell); Gupta, D. (Deepak); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Hadzic (Ermin); I. Haitsma (Iain); J.A. Hartings (Jed); R. Helbok (Raimund); E. Helseth (Eirik); Hertle, D. (Daniel); S. Hill (Sean); Hoedemaekers, A. (Astrid); S. Hoefer (Stefan); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); Håberg, A.K. (Asta Kristine); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); Janciak, I. (Ivan); K. Janssens (Koen); J.-Y. Jiang (Ji-Yao); Jones, K. (Kelly); Kalala, J.-P. (Jean-Pierre); Kamnitsas, K. (Konstantinos); Karan, M. (Mladen); Karau, J. (Jana); A. Katila (Ari); M. Kaukonen (Maija); Keeling, D. (David); Kerforne, T. (Thomas); N. Ketharanathan (Naomi); J. Kettunen (Johannes); Kivisaari, R. (Riku); A.G. Kolias (Angelos G.); Kolumbán, B. (Bálint); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin); D. Kondziella (Daniel); L.-O. Koskinen (Lars-Owe); Kovács, N. (Noémi); F. Kalovits (Ferenc); A. Lagares (Alfonso); L. Lanyon (Linda); S. Laureys (Steven); Lauritzen, M. (Martin); F.E. Lecky (Fiona); C. Ledig (Christian); R. Lefering; V. Legrand (Valerie); Lei, J. (Jin); L. Levi (Leon); R. Lightfoot (Roger); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Loeckx (Dirk); Lozano, A. (Angels); Luddington, R. (Roger); Luijten-Arts, C. (Chantal); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); MacDonald, S. (Stephen); MacFayden, C. (Charles); M. Maegele (Marc); M. Majdan (Marek); Major, S. (Sebastian); A. Manara (Alex); Manhes, P. (Pauline); G. Manley (Geoffrey); Martin, D. (Didier); C. Martino (Costanza); Maruenda, A. (Armando); H. Maréchal (Hugues); Mastelova, D. (Dagmara); Mattern, J. (Julia); C. McMahon (Catherine); Melegh, B. (Béla); T. Menovsky (Tomas); C. Morganti-Kossmann (Cristina); Mulazzi, D. (Davide); Mutschler, M. (Manuel); H. Mühlan (Holger); Negru, A. (Ancuta); D. Nelson (David); E. Neugebauer (Eddy); V.F. Newcombe (Virginia F.); Noirhomme, Q. (Quentin); Nyirádi, J. (József); M. Oddo (Mauro); Oldenbeuving, A. (Annemarie); M. Oresic (Matej); Ortolano, F. (Fabrizio); A. Palotie (Aarno); P.M. Parizel; Patruno, A. (Adriana); J.-F. Payen (Jean-François); Perera, N. (Natascha); V. Perlbarg (Vincent); Persona, P. (Paolo); W.C. Peul (Wilco); N. Pichon (Nicolas); Piilgaard, H. (Henning); A. Piippo (Anna); Pili, F.S. (Floury Sébastien); M. Pirinen (Matti); H. Ples (Horia); Pomposo, I. (Inigo); M. Psota (Marek); P. Pullens (Pim); L. Puybasset (Louis); A. Ragauskas (Arminas); Raj, R. (Rahul); Rambadagalla, M. (Malinka); Rehorčíková, V. (Veronika); J.K.J. Rhodes (Jonathan K.J.); S. Richardson (Sylvia); S. Ripatti (Samuli); S. Rocka (Saulius); Rodier, N. (Nicolas); Roe, C. (Cecilie); Roise, O. (Olav); Roks, G. (Gerwin); Romegoux, P. (Pauline); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Rosenfeld, J. (Jeffrey); C. Rosenlund (Christina); G. Rosenthal (Guy); R. Rossaint (Rolf); S. Rossi (Sandra); Rostalski, T. (Tim); Rueckert, D.L. (Danie L.); Ruiz De Arcaute, F. (Felix); M. Rusnák (Martin); Sacchi, M. (Marco); Sahakian, B. (Barbara); J. Sahuquillo (Juan); O. Sakowitz (Oliver); Sala, F. (Francesca); Sanchez-Pena, P. (Paola); Sanchez-Porras, R. (Renan); Sandor, J. (Janos); Santos, E. (Edgar); N. Sasse (Nadine); Sasu, L. (Luminita); Savo, D. (Davide); I.B. Schipper (Inger); Schlößer, B. (Barbara); S. Schmidt (Silke); Schneider, A. (Annette); H. Schoechl (Herbert); G.G. Schoonman; R. Schou (Rico); E. Schwendenwein (Elisabeth); Schöll, M. (Michael); Sir, O. (Özcan); T. Skandsen (Toril); Smakman, L. (Lidwien); D. Smeets (Dirk); Smielewski, P. (Peter); Sorinola, A. (Abayomi); Stamatakis, E.L. (Emmanue L.); S. Stanworth (Simon); Stegemann, K. (Katrin); Steinbüchel, N. (Nicole); R. Stevens (Robert); W. Stewart (William); N. Stocchetti (Nino); Sundström, N. (Nina); Synnot, A. (Anneliese); J. Szabó (József); J. Söderberg (Jeannette); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Tamás, V. (Viktória); Tanskanen, P. (Päivi); A. Tascu (Alexandru); Taylor, M.S. (Mark Steven); Te Ao, B. (Braden); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Teodorani, G. (Guido); A. Theadom (Alice); Thomas, M. (Matt); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.M. Tolias (Christos M.); Tshibanda, J.-F.L. (Jean-Flory Luaba); Tudora, C.M. (Cristina Maria); P. Vajkoczy (Peter); Valeinis, E. (Egils); W. van Hecke (Wim); D. Van Praag (Dominique); D. Van Roost (Dirk); Van Vlierberghe, E. (Eline); Vande Vyvere, T. (Thijs); Vanhaudenhuyse, A. (Audrey); A. Vargiolu (Alessia); E. Vega (Emmanuel); J. Verheyden (Jan); P.M. Vespa (Paul M.); A. Vik (Anne); R. Vilcinis (Rimantas); Vizzino, G. (Giacinta); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); V. Volovici (Victor); P. Vulekovic (Peter); Vámos, Z. (Zoltán); Wade, D. (Derick); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); Wang, L. (Lei); Wildschut, E. (Eno); G. Williams (Guy); Willumsen, L. (Lisette); Wilson, A. (Adam); L. Wilson (Lindsay); Winkler, M.K.L. (Maren K. L.); P. Ylén (Peter); Younsi, A. (Alexander); M. Zaaroor (Menashe); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); Zheng, Z. (Zelong); Zumbo, F. (Fabrizio); De Lange, S. (Stefanie); G.C.W. De Ruiter (Godard C.W.); Den Boogert, H. (Hugo); Van Dijck, J. (Jeroen); T.A. van Essen (T.); C.M. van Heugten (Caroline M.); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. van der Naalt (Joukje)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map

  18. Evaluation of the Use of Periodicals Collection of the Higher Education Council Documentation and Online Search Center: Arts and Humanities Periodicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elçin Özbudak

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the use perodicals collections in libraries is important as perodicals report the results of the latest scientific research and they are usually more expensive than other types of library materials. In this study we evaluate the use of Arts and Humanities periodicals in the collection of the Higher Education Council Documentation Center. Although the use of Arts and Humanities periodicals was found to be lower than, say, Biomedical periodicals collection, the number of journal titles in Arts and Humanities appears to be quite satisfactory. Some suggestions are made so as to increase the use of Arts and Humanities periodicals collection.

  19. Functional MR mapping of higher cognitive brain functions; Neurofunktionelle MR-Bildgebung hoeherer kognitiver Leistungen des menschlichen Gehirns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellemann, M E [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie; Spitzer, M [Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Sektion Experimentelle Psychopathologie; Brix, G [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie; Kammer, T [Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik, Heidelberg (Germany). Sektion Experimentelle Psychopathologie; Loose, R [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Schwartz, A [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Neurologische Klinik; Gueckel, F [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    1995-04-01

    Fifteen normal subjects were examined on a conventional 1.5-T MR system to visualize cortical activation during the performance of high-level cognitive tasks. A computer-controlled videoprojector was employed to present psychometrically optimized activation paradigms. Reaction times and error rates of the volunteers were acquired online during stimulus presentation. The time course of cortical activation was measured in a series of strongly T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient-echo images from three or four adjacent slices. For anatomical correlation, picture elements showing a stimulus-related significant signal increase were color-coded and superimposed on T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo images. Analysis of the fMRI data revealed a subtle (range 2-5%), but statistically significant increase in signal intensity during the periods of induced cortical activation. Judgment of semantic relatedness of word pairs, for example, activated selectively cortical areas in left frontal and left temporal brain regions. The strength of cortex activation in the semantic task decreased significantly in the course of stimulus presentation and was paralleled by a decrease in the corresponding reaction times. With its move into the area of cognitive neuroscience, fMRI calls both for the careful design of activation schemes and for the acquisition of behavioral data. For example, brain regions involved in language processing could only be identified clearly when psychometrically matched activation paradigms were employed. The reaction time data correlated well with selective learning and thus helped to facilitate interpretation of the fMRI data sets. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur Abbildung kortikaler Strukturen, die durch die Bearbeitung hoeherer kognitiver Aufgaben aktiviert werden, wurden 15 gesunde Probanden an einem konventionellen 1,5-Tesla-MR-System untersucht. Psychometrisch optimierte Aktivierungsparadigmen wurden rechnergesteuert praesentiert und gleichzeitig Reaktionszeiten und Fehlerraten der

  20. Variability of physiological brain perfusion in healthy subjects - A systematic review of modifiers. Considerations for multi-center ASL studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Patricia; Mutsaerts, Henk-Jan; Václavů, Lena

    2018-01-01

    was carried out for factors influencing quantitative measurements of perfusion in the human brain unrelated to medication use. A total of 58 perfusion modifiers were categorized into four groups. Several factors (e.g., caffeine, aging, and blood gases) were found to induce a considerable effect on brain...

  1. A system architecture for sharing de-identified, research-ready brain scans and health information across clinical imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Ann L; van Erp, Theo G M; Kesselman, Carl; D'Arcy, Mike; Sobell, Janet; Keator, David; Dahm, Lisa; Murry, Jim; Law, Meng; Hasso, Anton; Ames, Joseph; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of brain scans benefits from compare and contrast analyses of scans from patients with similar, and sometimes rare, demographic, diagnostic, and treatment status. A solution to both needs is to acquire standardized, research-ready clinical brain scans and to build the information technology infrastructure to share such scans, along with other pertinent information, across hospitals. This paper describes the design, deployment, and operation of a federated imaging system that captures and shares standardized, de-identified clinical brain images in a federation across multiple institutions. In addition to describing innovative aspects of the system architecture and our initial testing of the deployed infrastructure, we also describe the Standardized Imaging Protocol (SIP) developed for the project and our interactions with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) regarding handling patient data in the federated environment.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) in human brain: regional distribution of IGF II and of higher molecular mass forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselbacher, G.K.; Schwab, M.E.; Pasi, A.; Humbel, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four distinct areas of human brain were analyzed for the presence of insulin-like growth factor (IGF). As reported for cerebrospinal fluid, only IGF II-like immunoreactivity, but no significant amounts of IGF I-like immunoreactivity, could be found. Upon gel permeation chromatography, two to five distinct size classes were separated on the basis of their immunoreactivity. Radioimmunoassays and a bioassay also gave results indistinguishable from those of serum IGF II. The highest amounts of IGF II-like immunoreactivity occur in the anterior pituitary. This is up to 100 times more than in most other brain regions analyzed. The higher molecular mass immunoreactive species were partially characterized. After immunoaffinity purification, the 38- and 26-kDa species are active in a bioassay. Specific IGF-binding protein activity could be shown after purification of the 38- and 26-kDa species on an IGF-affinity column. The 13-kDa species released significant amounts of 7.5-kDa material. The results are interpreted as evidence for the presence of IGF II synthesized locally in human brain

  3. Characteristics and trends of pediatric traumatic brain injuries treated at a large pediatric medical center in China, 2002-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Shao

    Full Text Available Pediatric traumatic brain injuries (TBIs have not been well studied in China. This study investigated characteristics and trends of hospitalized TBIs sustained by Chinese children.We analyzed 2002-2011 hospitalized TBI patients (0-17 years of age treated at a large pediatric medical center in China. TBIs were defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10 codes. We examined age patterns across external causes of TBIs. We reported the trend of traffic-related TBIs for each year from 2002 to 2011. Of 4,230 TBI patients, 67.1% (95% CI: 65.4%-68.8% were city residents and 28.8% (95% CI: 26.3%-31.3% came from rural villages. Males had disproportionately more TBIs than females (65.2% vs. 34.8%. Falls, struck by/against objects, and traffic collisions were the top three external causes of TBIs for all age groups. Falls were the leading cause of TBI for all ages but peaked at 2 years of age. There were 125 TBIs in 0-2 year olds (5.9% of all TBIs in this age group that were caused by suspected child abuse. Suspected child abuse was significantly more likely to occur in 0-1 year olds. The proportion of traffic -related TBIs increased significantly from 12.99% in 2002 to 19.68% in 2008 but dropped each subsequent year until it reached a level of 8.91% in 2011.Our study confirms that falls, struck by/against objects and traffic collisions are the top external causes of TBIs in Chinese children. When compared with national data from the developed countries, gender patterns are similar, but the ranking of external causes is different. This is the first study to highlight the important role of suspected child abuse in causing TBIs in infants in China. TBIs caused by child abuse warrant further research and government attention as a social and medical problem in China.

  4. Estimation of center line and diameter of brain blood vessel using three-dimensional blood vessel matching method with head three-dimensional CTA image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Masashi; Shinohara, Toshihiro; Nakayama, Masato; Nakasako, Noboru

    2010-01-01

    To support and automate the brain blood vessel disease diagnosis, a novel method to obtain the center line and the diameter of a blood vessel is proposed with a three-dimensional head computed tomographic angiography (CTA) image. Although the line thinning processing with distance transform or gray information is generally used to obtain the blood vessel center line, this method is not essentially one to obtain the center line and tends to yield extra lines depending on CTA images. In this study, the center line of the blood vessel is obtained by tracing the vessel. The blood vessel is traced by sequentially estimating the center point and direction of the blood vessel. The center point and direction of the blood vessel are estimated by taking the correlation between the blood vessel and a solid model of the blood vessel that is designed by considering noise influence. In addition, the vessel diameter is also estimated by correlating the blood vessel and the blood vessel model of which the diameter is variable. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by experimentally applied the proposed method to an actual three-dimensional head CTA image. (author)

  5. Holistic face categorization in higher-level cortical visual areas of the normal and prosopagnosic brain: towards a non-hierarchical view of face perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Rossion

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available How a visual stimulus is initially categorized as a face in a network of human brain areas remains largely unclear. Hierarchical neuro-computational models of face perception assume that the visual stimulus is first decomposed in local parts in lower order visual areas. These parts would then be combined into a global representation in higher order face-sensitive areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. Here we tested this view in fMRI with visual stimuli that are categorized as faces based on their global configuration rather than their local parts (2-tones Mooney figures and Arcimboldo’s facelike paintings. Compared to the same inverted visual stimuli that are not categorized as faces, these stimuli activated the right middle fusiform gyrus (Fusiform face area, FFA and superior temporal sulcus (pSTS, with no significant activation in the posteriorly located inferior occipital gyrus (i.e., no occipital face area, OFA. This observation is strengthened by behavioral and neural evidence for normal face categorization of these stimuli in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient (PS whose intact right middle fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus are devoid of any potential face-sensitive inputs from the lesioned right inferior occipital cortex. Together, these observations indicate that face-preferential activation may emerge in higher order visual areas of the right hemisphere without any face-preferential inputs from lower order visual areas, supporting a non-hierarchical view of face perception in the visual cortex.

  6. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation presenting with steroid-responsive higher brain dysfunction: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeda Yasushi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 56-year-old man noticed discomfort in his left lower limb, followed by convulsion and numbness in the same area. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed white matter lesions in the right parietal lobe accompanied by leptomeningeal or leptomeningeal and cortical post-contrast enhancement along the parietal sulci. The patient also exhibited higher brain dysfunction corresponding with the lesions on MRI. Histological pathology disclosed β-amyloid in the blood vessels and perivascular inflammation, which highlights the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA-related inflammation. Pulse steroid therapy was so effective that clinical and radiological findings immediately improved. CAA-related inflammation is a rare disease, defined by the deposition of amyloid proteins within the leptomeningeal and cortical arteries associated with vasculitis or perivasculitis. Here we report a patient with CAA-related inflammation who showed higher brain dysfunction that improved with steroid therapy. In cases with atypical radiological lesions like our case, cerebral biopsy with histological confirmation remains necessary for an accurate diagnosis.

  7. Facilitating Geoscience Education in Higher-Education Institutes Worldwide With GeoBrain -- An Online Learning and Research Environment for Classroom Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, M.; di, L.

    2006-12-01

    Higher education in geosciences has imminent goals to prepare students with modern geoscience knowledge and skills to meet the increased demand on trained professionals for working on the big challenges faced by geoscience disciplines, such as the global environmental change, world energy supplies, sustainable development, etc. In order to reach the goal, the geoscience education in post-secondary institutes worldwide has to attract and retain enough students and to train students with knowledge and skills needed by the society. The classroom innovations that can encourage and support student investigations and research activities are key motivation mechanisms that help to reach the goal. This presentation describes the use of GeoBrain, an innovative geospatial knowledge system, as a powerful educating tool for motivating and facilitating innovative undergraduate and graduate teaching and research in geosciences. Developed in a NASA funded project, the GeoBrain system has adopted and implemented the latest Web services and knowledge management technologies for providing innovative methods in publishing, accessing, visualizing, and analyzing geospatial data and in building/sharing geoscience knowledge. It provides a data-rich online learning and research environment enabled by wealthy data and information available at NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Students, faculty members, and researchers from institutes worldwide can easily access, analyze, and model with the huge amount of NASA EOS data just like they possess such vast resources locally at their desktops. The online environment provided by GeoBrain has brought significant positive changes to geosciences education in higher-education institutes because of its new concepts and technologies, motivation mechanisms, free exploration resources, and advanced geo- processing capabilities. With the system, the used-to-be very challenging or even impossible teaching tasks has

  8. Post-Traumatic Hypoxia Is Associated with Prolonged Cerebral Cytokine Production, Higher Serum Biomarker Levels, and Poor Outcome in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Edwin B.; Satgunaseelan, Laveniya; Paul, Eldho; Bye, Nicole; Nguyen, Phuong; Agyapomaa, Doreen; Kossmann, Thomas; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Secondary hypoxia is a known contributor to adverse outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Based on the evidence that hypoxia and TBI in isolation induce neuroinflammation, we investigated whether TBI combined with hypoxia enhances cerebral cytokine production. We also explored whether increased concentrations of injury biomarkers discriminate between hypoxic (Hx) and normoxic (Nx) patients, correlate to worse outcome, and depend on blood–brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Forty-two TBI patients with Glasgow Coma Scale ≤8 were recruited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were collected over 6 days. Patients were divided into Hx (n=22) and Nx (n=20) groups. Eight cytokines were measured in the CSF; albumin, S100, myelin basic protein (MBP) and neuronal specific enolase (NSE) were quantified in serum. CSF/serum albumin quotient was calculated for BBB function. Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) was assessed at 6 months post-TBI. Production of granulocye macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was higher, and profiles of GM-CSF, interferon (IFN)-γ and, to a lesser extent, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), were prolonged in the CSF of Hx but not Nx patients at 4–5 days post-TBI. Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 increased similarly in both Hx and Nx groups. S100, MBP, and NSE were significantly higher in Hx patients with unfavorable outcome. Among these three biomarkers, S100 showed the strongest correlations to GOSE after TBI-Hx. Elevated CSF/serum albumin quotients lasted for 5 days post-TBI and displayed similar profiles in Hx and Nx patients. We demonstrate for the first time that post-TBI hypoxia is associated with prolonged neuroinflammation, amplified extravasation of biomarkers, and poor outcome. S100 and MBP could be implemented to track the occurrence of post-TBI hypoxia, and prompt adequate treatment. PMID:24279428

  9. Brain-behavioral adaptability predicts response to cognitive behavioral therapy for emotional disorders: A person-centered event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Jonathan P; MacNamara, Annmarie; Kennedy, Amy E; Hajcak, Greg; Phan, K Luan; Klumpp, Heide

    2017-06-23

    Single-trial-level analyses afford the ability to link neural indices of elaborative attention (such as the late positive potential [LPP], an event-related potential) with downstream markers of attentional processing (such as reaction time [RT]). This approach can provide useful information about individual differences in information processing, such as the ability to adapt behavior based on attentional demands ("brain-behavioral adaptability"). Anxiety and depression are associated with maladaptive information processing implicating aberrant cognition-emotion interactions, but whether brain-behavioral adaptability predicts response to psychotherapy is not known. We used a novel person-centered, trial-level analysis approach to link neural indices of stimulus processing to behavioral responses and to predict treatment outcome. Thirty-nine patients with anxiety and/or depression received 12 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Prior to treatment, patients performed a speeded reaction-time task involving briefly-presented pairs of aversive and neutral pictures while electroencephalography was recorded. Multilevel modeling demonstrated that larger LPPs predicted slower responses on subsequent trials, suggesting that increased attention to the task-irrelevant nature of pictures interfered with reaction time on subsequent trials. Whereas using LPP and RT averages did not distinguish CBT responders from nonresponders, in trial-level analyses individuals who demonstrated greater ability to benefit behaviorally (i.e., faster RT) from smaller LPPs on the previous trial (greater brain-behavioral adaptability) were more likely to respond to treatment and showed greater improvements in depressive symptoms. These results highlight the utility of trial-level analyses to elucidate variability in within-subjects, brain-behavioral attentional coupling in the context of emotion processing, in predicting response to CBT for emotional disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  10. A brain-derived neurotrophic factor polymorphism Val66Met identifies fibromyalgia syndrome subgroup with higher body mass index and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yangming; Russell, I Jon; Liu, Ya-Guang

    2012-08-01

    A common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the gene of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) results from a substitution at position 66 from valine (Val) to methionine (Met) and may predispose to human neuropsychiatric disorders. We proposed to determine whether these BDNF gene SNPs were associated with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and/or any of its typical phenotypes. Patients with FMS (N = 95) and healthy normal controls (HNC, N = 58) were studied. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The BDNF SNPs were determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).The BDNF SNP distribution was 65 (68%) Val/Val, 28 (30%) Val/Met, and 2 (2%) Met/Met for FMS and 40 (69%), 17(29%), and 1 (2%) for HNC, respectively. The serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)and body mass index (BMI) in FMS were higher than in HNC. The FMS with BDNF Val66Val had significantly higher mean BMI (P = 0.0001) and hsCRP (P = 0.02) than did FMS carrying the Val66Met genotype. This pattern was not found in HNC. Phenotypic measures of subjective pain, pain threshold, depression, or insomnia did not relate to either of the BDNF SNPs in FMS. The relative distribution BDNF SNPs did not differ between FMS and HNC. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism is not selective for FMS. The BDNF Val66Val SNP identifies a subgroup of FMS with elevated hsCRP and higher BMI. This is the first study to associate a BDNF polymorphism with a FMS subgroup phenotype.

  11. Activation in brain energy regulation and reward centers by food cues varies with choice of visual stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, E A; Kleinhans, N M; Goldberg, J; Buchwald, D; Schwartz, M W; Maravilla, K

    2009-06-01

    To develop a non-invasive method of studying brain mechanisms involved in energy homeostasis and appetite regulation in humans by using visual food cues that are relevant to individuals attempting weight loss. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to compare brain activation in regions of interest between groups of food photographs. Ten healthy, non-obese women who were not dieting for weight loss. Independent raters viewed food photographs and evaluated whether the foods depicted should be eaten by individuals attempting a calorically-restricted diet. Based on their responses, we categorized photographs into 'non-fattening' and 'fattening' food groups, the latter characterized by high-caloric content and usually also high-fat or high-sugar content. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was measured by fMRI while participants viewed photographs of 'fattening' food, 'non-fattening' food, and non-food objects. Viewing photographs of fattening food compared with non-food objects resulted in significantly greater activation in the brainstem; hypothalamus; left amygdala; left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; left orbitofrontal cortex; right insular cortex; bilateral striatum, including the nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen; bilateral thalamus; and occipital lobe. By comparison, only the occipital region had greater activation by non-fattening food than by object photographs. Combining responses to all food types resulted in attenuation of activation in the brainstem, hypothalamus, and striatum. These findings suggest that, in non-obese women, neural circuits engaged in energy homeostasis and reward processing are selectively attuned to representations of high-calorie foods that are perceived as fattening. Studies to investigate hormonal action or manipulation of energy balance may benefit from fMRI protocols that contrast energy-rich food stimuli with non-food or low-calorie food stimuli.

  12. Evaluation The Result Of Treating 1200 Patients Brain Tumor And Some Intracranial Diseases By Rotating GAMMA Knife (RGK) At The Nuclear Medicine And Oncology Center, Bach Mai Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Trong Khoa; Nguyen Quang Hung; Tran Dinh Ha

    2011-01-01

    The paper is evaluating results of treating brain tumor and some intracranial diseases by rotating gamma knife (RGK) at The Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Bach Mai Hospital, from July 2007 to August 2010, for 1200 patients treated with RGK. In 1200 patients - average age: 42.6 years old, Male/Female ratio:1/1.08 - pituitary tumors accounted for 19.8%, meningioma 18.3%, arteriovenous malformations (AVM) (16.7%), acoustic neuroma (8.7%), brain metastases (7.5%), craniopharyngeal tumor (5.0%), pineal tumor (3.5%), cavernoma (6%), astrocytoma (5.2%), meduloblastoma (2.9%), ependymoma (2.6%), others (3.8%). Average target volume: minimum 0.6cm 3 , maximum 27.6cm 3 , median 6.2 ± 4.6 cm 3 . Average radiosurgery dose changed depend on nature of the tumor: pituitary tumor (12.4 Gy), meningioma (18.8 Gy), AVM (18 Gy), acoustic neuroma (14.6 Gy), brain metastases (18.2 Gy), craniopharyngeal tumor (12.8 Gy), pineal tumor (16.3 Gy), cavernoma (17.5 Gy), astrocytoma (14.6 Gy), medulloblastoma (16.1 Gy), ependymoma (16.3 Gy), others (15 Gy). Conclusions: Almost case have improved clinical symptoms significantly: 80.2% after 1 month (complete response 20.2%), 100% at 36th month (complete response: 94%). Size of the tumor were reduced remarkably. Treatment were safe, no death or severe complications were observed within and after radiosurgery. (author)

  13. Clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors at New England Medical Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamenhof, R.G.A.; Madoc-Jones, H.; Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    A proposal is submitted that is based on the conclusions of a NCT expert panel recently convened at BNL by the Department of Energy to evaluate the status of NCT and to recommend what preclinical tasks should be accomplished prior to a clinical study being undertaken. The proposal is for two years of preclinical research and preparations, followed in the third year by a pilot clinical trial of ten patients with grade-IV astrocytoma brain tumors, for whom the prognosis with existing treatment modalities is less than a 5% three-year survival rate. Preclinical tasks would include modifying the MIT Nuclear Reactor medical facility to produce an epithermal as well as the existing and highly thermalized neutron treatment beam; characterizing the transport behavior of these beams in both physical and mathematical models of the human head, and developing a treatment planning scheme for NCT; further development of the neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography track-etch method for measuring macro- and micro-distributions of B-10 uptake in tissues and blood; investigations into the B-10 cellular uptake pattern of human tumors; and examination of the nature of endothelial cell vascular damage in B-10-containing animals undergoing irradiation with neutrons. With the successful completion of the above preclinical tasks we feel we will be in a position to embark in the third year on a pilot clinical evaluation

  14. Higher resting-state activity in reward-related brain circuits in obese versus normal-weight females independent of food intake

    OpenAIRE

    Hogenkamp, P S; Zhou, W; Dahlberg, L S; Stark, J; Larsen, A L; Olivo, G; Wiemerslage, L; Larsson, E-M; Sundbom, M; Benedict, C; Schi?th, H B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In response to food cues, obese vs normal-weight individuals show greater activation in brain regions involved in the regulation of food intake under both fasted and sated conditions. Putative effects of obesity on task-independent low-frequency blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signals-that is, resting-state brain activity-in the context of food intake are, however, less well studied. OBJECTIVE: To compare eyes closed, whole-brain low-frequency BOLD signals between severely obese...

  15. Predictors of health-related quality of life in neurosurgical brain tumor patients: focus on patient-centered perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevicius, Adomas; Tamasauskas, Sarunas; Deltuva, Vytenis; Tamasauskas, Arimantas; Radziunas, Andrius; Bunevicius, Robertas

    2014-02-01

    In brain tumor (BT) patients, the association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and psychological characteristics remains largely unknown. We evaluated the association of personality traits, clinical factors, psychological distress symptoms, and cognitive state with HRQoL in BT patients. On admission for BT surgery, 200 patients (69 % women; age 55.8 ± 14.5 years) were evaluated for HRQoL (SF-36 scale), Big-Five personality traits (Ten-Item Personality Inventory), psychological distress symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale or HADS), cognitive function (Mini-Mental State Examination or MMSE) and clinical characteristics, including functional status (Barthel index or BI). The most common BT diagnoses were meningioma (39 %) and high-grade glioma (18 %). Only factors significantly associated with SF-36 domains in univariable regression analyses were included in their respective multivariable models and predicted from 6 %-49 % of the total variance of SF-36 scores. Greater TIPI emotional stability score was independently associated with greater SF-36 emotional well-being (β = 0.23, p emotional well-being score (β = 0.13, p = 0.02). HADS-anxiety and HADS-depression scores were the strongest independent determinants of all, except physical functioning, SF-36 scores (β-values range from 0.14 to 0.56; p values ≤ 0.03). BI score was the strongest independent determinant of SF-36 physical functioning score (β = 0.36, p emotional well-being and social functioning SF-36 scores. Consciousness and emotional stability should be considered important personality-related determinants of HRQoL in BT patients. Psychological distress, functional disability, and cognitive impairment are also important predictors of HRQoL.

