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Sample records for high-yielding organic dairy

  1. Ovarian cysts in high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braw-Tal, R; Pen, S; Roth, Z

    2009-09-15

    We examined the hormonal and morphologic changes associated with ovarian cyst formation in high-yielding dairy cows. Follicle fluid was aspirated from 90 cysts and 15 preovulatory and 18 subordinate follicles and used for hormonal determination. Pieces of cystic wall were subjected to morphologic and immunohistochemical evaluation. Cysts were characterized by low concentrations of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and glucose and high activity of IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). Insulin and IGF-I levels were (mean+/-SEM) 205+/-22 pg/mL and 146+/-42 ng/mL in preovulatory follicles and 3+/-1 pg/mL and 61+/-6 ng/mL in cysts, respectively (Pcysts than in preovulatory follicles. Cysts were classified into three types according to their estradiol-to-progesterone (E/P) ratio. Type 1 cysts (n=23) exhibited the highest E/P ratio (10.8+/-2.3), partial loss of granulosa cells, and severe morphologic changes in the theca interna. Expression of P(450) side-chain cleavage and P(450) 17 alpha-hydroxylase was noted in theca cells and expression of inhibin-alpha in granulosa cells. Type 2 cysts (n=35) had a low E/P ratio (0.07+/-0.02), and patches of luteal-like tissue in the cystic wall. Type 3 cysts (n=32) had an E/P ratio of 0.91+/-0.17, and no recognizable granulosa or theca cells. In summary, intrafollicular steroid levels as expressed by E/P ratio, together with IGF-I and insulin levels and morphologic changes in the follicular wall, may serve as accurate cyst-classification parameters. Because IGF-I and/or insulin play an essential role in the final stage of follicle development, it can be speculated that abnormal levels of these metabolic hormones might lead to follicle dysfunction, resulting in follicular regression or cyst formation.

  2. Improved forage strategies for high-yielding dairy cows in Vietnam : report of a workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, A.P.; Lee, van der J.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents results of the workshop "Improved forage strategies for high-yielding dairy cows in Vietnam" which was held with Vietnamese stakeholders on January 17-18, 2013 in Ho Chi Minh City as part of the project "Forage and Grass Production for Dairy Development in Vietnam" funded by the

  3. Economics of fertility in high-yielding dairy cows on confined TMR systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, V E

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this review paper was to summarise the latest findings in dairy cattle reproductive economics with an emphasis on high yielding, confined total mixed ration systems. The economic gain increases as the reproductive efficiency improves. These increments follow the law of diminishing returns, but are still positive even at high reproductive performance. Reproductive improvement results in higher milk productivity and, therefore, higher milk income over feed cost, more calf sales and lower culling and breeding expenses. Most high-yielding herds in the United States use a combination of timed artificial insemination (TAI) and oestrous detection (OD) reproductive programme. The ratio of achievable pregnancies between OD and TAI determines the economic value difference between both and their combinations. Nonetheless, complex interactions between reproductive programme, herd relative milk yield, and type of reproductive programme are reported. For example, higher herd relative milk yield would favour programme relying more on TAI. In addition, improved reproductive efficiency produces extra replacements. The availability of additional replacements could allow more aggressive culling policies (e.g. less services for non-pregnant cows) to balance on-farm supply and demand of replacements. Balancing heifer replacement availability in an efficient reproductive programme brings additional economic benefits. New technologies such as the use of earlier chemical tests for pregnancy diagnosis could be economically effective depending on the goals and characteristics of the farm. Opportunities for individual cow reproductive management within defined reproductive programme exist. These decisions would be based on economic metrics derived from the value of a cow such as the value of a new pregnancy, the cost of a pregnancy loss, or the cost of an extra day open.

  4. Future consequences of decreasing marginal production efficiency in the high-yielding dairy cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moallem, U

    2016-04-01

    The objectives were to examine the gross and marginal production efficiencies in high-yielding dairy cows and the future consequences on dairy industry profitability. Data from 2 experiments were used in across-treatments analysis (n=82 mid-lactation multiparous Israeli-Holstein dairy cows). Milk yields, body weights (BW), and dry matter intakes (DMI) were recorded daily. In both experiments, cows were fed a diet containing 16.5 to 16.6% crude protein and net energy for lactation (NEL) at 1.61 Mcal/kg of dry matter (DM). The means of milk yield, BW, DMI, NEL intake, and energy required for maintenance were calculated individually over the whole study, and used to calculate gross and marginal efficiencies. Data were analyzed in 2 ways: (1) simple correlation between variables; and (2) cows were divided into 3 subgroups, designated low, moderate, and high DMI (LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI), according to actual DMI per day: ≤ 26 kg (n=27); >26 through 28.2 kg (n=28); and >28.2 kg (n=27). The phenotypic Pearson correlations among variables were analyzed, and the GLM procedure was used to test differences between subgroups. The relationships between milk and fat-corrected milk yields and the corresponding gross efficiencies were positive, whereas BW and gross production efficiency were negatively correlated. The marginal production efficiency from DM and energy consumed decreased with increasing DMI. The difference between BW gain as predicted by the National Research Council model (2001) and the present measurements increased with increasing DMI (r=0.68). The average calculated energy balances were 1.38, 2.28, and 4.20 Mcal/d (standard error of the mean=0.64) in the LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI groups, respectively. The marginal efficiency for milk yields from DMI or energy consumed was highest in LDMI, intermediate in MDMI, and lowest in HDMI. The predicted BW gains for the whole study period were 22.9, 37.9, and 75.8 kg for the LDMI, MDMI, and HDMI groups, respectively. The

  5. EXTREME METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS AND METABOLIC PROFILE IN HIGH YIELDING HOLSTEINFRIESIAN DAIRY COWS

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    Z. GERGÁCZ

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of two years (2002 and 2003 with different summer temperature extremes on variation in metabolic profile was analyzed in blood and urine samples taken from healthy, primiparous (n = 371 and multiparous (n = 795 high yielding Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. In this study main focus was lead on three most critical physiological phases, thus cows were assigned into three groups as follows: (1 dry cows for 10 days prior to calving; (2 cows 1-30 days after delivery, and (3 cows with more than 31 days post partum. Findings reveal clear response of the cows to heat in selected blood (hemoglobin, plasma aceto-acetic-acid, FFA, AST, glucose, urea and urine (pH, NABE and urea parameters. In the majority of cows, glucose and hemoglobin level, one of the most significant blood parameters, indicated symptoms of insufficient energy supply. Further metabolic indicators differed more or less from reference values depending on actual condition. Due to heat load dry matter intake has been decreased even by 10-15 per cent in primiparous cows. They were expected to increase body weight and size and simultaneously produce attain at large milk yields. In doing so that cows would have require large amount of nutrients. Out of parameters such as hemoglobin, glucose, FFA, AST and blood-urea differed from the reference values in most cases; however, this phenomenon seemed to be present in almost every case for hemoglobin and glucose. The lack of energy caused by heat stress can be contributed to the decrease of dry matter intake which has been indicated by the urea levels and pH both in blood and urine prevailing unfavorable and insufficient feeding practice. The results reconfirm the need to reconsider both the actual feeding practice (e.g. to increase of nutrient content in rations, reduce the intake of soluble proteins in rumen, pay attention of crude fiber in Total Mixed Rations (TMR, NDF and ADF, avoid overfeeding of inorganic buffers, to control moisture

  6. Determination of NABE in urine of high-yield dairy cows in early lactation in conditions of moderate heat stress

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    Fratrić Natalija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the results of investigations of the effect of moderate heat stress on the acidobasal status in high-yield dairy cows in early lactation. Improving performance in high-yield dairy cows increases their inclination toward metabolic disorders. The most likely to be affected is the acid-base balance, in particular when cows are exposed to heat stress. Investigations so far have shown that the taking of urine samples and their analysis is the best and fastest way to diagnose disorders in the acid-base balance. Investigations were carried out on 7 clinically healthy cows of the Holstein- Friesian breed in the phase of early lactation, 30 to 40 days (on days 30, 33 and 40 following calving during the summer period, during the month of July, when there were significant variations in daily and nightly temperatures. The cows were in the second and fourth lactation, the annual milk yield was 8000 L milk per cow. The average daily milk production in the early phase of lactation ranged from 35 to 40 L. The cows were fed mixed rations (TMR twice daily. Lucerne hay in limited quantities was given to the cows prior to the mixed feed ration. The ration for this animal category was optimized on the grounds of the daily milk production. The balance of cations and anions in the feed ration stood at 95 mEq/kg DM. The results clearly demonstrate the cows' response to moderate heat stress through the defense parameters in urine (urine pH, NABE (net-acid-base-excretion, acids, bases, ammonium ion (NH4. The determination of the kidney NABE yields more correct data than the urine pH on acidotic conditions. The results of examinations of the urine pH do not show any digressions from physiological values and are approximately the same in all cows during the investigated periods. Normal NABE values are from 100-200 mmol/L. Burdening with acid products results in a NABE range from 0-100mmol/L, and metabolic acidosis results in NAB<0 mmol/L. NABE in the cows

  7. Impact of ovarian and uterine conditions on some diagnostic tests output of endometritis in postpartum high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senosy, W; Uchiza, M; Tameoka, N; Izaike, Y; Osawa, T

    2011-10-01

    The effect of ovarian predominating structures and uterine condition on the result of some diagnostic tools for the evaluation of endometritis was studied in postpartum (pp) Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (n = 58). Endometrial cytology (EC) and the evaluation of vaginal mucus by vaginoscopy or Metricheck were performed weekly from week 3 to 7 pp. The ovarian studies involved the predominating structures including cystic follicles with plasma progesterone (P(4) ; more or 23 mm), corpus luteum (CL), pre-ovulatory follicles (10-23 mm) and small follicles (follicular cysts with low progesterone (P(4) ovarian structures and uterine condition in early pp high-yielding dairy cows. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logan, B.E.; Call, D.; Cheng, S.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Jeremiasse, A.W.; Rozendal, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few

  9. Once-daily milking effects in high-yielding Alpine dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komara, M; Boutinaud, M; Ben Chedly, H; Guinard-Flament, J; Marnet, P G

    2009-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the milk loss of high-yielding Alpine goats resulting from once-daily milking (ODM) and its relationship to udder cisternal size. We investigated the effects of application of this management strategy on milk yield, composition, and technological parameters: lipolysis, fat globule size, and cheese yield. In a second experiment, we investigated the effect of repeated periods of ODM management during lactation. Goats at the beginning of both experiments were at 25 d in milk on average and were previously milked twice daily (twice-daily milking; TDM). In experiment 1, which was conducted for 2 periods (P) of 9 wk (P1, P2), 48 goats were grouped (1, 2, 3, and 4) according to milk yield, parity, and somatic cell count (SCC). Over the 2 periods, goats from group 1 were managed with TDM and those from group 2 were managed with ODM. In group 3, goats were assigned to TDM during P1 and ODM during P2, conversely, those in group 4 were assigned to ODM in P1 and TDM in P2. During P1, the 12 goats from group 3 underwent 2 distinct morning machine milkings to measure milk repartition (cisternal and alveolar) in the udder based on the "atosiban method." On P1 plus the P2 period of 18 wk, milk loss caused by ODM (compared with TDM) was 16%. In our condition of 24-h milk accumulation, there was no correlation between milk loss and udder cisternal size. Milk fat content, fat globule size, or apparent laboratory cheese yield was not modified by ODM, but milk protein content (+2.7 g/kg), casein (+1.8 g/kg), milk soluble protein concentration (+1.0 g/kg), and SCC increased, whereas lipolysis decreased (-0.3 mEq/100 g of oleic acid). In experiment 2, which was conducted for 4 periods (P1, P2, P3, P4) of 5 wk each, 8 goats, blocked into 2 homogenous groups (5 and 6), were used to study the effects of a double inversion of milking frequency (TDM or ODM) for 20 wk of lactation. Milk loss was 17% and ODM did not modify milk fat or protein contents

  10. Differences in rumen fermentation characteristics between low-yield and high-yield dairy cows in early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofyan, Ahmad; Mitsumori, Makoto; Ohmori, Hideyuki; Uyeno, Yutaka; Hasunuma, Toshiya; Akiyama, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yokokawa, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Tsuneko; Shinkai, Takumi; Hirako, Makoto; Kushibiki, Shiro

    2017-07-01

    Relationship between rumen fermentation parameters, blood biochemical profiles and milk production traits in different yielding dairy cows during early lactation was investigated. Twelve dairy cows were divided into two groups based on their milk yield, that is low-yield (LY) and high-yield (HY) groups. Rumen fluid and blood were collected at 3 weeks prepartum and 4, 8 and 12 weeks postpartum. Results showed that proportions of acetate, propionate to total short chain fatty acids and acetate : propionate ratio were changed (P cholesterol, beta-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase in the HY group were higher (P milk yield and milk compositions were differently clustered between groups. These parameters showed similar direction with dry matter intake in the HY group and adverse direction in the LY group. Linear regression analysis indicated that butyrate was positively correlated with BHBA (P cows in the HY group seem to accommodate appropriately to negative energy balance in early lactation through rumen fermentation. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  11. Effect of a single injection of cabergoline at dry off on udder characteristics in high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulat, S; Isaka, N; de Prado, A; Lopez, A; Hetreau, T; Heuwieser, W

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, relationships between high milk yield at dry off, higher prevalence for new intramammary infections, and stress were evaluated. Considering increasing milk yield, dry off methods need to be refined to ensure udder health and animal welfare, especially in high-yielding dairy cows. The present work evaluated the effect of a single cabergoline injection (Velactis, Ceva Santé Animale, Libourne, France) at dry off on udder pressure, milk leakage, and signs of udder pain after dry off. A total of 234 high-yielding (≥16 kg of milk/d) dairy cows was enrolled 7 d before and followed up until 14 d after dry off. Cows were dried off without preparation (i.e., no feed change or intermittent milking before dry off) and treated with a single i.m. injection of 5.6 mg of cabergoline (n = 115) or placebo (n = 119) after last milking. Udder characteristics were measured 4 d before (i.e., before and after milking) and 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, and 14 d after dry off. Udder pressure was evaluated utilizing a hand-held dynamometer. Milk leakage and signs of udder pain were noted as binary variables. Whereas udder pressure baseline values after last milking did not differ between treatment groups (0.541 ± 0.15 kg), cabergoline significantly reduced udder pressure in primiparous but not in multiparous cows after dry off. Differences between cabergoline- and placebo-treated primiparous cows could be evaluated until 3 d after dry off. The first day after dry off, udder pressure in placebo- and cabergoline-treated cows increased by 115% and 42.3%, respectively. Whereas pressure values in placebo cows were highest on the first day after dry off (1.16 ± 0.61 kg) and slowly decreased afterward, udder pressure in cows treated with cabergoline had a slower increase and peak only 2 d after dry off (0.94 ± 0.44 kg). Furthermore, cabergoline caused a reduction of milk leakage, a known factor for new intramammary infections. Only 11.3% of cows treated with cabergoline showed milk

  12. Flow “Fine” Synthesis: High Yielding and Selective Organic Synthesis by Flow Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The concept of flow “fine” synthesis, that is, high yielding and selective organic synthesis by flow methods, is described. Some examples of flow “fine” synthesis of natural products and APIs are discussed. Flow methods have several advantages over batch methods in terms of environmental compatibility, efficiency, and safety. However, synthesis by flow methods is more difficult than synthesis by batch methods. Indeed, it has been considered that synthesis by flow methods can be applicable for the production of simple gasses but that it is difficult to apply to the synthesis of complex molecules such as natural products and APIs. Therefore, organic synthesis of such complex molecules has been conducted by batch methods. On the other hand, syntheses and reactions that attain high yields and high selectivities by flow methods are increasingly reported. Flow methods are leading candidates for the next generation of manufacturing methods that can mitigate environmental concerns toward sustainable society. PMID:26337828

  13. Glucose concentration and blood acid-basis status in high-yielding dairy cows during heat stress

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    Vujanac Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to examine the effect of heat stress on glucose and pH values in blood of high-yielding dairy cows in the early stage of lactation, as well as to determine whether the changes in these parameters are interdependent under such conditions. An experiment was performed on high-yielding dairy cows during the summer and the spring periods. Forty cows were selected, twenty each for the two periods under investigation. In the course of the experiment, the temperature humidity index (THI was determined for the entire period of investigations, and then also the average daily THI, nightmorning THI (average value of hourly THI measured from 22h on the previous day until 10h of the current day, as well as the day-night THI (average value of hourly THI measured during the period from 10h to 22h of the current day. The pH and glucose concentration were determined in blood samples taken in the morning and afternoon of days 30, 60, and 90 of lactation during the spring and summer periods of the investigations. Based on the results for the THI, it was established that the animals were not exposed to the effect of extreme heat stress during the spring period of investigations, while they were periodically exposed to moderate but also extreme heat stress during the summer, in particular in the afternoon hours. It can be concluded from the results obtained for the blood pH that the cows were in respiratory alkalosis during the summer in the morning and afternoon hours on day 30, in the afternoon hours of days 60 and 90 of lactation, as well as in the afternoon on day 90 of lactation during the spring period of investigations. During the summer period, there were no statistically significant differences between the pH value determined in the morning and afternoon hours on day 30 of lactation, while the pH value was significantly higher in the afternoon hours than in the morning hours on days 60 and 90 of lactation. There were no

  14. Whole lactation production responses in high-yielding dairy cows using high-quality grass/clover silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mikaela; Wredle, Ewa; Spörndly, Eva; Bertilsson, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Limiting the use of purchased concentrate for livestock and replacing it with home-grown forage without compromising milk production can offer benefits in both organic and conventional dairy systems. A full lactation trial was conducted with 92 cows over two years comparing three diets, each differing in the mean forage proportion over the lactation, 500 (500F), 600 (600F) and 700 (700F) g kg-1 dry matter (DM) respectively. The diets were designed to represent common conventional feeding, current regulations for organic production and more extreme high-forage-based production respectively. The aims were to determine the effects of forage proportion in the diet on milk production and feed utilisation. Compared with 500F, daily milk yield did not differ in 600F but was lower in 700F (31.3, 31.1 and 29.2 kg energy-corrected milk respectively). Daily dry matter intake (DMI) was similar between treatments (20.3, 20.4 and 19.9 kg in 500F, 600F and 700F respectively). Increasing the forage proportion from 500 to 600 g kg-1 DM did not have any adverse effects on milk production or DMI. Thus it is possible to produce the same quantity of milk with less concentrate and reduce the use of potential human feeds in dairy production. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  16. Microbial electrolysis cells for high yield hydrogen gas production from organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Bruce E; Call, Douglas; Cheng, Shaoan; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W; Rozendal, René A

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (> 0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment.

  17. Relationship between the pre- and postpartum body condition scores and periparturient indices and fertility in high-yielding dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Stefańska Barbara; Poźniak Agnieszka; Nowak Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between body condition score (BCS) determined on the dry-off day, calving day, and in the first month of lactation, its changes during the dry period and early lactation, and periparturient indices and fertility in high-producing dairy cows. Material and Methods: The experiment was conducted in two herds: A and B, located in Western Poland. The studies were conducted on 116 and 108 Polish Holstein-Friesian dairy cows resp...

  18. Influence of carbohydrates on feed intake, rumen fermentation and milk performance in high-yielding dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de H.

    1993-01-01

    Food for human consumption originates directly from plants, after processing, or indirectly by conversion of plant materials into food of animal origin through livestock. An important example of food of animal origin are dairy products such as milk, cheese, butter, yoghurt,

  19. Relationship between the pre- and postpartum body condition scores and periparturient indices and fertility in high-yielding dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefańska Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between body condition score (BCS determined on the dry-off day, calving day, and in the first month of lactation, its changes during the dry period and early lactation, and periparturient indices and fertility in high-producing dairy cows. Material and Methods: The experiment was conducted in two herds: A and B, located in Western Poland. The studies were conducted on 116 and 108 Polish Holstein-Friesian dairy cows respectively, with an average milk yield of >10 000 kg/305-day lactation. The experiment included the dry period (-56 d to the calving day, the calving day, and early lactation (from +1 to +56 d. The experimental factor was BCS (0 to 5-point scale. The BCS was performed by one person on day -56, on parturition day (in the first 12 h after calving and on day 30 of lactation. Results: A decrease in BCS (≥-0.25 in herd A during the dry period accelerated the planned calving period by 7.3 d. In the group of cows with BCS 3.50 in the first month of lactation (30 d resulted in the extension of uterine involution period (56 d. Improvement of BCS during the dry period shortened the anoestrus (60 d in herd A and the period of insemination service (60 d in herd B. However, in this group (IM BCS ≥ 0.25 of cows the day of the highest artificial insemination index (2.50 in herd B was analysed. Conclusion: The body condition on the dry-off day and at calving, as well as its deterioration in the first month of lactation, have a considerable effect on fertility indices in dairy cows, thus confirming the advisability of its regular monitoring during routine operations connected with the management of a dairy cattle herd.

  20. Reduced fertility in high-yielding dairy cows: are the oocyte and embryo in danger? Part II. Mechanisms linking nutrition and reduced oocyte and embryo quality in high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, J L M R; Van Soom, A; Opsomer, G; Goovaerts, I G F; Bols, P E J

    2008-10-01

    Dairy cow fertility has been declining during since the mid-80s and this has given rise to numerous scientific studies in which important parts of the pathogenesis are elucidated. Reduced oocyte and embryo quality are acknowledged as major factors in the widely described low conception rates and in the high prevalence of early embryonic mortality. Apart from the importance of the negative energy balance (NEB) and the associated endocrine and metabolic consequences, there is a growing attention towards the effect of the milk yield promoting diets which are rich in energy and protein. Starch-rich diets can improve the energy status and thus the ovarian activity in the early postpartum period but the oocyte and embryo quality can suffer from such insulinogenic diets. Supplementation of dietary fat has a similar dual effect with a beneficial stimulation of the ovarian steroid production while the oocyte and the embryo display an altered energy metabolism and excessive lipid accumulation. High-protein diets can elevate the ammonia and urea concentrations in the blood, leading to changed intrafollicular, oviductal and uterine environments. Oocytes and embryos are highly sensitive to such changes in their microenvironment, possibly leading to a disturbed maturation, fertilization or early cleavage. Several nutrition-linked mechanisms, through which oocyte and/or embryo quality can be affected in modern dairy cows, well after the period of NEB, are proposed and comprehensively reviewed in the present report.

  1. How does live yeast differ from sodium bicarbonate to stabilize ruminal pH in high-yielding dairy cows?

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    Marden, J P; Julien, C; Monteils, V; Auclair, E; Moncoulon, R; Bayourthe, C

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the capacity of 2 dietary feed additives, sodium bicarbonate and live yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain Sc 47), in optimizing ruminal pH in dairy cows and to determine their modes of action. Three early lactating Holstein cows, fitted with ruminal cannulas, were allocated in a 3 x 3 Latin square design. They were given a total mixed ration as control diet (CD) at a daily feeding rate of 28.0 kg of dry matter (DM)/cow supplemented with 150 g/d of sodium bicarbonate (SBD) or 5 g/d of live yeast (YD) during a 21-d experimental period (14 d of diet adaptation, 4 consecutive days of measurement and sampling and 3 d of transition). The pH and redox potential (E(h)) were measured from 1 h before feeding to 8 h after feeding at 1-h intervals, and samples of ruminal fluid were taken at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h after feeding for the determination of volatile fatty acids and lactate concentrations. Total tract apparent digestibility of the diet was also determined. Ruminal pH fluctuated between 6.53 at feeding and 5.57 at 5 h postfeeding. Mean pH was greater with SBD (6.21) and YD (6.14) compared with CD (5.94), showing that both additives had a pH stabilization effect. The E(h) varied from -88 mV at 1 h before feeding to -165 mV at 1 h after feeding. Mean E(h) and Clark's Exponent (rH) were lower with YD (-149 mV and 7.31, respectively) than with SBD (-137 mV and 7.85, respectively) and CD (-115 mV and 8.05, respectively), indicating that the yeast strengthened the reducing power of the milieu. Total volatile fatty acids were greater in SBD (95.3 mM) and YD (99.4 mM) compared with CD (85.3 mM). Acetate concentration was greater in SBD (60.8 mM) and YD (59.1 mM) compared with CD (53.2 mM). Propionate concentration was greater in YD (25.8 mM) than in SBD (20.0 mM) and CD (18.0 mM). Butyrate remained constant between diets. Mean total lactate concentrations were 16.5, 12.2, and 5.4 mM for CD, SBD, and YD, respectively, with a 67

  2. Preovulatory follicular status and diet affect the insulin and glucose content of follicles in high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, S; Braw-Tal, R; Kaim, M; Bor, A; Bruckental, I

    2000-12-29

    Insulin and glucose may be limiting factors for ovarian function in dairy cows genetically selected for high milk yield. The effects of nutrition on the intrafollicular content of insulin and glucose were investigated in Israeli Holstein dairy cattle fed a basic total mixed ration and producing 34-39kg of milk daily. In experiment 1, carried out in 11 oestrus-synchronised cows, little variation in insulin concentration was found in plasma sampled during the luteal phase, but high variation was found in plasma sampled during the follicular phase. Therefore, in order to prevent confounding the effects of diet and of phase in cycle in the following experiments, experimental diets were fed during the luteal phase of synchronised oestrus cycles. In experiment 2, designed as Latin-Square, six cows received sequentially diets containing 17.1 (control) or 19.7% of crude protein, using two sources of supplementary protein, i.e. soyabean meal (SBM) and corn gluten meal (CGM), differing in ruminal degradability and leucine content. When dry matter intake was used as covariant, plasma insulin on day 16 was 29.5 and 26.4% higher in cows fed diets containing SBM and CGM than in the control (Pmorning of day 17, they were administered PGF(2alpha) and the content of 26 largest follicles was aspirated by using the transvaginal ovum pick-up technique. Follicles were sorted into two classes (preovulatory and subordinate) according to oestradiol concentration and the progesterone:oestradiol ratio in follicular fluid (FF). Higher concentrations of insulin (0.282 versus 0.127ng/ml, Peffects did not reach significance in subordinate follicles. The finding that preovulatory follicular status is associated with increased intrafollicular insulin and glucose suggests that insulin is involved in follicular maturation. The nutritional effect on intrafollicular glucose and insulin may have practical implications to optimise feeding in dairy cows during phases of the oestrus cycle.