  16. Methodology for a Trial of Brain-Centered versus Anti-cholinergic Therapy for Women with Urgency Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komesu, Yuko M.; Ketai, Loren H.; Sapien, Robert E.; Rogers, Rebecca G.; Schrader, Ronald M.; Simmerman-Sierra, Timothy; Mayer, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This paper describes the rationale and methodology a study which investigates mind-body treatment versus pharmacotherapy for women with urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). To explore brain associations in UUI, a subset of patients will also undergo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We hypothesize that hypnotherapy a mind-body intervention, will be at least as effective pharmacotherapy in treating UUI. We also hypothesize that fMRI findings will change following treatment, with changes potentially differing between groups. Methods The purpose of this manuscript is to recount the development and design challenges of a study evaluating the efficacy of hypnotherapy compared to conventional pharmacotherapy in UUI treatment. The study randomizes women to either of these treatments and outcome measures include bladder diaries and validated questionnaires. Sample size estimates, based on a non-inferiority test (alpha=.025, beta=0.20), after considering drop-out/loss to follow-up, indicated approximately 150 woman would be required to test the hypothesis that hypnotherapy is non-inferior to pharmacotherapy within a 5% non-inferiority margin. The study will also evaluate fMRI change in a subset of participants before and after therapy. Study challenges included designing a study with a mind-body therapy and a comparison treatment equally acceptable to participants, standardizing the interventions, confronting the reality that trials are time-consuming for participants and making appropriate accommodations. Results Study enrollment began March 2013 and is ongoing. Conclusions This manuscript details the design a of randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing mind-body therapy to medications in treatment of UUI and describes the challenges encountered in its planning. PMID:27752750

  17. Structure, Process, and Culture Differences of Pediatric Trauma Centers Participating in an International Comparative Effectiveness Study of Children with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gitte Y; Schober, Michelle; Fabio, Anthony; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Grant, Mary Jo C; Shafi, Nadeem; Bennett, Tellen D; Hirtz, Deborah; Bell, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important worldwide cause of death and disability for children. The Approaches and Decisions for Acute Pediatric TBI (ADAPT) Trial is an observational, cohort study to compare the effectiveness of six aspects of TBI care. Understanding the differences between clinical sites-including their structure, clinical processes, and culture differences-will be necessary to assess differences in outcome from the study and can inform the overall community regarding differences across academic centers. We developed a survey and queried ADAPT site principal investigators with a focus on six domains: (i) hospital, (ii) pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), (iii) medical staff characteristics, (iv) quality of care, (v) medication safety, and (vi) safety culture. Summary statistics were used to describe differences between centers. ADAPT clinical sites that enrolled a subject within the first year (32 US-based, 11 international) were studied. A wide variation in site characteristics was observed in hospital and ICU characteristics, including an almost sevenfold range in ICU size (8-55 beds) and more than fivefold range of overall ICU admissions (537-2623). Nursing staffing (predominantly 1:1 or 1:2) and the presence of pharmacists within the ICU (79 %) were less variable, and most sites "strongly agreed" or "agreed" that Neurosurgery and Critical Care teams worked well together (81.4 %). However, a minority of sites (46 %) used an explicit protocol for treatment of children with severe TBI care. We found a variety of inter-center structure, process, and culture differences. These intrinsic differences between sites may begin to explain why interventional studies have failed to prove efficacy of experimental therapies. Understanding these differences may be an important factor in analyzing future ADAPT trial results and in determining best practices for pediatric severe TBI.

  18. Voxel-based morphometry multi-center mega-analysis of brain structure in social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Marie Bas-Hoogendam

    2017-01-01

    An international multi-center mega-analysis on the largest database of SAD structural T1-weighted 3T MRI scans to date was performed to compare GM volume of SAD-patients (n = 174 and healthy control (HC-participants (n = 213 using voxel-based morphometry. A hypothesis-driven region of interest (ROI approach was used, focusing on the basal ganglia, the amygdala-hippocampal complex, the prefrontal cortex, and the parietal cortex. SAD-patients had larger GM volume in the dorsal striatum when compared to HC-participants. This increase correlated positively with the severity of self-reported social anxiety symptoms. No SAD-related differences in GM volume were present in the other ROIs. Thereby, the results of this mega-analysis suggest a role for the dorsal striatum in SAD, but previously reported SAD-related changes in GM in the amygdala, hippocampus, precuneus, prefrontal cortex and parietal regions were not replicated. Our findings emphasize the importance of large sample imaging studies and the need for meta-analyses like those performed by the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA Consortium.

  19. Right Brain Drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Adryce C.

    1985-01-01

    The author describes activities of a weekly enrichment class providing right-brain tasks to gifted elementary students. Activities, which centered on artistic creativity, were taken from "Drawing On the Right Side of the Brain" by B. Edwards. (CL)

  20. Development of a Questionnaire Designed To Evaluate the Employee Development Activities at Paradise Valley Community College Center: Politics, Law, and Economics of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, Marilyn J.; Nellis, Deo E.

    This paper describes the development of a questionnaire for evaluating the activities of the Employee Development Program (EDP) at Paradise Valley Community College Center (PVCCC) in Phoenix (Arizona). Four major goals of the evaluation of the activities of the EDP, and a means for ensuring the content validity of the questionnaire are described.…

  1. Stress-Induced Hyperglycemia, but Not Diabetic Hyperglycemia, Is Associated with Higher Mortality in Patients with Isolated Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Analysis of a Propensity Score-Matched Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chien, Peng-Chen; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2017-11-03

    Background : Admission hyperglycemia is associated with higher morbidity and mortality in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Stress-induced hyperglycemia (SIH), a form of hyperglycemia induced by the stress response, is associated with increased patient mortality following TBI. However, admission hyperglycemia occurs not only in SIH but also in patients with diabetic hyperglycemia (DH). Current information regarding whether trauma patients with SIH represent a distinct group with differential outcomes compared to those with DH remains limited. Methods : Serum glucose concentration ≥200 mg/dL upon arrival at the emergency department was defined as hyperglycemia. Presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) was determined by patient history and/or admission glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level ≥6.5%. In the present study, the patient cohort included those with moderate and severe TBI, as defined by an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score ≥3 points in the head, and excluded those who had additional AIS scores ≥3 points in any other region of the body. A total of 1798 adult patients with isolated moderate to severe TBI were allocated into four groups: SIH ( n = 140), DH ( n = 187), diabetic normoglycemia (DN, n = 186), and non-diabetic normoglycemia (NDN, n = 1285). Detailed patient information was retrieved from the Trauma Registry System at a level I trauma center between 1 January 2009, and 31 December 2015. Unpaired Student's t - and Mann-Whitney U -tests were used to analyze normally and non-normally distributed continuous data, respectively. Categorical data were compared using the Pearson chi-square or two-sided Fisher's exact tests. Matched patient populations were allocated in a 1:1 ratio according to propensity scores calculated by NCSS software. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of SIH and DH on the adjusted mortality outcome. Results : In patients with isolated moderate to severe TBI, the presence of SIH and DH led to 9.1-fold and 2

  2. Spelling is Just a Click Away - A User-Centered Brain-Computer Interface Including Auto-Calibration and Predictive Text Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Tobias; Völker, Stefan; Gunesch, Laura; Kübler, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) based on event-related potentials (ERP) allow for selection of characters from a visually presented character-matrix and thus provide a communication channel for users with neurodegenerative disease. Although they have been topic of research for more than 20 years and were multiply proven to be a reliable communication method, BCIs are almost exclusively used in experimental settings, handled by qualified experts. This study investigates if ERP-BCIs can be handled independently by laymen without expert support, which is inevitable for establishing BCIs in end-user's daily life situations. Furthermore we compared the classic character-by-character text entry against a predictive text entry (PTE) that directly incorporates predictive text into the character-matrix. N = 19 BCI novices handled a user-centered ERP-BCI application on their own without expert support. The software individually adjusted classifier weights and control parameters in the background, invisible to the user (auto-calibration). All participants were able to operate the software on their own and to twice correctly spell a sentence with the auto-calibrated classifier (once with PTE, once without). Our PTE increased spelling speed and, importantly, did not reduce accuracy. In sum, this study demonstrates feasibility of auto-calibrating ERP-BCI use, independently by laymen and the strong benefit of integrating predictive text directly into the character-matrix.

  3. Are Cancer incidence Rates Among Present And Past Workers Of The research Centers Of The Atomic Energy Commission higher Than The Rates Among The General Population?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litai, D.

    1999-01-01

    Cancer incidence rates among the workers of the AEC and its retirees have increased several fold in the last decade compared to the rates experienced in previous ones. This has brought about a wave of claims for compensation with negative repercussions in the media about the state of radiation safety in the nuclear research centers in the country. The Nuclear Research Center - Negev, being, generally closed to public and media visits, has taken the brunt of this criticism. Consequently, the question spelled out in the title has caused much concern and deserves to be discussed and explained. The purpose of this paper is to review what we know in this context and to show that the observed morbidity rates, worrying as they may be, are entirely natural, and, by and large, unrelated to the occupational exposures of the workers. It is well known that cancer incidence rates in the population rise steeply with age, especially over 50. As both research centers are approaching the age of 40, it is clear that a very large fraction of the workers and all retirees have passed this age and many are already in their sixties and even seventies. It is a well established fact that close to 40% of the population in this country (and many others as well) develop some type of cancer during their lifetime and close to a half of these succumb to it. As most of those cancers occur after the age of 50, this explains the increased rates alluded to above. Notably, numerous research centers around the globe have reached similar ages in the last decade and experience similar increases in morbidity, that have caused understandable concern and the initiation of epidemiological studies intended to identify the health effects of extended exposures to low doses, if any. Such studies have been carried out in several countries and followed, altogether, about 100,000 workers through 40 years. The studies showed no excess of cancer mortality among workers compared to the general population (adjusted

  4. The KhoeSan Early Learning Center Pilot Project: Negotiating Power and Possibility in a South African Institute of Higher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wet, Priscilla

    2011-01-01

    As we search for a new paradigm in post-apartheid South Africa, the knowledge base and worldview of the KhoeSan first Indigenous peoples is largely missing. The South African government has established various mechanisms as agents for social change. Institutions of higher learning have implemented transformation programs. KhoeSan peoples, however,…

  5. Higher resting-state activity in reward-related brain circuits in obese versus normal-weight females independent of food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenkamp, P S; Zhou, W; Dahlberg, L S; Stark, J; Larsen, A L; Olivo, G; Wiemerslage, L; Larsson, E-M; Sundbom, M; Benedict, C; Schiöth, H B

    2016-11-01

    In response to food cues, obese vs normal-weight individuals show greater activation in brain regions involved in the regulation of food intake under both fasted and sated conditions. Putative effects of obesity on task-independent low-frequency blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signals-that is, resting-state brain activity-in the context of food intake are, however, less well studied. To compare eyes closed, whole-brain low-frequency BOLD signals between severely obese and normal-weight females, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations were measured in the morning following an overnight fast in 17 obese (age: 39±11 years, body mass index (BMI): 42.3±4.8 kg m - 2 ) and 12 normal-weight females (age: 36±12 years, BMI: 22.7±1.8 kg m - 2 ), both before and 30 min after consumption of a standardized meal (~260 kcal). Compared with normal-weight controls, obese females had increased low-frequency activity in clusters located in the putamen, claustrum and insula (Pfood intake. Self-reported hunger dropped and plasma glucose concentrations increased after food intake (Pfood intake under the experimental settings applied in the current study. Future studies involving males and females, as well as utilizing repeated post-prandial resting-state fMRI scans and various types of meals are needed to further investigate how food intake alters resting-state brain activity in obese humans.

  6. Rapid Bioavailability and Disposition protocol: A novel higher throughput approach to assess pharmacokinetics and steady-state brain distribution with reduced animal usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tingting; Gao, Ruina; Scott-Stevens, Paul; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Chalmers; Wang, Jianfei; Summerfield, Scott; Liu, Houfu; Sahi, Jasminder

    2018-05-29

    Besides routine pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters, unbound brain-to-blood concentration ratio (K p,uu ) is an index particularly crucial in drug discovery for central nervous system (CNS) indications. Despite advantages of K p,uu from steady state after constant intravenous (i.v.) infusion compared with one- or multiple time points after transient dosing, it is seldom obtained for compound optimization in early phase of CNS drug discovery due to requirement of prerequisite PK data to inform the study design. Here, we designed a novel rat in vivo PK protocol, dubbed as Rapid Bioavailability and Disposition (RBD), which combined oral (p.o.) dosing and i.v. infusion to obtain steady-state brain penetration, along with blood clearance, oral exposure and oral bioavailability for each discovery compound, within a 24 hour in-life experiment and only a few (e.g., 3) animals. Protocol validity was verified through simulations with a range of PK parameters in compartmental models as well as data comparison for nine compounds with distinct PK profiles. PK parameters (K p,brain , CL b and oral AUC) measured from the RBD protocol for all compounds, were within two-fold and/or statistically similar to those derived from conventional i.v./p.o. crossover PK studies. Our data clearly indicates that the RBD protocol offers reliable and reproducible data over a wide range of PK properties, with reduced turnaround time and animal usage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Pathological and incidental findings on brain MRI in a single-center study of 229 consecutive girls with early or precocious puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Aksglaede, Lise; Mouritsen, Annette

    2012-01-01

    Central precocious puberty may result from organic brain lesions, but is most frequently of idiopathic origin. Clinical or biochemical factors which could predict a pathological brain MRI in girls with CPP have been searched for. With the recent decline in age at pubertal onset among US and Europ...

  8. Higher levels of physical fitness are associated with a reduced risk of suffering sarcopenic obesity and better perceived health among the elderly: the EXERNET multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrero-Chamizo, R; Gómez-Cabello, A; Meléndez, A; Vila-Maldonado, S; Espino, L; Gusi, N; Villa, G; Casajús, J A; González-Gross, M; Ara, I

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the associations between physical fitness levels, health related quality of life (HRQoL) and sarcopenic obesity (SO) and to analyze the usefulness of several physical fitness tests as a screening tool for detecting elderly people with an increased risk of suffering SO. Cross-sectional analysis of a population-based sample. Non-institutionalized Spanish elderly participating in the EXERNET multi-centre study. 2747 elderly subjects aged 65 and older. Body weight, height and body mass index were evaluated in each subject. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance. Four SO groups were created based on percentage of body fat and relative muscle mass; 1) normal group, 2) sarcopenic group, 3) obesity group and 4) SO group. Physical fitness was evaluated using 8 tests (balance, lower and upper body strength, lower and upper body flexibility, agility, walking speed and aerobic capacity). Three tertiles were created for each test based on the calculated scores. HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQol visual analogue scale. Participants with SO showed lower physical fitness levels compared with normal subjects. Better balance, agility, and aerobic capacity were associated to a lower risk of suffering SO in the fittest men (odds ratio health was associated with better physical fitness performance. Higher levels of physical fitness were associated with a reduced risk of suffering SO and better perceived health among elderly. SO elderly people have lower physical functional levels than healthy counterparts.

  9. Clinical presentation and epidemiology of brain tumors firstly diagnosed in adults in the Emergency Department: a 10-year, single center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelli, Ivan; Lippi, Giuseppe; Campana, Valentina; Servadei, Franco; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2017-07-01

    Several patients with new onset brain tumors present to the Emergency Department (ED) complaining for new symptoms. Although information exists on symptom prevalence in the entire population of patients with brain tumors, little is known about the clinical presentation in ED. This retrospective study was planned to investigate clinical presentation and epidemiology of brain tumors firstly diagnosed in a large urban ED throughout a 10-year period. All medical records of patients aged ≥18 years, discharged from our ED with a diagnosis of brain tumor were retrieved from the electronic hospital database during a 10-year period (2006 to 2015). The records were reassessed for selecting only brain tumors firstly diagnosed in the ED. The symptoms at presentation were divided in six categories: (I) headache; (II) seizures; (III) focal signs; (IV) altered mental status; (V) nausea/vomiting/dizziness; (VI) trauma. For all cases, the hospital record was retrieved, to obtain histologic classification of tumors. Patients with inflammatory neoformations were excluded from the study. Overall, 205 patients with firstly diagnosed brain tumor were identified among 870,135 ED visits (i.e., presentation signs/symptoms. First presentation of brain tumor in the ED is not a rare occurrence, so that the emergency physicians should be aware of this possibility.

  10. The autonomic higher order processing nuclei of the lower brain stem are among the early targets of the Alzheimer's disease-related cytoskeletal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, U; Del Tredici, K; Schultz, C; Thal, D R; Braak, E; Braak, H

    2001-06-01

    The nuclei of the pontine parabrachial region (medial parabrachial nucleus, MPB; lateral parabrachial nucleus, LPB; subpeduncular nucleus, SPP) together with the intermediate zone of the medullary reticular formation (IRZ) are pivotal relay stations within central autonomic regulatory feedback systems. This study was undertaken to investigate the evolution of the Alzheimer's disease-related cytoskeletal pathology in these four sites of the lower brain stem. We examined the MPB, LPB, SPP and IRZ in 27 autopsy cases and classified the cortical Alzheimer-related cytoskeletal anomalies according to an established staging system (neurofibrillary tangle/neuropil threads [NFT/NT] stages I-VI). The lesions were visualized either with the antibody AT8, which is immunospecific for the abnormally phosphorylated form of the cytoskeletal protein tau, or with a modified Gallyas silver iodide stain. The MPB, SPB, and IRZ display cytoskeletal pathology in stage I and the LPB in stage II, whereby bothstages correspond to the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In stages III-IV (incipient AD), the MPB and SPP are severely affected. In all of the stage III-IV cases, the lesions in the LPB and IRZ are well developed. In stages V and VI (clinical phase of AD), the MPB and SPP are filled with the abnormal intraneuronal material. At stages V-VI, the LPB is moderately involved and the IRZ shows severe damage. The pathogenesis of the AD-related cytoskeletal lesions in the nuclei of the pontine parabrachial region and in the IRZ conforms with the cortical NFT/NT staging sequence I-VI. In the event that the cytoskeletal pathology observed in this study impairs the function of the nerve cells involved, it is conceivable that autonomic mechanisms progressively deteriorate with advancing cortical NFT/NT stages. This relationship remains to be established, but it could provide insights into the illusive correlation between the AD-related cytoskeletal pathology and the function of

  11. Operation Brain Trauma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Ho, C., Jenkins, L.W., and Kochanek, P.M. (2013). MRI assessment of cerebral blood flow following experimental traumatic brain injury combined with...Neuroproteomics and Biomarkers Research, Banyan Biomarkers, Inc., Alachua, Florida. 8Center for Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School... Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 8Center for Innovative Research, Center for Neuroproteomics and

  12. Novel Middle-Type Kenyon Cells in the Honeybee Brain Revealed by Area-Preferential Gene Expression Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Kumi; Ikeda, Tsubomi; Nagai, Mirai; Hori, Sayaka; Umatani, Chie; Tadano, Hiroto; Ugajin, Atsushi; Nakaoka, Takayoshi; Paul, Rajib Kumar; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Shirai, Kenichi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kubo, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    The mushroom bodies (a higher center) of the honeybee (Apis mellifera L) brain were considered to comprise three types of intrinsic neurons, including large- and small-type Kenyon cells that have distinct gene expression profiles. Although previous neural activity mapping using the immediate early gene kakusei suggested that small-type Kenyon cells are mainly active in forager brains, the precise Kenyon cell types that are active in the forager brain remain to be elucidated. We searched for n...

  13. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feistel, H.

    1991-01-01

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Brain Age in Early Stages of Bipolar Disorders or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Tomas; Franke, Katja; Kolenic, Marian; Capkova, Jana; Matejka, Martin; Propper, Lukas; Uher, Rudolf; Stopkova, Pavla; Novak, Tomas; Paus, Tomas; Kopecek, Miloslav; Spaniel, Filip; Alda, Martin

    2017-12-20

    The greater presence of neurodevelopmental antecedants may differentiate schizophrenia from bipolar disorders (BD). Machine learning/pattern recognition allows us to estimate the biological age of the brain from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans (MRI). The discrepancy between brain and chronological age could contribute to early detection and differentiation of BD and schizophrenia. We estimated brain age in 2 studies focusing on early stages of schizophrenia or BD. In the first study, we recruited 43 participants with first episode of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (FES) and 43 controls. In the second study, we included 96 offspring of bipolar parents (48 unaffected, 48 affected) and 60 controls. We used relevance vector regression trained on an independent sample of 504 controls to estimate the brain age of study participants from structural MRI. We calculated the brain-age gap estimate (BrainAGE) score by subtracting the chronological age from the brain age. Participants with FES had higher BrainAGE scores than controls (F(1, 83) = 8.79, corrected P = .008, Cohen's d = 0.64). Their brain age was on average 2.64 ± 4.15 years greater than their chronological age (matched t(42) = 4.36, P stages of BD showed comparable BrainAGE scores to controls (F(2,149) = 1.04, corrected P = .70, η2 = 0.01) and comparable brain and chronological age. Early stages of schizophrenia, but not early stages of BD, were associated with advanced BrainAGE scores. Participants with FES showed neurostructural alterations, which made their brains appear 2.64 years older than their chronological age. BrainAGE scores could aid in early differential diagnosis between BD and schizophrenia. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. 5-Fluorouracil and 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) followed by hydroxyurea, misonidazole, and irradiation for brain stem gliomas: a pilot study of the Brain Tumor Research Center and the Childrens Cancer Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, V.A.; Edwards, M.S.; Wara, W.M.; Allen, J.; Ortega, J.; Vestnys, P.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-eight evaluable children with the diagnosis of brain stem glioma were treated with 5-fluorouracil and CCNU before posterior fossa irradiation (5500 rads); during irradiation, the children received hydroxyurea and misonidazole. The treatment was well tolerated, and minimal toxicity was produced. The median relapse-free survival was 32 weeks, and the median survival was 44 weeks. Analysis of covariates showed that, in patients between the ages of 2 and 19 years, survival was longest in the older children (P less than 0.02). Tumor histology, sex, extent of operation (if any), Karnofsky score, and radiation dose did not correlate with survival

  16. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in brain tumors and cervical region. Experience of the Dean Funes Medical Center, first experience in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery inside the country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Vita, H.; Brunetto, M.; Derechinsky, V; Derechinsky, G.; Derechinsky, M.; Gonzalez, S.; Marinello, A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study to analyze the results of 53 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes' was performed. The patients had brain and head and neck tumors. Patients and methods: From November 1997 to March 2003, 53 patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes'. The daily dose administered varied from 1.8 to 2 Gy and the total dose from 30 to 70 Gy. The minimal follow up was 2 months, and the medium follow up 32 months. Local control and survival were analyzed in all patients, as well as tolerance and the complications of the treatment. Results: Since these series represented a very heterogeneous group of patients, the final results were very difficult to compare with other alternative treatments. However, an excellent tolerance to therapy was observed. Some subsets of patients had good results to treatment: patients with metastasis to the orbit, patients with lesions to the sellar and parasellar regions and some who relapsed following conventional radiotherapy, mainly lymphomas. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiotherapy is a valid therapeutic method to treat tumors of the brain and head and neck, as long as the tumor has a moderate size (6 cm. or less) and the shape is cylindrical or ellipsoid. Stereotactic radiation improves the therapeutic ratio as compared with the conventional radiotherapy. It has advantages over the 3D technique, and could compete with IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy). (author) [es

  17. The relationship between right-to-left shunt and brain white matter lesions in Japanese patients with migraine: a single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Akio; Suzuki, Keisuke; Takekawa, Hidehiro; Takashima, Ryotaro; Suzuki, Ayano; Suzuki, Shiho; Hirata, Koichi

    2017-12-01

    There may be a link between right-to-left shunt (RLs) and brain white matter lesions (WMLs) in patients with migraine. In this study, we assessed the relationship between WMLs and RLs in Japanese migraine patients. A total of 107 consecutive patients with migraine with (MA) and without aura (MWOA) were included in this study. Contrast transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to detect RLs. WMLs were graded using brain magnetic resonance imaging based on well-established criteria. The prevalence of RLs was significantly increased in the WMLs positive group (n = 24) compared with the WMLs negative group (n = 83) (75.0% vs. 47.0%, p = 0.015). In prevalence of WMLs between MA and MWOA patients, there were no statistical differences (p = 0.410). Logistic regression analysis adjusted by age and disease duration of migraine identified an RLs-positive status as the sole determinant for the presence of WMLs (OR = 6.15; 95% CI 1.82-20.8; p = 0.003) CONCLUSION: Our study suggests a possible link between RLs and WMLs in Japanese patients with migraine.

  18. Higher Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kunle Amuwo: Higher Education Transformation: A Paradigm Shilt in South Africa? ... ty of such skills, especially at the middle management levels within the higher ... istics and virtues of differentiation and diversity. .... may be forced to close shop for lack of capacity to attract ..... necessarily lead to racial and gender equity,.

  19. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  20. Hardware-related infections after deep brain stimulation surgery: review of incidence, severity and management in 212 single-center procedures in the first year after implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentino, Massimo; Pilleri, Manuela; Bartolomei, Luigi

    2011-12-01

    Device-related infection is a common occurrence after deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery, and may result in additional interventions and a loss of efficacy of therapy. This retrospective review aimed to evaluate the incidence, severity and management of device-related infections in 212 DBS procedures performed in our institute. Data on 106 patients, in whom 212 DBS procedures were performed between 2001 and 2011 at our institute by a single neurosurgeon (M.P.), were reviewed to assess the incidence, severity, management and clinical characteristics of infections in the first year after the implantation of a DBS system. Infections occurred in 8.5% of patients and 4.2% of procedures. Of the nine infections, eight involved the neurostimulator and extensions, and one the whole system. The infections occurred 30.7 days after implantation: 7 within 30 days and 2 within 6 months. Infected and uninfected patients were comparable in terms of age, sex, indication for DBS implantation and neurostimulator location. In eight cases, the system components involved were removed and re-implanted after 3 months, while in one case the complete hardware was removed and not re-implanted. The overall incidence of postoperative infections after DBS system implantation was 4.2%; this rate decreased over time. All infections required further surgery. Correct and timely management of partial infections may result in successful salvage of part of the system.

  1. Spelling is just a click away – a user-centered brain-computer interface including auto-calibration and predictive text entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eKaufmann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI based on event-related potentials (ERP allow for selection of characters from a visually presented character-matrix and thus provide a communication channel for users with neurodegenerative disease. Although they have been topic of research for more than 20 years and were multiply proven to be a reliable communication method, BCIs are almost exclusively used in experimental settings, handled by qualified experts. This study investigates if ERP-BCIs can be handled independently by laymen without expert interference, which is inevitable for establishing BCIs in end-user’s daily life situations. Furthermore we compared the classic character-by-character text entry against a predictive text entry (PTE that directly incorporates predictive text into the character matrix. N=19 BCI novices handled a user-centred ERP-BCI application on their own without expert interference. The software individually adjusted classifier weights and control parameters in the background, invisible to the user (auto-calibration. All participants were able to operate the software on their own and to twice correctly spell a sentence with the auto-calibrated classifier (once with PTE, once without. Our PTE increased spelling speed and importantly did not reduce accuracy. In sum, this study demonstrates feasibility of auto-calibrating ERP-BCI use, independently by laymen and the strong benefit of integrating predictive text directly into the character-matrix.

  2. Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    This chapter reports 1982 cases involving aspects of higher education. Interesting cases noted dealt with the federal government's authority to regulate state employees' retirement and raised the questions of whether Title IX covers employment, whether financial aid makes a college a program under Title IX, and whether sex segregated mortality…

  3. Diffusion tractography of the subcortical auditory system in a postmortem human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Sitek, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The subcortical auditory system is challenging to identify with standard human brain imaging techniques: MRI signal decreases toward the center of the brain as well as at higher resolution, both of which are necessary for imaging small brainstem auditory structures.Using high-resolution diffusion-weighted MRI, we asked:Can we identify auditory structures and connections in high-resolution ex vivo images?Which structures and connections can be mapped in vivo?

  4. Comparison of the New Adult Ventilator-Associated Event Criteria to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pediatric Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Definition (PNU2) in a Population of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirulis, Meghan M; Hamele, Mitchell T; Stockmann, Chris R; Bennett, Tellen D; Bratton, Susan L

    2016-02-01

    The new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention paradigm for ventilator-associated events is intended to simplify surveillance of infectious and noninfectious complications of mechanical ventilation in adults. We assessed the ventilator-associated events algorithm in pediatric patients. A retrospective observational cohort study. This single-center study took place in a PICU at an urban academic medical facility. Pediatric (ages 0-18 yr old) trauma patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury ventilated for greater than or equal to 2 days. We assessed for pediatric ventilator-associated pneumonia (as defined by current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention PNU2 guidelines), adult ventilator-associated events, and an experimental ventilator-associated events definition modified for pediatric patients. We compared ventilator-associated events to ventilator-associated pneumonia to calculate the test characteristics. Thirty-nine of 119 patients (33%) developed ventilator-associated pneumonia. Sensitivity of the adult ventilator-associated condition definition was 23% (95% CI, 11-39%), which increased to 56% (95% CI, 40-72%) using the modified pediatric ventilator-associated pneumonia criterion. Specificity reached 100% for both original and modified pediatric probable ventilator-associated pneumonia using ventilator-associated events criteria. Children who developed ventilator-associated pneumonia or ventilator-associated condition had similar baseline characteristics: age, mechanism of injury, injury severity scores, and use of an intracranial pressure monitor. Diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia and ventilator-associated condition portended similarly unfavorable outcomes: longer median duration of ventilation, ICU and hospital length of stay, and more discharges to rehabilitation, home health, or nursing care compared with patients with no pulmonary complication. Both current and modified ventilator-associated events criteria have poor

  5. Migraine and brain changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, I.H.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis describes the longitudinal population-based CAMERA-study on the association between migraine and brain changes (e.g. white matter hyperintensities, infarct-like and other lesions) and possible causes and consequences of those brain changes. Women with migraine showed higher incidence of

  6. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  7. of brain tumours

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outline of the important clinical issues related to brain tumours and psychiatry. ... Left-sided, frontal tumours also seem to be associated with higher rates of depression, while those in the frontal lobe of the right .... Oxford: Blackwell Science,.

  8. The guiding center Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recursion relations determining the guiding center Langrangian Λ and the associated guiding center variables to all orders are derived. We consider some particularly simple forms of Λ obtainable by specific choices of certain arbitrary functions appearing as free parameters in the theory. It is, for example, possible to locally define the guiding center variables so that the expression for the corresponding Langrangian is unchanged by all higher order terms. (orig.)

  9. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  10. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  11. Development of the Young Brain

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of age Brain activity can predict success of depression treatment More News From the Field... Contact Us The National Institute of Mental Health Information Resource Center Hours: 8:30 a.m. ...

  12. Obese individuals with more components of the metabolic syndrome and/or prediabetes demonstrate decreased activation of reward-related brain centers in response to food cues in both the fed and fasting states: a preliminary fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, O M; Mantzoros, C S

    2017-03-01

    It remains unknown whether obese individuals with more components of the metabolic syndrome and/or prediabetes demonstrate altered activation of brain centers in response to food cues. We examined obese individuals with prediabetes (n=26) vs obese individuals without prediabetes (n=11) using fMRI. We also performed regression analyses on the basis of the number of MetS components per subject. Obese individuals with prediabetes have decreased activation of the reward-related putamen in the fasting state and decreased activation of the salience- and reward-related insula after eating. Obese individuals with more components of MetS demonstrate decreased activation of the putamen while fasting. All these activations remain significant when corrected for BMI, waist circumference (WC), HbA1c and gender. Decreased activation in the reward-related central nervous system areas among the obese is more pronounced in subjects with prediabetes and MetS. Prospective studies are needed to quantify their contributions to the development of prediabetes/MetS and to study whether they may predispose to the exacerbation of obesity and the development of comorbidities over time.