  3. Effects of feeding lutein on production performance, antioxidative status, and milk quality of high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C Z; Wang, H F; Yang, J Y; Wang, J H; Duan, Z Y; Wang, C; Liu, J X; Lao, Y

    2014-11-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the influences of supplementing different levels of an additive containing lutein in the diet of Chinese Holstein lactating cows on production performance, antioxidative plasma metabolites, and milk quality. This study was performed on 60 multiparous Holstein dairy cows in peak lactation. The cows were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 homogeneous treatments, with lutein preparation (extracted from marigolds; effective lutein content was 2%) added at levels of 0, 100, 150, and 200 g/d per head, with the actual available amounts being 0, 2, 3, and 4 g of lutein/d per head, respectively. The experiment lasted for 13 wk, with the first week for adaptation. Milk yield and milk compositions were recorded weekly, and milk concentrations of lutein, dry matter intake, and antioxidative blood index were analyzed in the first, fourth, seventh, and thirteenth week of the study. The results showed that adding lutein in the diet had no effect on dry matter intake compared with the control group; however, it slowed down the trend of decline in milk yield, and had a linear incremental effect on milk yield with increasing concentration of lutein. Dietary lutein tended to quadratically increase the percentage of milk fat, and linearly increased milk lactose concentration, with the highest value when treated at 200 g of lutein preparation/d per head, and decreased somatic cell count, with the lowest values when treated with 150 and 200 g of lutein preparation/d per head. The concentration of lutein in milk linearly increased with the incorporation of the additive, with a value of 0.59, 0.70, 1.20, and 1.50 μg/100mL when treated with 0, 100, 150, and 200 g/d, respectively. Total plasma antioxidant capacity tended to linearly increase in cows fed lutein preparation, whereas plasma superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities did not differ significantly. In conclusion, addition of lutein in the diet could improve the production

  4. Negative energy balance and hepatic gene expression patterns in high-yielding dairy cows during the early postpartum period: a global approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, S D; Waters, S M; Kenny, D A; Diskin, M G; Fitzpatrick, R; Patton, J; Wathes, D C; Morris, D G

    2010-11-15

    In high-yielding dairy cows the liver undergoes extensive physiological and biochemical changes during the early postpartum period in an effort to re-establish metabolic homeostasis and to counteract the adverse effects of negative energy balance (NEB). These adaptations are likely to be mediated by significant alterations in hepatic gene expression. To gain new insights into these events an energy balance model was created using differential feeding and milking regimes to produce two groups of cows with either a mild (MNEB) or severe NEB (SNEB) status. Cows were slaughtered and liver tissues collected on days 6-7 of the first follicular wave postpartum. Using an Affymetrix 23k oligonucleotide bovine array to determine global gene expression in hepatic tissue of these cows, we found a total of 416 genes (189 up- and 227 downregulated) to be altered by SNEB. Network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that SNEB was associated with widespread changes in gene expression classified into 36 gene networks including those associated with lipid metabolism, connective tissue development and function, cell signaling, cell cycle, and metabolic diseases, the three most significant of which are discussed in detail. SNEB cows displayed reduced expression of transcription activators and signal transducers that regulate the expression of genes and gene networks associated with cell signaling and tissue repair. These alterations are linked with increased expression of abnormal cell cycle and cellular proliferation associated pathways. This study provides new information and insights on the effect of SNEB on gene expression in high-yielding Holstein Friesian dairy cows in the early postpartum period.

  5. Stability in the rumen and effect on plasma status of single oral doses of vitamin D and vitamin E in high-yielding dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hymøller, Lone; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2010-01-01

    from high-yielding dairy cows. Changes in plasma concentrations of the vitamins relative to the amount of vitamin introduced to the rumen indicated a lower effect on plasma status of ergocalciferol than of cholecalciferol, and an even lower effect of α-tocopherol. The limited plasma response after......The ruminal fate of the fat-soluble vitamins D and E was studied in dairy cows. Ten to 15 kg of ruminal contents was taken from each cow through a ruminal fistula. A sample was taken out (0-h sample) and the rest of the contents were mixed with 4,360 mg of all-rac-α-tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E......; study 1) or 4,360 mg of all-rac-α-tocopheryl acetate, 250 mg of ergocalciferol (vitamin D2), and 250 mg of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3; study 2). After mixing, the ruminal contents were returned to the respective cows. Blood was collected 0, 6, 24, and 30 h after introducing the vitamins into the rumen...

  6. Effect of β-hydroxybutyric acid, parity, and body condition score on phenotype and proliferative capacity of colostral mononuclear leukocytes of high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meganck, V; Goddeeris, B M; De Campeneere, S; Hostens, M; Van Eetvelde, M; Piepers, S; Cox, E; Opsomer, G

    2015-10-01

    In neonatal calves, the ingestion of colostrum is imperative for preventing infectious diseases. Investigations into the transfer of passive immunity of cattle have primarily focused on the importance of colostral immunoglobulins, with a recent increase in focus on understanding the role of colostral leukocytes. The main objective of the present study was to measure the influence of parity, body condition score, serum nonesterified fatty acids, and serum β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations of periparturient cows on phenotype and mitogen- and antigen-induced proliferative capacity of bovine colostral leukocytes. Holstein-Friesian cows (n=141) were intramuscularly vaccinated at 60 and 30 d before the expected parturition date with a tetanus toxoid vaccine. Of these 141 animals, 28 primiparous and 72 multiparous cows were sampled immediately after parturition. Colostrum mononuclear cell populations were identified by flow cytometry using bovine cluster of differentiation markers, and the proliferative capacity of these cells was determined using a (3)H-thymidine proliferation assay. Under-conditioned cows had a significantly higher percentage of colostral macrophages than normal-conditioned animals, whereas over-conditioned cows had significantly more colostral B-lymphocytes. Serum β-hydroxybutyrate was significantly associated with higher numbers of colostral T-lymphocytes and macrophages. Heifers had significantly higher mitogen- and antigen-induced proliferation of their colostral leukocytes than third parity or older cows. In conclusion, body condition score, parity, and serum β-hydroxybutyrate concentration of periparturient high-yielding dairy cows were shown to influence the number of colostral macrophages or the mitogen- and antigen-induced proliferation of colostral leukocytes, possibly influencing the cellular immunity of the newborn calf. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HIGH YIELD AND RAPID SYNTHESES METHODS FOR PRODUCING METALLO-ORGANIC SALTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    A new method for preparing salts of metal cations and organic acids, especially divalent salts of alkaline earth metal ions from group II of the periodic system and carboxylic acids. The method comprising the use of a high temperature (about 90° or more) and, optionally. high pressure, in order...... to obtain a higher yield, purity and faster reaction speed than obtained with known synthesis methods. In particular, the present invention relates to the production of strontium salts of carboxylic acids. Novel strontium salts are also provided by the present method....

  8. Transition period-related changes in the abundance of the mRNAs of adiponectin and its receptors, of visfatin, and of fatty acid binding receptors in adipose tissue of high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemor, Anneka; Hosseini, Afshin; Sauerwein, Helga; Mielenz, Manfred

    2009-07-01

    Adipose tissue expresses adipokines, which are involved in regulation of energy expenditure, lipid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity. To adapt for the transition from pregnancy to lactation, particularly in high-yielding dairy cows, adipokines, their receptors, and particular G-protein coupled receptors (GPRs) are of potential importance. Signaling by GPR 41 stimulates leptin release via activation by short-chain fatty acids; GPR 43/109A inhibits lipolysis, and GPR 109A thereby mediates the lipid-lowering effects of nicotinic acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate. The aim of this study was to compare the mRNA expression of adiponectin and visfatin, adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 (AdipoR1/2), leptin receptor (obRb), insulin receptor as of the aforementioned GPRs during the transition period in high-yielding dairy cows. Biopsies from subcutaneous fat and blood samples were obtained from 10 dairy cows 1 week before and 3 weeks after calving. For AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mRNA abundance as well as for leptin concentrations in plasma, a reduction (P

  9. The effect of marine algae in the ration of high-yielding dairy cows during transition on metabolic parameters in serum and follicular fluid around parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostens, M; Fievez, V; Vlaeminck, B; Buyse, J; Leroy, J; Piepers, S; De Vliegher, S; Opsomer, G

    2011-09-01

    .71 mol in the udder when milk fat is depressed. Concurrent increased BHBA concentrations in FF in the ALG group cannot be attributed to a worsened energy status of the animals because all other indicators contradict any change in energy balance, indicating that BHBA might not be an appropriate metabolic parameter to estimate the energy balance in early lactating dairy cows during MFD. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of milk protein composition and rennet coagulation properties in native Swedish dairy cow breeds and high-yielding Swedish Red cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Nina A; Glantz, Maria; Rosengaard, Anette K; Paulsson, Marie; Larsen, Lotte B

    2017-11-01

    exploited in niche dairy products. In milk from Swedish Mountain cows, levels of ionic calcium seemed to be more important for rennet-induced gel firmness than variation in the relative protein profile. In Swedish Red, lower protein content as well as higher fraction of αS2-CN and lower fraction of αS1-CN 9P were related to NC milk. Further, a decrease in the frequency of the composite β-κ-CN genotype A2A2/AA through selective breeding could have a positive effect on milk coagulation properties. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Early mammary gland metabolic and immune responses during natural-like and forceful drying-off in high-yielding dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silanikove, Nissim; Merin, Uzi; Shapiro, Fira; Leitner, Gabriel

    2013-10-01

    increase in leukocyte numbers, mainly in the form of polymorphonuclear cells. Our data indicate that the abrupt mammary involution induced in AFI cows provoked signs of distress, which were associated with neutrophilia in milk. In contrast, in the ANI cows, cessation of milking occurred without evidence of engorgement of the udder. Physiological differences in ANI and AFI cows are distinct and are reflected in the differences in the leukocyte populations in milk. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Access to outside areas during march and april in Denmark has negligible effect on the vitamin D3 status of organic dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hymøller, Lone; Mikkelsen, Louise Karoline; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2008-01-01

    Use of artificial fat-soluble vitamins in feed for dairy cows does not conform to organic production principles. Therefore sunlight is the only natural source of vitamin D3 for organic dairy coes. In order to establish the effect of sunlight on the vitamin D3 status of high yielding dairy cows...... in spring when sunlight is scarce, 78 Danish Holstein cows from two different organic farms (farm 1 and farm 2) were blood sampled four times between November 2005 and April 2006. Use of artificial vitamin D3 supplements in feed was terminated prior to first blood sampling and the cows in each herd were...

  13. Is the Modern High Potential Dairy Cow Suitable for Organic Farming Conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harðarson Grétar H

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available It is not acceptable to compromise animal welfare in any system of farming. Feeding should be aimed at meeting the nutritional requirements at the various stages of production. This paper deals with the detrimental effects that organic, extensive or low input farming systems may have on the energy status in early lactation of the high potential dairy cow. Bovine ketosis is the most important disease resulting from insufficient energy intake in early lactation. It is also important to realize that ketosis is a part of the so-called periparturient disease complex, which includes milk fever, mastitis, retained placenta, endometritis and poor fertility also. All these diseases are interrelated and reflect to a large extent the nutritional status of the animal. If organic dairy farming is to be successful the breeding programmes have to divert from selection for high yields as a main goal, to more emphasis on a flatter lactation curve, less production diseases and longevity.

  14. Treatment Options for Lameness Disorders in Organic Dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, Pablo; Velez, Juan; Manriquez, Diego; Bothe, Hans

    2017-07-01

    Animal welfare is an essential aspect of organic dairying. Consequently, adequate lameness control should be a central component of on-farm health monitoring programs. The combination of organic management practices, including grazing requirements that are combined with different types of housing, results in unique features determining the cows' feet and legs health condition. Because the use of therapeutic resources is limited, preventive management and early detection of lameness is critical in organic dairies. This article discusses the relevant aspects of prevention and treatment options of lameness disorders in organic dairy farms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An Efficient Synthesis Strategy for Metal-Organic Frameworks: Dry-Gel Synthesis of MOF-74 Framework with High Yield and Improved Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Atanu Kumar; Vemuri, Rama Sesha; Kutnyakov, Igor; McGrail, B Peter; Motkuri, Radha Kishan

    2016-06-16

    Vapor-assisted dry-gel synthesis of the metal-organic framework-74 (MOF-74) structure, specifically Ni-MOF-74 produced from synthetic precursors using an organic-water hybrid solvent system, showed a very high yield (>90% with respect to 2,5-dihydroxyterepthalic acid) and enhanced performance. The Ni-MOF-74 obtained showed improved sorption characteristics towards CO2 and the refrigerant fluorocarbon dichlorodifluoromethane. Unlike conventional synthesis, which takes 72 hours using the tetrahydrofuran-water system, this kinetic study showed that Ni-MOF-74 forms within 12 hours under dry-gel conditions with similar performance characteristics, and exhibits its best performance characteristics even after 24 hours of heating. In the dry-gel conversion method, the physical separation of the solvent and precursor mixture allows for recycling of the solvent. We demonstrated efficient solvent recycling (up to three times) that resulted in significant cost benefits. The scaled-up manufacturing cost of Ni-MOF-74 synthesized via our dry-gel method is 45% of conventional synthesis cost. Thus, for bulk production of the MOFs, the proposed vapor-assisted, dry-gel method is efficient, simple, and inexpensive when compared to the conventional synthesis method.

  16. The Economics and Productivity of Organic versus Non-organic U.S. Dairy Farms

    OpenAIRE

    Nehring, Richard; Gillespie, Jeffrey; Hallahan, Charles; Sauer, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We estimate a production function for U.S. dairy farming to examine the productivity of organic and non-organic dairy production by system and size. Across organic/non-organic systems and size classes, size is the major determinant of competitiveness based on various measures of productivity and returns to scale.

  17. Organic Dairy Production Systems in Pennsylvania: A Case Study Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotz, C.A.; Kamphuis, G.H.; Karsten, H.D.; Weaver, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    The current market demand and price for organic milk is encouraging dairy producers, particularly those on smaller farms, to consider organic production as a means for improving the economic viability of their operations. Organic production systems vary widely in scale, in practices, and across

  18. What is the benefit of organically-reared dairy cattle? Societal perception towards conventional and organic dairy farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inken Christoph-Schulz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, current systems in agriculture and food production have been topic in public discussions. Especially modern animal husbandry seems not to match consumers’ or societal needs any longer. This paper concentrates on the society’s perspective regarding dairy farming in general and diverting perceptions and expectations with respect to dairy cattle either reared organically or reared conventionally. It aims to give orientation to farmers as well as policymakers about the societal point of view of dairy farming.Six focus groups were carried out in three German cities to capture the scope of opinions and expectations among the population. Three of those groups consisted of participants buying mainly organic food while the other three comprised citizens buying mainly conventional food.With respect to society’s perception of today’s dairy farming results showed that participants put emphasis on the following topics: the space for each cow was considered as insufficient and not species-appropriate, assumed application of medications as too high, and in particular the prophylactic use of antibiotics as problematic.Asked about perceived differences between organic versus conventional farming it became obvious that organic in contrast to the conventional farming was perceived as more species-appropriate. More or less, all previously criticized aspects seem to be regarded as irrelevant in organic farming. Some participants showed a very romantic view of organic dairy farming. The most critical point was an assumed high rate of rogue traders among organic farmers.

  19. Extended lactations may improve cow health, productivity and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from organic dairy production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Jesper Overgård; Mogensen, Lisbeth; Kristensen, Troels

    2014-01-01

    The concept of extended lactation is a break with the tradition of getting one calf per cow per year that should improve cow health, increase productivity and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emission per kg milk produced in high-yield organic dairy herds. These effects are achieved through fewer...... calvings per year and hence a production of fewer replacement heifers, which, in combination with fewer days dry per cow per year, will reduce the annual herd requirement for feed. Total herd feed use is a major determinant of GHG emission at farm gate. However, these effects also rely on the assumption...... will be able to produce milk for the same number of lactations and thus have longer, more productive lives. Additionally, cow health may be improved as the majority of diseases occur around calving. Increased productivity and improved cow health should also improve farm profitability, although fewer bull...

  20. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectral features of organic matter in conventional and organic dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhongqi; Ohno, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Organic dairy production has exhibited potential for growth in the United States dairy sector. However, little information is available on whether there is any difference in manure composition and quality between organic (OD) and conventional (CD) dairy manure even though the composition and quality are important parameters with respect to availability, utilization, and cycling of manure nutrients and environmental impact evaluation. We comparatively characterized whole and water-extracted materials of 15 OD and seven CD dairy manure samples by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. Fourier transform infrared features of manure organic matter varied mainly in the 1650 to 1550 cm range, reflecting the presence of different N compounds in these manure samples. Fluorescence data revealed five fluorophore components present in the water-extracted organic matter from the manures. We found no clearly distinct value ranges in whole and water-extractable organic matter between the two types of dairy manure with respect to C and N contents and FT-IR and fluorescence spectral features. However, based on the average values, we observed general pattern differences on the effect of organic farming on the manure composition: OD contained less soluble C and N compounds on dry weight basis but more hydrophobic aliphatic groups in whole manure. The soluble organic matter in OD samples contained more stable humic- and lignin-related components and less amino/protein N-related components based on their spectroscopic features. These differences might be attributed to more forage feedstuffs in organic dairy farming management and more protein additives in conventional dairy feedstuffs. Information from this work may be useful in aiding organic dairy farmers in making manure management decisions. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Management practices on organic and conventional dairy herds in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, U S; Moon, R; Wolff, L J; Michels, L; Schroth, S; Kelton, D F; Heins, B

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and compare husbandry practices on organic and conventional dairy farms of similar sizes in Minnesota. Organic (ORG, n=35), same-sized conventional (SC, n=15, conventional (MC, n=13, ≥200 cows) dairy herds were visited in 2012, and farmers were interviewed once about their farm, herd demographics, and herd management practices concerning nutrition, housing, and reproductive programs. Organic farms had been established as long as conventional farms, and ORG producers had most commonly selected ORG farming because of a negative perception of pesticides for human health. The distribution of cattle breeds and ages differed across farm types. Organic farms had more crossbred cows and a greater number of older cows than conventional farms, who had mainly Holstein cattle. Organic farms did not dock tails, were more likely to use breeding bulls, and were less likely to conduct pregnancy diagnoses in cattle. All conventional farmers fed corn, corn silage, and hay, but no forage or feed supplement was fed by all ORG farms with the exception of pasture. Kelp was supplemented on most ORG farms but on none of the conventional farms. In summary, although there were differences across farm types regarding the use of pasture, feeds, and feed additives, breed and age distribution, reproductive management, and the use of tail docking, observations in other management areas showed large overlap across herd types. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Happy Dutch organic calves: suckling systems in organic dairying in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Wagenaar, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    Organic dairy farmers in The Netherlands, supported by the Louis Bolk Institute, developed a calf rearing system in which newborn heifer calves suckle their mother or a nurse cow up to three months of age. Consumers played an important role. Their critical questions made farmers take the initiative to investigate and develop an alternative way (more animal friendly) to raise organic dairy calves. Increased animal welfare and health were the focus of system development, but the practical an...

  3. Biodegradation of organic contaminants from the dairy industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Prócel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the environmental aspects of high impact in dairy industries is the discharge of wastewaters, because of contaminating organic matter as well as the substantial generation of effluents. In the present study, a biofiltration of effluents from a dairy industry in San Miguel de Nono (Ecuador with a pollution load of 10.000 mg/L in terms of chemical oxygen demand and turbidity of 799 NTU was implemented. The system with a capacity of 55 L per batch consisted of three biofilters in series and activated zeolite assisted clarification. Organic degradation reached 98,9%; turbidity removal was 95,2%, 94,4% of nitrogen and 89,1% of phosphorus. The presence of milk fat did not decrease the efficiency of the biofiltration but increased the removal of suspended matter and pH neutralisation in the clarification. The optimal operating time was 6 hours under aerobic conditions.

  4. Helminth infections on organic dairy farms in Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orjales, I.; Mezo, M.; Miranda, M.

    2017-01-01

    exposure, respectively. The study findings demonstrate that helminth infection in organic dairy farming is similar or even lower than previous data reported from conventional farming. Special attention should be paid to the impact of these infections on milk production......., but similar to data reported from conventional farming in the same area. The prevalence rate of C. daubneyi infection was higher than previous data mirroring an increase of the prevalence that was also reported in other European countries in recent years. Specific antibodies against O. ostertargi were......The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of the major helminth infections affecting organic dairy cattle in northern Spain. Milk and faecal samples were obtained from 443 milking cows. Ostertagia ostertargi and Fasciola hepatica exposure was assessed by detection of specific antibodies...

  5. Technology Adoption and Technical Efficiency: Organic and Conventional Dairy Farms in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos D. Mayen; Joseph V. Balagtas; Corinne E. Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We compare productivity and technical efficiency of organic and conventional dairy farms in the United States. We address self-selection into organic farming by using propensity score matching and explicitly test the hypothesis that organic and conventional farms employ a single, homogeneous technology. Utilizing the 2005 Agricultural Resource Management Survey on Dairy Costs and Returns Report (ARMS) data, we reject the homogeneous technology hypothesis and find that the organic dairy techno...

  6. Economic Efficiency of U.S. Organic Versus Conventional Dairy Farms: Evidence from 2005 and 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Nehring, Richard F.; Gillespie, Jeffrey M.; Hallahan, Charles B.; Sauer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    We estimate an input distance function for U.S. dairy farming to examine the competitiveness of organic and non-organic dairy production by system and size. Across organic/non-organic systems and size classes, size is the major determinant of competitiveness based on various measures of productivity and returns to scale.

  7. Animal breeding in organic dairy farming : an inventory of farmers' views and difficulties to overcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, W.J.; Groen, A.F.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Roep, D.; Baars, T.

    2005-01-01

    Currently, most organic dairy farmers in the Netherlands use conventional breeding methods and production stock. In view of the organic objective of closed chains, organic dairy farmers discussed in workshops the desirability and practical merits of different possible scenarios for realizing

  8. Evaluation of trace element status of organic dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjales, I; Herrero-Latorre, C; Miranda, M; Rey-Crespo, F; Rodríguez-Bermúdez, R; López-Alonso, M

    2017-11-06

    The present study aimed to evaluate trace mineral status of organic dairy herds in northern Spain and the sources of minerals in different types of feed. Blood samples from organic and conventional dairy cattle and feed samples from the respective farms were analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the concentrations of the essential trace elements (cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), iodine (I), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn)) and toxic trace elements (arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb)). Overall, no differences between organic and conventional farms were detected in serum concentrations of essential and toxic trace elements (except for higher concentrations of Cd on the organic farms), although a high level of inter-farm variation was detected in the organic systems, indicating that organic production greatly depends on the specific local conditions. The dietary concentrations of the essential trace elements I, Cu, Se and Zn were significantly higher in the conventional than in the organic systems, which can be attributed to the high concentration of these minerals in the concentrate feed. No differences in the concentrations of trace minerals were found in the other types of feed. Multivariate chemometric analysis was conducted to determine the contribution of different feed sources to the trace element status of the cattle. Concentrate samples were mainly associated with Co, Cu, I, Se and Zn (i.e. with the elements supplemented in this type of feed). However, pasture and grass silage were associated with soil-derived elements (As, Cr, Fe and Pb) which cattle may thus ingest during grazing.

  9. Use of homeopathy in organic dairy farming in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjales, Inmaculada; López-Alonso, Marta; Rodríguez-Bermúdez, Ruth; Rey-Crespo, Francisco; Villar, Ana; Miranda, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Organic farming principles promote the use of unconventional therapies as an alternative to chemical substances (which are limited by organic regulations), with homeopathy being the most extensive. Traditionally, Spain has had little faith in homeopathy but its use in organic farming is growing. Fifty-six Spanish organic dairy farmers were interviewed to obtain what we believe to be the first data on the use of homeopathy in organic dairy cattle in Spain. Only 32% of farms use some sort of alternative therapy (16.1% homeopathy, 10.7% phytotherapy and 5.3% using both therapies) and interestingly, a clear geographical pattern showing a higher use towards the East (similar to that in the human population) was observed. The main motivation to use homeopathy was the need to reduce chemical substances promoted by organic regulations, and the treatment of clinical mastitis being the principle reason. The number of total treatments was lower in farms using homeopathy compared with those applying allopathic therapies (0.13 and 0.54 treatments/cow/year respectively) and although the bulk SCC was significantly higher (p farms (161,826 and 111,218 cel/ml, respectively) it did not have any negative economical penalty for the farmer and milk quality was not affected complying with the required standards; on the contrary homeopathic therapies seems to be an alternative for reducing antibiotic treatments, allowing farmers to meet the organic farming principles. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reducing Use of Antimicrobials - Experiences from an Intervention Study in Organic Dairy Herds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsgaard, Torben Werner; Klaas, Ilka Christine; Vaarst, Mette

    2010-01-01

    on production and herd health were evaluated from two years before to three years after the start of the Stable Schools. For comparison, data was collected from the remaining 35 herds delivering to the same dairy company, 118 organic dairy herds delivering to other dairies and 115 conventional herds. On average......With the aim of phasing out the use of antimicrobials 23 Danish organic dairy producers from the same organic dairy company participated in Stable School farmer groups from February 2004 to March 2005 in order to go through a common learning and development process towards their common goal. Data......, the project herds were smaller with lower production and had half the incidence rate of mastitis treatment than the organic herds from other dairies before the start of the project. The incidence rate of mastitis treatments was reduced considerably from 20 treatments per 100 cow years to 10 treatments per 100...

  11. Happy Dutch organic calves: suckling systems in organic dairying in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Organic dairy farmers in the Netherlands, supported by the Louis Bolk Institute, developed a calf rearing system in whicht newborn heifer calves suckle their mother or a nurse cow up to three months of age. Consumers played an important role. Their critical questions made farmers take the initiative

  12. Effects of toasting blue lupins, soybeans or barley as supplement for high-yielding organic dairy cows fed grass-clover silage ad libitum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Lisbeth; Lund, Peter; Kristensen, Troels

    2008-01-01

    . The supplement under investigation was: lupins in experiment 1, barley in experiment 2 and soybeans in experiment 3. The same forage mixture of grass-clover silage (84% of DM), grass pellets (11% of DM) and straw (5% of DM) was fed ad libitum in all the experiments. Toasting decreased effective rumen protein...... degradability determined in situ for all three supplements. Compared to untreated lupins toasting of lupins tended (P = 0.10) to increase milk yield, whereas toasting of soybeans did not affect milk yield. Toasting of lupins decreased (P = 0.03) milk protein content (32.2 versus 32.7 g/kg), whereas toasting...... of soybeans did not affect milk protein content. ECM yield was significantly higher (P = 0.002) for cows fed toasted soybeans than for cows fed untreated soybeans (28.1 versus 26.4 kg ECM) whereas there was no significant effect on ECM yield from toasting lupins or barley. It can be concluded...

  13. Perceptions of French private veterinary practitioners’ on their role in organic dairy farms and opportunities to improve their advisory services for organic dairy farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, J E; Bareille, N; Fourichon, C

    2016-01-01

    Veterinarians could be the expected sparring partners of organic dairy farmers in promoting animal health which is one of the main organic principles. However, in the past organic dairy farmers did not always consider veterinarians to be pertinent advisors for them. The objectives of this study...... not always able to establish themselves an advisory role supporting farmers in improving this. Indeed, organic production principles, regulations and farmers’ health approaches challenged veterinarians’ values on animal health and welfare and their perceptions of ‘good veterinary practices’. Also, some...... veterinarians considered that there was no direct economic interest for them in the organic dairy sector and that could diminish their willingness to invest in this sector. Possible opportunities for improvement were identified; for example proposing more proactively advice via existing organisations, by making...

  14. Vision of Dutch organic dairy farmers on animal health and welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, E.A.A.; Bestman, M.W.P.; Eijck, I.A.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch organic dairy farmers expressed their opinions on animal health and welfare in order to be able to communicate it internally (within the dairy sector) and externally (to consumers). A healthy animal in their opinion is free of physical and psychological discomfort, survives in a herd, takes

  15. Alfa-tocopherol and beta-carotene in roughages and milk in organic dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Lisbeth; Kristensen, Troels; Søegaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present on-farm study was to analyse vitamin content in roughage at harvest and during storage and to analyze milk vitamin content when feeding the roughage to dairy cows. Roughages produced at five organic dairy farms were monitored at harvest and several times during winter as st...

  16. Udder health in organic dairy cattle in Northern Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, A.; López-Alonso, M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents first data on the udder health status of organic dairy farms in Northern Spain and analyses some management and productive characteristics related to milk production comparing with the conventional sector. Five certified organic farms from the Cantabrian Region were monitored monthly from February 2006 to January 2008 and individual samples of all lactating cows were taken from parturition to the end of lactation. Although organic farms in our study showed a great individual variability, overall these were small (<50 lactating cows) traditional farms, with a high degree of pasture (66-82% dry matter intake) and a milk production (average milk yield: 5950 L) 23% lower compared with the reference conventional sector (<50 cow farms). The organic farms had higher (p<0.05) average number of calves per cow (3.93) and a lower number of first-lactation cows (16.9%) than the comparable conventional farms (2.47 calves per cow and 33.1% first-lactation cows). Organic farms showed higher (p<0.05) somatic cell counts (SCC) than the reference conventional farms (mean log10±SD for all cows: 5.25±0.49 and 5.06±0.59, respectively). Detailed analysis of the SCC depending on the number of lactation and % of monthly SCC tests with linear scores indicative of udder infection suggest that while the heifers’ sanitary condition at the beginning of their productive cycle was similar in both types of farms, this seems to become worse along the productive cycle in the organics. This could be related to a low use of antibiotics for prophylaxis and treatment of udder infections and merits further. (Author)

  17. Udder health in organic dairy cattle in Northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Villar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents first data on the udder health status of organic dairy farms in Northern Spain and analyses some management and productive characteristics related to milk production comparing with the conventional sector. Five certified organic farms from the Cantabrian Region were monitored monthly from February 2006 to January 2008 and individual samples of all lactating cows were taken from parturition to the end of lactation. Although organic farms in our study showed a great individual variability, overall these were small (<50 lactating cows traditional farms, with a high degree of pasture (66-82% dry matter intake and a milk production (average milk yield: 5950 L 23% lower compared with the reference conventional sector (<50 cow farms. The organic farms had higher (p<0.05 average number of calves per cow (3.93 and a lower number of first-lactation cows (16.9% than the comparable conventional farms (2.47 calves per cow and 33.1% first-lactation cows. Organic farms showed higher (p<0.05 somatic cell counts (SCC than the reference conventional farms (mean log10±SD for all cows: 5.25±0.49 and 5.06±0.59, respectively. Detailed analysis of the SCC depending on the number of lactation and % of monthly SCC tests with linear scores indicative of udder infection suggest that while the heifers’ sanitary condition at the beginning of their productive cycle was similar in both types of farms, this seems to become worse along the productive cycle in the organics. This could be related to a low use of antibiotics for prophylaxis and treatment of udder infections and merits further investigation.

  18. THE FEATURES AND THE PROBLEMS OF STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT OF A DAIRY SUBCOMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анна Николаевна Рида

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is finding out the specific features and problems of strategic development of an agricultural and overworking enterprises of a dairy subcomplex. The characteristic of functional structure of a dairy subcomplex is given in the article. The importance of a dairy subcomplex in ensuring food security of the country is designated. Specific features of a dairy subcomplex which should be considered in the course of strategic management of the enterprises of this type of economic activity are presented. The main problems of development of the organizations of a dairy animal husbandry and the dairy industry are revealed: high capital intensity of investment projects, use of outdated technologies, low efficiency of dairy animal husbandry, Russia's accession to the World Trade Organization etc. On the basis of the conducted research there was drawn a conclusion that one of the directions of strategic development of a dairy subcomplex is supposed to be a creation of the cooperated and integrated structures.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-40

  19. Conversion to Organic Dairy Production in the Netherlands: Opportunities and Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Arnoud A. H.; Driessen, Peter P. J.; Glasbergen, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    Organic agriculture is perceived as being more sustainable than conventional agriculture. However, while there is a growing interest in, and market for, organic products, large-scale conversion to organic agriculture is not taking place. Even though conversion from conventional to organic dairy production is not especially difficult in theory,…

  20. Assessing the research and education needs of the organic dairy industry in the northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A B D; Brito, A F; Townson, L L; Townson, D H

    2013-01-01

    Demographic and management data about organic dairies have been reported previously, but the current study is the first needs assessment of research and educational priorities of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States based directly upon their input. Our objectives were to (1) develop an initial understanding of the emerging research and educational needs of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States via focus group interviews, and (2) prioritize the needs identified by the focus groups with a broader population of organic dairy farmers via survey methods. Focus group interviews determined the questions used for the survey questionnaire distributed to 1,200 members of the Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance. The members were asked about demographic information, but more importantly, challenges concerning business management and marketing, organic certification, and animal nutrition, health, and reproduction. The results (183 respondents, 15% response rate) were parsed by region (New England farms compared with New York and Pennsylvania farms), herd size (i.e., 12 to 37, 38 to 59, and >60 cows), and years of organic certification (farm consisted of 309 acres and 57 milking cows, on which most of the forage was homegrown but grains were purchased (73% of farms). Among the greatest challenges identified by the farmers were obtaining a steady, fair price for milk (85% respondents); determining dry matter intake for animals on pasture (76%); and controlling nuisance flies (89%). Needs for additional research included organic treatments for mastitis (92% respondents), growing forages for organic production (84%), and developing value-added products (84%). Farms with learning about direct marketing possibilities (76% respondents) and providing training to regional veterinarians interested in organic remedies (91%). In conclusion, the information obtained from the current needs assessment provides a foundation for future research

  1. ‘Milk is Milk’: Organic Dairy Adoption Decisions and Bounded Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C. Brock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bounded rationality is an especially appropriate framework for organic dairy adoption decisions as it recognizes internal and external constraints which are critical in understanding complex farm decision making. Farmers use of, and access to, information is examined using interview data gathered from organic, conventional, managed graziers, and Amish dairy farmers in Southwestern Wisconsin at a time when organic milk prices offered a 50% premium over conventional prices. Focusing on certain aspects and impressions of organic dairy, such as the sentiment that “milk is milk”, may lead to information satisficing where farmers do not take full advantage of the information available to them. Organic farmer interviews reveal the challenges they faced with bounded rationality constraints and how they countered these challenges with the help of social networks, as well as how situational factors such as economic and health crises may have motivated them to adopt organic dairy. The interview data from organic and conventional farmers alike also reveals how many conventional dairy farmers utilized information strategies which did not fully consider the pros and cons of the organic system. A bounded rationality framework could enlighten policy makers and educators as they tailor sustainable agricultural policy design and information dissemination strategies to serve the diversity of farmers on the landscape.

  2. Comparison of nutritional quality between conventional and organic dairy products: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palupi, Eny; Jayanegara, Anuraga; Ploeger, Angelika; Kahl, Johannes

    2012-11-01

    As a contribution to the debate on the comparison of nutritional quality between conventional versus organic products, the present study would like to provide new results on this issue specifically on dairy products by integrating the last 3 years' studies using a meta-analysis approach with Hedges' d effect size method. The current meta-analysis shows that organic dairy products contain significantly higher protein, ALA, total omega-3 fatty acid, cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid, trans-11 vaccenic acid, eicosapentanoic acid, and docosapentanoic acid than those of conventional types, with cumulative effect size ( ± 95% confidence interval) of 0.56 ± 0.24, 1.74 ± 0.16, 0.84 ± 0.14, 0.68 ± 0.13, 0.51 ± 0.16, 0.42 ± 0.23, and 0.71 ± 0.3, respectively. It is also observed that organic dairy products have significantly (P conventional types. The current regulation on organic farming indeed drives organic farms to production of organic dairy products with different nutritional qualities from conventional ones. The differences in feeding regime between conventional and organic dairy production is suspected as the reason behind this evidence. Further identical meta-analysis may be best applicable for summarizing a comparison between conventional and organic foodstuffs for other aspects and food categories. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Carbon footprints of organic dairying in six European countries—real farm data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hietala, Sanna; Smith, Laurence; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman

    2015-01-01

    and United Kingdom. A total of 34 farms were analysed. The assessment was carried out using an attributional approach with system boundaries from cradle to farm gate. In relation to dairy production, a functional unit of 1 kg of energy corrected milk was used. The results gave an average of 1.32 kg CO2......Dairy farming is the largest agricultural contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in Europe. In this study, the carbon footprint of organic dairying was evaluated by means of a life cycle assessment, based on real farm data from six European countries: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Italy...

  4. A study on bovine brucellosis in an organized dairy farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bhanu Rekha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the status of bovine brucellosis in an organized dairy with a past history of Brucella abortions and where Brucella control measures including test and removal, calf-hood vaccination (already present adult animals were not vaccinated, use of semen obtained from a screened bull and general hygienic measures helps in the control of brucellosis in the farm have been implemented for the past four years.Materials and Methods: A total of 195 samples including 89 blood samples, 89 serum samples and 17 milk samples were collected and analysed by isolation and identification, Polymerase chain Reaction (PCR, Milk Ring Test (MRT, Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT, Standard Tube Agglutination Test (STAT and Enzyme Linked Immnuno-Sorbent assay ELISA.Results: On analysis, all the 89 blood and 17 milk samples turned out to be negative for culture and PCR. MRT and ELISA tests on all the 17 milk samples and STAT on all the 89 serum samples were also negative. The percent positives for Brucella antibodies in serum samples were 4.5 and 6.7 by RBPT and ELISA, respectively. Of the 17 vaccinated animals, 14 were negative by all the Brucella antigen and antibody diagnostic tests employed. Amongst the three vaccinated animals, one animal was positive by RBPTand I-ELISAand, two animals were positive by I-ELISAalone. On the other hand, of the 72 nonvaccinated animals, 65 were negative by all the diagnostic tests employed, three animals were positive by RBPTand 4 animals were positive by I-ELISA. Conclusion: The results of our study indicated that a combination of RBPT and I-ELISA can be successfully used for screening for brucellosis when the prevalence is low. Implementation of control measures including test and removal of the affected, calf-hood vaccination, use of semen obtained from a screened bull and general hygienic measures help in the control of brucellosis in the farm.

  5. Milk yield, udder health and reproductive performance in Swedish organic and conventional dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Nils; Emanuelson, Ulf

    2009-11-01

    Organic dairy farming is an expanding segment of the dairy sector where cow management differs from the conventional model in many respects. Thus, a comparative evaluation of disease and welfare status in organically and conventionally managed dairy cows is required. Assessment of milk yield, udder health and reproductive performance (RP) was done in 20 organically and 20 conventionally managed Swedish dairy herds. In accordance with earlier findings we confirmed lower milk yield in organic cows. Udder health and RP were chosen as indicators of animal health in view of their clinical relevance and the availability of appropriate data bases providing good background knowledge for further animal health assessment. No obvious differences were found in the investigations of somatic cell count (SCC) profiles or time to veterinary-treated cases of mastitis between organically and conventional managed cows. Pregnancy success at first insemination, an appropriate measurement of RP with biological interpretation and background, did not reveal any difference between management types, whereas the hazard rate-ratio (HR) of having a calving-interval was significantly lower (HR=0.71) in organically managed cows. The calving-interval is an important financial determinator in dairy production, but it is not considered an optimal indicator of biologic relevance as it partially reflects farmer decisions. In conclusion, the organically managed cows in this study did not differ from conventionally managed cows in udder health or RP, with the exception of calving interval.

  6. Reduced Medication in Organic Farming with Emphasis on Organic Dairy Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennedsgaard Torben W

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Medication is an important focus area in organic animal husbandry. The combination of goals relating to improved animal welfare and reduced use of chemicals in general creates a common wish to reduce medication. Based on data from current Danish research projects in organic dairy farming, one specific organic medication pattern or policy cannot be described. The disease treatment pattern is influenced by many factors, e.g. the interaction with colleagues, veterinarians and agricultural advisors. No significant difference could be found with regard to incidence of mastitis treatments or somatic cell counts in 27 organic and 57 conventional herds. A marked tendency to shorter treatment periods in relation to mastitis treatments was described for organic farms in comparison with conventional farms (1.9 days versus 3.2 days (5 organic and 7 conventional herds. In a study of development of health advisory service in organic herds, the dialogue between farmer, veterinarian and agricultural cattle advisor changed the treatment pattern markedly during a period of 6 months. Among important future challenges for veterinarians in organic farming is pointed at the constructive, open, and critical interaction with the single organic farmer as well as the organic animal husbandry system in general.

  7. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dairy Farming and their effect on San Joaquin Valley Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. R.; Yang, M.; Meinardi, S.; Krauter, C.; Rowland, F. S.

    2009-05-01

    The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District of California issued a report identifying dairies as a main source of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). A dairy study funded by the California Air Resources Board commenced shortly after the report was issued. Our University of California Irvine group teamed with California State University Fresno to determine the major sources of VOCs from various dairy operations and from a variety of dairy types. This study identified ethanol and methanol as two gases produced in major quantities throughout the dairies in the San Joaquin valley as by-products of yeast fermentation of silage. Three different types of sampling protocols were employed in order to determine the degree of enhancement of the target oxygenates in the valley air shed. Their sources, emission profiles, and emission rates were determined from whole air samples collected at various locations at the six dairies studied. An assessment of the impact of dairy emissions in the valley was achieved by using data obtained on low altitude NASA DC-8 flights through the valley, and from ground level samples collected though out the valley in a grid like design. Our data suggest that a significant amount of O3 production in the valley may come from methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde (a photochemical by-product ethanol oxidation). Our findings indicate that improvement to valley air quality may be obtained by focusing on instituting new silage containment practices and regulations.

  8. A field study to unravel factors that are significantly associated with the secretory activity of the corpus luteum during the first three postpartum cycles in high yielding dairy cows, based on the amount of steroidogenic and endothelial cells present in the luteal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, S; Van den Broeck, W; Bossaert, P; Hostens, M; Opsomer, G

    2014-12-01

    Fourteen multi- and eight primiparous high-yielding dairy cows were followed from the first till the fourth ovulation postpartum. Cows were randomly divided into two groups and supplemented with soybean (group I; n = 11) or rapeseed meal (group II; n = 11). Both groups were subjected to a biopsy sampling of the corpus luteum (CL) at cycle day 9. The luteal capillary network (visualized by Bandeiraea simplicifolia) was denser in cycles 2 and 3 (p = 0.0005). The same was seen for the surface occupied by steroidogenic cells (visualized by 3β-hydroxysteroiddehydrogenase) (p = 0.0001). The peripheral blood progesterone concentration showed an increasing trend with increasing cycle number and was higher in primiparous cows (p = 0.013), which had also larger glands on cycle day 9. The area occupied by endothelial cells was positively correlated with the area occupied by steroidogenic cells (r = 0.59; p < 0.0001). Both the areas occupied by endothelial and by steroidogenic cells were negatively correlated with the blood concentration of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) (respectively, r = -0.377; p = 0.004 and r = -0.355; p = 0.007). We can conclude that primiparous cows generally have higher peripheral progesterone levels during the first three cycles after calving which is associated with a larger CL. In comparison with those of the first post-partum cycle, corpora lutea of cycles 2 and 3 have a denser capillary network and a larger area of steroidogenic cells, while these are only associated with a trend of higher peripheral progesterone concentrations. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Sustainability evaluation of automatic and conventional milking systems on organic dairy farms in Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, F.W.; Kristensen, T.; Zijpp, van der A.J.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic dairy farmers in Denmark currently are implementing automatic milking systems (AMS) to save labour costs. As organic agriculture aims at sustainable production, the introduction of a new technology such as AMS should be evaluated regarding its economic viability, environmental impact, and

  10. Monitoring GHG from manure stores on organic and conventional dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneath, R.W.; Beline, F.; Hilhorst, M.A.; Peu, P.

    2006-01-01

    Organic farming methods are claimed to be more environmentally friendly than conventional methods and the EU MIDAIR project had an overall aim to compare emissions from organic dairy farming with conventional methods of milk production. Manure stores are the second largest source of methane

  11. Farm-specific factors affecting the choice between conventional and organic dairy farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardebroek, C.

    2003-01-01

    Organic dairy farming in the Netherlands is a growing sector. This paper investigates the impact of a number of economic and farm-specific variables on the choice between conventional and organic farming. Based on expected utility maximization, a theoretical framework is developed that explicitly

  12. Comparing risk in conventional and organic dairy farming in the Netherlands: An empirical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentsen, P.B.M.; Kovacs, K.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to contribute to the understanding of why most dairy farmers do not convert to organic farming. Therefore, the objective of this research was to assess and compare risks for conventional and organic farming in the Netherlands with respect to gross margin and the underlying

  13. INDICADORES DO METABOLISMO ENERGÉTICO NO PÓS-PARTO DE VACAS LEITEIRAS DE ALTA PRODUÇÃO E SUA RELAÇÃO COM A COMPOSIÇÃO DO LEITE BIOCHEMICAL ENERGY INDICATORS DURING POST-PARTUM PERIOD IN HIGH-YIELDING DAIRY COWS THEIR RELATION WITH MILK COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Lacerda

    2007-07-01

    by mobilization of lipid reserves. main objective of this work was to monitor biochemical energy indicators during postpartum period in high-yielding dairy cows and to evaluate possible relations of those metabolites with milk composition. The study was done with 110 multiparous Holstein Friesian dairy cows fed forage, hay, silage, concentrate and mineral supplement. Balancing of the diet was made through commercial software. The postpartum period that was evaluated by groups corresponded to 2, 5, 8 and 11 weeks of lactation, the same group and number of animals were evaluated during the winter and the summer. In the each period blood and milk samples were collected from seven animals group in five different herds. Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA, beta-hydroxibutirate (BHB, glucose, triglycerydes and cholesterol were determined through colorimetric technique. Milk composition was determined by near infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS. Statistical analyses included correlation test, analysis of variance and Tukey´s means test. It was concluded that there is no statistical association between milk composition and energetic indicators. KEY-WORDS: Dairy cows, energetic metabolism, energy balance, milk composition.

  14. SIMS(DAIRY): a modelling framework to identify sustainable dairy farms in the UK. Framework description and test for organic systems and N fertiliser optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prado, A; Misselbrook, T; Chadwick, D; Hopkins, A; Dewhurst, R J; Davison, P; Butler, A; Schröder, J; Scholefield, D

    2011-09-01

    Multiple demands are placed on farming systems today. Society, national legislation and market forces seek what could be seen as conflicting outcomes from our agricultural systems, e.g. food quality, affordable prices, a healthy environmental, consideration of animal welfare, biodiversity etc., Many of these demands, or desirable outcomes, are interrelated, so reaching one goal may often compromise another and, importantly, pose a risk to the economic viability of the farm. SIMS(DAIRY), a farm-scale model, was used to explore this complexity for dairy farm systems. SIMS(DAIRY) integrates existing approaches to simulate the effect of interactions between farm management, climate and soil characteristics on losses of nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon. The effects on farm profitability and attributes of biodiversity, milk quality, soil quality and animal welfare are also included. SIMS(DAIRY) can also be used to optimise fertiliser N. In this paper we discuss some limitations and strengths of using SIMS(DAIRY) compared to other modelling approaches and propose some potential improvements. Using the model we evaluated the sustainability of organic dairy systems compared with conventional dairy farms under non-optimised and optimised fertiliser N use. Model outputs showed for example, that organic dairy systems based on grass-clover swards and maize silage resulted in much smaller total GHG emissions per l of milk and slightly smaller losses of NO(3) leaching and NO(x) emissions per l of milk compared with the grassland/maize-based conventional systems. These differences were essentially because the conventional systems rely on indirect energy use for 'fixing' N compared with biological N fixation for the organic systems. SIMS(DAIRY) runs also showed some other potential benefits from the organic systems compared with conventional systems in terms of financial performance and soil quality and biodiversity scores. Optimisation of fertiliser N timings and rates showed a

  15. Characteristics of organic dairy farm types in seven European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Vanlierde, A.; Grelet, C.; Gengler, Nicolas; Ferris, C.; Sorensen, M.T.; Höglund, J; Carter, F; Santoro, A; Hermans, K.; Hostens, M.; Dardenne, P; Dehareng, F.

    2016-01-01

    The current context leads to more and more efficient and rational animal productions. The objective of the “Genotype plus Environment” project (G plus E) is to support novel phenotyping approaches to provide large scale phenotypes for a genomic study and contributing to the sustainability of dairy cow production systems. In this framework, 3 European farms (AFBI-UK, UCD-IRL, AU-DK) collected observations (weight, body condition score, uterine health, residual feed intake, lameness,…) and samp...

  16. Dairy calf management-A comparison of practices and producer attitudes among conventional and organic herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pempek, J A; Schuenemann, G M; Holder, E; Habing, G G

    2017-10-01

    Dairy calves are at high risk for morbidity and mortality early in life. Understanding producer attitudes is important for implementation of best management practices to improve calf health. The objectives of this study were to evaluate usage frequency and producer attitudes on key calf management practices between conventional and organic dairy operations. A cross-sectional survey was mailed to conventional and organic dairy producers in Ohio and Michigan that included questions on cow-calf separation, colostrum management, and vaccination use. The overall survey response rate was 49% (727/1,488); 449 and 172 conventional and organic producer respondents, respectively, were included in the final analysis. Binary, cumulative, and multinomial logistic regression models were used to test differences within and between herd types for management practices and producer attitudes. The majority of conventional (64%, 279/439) producers reported separating the calf from the dam 30 min to 6 h after birth. More organic (34%, 56/166) than conventional (18%, 80/439) producers reported separation 6 to 12 h after birth, and organic producers were more likely to agree time before separation is beneficial. Few conventional (10%, 44/448) and organic (3%, 5/171) producers reported measuring colostrum quality. Most conventional producers (68%, 304/448) hand-fed the first feeding of colostrum, whereas the majority of organic producers (38%, 69/171) allowed calves to nurse colostrum. Last, 44% (188/430) of conventional producers reported vaccinating their calves for respiratory disease, compared with 14% (22/162) of organic producers; organic producers were more likely to perceive vaccines as ineffective and harmful to calf health. Thus, the usage frequency and perceived risks and benefits of calf management practices vary considerably between conventional and organic dairy producers. These findings provide helpful information to understand decision making at the herd level regarding

  17. Vitaminen in rantsoenen voor biologisch melkvee = Fat soluble vitamins in rations for organic dairy cows en goat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, G.; Eekeren, van N.J.M.; Neijenhuis, F.