  13. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  14. NEUROSPIN, sensing brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganier, Aude

    2007-01-01

    Research center, the NeuroSpin platform is to be equipped with unrivalled means of exploring the nervous system and cognitive process. Located at Saclay, it will soon gather together the world's best experts in neuro-sciences, for example in imaging and physics. An exceptional complex that does not just have the brain in mind. (authors)

  15. Higher Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Lower Plasma Glucose Are Associated with Larger Gray Matter Volume but Not with White Matter or Total Brain Volume in Dutch Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer-Brolsma, E.M.; Zwaluw, N.L. van der; Wijngaarden, J.P. van; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.; Veld, P.H. In 't; Feskens, E.J.M.; Smeets, P.A.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Rest, O. van de; Groot, L.C. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown beneficial associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status and cognitive performance, but results are inconclusive. Studies on 25(OH)D status and brain volumetric measures may provide more insight in the potential role of vitamin D in cognitive

  16. Higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and lower plasma glucose are associated with larger gray matter volume but not with white matter or total brain volume in dutch community-dwelling older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M.; van der Zwaluw, Nikita L.; van Wijngaarden, Janneke P.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A.; in 't Veld, Paulette H.; Feskens, Edith J.; Smeets, Paul A.; Kessels, Roy P.; van de Rest, Ondine; de Groot, Lisette C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown beneficial associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status and cognitive performance, but results are inconclusive. Studies on 25(OH)D status and brain volumetric measures may provide more insight in the potential role of vitamin D in cognitive

  17. Higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and lower plasma glucose are associated with larger gray matter volume but not with white matter or total brain volume in Dutch community-dwelling older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer-Brolsma, E.M.; Zwaluw, N.L. van der; Wijngaarden, J.P. van; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.; Veld, P.H. in 't; Feskens, E.J.M.; Smeets, P.A.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Rest, O. van de; Groot, L.C.P.G.M. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown beneficial associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status and cognitive performance, but results are inconclusive. Studies on 25(OH)D status and brain volumetric measures may provide more insight in the potential role of vitamin D in cognitive

  18. Magnetic resonance elastography in normal human brain: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lei; Gao Peiyi; Lin Yan; Han Jiancheng; Xi Zhinong; Shen Hao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the application of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the human brain. Methods: An external force actuator was developed. The actuator was fixed to the head coil. During MRE scan, one side of the actuator was attached to the volunteers' head. Low frequency oscillation was produced by the actuator and generated shear waves propagating into brain tissue. The pulse sequence of MRE was designed. A modified gradient echo sequence was developed with motion sensitizing gradient (MSG) imposed along X, Y or Z direction. Cyclic displacement within brain tissue induced by shear waves caused a measurable phase shift in the received MR signal. From the measured phase shift, the displacement at each voxel could be calculated, and the shear waves within the brain were directly imaged. By adjusting the phase offset, the dynamic propagation of shear waves in a wave cycle was obtained. Phase images were processed with local frequency estimation (LFE) technique to obtain the elasticity images. Shear waves at 100 Hz, 150 Hz, and 200 Hz were applied. Results: The phase images of MRE directly imaged the propagating shear waves within the brain. The direction of the propagation was from surface of the brain to the center. The wavelength of shear waves varied with the change of actuating frequency. The change of wavelength of shear waves in gray and white matter of the brain was identified. The wavelength of shear waves in gray matter was shorter than that in white matter. The elasticity image of the brain revealed that the shear modulus of the white matter was higher than that of gray matter. Conclusion: The phase images of MRE can directly visualize the propagation of shear waves in the brain tissue. The elasticity image of the brain can demonstrate the change of elasticity between gray and white matter. (authors)

  19. Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month The military community recognizes the strength and resilience of our wounded, ill, and injured service members, and their families and caregivers in November. This year’s theme is “Show of ...

  20. A Plea for Right Brain Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Thomas R.

    1984-01-01

    The visuo-spatial centers of the right brain are crucial to being able to problem solve or conceptualize (two abilities necessary for success in understanding science). Yet, current educational format is almost exclusively a left-brain undertaking. Reasons why educators should emphasize right-brain understanding in educational curricula at all…

  1. The Brain and Spinal Injury Center score: a novel, simple, and reproducible method for assessing the severity of acute cervical spinal cord injury with axial T2-weighted MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbott, Jason F; Whetstone, William D; Readdy, William J; Ferguson, Adam R; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Saigal, Rajiv; Hawryluk, Gregory W J; Beattie, Michael S; Mabray, Marc C; Pan, Jonathan Z; Manley, Geoffrey T; Dhall, Sanjay S

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies that have evaluated the prognostic value of abnormal changes in signals on T2-weighted MRI scans of an injured spinal cord have focused on the longitudinal extent of this signal abnormality in the sagittal plane. Although the transverse extent of injury and the degree of spared spinal cord white matter have been shown to be important for predicting outcomes in preclinical animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI), surprisingly little is known about the prognostic value of altered T2 relaxivity in humans in the axial plane. The authors undertook a retrospective chart review of 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria of this study and presented to the authors' Level I trauma center with an acute blunt traumatic cervical SCI. Within 48 hours of admission, all patients underwent MRI examination, which included axial and sagittal T2 images. Neurological symptoms, evaluated with the grades according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), at the time of admission and at hospital discharge were correlated with MRI findings. Five distinct patterns of intramedullary spinal cord T2 signal abnormality were defined in the axial plane at the injury epicenter. These patterns were assigned ordinal values ranging from 0 to 4, referred to as the Brain and Spinal Injury Center (BASIC) scores, which encompassed the spectrum of SCI severity. The BASIC score strongly correlated with neurological symptoms at the time of both hospital admission and discharge. It also distinguished patients initially presenting with complete injury who improved by at least one AIS grade by the time of discharge from those whose injury did not improve. The authors' proposed score was rapid to apply and showed excellent interrater reliability. The authors describe a novel 5-point ordinal MRI score for classifying acute SCIs on the basis of axial T2-weighted imaging. The proposed BASIC score stratifies the SCIs according to the extent of transverse T2

  2. Structure, Process, and Culture of Intensive Care Units Treating Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Survey of Centers Participating in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Aziz S; McCredie, Victoria A; Mainprize, Todd G; Gomez, David; Nathens, Avery B

    2017-10-01

    Outcome after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) differs substantially between hospitals. Explaining this variation begins with understanding the differences in structures and processes of care, particularly at intensive care units (ICUs) where acute TBI care takes place. We invited trauma medical directors (TMDs) from 187 centers participating in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program (ACS TQIP) to complete a survey. The survey domains included ICU model, type, availability of specialized units, staff, training programs, standard protocols and order sets, approach to withdrawal of life support, and perceived level of neurosurgeons' engagement in the ICU management of TBI. One hundred forty-two TMDs (76%) completed the survey. Severe TBI patients are admitted to dedicated neurocritical care units in 52 hospitals (37%), trauma ICUs in 44 hospitals (31%), general ICUs in 34 hospitals (24%), and surgical ICUs in 11 hospitals (8%). Fifty-seven percent are closed units. Board-certified intensivists directed 89% of ICUs, whereas 17% were led by neurointensivists. Sixty percent of ICU directors were general surgeons. Thirty-nine percent of hospitals had critical care fellowships and 11% had neurocritical care fellowships. Fifty-nine percent of ICUs had standard order sets and 61% had standard protocols specific for TBI, with the most common protocol relating to intracranial pressure management (53%). Only 43% of TMDs were satisfied with the current level of neurosurgeons' engagement in the ICU management of TBI; 46% believed that neurosurgeons should be more engaged; 11% believed they should be less engaged. In the largest survey of North American ICUs caring for TBI patients, there is substantial variation in the current approaches to ICU care for TBI, highlighting multiple opportunities for comparative effectiveness research.

  3. Lion's Mane, Hericium erinaceus and Tiger Milk, Lignosus rhinocerotis (Higher Basidiomycetes) Medicinal Mushrooms Stimulate Neurite Outgrowth in Dissociated Cells of Brain, Spinal Cord, and Retina: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samberkar, Snehlata; Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Naidu, Murali; Wong, Kah-Hui; Raman, Jegadeesh; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disease is defined as a deterioration of the nervous system in the intellectual and cognitive capabilities. Statistics show that more than 80-90 million individuals age 65 and above in 2050 may be affected by neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Studies have shown that out of 2000 different types of edible and/or medicinal mushrooms, only a few countable mushrooms have been selected until now for neurohealth activity. Hericium erinaceus is one of the well-established medicinal mushrooms for neuronal health. It has been documented for its regenerative capability in peripheral nerve. Another mushroom used as traditional medicine is Lignosus rhinocerotis, which has been used for various illnesses. It has been documented for its neurite outgrowth potential in PC12 cells. Based on the regenerative capabilities of both the mushrooms, priority was given to select them for our study. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of H. erinaceus and L. rhinocerotis to stimulate neurite outgrowth in dissociated cells of brain, spinal cord, and retina from chick embryo when compared to brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Neurite outgrowth activity was confirmed by the immu-nofluorescence method in all tissue samples. Treatment with different concentrations of extracts resulted in neuronal differentiation and neuronal elongation. H. erinaceus extract at 50 µg/mL triggered neurite outgrowth at 20.47%, 22.47%, and 21.70% in brain, spinal cord, and retinal cells. L. rhinocerotis sclerotium extract at 50 µg/mL induced maximum neurite outgrowth of 20.77% and 24.73% in brain and spinal cord, whereas 20.77% of neurite outgrowth was observed in retinal cells at 25 µg/mL, respectively.

  4. Brain Death in Islamic Jurisprudence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nikzad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: In today's world, Islamic jurisprudence encounters  new issues. One of the areas where jurisprudence gets involved is the issues concerned with brain death, whether brain death in jurisprudence and Islamic law is considered the end of life. In this study, brain death was discussed from the Shiite jurisprudence perspective and also the opinions of the specialists are taken into account. METHODS: This study is designed based on library collection and review of the literature in the field of brain death. Also, Quranic verses, hadiths and fatwas (religious opinions of the scholars are used. Some of the articles which were centered around Islamic jurisprudence, particularly Shiite jurisprudence that explain and deal with brain death were given special consideration. FINDINGS: Brain death from religious and jurisprudence perspective is considered the termination of life and removing the vital organs from the body is not viewed as committing manslaughter. A person with brain death is not a normally known injured man who is still alive. The brain death patinets have no life and getting rid of the body does not constitute a case of manslaughter. Amputation of the organs of brain death patients for donation and transplantation amounts to the amputation of a dead body. If the life of a Muslim is subject to transplant of organs from the body of a brain death patient, it will be permissible. CONCLUSION: In principle, if the life of a Muslim entails transplant of organs of brain death patients, it will be permissible 

  5. Peripersonal space in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pellegrino, Giuseppe; Làdavas, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Research in neuroscience reveals that the brain constructs multiple representation of space. Here, we primarily focus on peripersonal space (PPS) representation, the region of space immediately surrounding our bodies and in which objects can be grasped and manipulated. We review convergent results from several generations of studies, including neurophysiological studies in animals, neuropsychological investigations in monkeys and brain-damaged patients with spatial cognition disorders, as well as recent neuroimaging experiments in neurologically normal individuals. Collectively, these studies show that the primate brain constructs multiple, rapidly modifiable representations of space, centered on different body parts (i.e., hand-centered, head-centered, and trunk-centered), which arise through extensive multisensory interactions within a set of interconnected parietal and frontal regions. PPS representations are pivotal in the sensory guidance of motor behavior, allowing us to interact with objects and, as demonstrated by recent studies, with other people in the space around us. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased expression of aquaporin-4 in human traumatic brain injury and brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hua; YAO Hong-tian; ZHANG Wei-ping; ZHANG LEI; DING Wei; ZHANG Shi-hong; CHEN Zhong; WEI Er-qing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), one of the aquaporins (AQPs), in human brain specimens from patients with traumatic brain injury or brain tumors. Methods: Nineteen human brain specimens were obtained from the patients with traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, benign meningioma or early stage hemorrhagic stroke. MRI or CT imaging was used to assess brain edema. Hematoxylin and eosin staining were used to evaluate cell damage. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the AQP4 expression. Results: AQP4 expression was increased from 15h to at least 8 d after injury. AQP4immunoreactivity was strong around astrocytomas, ganglioglioma and metastatic adenocarcinoma. However, AQP4 immunoreactivity was only found in the centers of astrocytomas and ganglioglioma, but not in metastatic adenocarcinoma derived from lung.Conclusion: AQP4 expression increases in human brains after traumatic brain injury, within brain-derived tumors, and around brain tumors.

  7. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resourceintegration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. Ausage center consists of a combination of interdependent actors that draw onresources across their individual usage processes to create v...

  8. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  9. Brain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become a Member Home Early Development & Well-Being Brain Development A child’s brain undergoes an amazing period of development from birth ... neural connections each second. The development of the brain is influenced by many factors, including a child’s ...

  10. Cortical Activation during Landmark-Centered vs. Gaze-Centered Memory of Saccade Targets in the Human: An FMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A remembered saccade target could be encoded in egocentric coordinates such as gaze-centered, or relative to some external allocentric landmark that is independent of the target or gaze (landmark-centered. In comparison to egocentric mechanisms, very little is known about such a landmark-centered representation. Here, we used an event-related fMRI design to identify brain areas supporting these two types of spatial coding (i.e., landmark-centered vs. gaze-centered for target memory during the Delay phase where only target location, not saccade direction, was specified. The paradigm included three tasks with identical display of visual stimuli but different auditory instructions: Landmark Saccade (remember target location relative to a visual landmark, independent of gaze, Control Saccade (remember original target location relative to gaze fixation, independent of the landmark, and a non-spatial control, Color Report (report target color. During the Delay phase, the Control and Landmark Saccade tasks activated overlapping areas in posterior parietal cortex (PPC and frontal cortex as compared to the color control, but with higher activation in PPC for target coding in the Control Saccade task and higher activation in temporal and occipital cortex for target coding in Landmark Saccade task. Gaze-centered directional selectivity was observed in superior occipital gyrus and inferior occipital gyrus, whereas landmark-centered directional selectivity was observed in precuneus and midposterior intraparietal sulcus. During the Response phase after saccade direction was specified, the parietofrontal network in the left hemisphere showed higher activation for rightward than leftward saccades. Our results suggest that cortical activation for coding saccade target direction relative to a visual landmark differs from gaze-centered directional selectivity for target memory, from the mechanisms for other types of allocentric tasks, and from the directionally

  11. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  12. Brain Basics: Know Your Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however, the brain is beginning to relinquish its secrets. Scientists have learned more about the brain in ... through the activity of these lobes. At the top of each temporal lobe is an area responsible ...

  13. mammalian brain system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Kania

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Relaxin-3, a member of the relaxin peptide family, was discovered in 2001 as a homologue of relaxin – a well-known reproductive hormone. However, it is the brain which turned out to be a major expression site of this newly discovered peptide. Both its molecular structure and expression pattern were shown to be very conserved among vertebrates. Extensive research carried out since the discovery of relaxin-3 contributed to the significant progress in our knowledge regarding this neuropeptide. The endogenous relaxin-3 receptor (RXFP3 was identified and the anatomy of the yet uncharacterized mammalian brain system was described, with nucleus incertus as the main center of relaxin-3 expression. Not only its diffusive projections throughout the whole brain, which reach various brain structures such as the hippocampus, septum, intergeniculate leaflet or amygdala, but also functional studies of the relaxin-3/RXFP3 signaling system, allowed this brain network to be classified as one of the ascending nonspecific brain systems. Thus far, research depicts the connection of relaxin-3 with phenomena such as feeding behavior, spatial memory, sleep/wake cycle or modulation of pituitary gland hormone secretion. Responsiveness of relaxin-3 neurons to stress factors and the strong orexigenic effect exerted by this peptide suggest its participation in modulation of feeding by stress, in particular of the chronic type. The discovery of relaxin-3 opened a new research field which will contribute to our better understanding of the neurobiological basis of feeding disorders.

  14. High-field, high-resolution, susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: improved image quality by addition of contrast agent and higher field strength in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinker, K.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Szomolanyi, P.; Weber, M.; Grabner, G.; Trattnig, S.; Stavrou, I.; Knosp, E.; Hoeftberger, R.; Stadlbauer, A.

    2008-01-01

    To demonstrate intratumoral susceptibility effects in malignant brain tumors and to assess visualization of susceptibility effects before and after administration of the paramagnetic contrast agent MultiHance (gadobenate dimeglumine; Bracco Imaging), an agent known to have high relaxivity, with respect to susceptibility effects, image quality, and reduction of scan time. Included in the study were 19 patients with malignant brain tumors who underwent high-resolution, susceptibility-weighted (SW) MR imaging at 3 T before and after administration of contrast agent. In all patients, Multihance was administered intravenously as a bolus (0.1 mmol/kg body weight). MR images were individually evaluated by two radiologists with previous experience in the evaluation of pre- and postcontrast 3-T SW MR images with respect to susceptibility effects, image quality, and reduction of scan time. In the 19 patients 21 tumors were diagnosed, of which 18 demonstrated intralesional susceptibility effects both in pre- and postcontrast SW images, and 19 demonstrated contrast enhancement in both SW images and T1-weighted spin-echo MR images. Conspicuity of susceptibility effects and image quality were improved in postcontrast images compared with precontrast images and the scan time was also reduced due to decreased TE values from 9 min (precontrast) to 7 min (postcontrast). The intravenous administration of MultiHance, an agent with high relaxivity, allowed a reduction of scan time from 9 min to 7 min while preserving excellent susceptibility effects and image quality in SW images obtained at 3 T. Contrast enhancement and intralesional susceptibility effects can be assessed in one sequence. (orig.)

  15. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  16. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of ‘image registration paths’ to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10-9).

  17. Risk of intracranial hemorrhage and cerebrovascular accidents in non-small cell lung cancer brain metastasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Geetika; Rana, Vishal; Wallace, Suzy; Taylor, Sarah; Debnam, Matthew; Feng, Lei; Suki, Dima; Karp, Daniel; Stewart, David; Oh, Yun

    2009-03-01

    Brain metastases confer significant morbidity and a poorer survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted antiangiogenic therapies (AAT) have demonstrated benefit for patients with metastatic NSCLC and are expected to directly inhibit the pathophysiology and morbidity of brain metastases, yet patients with brain metastases have been excluded from most clinical trials of AAT for fear of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The underlying risk of ICH from NSCLC brain metastases is low, but needs to be quantitated to plan clinical trials of AAT for NSCLC brain metastases. Data from MD Anderson Cancer Center Tumor Registry and electronic medical records from January 1998 to March 2006 was interrogated. Two thousand one hundred forty-three patients with metastatic NSCLC registering from January 1998 to September 2005 were followed till March 2006. Seven hundred seventy-six patients with and 1,367 patients without brain metastases were followed till death, date of ICH, or last date of study, whichever occurred first. The incidence of ICH seemed to be higher in those with brain metastasis compared with those without brain metastases, in whom they occurred as result of cerebrovascular accidents. However, the rates of symptomatic ICH were not significantly different. All ICH patients with brain metastasis had received radiation therapy for them and had been free of anticoagulation. Most of the brain metastasis-associated ICH's were asymptomatic, detected during increased radiologic surveillance. The rates of symptomatic ICH, or other cerebrovascular accidents in general were similar and not significantly different between the two groups. In metastatic NSCLC patients, the incidence of spontaneous ICH appeared to be higher in those with brain metastases compared with those without, but was very low in both groups without a statistically significant difference. These data suggest a minimal risk of clinically significant ICH for NSCLC

  18. Brain hypoxia imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The measurement of pathologically low levels of tissue pO{sub 2} is an important diagnostic goal for determining the prognosis of many clinically important diseases including cardiovascular insufficiency, stroke and cancer. The target tissues nowadays have mostly been tumors or the myocardium, with less attention centered on the brain. Radiolabelled nitroimidazole or derivatives may be useful in identifying the hypoxic cells in cerebrovascular disease or traumatic brain injury, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In acute stroke, the target of therapy is the severely hypoxic but salvageable tissue. {sup 18}F-MISO PET and {sup 99m}Tc-EC-metronidazole SPECT in patients with acute ischemic stroke identified hypoxic tissues and ischemic penumbra, and predicted its outcome. A study using {sup 123}I-IAZA in patient with closed head injury detected the hypoxic tissues after head injury. Up till now these radiopharmaceuticals have drawbacks due to its relatively low concentration with hypoxic tissues associated with/without low blood-brain barrier permeability and the necessity to wait a long time to achieve acceptable target to background ratios for imaging in acute ischemic stroke. It is needed to develop new hypoxic marker exhibiting more rapid localization in the hypoxic region in the brain. And then, the hypoxic brain imaging with imidazoles or non-imidazoles may be very useful in detecting the hypoxic tissues, determining therapeutic strategies and developing therapeutic drugs in several neurological disease, especially, in acute ischemic stroke.

  19. Sino-Danish Brain Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø; Du, Xiangyun; Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2014-01-01

    China is faced with urgent needs to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable economy based on innovation and knowledge. Brain circulation and research and business investments from the outside are central for this development. Sino-American brain circulation and research...... and investment by overseas researchers and entrepreneurs are well described. In that case, the US is the center of global R&D and S&T. However, the brain circulation and research and investments between a small open Scandinavian economy, such as Denmark, and the huge developing economy of China are not well...... understood. In this case, Denmark is very highly developed, but a satellite in the global R&D and S&T system. With time and the growth of China as a R&D and S&T power house, both Denmark and China will benefit from brain circulation between them. Such brain circulation is likely to play a key role in flows...

  20. Brain anatomical network and intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Intuitively, higher intelligence might be assumed to correspond to more efficient information transfer in the brain, but no direct evidence has been reported from the perspective of brain networks. In this study, we performed extensive analyses to test the hypothesis that individual differences in intelligence are associated with brain structural organization, and in particular that higher scores on intelligence tests are related to greater global efficiency of the brain anatomical network. We constructed binary and weighted brain anatomical networks in each of 79 healthy young adults utilizing diffusion tensor tractography and calculated topological properties of the networks using a graph theoretical method. Based on their IQ test scores, all subjects were divided into general and high intelligence groups and significantly higher global efficiencies were found in the networks of the latter group. Moreover, we showed significant correlations between IQ scores and network properties across all subjects while controlling for age and gender. Specifically, higher intelligence scores corresponded to a shorter characteristic path length and a higher global efficiency of the networks, indicating a more efficient parallel information transfer in the brain. The results were consistently observed not only in the binary but also in the weighted networks, which together provide convergent evidence for our hypothesis. Our findings suggest that the efficiency of brain structural organization may be an important biological basis for intelligence.

  1. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Živković Nenad; Mihailović Goran; Marković Marko; Berisavac Iva; Spaić Milan

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of b...

  2. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  3. Isoflurane Impairs Low-Frequency Feedback but Leaves High-Frequency Feedforward Connectivity Intact in the Fly Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Dror; van Swinderen, Bruno; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2018-01-01

    Hierarchically organized brains communicate through feedforward (FF) and feedback (FB) pathways. In mammals, FF and FB are mediated by higher and lower frequencies during wakefulness. FB is preferentially impaired by general anesthetics in multiple mammalian species. This suggests FB serves critical functions in waking brains. The brain of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is also hierarchically organized, but the presence of FB in these brains is not established. Here, we studied FB in the fly brain, by simultaneously recording local field potentials (LFPs) from low-order peripheral structures and higher-order central structures. We analyzed the data using Granger causality (GC), the first application of this analysis technique to recordings from the insect brain. Our analysis revealed that low frequencies (0.1-5 Hz) mediated FB from the center to the periphery, while higher frequencies (10-45 Hz) mediated FF in the opposite direction. Further, isoflurane anesthesia preferentially reduced FB. Our results imply that the spectral characteristics of FF and FB may be a signature of hierarchically organized brains that is conserved from insects to mammals. We speculate that general anesthetics may induce unresponsiveness across species by targeting the mechanisms that support FB.

  4. Webinar Presentation: The Impact of Toxins on the Developing Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, The Impact of Toxins on the Developing Brain, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Historical Perspectives and Research Updates from Previously Funded Children's Centers held on Nov. 18, 2015.

  5. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in / Jacobs Retina Center Department of Psychology University of California, San Francisco Department of University School of Optometry Maui Community College Maui Community College Space Grant Program Montana

  6. Genetic Variation Underlying Traumatic Brain injury (TBI) and Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Stable trajectory, Decliners were more likely women , older, less educated, from non-White ancestry population and APOE-ε4 carriers. The highest annual...with slightly higher rates for women compared to males (rates= 4.0 versus 3.8) and the highest rates achieved by subjects with a Caribbean-Hispanic... Single nucleotide polymorphism (dbSNP) Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) The Department of Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) Genome

  7. Primate brain architecture and selection in relation to sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenfors, Patrik; Nunn, Charles L; Barton, Robert A

    2007-05-10

    Social and competitive demands often differ between the sexes in mammals. These differing demands should be expected to produce variation in the relative sizes of various brain structures. Sexual selection on males can be predicted to influence brain components handling sensory-motor skills that are important for physical competition or neural pathways involving aggression. Conversely, because female fitness is more closely linked to ecological factors and social interactions that enable better acquisition of resources, social selection on females should select for brain components important for navigating social networks. Sexual and social selection acting on one sex could produce sexual dimorphism in brain structures, which would result in larger species averages for those same brain structures. Alternatively, sex-specific selection pressures could produce correlated effects in the other sex, resulting in larger brain structures for both males and females of a species. Data are presently unavailable for the sex-specific sizes of brain structures for anthropoid primates, but under either scenario, the effects of sexual and social selection should leave a detectable signal in average sizes of brain structures for different species. The degree of male intra-sexual selection was positively correlated with several structures involved in autonomic functions and sensory-motor skills, and in pathways relating to aggression and aggression control. The degree of male intra-sexual selection was not correlated with relative neocortex size, which instead was significantly positively correlated with female social group size, but negatively correlated with male group size. Sexual selection on males and social selection on females have exerted different effects on primate brain architecture. Species with a higher degree of male intra-sexual selection carry a neural signature of an evolutionary history centered on physical conflicts, but no traces of increased demands on

  8. Primate brain architecture and selection in relation to sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunn Charles L

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social and competitive demands often differ between the sexes in mammals. These differing demands should be expected to produce variation in the relative sizes of various brain structures. Sexual selection on males can be predicted to influence brain components handling sensory-motor skills that are important for physical competition or neural pathways involving aggression. Conversely, because female fitness is more closely linked to ecological factors and social interactions that enable better acquisition of resources, social selection on females should select for brain components important for navigating social networks. Sexual and social selection acting on one sex could produce sexual dimorphism in brain structures, which would result in larger species averages for those same brain structures. Alternatively, sex-specific selection pressures could produce correlated effects in the other sex, resulting in larger brain structures for both males and females of a species. Data are presently unavailable for the sex-specific sizes of brain structures for anthropoid primates, but under either scenario, the effects of sexual and social selection should leave a detectable signal in average sizes of brain structures for different species. Results The degree of male intra-sexual selection was positively correlated with several structures involved in autonomic functions and sensory-motor skills, and in pathways relating to aggression and aggression control. The degree of male intra-sexual selection was not correlated with relative neocortex size, which instead was significantly positively correlated with female social group size, but negatively correlated with male group size. Conclusion Sexual selection on males and social selection on females have exerted different effects on primate brain architecture. Species with a higher degree of male intra-sexual selection carry a neural signature of an evolutionary history centered on

  9. Why lutein is important for the eye and the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez Maria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lutein and zeaxanthin are carotenoids that accumulate in the macula. The macula is a yellow spot near the center of the retina that is responsible of high resolution vision. Macular pigment acts as a natural blue light filter and protects the eye from damage. Macular pigment optical density (MPOD increases with lutein administration and is related to visual function and to the prevention of age-related macular degeneration. MOPD can be measured non-invasively and has been related to better cognitive performance. Moreover, compositional analyses of centenarian brains have shown that lutein is the main carotenoid in the brain although not in plasma, indicating a preferential accumulation in neural tissues, and that carotenoids status is correlated with some functional outcomes. Carotenoids are present in human milk with higher concentration in colostrum than in transitional and mature milk. Formula fed-infants have less plasma lutein concentration than breast fed infants. Analyses of brain from infants who died during the first year of life showed that lutein is also the predominant carotenoid of brain. Studies in non-human primates revealed that carotenoids are determinant in the formation of the retinal epithelia. In vitro studies showed that lutein stimulates the differentiation of human stem cells to neural progenitor cells. All this findings together, mostly the presence of lutein in breast milk, plasma concentration in breast-fed infants vs. formula fed infants, preferential accumulation in the brain and evidences of influence on the retina and the functionality of the brain signal the importance of the role of lutein and zeaxanthin on visual maturation and brain development.

  10. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  11. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  12. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer - brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  13. Brain abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found. However, the most common source is a lung infection. Less often, a heart infection is the cause. The following raise your chance of developing a brain abscess: A weakened immune system (such as in people ...

  14. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  15. BrainMap `95 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The fourth annual BrainMap workshop was held at La Mansion del Rio Hotel in San Antonio December 3--4, 1995. The conference title was ``Human Brain Mapping and Modeling.`` The meeting was attended by 137 registered participants and 30 observers from 82 institutions representing 12 countries. The meeting focused on the technical issues associated with brain mapping and modeling. A total of 23 papers were presented covering the following topics: spatial normalization and registration; functional image analysis; metanalysis and modeling; and new horizons in biological databases. The full program with abstracts was available on the Research Imaging Center`s web site. A book will be published by John Wiley and Sons prior to the end of 1998.

  16. Prospective evaluation of quality of life effects in patients undergoing palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmann, Diana; Gerstein, Johanna; Gharbi, Nadine; Hagg, Juliane; Hipp, Matthias; Kleff, Irmgard; Müller, Axel; Schäfer, Christof; Schleicher, Ursula; Sehlen, Susanne; Theodorou, Marilena; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Wypior, Hans-Joachim; Zehentmayr, Franz; Oorschot, Birgitt van; Vordermark, Dirk; Geinitz, Hans; Aschoff, Raimund; Bayerl, Anja; Bölling, Tobias; Bosch, Elisabeth; Bruns, Frank; Eichenseder-Seiss, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Recently published results of quality of life (QoL) studies indicated different outcomes of palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases. This prospective multi-center QoL study of patients with brain metastases was designed to investigate which QoL domains improve or worsen after palliative radiotherapy and which might provide prognostic information. From 01/2007-01/2009, n=151 patients with previously untreated brain metastases were recruited at 14 centers in Germany and Austria. Most patients (82 %) received whole-brain radiotherapy. QoL was measured with the EORTC-QLQ-C15-PAL and brain module BN20 before the start of radiotherapy and after 3 months. At 3 months, 88/142 (62 %) survived. Nine patients were not able to be followed up. 62 patients (70.5 % of 3-month survivors) completed the second set of questionnaires. Three months after the start of radiotherapy QoL deteriorated significantly in the areas of global QoL, physical function, fatigue, nausea, pain, appetite loss, hair loss, drowsiness, motor dysfunction, communication deficit and weakness of legs. Although the use of corticosteroid at 3 months could be reduced compared to pre-treatment (63 % vs. 37 %), the score for headaches remained stable. Initial QoL at the start of treatment was better in those alive than in those deceased at 3 months, significantly for physical function, motor dysfunction and the symptom scales fatigue, pain, appetite loss and weakness of legs. In a multivariate model, lower Karnofsky performance score, higher age and higher pain ratings before radiotherapy were prognostic of 3-month survival. Moderate deterioration in several QoL domains was predominantly observed three months after start of palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases. Future studies will need to address the individual subjective benefit or burden from such treatment. Baseline QoL scores before palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases may contain prognostic information

  17. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  18. The imaging diagnosis of diffuse brain swelling due to severe brain trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jianqiang; Hu Jiawang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical and pathological characteristics and the imaging types of the diffuse brain swelling due to severe brain trauma. Methods: The clinical data and CT and MR images on 48 cases with diffuse brain swelling due to severe brain trauma were analyzed. Results: Among these 48 cases of the diffuse brain swelling due to severe brain trauma, 33 cases were complicated with brain contusions (including 12 cases brain diffuse axonal injury, 1 case infarct of the right basal ganglion), 31 cases were complicated with hematoma (epidural, subdural or intracerebral), 27 cases were complicated with skull base fracture, and 10 cases were complicated with subarachnoid hematoma. The CT and MR imaging of the diffuse brain swelling included as followed: (1) Symmetrically diffuse brain swelling in both cerebral hemispheres with cerebral ventricles decreased or disappeared, without median line shift. (2)Diffuse brain swelling in one side cerebral hemisphere with cerebral ventricles decreased or disappeared at same side, and median line shift to other side. (3) Subarachnoid hematoma or little subcortex intracerebral hematoma were complicated. (4) The CT value of the cerebral could be equal, lower or higher comparing with normal. Conclusion: The pathological reason of diffuse brain swelling was the brain vessel expanding resulting from hypothalamus and brainstem injured in severe brain trauma. There were four CT and MR imaging findings in diffuse brain swelling. The diffuse brain swelling without hematoma may be caused by ischemical reperfusion injury. (authors)

  19. Radiation risk to critical organ during brain CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaraki, N. M. E.

    2012-08-01

    Study was performed to evaluate dose to critical organ for patient undergoing CT brain in modern medical center a total of 61 patient were examined in this study. The data collected from Modern Medical Center for brain. The data collected from Modern Medical Center for brain. The eye lens dose was 31.31 mSv, skin 29.23 mSv, cranium 30.01 mSv, brain 34.50 mSv, mandible 4.39 mSv, thyroid 2.59 mSv. The organ dose value were comparable to the previous studies. (Author)

  20. Response of avian embryonic brain to spatially segmented x-ray microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmanian, F A; Morris, G M; Le Duc, G; Huang, X; Ren, B; Bacarian, T; Allen, J C; Kalef-Ezra, J; Orion, I; Rosen, E M; Sandhu, T; Sathé, P; Wu, X Y; Zhong, Z; Shivaprasad, H L

    2001-05-01

    Duck embryo was studied as a model for assessing the effects of microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) on the human infant brain. Because of the high risk of radiation-induced disruption of the developmental process in the immature brain, conventional wide-beam radiotherapy of brain tumors is seldom carried out in infants under the age of three. Other types of treatment for pediatric brain tumors are frequently ineffective. Recent findings from studies in Grenoble on the brain of suckling rats indicate that MRT could be of benefit for the treatment of early childhood tumors. In our studies, duck embryos were irradiated at 3-4 days prior to hatching. Irradiation was carried out using a single exposure of synchrotron-generated X-rays, either in the form of parallel microplanar beams (microbeams), or as non-segmented broad beam. The individual microplanar beams had a width of 27 microm and height of 11 mm, and a center-to-center spacing of 100 microm. Doses to the exposed areas of embryo brain were 40, 80, 160 and 450 Gy (in-slice dose) for the microbeam, and 6, 12 and 18 Gy for the broad beam. The biological end point employed in the study was ataxia. This neurological symptom of radiation damage to the brain developed within 75 days of hatching. Histopathological analysis of brain tissue did not reveal any radiation induced lesions for microbeam doses of 40-160 Gy (in-slice), although some incidences of ataxia were observed in that dose group. However, severe brain lesions did occur in animals in the 450 Gy microbeam dose groups, and mild lesions in the 18 Gy broad beam dose group. These results indicate that embryonic duck brain has an appreciably higher tolerance to the microbeam modality, as compared to the broad beam modality. When the microbeam dose was normalized to the full volume of the irradiated tissue. i.e., the dose averaged over microbeams and the space between the microbeams, brain tolerance was estimated to be about three times higher to microbeam

  1. Arts, Brain and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarin, Vida; Bedeković, Marina Roje; Puretić, Marijana Bosnar; Pašić, Marija Bošnjak

    2016-12-01

    Art is a product of human creativity; it is a superior skill that can be learned by study, practice and observation. Modern neuroscience and neuroimaging enable study of the processes during artistic performance. Creative people have less marked hemispheric dominance. It was found that the right hemisphere is specialized for metaphoric thinking, playfulness, solution finding and synthesizing, it is the center of visualization, imagination and conceptualization, but the left hemisphere is still needed for artistic work to achieve balance. A specific functional organization of brain areas was found during visual art activities. Marked hemispheric dominance and area specialization is also very prominent for music perception. Brain is capable of making new connections, activating new pathways and unmasking secondary roads, it is "plastic". Music is a strong stimulus for neuroplasticity. fMRI studies have shown reorganization of motor and auditory cortex in professional musicians. Other studies showed the changes in neurotransmitter and hormone serum levels in correlation to music. The most prominent connection between music and enhancement of performance or changing of neuropsychological activity was shown by studies involving Mozart's music from which the theory of "The Mozart Effect" was derived. Results of numerous studies showed that listening to music can improve cognition, motor skills and recovery after brain injury. In the field of visual art, brain lesion can lead to the visuospatial neglect, loss of details and significant impairment of artistic work while the lesions affecting the left hemisphere reveal new artistic dimensions, disinhibit the right hemisphere, work is more spontaneous and emotional with the gain of artistic quality. All kinds of arts (music, painting, dancing...) stimulate the brain. They should be part of treatment processes. Work of many artists is an excellent example for the interweaving the neurology and arts.

  2. Primary brain tumours, meningiomas and brain metastases in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verheecke, Magali; Halaska, Michael J; Lok, Christianne A

    2014-01-01

    to obtain better insight into outcome and possibilities of treatment in pregnancy. METHODS: We collected all intracranial tumours (primary brain tumour, cerebral metastasis, or meningioma) diagnosed during pregnancy, registered prospectively and retrospectively by international collaboration since 1973......, respectively. Eight patients (30%) underwent brain surgery, seven patients (26%) had radiotherapy and in three patients (11%) chemotherapy was administered during gestation. Two patients died during pregnancy and four pregnancies were terminated. In 16 (59%) patients elective caesarean section was performed...... were reassuring. CONCLUSION: Adherence to standard protocol for the treatment of brain tumours during pregnancy appears to allow a term delivery and a higher probability of a vaginal delivery....

  3. Drug addiction, love, and the higher power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve; Reynaud, Michel; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Leventhal, Adam M

    2011-09-01

    This discussion piece suggests that reliance on a Higher Power in drug abuse recovery programs is entertained among some addicts for its psychobiological effects. Prayer, meditation, early romantic love, and drug abuse may have in common activation of mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways of the brain and the generation of intense emotional states. In this sense, reliance on a Higher Power may operate as a substitute addiction, which replaces the psychobiological functions formerly served by drug use. Implications of this perspective are discussed.

  4. Issues of cultural diversity in acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequerica, Anthony; Krch, Denise

    2014-01-01

    With the general population in the United States becoming increasingly diverse, it is important for rehabilitation professionals to develop the capacity to provide culturally sensitive treatment. This is especially relevant when working with minority populations who have a higher risk for brain injury and poorer rehabilitation outcomes. This article presents a number of clinical vignettes to illustrate how cultural factors can influence behavior in patients recovering from brain injury, as well as rehabilitation staff. The main objectives are to raise awareness among clinicians and stimulate research ideas by highlighting some real world examples of situations where a specialized, patient-centered approach needs to consider factors of cultural diversity. Because one's own world view impacts the way we see the world and interpret behavior, it is important to understand one's own ethnocentrism when dealing with a diverse population of patients with brain injury where behavioral sequelae are often expected. Being able to see behavior after brain injury with an open mind and taking into account cultural and contextual factors is an important step in developing culturally competent rehabilitation practices.

  5. Metabolic Profiles of Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone F. Bathen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis to the brain is a feared complication of systemic cancer, associated with significant morbidity and poor prognosis. A better understanding of the tumor metabolism might help us meet the challenges in controlling brain metastases. The study aims to characterize the metabolic profile of brain metastases of different origin using high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS to correlate the metabolic profiles to clinical and pathological information. Biopsy samples of human brain metastases (n = 49 were investigated. A significant correlation between lipid signals and necrosis in brain metastases was observed (p < 0.01, irrespective of their primary origin. The principal component analysis (PCA showed that brain metastases from malignant melanomas cluster together, while lung carcinomas were metabolically heterogeneous and overlap with other subtypes. Metastatic melanomas have higher amounts of glycerophosphocholine than other brain metastases. A significant correlation between microscopically visible lipid droplets estimated by Nile Red staining and MR visible lipid signals was observed in metastatic lung carcinomas (p = 0.01, indicating that the proton MR visible lipid signals arise from cytoplasmic lipid droplets. MRS-based metabolomic profiling is a useful tool for exploring the metabolic profiles of metastatic brain tumors.

  6. Brain banking for immunocytochemistry and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymin, C.; Jordan, D.; Saint-Pierre, G.; Kopp, N.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of a human brain bank is to establish groups of matched brains (normal control versus pathological groups) for studying human diseases of the nervous system. This bank is obtained by means of autopsy performed with a very short post-mortem delay and from clinically and neuropathologically well-documented patients. According to research protocols, two types of brain tissue storage are performed: fixed tissue or frozen tissue. Brain dissection procedures are performed according to precise anatomical boundaries of each brain region. This paper will center on the questions raised by brain banking in relation to histological and immunocytochemical studies and to biochemistry and autoradiography of binding sites. The lack of neuroanatomical data of the human brain leads us to compare anatomical results obtained in animals to that of the human. Moreover, it is clear that human brains present numerous interindividual differences (Kopp et al., 1977; Jack et al., 1989). Therefore, investigations of the human brain should be made on a large series of brains indicating the necessity of a well-documented brain bank of tissue from normal controls and patients. (authors)

  7. Higher education reform: getting the incentives right

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canton, Erik; Venniker, Richard; Jongbloed, Benjamin W.A.; Koelman, Jos; Koelman, Jos; van der Meer, Peter; van der Meer, Peter; Vossensteyn, Johan J.

    2001-01-01

    This study is a joint effort by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) and the Center for Higher Education Policy Studies. It analyses a number of `best practices¿ where the design of financial incentives working on the system level of higher education is concerned. In Chapter 1,

  8. Brain Fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relationship with your doctor(s): • Always report changes in cognition/memory and mood (depression, anxiety). • Make sure your physician ... joint pain. • Exercise regularly. Adequate physical exercise enhances cognition/memory. • Train the Brain! “If you don’t use ...

  9. Robot brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babuska, R.

    2011-01-01

    The brain hosts complex networks of neurons that are responsible for behavior in humans and animals that we generally call intelligent. I is not easy to give an exact definition of intelligence – for the purpose of this talk it will suffice to say that we refer to intelligence as a collection of

  10. Area-specific migration and recruitment of new neurons in the adult songbird brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vellema, Michiel; Van der Linden, Annemie; Gahr, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    sensitive to plastic changes, such as nucleus higher vocal center (HVC) and area X, recruited similar numbers of new neurons as their surrounding brain tissues, employing no specific directional mechanisms. The distribution pattern in and around HVC could best be described by a random displacement model......Neuron recruitment has been implicated in morphological and functional plasticity in the adult brain. Whereas mammals restrict neuron recruitment specifically to two regions of known plasticity, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb, newborn neurons are found throughout the forebrain of adult...... songbirds. In order to study the area-specificity of the widespread proliferation and recruitment in the songbird brain, six adult male canaries received repetitive intraperitoneal injections of the mitotic marker BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) and were sacrificed after 24 hours to study proliferation...

  11. Issues in Moroccan Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Lazrak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, education has always been the springboard for socio-economic development of nations. Undoubtedly, education proved to be the catalyst of change and the front wagon that drives with it all the other wagons pertaining to other dynamic sectors. In effect, the role of education can be seen to provide pupils with the curriculum and hidden curriculum skills alike; teaching skills that will prepare them physically, mentally and socially for the world of work in later life. In Morocco, the country spends over 26% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP on education. Unfortunately, though this number is important, Moroccan education (primary, secondary and higher education alike still suffers from the mismatch between the state expenditures on education and the general product in reality. In this article, an attempt is made to touch on some relevant issues pertaining to higher education with special reference to Morocco. First, it provides some tentative definitions, mission and functions of university and higher education. Second, it gives a historical sketch of the major reforms that took place in Morocco as well as the major changes pertaining to these reforms respectively. Third, it provides a general overview of the history of higher education in Morocco, it also tackles an issue related to governance in higher education which is cost sharing. Fourth, it delves into the history of English Language Teaching (ELT, lists some characteristics of the English Departments in Morocco. Fifth, it discusses the issue of private vs. public higher education. Last, but not least, it tackles the issue of Brain Drain.

  12. Strategic Brain Drain: Implications for Higher Education in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Barwani, Thuwayba; Chapman, David W.; Ameen, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Oman will soon be producing three times more college graduates than there are jobs available in the country each year, forcing graduates to seek employment outside of Oman. Their success in securing and holding employment will be based more on training and performance than might be the case if they were working in Oman. If graduates find that the…

  13. Centering research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katan, Lina Hauge; Baarts, Charlotte

    Research-based teaching has long been a distinguishing trait of higher education. Engaging students in research-like processes has been employed to great effect in learning and continues to be encouraged by educational studies. The literature on this subject reflects how ‘technical’ or ‘field......’ exercises tend to dominate the common understandings of research-based learning. Here we address a specific area of inquiry overlooked by previous studies: whether and how reading, thinking and writing indeed share the same learning potentials as the practical foundation for research-based teaching....... In the humanities and social sciences, integrated acts of reading, writing and thinking account for an obvious and substantial overlap in student and researcher practices, creating a clear opportunity for research-based teaching. Moreover, our empirical data point to reading, thinking and writing as quintessential...

  14. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  15. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  16. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain Tumors What's in ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  17. Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain and Nervous System KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain and ... healthy, and remove waste products. All About the Brain The brain is made up of three main ...

  18. Revisiting the student centered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise

    2018-01-01

    Has the orthodoxy of progressive pedagogy, or what praise as the student centered, become means of an overall managerial turn that erodes students’ freedom do learn? This is the main question in Bruce Macfarlane’s book Freedom to learn - The Threat to Student Academic Freedom and Why it Needs...... to be Reclaimed (2017). In eighth well-written chapters, Macfarlane explores an often-overlooked paradox in higher education teaching and learning: The idea of the student centered learning, deriving from humanist psychology and progressive pedagogy, has been hijacked by increased and continuous demands of bodily......, cognitive and emotional performance that restricts students’ freedom to develop as autonomous adults. Macfarlane’s catch 22 is, however, that his heritage from humanist psychology, i.e. the idea that we as humans are born with an inner potential that we should be free to realise though education...

  19. 75 FR 1066 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... Person: Patrick K. Lai, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes... Committee: Brain Disorders and Clinical Neuroscience Integrated Review Group; Clinical Neuroscience and...

  20. Brain damage and addictive behavior: a neuropsychological and electroencephalogram investigation with pathologic gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regard, Marianne; Knoch, Daria; Gütling, Eva; Landis, Theodor

    2003-03-01

    Gambling is a form of nonsubstance addiction classified as an impulse control disorder. Pathologic gamblers are considered healthy with respect to their cognitive status. Lesions of the frontolimbic systems, mostly of the right hemisphere, are associated with addictive behavior. Because gamblers are not regarded as "brain-lesioned" and gambling is nontoxic, gambling is a model to test whether addicted "healthy" people are relatively impaired in frontolimbic neuropsychological functions. Twenty-one nonsubstance dependent gamblers and nineteen healthy subjects underwent a behavioral neurologic interview centered on incidence, origin, and symptoms of possible brain damage, a neuropsychological examination, and an electroencephalogram. Seventeen gamblers (81%) had a positive medical history for brain damage (mainly traumatic head injury, pre- or perinatal complications). The gamblers, compared with the controls, were significantly more impaired in concentration, memory, and executive functions, and evidenced a higher prevalence of non-right-handedness (43%) and, non-left-hemisphere language dominance (52%). Electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed dysfunctional activity in 65% of the gamblers, compared with 26% of controls. This study shows that the "healthy" gamblers are indeed brain-damaged. Compared with a matched control population, pathologic gamblers evidenced more brain injuries, more fronto-temporo-limbic neuropsychological dysfunctions and more EEG abnormalities. The authors thus conjecture that addictive gambling may be a consequence of brain damage, especially of the frontolimbic systems, a finding that may well have medicolegal consequences.

  1. Neuroenergetics: How energy constraints shape brain function

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The nervous system consumes a disproportionate fraction of the resting body’s energy production. In humans, the brain represents 2% of the body’s mass, yet it accounts for ~20% of the total oxygen consumption. Expansion in the size of the brain relative to the body and an increase in the number of connections between neurons during evolution underpin our cognitive powers and are responsible for our brains’ high metabolic rate. The molecules at the center of cellular energy metabolism also act as intercellular signals and constitute an important communication pathway, coordinating for instance the immune surveillance of the brain. Despite the significance of energy consumption in the nervous system, how energy constrains and shapes brain function is often under appreciated. I will illustrate the importance of brain energetics and metabolism with two examples from my recent work. First, I will show how the brain trades information for energy savings in the visual pathway. Indeed, a significant fraction ...

  2. Oxidative stress and superoxide dismutase activity in brain of rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in brain homogenates of Wistar rats. Oxidative stress measured as ..... on the brain and nervous system of humans as handlers and ... environment may be at higher health risk in that their internal ...

  3. Involvement of brain gangliosides in temperature adaptation of fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breer, H.; Rahmann, H.

    1976-10-01

    The ganglioside pattern of goldfish brain was investigated after adaptation (acclimatization, acclimation) to different temperatures. Adaptation at lower ambient temperature causes a higher proportion of polysialogangliosides to be formed in fish brain.

  4. The Creative Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Ned

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the differences between left-brain and right-brain functioning and between left-brain and right-brain dominant individuals, and concludes that creativity uses both halves of the brain. Discusses how both students and curriculum can become more "whole-brained." (Author/JM)

  5. Tumor Biology and Immunology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor Biology and Immunology The Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium is collaborating with National Center for Advanced Translational Sciences to complete whole exome sequencing on canine meningioma samples. Results will be published and made publicly available.

  6. Are All Spatial Reference Frames Egocentric? Reinterpreting Evidence for Allocentric, Object-Centered, or World-Centered Reference Frames

    OpenAIRE

    Filimon, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    The use and neural representation of egocentric spatial reference frames is well-documented. In contrast, whether the brain represents spatial relationships between objects in allocentric, object-centered, or world-centered coordinates is debated. Here, I review behavioral, neuropsychological, neurophysiological (neuronal recording), and neuroimaging evidence for and against allocentric, object-centered, or world-centered spatial reference frames. Based on theoretical considerations, simulati...

  7. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, L.D.; Bennett, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    Imaging with radionuclides should be used in a complementary fashion with other neuroradiologic techniques. It is useful in the early detection and evaluation of intracranial neoplasm, cerebrovascular accident and abscess, and in postsurgical follow-up. Cisternography yields useful information about the functional status of cerebrospinal fluid pathways. Computerized axial tomography is a new technique of great promise that produced a cross-sectional image of the brain

  8. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions

  9. Globalisation and Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marginson, Simon; van der Wende, Marijk

    2007-01-01

    Economic and cultural globalisation has ushered in a new era in higher education. Higher education was always more internationally open than most sectors because of its immersion in knowledge, which never showed much respect for juridical boundaries. In global knowledge economies, higher education

  10. Neuro-Oncology Branch Appointment - what happens at the clinical center | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Happens When I Get To The Clinical Center at NIH? 1. Visit the Admissions Department Registering is the first step to being evaluated by the Brain Tumor Clinic. Visit Admissions to get registered as a patient. They will ask you for your contact information and provide you with a patient identification number. 2. Proceed to the NOB Clinic Proceed to the Brain Tumor Clinic on the 13th floor.

  11. Clinical features of brain metastases in breast cancer: an implication for hippocampal-sparing whole-brain radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available San-Gang Wu,1,* Jia-Yuan Sun,2,* Qin Tong,3 Feng-Yan Li,2 Zhen-Yu He2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Xiamen Cancer Hospital, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objectives of this study were to describe the distribution of brain metastases (BM in breast cancer patients and investigate the risk factors for perihippocampal metastases (PHM. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of the clinicopathological characteristics and patterns of BM was performed. Associations between clinicopathological characteristics and PHM (the hippocampus plus 5 mm margin were evaluated using logistic regression analyses. Results: A total of 1,356 brain metastatic lesions were identified in 192 patients. Patients with 1–3 BM, 4–9 BM, and ≥10 BM accounted for 63.0%, 18.8%, and 18.2%, respectively. There were only 7 (3.6% patients with hippocampal metastases (HM and 14 (7.3% patients with PHM. On logistic regression, the number of BM was an independent risk factor for PHM. Patients with ≥10 BM had a significantly higher risk of PHM compared with those with <10 BM. Breast cancer subtype (BCS was not associated with PHM. The number of BM was significantly correlated with various BCSs. Patients with hormone receptor (HR+/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2+, HR-/HER2+, and HR-/HER2- subtypes had a higher probability of ≥10 BM, relative to patients with an HR+/HER2- subtype. Conclusion: Our study suggests that a low incidence of PHM may be acceptable to perform hippocampal-sparing whole-brain radiation therapy for breast cancer patients

  12. Effects of dexamethasone on brain edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Motohisa

    1982-01-01

    Experimental cerebral edema was produced on the right parietal lobe of Wistar male rats with a cold metal probe cooled by liquid nitrogen. Twenty hour later, 3 H-dexamethasone was either intramuscularly or intravenously injected into rats, estimated in the brain tissue by the liquid scintillation counting method. Edematous brain generally contained much higher 3 H-activity than the control. Furthermore, I.V. injection showed higher 3 H-activity than I.M injection in edematous and control brains at all times. For examination of the subcellular distribution of 3 H-dexamethasone in edematous brain, 3 H-activity was most strongly detected in the supernatant fraction (63%), followed by the heavy mitochondrial fraction (25.4%) and the nuclear fraction (8.4%). Although edematous brain tissue constantly demonstrated higher 3 H-activity than the control, its supernatant fraction conversely had less activity. As a next step, distribution of 3 H-dexamethasone in the supernatant fraction was studies. The result was that the high molecular weight fraction in the edematous brain showed higher radioactivity than the control. From these findings, unequivocal distribution of dexamethasone in the supernatant fraction of edematous brain tissue could be correlated with its biochemical action for preventing brain edema. (J.P.N.)

  13. Iowa Water Center | Iowa Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Iowa State University Extension Iowa Water Center Submitted by mollyd on April 24, 2012 - 09 :42 Advancing the state of water knowledge and management The Iowa Water Center is a part of a nationwide network of university-based water centers created to encourage interdisciplinary water research

  14. Higher Education and Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Roger

    2018-01-01

    After climate change, rising economic inequality is the greatest challenge facing the advanced Western societies. Higher education has traditionally been seen as a means to greater equality through its role in promoting social mobility. But with increased marketisation higher education now not only reflects the forces making for greater inequality…

  15. Higher Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Policy Institute of California, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Higher education enhances Californians' lives and contributes to the state's economic growth. But population and education trends suggest that California is facing a large shortfall of college graduates. Addressing this short­fall will require strong gains for groups that have been historically under­represented in higher education. Substantial…

  16. Reimagining Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, E. Eileen; Groom, David E., Jr.; Heltzel, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges facing higher education continue to mount. The shifting of the U.S. ethnic and racial demographics, the proliferation of advanced digital technologies and data, and the move from traditional degrees to continuous learning platforms have created an unstable environment to which Christian higher education must adapt in order to remain…

  17. Happiness in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwick, Alex; Cannizzaro, Sara

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the higher education literature surrounding happiness and related notions: satisfaction, despair, flourishing and well-being. It finds that there is a real dearth of literature relating to profound happiness in higher education: much of the literature using the terms happiness and satisfaction interchangeably as if one were…

  18. Gender and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Barbara J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive, encyclopedic review explores gender and its impact on American higher education across historical and cultural contexts. Challenging recent claims that gender inequities in U.S. higher education no longer exist, the contributors--leading experts in the field--reveal the many ways in which gender is embedded in the educational…

  19. Quality of Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Yihuan

    is about constructing a more inclusive understanding of quality in higher education through combining the macro, meso and micro levels, i.e. from the perspectives of national policy, higher education institutions as organizations in society, individual teaching staff and students. It covers both......Quality in higher education was not invented in recent decades – universities have always possessed mechanisms for assuring the quality of their work. The rising concern over quality is closely related to the changes in higher education and its social context. Among others, the most conspicuous...... changes are the massive expansion, diversification and increased cost in higher education, and new mechanisms of accountability initiated by the state. With these changes the traditional internally enacted academic quality-keeping has been given an important external dimension – quality assurance, which...

  20. Longitudinal Examination of Resilience After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas F; Zafonte, Ross; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate (1) the trajectory of resilience during the first year after a moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); (2) factors associated with resilience at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury; and (3) changing relationships over time between resilience and other factors. Longitudinal analysis of an observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients with TBI (N=195) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model Systems study with data collected at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Initially, resilience levels appeared to be stable during the first year postinjury. Individual growth curve models were used to examine resilience over time in relation to demographic, psychosocial, and injury characteristics. After adjusting for these characteristics, resilience actually declined over time. Higher levels of resilience were related to nonminority status, absence of preinjury substance abuse, lower anxiety and disability level, and greater life satisfaction. Resilience is a construct that is relevant to understanding brain injury outcomes and has potential value in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stephenson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City is an NCI-designated cancer center at the forefront of NCI-supported cancer research. Learn more about the Stephenson Cancer Center's mission.

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the " ...

  4. Higher English for CFE

    CERN Document Server

    Bridges, Ann; Mitchell, John

    2015-01-01

    A brand new edition of the former Higher English: Close Reading , completely revised and updated for the new Higher element (Reading for Understanding, Analysis and Evaluation) - worth 30% of marks in the final exam!. We are working with SQA to secure endorsement for this title. Written by two highly experienced authors this book shows you how to practice for the Reading for Understanding, Analysis and Evaluation section of the new Higher English exam. This book introduces the terms and concepts that lie behind success and offers guidance on the interpretation of questions and targeting answer

  5. Baby Brain Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Member Home Resources & Services Professional Resource Baby Brain Map Mar 17, 2016 The Brain Map was adapted in 2006 by ZERO TO ... supports Adobe Flash Player. To view the Baby Brain Map, please visit this page on a browser ...

  6. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  7. That's Using Your Brain!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Dana R.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses new adult learning theories, including those of Roger Sperry (left brain/right brain), Paul McLean (triune brain), and Howard Gardner (multiple intelligences). Relates adult learning theory to training. (JOW)

  8. Planning for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Caj-Gunnar

    1984-01-01

    Decision processes for strategic planning for higher education institutions are outlined using these parameters: institutional goals and power structure, organizational climate, leadership attitudes, specific problem type, and problem-solving conditions and alternatives. (MSE)

  9. Advert for higher education

    OpenAIRE

    N.V. Provozin; А.S. Teletov

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the features advertising higher education institution. The analysis results of marketing research students for their choice of institutions and further study. Principles of the advertising campaign on three levels: the university, the faculty, the separate department.

  10. On higher derivative gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accioly, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    A possible classical route conducting towards a general relativity theory with higher-derivatives starting, in a sense, from first principles, is analysed. A completely causal vacuum solution with the symmetries of the Goedel universe is obtained in the framework of this higher-derivative gravity. This very peculiar and rare result is the first known vcuum solution of the fourth-order gravity theory that is not a solution of the corresponding Einstein's equations.(Author) [pt

  11. Higher Spins & Strings

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The conjectured relation between higher spin theories on anti de-Sitter (AdS) spaces and weakly coupled conformal field theories is reviewed. I shall then outline the evidence in favour of a concrete duality of this kind, relating a specific higher spin theory on AdS3 to a family of 2d minimal model CFTs. Finally, I shall explain how this relation fits into the framework of the familiar stringy AdS/CFT correspondence.

  12. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  13. Consciousness, cognition and brain networks: New perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, E M; Valverde, J L; Fábregas, N

    2016-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the literature on consciousness and cognition mechanisms based on the neural networks theory is presented. The immune and inflammatory response to the anesthetic-surgical procedure induces modulation of neuronal plasticity by influencing higher cognitive functions. Anesthetic drugs can cause unconsciousness, producing a functional disruption of cortical and thalamic cortical integration complex. The external and internal perceptions are processed through an intricate network of neural connections, involving the higher nervous activity centers, especially the cerebral cortex. This requires an integrated model, formed by neural networks and their interactions with highly specialized regions, through large-scale networks, which are distributed throughout the brain collecting information flow of these perceptions. Functional and effective connectivity between large-scale networks, are essential for consciousness, unconsciousness and cognition. It is what is called the "human connectome" or map neural networks. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Energy Efficiency Center - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obryk, E.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The Energy Efficiency Center (EEC) activities have been concentrated on Energy Efficiency Network (SEGE), education and training of energy auditors. EEC has started studies related to renewable fuels (bio fuel, wastes) and other topics related to environment protection. EEC has continued close collaboration with Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway. It has been organized and conducted Seminar and Workshop on ''How to Reduce Energy and Water Cost in Higher Education Buildings'' for general and technical managers of the higher education institutions. This Seminar was proceeded by the working meeting on energy efficiency strategy in higher education at the Ministry of National Education. EEC has worked out proposal for activities of Cracow Regional Agency for Energy Efficiency and Environment and has made offer to provide services for this Agency in the field of training, education and consulting. The vast knowledge and experiences in the field of energy audits have been used by the members of EEC in lecturing at energy auditors courses authorized by the National Energy Efficiency Agency (KAPE). Altogether 20 lectures have been delivered. (author)

  15. Brain SPECT in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, M.; Baulieu, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Brain SPECT in child involves specific trends regarding the patient cooperation, irradiation, resolution and especially interpretation because of the rapid scintigraphic modifications related to the brain maturation. In a general nuclear medicine department, child brain SPECT represents about 2 % of the activity. The choice indications are the perfusion children: thallium and MIBI in brain tumours, pharmacological and neuropsychological interventions. In the future, brain dedicated detectors and new radiopharmaceuticals will promote the development of brain SPECT in children. (author)

  16. Timing of potential and metabolic brain energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korf, Jakob; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert

    2007-01-01

    functions. We introduce the concepts of potential and metabolic brain energy to distinguish trans-membrane gradients of ions or neurotransmitters and the capacity to generate energy from intra- or extra-cerebral substrates, respectively. Higher brain functions, such as memory retrieval, speaking......The temporal relationship between cerebral electro-physiological activities, higher brain functions and brain energy metabolism is reviewed. The duration of action potentials and transmission through glutamate and GABA are most often less than 5 ms. Subjects may perform complex psycho......-physiological tasks within 50 to 200 ms, and perception of conscious experience requires 0.5 to 2 s. Activation of cerebral oxygen consumption starts after at least 100 ms and increases of local blood flow become maximal after about 1 s. Current imaging technologies are unable to detect rapid physiological brain...