    2005-01-01

    On five organic dairy cow farms during the period spring 2004/2005 feedstuffs and blood samples were taken 3 times to analyse beta carotene, vitamin D and vitamin E (tocopherols). On 3 organic dairy goat farms feeds and blood samples were taken only in spring 2005. Within types of feeds there are

  18. Methods for high yield production of terpenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutchan, Toni; Higashi, Yasuhiro; Feng, Xiaohong

    2017-01-03

    Provided are enhanced high yield production systems for producing terpenes in plants via the expression of fusion proteins comprising various combinations of geranyl diphosphate synthase large and small subunits and limonene synthases. Also provided are engineered oilseed plants that accumulate monoterpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons in their seeds, as well as methods for producing such plants, providing a system for rapidly engineering oilseed crop production platforms for terpene-based biofuels.

  19. Mastitis incidence and milk quality in organic dairy farms which use suckling systems in calf rearing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.P.; Smolders, E.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify important factors influencing animal health and general disease resistance, detailed qualitative and quantitative farm data were collected from 99 organic dairy farms in the Netherlands. Mastitis incidence and milk quality were focal points of the data collection. In this paper

  20. Preliminary Results to Identifying the Opportunities of the Organic Sheep Dairy Sector in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ilisiu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The organic sheep number raised in Romania is currently relatively low, namely 0.85% of the total sheep number at national level. The development of sheep breeding sector in organic system is very heavily influenced by economical factors, but also consumers’ demand for organic products. The goal of the research was to analyze consumer behavior vis-à-vis of organic dairy products derived from sheep, in order to support the decisions that may be taken to develop the sector. Data were collected through telephone interviews using a questionnaire. Interviews were conducted between September-December 2016. 180 respondents were surveyed in total, who answered a questionnaire which included 23 questions. This study revealed that approximately one quarter of respondents have never consumed organic dairy products, while 60% of respondents say they did. Organic cheese is considered to be more expensive when compared to conventionally produced cheese, about 97% of the respondents, while 82% of respondents believe that higher prices are justified. Willingness to pay a higher price for organic products from sheep's milk is very different. Around 13% of respondents are not willing to pay an additional fee for cheese produced in organic system. However, about 2% were willing to pay an additional fee up to 60% more, comparing to conventional cheese products. 38% of respondents are willing to pay the additional price of up to 10%, and 23% of  interviewed people are ready to pay an additional charge of 20% of the dairy products obtained by conventional methods.

  1. Emissions of organic carbon and methane from petroleum and dairy operations in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentner, D. R.; Ford, T. B.; Guha, A.; Boulanger, K.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.; Atlas, E.; Lonneman, W. A.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Beaver, M. R.; St. Clair, J. M.; Wennberg, P. O.; VandenBoer, T. C.; Markovic, M. Z.; Murphy, J. G.; Harley, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Petroleum and dairy operations are prominent sources of gas-phase organic compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley. It is essential to understand the emissions and air quality impacts of these relatively understudied sources, especially for oil/gas operations in light of increasing US production. Ground site measurements in Bakersfield and regional aircraft measurements of reactive gas-phase organic compounds and methane were part of the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) project to determine the sources contributing to regional gas-phase organic carbon emissions. Using a combination of near-source and downwind data, we assess the composition and magnitude of emissions, and provide average source profiles. To examine the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley, we developed a statistical modeling method using ground-based data and the FLEXPART-WRF transport and meteorological model. We present evidence for large sources of paraffinic hydrocarbons from petroleum operations and oxygenated compounds from dairy (and other cattle) operations. In addition to the small straight-chain alkanes typically associated with petroleum operations, we observed a wide range of branched and cyclic alkanes, most of which have limited previous in situ measurements or characterization in petroleum operation emissions. Observed dairy emissions were dominated by ethanol, methanol, acetic acid, and methane. Dairy operations were responsible for the vast majority of methane emissions in the San Joaquin Valley; observations of methane were well correlated with non-vehicular ethanol, and multiple assessments of the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley highlight the dominance of dairy operations for methane emissions. The petroleum operations source profile was developed using the composition of non-methane hydrocarbons in unrefined natural gas associated with crude oil. The observed source profile is

  2. Water flow in soil from organic dairy rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Eriksen, Jørgen; Krogh, Paul Henning

    2017-01-01

    Managed grasslands are characterized by rotations of leys and arable crops. The regime of water flow evolves during the leys because of earthworm and root activity, climate and agricultural practices (fertilizer, cutting and cattle trampling). The effects of duration of the leys, cattle trampling...... and fertilizer practice on the movement of water through sandy loam soil profiles were investigated in managed grassland of a dairy operation. Experiments using tracer chemicals were performed, with or without cattle slurry application, with cutting or grazing, in the 1st and the 3rd year of ley, and in winter...... rye. Each plot was irrigated for an hour with 18·5 mm of water containing a conservative tracer, potassium bromide; 24 h after irrigation, macropores >1 mm were recorded visually on a horizontal plan of 0·7 m2 at five depths (10, 30, 40, 70 and 100 cm). The bromide (Br−) concentration in soil was also...

  3. Comparing risk in conventional and organic dairy farming in the Netherlands: an empirical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, P B M; Kovacs, K; van Asseldonk, M A P M

    2012-07-01

    This study was undertaken to contribute to the understanding of why most dairy farmers do not convert to organic farming. Therefore, the objective of this research was to assess and compare risks for conventional and organic farming in the Netherlands with respect to gross margin and the underlying price and production variables. To investigate the risk factors a farm accountancy database was used containing panel data from both conventional and organic representative Dutch dairy farms (2001-2007). Variables with regard to price and production risk were identified using a gross margin analysis scheme. Price risk variables were milk price and concentrate price. The main production risk variables were milk yield per cow, roughage yield per hectare, and veterinary costs per cow. To assess risk, an error component implicit detrending method was applied and the resulting detrended standard deviations were compared between conventional and organic farms. Results indicate that the risk included in the gross margin per cow is significantly higher in organic farming. This is caused by both higher price and production risks. Price risks are significantly higher in organic farming for both milk price and concentrate price. With regard to production risk, only milk yield per cow poses a significantly higher risk in organic farming. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Aubert, Pascal; Sennour, Mohamed; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf; Thorel, Alain; Gaffet, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties. PMID:19451687

  5. Comparisons of milk quality on North Carolina organic and conventional dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, K A E; Sparks, L G; Lyman, R L; Washburn, S P; Anderson, K L

    2013-10-01

    The organic dairy industry is growing rapidly across the United States and has recently expanded into the southeastern states. To date, no published comparisons of milk quality exist between organic and conventional dairies in the Southeastern United States. Maintaining high milk quality is challenging in this region due to the longer periods of high heat and humidity. The objective of this observational study was to compare milk quality on organic and conventional dairies in North Carolina during the warm summer months of the year. Data were compared from 7 organically and 7 conventionally managed herds in North Carolina. To assess milk quality, milk samples were aseptically collected from each functional quarter of each cow in the milking herds at the time of sampling and linear somatic cell scores (SCS) were obtained for individual cows. A total of 4,793 quarter milk samples (2,526 conventional and 2,267 organic) were collected from 1,247 cows (652 conventional and 595 organic). Milk samples were cultured and bacterial growth was identified using protocols consistent with those of the National Mastitis Council (Verona, WI). Subclinical mastitis was defined as the presence of SCS ≥ 4 and also a microbiological infection in at least 1 quarter. The proportion of cows with subclinical mastitis did not differ between conventional (20.8%) and organic (23.3%) herds. No significant difference was observed between herd management types in the proportion of cows without microbiological growth in milk samples. Also, no significant differences were observed between organic and conventional herds for cow-level prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., or Corynebacterium spp. Two of the organic herds had a notably higher prevalence of Corynebacterium spp. and higher SCS. Coliforms were found in 5 of 7 conventional herds and in only 1 of 7 organic herds. Mean SCS did not differ between conventional (3.3±0.2) and organic

  6. Demand structure and willingness to pay for organic dairy products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Sinne

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses if the introduction of a new and “low fat” organic variety of fluid milk has any effect on consumers’ valuation of organic milk in general and can rewind the stagnating trend in the demand for organic milk. In order to analyse this, the consumers’ purchasing structure was anal...

  7. Economic sustainability of organic dairy sheep systems in Central Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Toro-Mujica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheep production systems in regions with a Mediterranean climate are important in social, economic and environmental terms. Modeling these systems allows, among others, evaluation of the costs efficiencies which in turn permits assessing the expected effects of changes in production variables. This paper presents a prototype analysis of the economic sustainability of ecological dairy sheep systems of Castilla-La Mancha, Central Spain evaluated through the estimation of costs efficiencies. Costs functions were developed using data from 31 farms. Rate of supplementary feeding, labour use, and flock size were used to measure the cost efficiency. On average, cost efficiency was 61.7±15.5%, with significant differences among typological groups. High efficiency was found in only 29% of the farms. The economic analyses performed suggest that the continued existence of economically unsustainably farms is explained by the available subsidies, lack of amortization of fixed assets leading to progressive decapitalization, and subsistence incomes by family groups (gross family income.

  8. High-Yield Functional Molecular Electronic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunhak; Kim, Dongku; Xiang, Dong; Lee, Takhee

    2017-07-25

    An ultimate goal of molecular electronics, which seeks to incorporate molecular components into electronic circuit units, is to generate functional molecular electronic devices using individual or ensemble molecules to fulfill the increasing technical demands of the miniaturization of traditional silicon-based electronics. This review article presents a summary of recent efforts to pursue this ultimate aim, covering the development of reliable device platforms for high-yield ensemble molecular junctions and their utilization in functional molecular electronic devices, in which distinctive electronic functionalities are observed due to the functional molecules. In addition, other aspects pertaining to the practical application of molecular devices such as manufacturing compatibility with existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, their integration, and flexible device applications are also discussed. These advances may contribute to a deeper understanding of charge transport characteristics through functional molecular junctions and provide a desirable roadmap for future practical molecular electronics applications.

  9. Sustainability evaluation of automatic and conventional milking systems on organic dairy farms in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudshoorn, Frank W; Kristensen, Troels; van der Zijpp, A J

    2012-01-01

    , and social acceptability, i.e., its contribution to sustainable development. The objective of this research, therefore, was to evaluate sustainability of AMS use on organic dairy farms in Denmark, by comparing results of a set of sustainability indicators for nine farms using AMS with nine farms using...... conventional milking systems (CMS). Sustainability indicators were quantified for economic performance of the farm, on-farm eutrophication, on-farm biodiversity, animal welfare (including health), grazing time, milk composition and labour time. Milk yield per cow per year was higher for AMS farms (9021 kg...... this quantification of selected sustainability indicators it can be concluded that organic dairy farms using AMS, in spite of the substantial decrease in grazing time, show the potential of economic and environmental sustainable development within the range of herd sizes investigated (65–157 cows per farm). Even...

  10. Characterization of micro‐organisms isolated from dairy industry after cleaning and fogging disinfection with alkyl amine and peracetic acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bore, E; Langsrud, S

    2005-01-01

    Aims:  To characterize micro‐organisms isolated from Norwegian dairy production plants after cleaning and fogging disinfection with alkyl amine/peracetic acid and to indicate reasons for survival...

  11. A comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for Staphylococcus aureus in organic and conventional dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikofsky, Linda L; Barlow, John W; Santisteban, Carlos; Schukken, Ynte H

    2003-01-01

    Selective pressure from antimicrobial use, mutations, or acquisition of foreign resistance determinants mediate antimicrobial resistance. If antimicrobial use is the major selective pressure encouraging the development of resistance, then reduced use should result in decreased resistance. We compared antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from milk samples from 22 organic (nonantibiotic using) dairy herds to isolates from 16 conventional dairy herds. Susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion, and zone diameters were recorded in millimeters for 144 isolates from organic farms and 117 isolates from conventional farms and were also classified as susceptible or not-susceptible (intermediate and resistant categories combined). Strength of association between high or low use and proportion susceptible was evaluated by Chi-square analysis and differences in mean zone diameter for isolates from organic farms versus isolates from conventional farms were compared by analysis of variance. Analysis was done for each antimicrobial and deemed significant at p organic and conventional herds for seven of the nine antibiotics studied. Herds that were certified organic had S. aureus isolates that were more susceptible to antimicrobials. Overall, S. aureus isolates from both organic and conventional herds showed good susceptibility to most commonly used bovine mastitis antimicrobials; however, isolates from organic herds were significantly more susceptible. Longitudinal studies of herds undergoing the transition to organic farming would help elucidate the dynamics of antimicrobial resistance and the potential return of antimicrobial susceptibility.

  12. Mastitis and related management factors in certified organic dairy herds in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson Ingrid

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mastitis is one of the major threats to animal health, in organic farming as well as conventional. Preliminary studies of organic dairy herds have indicated better udder health in such herds, as compared to conventional herds. The aim of this paper was to further study mastitis and management related factors in certified organic dairy herds. Methods An observational study of 26 certified organic dairy herds in mid-eastern Sweden was conducted during one year. A large-animal practitioner visited the herds three times and clinically examined and sampled cows, and collected information about general health and management routines. Data on milk production and disorders treated by a veterinarian in the 26 herds, as well as in 1102 conventional herds, were retrieved from official records. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess associations between herd type (organic vs. conventional and incidence of disorders. Results The organic herds that took part in the study ranged in size from 12 to 64 cows, in milk production from 3772 to 10334 kg per cow and year, and in bulk milk somatic cell counts from 83000 to 280000 cells/ml. The organic herds were found to have a lower incidence of clinical mastitis, teat injuries, and a lower proportion of cows with a high somatic cell count (as indicated by the UDS, Udder Disease Score compared to conventional herds. The spectrum of udder pathogenic bacteria was similar to that found in other Swedish studies. Treatment of mastitis was found to be similar to what is practised in conventional herds. Homeopathic remedies were not widely used in the treatment of clinical mastitis. The calves in most of these organic herds suckled their dams for only a few days, which were not considered to substantially affect the udder health. The main management factor that was different from conventional herds was the feeding strategy, where organic herds used a larger share of forage. Conclusion Udder

  13. Adapted breeds for organic and low input dairy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Marco; Ferris, C; Sairanen, A

    2014-01-01

    Part of SOLID is to understand how contrasting genotypes adapt to a systematic restriction of nutrient and energy supply. In new studies, a number of genotypes identified as being adapted to organic and low input systems were compared with conventional breeds....

  14. How can veterinarians be interesting partners for organic dairy farmers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, J E; Bareille, N; Fourichon, C

    2017-01-01

    problems. Furthermore, veterinarians did not always share farmers' (organic) objectives, values and priorities and this could lead to disagreement on the best choice in animal health management practices. This might be further amplified in situations where there exists a lack of dialogue and mutual...

  15. Sustainability of US Organic Beef and Dairy Production Systems: Soil, Plant and Cattle Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy J. Soder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, the National Organic Program implemented a rule for the US stating that pasture must be a significant source of feed in organic ruminant systems. This article will focus on how the pasture rule has impacted the management, economics and nutritional value of products derived from organic ruminant systems and the interactions of grazing cattle with pasture forages and soils. The use of synthetic fertilizers is prohibited in organic systems; therefore, producers must rely on animal manures, compost and cover crops to increase and maintain soil nitrogen content. Rotational and strip grazing are two of the most common grazing management practices utilized in grazing ruminant production systems; however, these practices are not exclusive to organic livestock producers. For dairy cattle, grazing reduces foot and leg problems common in confinement systems, but lowers milk production and exposes cows to parasites that can be difficult to treat without pharmaceuticals. Organic beef cattle may still be finished in feedlots for no more than 120 days in the US, but without growth hormones and antibiotics, gains may be reduced and illnesses increased. Grazing reduces the use of environmentally and economically costly concentrate feeds and recycles nutrients back to the soil efficiently, but lowers the rate of beef liveweight gain. Increased use of pasture can be economically, environmentally and socially sustainable if forage use efficiency is high and US consumers continue to pay a premium for organic beef and dairy products.

  16. Animal Health and Welfare Planning in Organic Dairy Cattle Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette; Winckler, Christoph; Roderick, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Continuous development is needed within the farm to reach the goal of good animal health and welfare in organic livestock farming. The very different conditions between countries call for models that are relevant for different farming types and can be integrated into local practice and be relevant...... for each type of farming context. This article reviews frameworks, principles and practices for animal health and welfare planning which are relevant for organic livestock farming. This review is based on preliminary analyses carried out within a European project (acronym ANIPLAN) with participants from...... as well as animal health and welfare professionals (veterinarians and advisors) is paramount. This paper provides an overview of some current animal health and welfare planning initiatives and explains the principles of animal health and welfare planning which are being implemented in ANIPLAN partner...

  17. The effect of dha omega-3 feeding in the high yielding holstein herd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Karcol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of supplementary feeding of DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid rich algae product (Algae STM Alltech Inc. on production of milk, fat and protein as well as on reproduction of high yielding Holstein dairy herd. Field trial was set up on Top 10 dairy farm in western part of Slovakia, under commercial conditions. The data of high yielding dairy cows, separated in two groups of 30 (control and 29 (trial animals, were recorded for period of 3 subsequent months from October to December 2015. Animals were fed once a day Total Mixed Ration based diet with different feed mixture composition in trial group (+100 g Algae STM Alltech Inc. per cow and day. Performance data were collected in accordance with official milk recording system of Breeding Services of Slovak Republic s. e. and milk samples were collected once per month according to the A4 standard methodology. The control group showed higher level of milk production compared to trial. Our study indicated that the feeding of algae caused milk fat depression and generally lower protein content in milk. Significant impact of algae feeding was found also for the level of urea in milk. In addition, the supplementary feeding of DHA may represent effective strategy to increase the percentage of pregnancies per inseminations in lactating dairy cows.

  18. Technical efficiency and technology adoption: a study of organic farming in the French dairy sector

    OpenAIRE

    Latruffe, Laure; Nauges, Celine; Desjeux, Yann

    2014-01-01

    AgriBio3 PEPP « Rôle de la Performance Economique des exploitations et des filières, et des Politiques Publiques, dans le développement de l’AB »; Using original survey data from France we study the importance of technical efficiency as a potential determinant of farm conversion to organic farming in the dairy sector. We run a two-stage analysis. In the first stage we calculate technical efficiency of farms when they were conventional (including organic farms before they convert) as well as t...

  19. A comparative study of production performance and animal health practices in organic and conventional dairy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jenevaldo B; Fagundes, Gisele M; Soares, João P G; Fonseca, Adivaldo H; Muir, James P

    2014-10-01

    Health and production management strategies influence environmental impacts of dairies. The objective of this paper was to measure risk factors on health and production parameters on six organic and conventional bovine, caprine, and ovine dairy herds in southeastern Brazil over six consecutive years (2006-2011). The organic operations had lower milk production per animal (P ≤ 0.05), lower calf mortality (P ≤ 0.05), less incidence of mastitis (P ≤ 0.05), fewer rates of spontaneous abortions (P ≤ 0.05), and reduced ectoparasite loads (P ≤ 0.05) compared to conventional herds and flocks. Organic herds, however, had greater prevalence of internal parasitism (P ≤ 0.05) than conventional herds. In all management systems, calves, kids, and lambs had greater oocyte counts than adults. However, calves in the organic group showed lower prevalence of coccidiosis. In addition, animals in the organic system exhibited lower parasitic resistance to anthelmintics. Herd genetic potential, nutritive value of forage, feed intake, and pasture parasite loads, however, may have influenced productive and health parameters. Thus, although conventional herds showed greater milk production and less disease prevalence, future research might quantify the potential implications of these unreported factors.

  20. Organic and Conventional Dairy Farmers Prefer Different Improvements in Breeding Goal Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagboom, Margot; Kargo, Morten; Edwards, David

    In dairy cattle breeding, breeding goals (BG) are developed and subsequently a selection index that farmers want to use. Therefore it is important to take their preferences for BG traits into account. Two production systems that are expected to influence farmer preferences for BG traits are organ....... This study shows that organic and conventional farmers differ in their preferences for improvements in BG traits, and the results can be used to set up specific breeding goals for organic and conventional farming systems....... and conventional systems. The aim of this study was to characterize preferences of organic and conventional Danish dairy farmers for improvements in BG traits for Holstein cattle. A survey was established to characterize preferences for improvements in ten traits, by means of pairwise rankings using the online...... software 1000Minds. These pairwise rankings were based on equal economic worth of trait improvements. The survey was filled in by 106 organic and 290 conventional farmers. The most preferred trait improvement for both production systems was in cow fertility, and the least preferred improvement...

  1. Influence of composted dairy manure and perennial forage on soil carbon and nitrogen fractions during transition into organic management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Composted dairy manure (CDM) is among the management practices used in transitioning from a conventional to an organic agricultural system. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the impact of several organic nitrogen (N) sources on: (i) soil organic C (SOC) and soil total N (STN) content; (ii...

  2. Impact of animal health and welfare planning on medicine use, herd health and production in European organic dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivemeyer, S.; Smolders, E.A.A.; Brinkmann, J.; Gratzer, E.; Hansen, B.; Henriksen, B.I.F.; Huber, J.; Leeb, C.; March, S.; Mejdell, C.; Nicholas, P.; Roderick, S.; Stöger, E.; Vaarst, M.; Whistance, L.K.; Winckler, C.; Walkenhorst, M.

    2012-01-01

    Achieving and maintaining high herd health and welfare status and low veterinary medicine inputs are important aims in organic livestock farming. Therefore, an on-farm intervention study (CORE Organic ANIPLAN) was conducted on 128 organic dairy farms in seven European countries aiming at minimising

  3. Genotype by Environment Interaction for Milk Production Traits Betweeen Organic and Conventional Dairy Production in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, W.J.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Brascamp, E.W.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2006-01-01

    Estimates of genetic parameters for organic dairy farming have not been published previously, and neither is information available on the magnitude of genotype by environment interaction (GxE) between organic and conventional farming. However, organic farming is growing worldwide and basic

  4. Impact of animal health and welfare planning on medicine use, herd health and production in European organic dairy farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivemeyer, S; Smolders, G; Brinkmann, J

    2012-01-01

    Achieving and maintaining high herd health and welfare status and low veterinary medicine inputs are important aims in organic livestock farming. Therefore, an on-farm intervention study (CORE Organic ANIPLAN) was conducted on 128 organic dairy farms in seven European countries aiming at minimising...... medicine use through animal health and welfare planning (AHWP). Medicine use (excluding complementary treatments such as homeopathic remedies) was assessed as the total number of treatments and as the number of treatments of various disease categories (udder, fertility, metabolism, locomotion and others...... be regarded as a feasible approach to minimising medicine use without the impairment of production and herd health under several organic dairy farming conditions in Europe....

  5. Innovations in low input and organic dairy supply chains--what is acceptable in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, P K; Mandolesi, S; Naspetti, S; Zanoli, R

    2014-02-01

    The growth in organic and low-input farming practices is driven by both market demand for high quality, safe food, and European Union policy support, and these types of farming practices are considered in European Union policies for sustainable production, food quality, healthy life, and rural development. However, many constraints to the development of low-input and organic dairy farming supply chains have been identified, including economic, political, and technical constraints. In order for these types of supply chains to develop and provide further benefits to society, innovations are required to improve their sustainability. However, an innovation will only be taken up and result in desirable change if the whole supply chain accepts the innovation. In this paper, Q methodology is used to identify the acceptability of dairy supply chain innovations to low-input and organic supply chain members and consumers in Belgium, Finland, Italy, and the United Kingdom. A strong consensus existed across all respondents on innovations that were deemed as unacceptable. The use of genetically modified and transgenic organisms in the farming system and innovations perceived as conflicting with the naturalness of the production system and products were strongly rejected. Innovations that were strongly liked across all participants in the study were those related to improving animal welfare and improving forage quality to be able to reduce the need for purchased concentrate feeds. Only minor differences existed between countries as to where the priorities lay in terms of innovation acceptability. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of stored feed cropping systems and farm size on the profitability of Maine organic dairy farm simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshide, A K; Halloran, J M; Kersbergen, R J; Griffin, T S; DeFauw, S L; LaGasse, B J; Jain, S

    2011-11-01

    United States organic dairy production has increased to meet the growing demand for organic milk. Despite higher prices received for milk, organic dairy farmers have come under increasing financial stress due to increases in concentrated feed prices over the past few years, which can make up one-third of variable costs. Market demand for milk has also leveled in the last year, resulting in some downward pressure on prices paid to dairy farmers. Organic dairy farmers in the Northeast United States have experimented with growing different forage and grain crops to maximize on-farm production of protein and energy to improve profitability. Three representative organic feed systems were simulated using the integrated farm system model for farms with 30, 120, and 220 milk cows. Increasing intensity of equipment use was represented by organic dairy farms growing only perennial sod (low) to those with corn-based forage systems, which purchase supplemental grain (medium) or which produce and feed soybeans (high). The relative profitability of these 3 organic feed systems was strongly dependent on dairy farm size. From results, we suggest smaller organic dairy farms can be more profitable with perennial sod-based rather than corn-based forage systems due to lower fixed costs from using only equipment associated with perennial forage harvest and storage. The largest farm size was more profitable using a corn-based system due to greater economies of scale for growing soybeans, corn grain, winter cereals, and corn silages. At an intermediate farm size of 120 cows, corn-based forage systems were more profitable if perennial sod was not harvested at optimum quality, corn was grown on better soils, or if milk yield was 10% higher. Delayed harvest decreased the protein and energy content of perennial sod crops, requiring more purchased grain to balance the ration and resulting in lower profits. Corn-based systems were less affected by lower perennial forage quality, as corn silage

  7. Dairy cattle management, health and welfare in smallholder farms: An organic farming perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odhong, Charles; Wahome, Raphael; Vaarst, Mette

    2015-01-01

    livestock production practices as specified by the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements and the East Africa Organic Product Standard. A longitudinal study of 24 farms was conducted to document and assess management practices and their potential effect on animal health and welfare......Organic production principles aim at achieving good animal health and welfare of livestock. The objective of the present study was to investigate animal management, health and welfare in smallholder dairy farms in Kenya, Africa, and to be able to give recommendations which can guide organic...... type, aspects of the housing system, farm characteristics, and management routines. The average herd size was 3.15 in Kiambu and 3.91 in Kajiado, with all the cows’ zero-grazed. Seventy five percent of the cubicles were small (less than 2.50m2). Many of the farmers sprayed their animals weekly (47...

  8. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six "internal" influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production.

  9. Growth, carcass characteristics, and profitability of organic versus conventional dairy beef steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, E A; Heins, B J; Dicostanzo, A; Chester-Jones, H

    2014-03-01

    Bull calves (n=49), born at the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center (Morris) between March and May 2011, were used to compare growth measurements and profitability of conventional and organic dairy steers. Calves were assigned to 1 of 3 replicated groups at birth: conventional (CONV; n=16), organic (pasture and concentrate; ORG; n=16), or organic grass only (GRS; n=17), and analysis of variables was on a pen basis. Breed groups of calves were Holstein (HO; n=9); Holsteins (n=11) maintained at 1964 breed average level; crossbreds (n=19) including combinations of HO, Montbéliarde, and Swedish Red; and crossbreds (n=10) including combinations of HO, Jersey, Swedish Red, and Normande. The CONV steers were fed a diet of 80% concentrate and 20% forage. The ORG steers were fed a diet of organic corn, organic corn silage, and at least 30% of their diet consisted of organic pasture during the grazing season. The GRS steers grazed pasture during the grazing season and were fed high-quality hay or hay silage during the nongrazing season. Intakes of a total mixed ration were recorded daily with herd management software. A profit function was defined to include revenues and expenses for beef value, feed intake, pasture intake, health cost, and yardage. The GRS (358.6 kg) steers had lesser total gains from birth to slaughter than ORG (429.6 kg) and CONV (534.5 kg) steers. Furthermore, the GRS (0.61 kg/d) steers had lesser average daily gain from birth compared with ORG (0.81 kg/d) and CONV (1.1 kg/d) steers. The GRS and ORG steers had smaller rib eye area (49.5 and 65.8 cm(2), respectively) compared with CONV (75.4 cm(2)) steers. For profitability, GRS steers had 43% greater profit than CONV steers due to organic beef price premiums and lower feed costs. On the other hand, ORG steers had substantially less profit than CONV steers. The higher cost of production for the ORG steers is due to the extreme high value of organic corn. The results of the

  10. Parasites and parasite management practices of organic and conventional dairy herds in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, U S; Moon, R D; Stromberg, B E; Schroth, S L; Michels, L; Wolff, L J; Kelton, D F; Heins, B J

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and practices used to manage internal helminth parasites and external arthropod parasites on organic and conventional dairy herds in Minnesota. All organic (ORG) dairy herds in Minnesota (n=114) and a convenience sample of conventional herds were invited to participate in the study. Thirty-five ORG herds and 28 conventional herds were visited once in summer and fall of 2012. Conventional dairy herds were split into small conventional (SC,parasites, hygiene scores were recorded for adult stock, and fecal samples were collected from a nominal 20 breeding-age heifers to characterize abundance of internal parasites. Nonparametric tests were used to compare fecal egg counts per gram (FEC) among farms grouped by management systems and practices. Organic farms had more designated pasture and were more likely to use rotational grazing compared with conventional farms, but the stocking densities of animals on pasture were similar among farm types. The overall FEC were very low, and only a few individual ORG heifers had FEC >500 eggs/gram. Samples from heifers on ORG farms had significantly more strongyle-type eggs than those on SC and MC farms (ORG: 6.6±2.1; SC: 0.5±0.3; MC: 0.8±0.7), but egg counts of other types of gastrointestinal parasites did not differ significantly among the 3 herd groups. Fly control measures were applied mainly to milking cows and preweaned calves and were used on 88.6% of ORG herds, 60.0% of SC herds, and 91.7% of MC herds. Approximately half of the producers reported having seen skin conditions suggestive of lice or tail mange in their cattle during the previous winter (ORG: 48.6%, SC: 57.1%, MC: 53.9%). Although most conventional producers reported treating these skin conditions, most organic producers stated they had not treated them. In conclusion, gastrointestinal parasite egg counts were low overall at the time of the survey, and most surveyed producers did not perceive

  11. Nutritional status of high yielding crossbred cow around parturition

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    Mohammad Yousuf

    2016-03-01

    Materials and methods: Nutritional status of cows around the peri-parturient period was investigated for six months in dairy farm. Seven to eight months' pregnant cows were selected for this study. Blood samples from 24 randomly selected cows were collected at stage-1, -2 and -3. The serum was stored at -20C until analyzing glucose, total protein (TP, albumin (Alb, triglycerides (Tg, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL, calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg and phosphorus (P. Results: An increasing trend of glucose level was evidenced (P=0.07 during stage-1. Instead, higher levels of TP were found during stage-3 as compared to the stage-1 and -2. The Alb levels differed significantly (P<0.01 among different stages. A significantly increased (P<0.01 cholesterol, Tg, and HDL were found after parturition (stage-2 and -3 than before parturition (stage-1. LDL was significantly (P=0.02 increased during stage-2 and -3. A significantly higher level of Ca (P<0.01, Mg (P<0.01 and P (P=0.03 were present during stage-1. Glucose, TP, cholesterol and Tg were significantly higher (P<0.01 in cows two months after parturition, while Alb was found to be the highest (P<0.01 in cows immediately after parturition. An increasing trend of LDL (P=0.07 and HDL (P=0.07 were found in the cows two months after parturition. However, Ca levels were significantly (P=0.04 higher in cows two months after parturition. Conclusion: The results indicate that there is alteration of biochemical levels among the study population at three different stages, and these data may be helpful in using the necessary nutrients to the the high yielding cows around their parturition. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(1.000: 68-74

  12. Culling reasons in organic and conventional dairy herds and genotype by environment interaction for longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlman, T; Berglund, B; Rydhmer, L; Strandberg, E

    2011-03-01

    Dairy cow longevity combines all functional traits and is thought to be especially important in organic production, which is an established, increasing part of Swedish dairy production, representing approximately 6% of the market. The aim of this study was to compare dynamics in culling reasons between organic and conventional production and to analyze genotype by environment interactions for longevity. The data contained information from all organic herds with information available from official recording (n=402) and from approximately half of the conventional herds (n=5,335). Records from Swedish Holsteins (n=155,379) and Swedish Red cows (n=160,794) that had their first calf between January 1998 and September 2003 were included. The opportunity period for longevity was at least 6 yr. Six longevity traits were defined: length of productive life; survival through first, second, and third lactations; fertility-determined survival; and udder health-determined survival. Twenty codes were used to describe the cause of culling, and these were divided into 8 groups: udder health, low fertility, low production, leg problems, metabolic diseases, other diseases, other specified causes, and unspecified cause. The main reason for culling cows in organic herds was poor udder health, whereas for cows in conventional herds it was low fertility. Furthermore, the shift in main culling reason from fertility, which was most common in first lactation regardless of production system, to udder health occurred at a lower age in organic production. Heritabilities and genetic correlations for the longevity traits expressed in organic and conventional herds were estimated from a bivariate animal model. The genetic correlations were close to unity (>0.88), except for fertility-determined survival in the Swedish Red breed (0.80). Heritabilities were low to moderate, and no clear pattern was identified for production system or breed. In general, the results indicate that farmers' culling

  13. Substantial Differences between Organ and Muscle Specific Tracer Incorporation Rates in a Lactating Dairy Cow.

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    Nicholas A Burd

    Full Text Available We aimed to produce intrinsically L-[1-(13C]phenylalanine labeled milk and beef for subsequent use in human nutrition research. The collection of the various organ tissues after slaughter allowed for us to gain insight into the dynamics of tissue protein turnover in vivo in a lactating dairy cow. One lactating dairy cow received a constant infusion of L-[1-(13C]phenylalanine (450 µmol/min for 96 h. Plasma and milk were collected prior to, during, and after the stable isotope infusion. Twenty-four hours after cessation of the infusion the cow was slaughtered. The meat and samples of the various organ tissues (liver, heart, lung, udder, kidney, rumen, small intestine, and colon were collected and stored. Approximately 210 kg of intrinsically labeled beef (bone and fat free with an average L-[1-(13C]phenylalanine enrichment of 1.8±0.1 mole percent excess (MPE was obtained. The various organ tissues differed substantially in L-[1-(13C]phenylalanine enrichments in the tissue protein bound pool, the highest enrichment levels were achieved in the kidney (11.7 MPE and the lowest enrichment levels in the skeletal muscle tissue protein of the cow (between 1.5-2.4 MPE. The estimated protein synthesis rates of the various organ tissues should be regarded as underestimates, particularly for the organs with the higher turnover rates and high secretory activity, due to the lengthened (96 h measurement period necessary for the production of the intrinsically labeled beef. Our data demonstrates that there are relatively small differences in L-[1-(13C]phenylalanine enrichments between the various meat cuts, but substantial higher enrichment values are observed in the various organ tissues. We conclude that protein turnover rates of various organs are much higher when compared to skeletal muscle protein turnover rates in large lactating ruminants.

  14. Work organization on smallholder dairy farms: a process unique to each farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostiou, Nathalie; Cialdella, Nathalie; Vazquez, Vincent; Müller, Artur Gustavo; Le Gal, Pierre-Yves

    2015-10-01

    The way smallholder farms organize and carry out work impacts their ability to secure their livelihoods and meet growing demand for agricultural products. This study investigates the way dairy family farms in Brazil manage their workforce to achieve their objectives of production and income. Fifteen smallholder farms were surveyed using the QuaeWork method to understand the work organization on each farm. A high diversity of workloads was found, but these do not appear to be strictly related to the farms' production systems. The high variability of workloads is linked to the available workforce, technical choices, and the delegation of tasks to an external workforce. Farmers can decrease their workload by adopting milking mechanization, silage, hiring labor, and increasing the duration of the work day. Work organization depends on a farmer's personal choices, rendering the whole issue of workforce management a process unique to each farm.

  15. Innovative technology and sustainable development of organic dairy farming : the case of automatic milking systems in Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, F.W.

    2009-01-01

    Development of organic dairy farming in Denmark is characterized by up-scaling, increasing productivity and automation. Increasing discussion on compliance with organic principles and sustainability has been forwarded. Automatic milking systems (AMS) are part of this development and have been

  16. Comparative analysis of the diversity of aerobic spore-forming bacteria in raw milk from organic and conventional dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorevits, An; De Jonghe, Valerie; Vandroemme, Joachim; Reekmans, Rieka; Heyrman, Jeroen; Messens, Winy; De Vos, Paul; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2008-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of raw milk can originate from different sources: air, milking equipment, feed, soil, faeces and grass. It is hypothesized that differences in feeding and housing strategies of cows may influence the microbial quality of milk. This assumption was investigated through comparison of the aerobic spore-forming flora in milk from organic and conventional dairy farms. Laboratory pasteurized milk samples from five conventional and five organic dairy farms, sampled in late summer/autumn and in winter, were plated on a standard medium and two differential media, one screening for phospholipolytic and the other for proteolytic activity of bacteria. Almost 930 isolates were obtained of which 898 could be screened via fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Representative isolates were further analysed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and (GTG)(5)-PCR. The majority of aerobic spore-formers in milk belonged to the genus Bacillus and showed at least 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with type strains of Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus circulans, Bacillus subtilis and with type strains of species belonging to the Bacillus cereus group. About 7% of all isolates may belong to possibly new spore-forming taxa. Although the overall diversity of aerobic spore-forming bacteria in milk from organic vs. conventional dairy farms was highly similar, some differences between both were observed: (i) a relatively higher number of thermotolerant organisms in milk from conventional dairy farms compared to organic farms (41.2% vs. 25.9%), and (ii) a relatively higher number of B. cereus group organisms in milk from organic (81.3%) and Ureibacillus thermosphaericus in milk from conventional (85.7%) dairy farms. One of these differences, the higher occurrence of B. cereus group organisms in milk from organic dairy farms, may be linked to differences in housing strategy between the two types of dairy farming. However, no plausible clarification was found for

  17. Influence of bitter lupin on consumption and digestibility in organic dairy cattle soya bean free diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tocci

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the main principles of organic husbandry is that animal feed must be GMO free, and soya bean is well-known as a high risk GMO alimentary source. About 25 dry dairy cattle of the Italian Holstein breed, from the Cooperativa Emilio Sereni of Borgo S. Lorenzo (FI, were fed in two successive diets: the first with extruded soya bean (A, and the second in which bitter lupin, faba bean and proteinic pea substituted the soya bean (B. We evaluated both the consumption and the apparent digestibility (using acid insoluble ash as internal marker of the two diets, repeating the trial twice. The presence of bitter lupin did not influence either the consumption of other feed, or the faecal water content. The apparent digestibility of the organic matter resulted satisfactory in both the diets, but was significantly higher in diet (A than in diet (B (71,6% vs 67,3%. In conclusion, even though we wish the cultivation of sweet lupin would be increase in Italy, we retain that also bitter lupin (mixed with other feed to increase the palatability could be used as alternative protein source in dairy cattle diets.

  18. Employment of factorial design to evaluate the organic loading and aeration of biological systems in the degradation of dairy wastewater

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    Hélcio José Izário Filho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Among industries producing foodstuffs, the dairy industry is notable for producing great amount of wastewater and high water consumption. Organic loading treatment based on biological degradation is a preferential treatment for dairy wastewater and effluents. However, it has some limiting factors for broader application due to the organic loading variation that results in an overload and wash-out of biological treatment systems. Considering these limitations, the organic loading and oxygen supply as factors in the rated efficiency of biological treatment systems with results expressed as removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (%CODremoved were evaluated. The variables investigated were: 1 initial concentration of organic load [raw, diluted 1:1 v/v (wastewater/distilled water and diluted 1:3 v/v (wastewater/distilled water] and 2 aeration (with or without. A Doehlert factorial design type (2x3 was employed for these studies. Aerobics systems with organic loading at a 1:3 ratio (v/v dairy effluent /distillated water showed elevated efficiency in biodegradation (88.31 ± 2.16 %CODremoved. The least efficient biodegradation was observed in anaerobic system for raw dairy effluent equal to 10.42 ± 3.97 %CODremoved. This indicated that a dilution of effluent organic loading was necessary in obtaining greater efficiency from a biodegradation system and low hydraulic retention time.

  19. Strategies used by dairy family farmers in the south of Brazil to comply with organic regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorato, L A; Machado Filho, L C P; Barbosa Silveira, I D; Hötzel, M J

    2014-03-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the environmental, feeding, and health management of organic (ORG) family dairy farms in the south of Brazil in comparison with conventional (CONV) farms, and to assess their degree of compliance with Brazilian organic legislation and the strategies they adopt to accomplish this (n=17 per group). During 2 visits to each farm in March and September, 2010, observations were made on the environment, feed, and health management, followed by bulk milk testing, clinical evaluation, and breed assessment of each individual cow, and an evaluation of diseases and treatments reported within the period. Additional data were collected directly from the farmers through direct interviews. The number of lactating cows was, on average, 11 (range 5 to 19) in the ORG and 16 (range 7 to 42) in the CONV herds. The ORG herds presented a lower percentage of the Holstein breed; whereas CONV herds were predominantly Holstein, in the ORG herds, only 2 herds were 100% Holstein and the remaining herds were crosses of Holstein, Jersey, and Gir (Bos indicus) cattle. Milk production per cow was lower (10.2 vs. 15.1 ± 1.22 L/cow, respectively) in ORG than in the CONV farms. The ORG farms offered less concentrate feed than CONV farms and had better pasture management. Organic farmers reported using phytotherapic and homeopathic products, and pasture management as a strategy to keep infection levels of endo- and ectoparasites low, whereas CONV farmers regularly used anthelmintics and acaricides. Milk production was lower in ORG than in CONV farms, but cow health and condition scores were broadly similar, indicating that the with these strategies ORG farms were able to secure levels of animal welfare comparable with CONV farms while complying with organic regulation, although at the cost of lower cow productivity. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A participatory approach to design monitoring indicators of production diseases in organic dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, J E; Fourichon, C; Madouasse, A; Sjöström, K; Emanuelson, U; Bareille, N

    2016-06-01

    Production diseases have an important negative effect on the health and welfare of dairy cows. Although organic animal production systems aim for high animal health levels, compliance with European organic farming regulations does not guarantee that this is achieved. Herd health and production management (HHPM) programs aim at optimizing herd health by preventing disease and production problems, but as yet they have not been consistently implemented by farmers. We hypothesize that one reason is the mismatch between what scientists propose as indicators for herd health monitoring and what farmers would like to use. Herd health monitoring is a key element in HHPM programs as it permits a regular assessment of the functioning of the different components of the production process. Planned observations or measurements of these components are indispensable for this monitoring. In this study, a participatory approach was used to create an environment in which farmers could adapt the indicators proposed by scientists for monitoring the five main production diseases on dairy cattle farms. The adaptations of the indicators were characterized and the farmers' explanations for the changes made were described. The study was conducted in France and Sweden, which differ in terms of their national organic regulations and existing advisory services. In both countries, twenty certified organic dairy farmers and their animal health management advisors participated in the study. All of the farmers adapted the initial monitoring plan proposed by scientists to specific production and animal health situation on their farm. This resulted in forty unique and farm-specific combinations of indicators for herd health monitoring. All but three farmers intended to monitor five health topics simultaneously using the constructed indicators. The qualitative analysis of the explanations given by farmers for their choices enabled an understanding of farmers' reasons for selecting and adapting

  1. Comparison of types and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus from conventional and organic dairies in west-central Minnesota, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombyk, R A M; Bykowski, A L; Draper, C E; Savelkoul, E J; Sullivan, L R; Wyckoff, T J O

    2008-06-01

    To assess whether conventional and organic dairy management practices are associated with differences in the susceptibility of Staphylococcus to antimicrobial agents. Staphylococcus was isolated from milk samples collected from conventional and organic dairies in west-central Minnesota. Isolates were categorized as (1) coagulase-positive, (2) novobiocin-sensitive coagulase-negative or (3) novobiocin-resistant coagulase-negative. Novobiocin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) was more common on conventional farms and novobiocin-sensitive CNS predominated the isolates from organic farms. Overall, a larger proportion of isolates from organic rather than conventional farms were susceptible to erythromycin, pirlimycin and tetracycline. However, for pirlimycin and tetracycline, different patterns of susceptibility were observed among Staphylococcus categories. In this study, organic dairy management was associated with more overall antimicrobial susceptibility among Staphylococcus than was conventional management. However, different patterns of susceptibility among Staphylococcus categories suggest that multiple management practices, including some unrelated to antimicrobial use, may contribute to the observed differences in susceptibility. This study adds to our understanding of the implications of dairy management choices.

  2. Organic marker compounds for surface soil and fugitive dust from open lot dairies and cattle feedlots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Wolfgang F.; Medeiros, Patricia M.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Fugitive dust emissions from cattle feedlots and open lot dairies are substantial. In order to determine the contribution of intensive cattle operations on ambient PM levels, more knowledge besides the elemental composition is necessary in order to distinguish between airborne PM from nearby agricultural fields, barren lands, or dirt roads. Here, as part of the San Joaquin Valley Fugitive Dust Characterization Study, surface soil samples collected from feedlots and open lot dairy farms are investigated for potential source specific molecular marker compounds. More than 100 organic compounds were quantified including: n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanols, n-alkanals, n-alkan-2-ones, steroids, triterpenoids, isoprenoids, and tocopherols (vitamin E) and metabolites. Biohydrogenation of plant lipids and sterols in the rumen results in distinctive alteration products. Animal and plant derived steroids are most abundant. Here, it is shown that 5 β-stigmastanol and epi-5 β-stigmastanol, two biohydrogenation products of sitosterol and stigmasterol, are the most distinctive molecular marker compounds. While stearic (C 18) and palmitic (C 16) acids are as individual compounds not source specific, biohydrogenation of the more abundant C 18 unsaturated fatty acids, causes the ratio of C 18/C 16 fatty acids to shift from below 0.5 for vegetation to an average of 3.0±0.7. Consequently, the C 18/C 16 fatty acid ratio is unique and can be used as well in source apportionment studies.

  3. Organic dairy farmers put more emphasis on production traits than conventional farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagboom, M; Kargo, M; Edwards, D; Sørensen, A C; Thomasen, J R; Hjortø, L

    2016-12-01

    The overall aim of this research was to characterize the preferences of Danish dairy farmers for improvements in breeding goal traits. The specific aims were (1) to investigate the presence of heterogeneity in farmers' preferences by means of cluster analysis, and (2) to associate these clusters with herd characteristics and production systems (organic or conventional). We established a web-based survey to characterize the preferences of farmers for improvements in 10 traits, by means of pairwise rankings. We also collected a considerable number of herd characteristics. Overall, 106 organic farmers and 290 conventional farmers answered the survey, all with Holstein cows. The most preferred trait improvement was cow fertility, and the least preferred was calving difficulty. By means of cluster analysis, we identified 4 distinct clusters of farmers and named them according to the trait improvements that were most preferred: Health and Fertility, Production and Udder Health, Survival, and Fertility and Production. Some herd characteristics differed between clusters; for example, farmers in the Survival cluster had twice the percentage of dead cows in their herds compared with the other clusters, and farmers that gave the highest ranking to cow and heifer fertility had the lowest conception rate in their herds. This finding suggests that farmers prefer to improve traits that are more problematic in their herd. The proportion of organic and conventional farmers also differed between clusters; we found a higher proportion of organic farmers in the production-based clusters. When we analyzed organic and conventional data separately, we found that organic farmers ranked production traits higher than conventional farmers. The herds of organic farmers had lower milk yields and lower disease incidences, which might explain the high ranking of milk production and the low ranking of disease traits. This study shows that heterogeneity exists in farmers' preferences for

  4. Assessment of herd management on organic and conventional dairy farms in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglbauer, K E; Cicconi-Hogan, K M; Richert, R; Schukken, Y H; Ruegg, P L; Gamroth, M

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate management characteristics on organic and similarly sized conventional dairy farms located in New York, Wisconsin, and Oregon. Data from 192 organic farms (ORG), 64 conventional nongrazing farms (CON-NG), and 36 conventional grazing farms (CON-GR) were collected during farm visits and were size-matched and analyzed. The average lactation number of animals on ORG and CON-GR farms was 2.6 lactations, which was greater than that on CON-NG farms (2.3 lactations). A greater percentage of first-lactation heifers were found on conventional farms than on ORG farms. Facilities used by adult animals, including housing and milking facilities, did not differ among the grazing systems. Cattle on conventional farms were fed approximately twice as much grain as cattle on ORG farms and had greater milk production. Little difference was found for the average reported somatic cell count and standard plate count, suggesting that milk quality is not dependent on grazing system. Milking procedures were similar across all 3 grazing systems, indicating that an industry standard now exists for milking and that milk quality problems will need to be addressed with other management problems in mind. Although some disease prevention measures were commonly utilized on ORG farms, such as keeping a closed herd and having a written record of treatments administered to the animals, the use of outside support and vaccinations were found to be less prevalent on organic farms than on conventional farms. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatiotemporal soil organic carbon dynamics in irrigated corn silage-alfalfa production systems receiving liquid dairy manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurately measuring soil organic C (SOC) stock changes over time is essential for verifying agronomic management effects on C sequestration. This study quantified the spatial and temporal changes in SOC stocks on adjacent 65-ha corn silage-alfalfa production fields receiving liquid dairy manure in...

  6. Economic and environmental evaluation of three goal-vision based scenarios for organic dairy farming in Denmark.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, F.W.; Sorensen, C.A.G.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the sustainability of future organic dairy farming systems in Denmark, by evaluating the economic and environmental consequences of three scenarios at the farm level based on different visions of future sustainability leading to different farm-based goals.

  7. Implications of feed concentrate reduction in organic grassland-based dairy systems: a long-term on-farm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiber, F; Schenk, I K; Maeschli, A; Ivemeyer, S; Zeitz, J O; Moakes, S; Klocke, P; Staehli, P; Notz, C; Walkenhorst, M

    2017-11-01

    In response to increasing efforts for reducing concentrate inputs to organic dairy production in grassland-rich areas of Europe, a long-term study was conducted, which assessed the impacts of concentrate reductions on cows' performance, health, fertility and average herd age. In total, 42 Swiss commercial organic dairy cattle farms were monitored over 6 years ('Y0', 2008/09 until 'Y5', 2013/14). In comparison with overall data of Swiss herdbooks (including conventional and organic farms), the herds involved in the project had lower milk yields, similar milk solids, shorter calving intervals and higher average lactation numbers. During the first 3 project years farmers reduced the concentrate proportion (i.e. cereals, oilseeds and grain legumes) in the dairy cows' diets to varying degrees. In Y0, farms fed between 0% and 6% (dietary dry matter proportion per year) of concentrates. During the course of the study they changed the quantity of concentrates to voluntarily chosen degrees. Retrospectively, farms were clustered into five farm groups: Group '0-conc' (n=6 farms) already fed zero concentrates in Y0 and stayed at this level. Group 'Dec-to0' (n=11) reduced concentrates to 0 during the project period. Groups 'Dec-strong' (n=8) and 'Dec-slight' (n=12) decreased concentrate amounts by >50% and organic dairy farms, affected neither milk composition, nor fertility and veterinary treatments. Milk yields tended to decline, but at a low rate per saved kilogram of concentrate.