  17. Revisiting Einstein's brain in Brain Awareness Week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Chen, Su; Zeng, Lidan; Zhou, Lin; Hou, Shengtao

    2014-10-01

    Albert Einstein's brain has long been an object of fascination to both neuroscience specialists and the general public. However, without records of advanced neuro-imaging of his brain, conclusions regarding Einstein's extraordinary cognitive capabilities can only be drawn based on the unique external features of his brain and through comparison of the external features with those of other human brain samples. The recent discovery of 14 previously unpublished photographs of Einstein's brain taken at unconventional angles by Dr. Thomas Stoltz Harvey, the pathologist, ignited a renewed frenzy about clues to explain Einstein's genius. Dr. Dean Falk and her colleagues, in their landmark paper published in Brain (2013; 136:1304-1327), described in such details about the unusual features of Einstein's brain, which shed new light on Einstein's intelligence. In this article, we ask what are the unique structures of his brain? What can we learn from this new information? Can we really explain his extraordinary cognitive capabilities based on these unique brain structures? We conclude that studying the brain of a remarkable person like Albert Einstein indeed provides us a better example to comprehensively appreciate the relationship between brain structures and advanced cognitive functions. However, caution must be exercised so as not to over-interpret his intelligence solely based on the understanding of the surface structures of his brain.

  18. Fuel Class Higher Alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2016-08-17

    This chapter focuses on the production and combustion of alcohol fuels with four or more carbon atoms, which we classify as higher alcohols. It assesses the feasibility of utilizing various C4-C8 alcohols as fuels for internal combustion engines. Utilizing higher-molecular-weight alcohols as fuels requires careful analysis of their fuel properties. ASTM standards provide fuel property requirements for spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines such as the stability, lubricity, viscosity, and cold filter plugging point (CFPP) properties of blends of higher alcohols. Important combustion properties that are studied include laminar and turbulent flame speeds, flame blowout/extinction limits, ignition delay under various mixing conditions, and gas-phase and particulate emissions. The chapter focuses on the combustion of higher alcohols in reciprocating SI and CI engines and discusses higher alcohol performance in SI and CI engines. Finally, the chapter identifies the sources, production pathways, and technologies currently being pursued for production of some fuels, including n-butanol, iso-butanol, and n-octanol.

  19. Higher spin gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Henneaux, Marc; Vasiliev, Mikhail A

    2017-01-01

    Symmetries play a fundamental role in physics. Non-Abelian gauge symmetries are the symmetries behind theories for massless spin-1 particles, while the reparametrization symmetry is behind Einstein's gravity theory for massless spin-2 particles. In supersymmetric theories these particles can be connected also to massless fermionic particles. Does Nature stop at spin-2 or can there also be massless higher spin theories. In the past strong indications have been given that such theories do not exist. However, in recent times ways to evade those constraints have been found and higher spin gauge theories have been constructed. With the advent of the AdS/CFT duality correspondence even stronger indications have been given that higher spin gauge theories play an important role in fundamental physics. All these issues were discussed at an international workshop in Singapore in November 2015 where the leading scientists in the field participated. This volume presents an up-to-date, detailed overview of the theories i...

  20. INTERNATIONALIZATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Crisan-Mitra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Internationalization of higher education is one of the key trends of development. There are several approaches on how to achieve competitiveness and performance in higher education and international academic mobility; students’ exchange programs, partnerships are some of the aspects that can play a significant role in this process. This paper wants to point out the student’s perception regarding two main directions: one about the master students’ expectation regarding how an internationalized master should be organized and should function, and second the degree of satisfaction of the beneficiaries of internationalized master programs from Babe-Bolyai University. This article is based on an empirical qualitative research that was implemented to students of an internationalized master from the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration. This research can be considered a useful example for those preoccupied to increase the quality of higher education and conclusions drawn have relevance both theoretically and especially practically.

  1. Quality of Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Yihuan; Zhao, Yingsheng; Du, Xiangyun

    . This transformation involves a broad scale of change at individual level, organizational level, and societal level. In this change process in higher education, staff development remains one of the key elements for university innovation and at the same time demands a systematic and holistic approach.......This paper starts with a critical approach to reflect on the current practice of quality assessment and assurance in higher education. This is followed by a proposal that in response to the global challenges for improving the quality of higher education, universities should take active actions...... of change by improving the quality of teaching and learning. From a constructivist perspective of understanding education and learning, this paper also discusses why and how universities should give more weight to learning and change the traditional role of teaching to an innovative approach of facilitation...

  2. Reputation in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martensen, Anne; Grønholdt, Lars

    2005-01-01

    leaders of higher education institutions to set strategic directions and support their decisions in an effort to create even better study programmes with a better reputation. Finally, managerial implications and directions for future research are discussed.Keywords: Reputation, image, corporate identity......The purpose of this paper is to develop a reputation model for higher education programmes, provide empirical evidence for the model and illustrate its application by using Copenhagen Business School (CBS) as the recurrent case. The developed model is a cause-and-effect model linking image...

  3. Reputation in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plewa, Carolin; Ho, Joanne; Conduit, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    Reputation is critical for institutions wishing to attract and retain students in today's competitive higher education setting. Drawing on the resource based view and configuration theory, this research proposes that Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) need to understand not only the impact...... of independent resources but of resource configurations when seeking to achieve a strong, positive reputation. Utilizing fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA), the paper provides insight into different configurations of resources that HEIs can utilize to build their reputation within their domestic...

  4. Navigating in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Hanne Balsby; Reimer, David; Keiding, Tina Bering

    Denne rapport er skrevet på baggrund af spørgeskemaundersøgelsen – Navigating in Higher Education (NiHE) – der rummer besvarelser fra 1410 bachelorstuderende og 283 undervisere fordelt på ni uddannelser fra Aarhus Universitet: Uddannelsesvidenskab, Historie, Nordisk sprog og litteratur, Informati......Denne rapport er skrevet på baggrund af spørgeskemaundersøgelsen – Navigating in Higher Education (NiHE) – der rummer besvarelser fra 1410 bachelorstuderende og 283 undervisere fordelt på ni uddannelser fra Aarhus Universitet: Uddannelsesvidenskab, Historie, Nordisk sprog og litteratur...

  5. The Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Aging Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacob S; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has come to the forefront of both the scientific and popular culture. Specifically, sports-related concussions or mild TBI (mTBI) has become the center of scientific scrutiny with a large amount of research focusing on the long-term sequela of this type of injury. As the populace continues to age, the impact of TBI on the aging brain will become clearer. Currently, reports have come to light that link TBI to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as certain psychiatric diseases. Whether these associations are causations, however, is yet to be determined. Other long-term sequelae, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), appear to be associated with repetitive injuries. Going forward, as we gain better understanding of the pathophysiological process involved in TBI and subclinical head traumas, and individual traits that influence susceptibility to neurocognitive diseases, a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of the connection between brain injury and resultant disease processes in the aging brain will become evident.

  6. Decoding the auditory brain with canonical component analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Cheveigné, Alain; Wong, Daniel D E; Di Liberto, Giovanni M

    2018-01-01

    The relation between a stimulus and the evoked brain response can shed light on perceptual processes within the brain. Signals derived from this relation can also be harnessed to control external devices for Brain Computer Interface (BCI) applications. While the classic event-related potential (ERP...... higher classification scores. CCA strips the brain response of variance unrelated to the stimulus, and the stimulus representation of variance that does not affect the response, and thus improves observations of the relation between stimulus and response....

  7. Left brain, right brain: facts and fantasies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corballis, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Handedness and brain asymmetry are widely regarded as unique to humans, and associated with complementary functions such as a left-brain specialization for language and logic and a right-brain specialization for creativity and intuition. In fact, asymmetries are widespread among animals, and support the gradual evolution of asymmetrical functions such as language and tool use. Handedness and brain asymmetry are inborn and under partial genetic control, although the gene or genes responsible are not well established. Cognitive and emotional difficulties are sometimes associated with departures from the "norm" of right-handedness and left-brain language dominance, more often with the absence of these asymmetries than their reversal.

  8. Immigration and Higher Education: The Crisis and the Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David W.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in immigration patterns bring problems and opportunities to higher education. New federal law significantly changes the ethnic and skills mix of the immigrant pool. Issues emerging include potential brain drain; pressure for curriculum change; language as a barrier to access; and the rights of illegal immigrants to higher education. (MSE)

  9. Exploring Higher Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Willis M.

    1992-01-01

    Maintains that the social studies reform movement includes a call for the de-emphasis of rote memory and more attention to the development of higher-order thinking skills. Discusses the "thinking tasks" concept derived from the work of Hilda Taba and asserts that the tasks can be used with almost any social studies topic. (CFR)

  10. Higher-Order Hierarchies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of higher-order inheritance hierarchies. They are useful because they provide well-known benefits of object-orientation at the level of entire hierarchies-benefits which are not available with current approaches. Three facets must be adressed: First, it must be po...

  11. Inflation from higher dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Q.

    1987-01-01

    We argue that an inflationary phase in the very early universe is related to the transition from a higher dimensional to a four-dimensional universe. We present details of a previously considered model which gives sufficient inflation without fine tuning of parameters. (orig.)

  12. Higher Education Funding Formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown-Moak, Mary P.

    1999-01-01

    One of the most critical components of the college or university chief financial officer's job is budget planning, especially using formulas. A discussion of funding formulas looks at advantages, disadvantages, and types of formulas used by states in budgeting for higher education, and examines how chief financial officers can position the campus…

  13. Liberty and Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dennis F.

    1989-01-01

    John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty is discussed with the view that it needs to be revised to guide moral judgments in higher education. Three key elements need to be modified: the action that is constrained; the constraint on the action; and the agent whose action is constrained. (MLW)

  14. Fuel Class Higher Alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the production and combustion of alcohol fuels with four or more carbon atoms, which we classify as higher alcohols. It assesses the feasibility of utilizing various C4-C8 alcohols as fuels for internal combustion engines

  15. Evaluation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Branko; Bungic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    One of the means of transforming classroom experience is by conducting action research with students. This paper reports about the action research with university students. It has been carried out within a semester of the course "Methods of Upbringing". Its goal has been to improve evaluation of higher education teaching. Different forms…

  16. Higher-level Innovization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandaru, Sunith; Tutum, Cem Celal; Deb, Kalyanmoy

    2011-01-01

    we introduce the higher-level innovization task through an application of a manufacturing process simulation for the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process where commonalities among two different Pareto-optimal fronts are analyzed. Multiple design rules are simultaneously deciphered from each front...

  17. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson…

  18. Creativity in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Drazena; Mabic, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents results of research related to perception of creativity in higher education made by the authors at the University of Mostar from Bosnia and Herzegovina. This research was based on a survey conducted among teachers and students at the University. The authors developed two types of questionnaires, one for teachers and the other…

  19. California's Future: Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Hans

    2015-01-01

    California's higher education system is not keeping up with the changing economy. Projections suggest that the state's economy will continue to need more highly educated workers. In 2025, if current trends persist, 41 percent of jobs will require at least a bachelor's degree and 36 percent will require some college education short of a bachelor's…

  20. Cyberbullying in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Maria A.; Smith, Gina S.; Brashen, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Bullying has extended beyond the schoolyard into online forums in the form of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a growing concern due to the effect on its victims. Current studies focus on grades K-12; however, cyberbullying has entered the world of higher education. The focus of this study was to identify the existence of cyberbullying in higher…

  1. Competitiveness - higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labas Istvan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of European Union plays an important role in the areas of education and training equally. The member states are responsible for organizing and operating their education and training systems themselves. And, EU policy is aimed at supporting the efforts of member states and trying to find solutions for the common challenges which appear. In order to make our future sustainable maximally; the key to it lies in education. The highly qualified workforce is the key to development, advancement and innovation of the world. Nowadays, the competitiveness of higher education institutions has become more and more appreciated in the national economy. In recent years, the frameworks of operation of higher education systems have gone through a total transformation. The number of applying students is continuously decreasing in some European countries therefore only those institutions can “survive” this shortfall, which are able to minimize the loss of the number of students. In this process, the factors forming the competitiveness of these budgetary institutions play an important role from the point of view of survival. The more competitive a higher education institution is, the greater the chance is that the students would like to continue their studies there and thus this institution will have a greater chance for the survival in the future, compared to ones lagging behind in the competition. Aim of our treatise prepared is to present the current situation and main data of the EU higher education and we examine the performance of higher education: to what extent it fulfils the strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth which is worded in the framework of Europe 2020 programme. The treatise is based on analysis of statistical data.

  2. Controlling the brain : How electrical stimulation can be used as an effective treatment for many brain disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dongen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Our brain is the center of our nervous system. Literally everything we do, from eating an apple to solving a Schrödinger equation, is controlled by it. Usually we don’t give much thought to the fact our brain is so utterly important, but imagine something starts to go drastically wrong inside the

  3. Radiation therapy of brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. J.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. Y.

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and six cases of brain tumors were treated at the Yonsei Cancer Center from January 1972 to August 1978 by Co-60 teletherapy unit. We analyses their clinical findings, histopathological findings, treatment and results. In those cases which computerized tomography had been used before and after radiation therapy, changes in tumor size and the presence of edema or necrosis following treatment was evaluated. 1. Among 106 cases, 90 cases were primary brain tumors and 16 cases were metastatic brain tumors. Pituitary tumors (38), glioma (34) and pinealoma (10) composed of most of primary brain tumors. 2. Post treatment follow-up was possible in 38 cases more than 1 years. Four among 11 cases of giloma expired and survivors had considerable neurological symptoms except 2 cases. Sixty five percent (12/20) of pituitary tumors showed improvement of visual symptoms and all cases (7) of pinealoma which post treatment follow-up was possible, showed remarkable good response. 3. Findings of CT scan after radiation treatment were compatible with results of clinical findings and post treatment follow-up. It showed complete regression of tumor mass in one case of pinealoma and medulloblastoma. One case of pituitary tumor showed almost complete regression of tumor mass. It also showed large residual lesion in cases of glioblastoma multiforme and cystic astrocytoma.

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury and Personality Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Marc; McCabe, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and lifelong disability in the United States for individuals below the age of 45. Current estimates from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicate that at least 1.4 million Americans sustain a TBI annually. TBI affects 475,000 children under age 14 each year in the United States alone.…

  5. Brain Aneurysm Warning Signs/Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Susco Chair of Research North Shore University Hospital, Brain Aneurysm Center Chair of Research The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research Kristen’s Legacy of Love Chair of Research TeamCindy Alcatraz Chair of Research ...

  6. Radiosensitivity of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhijie

    1992-11-01

    The general views on radiosensitivity of higher plants have been introduced from published references. The radiosensitivity varies with species, varieties and organs or tissues. The main factors of determining the radiosensitivity in different species are nucleus volume, chromosome volume, DNA content and endogenous compounds. The self-repair ability of DNA damage and chemical group of biological molecules, such as -SH thiohydroxy of proteins, are main factors to determine the radiosensitivity in different varieties. The moisture, oxygen, temperature radiosensitizer and protector are important external factors for radiosensitivity. Both the multiple target model and Chadwick-Leenhouts model are ideal mathematical models for describing the radiosensitivity of higher plants and the latter has more clear significance in biology

  7. Higher Education Language Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary of recommendations HEIs are encouraged, within the framework of their own societal context, mission, vision and strategies, to develop the aims and objectives of a Higher Education Language Policy (HELP) that allows them to implement these strategies. In this process, they may want......: As the first step in a Higher Education Language Policy, HEIs should determine the relative status and use of the languages employed in the institution, taking into consideration the answers to the following questions:  What is/are the official language(s) of the HEI?  What is/are the language...... and the level of internationalisation the HEI has or wants to have, and as a direct implication of that, what are the language proficiency levels expected from the graduates of these programme?  Given the profile of the HEI and its educational strategies, which language components are to be offered within...

  8. Evaluation of the Use of Periodicals Collection of the Higher Education Council Documentation and Online Search Center: Arts and Humanities Periodicals YÖK Dokümantasyon ve Uluslararası Bilgi Tarama Merkezi Koleksiyonundaki Sanat ve Beşeri Bilimler Konulu Süreli Yayınların Kullanım Değerlendirmesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elçin Özbudak

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the use perodicals collections in libraries is important as perodicals report the results of the latest scientific research and they are usually more expensive than other types of library materials. In this study we evaluate the use of Arts and Humanities periodicals in the collection of the Higher Education Council Documentation Center. Although the use of Arts and Humanities periodicals was found to be lower than, say, Biomedical periodicals collection, the number of journal titles in Arts and Humanities appears to be quite satisfactory. Some suggestions are made so as to increase the use of Arts and Humanities periodicals collection. Bilimsel araştırmalar için en güncel bilgileri veren ve maliyeti diğer materyallere göre daha fazla olan süreli yayınların ne oranda kullanıldığının araştırılması, koleksiyon değerlendirmesi açısından önemlidir. Bu amaçla, Yükseköğretim Kurulu Dokümantasyon ve Uluslararası Bilgi Tarama Merkezi süreli yayınlar koleksiyonunun genel bir değerlendirmesi yapılarak "Sanat ve Beşeri Bilimler" konulu süreli yayınların kullanımları incelenmiş, Yükseköğretim Kurulu Dokümantasyon ve Uluslararası Bilgi Tarama Merkezi 'nde önemli ve büyük bir süreli yayınlar koleksiyonu bulunduğu, "Sanat ve Beşeri Bilimler" konulu süreli yayınların da yeterli olduğu sonuçları çıkartılmıştır. "Sanat ve Beşeri Bilimler" konulu süreli yayınların kullanımlarının nispeten düşük oluşu, bu alanda çalışan araştırmacıların süreli yayınlara yeterince ilgi göstermemelerine bağlanarak, kullanımı artırmak için öneriler getirilmiştir.

  9. Mindboggle: Automated brain labeling with multiple atlases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Arno; Mensh, Brett; Ghosh, Satrajit; Tourville, Jason; Hirsch, Joy

    2005-01-01

    To make inferences about brain structures or activity across multiple individuals, one first needs to determine the structural correspondences across their image data. We have recently developed Mindboggle as a fully automated, feature-matching approach to assign anatomical labels to cortical structures and activity in human brain MRI data. Label assignment is based on structural correspondences between labeled atlases and unlabeled image data, where an atlas consists of a set of labels manually assigned to a single brain image. In the present work, we study the influence of using variable numbers of individual atlases to nonlinearly label human brain image data. Each brain image voxel of each of 20 human subjects is assigned a label by each of the remaining 19 atlases using Mindboggle. The most common label is selected and is given a confidence rating based on the number of atlases that assigned that label. The automatically assigned labels for each subject brain are compared with the manual labels for that subject (its atlas). Unlike recent approaches that transform subject data to a labeled, probabilistic atlas space (constructed from a database of atlases), Mindboggle labels a subject by each atlas in a database independently. When Mindboggle labels a human subject's brain image with at least four atlases, the resulting label agreement with coregistered manual labels is significantly higher than when only a single atlas is used. Different numbers of atlases provide significantly higher label agreements for individual brain regions. Increasing the number of reference brains used to automatically label a human subject brain improves labeling accuracy with respect to manually assigned labels. Mindboggle software can provide confidence measures for labels based on probabilistic assignment of labels and could be applied to large databases of brain images

  10. Influence of age on brain edema formation, secondary brain damage and inflammatory response after brain trauma in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Timaru-Kast

    Full Text Available After traumatic brain injury (TBI elderly patients suffer from higher mortality rate and worse functional outcome compared to young patients. However, experimental TBI research is primarily performed in young animals. Aim of the present study was to clarify whether age affects functional outcome, neuroinflammation and secondary brain damage after brain trauma in mice. Young (2 months and old (21 months male C57Bl6N mice were anesthetized and subjected to a controlled cortical impact injury (CCI on the right parietal cortex. Animals of both ages were randomly assigned to 15 min, 24 h, and 72 h survival. At the end of the observation periods, contusion volume, brain water content, neurologic function, cerebral and systemic inflammation (CD3+ T cell migration, inflammatory cytokine expression in brain and lung, blood differential cell count were determined. Old animals showed worse neurological function 72 h after CCI and a high mortality rate (19.2% compared to young (0%. This did not correlate with histopathological damage, as contusion volumes were equal in both age groups. Although a more pronounced brain edema formation was detected in old mice 24 hours after TBI, lack of correlation between brain water content and neurological deficit indicated that brain edema formation is not solely responsible for age-dependent differences in neurological outcome. Brains of old naïve mice were about 8% smaller compared to young naïve brains, suggesting age-related brain atrophy with possible decline in plasticity. Onset of cerebral inflammation started earlier and primarily ipsilateral to damage in old mice, whereas in young mice inflammation was delayed and present in both hemispheres with a characteristic T cell migration pattern. Pulmonary interleukin 1β expression was up-regulated after cerebral injury only in young, not aged mice. The results therefore indicate that old animals are prone to functional deficits and strong ipsilateral cerebral

  11. The development and investigation of a prototype three-dimensional compensator for whole brain radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, Paul; Arief, Isti; Shamas, Sofia; Weiss, Elisabeth; Castle, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is the standard treatment for patients with brain metastases, and is often used in conjunction with stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with a limited number of brain metastases, as well as prophylactic cranial irradiation. The use of open fields (conventionally used for WBRT) leads to higher doses to the brain periphery if dose is prescribed to the brain center at the largest lateral radius. These dose variations potentially compromise treatment efficacy and translate to increased side effects. The goal of this research was to design and construct a 3D 'brain wedge' to compensate dose heterogeneities in WBRT. Radiation transport theory was invoked to calculate the desired shape of a wedge to achieve a uniform dose distribution at the sagittal plane for an ellipsoid irradiated medium. The calculations yielded a smooth 3D wedge design to account for the missing tissue at the peripheral areas of the brain. A wedge was machined based on the calculation results. Three ellipsoid phantoms, spanning the mean and ± two standard deviations from the mean cranial dimensions were constructed, representing 95% of the adult population. Film was placed at the sagittal plane for each of the three phantoms and irradiated with 6 MV photons, with the wedge in place. Sagittal plane isodose plots for the three phantoms demonstrated the feasibility of this wedge to create a homogeneous distribution with similar results observed for the three phantom sizes, indicating that a single wedge may be sufficient to cover 95% of the adult population. The sagittal dose is a reasonable estimate of the off-axis dose for whole brain radiation therapy. Comparing the dose with and without the wedge the average minimum dose was higher (90% versus 86%), the maximum dose was lower (107% versus 113%) and the dose variation was lower (one standard deviation 2.7% versus 4.6%). In summary, a simple and effective 3D wedge for whole brain radiotherapy has been developed

  12. Insights into brain development and disease from neurogenetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-08

    Jul 8, 2014 ... powers of man could have evolved from those of higher animals. From a series of ... neuroanatomical level, the brains and central nervous sys- tems of higher .... Through their proliferative activity, neuroblasts each gen-.

  13. Caffeine, exercise and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeusen, Romain; Roelands, Bart; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine can improve exercise performance when it is ingested at moderate doses (3-6 mg/kg body mass). Caffeine also has an effect on the central nervous system (CNS), and it is now recognized that most of the performance-enhancing effect of caffeine is accomplished through the antagonism of the adenosine receptors, influencing the dopaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems. Adenosine and dopamine interact in the brain, and this might be one mechanism to explain how the important components of motivation (i.e. vigor, persistence and work output) and higher-order brain processes are involved in motor control. Caffeine maintains a higher dopamine concentration especially in those brain areas linked with 'attention'. Through this neurochemical interaction, caffeine improves sustained attention, vigilance, and reduces symptoms of fatigue. Other aspects that are localized in the CNS are a reduction in skeletal muscle pain and force sensation, leading to a reduction in perception of effort during exercise and therefore influencing the motivational factors to sustain effort during exercise. Because not all CNS aspects have been examined in detail, one should consider that a placebo effect may also be present. Overall, it appears that the performance-enhancing effects of caffeine reside in the brain, although more research is necessary to reveal the exact mechanisms through which the CNS effect is established. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Comparison of SPET brain perfusion and 18F-FDG brain metabolism in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Judeh, H H; Levine, S; Kumar, M; el-Zeftawy, H; Naddaf, S; Lou, J Q; Abdel-Dayem, H M

    1998-11-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is a clinically defined condition of uncertain aetiology. We compared 99Tcm-HMPAO single photon emission tomography (SPET) brain perfusion with dual-head 18F-FDG brain metabolism in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Eighteen patients (14 females, 4 males), who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of the Centers for Disease Control for chronic fatigue syndrome, were investigated. Thirteen patients had abnormal SPET brain perfusion scans and five had normal scans. Fifteen patients had normal glucose brain metabolism scans and three had abnormal scans. We conclude that, in chronic fatigue syndrome patients, there is discordance between SPET brain perfusion and 18F-FDG brain uptake. It is possible to have brain perfusion abnormalities without corresponding changes in glucose uptake.

  15. Higher Education in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2015-01-01

    Higher education systems around the world have been undergoing fundamental changes through the last 50 years from more narrow self-sustaining universities for the elite and into mass universities, where new groups of students have been recruited and the number of students enrolled has increased...... an impact on the educational systems in Scandinavia, and what possible futures can be envisioned?...... dramatically. In adjusting to the role of being a mass educational institution, universities have been challenged on how to cope with external pressures, such as forces of globalization and international markets, increased national and international competition for students and research grants, increased...

  16. Higher engineering mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    John Bird

    2014-01-01

    A practical introduction to the core mathematics principles required at higher engineering levelJohn Bird's approach to mathematics, based on numerous worked examples and interactive problems, is ideal for vocational students that require an advanced textbook.Theory is kept to a minimum, with the emphasis firmly placed on problem-solving skills, making this a thoroughly practical introduction to the advanced mathematics engineering that students need to master. The extensive and thorough topic coverage makes this an ideal text for upper level vocational courses. Now in

  17. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faul, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care.   Methods: We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I-IV trauma center (n=443. The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need” as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need.     Results: Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need.  Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion: Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the

  18. Towards higher intensities

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 2 weeks, commissioning of the machine protection system has advanced significantly, opening up the possibility of higher intensity collisions at 3.5 TeV. The intensity has been increased from 2 bunches of 1010 protons to 6 bunches of 2x1010 protons. Luminosities of 6x1028 cm-2s-1 have been achieved at the start of fills, a factor of 60 higher than those provided for the first collisions on 30 March.   The recent increase in LHC luminosity as recorded by the experiments. (Graph courtesy of the experiments and M. Ferro-Luzzi) To increase the luminosity further, the commissioning crews are now trying to push up the intensity of the individual proton bunches. After the successful injection of nominal intensity bunches containing 1.1x1011 protons, collisions were subsequently achieved at 450 GeV with these intensities. However, half-way through the first ramping of these nominal intensity bunches to 3.5 TeV on 15 May, a beam instability was observed, leading to partial beam loss...

  19. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  20. Tehran Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Tehran Nuclear Research Center was formerly managed by the University of Tehran. This Center, after its transformation to the AEOI, has now become a focal point for basic research in the area of Nuclear Energy in Iran

  1. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  3. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster ... Sitemap RSS E-mail Inside CPSC Accessibility Privacy Policy Budget, Performances & Finance Open Government Freedom of Information ( ...

  5. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  6. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  7. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  8. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Science Learning Center Making science and health easy for everyone to understand Home News Our Team What We Do ... Collaboration Conferences Current Projects Publications Contact The Genetic Science Learning Center at The University of Utah is a ...

  9. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  10. Brain Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain cancer refers to growths of malignant cells in tissues of the brain. Tumors that start in the brain are called primary brain tumors. Tumors that spread to the brain are called metastatic brain tumors. Start here to find information on brain cancer treatment, research, and statistics.

  11. Neuroscience, brains, and computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorno Maria Innocenti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the role of the neurosciences in establishing what the brain is and how states of the brain relate to states of the mind. The brain is viewed as a computational deviceperforming operations on symbols. However, the brain is a special purpose computational devicedesigned by evolution and development for survival and reproduction, in close interaction with theenvironment. The hardware of the brain (its structure is very different from that of man-made computers.The computational style of the brain is also very different from traditional computers: the computationalalgorithms, instead of being sets of external instructions, are embedded in brain structure. Concerningthe relationships between brain and mind a number of questions lie ahead. One of them is why andhow, only the human brain grasped the notion of God, probably only at the evolutionary stage attainedby Homo sapiens.

  12. FROM BRAIN DRAIN TO BRAIN NETWORKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina BONCEA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific networking is the most accessible way a country can turn the brain drain into brain gain. Diaspora’s members offer valuable information, advice or financial support from the destination country, without being necessary to return. This article aims to investigate Romania’s potential of turning brain drain into brain networking, using evidence from the medical sector. The main factors influencing the collaboration with the country of origin are investigated. The conclusions suggest that Romania could benefit from the diaspora option, through an active implication at institutional level and the implementation of a strategy in this area.

  13. Teaching at higher levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Undergraduate physics programmes for the 21st century were under discussion at a recent event held in Arlington, USA, open to two or three members of the physics faculties of universities from across the whole country. The conference was organized by the American Association of Physics Teachers with co-sponsorship from the American Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society and Project Kaleidoscope. Among the various aims were to learn about physics departments that have successfully revitalized their undergraduate physics programmes with innovative introductory physics courses and multi-track majors programmes. Engineers and life scientists were to be asked directly how physics programmes can better serve their students, and business leaders would be speaking on how physics departments can help to prepare their students for the diverse careers that they will eventually follow. It was planned to highlight ways that departments could fulfil their responsibilities towards trainee teachers, to identify the resources needed for revitalizing a department's programme, and to develop guidelines and recommendations for a funding programme to support collaborative efforts among physics departments for carrying out the enhancements required. More details about the conference can be found on the AAPT website (see http://www.aapt.org/programs/rupc.html). Meanwhile the UK's Higher Education Funding Council has proposed a two-pronged approach to the promotion of high quality teaching and learning, as well as widening participation in higher education from 1999-2000. A total of £60m should be available to support these initiatives by the year 2001-2002. As part of this scheme the Council will invite bids from institutions to support individual academics in enhancing learning and teaching, as well as in recognition of individual excellence. As with research grants, such awards would enable staff to pursue activities such as the development of teaching materials

  14. Regular Marijuana Users May Have Impaired Brain Reward Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  15. Craving love? Enduring grief activates brain's reward center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mary-Frances; Wellisch, David K; Stanton, Annette L; Eisenberger, Naomi I; Irwin, Michael R; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2008-08-15

    Complicated Grief (CG) occurs when an individual experiences prolonged, unabated grief. The neural mechanisms distinguishing CG from Noncomplicated Grief (NCG) are unclear, but hypothesized mechanisms include both pain-related activity (related to the social pain of loss) and reward-related activity (related to attachment behavior). Bereaved women (11 CG, 12 NCG) participated in an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging scan, during grief elicitation with idiographic stimuli. Analyses revealed that whereas both CG and NCG participants showed pain-related neural activity in response to reminders of the deceased, only those with CG showed reward-related activity in the nucleus accumbens (NA). This NA cluster was positively correlated with self-reported yearning, but not with time since death, participant age, or positive/negative affect. This study supports the hypothesis that attachment activates reward pathways. For those with CG, reminders of the deceased still activate neural reward activity, which may interfere with adapting to the loss in the present.

  16. Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Deployments inTransition Support for Caregivers Support for Children Guard and Reserve Locating Health Care Media & Resources Media Relations News Room Social Media Graphics Videos and Podcasts External Links Continuing ...

  17. Data Center Tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temares, M. Lewis; Lutheran, Joseph A.

    Operations tasking for data center management is discussed. The original and revised organizational structures of the data center at the University of Miami are also described. The organizational strategy addresses the functions that should be performed by the data center, anticipates the specialized skills required, and addresses personnel…

  18. Center of buoyancy definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.

    1988-12-01

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations

  19. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure ulcer - wound care center; Decubitus ulcer - wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound ... Common types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical ... flow, or swollen legs Certain wounds may not heal well due to: ...

  20. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  1. Higher Order Mode Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Stine Møller

    This PhD thesis considers higher order modes (HOMs) in optical fibers. That includes their excitation and characteristics. Within the last decades, HOMs have been applied both for space multiplexing in optical communications, group velocity dispersion management and sensing among others......-radial polarization as opposed to the linear polarization of the LP0X modes. The effect is investigated numerically in a double cladding fiber with an outer aircladding using a full vectorial modesolver. Experimentally, the bowtie modes are excited using a long period grating and their free space characteristics...... and polarization state are investigated. For this fiber, the onset of the bowtie effect is shown numerically to be LP011. The characteristics usually associated with Bessel-likes modes such as long diffraction free length and selfhealing are shown to be conserved despite the lack of azimuthal symmetry...

  2. Spiky higher genus strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjoern, J.; Bellini, A.; Johnston, D.

    1990-10-01

    It is clear from both the non-perturbative and perturbative approaches to two-dimensional quantum gravity that a new strong coupling regime is setting in at d=1, independent of the genus of the worldsheet being considered. It has been suggested that a Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) phase transition in the Liouville theory is the cause of this behaviour. However, it has recently been pointed out that the XY model, which displays a KT transition on the plane and the sphere, is always in the strong coupling, disordered phase on a surface of constant negative curvature. A higher genus worldsheet can be represented as a fundamental region on just such a surface, which might seem to suggest that the KT picture predicts a strong coupling region for arbitrary d, contradicting the known results. We resolve the apparent paradox. (orig.)

  3. VA's National PTSD Brain Bank: a National Resource for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Matthew J; Huber, Bertrand R; Brady, Christopher B; Ursano, Robert J; Benedek, David M; Kowall, Neil W; McKee, Ann C

    2017-08-25

    The National PTSD Brain Bank (NPBB) is a brain tissue biorepository established to support research on the causes, progression, and treatment of PTSD. It is a six-part consortium led by VA's National Center for PTSD with participating sites at VA medical centers in Boston, MA; Durham, NC; Miami, FL; West Haven, CT; and White River Junction, VT along with the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences. It is also well integrated with VA's Boston-based brain banks that focus on Alzheimer's disease, ALS, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and other neurological disorders. This article describes the organization and operations of NPBB with specific attention to: tissue acquisition, tissue processing, diagnostic assessment, maintenance of a confidential data biorepository, adherence to ethical standards, governance, accomplishments to date, and future challenges. Established in 2014, NPBB has already acquired and distributed brain tissue to support research on how PTSD affects brain structure and function.

  4. Zen and the Brain: Mutually Illuminating Topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Austin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zen Buddhist meditative practices emphasize the long-term, mindful training of attention and awareness during one’s ordinary daily-life activities, the shedding of egocentric behaviors, and the skillful application of one’s innate compassionate resources of insight-wisdom toward others and oneself.This review focuses on how such a comprehensive approach to training the brain could relate to a distinctive flavor of Zen: its emphasis on direct experience, with special reference to those major acute states of awakening that create deep transformations of consciousness and behavior. In Japanese, these advanced states are called kensho and satori.Ten key concepts are reviewed. They begin by distinguishing between the concentrative and receptive forms of meditation, noticing the complementary ways that they each train our normal ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ modes of attentive processing. Additional concepts distinguish between our two major processing pathways. The self-centered, egocentric frame of reference processes information in relation to our body (our soma or to our mental functions (our psyche. The other-centered frame of reference processes information anonymously. Its prefix, allo- simply means ‘other’ in Greek. Subsequent concepts consider how these useful Greek words --- ego/allo, soma/psyche --- correlate with the normal functional anatomy of important thalamo↔cortical connections. A plausible model then envisions how a triggering stimulus that captures attention could prompt the reticular nucleus to release GABA; how its selective inhibition of the dorsal thalamus could then block both our higher somatic and psychic cortical functions; so as to: a delete the maladaptive aspects of selfhood, while also b releasing the direct, all-inclusive, globally-unified experience of other.Two final concepts consider how the long-term meditative training of intuitive functions relates to certain kinds of word-free spatial tasks that

  5. [NEURO-ONCOLOGY A NEW FIELD IN DAVIDOFF CANCER CENTER AT RABIN MEDICAL CENTER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Abu-Shkara, Ramez; Siegal, Tali

    2017-08-01

    Neuro-oncology is a subspecialty attracting physicians from medical disciplines such as neurology, neurosurgery, pediatrics, oncology, and radiotherapy. It deals with diagnosis and management of primary brain tumors, as well as metastatic and non-metastatic neurological manifestations that frequently affect cancer patients including brain metastases, paraneoplastic syndromes and neurological complications of cancer treatment. A neuro-oncology unit was established in Davidoff Cancer Center at Rabin Medical Center. It provides a multidisciplinary team approach for management of brain tumors and services, such as expert outpatient clinics and inpatient consultations for the departments of oncology, hematology, bone marrow transplantation and other departments in the Rabin Medical Center. In addition, expert consultation is frequently provided to other hospitals that treat cancer patients with neurological manifestations. The medical disciplines that closely collaborate for the daily management of neuro-oncology patients include radiotherapy, hematology, oncology, neuro-surgery, neuro-radiology and neuro-pathology. The neuro-oncology center is also involved in clinical and laboratory research conducted in collaboration with researchers in Israel and abroad. The new service contributes substantially to the improved care of cancer patients and to the advance of research topics in the field of neuro-oncology.

  6. The Soviet Higher Military Educational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    blems of management and administra- tion of higher educational institu- tions."’ Data on students alone in each institution totaled several... educational institutes with modern facilities and constantly perfecting their 35ibid., p. 58. Such "work" is classified as scientific research work...resources and train- ing support resources and be located both in the area of the permanent educational facility and in a training center

  7. Excessive Sugar Consumption May Be a Difficult Habit to Break: A View From the Brain and Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Matthew S; Stanhope, Kimber L; Epel, Elissa S; Mason, Ashley E; Brown, Rashida; Medici, Valentina; Havel, Peter J; Laugero, Kevin D

    2015-06-01

    Sugar overconsumption and chronic stress are growing health concerns because they both may increase the risk for obesity and its related diseases. Rodent studies suggest that sugar consumption may activate a glucocorticoid-metabolic-brain-negative feedback pathway, which may turn off the stress response and thereby reinforce habitual sugar overconsumption. The objective of the study was to test our hypothesized glucocorticoid-metabolic-brain model in women consuming beverages sweetened with either aspartame of sucrose. This was a parallel-arm, double-masked diet intervention study. The study was conducted at the University of California, Davis, Clinical and Translational Science Center's Clinical Research Center and the University of California, Davis, Medical Center Imaging Research Center. Nineteen women (age range 18-40 y) with a body mass index (range 20-34 kg/m(2)) who were a subgroup from a National Institutes of Health-funded investigation of 188 participants assigned to eight experimental groups. The intervention consisted of sucrose- or aspartame-sweetened beverage consumption three times per day for 2 weeks. Salivary cortisol and regional brain responses to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task were measured. Compared with aspartame, sucrose consumption was associated with significantly higher activity in the left hippocampus (P = .001). Sucrose, but not aspartame, consumption associated with reduced (P = .024) stress-induced cortisol. The sucrose group also had a lower reactivity to naltrexone, significantly (P = .041) lower nausea, and a trend (P = .080) toward lower cortisol. These experimental findings support a metabolic-brain-negative feedback pathway that is affected by sugar and may make some people under stress more hooked on sugar and possibly more vulnerable to obesity and its related conditions.

  8. The Chronicle Index of For-Profit Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2007-01-01

    This Index tracks the performance of eight publicly traded higher-education companies. The index was developed for The Chronicle by the Center for Research in Security Prices at the University of Chicago's Graduate School of Business.

  9. Learning higher mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Pontrjagin, Lev Semenovič

    1984-01-01

    Lev Semenovic Pontrjagin (1908) is one of the outstanding figures in 20th century mathematics. In a long career he has made fundamental con­ tributions to many branches of mathematics, both pure and applied. He has received every honor that a grateful government can bestow. Though in no way constrained to do so, he has through the years taught mathematics courses at Moscow State University. In the year 1975 he set himself the task of writing a series of books on secondary school and beginning university mathematics. In his own words, "I wished to set forth the foundations of higher mathematics in a form that would have been accessible to myself as a lad, but making use of all my experience as a scientist and a teacher, ac­ cumulated over many years. " The present volume is a translation of the first two out of four moderately sized volumes on this theme planned by Pro­ fessor Pontrjagin. The book begins at the beginning of modern mathematics, analytic ge­ ometry in the plane and 3-dimensional space. Refin...

  10. The Brain Prize 2014: complex human functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigaityte, Kristina; Iacoboni, Marco

    2014-11-01

    Giacomo Rizzolatti, Stanislas Dehaene, and Trevor Robbins were recently awarded the 2014 Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize for their 'pioneering research on higher brain mechanisms underpinning such complex human functions as literacy, numeracy, motivated behavior and social cognition, and for their effort to understand cognitive and behavioral disorders'. Why was their work highlighted? Is there anything that links together these seemingly disparate lines of research? Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obedian, E.; Lotbiniere, A.C.J. de; Haffty, B.G.; Piepmeier, J.M.; Fischer, D.B.; Knisely, J.P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the influence of several prognostic factors on overall survival and progression free survival in patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Materials and Methods: Records of 61 coecutive patients with pathologically confirmed extra-cranial malignancies undergoing SRS at Yale University School of Medicine between 12/18/91 and 7/2/96 were reviewed. All patients underwent head frame localization and CT and/or MRI based treatment planning. Outcome was analyzed with respect to age, number of lesions, size of lesions, location of lesions, site and stage of primary tumor, status of primary tumor at time of SRS, history of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), surgery, and/or chemotherapy prior to or after SRS, delay in SRS from diagnosis of brain metastases, dose of radiation delivered, and brain metastasis free interval. Both overall survival and progression free survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Tests for statistical significance were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Median follow-up was 29 months. 3% ((8(61))) of patients displayed evidence of progressive disease at the site of SRS, and 87% ((53(61))) of patients have died. Overall and progression free survival rates for the entire cohort of patients were 43.8% and 89.5% at 1 year and 11.1% and 71.4% at 2 years, respectively. Patients undergoing SRS for a solitary brain metastasis had a significant improvement in overall survival with 1 year survival rates of 52.6% vs. 32.7% for patients undergoing SRS for more than 1 brain metastasis (p=0.002). Patients who presented with progressive systemic disease at the time of SRS had an inferior overall survival with a 1 year survival rate of 15.4% compared to patients with presumed/known stable disease who had a 1 year survival rate of 51.5%/54.2% (p<0.001). Patients treated for cerebral metastases had a higher progression free survival compared to patients undergoing SRS

  12. Are all spatial reference frames egocentric? Reinterpreting evidence for allocentric, object-centered, or world-centered reference frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia eFilimon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use and neural representation of egocentric spatial reference frames is well documented. In contrast, whether the brain represents spatial relationships between objects in allocentric, object-centered, or world-centered coordinates is debated. Here, I review behavioral, neuropsychological, neurophysiological (neuronal recording, and neuroimaging evidence for and against allocentric, object-centered, or world-centered spatial reference frames. Based on theoretical considerations, simulations, and empirical findings from spatial navigation, spatial judgments, and goal-directed movements, I suggest that all spatial representations may in fact be dependent on egocentric reference frames.

  13. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  14. Clinical review: Brain-body temperature differences in adults with severe traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Surrogate or 'proxy' measures of brain temperature are used in the routine management of patients with brain damage. The prevailing view is that the brain is 'hotter' than the body. The polarity and magnitude of temperature differences between brain and body, however, remains unclear after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The focus of this systematic review is on the adult patient admitted to intensive/neurocritical care with a diagnosis of severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 8). The review considered studies that measured brain temperature and core body temperature. Articles published in English from the years 1980 to 2012 were searched in databases, CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Ovid SP, Mednar and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database. For the review, publications of randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, before and after studies, cohort studies, case-control studies and descriptive studies were considered for inclusion. Of 2,391 records identified via the search strategies, 37 were retrieved for detailed examination (including two via hand searching). Fifteen were reviewed and assessed for methodological quality. Eleven studies were included in the systematic review providing 15 brain-core body temperature comparisons. The direction of mean brain-body temperature differences was positive (brain higher than body temperature) and negative (brain lower than body temperature). Hypothermia is associated with large brain-body temperature differences. Brain temperature cannot be predicted reliably from core body temperature. Concurrent monitoring of brain and body temperature is recommended in patients where risk of temperature-related neuronal damage is a cause for clinical concern and when deliberate induction of below-normal body temperature is instituted. PMID:23680353

  15. On development of functional brain connectivity in the young brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.E. Anna-Jasmijn eHoff

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our brain is a complex network of structurally and functionally interconnected regions, shaped to efficiently process and integrate information. The development from a brain equipped with basic functionalities to an efficient network facilitating complex behavior starts during gestation and continues into adulthood. Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI enables the examination of developmental aspects of functional connectivity and functional brain networks. This review will discuss changes observed in the developing brain on the level of network functional connectivity (FC from a gestational age of 20 weeks onwards. We discuss findings of resting-state fMRI studies showing that functional network development starts during gestation, creating a foundation for each of the resting-state networks to be established. Visual and sensorimotor areas are reported to develop first, with other networks, at different rates, increasing both in network connectivity and size over time. Reaching childhood, marked fine-tuning and specialization takes place in the regions necessary for higher-order cognitive functions.

  16. Left brain, right brain: facts and fantasies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Corballis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Handedness and brain asymmetry are widely regarded as unique to humans, and associated with complementary functions such as a left-brain specialization for language and logic and a right-brain specialization for creativity and intuition. In fact, asymmetries are widespread among animals, and support the gradual evolution of asymmetrical functions such as language and tool use. Handedness and brain asymmetry are inborn and under partial genetic control, although the gene or genes responsible are not well established. Cognitive and emotional difficulties are sometimes associated with departures from the "norm" of right-handedness and left-brain language dominance, more often with the absence of these asymmetries than their reversal.

  17. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  18. Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep Anatomy of Sleep Sleep Stages ... t form or maintain the pathways in your brain that let you learn and create new memories, ...

  19. Aneurysm in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/001414.htm Aneurysm in the brain To use the sharing features on this page, ... aneurysm occurs in a blood vessel of the brain, it is called a cerebral, or intracranial, aneurysm. ...

  20. Brain injury - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000163.htm Brain injury - discharge To use the sharing features on ... know was in the hospital for a serious brain injury. At home, it will take time for ...

  1. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  2. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  3. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  4. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Family Donate Volunteer Justin's Hope Fund Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  5. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000123.htm Brain aneurysm repair - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a brain aneurysm . An aneurysm is a weak area in ...

  6. Numbers and brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallistel, C R

    2017-12-01

    The representation of discrete and continuous quantities appears to be ancient and pervasive in animal brains. Because numbers are the natural carriers of these representations, we may discover that in brains, it's numbers all the way down.

  7. Protect Your Brain

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    At least three and a half million people in the U.S. sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI), either with or without other injuries. This podcast discusses the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of brain injuries.

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brain injury Some traumatic brain injuries have lasting effects, and some do not. You may be left with disabilities. These can be physical, behavioral, communicative, and/or mental. Customized treatment helps you to have as full ...

  9. High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA

    2011-12-06

    A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

  10. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  11. Brain cancer spreads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue).......The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue)....

  12. Neuromythology of Einstein's brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Terence

    2014-07-01

    The idea that the brain of the great physicist Albert Einstein is different from "average" brains in both cellular structure and external shape is widespread. This belief is based on several studies examining Einstein's brain both histologically and morphologically. This paper reviews these studies and finds them wanting. Their results do not, in fact, provide support for the claim that the structure of Einstein's brain reflects his intellectual abilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Brain imaging and schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinot, J.L.; Dao-Castellana, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Brain structures and brain function have been investigated by the new brain imaging techniques for more than ten years. In Psychiatry, these techniques could afford a new understanding of mental diseases. In schizophrenic patients, CAT scanner and RMI pointed out statistically significant ventricular enlargments which are presently considered as evidence for abnormalities in brain maturation. Functional imaging techniques reported metabolic dysfunctions in the cortical associative areas which are probably linked to the cognitive features of schizophrenics [fr

  14. Higher Efficiency HVAC Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Charles Joseph [QM Power, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2018-02-13

    failure prone capacitors from the power stage. Q-Sync’s simpler electronics also result in higher efficiency because it eliminates the power required by the PCB to perform the obviated power conversions and PWM processes after line synchronous operating speed is reached in the first 5 seconds of operation, after which the PWM circuits drop out and a much less energy intensive “pass through” circuit takes over, allowing the grid-supplied AC power to sustain the motor’s ongoing operation.

  15. Brain atrophy during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Takeda, Shumpei; Hatazawa, Jun

    1985-01-01

    Age-related brain atrophy was investigated in thousands of persons with no neurologic disturbances using X-CT and NMR-CT and following results were obtained. Brain atrophy was minimal in 34 -- 35 years old in both sexes, increased exponentially to the increasing age after 34 -- 35 years, and probably resulted in dementia, such as vascular or multiinfarct dementia. Brain atrophy was significantly greater in men than in women at all ages. Brain volumes were maximal in 34 -- 35 years old in both sexes with minimal individual differences which increased proportionally to the increasing age. Remarkable individual differences in the extents of brain atrophy (20 -- 30 %) existed among aged subjects. Some aged subjects had little or no atrophy of their brains, as seen in young subjects, and others had markedly shrunken brains associated with senility. From these results there must be pathological factors promoting brain atrophy with a great individual difference. We have studied the relation of intelligence to brain volume, and have ascertained that progression of brain atrophy was closely related to loss of mental activities independently of their ages. Our longitudinal study has revealed that the most important factors promoting brain atrophy during aging was decrease in the cerebral blood flow. MNR-CT can easily detected small infarction (lacunae) and edematous lesions resulting from ischemia and hypertensive encephalopathy, while X-CT can not. Therefore NMR-CT is very useful for detection of subtle changes in the brain. (J.P.N.)

  16. Brain Migration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, Annie

    2006-01-01

    The "brain drain/brain gain" debate has been going on for the past 40 years, with irresolvable theoretical disputes and unenforceable policy recommendations that economists commonly ascribe to the lack of reliable empirical data. The recent report of the World Bank, "International migration, remittances and the brain drain", documents the…

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for brain - SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretti, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Perfusion tracers for brain SPECT imaging suitable for regional cerebral blood flow measurement and regional cerebral blood volume determination, with respect to their ability to pass the blood-brain-barrier, are described. Problems related t the use of specific radiotracers to map receptors distribution in the brain are also discussed in this lecture. 9 figs, 6 tabs

  18. Brain Research and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, Mary

    Current research on brain activity has many implications for educators. The triune brain concept and the left and right hemisphere concepts are among the many complex theories evolving from experimentation and observation. The triune brain concept suggests that the human forebrain has expanded while retaining three structurally unique formations…

  19. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  20. Handbook on data centers

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Samee Ullah

    2015-01-01

    This handbook offers a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research achievements in the field of data centers. Contributions from international, leading researchers and scholars offer topics in cloud computing, virtualization in data centers, energy efficient data centers, and next generation data center architecture.  It also comprises current research trends in emerging areas, such as data security, data protection management, and network resource management in data centers. Specific attention is devoted to industry needs associated with the challenges faced by data centers, such as various power, cooling, floor space, and associated environmental health and safety issues, while still working to support growth without disrupting quality of service. The contributions cut across various IT data technology domains as a single source to discuss the interdependencies that need to be supported to enable a virtualized, next-generation, energy efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly data cente...

  1. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    in order to relate the results to the service levels used in call centers. Furthermore, the generic nature of the approximation is demonstrated by applying it to a system incorporating a dynamic priority scheme. In the last paper Optimization of overflow policies in call centers, overflows between agent......The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructure...... in modern call centers allows for a high level of customization, but also induces complicated operational processes. The size of the industry together with the complex and labor intensive nature of large call centers motivates the research carried out to understand the underlying processes. The customizable...

  2. Age and Gender Effects On Auditory Brain Stem Response (ABR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yones Lotfi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Auditory Brain Stem Response (ABR is a result of eight nerve and brain stem nuclei stimulation. Several factors may affect the latencies, interpeak latencies and amplitudes in ABR especially sex and age. In this study, age and sex influence on ABR were studied. Methods: This study was performed on 120 cases (60 males and 60 females at Akhavan rehabilitation center of university of welfare and rehabilitation sciences, Tehran, Iran. Cases were divided in three age groups: 18-30, 31-50 and 51-70 years old. Each age group consists of 20 males and 20 females. Age and sex influences on absolute latency of wave I and V, and IPL of I-V were examined. Results: Independent t test showed that females have significantly shorter latency of wave I, V, and IPL I-V latency (P<0.001 than males. Two way ANOVA showed that latency of wave I, V and IPL I-V in 51-70 years old group was significantly higher than 18-30 and 31-50 years old groups (P<0.001 Discussion: According to the results of present study and similar studies, in clinical practice, different norms for older adults and both genders should be established.

  3. Association of Ki-67, p53, and bcl-2 expression of the primary non-small-cell lung cancer lesion with brain metastatic lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubb, Robbin S.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Hachiya, Tsutomu; Milas, Ivan; Ro, Jae Y.; Langford, Lauren; Sawaya, Raymond; Putnam, Joe B.; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D.; McDonnell, Timothy J.; Brock, William; Hong, Waun K.; Roth, Jack A.; Milas, Luka

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The study was conducted to determine whether immunohistochemical analysis of Ki-67, p53, and bcl-2 in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer is associated with a higher rate of brain metastases and whether the intrapatient expression of these biomarkers (in the primary tumors vs. brain lesions) is similar. Methods and Materials: At the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, tumors from 29 case patients with primary lung tumor and brain metastasis and 29 control patients with primary lung tumor but no brain metastasis were resected and examined for immunohistochemical expression. Ki-67, p53, and bcl-2 were analyzed in resected primary lung, lymph node, and metastatic brain tumors. Each control patient was matched by age, gender, and histology to a patient with brain metastasis. Results: No significant differences in patient survival characteristics were detected between the case group and control group. Also, difference in patient outcome between the two groups was not generally predicted by biomarker analysis. However, when the groups were combined, the biomarker analysis was predictive for certain patient outcome end points. Using median values as cutoff points between low and high expression of biomarkers, it was observed that high expression of Ki-67 (>40%) in lung primaries was associated with poorer disease-free survival (p=0.04), whereas low expression of p53 in lung primaries was associated with poorer overall survival (p=0.04), and these patients had a higher rate of nonbrain distant metastases (p=0.02). The patients with brain metastases were particularly prone to developing nonbrain distant metastases if the percentage of p53-positive cells in brain metastases was low (p=0.01). There was a positive correlation in the expression of Ki-67 (p=0.02) (r 2 =0.1608), as well as p53 (p 2 =0.7380), between lung primaries and brain metastases. Compared to Ki-67 and p53, bcl-2 was the least predictive. Conclusion: Differences in biomarker expression between the

  4. Brain atrophy during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Yamada, Kenji; Yamada, Susumu; Ono, Shuichi; Takeda, Shunpei; Hatazawa, Jun; Ito, Masatoshi; Kubota, Kazuo

    1985-01-01

    Age-related brain atrophy was investigated in thousands of persons with no neurologic disturbances using X-CT and NMR-CT. Brain atrophy was minimal in 34-35 years old in both sexes, increased exponentially to the increasing age after 34-35 years, and probably resulted in dementia, such as vascular or multi-infarct dementia. Brain atrophy was significantly greater in men than in women at all ages. Brain volumes were maximal in 34-35 years old in both sexes with minimal individual differences which increased proportionally to the increasing age. Remarkable individual differences in the extent of brain atrophy (20 - 30 %) existed among aged subjects. Progression of brain atrophy was closely related to loss of mental activities independently of their ages. Our longitudinal study has revealed that the most important factors promoting brain atrophy during aging was the decrease in the cerebral blood flow. We have classified brain atrophy into sulcal and cisternal enlargement type (type I), ventricular enlargement type (type II) and mixed type (type III) according to the clinical study using NMR-CT. Brain atrophy of type I progresses significantly in almost all of the geriatric disorders. This type of brain atrophy progresses significantly in heavy smokers and drinkers. Therefore this type of brain atrophy might be caused by the decline in the blood flow in anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Brain atrophy of type II was caused by the disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid circulation after cerebral bleeding and subarachnoid bleeding. Brain atrophy of type III was seen in vascular dementia or multi-infarct dementia which was caused by loss of brain matter after multiple infarction, and was seen also in dementia of Alzheimer type in which degeneration of nerve cells results in brain atrophy. NMR-CT can easily detect small infarction (lacunae) and edematous lesions resulting from ischemia and hypertensive encephalopathy. (J.P.N.)

  5. A SPECT study of language and brain reorganization three years after pediatric brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu Wong, Stephanie B; Chapman, Sandra B; Cook, Lois G; Anand, Raksha; Gamino, Jacquelyn F; Devous, Michael D

    2006-01-01

    Using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), we investigated brain plasticity in children 3 years after sustaining a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). First, we assessed brain perfusion patterns (i.e., the extent of brain blood flow to regions of the brain) at rest in eight children who suffered severe TBI as compared to perfusion patterns in eight normally developing children. Second, we examined differences in perfusion between children with severe TBI who showed good versus poor recovery in complex discourse skills. Specifically, the children were asked to produce and abstract core meaning for two stories in the form of a lesson. Inconsistent with our predictions, children with severe TBI showed areas of increased perfusion as compared to normally developing controls. Adult studies have shown the reverse pattern with TBI associated with reduced perfusion. With regard to the second aim and consistent with previously identified brain-discourse relations, we found a strong positive association between perfusion in right frontal regions and discourse abstraction abilities, with higher perfusion linked to better discourse outcomes and lower perfusion linked to poorer discourse outcomes. Furthermore, brain-discourse patterns of increased perfusion in left frontal regions were associated with lower discourse abstraction ability. The results are discussed in terms of how brain changes may represent adaptive and maladaptive plasticity. The findings offer direction for future studies of brain plasticity in response to neurocognitive treatments.

  6. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  7. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  8. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Business with VA Acquisition, Logistics, & Construction Small & Veteran Business Programs VetBiz.gov Financial & Asset Enterprise Management Security Investigation Center/Background Clearances Freedom of Information ...

  9. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  10. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  11. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  12. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  13. Audio Visual Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Audiovisual Services Center provides still photographic documentation with laboratory support, video documentation, video editing, video duplication, photo/video...

  14. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  15. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  16. Instant BrainShark

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. ""Instant BrainShark"" is a step-by-step guide to creating online presentations using BrainShark. The book covers digital marketing best practices alongside tips for sales conversions. The book is written in an easy-to-read style for anybody to easily pick up and get started with BrainShark.Instant BrainShark is for anyone who wants to use BrainShark to create presentations online and share them around the community. The book is also useful for developers who are looking to explore

  17. David Ferrier: brain drawings and brain maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, J Wayne

    2013-01-01

    This chapter has two emphases, one is about the men who influenced the visual representations that David Ferrier (1843-1928) used to illustrate his work on localization of brain functions during the years 1873-1875, namely, Alexander Ecker, John C. Galton, and Ernest Waterlow, and the other is about the nature of medical representations and of Ferrier's illustrations in particular. Medical illustrations are characterized either as pictures, line drawings, or brain maps. Ferrier's illustrations will be shown to be increasingly sophisticated brain maps that contrast with early nineteenth-century standards of medical illustrations, as exemplified by John Bell (1763-1829). © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of mild hypothermia on glucose metabolism and glycerol of brain tissue in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiong; LI Ai-lin; ZHI Da-shi; HUANG Hui-ling

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of mild hypothermia on glucose metabolism and glycerol of brain tissue in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (STBI) using clinical microdialysis.Methods: Thirty-one patients with STBI ( GCS ≤8) were randomly divided into hypothermic group (Group A) and control group (Group B). Microdialysis catheters were inserted into the cerebral cortex of perilesional and normal brain tissue. All samples were analyzed using CMA microdialysis analyzer.Results: In comparison with the control group, lactate/glucose ratio ( L/G) , lactate/pyruvate ratio ( L/P) and glycerol (Gly) in perilensional tissue were significantly decreased; L/P in normal brain tissue was significantly decreased. In control group, L/G, L/P and Gly in perilensional tissue were higher than that in normal brain tissue. In the hypothermic group, L/P in perilensional tissue was higher than that in relative normal brain.Conclusions: Mild hypothermia protects brain tissues by decreasing L/G, L/P and Gly in perilensional tissue and L/P in "normal brain" tissues. The energy crisis and membrane phospholipid degradation in perilensional tissue are easier to happen after traumatic brain injury, and mild hypothermia protects brain better in perilensional tissue than in normal brain tissue.