  8. Comparison of prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Campylobacter spp. isolates from organic and conventional dairy herds in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Bartlett, P C; Kaneene, J B; Downes, F P

    2004-03-01

    The prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Campylobacter spp. isolates from bovine feces were compared between organic and conventional dairy herds. Thirty organic dairy herds, where antimicrobials are rarely used for calves and never used for cows, were compared with 30 neighboring conventional dairy farms, where antimicrobials were routinely used for animals for all ages. Fecal specimens from 10 cows and 10 calves on 120 farm visits yielded 332 Campylobacter isolates. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in organic and conventional farms was 26.7 and 29.1%, and the prevalence was not statistically different between the two types of farms. Campylobacter prevalence was significantly higher in March than in September, higher in calves than in cows, and higher in smaller farms than in large farms. The rates of retained placenta, pneumonia, mastitis, and abortion were associated with the proportion of Campylobacter isolation from fecal samples. The gradient disk diffusion MIC method (Etest) was used for testing susceptibility to four antimicrobial agents: ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Two isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, and none of isolates was resistant to gentamicin or erythromycin. Resistance to tetracycline was 45% (148 of 332 isolates). Tetracycline resistance was found more frequently in calves than in cows (P = 0.042), but no difference was observed between organic and conventional farms. When we used Campylobacter spp. as indicator bacteria, we saw no evidence that restriction of antimicrobial use on dairy farms was associated with prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline.

  9. Identifying sources of metal exposure in organic and conventional dairy farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alonso, M; Rey-Crespo, F; Herrero-Latorre, C; Miranda, M

    2017-10-01

    In humans the main route of exposure to toxic metals is through the diet, and there is therefore a clear need for this source of contamination to be minimized, particularly in food of animal origin. For this purpose, the various sources of toxic metals in livestock farming (which vary depending on the production system) must be taken into account. The objectives of the present study were to establish the profile of metal exposure in dairy cattle in Spain and to determine, by chemometric (multivariate statistical) analysis, any differences between organic and conventional systems. Blood samples from 522 cows (341 from organic farms and 181 from conventional farms) were analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the concentrations of 14 elements: As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn. In conventional systems the generally high and balanced trace element concentrations in the mineral-supplemented concentrate feed strongly determined the metal status of the cattle. However, in organic systems, soil ingestion was an important contributing factor. Our results demonstrate that general information about the effects of mineral supplementation in conventional farming cannot be directly extrapolated to organic farming and special attention should be given to the contribution of ingestion of soil during grazing and/or ingestion of soil contaminated forage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Management and use of dairy cattle feed resources on smallholder certified organic pineapple farms in Central Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kiggundu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Formulation of exclusively organic diets that meet maintenance and production requirements of dairy cattle is a major limitation to production of premium organic products of animal origin. This study was therefore carried out to assess the use and availability of feed resources and the coping strategies used by farmers to overcome dry season feed shortages on 64 smallholder certified organic pineapple farms. Data was collected using semi-structured questionnaires and two focus group discussions. Majority of households were headed by males (62.9% while average age of respondents was 42.5 years. Farmers allocated more land (P<0.05 to organic pineapple production compared to livestock. Beside dairy cattle, farmers also kept chickens, goats and pigs. Tethering was the commonest cattle management system. Fifty three percent of respondents reported using both natural pastures and crop residues as major dairy cattle feed resources while only 19% reported using elephant grass. Banana peels (25.1% and sweet potato vines (24.7% were the most important crop residues fed to cattle. Farmers reported high cost of concentrates and scarcity of feeds as their biggest challenges in dairy cattle production. Of the respondents, 51.4% conserved feed for their cattle as fodder banks. As a coping strategy to feed shortages, majority (42.9% of farmer scavenged for feed resources from both organic certified and nonorganic neighbouring farms which is contrary to organic livestock farming standards. It was, therefore, concluded that management of livestock feeding in the study area fell short of the requirements for organic livestock feeding standards. Research to develop strategies that can use alternative on-farm feed resources through ensiling organic pineapple wastes during the dry season is recommended as a long term strategy to address feed challenges for organic livestock farmers.

  11. Direct and ultrasensitive optofluidic-based immunosensing assay of aflatoxin M1 in dairy products using organic solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xuening; Zhu, Anna; Wang, Hongliang; Wu, Jun; Zhou, Liping; Long, Feng

    2016-10-12

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a highly toxic secondary metabolite, is present in a wide range of dairy products. In this study, we designed a simple, low-cost, reusable, and easy-to-operate immunosensing method for ultrasensitive detection of AFM1 in dairy products by using a portable evanescent wave-based optofluidic biosensing platform (EOBP). The developed method provides the minimum detection limit of 5 ng/L, which is below the most restrictive standard imposed by the current regulations for AFM1 in dairy products. The effect of several organic solvents, such as methanol, acetone, and acetonitrile, on the binding reaction of antibody-antigen in heterogeneous and homogeneous solutions was evaluated. Although the effect of organic solvents on the homogeneous binding reaction between antibody and antigen is more significant than that of heterogeneous binding reaction between antibody in solution and antigen immobilized onto the sensor surface, the fluorescence signal detected by EOBP is linearly dependent on AFM1 concentration. Therefore, AFM1 can be directly quantified even if the samples contain a certain organic solvent concentration. The robustness and stability of AFM1-ovalbumin conjugate allow the regeneration of modified biosensor surface for more than 200 times, thereby achieving a cost-effective and reliable AFM1 determination. The proposed method provides a rapid, ultrasensitive, and reliable AFM1 determination in dairy products without complicated sample pretreatment process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Organic dairy farmers' decision making in the first 2 years after conversion in relation to mastitis treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, M.; Thamsborg, S. M.; Bennedsgaard, T. W.

    2003-01-01

    and minimise the use of antimicrobials and the risk of antimicrobial resistance in organic farming, a study based on qualitative research interviews with newly converted organic farmers was carried out. Twenty farmers, 18-26 months after conversion, were interviewed focusing on mastitis treatment patterns...... symptoms of mastitis and affected general condition of the cow would cause antimicrobial treatment in all herds. Almost all other mastitis treatment choices were based on herd level considerations. Changes due to conversion to organic farming were experienced on the level of land and crop production......In organic dairy farming, a goal about improved animal welfare and avoidance of the use of chemicals has introduced restrictions in the use of antimicrobials for treatment of infectious diseases. Mastitis is the major cause of antimicrobial treatments in Danish dairy farming. In order to improve...

  13. Indicadores do ambiente ruminal e suas relações com a composição do leite e células somáticas em diferentes períodos da primeira fase da lactação em vacas de alta produção Indicators of rumen environment and their relation with milk composition and somatic cells in the first phase of lactation in high-yielding dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rómulo Campos

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available No atual sistema internacional de pagamento do leite por qualidade, têm-se valorizado dois aspectos fundamentais: a contagem de células somáticas (CCS e o conteúdo de sólidos totais. O primeiro fator depende da saúde da glândula mamária e o segundo, de maior importância econômica para os laticínios, está relacionado com o manejo alimentar e a raça dos animais. O ambiente ruminal pode modificar a composição do leite, em especial o teor de gordura. A fonte principal de proteína nos ruminantes depende da síntese de proteína no rúmen. Os atuais sistemas de alimentação, usados em vacas de alta produção, predispõem os animais à apresentação de síndromes metabólicas o que direta ou indiretamente afeta a produção de leite. Objetivou-se, com o presente trabalho, relacionar indicadores do ambiente ruminal (tempo de redução com azul de metileno e pH e o pH da urina com a composição do leite (sólidos totais e a CCS. Não foi encontrada associação estatística entre os parâmetros avaliados. Os valores médios dos sólidos não-gordurosos analisados no estudo foram inferiores ao limite estabelecido pela norma oficial do Brasil.In the current international milk payment system, where the quality is the main factor; two fundamental aspects have acquired great importance: the somatic cells count and the amount of total solids. The first one depends on the health of the mammary gland and the second factor, which has more economic impact for the dairy industry, is directly related to feeding management and the cattle breed. The environment of the rumen can modify the composition of the milk, specially the fat percentage. The main source of protein in the ruminants depends on the synthesis of protein in the rumen. The current feeding systems used in high-yielding dairy cows, predispose them to the outcome of metabolic syndromes that directly or indirectly affect the milk production. The purpose of this study was to establish a

  14. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus and bovine coronavirus in Swedish organic and conventional dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Cecilia; Emanuelson, Ulf; Ohlson, Anna; Alenius, Stefan; Fall, Nils

    2015-01-13

    Infections with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and bovine coronavirus (BoCV) are endemic to the cattle populations in most countries, causing respiratory and/or enteric disease. It has been demonstrated that herds can remain free from these infections for several years also in high prevalence areas. Organically managed (OM) dairy herds have been shown to have lower seroprevalence of both viruses compared to conventionally managed (CM) herds. The objective of this study was to challenge the hypothesis of a lower occurrence of BRSV and BoCV in OM compared to CM dairy herds. In November 2011, May 2012 and May 2013 milk samples from four homebred primiparous cows were collected in 75 to 65 OM and 69 to 62 CM herds. The antibody status regarding BRSV and BoCV was analysed with commercial indirect ELISAs. Herds were classified as positive if at least one individual sample was positive. The prevalence of positive herds ranged from 73.4% to 82.3% for BRSV and from 76.8% to 85.3% for BoCV among OM and CM herds, over the three sampling occasions. There was no statistically significant difference between OM and CM herds at any sampling occasion. The incidence risk of newly infected herds did not differ statistically between OM and CM herds at any sampling occasion, neither for BRSV nor for BoCV. The incidence of herds turning sero-negative between samplings corresponded to the incidence of newly infected. Bulk tank milk (BTM) samples were also sampled in the herds and analysed. Several herds were negative on individual samples but positive in BTM. Herd-level data on production, health and reproduction were retrieved from VÄXA Sweden and the study herds were representative of the source population. There was no difference in prevalence of or incidence risk for BRSV or BoCV between Swedish OM and CM herds. Because the incidence of herds becoming seropositive was balanced by herds becoming seronegative it should be possible to lower the prevalence of these two

  15. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Dairy Cows and Their Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, S.; Holzinger, R.; Mitloehner, F.; Goldstein, A.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are typically defined as those directly emitted from plants, but approximately 6% of global net primary production is consumed by cattle that carry out enteric fermentation and then emit VOCs that could also be considered biogenic. Current regulatory estimates suggest that dairy cattle in central California emit VOCs at rates comparable to those from passenger vehicles in the region, and thus contribute significantly to the extreme non-attainment of ozone standards there. We report PTR-MS measurements of ammonia and VOCs, and cavity-enhanced-absorption gas analyzer (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measurements of CH4, emitted from dairy cattle in various stages of pregnancy/lactation and their waste. Experiments were conducted in chambers at UC Davis that simulate freestall cow housing conditions. CH4 fluxes ranged from 125-374 lb/cow/year. The compounds with the highest fluxes from '3 cows+waste' treatments were: ammonia (1-18), methanol (0-2.3), acetone+propanal (0.2-0.7), dimethylsulfide (0-0.4), and mass 109 (likely ID = p-cresol; 0-0.3) in lb/cow/year. Mass 60 (likely ID = trimethylamine) and acetic acid were also abundant. There were 10s of additional compounds with detectable, but small, emissions. A few compounds that were likely emitted (i.e. ethanol, formaldehyde, and dimethylamine) were not quantified by the PTR-MS. The total flux for all measured organic gases (TOG = CH4 + PTR-MS VOCs(including acetone+propanal)) averaged 246±45 lb/cow/year for '3 cows+waste' treatments, and was dominated by methane (>98%). TOG flux for 'waste only' treatments averaged 1.1±0.1 lb/cow/year, and was instead dominated by VOC (>84%). The PTR-MS VOCs as a percent of TOG (0.6±0.2%) emitted from '3 cows+waste' treatments in chamber conditions was a factor of 10 smaller than that currently estimated by the California Air Resources Board. In addition, the ozone forming potentials of the most abundant VOCs are only about 10% those of typical combustion or plant

  16. Acute coccidiosis in an organic dairy farm in tropical region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica M. Florião

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Florião M.M., Lopes B. do B., Berto B.P. & Lopes C.W.G. Acute coccidiosis in an organic dairy farm in tropical region, Brazil. [Coccidiose aguda em uma fazenda de gado leiteiro orgânico na região tropical, Brasil.] Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(Supl.1:6-12, 2015. Curso de Pós- -Graduação em Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação em Agropecuária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465, Km 7, Campus Seropédica, RJ 23897- 970, Brasil. E-mail: monicafloriao@hotmail.com Coccidiosis or bovine eimeriosis is an intestinal disease caused by species of the genus Eimeria Schneider, 1875. It is responsible for gastrointestinal disorders and in some cases, animals died, especially the young animals. The proposed organic management for the system was relevant in establishing the health of the studied herd. Only some of the animals had clinical signs of acute eimeriosis. In nursing calves clinical signs appeared at 30 days old, during the first period of the study (2013-2014, occurring shortly after abrupt change in management, when the amount of milk supplied to animals of this extract was reduced. The other two cases occurred during the second period of the study (2014-2015, after fire in the area of pastures, causing the batch of weaned calves come into pasture destined to cows, with such abrupt change in management developed clinical signs of acute eimeriosis. The most frequent species was E. zuernii in both extracts, followed by E. cylindrica in nursing calves, and E. bovis and E. bukidnonensis in the weaned calves. The recovery of the animals was performed with the return to the proposed organic management associated with use of homeopathic medication. In addition, the animals recovered their body weight gains established for Gir breed (zebu dairy cattle and its cross breeds.

  17. The use of seaweed from the Galician coast as a mineral supplement in organic dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Crespo, F; López-Alonso, M; Miranda, M

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to assess the value of seaweeds from the Galician coast as a source of minerals (especially iodine (I) but also other micro-minerals) in organic dairy cattle. It was conducted in an organic dairy farm in the Lugo province that typically represents the organic milk production in NW Spain. The animal's diet consisted mainly of local forage (at pasture or as hay and silage in the winter) and 5 kg of purchased concentrate/day per animal (representing 23.5% of feed intake). Based on the mineral composition of the diet, the physiological requirements and the EU maximum authorised levels in feed, a supplement composed by Sea Lettuce (Ulva rigida) (as flakes, 80%), Japanese Wireweed (Sargasum muticum) (flakes, 17.5%) and Furbelows (Saccorhiza polyschides) (powder, 2.5%) was formulated to give 100 g/animal per day. Sixteen Holstein Friesian lactating cows were randomly selected and assigned to the control (n=8) and algae-supplemented groups (n=8). Both groups had exactly the same feeding and management with the exception of the algae supplement, which was mixed with the concentrate feed and given to the animals at their morning milking for 10 weeks. Heparinised blood (for plasma analysis) and milk samples were collected at 2-week intervals and analysed for toxic and trace element concentrations by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. The algae supplement significantly improved the animals' mineral status, particularly I and selenium that were low on the farm. However, the effect of the algae supplement on the molybdenum status in cattle needs further investigation because of its great relevance on copper metabolism in ruminants. The I supply deserves special attention, since this element is at a very high concentration in brown-algae species and it is excreted in the milk proportionally to its concentration in plasma concentrations (mean ± s.e. in the algae-supplemented and control

  18. European organic dairy farmers’ preference for animal health management within the farm management system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van F.J.S.; Mourits, M.C.M.; Hogeveen, H.

    2015-01-01

    The expertise and knowledge of veterinary advisors on improving animal health management is key towards a better herd health status. However, veterinary advisors are not always aware of the goals and priorities of dairy farmers. To dairy farmers animal health is only one aspect of farm management

  19. Efficacy Study of Metho-Chelated Organic Minerals preparation Feeding on Milk Production and Fat Percentage in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somkuwar A.P.1

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the effect of feeding different mineral based formulation on dairy cow production performance, namely milk yield and fat percentage. The trial was conducted with dairy cows across various stages of lactation (Early, Mid and Late stage with 30 cows per stage. The experimental treatments included: Bestmin Gold (Metho-chelated organic minerals, given 30 gms per day, Inorganic mineral preparation (Inorg. Mineral, @ 50 gms/day/ cow and control. The study lasted from 0 to 40 days. Milk yield and fat percentage of cows were measured individually on Days 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 40. The Bestmin Gold treated group (Metho-chelated organic minerals improved the milk yield, net gain in milk and the milk fat percentage of animals across the various stages of lactation as compared to in control and inorganic mineral treated group of animals. [Veterinary World 2011; 4(1.000: 19-21

  20. Danish stable schools for experiential common learning in groups of organic dairy farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarst, M; Nissen, T B; Østergaard, S; Klaas, I C; Bennedsgaard, T W; Christensen, J

    2007-05-01

    The farmer field school (FFS) is a concept for farmers' learning, knowledge exchange, and empowerment that has been developed and used in developing countries. In Denmark, a research project focusing on explicit non-antibiotic strategies involves farmers who have actively expressed an interest in phasing out antibiotics from their herds through promotion of animal health. One way of reaching this goal was to form participatory focused farmer groups in an FFS approach, which was adapted to Danish conditions and named "stable schools." Four stable schools were established and went through a 1-yr cycle with 2 visits at each of the 5 or 6 farms connected to each group. A facilitator was connected to each group whose role was to write the meeting agenda together with the host farmer, direct the meeting, and write the minutes to send to the group members after the meeting. Through group focus interviews and individual semistructured qualitative interviews of all participants, the approach of the farmers' goal-directed work toward a common goal was judged to be very valuable and fruitful and based on a common learning process. Complex farming situations were the focus of all groups and in this context, problems were identified and solutions proposed based on each farmer's individual goals. In this article, we describe the experiences of 4 stable school groups (each comprising farmers and a facilitator), and the common process of building a concept that is suitable for Danish organic dairy farming.

  1. Comparison of selected animal observations and management practices used to assess welfare of calves and adult dairy cows on organic and conventional dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, M A; Richert, R M; Cicconi-Hogan, K M; Gamroth, M J; Schukken, Y H; Stiglbauer, K E; Ruegg, P L

    2014-07-01

    Differences in adoption of selected practices used in welfare assessment and audit programs were contrasted among organic (ORG; n=192) herds and similarly sized conventional grazing herds (CON-GR; n=36), and conventional nongrazing herds (CON-NG; n=64). Criteria from 3 programs were assessed: American Humane Association Animal Welfare Standards for Dairy Cattle, Farmers Assuring Responsible Management (FARM), and the Canadian Codes of Practice (CCP). Data were collected by trained study personnel during a herd visit and included information about neonatal care, dehorning, pain relief, calf nutrition, weaning, record keeping, use of veterinarians, and animal observations. Associations of management type (ORG, CON-GR, or CON-NG) with adoption of selected practice were assessed. Almost all farms (97%) met criteria suggested for age at weaning but fewer CON-NG farmers weaned calves at ≥5 wk of age compared with ORG and CON-GR farmers. Only 23% of farms met program requirements for use of pain relief during dehorning, and fewer CON-NG farmers used pain relief for calves after dehorning compared with ORG and CON-GR farmers. Calves on ORG farms were fed a greater volume of milk and were weaned at an older age than calves on CON-GR and CON-NG farms. Calves on CON-GR farms were dehorned at a younger age compared with calves on ORG and CON-NG farms. The calving area was shared with lactating cows for a larger proportion of ORG herds compared with conventional herds. About 30% of herds met welfare program criteria for body condition score but only about 20% met criteria for animal hygiene scores. The least proportion of cows with hock lesions was observed on ORG farms. Regular use of veterinarians was infrequent for ORG herds. Results of this study indicate that most of the organic and conventional farms enrolled in this study would have been unlikely to achieve many criteria of audit and assessment programs currently used in the US dairy industry. Copyright © 2014

  2. Algae-based biofilm productivity utilizing dairy wastewater: effects of temperature and organic carbon concentration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fica, Zachary T; Sims, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    .... The dairy industry is a significant source of wastewater worldwide that could provide an inexpensive and nutrient rich feedstock for the cultivation of algae biomass for use in downstream processing...

  3. Rate of change in concentration of organic compounds and nutrients in municipal and dairy wastewater treated in full technical SBR scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struk-Sokolowska Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Municipal WWTP often receive the industrial wastewater, including dairy sewage. The problem of sewage treatment from this sector of economy is not completely solved, especially in plants of medium and small milk processing capacity. The aim of the study was to determine the rate of change in organic compounds and nutrients in municipal wastewater with the participation of dairy products during the processing phases of SBR-type reactor in a technical scale. The study was conducted in WWTP in Sokolka. Rate of changes in the concentrations of organic compounds, nitrogen and phosphorus in wastewater during the processing phases of SBR reactor was determined. Presence of dairy sewage (13% volume participation affected the decrease in the rate of changes in organic compounds concentrations defined as BOD5 during all processing phases of SBR reactor. Significant influence of dairy sewage on rates of change in nitrogen and phosphorus compounds concentrations during filling, aeration, stirring, sedimentation and decantation phases, was found.

  4. Organic ligand effects on enzymatic dephosphorylation of myo-inositol hexakis dihydrogenphosphate in dairy wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Thanh H

    2004-01-01

    Animal manure contains partially digested feed fiber and grains where phosphorus (P) is bound in organic compounds that include myo-inositol 1,2,3,5/4,6-hexakis dihydrogenphosphate or phytic acid (IP6). Information is needed on the effects of other (non-IP6) organic ligands (LIGND) on the enzymatic dephosphorylation of IP6, which is a potential source of dissolved orthophosphate P (PO4-P) in the soil-manure-water system. The effects of 1,2-cyclohexane diamino-tetraacetate (CDTA), diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetate (DTPA), ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetate (EDTA), oxalate (OXA), and phthalate (PHTH) and LIGND to IP6 molar ratio and charge concentration ratio on IP6 dephosphorylation were studied to determine controlling mechanisms of IP6 persistence in manure. Solution PO4-P concentrations were analyzed by ion chromatography as the phosphomolybdate-ascorbic acid method partly includes IP6-P. Uncomplexed IP6 dephosphorylation by Aspergillus ficuum (Reichardt) Henn. phytase EC 3.1.3.8 at pH 4.5 and 6 is unaffected by the presence of LIGNDs. As the concentrations of Ca2+, Al3+, or Fe3+ increase, dephosphorylation is reduced. Their inhibitory effect lessens in the presence of LIGNDs, in the following order: CDTA = EDTA > DTPA > OXA > or = PHTH. Whether CDTA or EDTA is the most effective LIGND depends upon the acidity of the suspension and LIGND charge concentration, reducing the inhibitory effect of polyvalent counterions to the point of promoting the hydrolysis of a manure phytase-hydrolyzable phosphorus (PHP) fraction that is otherwise unavailable. Therefore, ligand-induced changes increase the mobilization and dephosphorylation of complexed organic P, above and beyond the simple dissolution of inorganic phosphates. An analytical method for potentially bioavailable PHP in animal manure should include a LIGND as extracting reagent. Also, potential LIGNDs in an organic carbon-rich dairy wastewater may increase the release of PHP and environmental

  5. High yielding synthesis of N-ethyl dehydroamino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Luís S; Suárez, Ana S

    2012-10-01

    Recently we reported the use of a sequence of alkylation and dehydration methodologies to obtain N-ethyl-α, β-dehydroamino acid derivatives. The application of this N-alkylation procedure to several methyl esters of β,β-dibromo and β-bromo, β-substituted dehydroamino acids protected with standard amine protecting groups was subsequently reported. The corresponding N-ethyl, β-bromo dehydroamino acid derivatives were obtained in fair to high yields and some were used as substrates in Suzuki cross-coupling reactions to give N-ethyl, β,β-disubstituted dehydroalanine derivatives. Herein, we further explore N-ethylation of β-halo dehydroamino acid derivatives using triethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate as alkylating agent, but substituting N,N-diisopropylethylamine for potassium tert-butoxide as auxiliary base. In these conditions, for all β-halo dehydroamino acid derivatives, reactions were complete and the N-ethylated derivative could be isolated in high yield. This method was also applied for N-ethylation of non-halogenated dehydroamino acids. Again, with all compounds the reactions were complete and the N-ethyl dehydroamino acid derivatives could be isolated in high yields. Some of these N-ethyl dehydroamino acid methyl ester derivatives were converted in high yields to their corresponding acids and coupled to an amino acid methyl ester to give N-ethyl dehydrodipeptide derivatives in good yields. Thus, this method constitutes a general procedure for high yielding synthesis of N-ethylated dehydroamino acids, which can be further applied in peptide synthesis.

  6. Organization of crop and animal production in dairy farms localised in three chosen regions of lubelskie voivodeship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Bojarszczuk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of organization of crop and animal production in dairy farms localised in three regions in Lubelskie voivodeship was presented in the paper. The data source was questionnaire research. The study was trained in 145 farms. The provided analysis showed that cereals had significantly share in pattern system in tested farms. Researched farms are differentiated of occupied differentiation of cropping pattern and density livestock between farms localised in different regions of Lubelskie voivodeship caused different level of intensity of organization animal and crops production. The differentiation of indicators was especially significant between farms in Krasnystaw and Ryki.

  7. Nitrate leaching from an organic dairy crop rotation: the effect of manure type, N-input and improved crop rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksen, J.; Askegaard, M.; Kristensen, K.

    2004-01-01

    Four management systems combining high and low livestock densities (0.7 and 1.4 LU ha-1) and different types of organic manure (slurry and straw based FYM) were applied to an organic dairy crop rotation (barley [undersown] – grass-clover – grass-clover – barley/pea – oats – fodder beet) between 1998 and 2001. The effects of the management systems on crop yields and nitrate leaching were measured. In all four years nitrate leaching, as determined using ceramic suction cups, was higher in the t...

  8. Soil microbial activities and solid-state {sup 1}3 CNMR to asses organic matter transformation in a reed-bed under cheese-dairy farm effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnet, A. M.; Prudent, P.; Ziarelli, F.; Domeizel, M.; Gros, R.