  19. Maturation of the adolescent brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arain M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Arain, Maliha Haque, Lina Johal, Puja Mathur, Wynand Nel, Afsha Rais, Ranbir Sandhu, Sushil Sharma Saint James School of Medicine, Kralendijk, Bonaire, The Netherlands Abstract: Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults – intellectually, physically, hormonally, and socially. Adolescence is a tumultuous time, full of changes and transformations. The pubertal transition to adulthood involves both gonadal and behavioral maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have discovered that myelinogenesis, required for proper insulation and efficient neurocybernetics, continues from childhood and the brain's region-specific neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable to impulsive sex, food, and sleep habits. The maturation of the adolescent brain is also influenced by heredity, environment, and sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone, which play a crucial role in myelination. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission predominates, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission remains under construction, and this might be responsible for immature and impulsive behavior and neurobehavioral excitement during adolescent life. The adolescent population is highly vulnerable to driving under the influence of alcohol and social maladjustments due to an immature limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Synaptic plasticity and the release of neurotransmitters may also be influenced by environmental neurotoxins and drugs of abuse including cigarettes, caffeine, and alcohol during adolescence. Adolescents may become involved with offensive crimes, irresponsible behavior, unprotected sex, juvenile courts, or even prison. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the major cause of death among the teenage population is due to injury and violence related to sex and substance abuse. Prenatal neglect, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption may also

  20. Euclidean supergravity and multi-centered solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Sabra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In ungauged supergravity theories, the no-force condition for BPS states implies the existence of stable static multi-centered solutions. The first solutions to Einstein–Maxwell theory with a positive cosmological constant describing an arbitrary number of charged black holes were found by Kastor and Traschen. Generalisations to five and higher dimensional theories were obtained by London. Multi-centered solutions in gauged supergravity, even with time-dependence allowed, have yet to be constructed. In this letter we construct supersymmetry-preserving multi-centered solutions for the case of D=5, N=2 Euclidean gauged supergravity coupled to an arbitrary number of vector multiplets. Higher dimensional Einstein–Maxwell multi-centered solutions are also presented.

  1. The Retention of Tacit Knowledge in Higher Learning Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Andrew Everardo

    2013-01-01

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) could be among organizations without effective programs for preserving tacit knowledge (TK) when knowledge workers retire, quit, take a leave of absence, or are terminated. The theoretical underpinnings of this study were neuroscience related to brain learning physiology, transformational leadership theory,…

  2. Developing Globally Compatible Institutional Infrastructures for Indian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Raj; Bartning, Augustine; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2010-01-01

    The authors profile developments in the globalization of Indian higher education, with an emphasis on emerging globally compatible institutional infrastructures. In recent decades, there has been an enormous amount of brain drain: the exodus of the brightest professionals and students to other countries. The article argues that the implementation…

  3. The ATOMKI Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biri, S.; Kormany, Z.; Berzi, I.; Hunyadi, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 a new division was established in our institute: the ATOMKI Accelerator Center (AAC). Before this time the facilities and staff of AAC belonged to other departments of the institute. The re-organization however, was necessary. It was understood that the translocation of all the accelerators into a centralized unit is advantageous in numerous fields. Here we just mention some of them. The submission of any instrumentation type proposal (EU or domestic) will be easier and has a higher chance to be supported. The organization and distribution of the beamtimes will be more equal and optimal. The usage of the maintenance and spare tools can became better and cheaper. The operating staff (cca. 20 person) can serve at more than one accelerator and the teams can help each other. The accelerator center actually became a fourth new basic unit of the institute besides the three traditional scientific divisions (see the Atomki homepage for the organization chart). The following six main facilities belong to the accelerator center: Cyclotron; VdG-5 accelerator; VdG-1 accelerator; ECR ion source; Isotope separator; Tandetron (under installation). In figure 1 the placements of these machines are shown in an artistic 3D map of the Atomki. The table 1 summarizes the main parameters of the accelerators. More detailed technical specification of the machines can be found in the new homepage of the center. In 2009 all the accelerators operated as scheduled, safely and without major breakdowns. After the experiences in the first months it can be concluded that the new center works well both for technical and human point of views. In the next sub-chapters the 2009 operation and development details of the individual accelerators are summarized. Cyclotron operation. The operation of the cyclotron in 2009 was concentrated to the usual 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 2009 hours; the time

  4. 75 FR 38506 - Office of Postsecondary Education: Overview Information; Coordinating Center for Transition and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... to establish a coordinating center for institutions of higher education that offer inclusive... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Postsecondary Education: Overview Information; Coordinating... purpose of this program is to establish a coordinating center for institutions of higher education that...

  5. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  6. Higher Physical Activity is Associated with Increased Attentional Network Connectivity in the Healthy Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon Ha Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential alterations in structural network properties related to physical activity (PA in healthy elderly. We recruited 76 elderly individuals with normal cognition from Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. All participants underwent the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery and 3.0T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Participants were subdivided into quartiles according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire scores, which represents the amount of PA. Through graph theory based analyses, we compared global and local network topologies according to PA quartile. The higher PA group demonstrated better performance in speed processing compared to the lower PA group. Regional nodal strength also significantly increased in the higher PA group, which involved the bilateral middle frontal, bilateral inferior parietal, right medial orbitofrontal, right superior and middle temporal gyri. These results were further replicated when the highest and the lowest quartile groups were compared in terms of regional nodal strengths and local efficiency. Our findings that the regional nodal strengths associated with the attentional network were increased in the higher PA group suggest the preventive effects of PA on age-related cognitive decline, especially in attention.

  7. Mapping brain function to brain anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentino, D.J.; Huang, H.K.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    In Imaging the human brain, MRI is commonly used to reveal anatomical structure, while PET is used to reveal tissue function. This paper presents a protocol for correlating data between these two imaging modalities; this correlation can provide in vivo regional measurements of brain function which are essential to our understanding of the human brain. The authors propose a general protocol to standardize the acquisition and analysis of functional image data. First, MR and PET images are collected to form three-dimensional volumes of structural and functional image data. Second, these volumes of image data are corrected for distortions inherent in each imaging modality. Third, the image volumes are correlated to provide correctly aligned structural and functional images. The functional images are then mapped onto the structural images in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional representations. Finally, morphometric techniques can be used to provide statistical measures of the structure and function of the human brain

  8. Brain imaging during seizure: ictal brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottamasu, Sambasiva Rao

    1997-01-01

    The role of single photon computed tomography (SPECT) in presurgical localization of medically intractable complex partial epilepsy (CPE) in children is reviewed. 99m Technetium neurolite, a newer lipophylic agent with a high first pass brain extraction and little or no redistribution is injected during a seizure, while the child is monitored with a video recording and continuous EEG and SPECT imaging is performed in the next 1-3 hours with the images representing regional cerebral profusion at the time of injection. On SPECT studies performed with radiopharmaceutical injected during a seizure, ictal focus is generally hypervascular. Other findings on ictal brain SPECT include hypoperfusion of adjacent cerebral cortex and white matter, hyperperfusion of contralateral motor cortex, hyperperfusion of ipsilateral basal ganglia and thalamus, brain stem and contralateral cerebellum. Ictal brain SPECT is non-invasive, cost effective and highly sensitive for localization of epileptic focus in patients with intractable CPE. (author)

  9. Evidence for brain glucose dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yang; Varma, Vijay R; Varma, Sudhir; Casanova, Ramon; Dammer, Eric; Pletnikova, Olga; Chia, Chee W; Egan, Josephine M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Troncoso, Juan; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; O'Brien, Richard; Thambisetty, Madhav

    2018-03-01

    It is unclear whether abnormalities in brain glucose homeostasis are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Within the autopsy cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, we measured brain glucose concentration and assessed the ratios of the glycolytic amino acids, serine, glycine, and alanine to glucose. We also quantified protein levels of the neuronal (GLUT3) and astrocytic (GLUT1) glucose transporters. Finally, we assessed the relationships between plasma glucose measured before death and brain tissue glucose. Higher brain tissue glucose concentration, reduced glycolytic flux, and lower GLUT3 are related to severity of AD pathology and the expression of AD symptoms. Longitudinal increases in fasting plasma glucose levels are associated with higher brain tissue glucose concentrations. Impaired glucose metabolism due to reduced glycolytic flux may be intrinsic to AD pathogenesis. Abnormalities in brain glucose homeostasis may begin several years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Tourette syndrome deep brain stimulation: a review and updated recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Lauren E; Mink, Jonathan W; Woods, Douglas W; Porta, Mauro; Servello, Dominico; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Silburn, Peter A; Foltynie, Thomas; Walker, Harrison C; Shahed-Jimenez, Joohi; Savica, Rodolfo; Klassen, Bryan T; Machado, Andre G; Foote, Kelly D; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Hu, Wei; Ackermans, Linda; Temel, Yasin; Mari, Zoltan; Changizi, Barbara K; Lozano, Andres; Auyeung, M; Kaido, Takanobu; Agid, Yves; Welter, Marie L; Khandhar, Suketu M; Mogilner, Alon Y; Pourfar, Michael H; Walter, Benjamin L; Juncos, Jorge L; Gross, Robert E; Kuhn, Jens; Leckman, James F; Neimat, Joseph A; Okun, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may improve disabling tics in severely affected medication and behaviorally resistant Tourette syndrome (TS). Here we review all reported cases of TS DBS and provide updated recommendations for selection, assessment, and management of potential TS DBS cases based on the literature and implantation experience. Candidates should have a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM V) diagnosis of TS with severe motor and vocal tics, which despite exhaustive medical and behavioral treatment trials result in significant impairment. Deep brain stimulation should be offered to patients only by experienced DBS centers after evaluation by a multidisciplinary team. Rigorous preoperative and postoperative outcome measures of tics and associated comorbidities should be used. Tics and comorbid neuropsychiatric conditions should be optimally treated per current expert standards, and tics should be the major cause of disability. Psychogenic tics, embellishment, and malingering should be recognized and addressed. We have removed the previously suggested 25-year-old age limit, with the specification that a multidisciplinary team approach for screening is employed. A local ethics committee or institutional review board should be consulted for consideration of cases involving persons younger than 18 years of age, as well as in cases with urgent indications. Tourette syndrome patients represent a unique and complex population, and studies reveal a higher risk for post-DBS complications. Successes and failures have been reported for multiple brain targets; however, the optimal surgical approach remains unknown. Tourette syndrome DBS, though still evolving, is a promising approach for a subset of medication refractory and severely affected patients. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. Comparative analysis of diagnostic accuracy of different brain biopsy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepali; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Sarkar, Chitra; Gupta, Deepak; Singh, Manmohan; Mahapatra, A K

    2006-12-01

    Image-guided procedures such as computed tomography (CT) guided, neuronavigator-guided and ultrasound-guided methods can assist neurosurgeons in localizing the intraparenchymal lesion of the brain. However, despite improvements in the imaging techniques, an accurate diagnosis of intrinsic lesion requires tissue sampling and histological verification. The present study was carried out to examine the reliability of the diagnoses made on tumor sample obtained via different stereotactic and ultrasound-guided brain biopsy procedures. A retrospective analysis was conducted of all brain biopsies (frame-based and frameless stereotactic and ultrasound-guided) performed in a single tertiary care neurosciences center between 1995 and 2005. The overall diagnostic accuracy achieved on histopathology and correlation with type of biopsy technique was evaluated. A total of 130 cases were included, which consisted of 82 males and 48 females. Age ranged from 4 to 75 years (mean age 39.5 years). Twenty per cent (27 patients) were in the pediatric age group, while 12% (16 patients) were >or= 60-years of age. A definitive histological diagnosis was established in 109 cases (diagnostic yield 80.2%), which encompassed 101 neoplastic and eight nonneoplastic lesions. Frame-based, frameless stereotactic and ultrasound-guided biopsies were done in 95, 15 and 20 patients respectively. Although the numbers of cases were small there was trend for better yield with frameless image-guided stereotactic biopsy and maximum diagnostic yield was obtained i.e, 87% (13/15) in comparison to conventional frame-based CT-guided stereotactic biopsy and ultrasound-guided biopsy. Overall, a trend of higher diagnostic yield was seen in cases with frameless image-guided stereotactic biopsy. Thus, this small series confirms that frameless neuronavigator-guided stereotactic procedures represent the lesion sufficiently in order to make histopathologic diagnosis.

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  13. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  14. From Periphery To Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carré, David

    2014-01-01

    the notions of Center/Periphery. As Hermans (2001) proposed, center and periphery are not fixed ‘I-positions’ of the self; in this vein, these notions are explored as relevant theoretical tools for addressing the developmental trajectories involved in the construction of scientific identities. In sum...

  15. ENERGY RESOURCES CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Virginia

    1979-11-01

    First I will give a short history of this Center which has had three names and three moves (and one more in the offing) in three years. Then I will tell you about the accomplishments made in the past year. And last, I will discuss what has been learned and what is planned for the future. The Energy and Environment Information Center (EEIC), as it was first known, was organized in August 1975 in San Francisco as a cooperative venture by the Federal Energy Administration (FEA), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These three agencies planned this effort to assist the public in obtaining information about energy and the environmental aspects of energy. The Public Affairs Offices of FEA, ERDA and EPA initiated the idea of the Center. One member from each agency worked at the Center, with assistance from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Information Research Group (LBL IRG) and with on-site help from the EPA Library. The Center was set up in a corner of the EPA Library. FEA and ERDA each contributed one staff member on a rotating basis to cover the daily operation of the Center and money for books and periodicals. EPA contributed space, staff time for ordering, processing and indexing publications, and additional money for acquisitions. The LBL Information Research Group received funds from ERDA on a 189 FY 1976 research project to assist in the development of the Center as a model for future energy centers.

  16. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Danbury, CT 06810 203-748-6000 Accredited Since March 1998 Corvallis Birth & Women's Health Center Accredited 2314 NW Kings Blvd, Suite ... Washington, DC 20002 202-398-5520 Accredited Since March 2001 Flagstaff Birth and Women's Center Accredited 401 West Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ ...

  17. Technology Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerson, E.L.; Shepherd, E.W.; Minor, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A Transportation Technology Center (TTC) has been established at Sandia to address the transportation of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The Technology Information Center (TIC) acts as TTC's clearing house for nuclear material transportation information. TIC's activities are divided into three activities: public information, policy information, and technical information. Some of the uses of TIC's activities are briefly outlined

  18. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  19. Brain tumor and CT, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Shinomiya, Youichi; Sano, Hirotoshi; Kanno, Tetsuo

    1981-01-01

    It is very important for a neurosurgeon to know the consistency of a brain tumor preoperatively, since the information which is of much use in indicating the likely difficulty of the operation, which operative tools should be selected, the amount of bleeding to be expected from the tumor, and so on. The authors, therefore, tried to evaluate the consistency of brain tumors preoperatively 27 cases in which the margin of the tumor was made clear with a homogeneous stain were studied concerning the relationship between the tumor consistency and the CT findings. The results are as follows: 1) A higher CT number on a plain CT indicated a harder consistency of the tumor. 2) A lesser contrast index (CT number on enhancement CT/CT number on plain CT) showed a harder consistency of the tumor. (author)

  20. 77 FR 293 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    .... Contact Person: Patrick K Lai, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Center for Scientific Review, [email protected] . Name of Committee: Brain Disorders and Clinical Neuroscience Integrated Review Group...

  1. 77 FR 61614 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ....gov . Name of Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Fellowships: Brain...: Endocrinology, Metabolism, Nutrition and Reproduction. Date: November 8, 2012. Time: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To...

  2. BrainAGE score indicates accelerated brain aging in schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadić, Igor; Dietzek, Maren; Langbein, Kerstin; Sauer, Heinrich; Gaser, Christian

    2017-08-30

    BrainAGE (brain age gap estimation) is a novel morphometric parameter providing a univariate score derived from multivariate voxel-wise analyses. It uses a machine learning approach and can be used to analyse deviation from physiological developmental or aging-related trajectories. Using structural MRI data and BrainAGE quantification of acceleration or deceleration of in individual aging, we analysed data from 45 schizophrenia patients, 22 bipolar I disorder patients (mostly with previous psychotic symptoms / episodes), and 70 healthy controls. We found significantly higher BrainAGE scores in schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder patients. Our findings indicate significantly accelerated brain structural aging in schizophrenia. This suggests, that despite the conceptualisation of schizophrenia as a neurodevelopmental disorder, there might be an additional progressive pathogenic component. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relative Lyapunov Center Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Claudia; Schilder, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Relative equilibria (REs) and relative periodic orbits (RPOs) are ubiquitous in symmetric Hamiltonian systems and occur, for example, in celestial mechanics, molecular dynamics, and rigid body motion. REs are equilibria, and RPOs are periodic orbits of the symmetry reduced system. Relative Lyapunov...... center bifurcations are bifurcations of RPOs from REs corresponding to Lyapunov center bifurcations of the symmetry reduced dynamics. In this paper we first prove a relative Lyapunov center theorem by combining recent results on the persistence of RPOs in Hamiltonian systems with a symmetric Lyapunov...... center theorem of Montaldi, Roberts, and Stewart. We then develop numerical methods for the detection of relative Lyapunov center bifurcations along branches of RPOs and for their computation. We apply our methods to Lagrangian REs of the N-body problem....

  4. [Brain oedema and acute liver failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, L

    2003-04-01

    Brain oedema leading to intracranial hypertension occurs in a significant proportion of patients with acute liver failure in whom it is a leading cause of death. Although precise pathogenic mechanisms associated to this severe complication remain incompletely understood, increasing evidence points to gut-derived neurotoxins including ammonia as key mediators in cerebral osmotic and perfusion disturbances. The management of brain oedema and intracranial hypertension requires a multidisciplinar approach in a center where liver transplantation is available, as this option is the only treatment modality that provides improvement in outcome. This article reviews the most common causes of acute liver failure and the standard of supportive care management, and describes future potential therapeutic aspects of brain oedema and intracranial hypertension.

  5. Images of the brain: past as prologue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The invention of the Anger scintillation camera and the development of /sup 99m/Tc tracers brought about a tenfold increase in nuclear brain scanning between 1963 and 1973, an increase that plateaued with the introduction of x-ray computed tomography. A second growth curve began in 1976 at which time there were four PET centers in the United States, a number that grew to 60 worldwide over the next decade. PET, SPECT, MRI, and MRS are leading us into a new era of in vivo brain chemistry, based on regional bioenergetics and neurotransmission. The immediate impact is in epilepsy, stroke, brain tumors and the dementias, with psychiatric diseases becoming a major focus of research. Receptivity has become a biochemical as well as a psychological approach to mental functions. The finding of elevated D2 dopamine receptors in schizophrenia in living patients may be the forerunner of a new biochemical approach to psychiatry

  6. BrainMap '95 workshop. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The fourth annual BrainMap workshop was held at La Mansion del Rio Hotel in San Antonio December 3--4, 1995. The conference title was ''Human Brain Mapping and Modeling.'' The meeting was attended by 137 registered participants and 30 observers from 82 institutions representing 12 countries. The meeting focused on the technical issues associated with brain mapping and modeling. A total of 23 papers were presented covering the following topics: spatial normalization and registration; functional image analysis; metanalysis and modeling; and new horizons in biological databases. The full program with abstracts was available on the Research Imaging Center's web site. A book will be published by John Wiley and Sons prior to the end of 1998

  7. China's Higher Education Expansion and the Task of Economic Revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jian

    2011-01-01

    This paper centers on the expansion from elite to mass higher education in China and its effects on China's economic development. These effects are twofold, including both the immediate influence of expanded enrollment in higher education on China's economy, and the human capital accumulation for the long term. The paper first provides a…

  8. Higher representations: Confinement and large N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the confining phase transition as a function of temperature for theories with dynamical fermions in the two index symmetric and antisymmetric representation of the gauge group. By studying the properties of the center of the gauge group we predict for an even number of colors a confining phase transition, if second order, to be in the universality class of Ising in three dimensions. This is due to the fact that the center group symmetry does not break completely for an even number of colors. For an odd number of colors the center group symmetry breaks completely. This pattern remains unaltered at a large number of colors. The confining/deconfining phase transition in these theories at large and finite N is not mapped in the one of super Yang-Mills theory. We extend the Polyakov loop effective theory to describe the confining phase transition of the theories studied here for a generic number of colors. Our results are not modified when adding matter in the same higher dimensional representations of the gauge group. We comment on the interplay between confinement and chiral symmetry in these theories and suggest that they are ideal laboratories to shed light on this issue also for ordinary QCD. We compare the free energy as a function of temperature for different theories. We find that the conjectured thermal inequality between the infrared and ultraviolet degrees of freedom computed using the free energy does not lead to new constraints on asymptotically free theories with fermions in higher dimensional representations of the gauge group. Since the center of the gauge group is an important quantity for the confinement properties at zero temperature our results are relevant here as well

  9. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  10. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  11. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  12. User-centered design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Joo Hyun; Kim, Hyeong Heon

    2008-01-01

    The simplification philosophy, as an example, that both of EPRI-URD and EUR emphasize is treated mostly for the cost reduction of the nuclear power plants, but not for the simplification of the structure of user's tasks, which is one of the principles of user-centered design. A user-centered design is a philosophy based on the needs and interests of the user, with an emphasis on making products usable and understandable. However, the nuclear power plants offered these days by which the predominant reactor vendors are hardly user-centered but still designer-centered or technology-centered in viewpoint of fulfilling user requirements. The main goal of user-centered design is that user requirements are elicited correctly, reflected properly into the system requirements, and verified thoroughly by the tests. Starting from the user requirements throughout to the final test, each requirement should be traceable. That's why requirement traceability is a key to the user-centered design, and main theme of a requirement management program, which is suggested to be added into EPRI-URD and EUR in the section of Design Process. (author)

  13. Expression and relevant research of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in differentgrades of brain glioma and normal brain tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Fei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore and analyze expression and relevant research of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in different grades of brain glioma and normal brain tissues. Methods: 52 cases of patients with brain glioma treated in our hospital from December 2013 to December 2014, and 50 cases of normal brain-tissue patients with intracranial hypertension were selected, and proceeding test to the surgical resection of brain tissue of the above patients to determine its MGMT and XRCC1 protein content, sequentially to record the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 of both groups. Grading of tumors to brain glioma after operation was carried out, and the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 gene in brain tissues of different patients was analyzed and compared;finally the contingency tables of X2 test was used to analyze the correlation of XRCC1and MGMT. Results:Positive rate of MGMT expression in normal brain tissue was 2%,while positive rate of MGMT expression in brain glioma was 46.2%,which was obviously higher than that in normal brain tissues (χ2=26.85, P0.05), which had no statistical significance. There were 12 cases of patients whose MGMT protein expression was positive and XRCC1 protein expression was positive; there were 18 cases of patients whose MGMT protein expression was negative and XRCC1 protein expression was negative. Contingency tables of X2 test was used to analyze the correlation of XRCC1 and MGMT, which indicated that the expression of XRCCI and MGMT in brain glioma had no correlation (r=0.9%, P=0.353), relevancy of both was r=0.9%. Conclusions: Positive rate of the expression of MGMT and XRCC1 in brain glioma was obviously higher than that in normal brain tissues, but the distribution of different grades of brain glioma had no obvious difference, and MGMT and XRCC1 expression had no obvious correlation, which needed further research.

  14. Handbook of Brain Connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jirsa, Viktor K

    2007-01-01

    Our contemporary understanding of brain function is deeply rooted in the ideas of the nonlinear dynamics of distributed networks. Cognition and motor coordination seem to arise from the interactions of local neuronal networks, which themselves are connected in large scales across the entire brain. The spatial architectures between various scales inevitably influence the dynamics of the brain and thereby its function. But how can we integrate brain connectivity amongst these structural and functional domains? Our Handbook provides an account of the current knowledge on the measurement, analysis and theory of the anatomical and functional connectivity of the brain. All contributors are leading experts in various fields concerning structural and functional brain connectivity. In the first part of the Handbook, the chapters focus on an introduction and discussion of the principles underlying connected neural systems. The second part introduces the currently available non-invasive technologies for measuring struct...

  15. Global brain metabolic quantification with whole-head proton MRS at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirov, Ivan I; Wu, William E; Soher, Brian J; Davitz, Matthew S; Huang, Jeffrey H; Babb, James S; Lazar, Mariana; Fatterpekar, Girish; Gonen, Oded

    2017-10-01

    Total N-acetyl-aspartate + N-acetyl-aspartate-glutamate (NAA), total creatine (Cr) and total choline (Cho) proton MRS ( 1 H-MRS) signals are often used as surrogate markers in diffuse neurological pathologies, but spatial coverage of this methodology is limited to 1%-65% of the brain. Here we wish to demonstrate that non-localized, whole-head (WH) 1 H-MRS captures just the brain's contribution to the Cho and Cr signals, ignoring all other compartments. Towards this end, 27 young healthy adults (18 men, 9 women), 29.9 ± 8.5 years old, were recruited and underwent T 1 -weighted MRI for tissue segmentation, non-localizing, approximately 3 min WH 1 H-MRS (T E /T R /T I  = 5/10/940 ms) and 30 min 1 H-MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) (T E /T R  = 35/2100 ms) in a 360 cm 3 volume of interest (VOI) at the brain's center. The VOI absolute NAA, Cr and Cho concentrations, 7.7 ± 0.5, 5.5 ± 0.4 and 1.3 ± 0.2 mM, were all within 10% of the WH: 8.6 ± 1.1, 6.0 ± 1.0 and 1.3 ± 0.2 mM. The mean NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios in the WH were only slightly higher than the "brain-only" VOI: 1.5 versus 1.4 (7%) and 6.6 versus 5.9 (11%); Cho/Cr were not different. The brain/WH volume ratio was 0.31 ± 0.03 (brain ≈ 30% of WH volume). Air-tissue susceptibility-driven local magnetic field changes going from the brain outwards showed sharp gradients of more than 100 Hz/cm (1 ppm/cm), explaining the skull's Cr and Cho signal losses through resonance shifts, line broadening and destructive interference. The similarity of non-localized WH and localized VOI NAA, Cr and Cho concentrations and their ratios suggests that their signals originate predominantly from the brain. Therefore, the fast, comprehensive WH- 1 H-MRS method may facilitate quantification of these metabolites, which are common surrogate markers in neurological disorders. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Revisiting Glycogen Content in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Kumar, Anjali; Moheet, Amir; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen provides an important glucose reservoir in the brain since the concentration of glucosyl units stored in glycogen is several fold higher than free glucose available in brain tissue. We have previously reported 3-4 µmol/g brain glycogen content using in vivo (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in conjunction with [1-(13)C]glucose administration in healthy humans, while higher levels were reported in the rodent brain. Due to the slow turnover of bulk brain glycogen in humans, complete turnover of the glycogen pool, estimated to take 3-5 days, was not observed in these prior studies. In an attempt to reach complete turnover and thereby steady state (13)C labeling in glycogen, here we administered [1-(13)C]glucose to healthy volunteers for 80 h. To eliminate any net glycogen synthesis during this period and thereby achieve an accurate estimate of glycogen concentration, volunteers were maintained at euglycemic blood glucose levels during [1-(13)C]glucose administration and (13)C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured by (13)C MRS approximately every 12 h. Finally, we fitted the data with a biophysical model that was recently developed to take into account the tiered structure of the glycogen molecule and additionally incorporated blood glucose levels and isotopic enrichments as input function in the model. We obtained excellent fits of the model to the (13)C-glycogen data, and glycogen content in the healthy human brain tissue was found to be 7.8 ± 0.3 µmol/g, a value substantially higher than previous estimates of glycogen content in the human brain.

  17. Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses of mKast suggest its late pupal and adult-specific functions in the honeybee brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuhiro Yamane

    Full Text Available In insect brains, the mushroom bodies (MBs, a higher center comprise intrinsic neurons, termed Kenyon cells (KCs. We previously showed that the honeybee (Apis mellifera L. MBs comprise four types of KCs, in addition to the previously known three types of KCs: class I large-type KCs (lKCs, class I small-type KCs (sKCs and class II KCs, novel class I 'middle-type' KCs (mKCs, which are characterized by the preferential expression of a gene, termed mKast. Although mKast was originally discovered during the search for genes whose expression is enriched in the optic lobes (OLs in the worker brain, subsequent analysis revealed that the gene is expressed in an mKC-preferential manner in the MBs. To gain more insights into the function of mKast in the honeybee brain, we here performed expression analysis of mKast and immunohistochemistry of the mKast protein. Prominent mKast expression was first detected in the brain after the P7 pupal stage. In addition, mKast was expressed almost selectively in the brain, suggesting its late pupal and adult specific functions in the brain. Immunohistochemistry revealed that mKast-like immunoreactivity is detected in several regions in the worker brain: inside and around the MB calyces, at the outer edges of the OL lobula, at the outer surface of and posterior to the antennal lobes (ALs, along the dorsal midline of the anterior brain and at the outer surface of the subesophageal ganglions (SOG. mKast-like immunoreactivities in the MBs, OLs, ALs and SOG were due to the corresponding neurons, while mKast-like immunoreactivities beneath/between the MB calyces were assumed to most likely correspond to the lateral/medial neurosecretory cells.

  18. Leptomeningeal enhancement on preoperative brain MRI in patients with glioblastoma and its clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hakyoung; Lim, Do Hoon; Kim, Tae Gyu; Lee, Jung-Il; Nam, Do-Hyun; Seol, Ho Jun; Kong, Doo-Sik; Choi, Jung Won; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Kim, Sung Tae

    2018-02-23

    Leptomeningeal enhancement (LME) on preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) does not always indicate leptomeningeal seeding (LMS). With Stupp's regimen, authors have treated glioblastoma patients with LME on preoperative brain MRI but here we tried to find the clinical impact of LME. From 2005 to 2015, 290 patients with glioblastoma have been treated with Stupp's regimen at Samsung Medical Center. Among these, 33 patients showed LME on preoperative brain MRI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the patients with or without LME on preoperative brain MRI and analyzed the clinical results according to changes of LME at following MRI. The median survival was 23 months, and 2-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 46.3% and 19.6%, respectively. Prognostic factors for OS and DFS were Karnofsky performance status, extent of resection and adjuvant chemotherapy. MGMT promoter methylation status was a significant prognostic factor for DFS. However, LME was not a significant prognostic factor for OS (P = 0.156) or DFS (P = 0.193). Among the 33 patients with LME on preoperative MRI, 21 (63.6%) showed persistent LME at the next MRI. A statistically significant difference in 2-year survival was evident between patients with and without persistent LME (OS, 17.3% and 70.1%, respectively, P = 0.044; DFS, 5.3% and 54.0%, respectively, P = 0.006). The most common pattern of failure was local recurrence. However, patients with persistent LME displayed a higher incidence of LMS than patients without LME. LME on preoperative brain MRI did not affect the clinical results in glioblastoma patients treated with the Stupp's regimen. However, persistence of LME was associated with poor survival and high possibility of LMS. For these patients, the postoperative adjuvant treatment should focus on palliative aim or more aggressive treatment scheme should be followed to overcome the disastrous results. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Mapping the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, S.; Wright, L.; Church, V.; Hager, M.