    2009-07-01

    In this study, we described the soil microbial activities involved in a small dairy effluent purification using a reed filter under a Mediterranean climate. We tested whether certain enzyme activities used as bio indicators of dairy waste degradation ({beta}-galactosidase and protease), vary through time which might influence organic matter degradation and to test whether specific microbial communities were selected at the contact of the effluent using community level catabolic profiles (CLCPs). (Author)

  9. Freezing point of milk in a herd of high yielding dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Golc Teger

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Factors affecting the freezing point of milk in a herd of 200 Black and White cows with the average milk yield of 8 386 kg in the lactation and 8 328 kg in the standard lactation were examinated. Over the period of one year (2002 and based upon 1 773 individual monthly collected milk samples with the average contents of 3.91% fat, 3.26% protein, 4.54% lactose, 33.4 mg/100 ml urea and 331000 somatic cells per ml in milk were determined. The average freezing point of milk (n = 1 680 was estimated to be –0.527 ºC, with a range from -0.562 ºC to -0.423 ºC. In 210 (12.5% samples was higher than -0.515 ºC. The lowest freezing point (-0.532 ºC was found in the samples collected in the first month after calving and highest (-0.522 ºC in the samples of 12th month of lactation. The differences between the freezing point of milk after the first and the second calving (-0.530 ºC; P < 0.05 and those after the fifth calving (-0.523 ºC; P < 0.05 were also significant. The samples collected in month from January to April (-0.538 ºC to -0.532 ºC were significantly lower in comparison to samples collected in May and June (-0.517 ºC and -0.519 ºC. The following statistically significant correlation coefficients between cows' properties, milk composition and the freezing point of milk were found: month of lactation r = 0.233 (P < 0.001; lactation number r = 0.196 (P < 0.001; age of cows (years r = 0.231 (P < 0.001; month of the year r = 0.0253 (P < 0.001; milk yield per milking day r = -0.106 (P < 0.001; fat corrected milk content (FCM per milking day r = -0.234 (P < 0.001; lactose % r = -0.530 (P < 0.001; fat % r = -0.351 (P < 0.001; protein % r = 0.058 (P < 0.05; urea mg/100 mL r = 0.091 (P < 0.001 and somatic cell count r = 0.154 (P < 0.001. The sum of effects (month of the year, lactation lenght and fat, protein and lactose content of milk was found to account for about 70% variability of the total depression of milk freezing point (R2 = 0.698.

  10. Esubacute acidosis in rumen of high-yield dairy cows: Prevalence and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrujkić Branko T.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the investigations presented in this paper was to establish the frequency of the incidence of subacute acidosis in the rumen of cows (SARA in the first three months of lactation and the possibilities for its prevention using a mineral mix based on bentonite, zeolite, magnesium oxide, and sodium bicarbonate (Mix plus. The values obtained for the rumen pH content show that subacute rumen acidosis occurs in in 20 percent of the examined cows in the early stage of lactation. For these investigations, cows in early stages of lactation were chosen and divided into 2 groups. Cows of the experimental group were administered a fodder mix which contained the mineral mix for a buffer effect (Mix plus. The average values of the rumen pH content in the control and the experimental group of cows at the beginning and on the 30th day of the experiment were approximately the same and did not differ significantly (p>0.05. On the 60th day of the experiment, the values for the electrochemical reaction of the rumen content for the control group amounted to an average of 6.219±0.18, and for the experimental group of cows it was 6.772±0.23. The obtained difference was statistically very significant (p<0.001. At the end of the experiment, on the 90th day, the average pH value of the rumen content of cows of the control group was 6.308±0.16, while this value in the experimental group of cows was significantly higher and amounted to 6.676±0.29 (p<0.01.

  11. [Investigation of metabolic parame- ters in high yielding dairy cows in pasture based production systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, S; Wichert, B; Wanner, M; Liesegang, A

    2015-11-01

    In the present study differences in metabolism between New Zealand Holstein-Friesian (NZHF) and Brown Swiss (CH-BV) or Swiss Holstein-Friesian (CH-HF) were investigated in a grassland based milk production system in Switzerland. Therefore 14 pairs of CH-BV/NZHF and 11 pairs of CH-HF/NZHF were available. The parameters glucose, insulin, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), urea and cholesterol were analysed at the times 5-3 weeks before the calculated partus and 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 18-22 weeks post partum. Only β-HB showed significantly higher concentrations (P = 0.0059) for both Swiss breeds compared to the NZ-HF. Regarding all other physiological parameters during early lactation New Zealand Holstein-Friesians were not different from Swiss breeds.

  12. Exposure to Inhalable Dust, Endotoxin, and Total Volatile Organic Carbons on Dairy Farms Using Manual and Automated Feeding Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinas, Ioannis; Cronin, Garvin; Hogan, Victoria; Sigsgaard, Torben; Hayes, James; Coggins, Ann Marie

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural workers tend to have high exposures to organic dusts which may induce or exacerbate respiratory disorders. Studies investigating the effect of work tasks and farm characteristics on organic dust exposures among farm workers suggest that handling of animal feed is an important exposure determinant; however, the effect of the animal feeding system has not been explored in any detail. To measure the exposure of Irish dairy farmers to inhalable dust, endotoxin, and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) during parlour work and to explore whether levels of exposure to these agents depend on the applied feeding system in the farms. Thirty-eight personal exposure measurements were collected from farmers across seven dairy farms. The farms used manual, loft, or semi-automated feeding systems. Information on worker tasks and farm characteristics was collected during the surveys. Associations between exposure concentrations and feeding systems, worker tasks, and other farm characteristics were explored in linear mixed-effect regression models with farmer identity treated as a random effect. Exposure concentrations were variable and had a geometric mean (GM; geometric standard deviation) of 1.5 mg m-3 (1.8) for inhalable dust and 128 EU m-3 (2.5) for endotoxin. More than 50% of the exposure measurements for endotoxin, and organic dust exceeded recommended health-based occupational exposure limits. Endotoxin levels were somewhat lower in farms using semi-automatic feeding systems when compared to those using manual feeding systems but in multivariate regression analysis associations were not statistically significant (β = -0.54, P = 0.4). Performance of activities related to handling and spreading of hay or straw was the strongest determinant for both inhalable dust and endotoxin exposure (β = 0.78, P ≤ 0.001; β = 0.72, P = 0.02, respectively). The level of dust exposure increased also as a consequence of a lower outdoor temperature, and higher ratio of

  13. Pharmacokinetic analysis of thymol, carvacrol and diallyl disulfide after intramammary and topical applications in healthy organic dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Sharon E; Mullen, Keena A E; Anderson, Kevin L; Washburn, Steven P; Yeatts, James L; Baynes, Ronald E

    2017-05-01

    Mastitis is among the most costly concerns for dairy producers whether cattle are managed conventionally or organically. Unfortunately, there are no USFDA-approved mastitis treatments that allow dairy cows in the United States to maintain organic dairy status. We investigated the plasma pharmacokinetics of three organic mastitis products currently used by organic producers and organic dairy veterinarians. Those products include intramammary, topical and intravaginal preparations, each dosed at two levels. Additionally, tissue data were collected for kidney, liver and fat in order to estimate a withholding time for each of the products. The lower limit of quantification (LOQ) and lower limit of detection (LOD) were 0.001 and 0.0005 µg ml-1, respectively, in plasma and all tissues except fat for both thymol and carvacrol. Fat had an LOQ of 0.01 µg ml-1 and an LOD of 0.005 µg ml-1 for thymol and carvacrol. Diallyl disulfide had an LOQ of 0.005 µg ml-1 and LOD of 0.001 µg ml-1 in all tissues. For diallyl disulfide (garlic), no levels above 0.001 µg ml-1 were measurable in plasma or tissues. For topical and intramammary products, levels were measurable in the plasma, liver, kidney and fat up to 72 h after the last dose. The plasma half-lives were short for thymol (approximately 1.6 h) and carvacrol (approximately 1.5 h), whereas the estimated half-lives for these substances in tissues ranged from 13.9 to 31.5 h for thymol and from 16.9 to 25 h for carvacrol. The predicted amount of time that the molecules would be found in the body based on the slowest depletion time of liver tissue was 13 days for thymol and 10 days for carvacrol. The apparent half-life of topically applied carvacrol was approximately 4.5 h in plasma, with an estimated withhold time of 10 days. These times were calculated using the USFDA's tolerance limit method for meat withdrawal times.

  14. Effect of organic sources of minerals on fat-corrected milk yield of dairy cows in confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Antonio Del Valle

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of organic and inorganic sources of minerals in diets for mid-lactation dairy cows on milk yield and composition, intake and total apparent digestibility of dry matter and nutrients, blood parameters, microbial protein synthesis, and energy and protein balances. Twenty Holstein cows averaging 146.83±67.34 days in milk and weighing 625.30±80.37 kg were used. The experimental design was a crossover. Diets were composed of corn silage (50%, ground grain corn, and soybean meal, differing with regard to the sources of trace minerals, plus an organic and inorganic mix. The organic mineral source increased milk fat and fat-corrected milk yield without changing milk yield, intake, or total apparent digestibility. Blood parameters, microbial protein synthesis, and energy and protein balances were not affected by the sources of minerals. Organic sources of minerals improve milk fat yield without affecting other parameters.

  15. Comparison of antibiotic resistance of udder pathogens in dairy cows kept on organic and on conventional farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, M; Perreten, V; Doherr, M G; Schaeren, W; Schällibaum, M; Blum, J W

    2006-03-01

    There has been a rapid rise in the emergence of multi-drug-resistant pathogens in the past 10 to 15 yr and some bacteria are now resistant to most antimicrobial agents. Antibiotic use is very restricted on Swiss organic dairy farms, and a purely prophylactic use, such as for dry cow mastitis prevention, is forbidden. A low prevalence of antibiotic resistance in organic farms can be expected compared with conventional farms because the bacteria are infrequently or not exposed to antibiotics. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance was compared between mastitis pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, nonaureus staphylococci, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis) from farms with organic and conventional dairy production. Clear differences in the percentage of antibiotic resistance were mainly species-related, but did not differ significantly between isolates from cows kept on organic and conventional farms, except for Streptococcus uberis, which exhibited significantly more single resistances (compared with no resistance) when isolated from cows kept on organic farms (6/10 isolates) than on conventional farms (0/5 isolates). Different percentages were found (albeit not statistically significant) in resistance to ceftiofur, erythromycin, clindamycin, enrofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin, oxacillin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and quinupristin-dalfopristin, but, importantly, none of the strains was resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid or vancomycin. Multidrug resistance was rarely encountered. The frequency of antibiotic resistance in organic farms, in which the use of antibiotics must be very restricted, was not different from conventional farms, and was contrary to expectation. The antibiotic resistance status needs to be monitored in organic farms as well as conventional farms and production factors related to the absence of reduced antibiotic resistance in organic farms need to be evaluated.

  16. New approaches for morphological diagnosis of bovine Eimeria species: a study on a subtropical organic dairy farm in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florião, Mônica Mateus; Lopes, Bruno do Bomfim; Berto, Bruno Pereira; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2016-03-01

    Bovine eimeriosis or coccidiosis is an intestinal disease caused by Eimeria spp. which is related to gastrointestinal disorders and, in some cases, death. The current work aimed to identify and provide detailed morphological characteristic features of the different Eimeria spp. parasites of crossbred cows of a subtropical organic dairy farm in Brazil, offering tools for the diagnosis of bovine eimeriosis. Eimeria auburnensis, Eimeria bovis, Eimeria bukidnonensis, Eimeria canadensis, Eimeria cylindrica, Eimeria ildefonsoi, and Eimeria zuernii were identified. The application of line regressions and ANOVA provided a means for the identification of these species. Finally, the current work proposes a dichotomous key to assist in the morphologic identification of bovine Eimeria spp. oocysts.

  17. Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and dairy manure: effects of food waste particle size and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyeman, Fred O; Tao, Wendong

    2014-01-15

    This study was to comprehensively evaluate the effects of food waste particle size on co-digestion of food waste and dairy manure at organic loading rates increased stepwise from 0.67 to 3 g/L/d of volatile solids (VS). Three anaerobic digesters were fed semi-continuously with equal VS amounts of food waste and dairy manure. Food waste was ground to 2.5 mm (fine), 4 mm (medium), and 8 mm (coarse) for the three digesters, respectively. Methane production rate and specific methane yield were significantly higher in the digester with fine food waste. Digestate dewaterability was improved significantly by reducing food waste particle size. Specific methane yield was highest at the organic loading rate of 2g VS/L/d, being 0.63, 0.56, and 0.47 L CH4/g VS with fine, medium, and coarse food waste, respectively. Methane production rate was highest (1.40-1.53 L CH4/L/d) at the organic loading rate of 3 g VS/L/d. The energy used to grind food waste was minor compared with the heating value of the methane produced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario Workshop Series Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie Park Ovard; Thomas H. Ulrich; David J. Muth Jr.; J. Richard Hess; Steven Thomas; Bryce Stokes

    2009-12-01

    To get a collective sense of the impact of research and development (R&D) on biomass resource availability, and to determine the feasibility that yields higher than baseline assumptions used for past assessments could be achieved to support U.S. energy independence, an alternate “High-Yield Scenario” (HYS) concept was presented to industry experts at a series of workshops held in December 2009. The workshops explored future production of corn/agricultural crop residues, herbaceous energy crops (HECs), and woody energy crops (WECs). This executive summary reports the findings of that workshop.

  19. Removal of organic matter from dairy industry waste water using low-cost adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, M.; Bhole, A.G. [College of Engineering, Badnera (India). Civil Engineering Department

    2002-07-01

    The present study envisages the use of cost-effective adsorbents such as fly ash, bagasse, wheat straw dust, sawdust, and coconut coir for the reduction of the TDS (total dissolved solids) from dairy industry effluent waste water. PAC (powdered activated carbon) was also used and the results were compared. Sorption data have been correlated with both the Langmuir and the Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The Freundlich static isotherm model is found applicable to all the six adsorbents for removing TDS from the dairy waste water. The order of selectivity is PAC, bagasse, fly ash, sawdust, wheat straw, coconut coir for the removal of TDS at optimum conditions. 8 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. [Study on High-yield Cultivation Measures for Arctii Fructus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi-yong; Jiang, Xiao-bo; Wang, Tao; Sun, Ji-ye; Hu, Shang-qin; Zhang, Li

    2015-02-01

    To find out the high yield cultivation measures for Arctii Fructus. Completely randomized block experiment design method was used in the field planting, to analyze the effect of different cultivation way on agronomic characters, phenological phase,quality and quantity of Arctii Fructus. Arctium lappa planted on August 28 had the best results of plant height, thousand seeds weight and yield. The highest yield of Arctii Fructus was got at the density of 1,482 plants/667 m2. Arctiin content was in an increase trend with the planting time delay and planting density increasing. The plant height, thousand seeds weight, yield and arctiin content by split application of fertilizer were significantly higher than that by one-time fertilization. Compared with open field Arctium lappa, plant height, yield, arctiin content and relative water content of plastic film mulching Arctium lappa was higher by 7.74%, 10.87%, 6.38% and 24.20%, respectively. In the topping Arctium lappa, the yield was increased by 11.09%, with 39. 89% less branching number. Early planting time and topping shortened the growth cycle of Arctium lappa plant. The high-yield cultivation measures of Arctii Fructus are: around August 28 to sowing, planting density of 1 482 plants/667 m2, split application of fertilizer for four times, covering film on surface of the soil and topping in bolting.

  1. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Nidom, Chairul A; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-02

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development.

  2. Reproductive Management of Dairy Cows with Particular Reference to Organic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Diskin, Michel G.; Kelly, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive efficiency is a major factor affecting production and economic efficiency indairy herds. In seasonally calving herds the requirement of good reproductive performance is of greater importance than in other production systems in order to maximally exploit the use of grazed grass in the diet of the cow. Reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows worldwide has declined over the past 30 years in association with selection for milk yield. There is increasing and consistent ev...

  3. Effect of feeding strategies and cropping systems on greenhouse gas emission from Wisconsin certified organic dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, D; Sun, F; Wattiaux, M A; Cabrera, V E; Hedtcke, J L; Silva, E M

    2017-07-01

    Organic agriculture continues to expand in the United States, both in total hectares and market share. However, management practices used by dairy organic producers, and their resulting environmental impacts, vary across farms. This study used a partial life cycle assessment approach to estimate the effect of different feeding strategies and associated crop production on greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from Wisconsin certified organic dairy farms. Field and livestock-driven emissions were calculated using 2 data sets. One was a 20-yr data set from the Wisconsin Integrated Cropping System Trial documenting management inputs, crop and pasture yields, and soil characteristics, used to estimate field-level emissions from land associated with feed production (row crop and pasture), including N 2 O and soil carbon sequestration. The other was a data set summarizing organic farm management in Wisconsin, which was used to estimate replacement heifer emission (CO 2 equivalents), enteric methane (CH 4 ), and manure management (N 2 O and CH 4 ). Three combinations of corn grain (CG) and soybean (SB) as concentrate (all corn = 100% CG; baseline = 75% CG + 25% SB; half corn = 50% CG + 50% SB) were assigned to each of 4 representative management strategies as determined by survey data. Overall, GHG emissions associated with crop production was 1,297 ± 136 kg of CO 2 equivalents/t of ECM without accounting for soil carbon changes (ΔSC), and GHG emission with ΔSC was 1,457 ± 111 kg of CO 2 equivalents/t of ECM, with greater reliance on pasture resulting in less ΔSC. Higher levels of milk production were a major driver associated with reduction in GHG emission per metric tonne of ECM. Emissions per metric tonne of ECM increased with increasing proportion of SB in the ration; however, including SB in the crop rotation decreased N 2 O emission per metric tonne of ECM from cropland due to lower applications of organically approved N fertility inputs. More SB at the expense of CG

  4. Potential Contradictions Connected to the Inclusion of Stable Schools in the Legislation for Danish Organic Dairy Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette; Fisker, I

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to raise questions and discuss how a previous farmer-driven group approach (Stable Schools) works under a legislation framework as a part of an obligatory health advisory service for Danish organic dairy producers. The study takes its starting point in an on-line questionnaire...... generally found the Stable Schools useful for many organic farmers, also after introduction to the legislation, given that farmers are motivated and the process is actively supported by a skilled facilitator. We raise the question of a potential mismatch between the legislative aims and the farmer group...... evaluation (79 farmer respondents) conducted after one year (2011) with the Stable School approach as part of the legislation. This is followed by a discussion on the perspectives of ‘obligatory farmer groups’ supported by literature on experience from other institutionalized advisory approaches. Respondents...

  5. Feeding strategies on certified organic dairy farms in Wisconsin and their effect on milk production and income over feed costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, C A; Wattiaux, M; Dutreuil, M; Gildersleeve, R; Keuler, N S; Cabrera, V E

    2014-07-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to analyze and categorize certified organic Wisconsin dairy farms based on general farm characteristics and feeding strategies during the course of 2010, and (2) to evaluate herd milk production and income over feed costs (IOFC). An on-site survey containing sections on farm demographics, feeding, grazing, and economics was conducted on 69 farms (12.6% survey response rate). A nonhierarchical clustering method using 9 variables related to general farm characteristics, feed supplementation, and grazing was applied to partition the farms into clusters. A scree plot was used to determine the most appropriate number of clusters. Dry matter intake was approximated based on farmer-reported total amounts of feed consumed (feed offered less refusals). Milk production was evaluated using reported milk rolling herd averages (RHA). Income over feed costs was calculated as milk sales minus feed expenses. The farms in clusters 1 (n=8) and 3 (n=32), the large and small high-input farms, respectively, included more feed ingredients in their lactating cow diets and relied more heavily on concentrates than farms in other clusters. Cows on these farms were predominantly Holstein. Clusters 1 and 3 had the highest RHA (6,878 and 7,457 kg/cow per year, respectively) and IOFC ($10.17 and $8.59/lactating cow per day, respectively). The farms in cluster 2 (n=5) were completely seasonal, extremely low-input farms that relied much more heavily on pasture as a source of feed, with 4 out of the 5 farms having all of their operated land in pasture. Farms in cluster 2 relied on fewer feeds during both the grazing and nongrazing seasons compared with farms in the other clusters. These farms had the lowest RHA and IOFC at 3,632 kg/cow per year and $5.76/lactating cow per day, respectively. Cluster 4 (n=24), the partly seasonal, moderate-input, pasture-based cluster, ranked third for RHA and IOFC (5,417 kg/cow per year and $5.92/lactating cow per day

  6. High-yield secretion of multiple client proteins in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segato, Fernando; Damásio, André R L; Gonçalves, Thiago A; de Lucas, Rosymar C; Squina, Fabio M; Decker, Stephen R; Prade, Rolf A

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Combining high biodiversity with high yields in tropical agroforests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Yann; Barkmann, Jan; Juhrbandt, Jana; Kessler, Michael; Wanger, Thomas Cherico; Anshary, Alam; Buchori, Damayanti; Cicuzza, Daniele; Darras, Kevin; Putra, Dadang Dwi; Erasmi, Stefan; Pitopang, Ramadhanil; Schmidt, Carsten; Schulze, Christian H.; Seidel, Dominik; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Stenchly, Kathrin; Vidal, Stefan; Weist, Maria; Wielgoss, Arno Christian; Tscharntke, Teja

    2011-01-01

    Local and landscape-scale agricultural intensification is a major driver of global biodiversity loss. Controversially discussed solutions include wildlife-friendly farming or combining high-intensity farming with land-sparing for nature. Here, we integrate biodiversity and crop productivity data for smallholder cacao in Indonesia to exemplify for tropical agroforests that there is little relationship between yield and biodiversity under current management, opening substantial opportunities for wildlife-friendly management. Species richness of trees, fungi, invertebrates, and vertebrates did not decrease with yield. Moderate shade, adequate labor, and input level can be combined with a complex habitat structure to provide high biodiversity as well as high yields. Although livelihood impacts are held up as a major obstacle for wildlife-friendly farming in the tropics, our results suggest that in some situations, agroforests can be designed to optimize both biodiversity and crop production benefits without adding pressure to convert natural habitat to farmland. PMID:21536873

  8. High-Yield Secretion of Multiple Client Proteins in Aspergillus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segato, F.; Damasio, A. R. L.; Goncalves, T. A.; de Lucas, R. C.; Squina, F. M.; Decker, S. R.; Prade, R. A.

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished.

  9. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bulk tank milk in organic and conventional dairy herds in the midwestern United States and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Bennedsgaard, T W; Bartlett, P C; Erskine, R J; Kaneene, J B

    2004-06-01

    An observational study was conducted to compare the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bulk tank milk in organic and conventional dairy farms in Wisconsin, United States, and southern Jutland, Denmark. Bulk tank milk samples and data regarding management and production were collected from 30 organic and 30 conventional dairy farms in Wisconsin and 20 organic and 20 conventional dairy farms in Denmark. S. aureus isolates were tested for resistance against 15 antimicrobial agents by semiautomatic microbroth dilution methods in each country. Of the 118 bulk tank milk samples in Wisconsin, 71 samples (60%) yielded at least one S. aureus isolate, and a total of 331 isolates were collected. Of the 40 bulk tank milk samples from Denmark, 27 samples (55%) yielded at least one S. aureus isolate, and a total of 152 isolates were collected. Significant differences between organic and conventional dairies were detected only to ciprofloxacin in Wisconsin and avilamycin in Denmark. Significant differences (P organic and conventional farm types in each country and larger differences between the two national agricultural systems.

  10. Polyphosphate- and glycogen-accumulating organisms in one EBPR system for liquid dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze-Hua; Pruden, Amy; Ogejo, Jactone Arogo; Knowlton, Katharine F

    2014-07-01

    Two enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) sequencing batch reactors (SBR1, SBR2) treating liquid dairy manure were operated with the same hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solids retention time (SRT), but with different aeration cycles. During eight months of operation, both SBRs achieved good removal of total phosphorus (P) (TP; 56.8 and 73.5% for SBR1 and SBR2 respectively) and of orthophosphate (OP; 76.2 vs. 82.7%, P manure and challenge conventional wisdom, since greater abundance of PAOs in EBPR system was not associated with improved OP removal and greater abundance of GAOs did not indicate deterioration of the EBPR system.

  11. Extruded pea (Pisum sativum as alternative to soybean protein for dairy cows feeding in organic Alpine farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Gottardo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the use of extruded pea as an alternative to soybean in the protein feeding of dairy cattle raised in organic Alpine farms. The research was carried out in a commercial organic dairy farm located in the Province of Trento (Northern Italy and it considered two separate periods of cows’ lactation: early and late lactation. According to the traditional management practice of alpine dairy herds with the seasonal calving of the cows in early winter, the former period was carried out during the cold season when cows were housed indoors, while the latter period started after the transfer of the entire herd to an alpine pasture for the summer grazing. In both periods, 16 cows of Rendena breed were equally assigned to 2 experimental groups. The dietary forage (meadow hay in early lactation or pasture in late lactation was supplemented to one group of cows with a Control concentrate in which soybean expeller, sunflower expeller and wheat bran were the main protein feeds. Soybean proteins were replaced by extruded peas in the Soy-free concentrate given to the other group of cows. The daily amount of concentrate was adjusted to the individual milk yield on a weekly basis adopting ratios of 0.360 and 0.125 kg of DM per kg of milk in early and late lactation periods, respectively. Cows receiving Soy-free concentrate showed a higher milk yield than the Control cows in both lactation periods (18.7 vs 17.5 kg/d in early lactation and 9.3 vs 8.6 kg/d on pasture, respectively. Milk fat and protein were not affected by the diet at any stage of lactation, while a higher concentration of milk urea was observed in milk samples taken from Soy-free cows in both periods of the study. This result could have been promoted by the higher soluble fraction of extruded pea proteins in comparison to that of soybean expeller. Cows feeding behaviour was monitored only in the early lactation period and despite of the different amount of concentrate consumed by

  12. Effect of Different Levels of Organic Acids Supplementation on Feed Intake, Milk Yield and Milk composition of Dairy Cows during Thermal Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahn, S.; Ali, A.; Mobashar, M.; Inam, M.; Ahmed, I.; Khan, N.A.; Ali, Mubarak; Khan, H.