    1992-01-01

    With powerful new technologies such as positron tomography and superconducting quantum interference device that peer through the skull and see the brain at work, neuroscientists seek the wellsprings of thoughts and emotions, the genesis of intelligence and language. A functional map of the brain is thus obtained and its challenge is to move beyond brain structure to create a detailed diagram of which part do what. For that the brain's cartographers rely on a variety of technologies such as positron tomography and superconducting quantum interference devices. Their performances and uses are briefly reviewed. ills

  20. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mild Traumatic Brain Injury Resilience Families with Kids Depression Families & Friendships Tobacco Life Stress Spirituality Anger Physical Injury Stigma Health & Wellness Work Adjustment Community Peer-2-Peer Forum ...

  1. Brain spect imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.G.L.; Hill, T.C.; Holman, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how the rapid development of single-photon radiopharmaceuticals has given new life to tomographic brain imaging in nuclear medicine. Further developments in radiopharmaceuticals and refinements in neuro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) instrumentation should help to reinstate brain scintigraphy as an important part of neurologic diagnosis. SPECT of the brain evolved from experimentation using prototype instrumentation during the early 1960s. Although tomographic studies provided superior diagnostic accuracy when compared to planar techniques, the arrival of X-ray CT of the head resulted in the rapid demise of technetium brain imaging

  2. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruckdeschel, John

    1999-01-01

    ... through screening, and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. In addition, the Center created and supports education programs to provide increased cancer awareness and established working collaborations with the James...

  3. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  4. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a search site for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  5. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  6. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  8. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  9. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  10. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data Consumer Opinion Surveys About CPSC About CPSC Chairman Commissioners Contact / FAQ ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  12. Climate Prediction Center - Outlooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather Service NWS logo - Click to go to the NWS home page Climate Prediction Center Home Site Map News Web resources and services. HOME > Outreach > Publications > Climate Diagnostics Bulletin Climate Diagnostics Bulletin - Tropics Climate Diagnostics Bulletin - Forecast Climate Diagnostics

  13. Heart Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rounds Seminar Series & Daily Conferences Fellowships and Residencies School of Perfusion Technology Education Resources Library & Learning Resource Center CME Resources THI Journal THI Cardiac Society Register for the Cardiac Society ...

  14. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  15. National Automotive Center - NAC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Encouraged by the advantages of collaboration, the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) worked with the Secretary of the...

  16. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  17. Mobility Data Analytics Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mobility Data Analytics Center aims at building a centralized data engine to efficiently manipulate : large-scale data for smart decision making. Integrating and learning the massive data are the key to : the data engine. The ultimate goal of underst...

  18. HUD Homeownership Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD Homeownership Centers (HOCs) insure single family Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgages and oversee the selling of HUD homes. FHA has four Homeownership...

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  20. - Oklahoma Water Resources Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development Ag Business Community & Rural Development Crops Family & Consumer Sciences Gardening Family & Consumer Sciences Food & Ag Products Center Horticulture & Landscape Architecture & Landscape Architecture Natural Resource Ecology & Management Plant & Soil Sciences

  1. Plumbing the brain drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravia, Nancy Gore; Miranda, Juan Francisco

    2004-08-01

    Opportunity is the driving force of migration. Unsatisfied demands for higher education and skills, which have been created by the knowledge-based global economy, have generated unprecedented opportunities in knowledge-intensive service industries. These multi-trillion dollar industries include information, communication, finance, business, education and health. The leading industrialized nations are also the focal points of knowledge-intensive service industries and as such constitute centres of research and development activity that proactively draw in talented individuals worldwide through selective immigration policies, employment opportunities and targeted recruitment. Higher education is another major conduit of talent from less-developed countries to the centres of the knowledge-based global economy. Together career and educational opportunities drive "brain drain and recirculation". The departure of a large proportion of the most competent and innovative individuals from developing nations slows the achievement of the critical mass needed to generate the enabling context in which knowledge creation occurs. To favourably modify the asymmetric movement and distribution of global talent, developing countries must implement bold and creative strategies that are backed by national policies to: provide world-class educational opportunities, construct knowledge-based research and development industries, and sustainably finance the required investment for these strategies. Brazil, China and India have moved in this direction, offering world-class education in areas crucial to national development, such as biotechnology and information technology, paralleled by investments in research and development. As a result, only a small proportion of the most highly educated individuals migrate from these countries, and research and development opportunities employ national talent and even attract immigrants.

  2. World data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapley, Alan H.; Hart, Pembroke J.

    One of the lasting heritages of the International Geophysical Year (1957-58) is the system of world data centers (WDC) through which there has been international exchange of a wide variety of geophysical data on a continuing basis. This voluntary exchange mechanism has been remarkably successful. The basic operating costs of the centers are provided by the host country. The international exchanges are mainly by barter. The data providers number in the thousands and the users in the tens of thousands.

  3. Impact of helmet use on traumatic brain injury from road traffic accidents in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saksham; Klaric, Katherine; Sam, Nang; Din, Vuthy; Juschkewitz, Tina; Iv, Vycheth; Shrime, Mark G; Park, Kee B

    2018-01-02

    Rapid urbanization and motorization without corresponding increases in helmet usage have made traumatic brain injury due to road traffic accidents a major public health crisis in Cambodia. This analysis was conducted to quantify the impact of helmets on severity of injury, neurosurgical indication, and functional outcomes at discharge for motorcycle operators who required hospitalization for a traumatic brain injury following a road traffic accident in Cambodia. The medical records of 491 motorcycle operators who presented to a major tertiary care center in Cambodia with traumatic brain injury were retrospectively analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. The most common injuries at presentation were contusions (47.0%), epidural hematomas (30.1%), subdural hematomas (27.9%), subarachnoid hemorrhages (12.4%), skull fractures (21.4%), and facial fractures (18.5%). Moderate-to-severe loss of consciousness was present in 36.3% of patients. Not wearing a helmet was associated with an odds ratio of 2.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-4.22) for presenting with moderate to severe loss of consciousness compared to helmeted patients. Craniotomy or craniectomy was indicated for evacuation of hematoma in 20.0% of cases, and nonhelmeted patients had 3.21-fold higher odds of requiring neurosurgical intervention (95% CI, 1.25-8.27). Furthermore, lack of helmet usage was associated with 2.72-fold higher odds of discharge with functional deficits (95% CI, 1.14-6.49). In total, 30.1% of patients were discharged with severe functional deficits. Helmets demonstrate a protective effect and may be an effective public health intervention to significantly reduce the burden of traumatic brain injury in Cambodia and other developing countries with increasing rates of motorization across the world.

  4. Globally Efficient Brain Organization and Treatment Response in Psychosis: A Connectomic Study of Gyrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyappan, Lena; Marques, Tiago Reis; Taylor, Heather; Mondelli, Valeria; Reinders, A A T Simone; Bonaccorso, Stefania; Giordano, Annalisa; DiForti, Marta; Simmons, Andrew; David, Anthony S; Pariante, Carmine M; Murray, Robin M; Dazzan, Paola

    2016-11-01

    Converging evidence suggests that patients with first-episode psychosis who show a poor treatment response may have a higher degree of neurodevelopmental abnormalities than good Responders. Characterizing the disturbances in the relationship among brain regions (covariance) can provide more information on neurodevelopmental integrity than searching for localized changes in the brain. Graph-based connectomic approach can measure structural covariance thus providing information on the maturational processes. We quantified the structural covariance of cortical folding using graph theory in first-episode psychosis, to investigate if this systems-level approach would improve our understanding of the biological determinants of outcome in psychosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging data were acquired in 80 first-episode psychosis patients and 46 healthy controls. Response to treatment was assessed after 12 weeks of naturalistic follow-up. Gyrification-based connectomes were constructed to study the maturational organization of cortical folding. Nonresponders showed a reduction in the distributed relationship among brain regions (high segregation, poor integration) when compared to Responders and controls, indicating a higher burden of aberrant neurodevelopment. They also showed reduced centrality of key regions (left insula and anterior cingulate cortex) indicating a marked reconfiguration of gyrification. Nonresponders showed a vulnerable pattern of covariance that disintegrated when simulated lesions removed high-degree hubs, indicating an abnormal dependence on highly central hub regions in Nonresponders. These findings suggest that a perturbed maturational relationship among brain regions underlies poor treatment response in first-episode psychosis. The information obtained from gyrification-based connectomes can be harnessed for prospectively predicting treatment response and prognosis in psychosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  5. Makerere Journal of Higher Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makerere Journal of Higher Education (MAJOHE) is the official publication of ... management and improvement of higher education from an international viewpoint. ... Historical Development of Science and Technology Education in Nigeria: ...

  6. MRI of 'brain death'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shigeki; Itoh, Takahiko; Tuchida, Shohei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken for two patients who suffered from severe cerebrovascular diseases and were clinically brain dead. The MRI system we used was Resona (Yokogawa Medical Systems, superconductive system 0.5 T) and the CT apparatus was Toshiba TCT-300. Initial CT and MRI were undertaken as soon as possible after admission, and repeated sequentially. After diagnosis of brain death, we performed angiography to determine cerebral circulatory arrest, and MRI obtained at the same time was compared with the angiogram and CT. Case 1 was a 77-year-old man who was admitted in an unconscious state. CT and MRI on the second day after hospitalization revealed cerebellar infarction. He was diagnosed as brain dead on day 4. Case 2 was a 35-year-old man. When he was transferred to our hospital, he was in cardiorespiratory arrested. Cardiac resuscitation was successful but no spontaneous respiration appeared. CT and MRI on admission revealed right intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed cessation of contrast medium in intracranial vessels in both of the patients. We found no 'flow signal void sign' in the bilateral internal carotid and basilar arteries on MRI images in both cases after brain death. MRI, showing us the anatomical changes of the brain, clearly revealed brain herniations, even though only nuclear findings of 'brain tamponade' were seen on CT. But in Case 1, we could not see the infarct lesions in the cerebellum on MR images obtained after brain death. This phenomenon was caused by the whole brain ischemia masking the initial ischemic lesions. We concluded that MRI was useful not only the anatomical display of lesions and brain herniation with high contrast resolution but for obtaining information on cerebral circulation of brain death. (author)

  7. Defining nodes in complex brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lawrence Stanley

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Network science holds great promise for expanding our understanding of the human brain in health, disease, development, and aging. Network analyses are quickly becoming the method of choice for analyzing functional MRI data. However, many technical issues have yet to be confronted in order to optimize results. One particular issue that remains controversial in functional brain network analyses is the definition of a network node. In functional brain networks a node represents some predefined collection of brain tissue, and an edge measures the functional connectivity between pairs of nodes. The characteristics of a node, chosen by the researcher, vary considerably in the literature. This manuscript reviews the current state of the art based on published manuscripts and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of three main methods for defining nodes. Voxel-wise networks are constructed by assigning a node to each, equally sized brain area (voxel. The fMRI time-series recorded from each voxel is then used to create the functional network. Anatomical methods utilize atlases to define the nodes based on brain structure. The fMRI time-series from all voxels within the anatomical area are averaged and subsequently used to generate the network. Functional activation methods rely on data from traditional fMRI activation studies, often from databases, to identify network nodes. Such methods identify the peaks or centers of mass from activation maps to determine the location of the nodes. Small (~10-20 millimeter diameter spheres located at the coordinates of the activation foci are then applied to the data being used in the network analysis. The fMRI time-series from all voxels in the sphere are then averaged, and the resultant time series is used to generate the network. We attempt to clarify the discussion and move the study of complex brain networks forward. While the correct method to be used remains an open, possibly unsolvable question that

  8. Internationalization of Chinese Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linhan; Huang, Danyan

    2013-01-01

    This paper probes into the development of internationalization of higher education in China from ancient times to modern times, including the emergence of international connections in Chinese higher education and the subsequent development of such connections, the further development of internationalization of Chinese higher education, and the…

  9. A Tax for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    Higher education pays off handsomely for society. Yet on a nationwide basis, states' support for higher education per full-time-equivalent student has fallen to just $6,290, the lowest in 15 years. A dedicated source of funds for higher education is problematic. But what if state and federal lawmakers applied the impeccable logic of the gas tax to…

  10. User-centered virtual environment assessment and design for cognitive rehabilitation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidopiastis, Cali Michael

    Virtual environment (VE) design for cognitive rehabilitation necessitates a new methodology to ensure the validity of the resulting rehabilitation assessment. We propose that benchmarking the VE system technology utilizing a user-centered approach should precede the VE construction. Further, user performance baselines should be measured throughout testing as a control for adaptive effects that may confound the metrics chosen to evaluate the rehabilitation treatment. To support these claims we present data obtained from two modules of a user-centered head-mounted display (HMD) assessment battery, specifically resolution visual acuity and stereoacuity. Resolution visual acuity and stereoacuity assessments provide information about the image quality achieved by an HMD based upon its unique system parameters. When applying a user-centered approach, we were able to quantify limitations in the VE system components (e.g., low microdisplay resolution) and separately point to user characteristics (e.g., changes in dark focus) that may introduce error in the evaluation of VE based rehabilitation protocols. Based on these results, we provide guidelines for calibrating and benchmarking HMDs. In addition, we discuss potential extensions of the assessment to address higher level usability issues. We intend to test the proposed framework within the Human Experience Modeler (HEM), a testbed created at the University of Central Florida to evaluate technologies that may enhance cognitive rehabilitation effectiveness. Preliminary results of a feasibility pilot study conducted with a memory impaired participant showed that the HEM provides the control and repeatability needed to conduct such technology comparisons. Further, the HEM affords the opportunity to integrate new brain imaging technologies (i.e., functional Near Infrared Imaging) to evaluate brain plasticity associated with VE based cognitive rehabilitation.

  11. Acute and chronic changes in brain activity with deep brain stimulation for refractory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conen, Silke; Matthews, Julian C; Patel, Nikunj K; Anton-Rodriguez, José; Talbot, Peter S

    2018-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a potential option for patients with treatment-refractory depression. Deep brain stimulation benefits have been reported when targeting either the subgenual cingulate or ventral anterior capsule/nucleus accumbens. However, not all patients respond and optimum stimulation-site is uncertain. We compared deep brain stimulation of the subgenual cingulate and ventral anterior capsule/nucleus accumbens separately and combined in the same seven treatment-refractory depression patients, and investigated regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with acute and chronic deep brain stimulation. Deep brain stimulation-response was defined as reduction in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score from baseline of ≥50%, and remission as a Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score ≤8. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow were assessed using [ 15 O]water positron emission tomography. Remitters had higher relative regional cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex at baseline and all subsequent time-points compared to non-remitters and non-responders, with prefrontal cortex regional cerebral blood flow generally increasing with chronic deep brain stimulation. These effects were consistent regardless of stimulation-site. Overall, no significant regional cerebral blood flow changes were apparent when deep brain stimulation was acutely interrupted. Deep brain stimulation improved treatment-refractory depression severity in the majority of patients, with consistent changes in local and distant brain regions regardless of target stimulation. Remission of depression was reached in patients with higher baseline prefrontal regional cerebral blood flow. Because of the small sample size these results are preliminary and further evaluation is necessary to determine whether prefrontal cortex regional cerebral blood flow could be a predictive biomarker of treatment response.

  12. A Cellular Perspective on Brain Energy Metabolism and Functional Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Magistretti, Pierre J.; Allaman, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body's energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization

  13. The multilingual brain

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The multilingual brain. Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? The given lecture will focus on the "cognitive advantages" of multilingualism and illustrate the impact that being multilingual has on the cognitive organisation of the brain. Practical questions regarding multilingual education will also be discussed.

  14. The Resilient Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Longhurst, James E.

    2005-01-01

    Brain research opens new frontiers in working with children and youth experiencing conflict in school and community. Blending this knowledge with resilience science offers a roadmap for reclaiming those identified as "at risk." This article applies findings from resilience research and recent brain research to identify strategies for reaching…

  15. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  16. What a Brain!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Kim

    1997-01-01

    Outlines basic concepts about how the brain develops and considers how Head Start teachers and parents can take full advantage of the brain's multisensory learning approach to develop more effective ways to interact with children. Focuses on the critical developmental period for stimulating neurons and developing neural connections. Suggests…

  17. Baby brain atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Kenichi; Chang, Linda; Huang, Hao

    2018-04-03

    The baby brain is constantly changing due to its active neurodevelopment, and research into the baby brain is one of the frontiers in neuroscience. To help guide neuroscientists and clinicians in their investigation of this frontier, maps of the baby brain, which contain a priori knowledge about neurodevelopment and anatomy, are essential. "Brain atlas" in this review refers to a 3D-brain image with a set of reference labels, such as a parcellation map, as the anatomical reference that guides the mapping of the brain. Recent advancements in scanners, sequences, and motion control methodologies enable the creation of various types of high-resolution baby brain atlases. What is becoming clear is that one atlas is not sufficient to characterize the existing knowledge about the anatomical variations, disease-related anatomical alterations, and the variations in time-dependent changes. In this review, the types and roles of the human baby brain MRI atlases that are currently available are described and discussed, and future directions in the field of developmental neuroscience and its clinical applications are proposed. The potential use of disease-based atlases to characterize clinically relevant information, such as clinical labels, in addition to conventional anatomical labels, is also discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Brain imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morihisa, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains the following five chapters: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Psychiatry; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) in Psychiatry: Methodological Issues; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Psychiatry: Application to Clinical Research; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Psychiatry: The Resting and Activated Brains of Schizophrenic Patients; and Brain Electrical Activity Mapping (BEAM) in Psychiatry

  19. Inside the Adolescent Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Stacy S.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Jay Giedd says that the main alterations in the adolescent brain are the inverted U-shaped developmental trajectories with late childhood/early teen peaks for gray matter volume among others. Giedd adds that the adolescent brain is vulnerable to substances that artificially modulate dopamine levels since its reward system is in a state of flux.

  20. One brain, two selves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, AATS; Nijenhuis, ERS; Paans, AMJ; Korf, J; Willemsen, ATM; den Boer, JA

    2003-01-01

    Having a sense of self is an explicit and high-level functional specialization of the human brain. The anatomical localization of self-awareness and the brain mechanisms involved in consciousness were investigated by functional neuroimaging different emotional mental states of core consciousness in

  1. Pencilbeam irradiation technique for whole brain radiotherapy: technical and biological challenges in a small animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schültke, Elisabeth; Trippel, Michael; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Renier, Michel; Bartzsch, Stefan; Requardt, Herwig; Döbrössy, Máté D; Nikkhah, Guido

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted the first in-vivo experiments in pencilbeam irradiation, a new synchrotron radiation technique based on the principle of microbeam irradiation, a concept of spatially fractionated high-dose irradiation. In an animal model of adult C57 BL/6J mice we have determined technical and physiological limitations with the present technical setup of the technique. Fifty-eight animals were distributed in eleven experimental groups, ten groups receiving whole brain radiotherapy with arrays of 50 µm wide beams. We have tested peak doses ranging between 172 Gy and 2,298 Gy at 3 mm depth. Animals in five groups received whole brain radiotherapy with a center-to-center (ctc) distance of 200 µm and a peak-to-valley ratio (PVDR) of ∼ 100, in the other five groups the ctc was 400 µm (PVDR ∼ 400). Motor and memory abilities were assessed during a six months observation period following irradiation. The lower dose limit, determined by the technical equipment, was at 172 Gy. The LD50 was about 1,164 Gy for a ctc of 200 µm and higher than 2,298 Gy for a ctc of 400 µm. Age-dependent loss in motor and memory performance was seen in all groups. Better overall performance (close to that of healthy controls) was seen in the groups irradiated with a ctc of 400 µm.

  2. Controlling the brain: How electrical stimulation can be used as an effective treatment for many brain disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dongen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Our brain is the center of our nervous system. Literally everything we do, from eating an apple to solving a Schrödinger equation, is controlled by it. Usually we don’t give much thought to the fact our brain is so utterly important, but imagine something starts to go drastically wrong inside the brain. Not being able to solve a Schrödinger equation might not be a big problem for the majority of people, but eating an apple is.

  3. Coping changes the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Nechvatal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the earliest and most consistent findings in behavioral neuroscience research is that learning changes the brain. Here we consider how learning as an aspect of coping in the context of stress exposure induces neuroadaptations that enhance emotion regulation and resilience. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 brain imaging studies in which humans with specific phobias or posttraumatic stress disorder were randomized to stress exposure therapies that diminished subsequent indications of anxiety. Most of these studies focused on functional changes in the amygdala and anterior corticolimbic brain circuits that control cognitive, motivational, and emotional aspects of physiology and behavior. Corresponding structural brain changes and the timing, frequency, and duration of stress exposure required to modify brain functions remain to be elucidated in future research. These studies will advance our understanding of coping as a learning process and provide mechanistic insights for the development of new interventions that promote stress coping skills.

  4. Epilepsy and Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-yi Sha

    2009-01-01

    @@ Epidemiology It is estimated 61,414 new cases of primary brain tumors are expected to be diagnosed in 2009 in the U.S. The incidence statistic of 61,414 persons diagnosed per year includes both malignant (22,738) and non-malignant (38,677) brain tumors. (Data from American Brain Tumor Association). During the years 2004-2005, approximately 359,000 people in the United States were living with the diagnosis of a primary brain or central nervous system tumor. Specifically, more than 81,000 persons were living with a malignant tumor, more than 267,000 persons with a benign tumor. For every 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 131 are living following the diagnosis of a brain tumor. This represents a prevalence rate of 130.8 per 100,000 person years[1].

  5. Brain-computer interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treder, Matthias S.; Miklody, Daniel; Blankertz, Benjamin

    quality measure'. We were able to show that for stimuli close to the perceptual threshold, there was sometimes a discrepancy between overt responses and brain responses, shedding light on subjects using different response criteria (e.g., more liberal or more conservative). To conclude, brain-computer...... of perceptual and cognitive biases. Furthermore, subjects can only report on stimuli if they have a clear percept of them. On the other hand, the electroencephalogram (EEG), the electrical brain activity measured with electrodes on the scalp, is a more direct measure. It allows us to tap into the ongoing neural...... auditory processing stream. In particular, it can tap brain processes that are pre-conscious or even unconscious, such as the earliest brain responses to sounds stimuli in primary auditory cortex. In a series of studies, we used a machine learning approach to show that the EEG can accurately reflect...

  6. Inside the Diabetic Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chomova M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available CNS complications resulting from diabetes mellitus (DM are a problem gaining more acceptance and attention in the recent years. Both types 1 and 2 DM represent an significant risk factor for decreased cognitive functions, memory and learning deficits as well as development of Alzheimer’s disease. Chronic hyperglycemia through protein glycation and increased oxidative stress contributes to brain dysfunction, however increasing evidences suggest that the pathology of DM in the brain involves a progressive and coordinated disruption of insulin signaling, with profound consequences for brain function and plasticity. Since many of the CNS changes observed in diabetic patients and animal models of DM are reminiscent of the changes seen in aging, the theory of advanced brain aging in DM has been proposed. This review summarizes the findings of the literature regarding the effects of DM on the brain in the terms of diabetes-related metabolic derangements and intracellular signaling.

  7. Modeling Structural Brain Connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosen, Karen Marie Sandø

    The human brain consists of a gigantic complex network of interconnected neurons. Together all these connections determine who we are, how we react and how we interpret the world. Knowledge about how the brain is connected can further our understanding of the brain’s structural organization, help...... improve diagnosis, and potentially allow better treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. Tractography based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging is a unique tool to estimate this “structural connectivity” of the brain non-invasively and in vivo. During the last decade, brain connectivity...... has increasingly been analyzed using graph theoretic measures adopted from network science and this characterization of the brain’s structural connectivity has been shown to be useful for the classification of populations, such as healthy and diseased subjects. The structural connectivity of the brain...

  8. Exploring the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, G.; Vernier, P.; Le Bihan, D.; Comtat, C.; Van Wassenhove, V.; Texier, I.; Planat-Chretien, A.; Poher, V.; Dinten, J.M.; Pannetier-lecoeur, M.; Trebossen, R.; Lethimonnier, F.; Eger, E.; Thirion, B.; Dehaene-Lambertz, G.; Piazza, M.; Mangin, J.F.; Dehaene, S.; Pallier, C.; Marti, S.; Klein, E.; Martinot, J.L.; Paillere, M.L.; Artiges, E.; Lemaitre, H.; Karila, L.; Houenou, J.; Sarrazin, S.; Hantraye, P.; Aron Badin, R.; Mergui, S.; Palfi, S.; Bemelmans, A.; Berger, F.; Frouin, V.; Pinel, J.F.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B.; Flury-Herard, A.

    2014-01-01

    CEA (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission) has been involved in brain research for over 50 years and this 62. issue of 'Clefs CEA' is the best occasion to come back on the latest advances in this wide field. The purpose is to show how neuroimaging combined with neuro sciences and computational sciences has shed light on various aspects of the brain life and experience such as for instance learning (with highlights on dyslexia and dyscalculia), vision, the feeling of time, consciousness, addictions, ageing, and neuro-degenerative diseases. This document is divided into 6 parts: 1) non-invasive exploration of the brain, 2) development, learning and plasticity of the brain, 3) cognitive architecture and the brain, 4) mental health and vulnerability, 5) neuro-degenerative diseases, and 6) identifying bio-markers for cerebral disorders. (A.C.)

  9. Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics and Facts A- A A+ Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts An estimated 6 million people in ... Understanding the Brain Warning Signs/ Symptoms Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Risk Factors Aneurysm ...

  10. PACS for imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, T J

    2003-01-01

    PACS can be a difficult and confusing decision for any radiology provider, but it can be an even more dynamic question for an outpatient imaging center. Every center represents a unique situation and requires a specialized solution. Typically, most of what is said and discussed about PACS concentrates on solutions and requirements for hospital radiology facilities. Administrators of imaging centers have different problems from hospital administrators, and they need different answers. For imaging centers, the financial justification for PACS may be less immediate than for hospitals. The first thing that must be understood is that no PAC system can make a typical imaging center completely filmless, at least not for quite a while. A hospital has the ability to dictate to its internal referring physicians how a radiological study is delivered, whereas in an imaging center environment, the roles are very much reversed. Once the justification are made for the financial viability of PACS in an imaging center, the next question is how to finance the acquisition of PACS. The decision will depend on how you cost justify your PACS, as well as the shape of your business model, and it will come to a decision between capital purchase or contracting with an application service provider, or ASP. Historically, in the hospital-dominated marketplace, PAC systems have been treated as capital acquisitions. However, for most imaging center, owning the system is more of a problem than a benefit. ASPs increasingly represent a successful alternative for imaging centers. One of the biggest things to consider with PACS is how to store all of those images. There are typically two options, on-site and off-site, with a new "hybrid" option surfacing more recently. Each option has benefits for the user, but the benefits of off-site storage are increasing as the technology advances. Some of the benefits are data security and access. Other issues to address are HIPAA compliance, standardized

  11. Insulin and C-peptide in human brain neurons (insulin/C-peptide/brain peptides/immunohistochemistry/radioimmunoassay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, A.; Bernstein, H.G.; Rinne, A.; Hahn, H.J.; Ziegler, M.

    1983-01-01

    The regional distribution and cellular localization of insulin and C-peptide immunoreactivities were studied in human cadaver brains using the indirect immunofluorescence method, the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique, and radioimmunoassay. Products of the immune reactions to both polypeptides were observed in most nerve cells in all areas of the brain examined. Immunostaining was mainly restricted to the cell soma and proximal dendrites. Radioimmunoassay revealed that human brain contains insulin and C-peptide in concentrations much higher than the blood, the highest being in the hypothalamus. These findings support the hypothesis that the 'brain insulin' is - at least in part - produced in the CNS. (author)

  12. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, L. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Boysel, M. B. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Smith, D. R. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States)

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  13. Determinants of Effective Caregiver Communication After Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobart-Porter, Laura; Wade, Shari; Minich, Nori; Kirkwood, Michael; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, Hudson Gerry

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the effects of caregiver mental health and coping strategies on interactions with an injured adolescent acutely after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Multi-site, cross-sectional study. Outpatient setting of 3 tertiary pediatric hospitals and 2 tertiary general medical centers. Adolescents (N = 125) aged 12-17 years, 1-6 months after being hospitalized with complicated mild to severe TBI. Data were collected as part of a multi-site clinical trial of family problem-solving therapy after TBI. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationship of caregiver and environmental characteristics to the dimensions of effective communication, warmth, and negativity during caregiver-adolescent problem-solving discussions. Adolescent and caregiver interactions, as measured by the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales. Caregivers who utilized problem-focused coping strategies were rated as having higher levels of effective communication (P teen interactions. Problem-focused coping strategies are associated with higher levels of effective communication and lower levels of caregiver negativity during the initial months after adolescent TBI, suggesting that effective caregiver coping may facilitate better caregiver-adolescent interactions after TBI. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  15. The negative brain scintiscan in brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalke, K.G.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of 53 histologically verified and two histologically unidentified brain tumours, the author examined the reasons for these wrongly negative scintiscans. EEGs and angiographies carried out at about the same time were taken into account and compared with the scintigraphic findings. (orig.) [de

  16. The application of graph theoretical analysis to complex networks in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Ponten, Sophie C.; Berendse, Henk W.; Stam, Cornelis J.

    2007-01-01

    Considering the brain as a complex network of interacting dynamical systems offers new insights into higher level brain processes such as memory, planning, and abstract reasoning as well as various types of brain pathophysiology. This viewpoint provides the opportunity to apply new insights in

  17. Differences in fatty acid composition between cerebral brain lobes in juvenile pigs after fish oil feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullemeijer, Carla; Zock, Peter L.; Coronel, Ruben; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Katan, Martijn B.; Brummer, Robert-Jan M.; Kok, Frans J.; Beekman, Jet; Brouwer, Ingeborg A.

    2008-01-01

    Very long-chain n-3 PUFA from fish are suggested to play a role in the development of the brain. Fish oil feeding results in higher proportions of n-3 PUFA in the brains of newborn piglets. However, the effect of fish oil on the fatty acid composition of specific cerebral brain lobes in juvenile

  18. Association between structural brain network efficiency and intelligence increases during adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenis, Marinka M G; Brouwer, Rachel M; Swagerman, Suzanne C; van Soelen, Inge L C; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2018-01-01

    Adolescence represents an important period during which considerable changes in the brain take place, including increases in integrity of white matter bundles, and increasing efficiency of the structural brain network. A more efficient structural brain network has been associated with higher

  19. The USC Epigenome Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Peter W

    2009-10-01

    The University of Southern California (USC, CA, USA) has a long tradition of excellence in epigenetics. With the recent explosive growth and technological maturation of the field of epigenetics, it became clear that a dedicated high-throughput epigenomic data production facility would be needed to remain at the forefront of epigenetic research. To address this need, USC launched the USC Epigenome Center as the first large-scale center in academics dedicated to epigenomic research. The Center is providing high-throughput data production for large-scale genomic and epigenomic studies, and developing novel analysis tools for epigenomic research. This unique facility promises to be a valuable resource for multidisciplinary research, education and training in genomics, epigenomics, bioinformatics, and translational medicine.

  20. International Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.