    2013-01-01

    In many developing countries in the tropics, thermal stress results in lower feed intake, changes in energy metabolism, alterations in endocrine profiles of dairy cows which lead to animal health problems and production losses. Supplementation of organic acids can reduce the toxic metabolites and

  13. Principles and practicality of organic dairy cattle breeding: different options and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Nauta, MSc W.J.; Roep, Dr. D.

    2008-01-01

    As yet there is no set of generally acknowledged rules for organic animal breeding. Most organic farmers depend on conventional breeding programmes, which conflict with organic principles. Do we need a separate, distinct organic breeding system? And how can we support the development of organic breeding? These questions were explored in a PhD study. In general organic farmers and other interest groups express the need for a separate, fully organic breeding system, particularly in view of the ...

  14. Dairy Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pico, Richard F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from the dairy industry covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) government regulations; (2) ion-plant control of dairy effluents; (3) dairy effluent treatment methods; and (4) research on dairy effluents. A list of 26 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. Status of vitamins E and A and β-carotene and health in organic dairy cows fed a diet without synthetic vitamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B; Persson Waller, K; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic vitamin supplementation is not consistent with organic production, so it is important to investigate whether dairy cows can maintain their health and production without synthetic vitamins being added to their diet. In basic dairy cow diets, provitamin A (β-carotene) and vitamin E...... are mainly found in pasture and in grass and legume silages, but the concentrations are highly variable. This study compared the vitamin status and health of cows without synthetic vitamin supplementation (NSV group) with control cows (CON group) fed synthetic vitamins according to Swedish recommendations...... (600 IU of vitamin E and 80,000 IU of vitamin A per cow per day) to investigate whether dairy cows can fulfill their requirements of vitamins A and E without supplementation with synthetic vitamins. Vitamin concentrations in blood plasma and milk, health, fertility, milk yield, and milk composition...

  16. Mixotrophic cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris using industrial dairy waste as organic carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Ana P; Fernandes, Bruno; Vicente, António A; Teixeira, José; Dragone, Giuliano

    2012-08-01

    Growth parameters and biochemical composition of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris cultivated under different mixotrophic conditions were determined and compared to those obtained from a photoautotrophic control culture. Mixotrophic microalgae showed higher specific growth rate, final biomass concentration and productivities of lipids, starch and proteins than microalgae cultivated under photoautotrophic conditions. Moreover, supplementation of the inorganic culture medium with hydrolyzed cheese whey powder solution led to a significant improvement in microalgal biomass production and carbohydrate utilization when compared with the culture enriched with a mixture of pure glucose and galactose, due to the presence of growth promoting nutrients in cheese whey. Mixotrophic cultivation of C. vulgaris using the main dairy industry by-product could be considered a feasible alternative to reduce the costs of microalgal biomass production, since it does not require the addition of expensive carbohydrates to the culture medium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Udder health and risk factors for subclinical mastitis in organic dairy farms in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busato, A; Trachsel, P; Schällibaum, M; Blum, J W

    2000-04-28

    1+ were submitted for somatic cell counting (SCC), bacteriological examination and to test for antibiotic susceptibility. The SCC and germ-cell counts of monthly bulk-tank milk samples were available through Dairy Inspection and Advisory Services and milk production data of 567 herd-book cows were available from breeding associations. Possible individual and environmental predictors of subclinical mastitis were identified using logistic models adjusted for clustering of the data at herd and cow levels. Data were analyzed separately for cows from 7 to 100 and from 101 to 305 days post partum. Prevalences of subclinical mastitis at the quarter level were 21.2% for lactation period 7-100 days and 34.5% for 101-305 days post partum. The geometric mean SCC in bulk-tank milk samples was 85.6x10(3)cells/ml. Samples at 7-100 and 101-305 days post partum were positive for Staphylococcus aureus in 16.0 and 7.4%, for coagulase-negative Staphylococci in 51.5 and 50.6%, for Streptococcus agalactiae in 0.0 and 0.8%, for other Streptococci in 19.4 and 15.6%, for E. coli in 1.0 and 0.4%, and for Corynebacterium bovis in 25.7 and 45.1%, respectively. Risks of subclinical mastitis increased significantly with increasing days post partum and advancing age of cow. Cows that were sampled when staying in alpine dairies had considerably higher risks of subclinical mastitis than cows staying in home barns. Significantly lower risks of subclinical mastitis were observed in farms where CMT was performed regularly as a control measure. Bacteria in milk from cows with mastitis exhibited antibiotic resistance at a comparable frequency as found previously in conventional farms.

  18. High yield production of extracellular recombinant levansucrase by Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneli, Claudia; Biedendieck, Rebekka; David, Florian; Jahn, Dieter; Wittmann, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a high yield production bioprocess with recombinant Bacillus megaterium for the production of the extracellular enzyme levansucrase (SacB) was developed. For basic optimization of culture parameters and nutrients, a recombinant B. megaterium reporter strain that produced green fluorescent protein under control of a vector-based xylose-inducible promoter was used. It enabled efficient microtiter plate-based screening via fluorescence analysis. A pH value of pH 6, 20 % of dissolved oxygen, 37 °C, and elevated levels of biotin (100 μg L(-1)) were found optimal with regard to high protein yield and reduced overflow metabolism. Among the different compounds tested, fructose and glycerol were identified as the preferred source of carbon. Subsequently, the settings were transferred to a B. megaterium strain recombinantly producing levansucrase SacB based on the plasmid-located xylose-inducible expression system. In shake flask culture under the optimized conditions, the novel strain already secreted the target enzyme in high amounts (14 U mL(-1) on fructose and 17.2 U mL(-1) on glycerol). This was further increased in high cell density fed-batch processes up to 55 U mL(-1), reflecting a levansucrase concentration of 0.52 g L(-1). This is 100-fold more than previous efforts for this enzyme in B. megaterium and more than 10-fold higher than reported values of other extracellular protein produced in this microorganism so far. The recombinant strain could also handle raw glycerol from biodiesel industry which provided the same amount and quality of the recombinant protein and suggests future implementation into existing biorefinery concepts.

  19. Uptake of inorganic and organic nutrient species during cultivation of a Chlorella isolate in anaerobically digested dairy waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahal, Shantanu; Viamajala, Sridhar

    2016-09-01

    A natural assemblage of microalgae from a facultative lagoon system treating municipal wastewater was enriched for growth in the effluents of an anaerobic digester processing dairy waste. A green microalga with close resemblance to Chlorella sp. was found to be dominant after multiple cycles of sub-culturing. Subsequently, the strain (designated as LLAI) was isolated and cultivated in 20× diluted digester effluents under various incident light intensities (255-1,100 µmoles m-2 s-1 ) to systematically assess growth and nutrient utilization. Our results showed that LLAI production increased with increasing incident light and a maximum productivity of 0.34 g L-1 d-1 was attained when the incident irradiance was 1,100 µmoles m-2 s-1 . Lack of growth in the absence of light indicated that the cultures did not grow heterotrophically on the organic compounds present in the medium. However, the cultures were able to uptake organic N and P under phototrophic conditions and our calculations suggest that the carbon associated with these organic nutrients contributed significantly to the production of biomass. Overall, under high light conditions, LLAI cultures utilized half of the soluble organic nitrogen and >90% of the ammonium, orthophosphate, and dissolved organic phosphorus present in the diluted waste. Strain LLAI was also found to accumulate triacylglycerides (TAG) even before the onset of nutrient limitation and a lipid productivity of 37 mg-TAG L-1 d-1 was measured in cultures incubated at an incident irradiance of 1,100 µmoles m-2 s-1 . The results of this study suggest that microalgae isolates from natural environments are well-suited for nutrient remediation and biomass production from wastewater containing diverse inorganic and organic nutrient species. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1336-1342, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Effects of different strategies of mineral supplementation (marine algae alone or combined with rumen boluses) in organic dairy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alonso, M; Rey-Crespo, F; Orjales, I; Rodríguez-Bermúdez, R; Miranda, M

    2016-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of marine algae supplementation alone or in combination with a regular mineral supplement (rumen boluses) to improve the mineral status in organic dairy cattle and their effect on the milk mineral composition, milk production, composition (% of fat and protein) and quality (SCC). Thirty-two Holstein Friesian lactating cows were randomly selected and assigned to the algae (A), boluses (B), algae+boluses (AB) and control group (C). For the algae groups (A, AB), a supplement composed of Sea Lettuce (80%), Japanese Wireweed (17.5%) and Furbelows (2.5%) was formulated to be given to the cows at the rate of 100 g/animal per day (A1) for the length of 4 weeks. In the second half of the experiment (weeks 5-8), the algae mixture was reformulated and the proportion of Furbelows was increased from 2.5% to 5.0% with a subsequent decrease of Lettuce to 77.5% (A2). In the boluses group (B), each cow received 2 boluses after calving. Blood (serum) and milk samples were collected at 2 and 4 week intervals, respectively, and analysed for trace element concentrations by ICP-MS. Information related to the milk composition and SCC during a 305-day lactation for each animal were obtained from the Dairy Records Management System. The supplementation with algae, boluses or the combination of both treatments showed a statistically significant effect on the iodine (algae), selenium (boluses) and cobalt (algae+boluses) status of the animals. In milk, treatments had a statistical significant increase on iodine, and a tendency to increase selenium concentrations. The assayed algae mixture combined with another source of selenium could be an effective tool to improve the mineral status in serum and milk. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Comparing ELISA test-positive prevalence, risk factors and management recommendations for Johne's disease prevention between organic and conventional dairy farms in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Laura; Sorge, Ulrike S; DeVries, Trevor; Godkin, Ann; Lissemore, Kerry; Kelton, David

    2015-11-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic, infectious disease in cattle. Between 2010 and 2013, a voluntary JD control program was successfully launched in Ontario, Canada, including a Risk Assessment and Management Plan (RAMP) and JD ELISA testing of the entire milking herd. Over the last decade, the organic dairy sector has been growing. However, organic farming regulations and philosophies may influence the risk for JD transmission on Ontario organic dairy farms. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate differences in JD ELISA test positive prevalence, risk factors for JD and recommendations for JD prevention between organic and conventional dairy herds in Ontario. RAMP results (i.e. RAMP scores and recommendations) and ELISA results were available for 2103 dairy herds, including 42 organic herds. If available, additional data on milk production, milk quality, and herd characteristics were gathered. Organic and conventional herds had a similar herd-level JD ELISA test-positive prevalence (26.2% and 27.2%, respectively). Organic herds (4.2%) had a higher within-herd JD ELISA test-positive prevalence compared to conventional herds (2.3%) if they had at least one JD test-positive animal on the farm. Organic farms had lower risk scores for biosecurity (9 points lower), and higher scores in the calving (7 points higher) and the calf-rearing management areas (4 points higher). After accounting for RAMP score, organic farms received fewer recommendations for the calving management area (Odds Ratio=0.41) and more recommendations in the adult cow management area (Odds Ratio=2.70). A zero-inflated negative binomial model was built with purchase of animals and the herd size included in the logistic portion of the model. Herd type (organic or conventional), colostrum and milk feeding practices, average bulk tank somatic cell count, and presence of non-Holstein breeds were included in the negative binomial portion of the model. Organic farms had a higher number of

  2. Commodity Policies and Product Differentiation: the California Milk Marketing Order and the Organic Dairy Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Balagtas, Joseph Valdes; Kreutzer, Kristina N.

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates the economic consequences of milk marketing orders for producers and consumers in organic and conventional milk markets. We develop a multi-market equilibrium displacement model that disaggregates the organic and conventional segments of the California milk market in order to evaluate the economic effects of alternative policies. We find that exemption of organics from marketing order regulation would make organic farmers better off at the expense of conventional farmers,...

  3. Sustainability of US Organic Beef and Dairy Production Systems: Soil, Plant and Cattle Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy J. Soder; Jennifer W. MacAdam; Aimee N. Hafla

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the National Organic Program implemented a rule for the US stating that pasture must be a significant source of feed in organic ruminant systems. This article will focus on how the pasture rule has impacted the management, economics and nutritional value of products derived from organic ruminant systems and the interactions of grazing cattle with pasture forages and soils. The use of synthetic fertilizers is prohibited in organic systems; therefore, producers must rely on animal manu...

  4. Organic dairy farmers put more emphasis on production traits than conventional farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagboom, Margot; Kargo, Morten; Edwards, David

    2016-01-01

    with herd characteristics and production systems (organic or conventional). We established a web-based survey to characterize the preferences of farmers for improvements in 10 traits, by means of pairwise rankings. We also collected a considerable number of herd characteristics. Overall, 106 organic farmers......, and farmers that gave the highest ranking to cow and heifer fertility had the lowest conception rate in their herds. This finding suggests that farmers prefer to improve traits that are more problematic in their herd. The proportion of organic and conventional farmers also differed between clusters; we found...... a higher proportion of organic farmers in the production-based clusters. When we analyzed organic and conventional data separately, we found that organic farmers ranked production traits higher than conventional farmers. The herds of organic farmers had lower milk yields and lower disease incidences, which...

  5. Management and use of dairy cattle feed resources on smallholder certified organic pineapple farms in Central Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiggundu, Muhammad; Kabi, Fred; Vaarst, Mette

    2014-01-01

    as major dairy cattle feed resources while only 19% reported using elephant grass. Banana peels (25.1%) and sweet potato vines (24.7%) were the most important crop residues fed to cattle. Farmers reported high cost of concentrates and scarcity of feeds as their biggest challenges in dairy cattle production...

  6. Associations of risk factors with somatic cell count in bulk tank milk on organic and conventional dairy farms in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicconi-Hogan, K M; Gamroth, M; Richert, R; Ruegg, P L; Stiglbauer, K E; Schukken, Y H

    2013-06-01

    In the past decade, the demand for organic agricultural products has increased rapidly in the United States and worldwide. Milk quality research is of major interest to both consumers and dairy farmers alike. However, scientific data on milk quality, herd management methods, and animal welfare on organic farms in the United States has been lacking before the research from this study. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of bulk tank milk somatic cell count (SCC) with management characteristics on organic and conventional dairy farms in New York, Oregon, and Wisconsin. Data from similarly sized organic farms (n=192), conventional nongrazing farms (n=64), and conventional grazing farms (n=36) were collected at a single farm visit. Of the 292 farms visited, 290 bulk tank milk samples were collected. Overall, no difference in SCC was observed between the conventional and organic grazing systems. Two models were created to assess the effects of various management and herd characteristics on the logarithmic transformation of the SCC (LSCC), one using data from all herds and one using data from organic herds only. From the total herd model, more grain fed per cow per day was negatively associated with LSCC, whereas a positive bulk tank culture for Staphylococcus aureus and years that a farmer reported being in the dairy business were both positively associated with LSCC. In the organic herd model, a seasonal effect indicated that LSCC tended to increase in the summer and decrease in the winter. Grain fed per cow per day, the use of anionic salts in transition-cow diets, the use of gloves during milking, and regular use of a quarantine unit at milking were all negatively associated with LSCC. Similar to the total herd model, a Staph. aureus-positive bulk tank culture was positively associated with LSCC in the organic model. Standard plate count was also positively associated with LSCC in the organic model. Several variables that were associated with

  7. Veterinarians’ and agricultural advisors’ perception of calf health and welfare in organic dairy production in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellingsen, Kristian; Mejdell, C. M.; Hansen, B.

    2012-01-01

    are more sceptical towards animal health and welfare in organic production compared with other professionals is not supported. The few differences found between the two groups may reflect different emphases due to their education and focus, e.g. treatment of disease versus advice on feeding, rather than...

  8. A comparative analysis of vehicle-related greenhouse gas emissions between organic and conventional dairy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggestam, Vivianne; Buick, Jon

    2017-08-01

    Agricultural industrialisation and globalisation have steadily increased the transportation of food across the world. In efforts to promote sustainability and self-sufficiency, organic milk producers in Sweden are required to produce a higher level of cattle feed on-farm in the hope that increased self-sufficiency will reduce reliance on external inputs and reduce transport-related greenhouse gas emissions. Using data collected from 20 conventional and 20 organic milk producers in Sweden this paper aims to assess the global warming impact of farmyard vehicles and the transportation of feed produced 'off-farm' in order to compare the impact of vehicle-related emissions from the different production methods. The findings show organic and conventional production methods have different vehicle-related emission outputs that vary according to a reliance on either road transportation or increased farmyard machinery use. Mechanical weeding is more fuel demanding than conventional agrichemical sprayers. However, artificial fertilising is one of the highest farmyard vehicle-related emitters. The general findings show organic milk production emits higher levels of farm vehicle-related emissions that fail to be offset by reduced emissions occurring from international transport emissions. This paper does not propose to cover a comprehensive supply chain carbon footprint for milk production or attempt to determine which method of production has the largest climatic impact. However, it does demonstrate that Sweden's legal requirements for organic producers to produce more feed on-farm to reduce transport emissions have brought emissions back within Sweden's greenhouse gas inventory and raises questions around the effectiveness of policies to reduce vehicle-related emissions. Further research is needed into the effectiveness of climate change mitigation on food production policies, in particular looking at various trade-offs that affects the entire food supply chain.

  9. Dynamics of mammary infections in organic dairy farms in Northern Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, A.; Gradillas, G.; Fernandez-Ruiz, C.; Rodriguez-Bermudez, R.; Lopez-Alonso, M.

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the microbiological state and the dynamics of the mammary infections of organic farms in North Spain to discover if the high somatic cell count (SCC) observed in these farms is associated to a high incidence of mastitis. Microbiological cultures and SCC were performed in 8,496 foremilk samples collected from 160 cows in five representative organic farms from February 2006 to January 2008. Even though 79.3% of cultures were positive, only 21.2% of the total fit our diagnosis of mastitis (clinical, subclinical and chronic). The great prevalence of Corynebacterium bovis (teat canal-region pathogen) in the positive cultures that did not fit the mastitis diagnosis criteria (nearly 70%) compared with those that did (27%) was found to be related to lack of post-milking teat disinfection. The study prevalence of mastitis was 69.2% (66.7% subclinical mastitis, 27.8% clinical mastitis); the mean monthly prevalence was 47.4%; the mean monthly incidence was 12.9% and the mean duration of infection was 3.84 ± 3.98 months The high SCC in foremilk samples from old cows (three or more lactations) not diagnosed as mastitis compared to the heifers, reflects a worsening health status of the animals over time. When compared with the conventional sector in Northern Spain, these parameters indicate a poorer udder health in the studied organic herds with a high presence of chronic subclinical processes. (Author)

  10. Dynamics of mammary infections in organic dairy farms in Northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Villar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to evaluate the microbiological state and the dynamics of the mammary infections of organic farms in North Spain to discover if the high somatic cell count (SCC observed in these farms is associated to a high incidence of mastitis. Microbiological cultures and SCC were performed in 8,496 foremilk samples collected from 160 cows in five representative organic farms from February 2006 to January 2008. Even though 79.3% of cultures were positive, only 21.2% of the total fit our diagnosis of mastitis (clinical, subclinical and chronic. The great prevalence of Corynebacterium bovis (teat canal-region pathogen in the positive cultures that did not fit the mastitis diagnosis criteria (nearly 70% compared with those that did (27% was found to be related to lack of post-milking teat disinfection. The study prevalence of mastitis was 69.2% (66.7% subclinical mastitis, 27.8% clinical mastitis; the mean monthly prevalence was 47.4%; the mean monthly incidence was 12.9% and the mean duration of infection was 3.84 ± 3.98 months The high SCC in foremilk samples from old cows (three or more lactations not diagnosed as mastitis compared to the heifers, reflects a worsening health status of the animals over time. When compared with the conventional sector in Northern Spain, these parameters indicate a poorer udder health in the studied organic herds with a high presence of chronic subclinical processes.

  11. Maximizing profit on New England organic dairy farms: an economic comparison of 4 total mixed rations for organic Holsteins and Jerseys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, S P; Clark, G W; Anderson, G W; Kersbergen, R J; Lunak, M; Marcinkowski, D P; Murphy, M R; Schwab, C G; Erickson, P S

    2011-06-01

    The objective of these experiments was to compare 4 total mixed rations fed to USDA-certified organic dairy cows in New England. Forty-eight Jersey cows from the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and 64 Holstein cows from the University of Maine (UMaine) were assigned to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments testing the main effects of corn silage versus grass silage as the forage base and commodity concentrates versus a complete pelleted concentrate mixture. Treatment diets were fed as a total mixed ration for 8 wk during the winter and spring months of 2007, 2008, and 2009. Milk yield, component, and quality data were recorded and used to calculate the value of the milk produced for each cow. The dry matter intake (DMI) was recorded and used to calculate the average cost per cow per day of each diet. Income over feed costs were calculated for each diet using milk value and feed cost data. Feed cost and income over feed cost data were resampled using bootstrap methodology to examine potential patterns. Milk yield, milk fat and true protein concentrations, and SCC were similar among treatments. Cows at UNH fed corn silage tended to have higher DMI and lower milk urea nitrogen than did cows fed grass silage, whereas cows fed pellets had higher DMI than cows fed commodities. Cows at UNH fed commodities tended to have higher body condition scores than those fed pellets. Cows at UMaine fed commodities tended to have higher DMI than did cows fed pellets, and cows fed corn silage had lower milk urea nitrogen than did cows fed grass silage. Body weights and body condition scores were not different for cows at UMaine. Feed costs were significantly higher for corn silage diets and diets at UNH containing pellets, but not at UMaine. The calculated value of the milk and income over feed costs did not differ among treatments at either university. Bootstrap replications indicated that the corn silage with commodities diet generally had the highest feed cost at both UNH

  12. The effect of feed demand on greenhouse gas emissions and farm profitability for organic and conventional dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Lukas; Menzel, Friederike; Bahrs, Enno

    2014-12-01

    The reduction of product-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in milk production appears to be necessary. The reduction of emissions on an individual farm might be highly accepted by farm owners if it were accompanied by an increase in profitability. Using life cycle assessments to determine the product carbon footprints (PCF) and farm-level evaluations to record profitability, we explored opportunities for optimization based on analysis of 81 organic and conventional pasture-based dairy farms in southern Germany. The objective of the present study was to detect common determining factors for low PCF and high management incomes (MI) to achieve GHG reductions at the lowest possible operational cost. In our sample, organic farms, which performed economically better than conventional farms, produced PCF that were significantly higher than those produced by conventional farms [1.61 ± 0.29 vs. 1.45 ± 0.28 kg of CO₂ equivalents (CO₂eq) per kg of milk; means ± SD)]. A multiple linear regression analysis of the sample demonstrated that low feed demand per kilogram of milk, high grassland yield, and low forage area requirements per cow are the main factors that decrease PCF. These factors are also useful for improving a farm's profitability in principle. For organic farms, a reduction of feed demand of 100 g/kg of milk resulted in a PCF reduction of 105 g of CO₂eq/kg of milk and an increase in MI of approximately 2.1 euro cents (c)/kg of milk. For conventional farms, a decrease of feed demand of 100 g/kg of milk corresponded to a reduction in PCF of 117 g of CO₂eq/kg of milk and an increase in MI of approximately 3.1 c/kg of milk. Accordingly, farmers could achieve higher profits while reducing GHG emissions. Improved education and training of farmers and consultants regarding GHG mitigation and farm profitability appear to be the best methods of improving efficiency under traditional and organic farming practices.

  13. Effect of short-term versus long-term grassland management and seasonal variation in organic and conventional dairy farming on the composition of bulk tank milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S A; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Govasmark, E

    2013-01-01

    Bulk tank milk from 28 dairy farms was sampled every second month for 2 yr to assess the effects of grassland management, production system and season on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins, Se, and milk sensory quality. Grassland management varied in terms...... of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long...... feeding periods had potential health benefits due to FA composition. In contrast, the higher milk-fat proportions of saturated FA in milk from ORG farms may be perceived as negative for human health....

  14. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont’s and photobiont’s consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont’s hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  15. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Papazi

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939 and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications.

  16. Dairy processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kenneth W

    2003-07-01

    The United States dairy processing sector is dynamic and adaptive to new changes in the market place. Changes in consumer preferences and manufacturing technologies are resulting in new challenges to the processing sector. Consumers want a wider array of quality dairy products. Fluid processors are adapting to changing consumer demands for beverage products by introducing new flavors, providing ultrapasteurization, and using creative packaging. In addition, United States food manufacturers are requesting dairy processors to provide new dairy fractions such as MPC for new nutrition products. United States dairy policy is attempting to adapt to these changes. Federal order reform has resulted in new market-oriented signals for dairy farmers to produce what the market wants; namely, quality milk components. US dairy farmers, however, also wants to maintain programs such as the DPSP that have had the unfortunate consequence of spurring demand for protein imports (i.e., MPCs, casein, and caseinates) and also resulted in a disincentive to produce these new innovative protein products here in the United States. Surplus skim milk solids are now moving into US Government warehouses rather than into commercial markets. The future of the United States dairy industry will clearly be toward producing innovative products that the market wants. There is a strong market for dairy products not only here in the United States but also overseas, which will mean learning to compete on a global scale. The challenge is to modernize our United States milk pricing programs to provide dairy farmers and processors proper price signals while providing a minimum level of support to dairy farmers. The benefit of a greater orientation toward the market place will be stronger rates of growth for United States-produced dairy products.

  17. Kamdhenu Dairy

    OpenAIRE

    Debasis Pradhan; Shabad Kalra; Sangeeta Srinivas

    2007-01-01

    Kamdhenu Dairy was one of the biggest dairy unions in India that came into being in 1969. Kamdhenu dairy, with an annual sales turnover of Rs.5250 million, was procuring its milk from the regular suppliers residing in the villages using its own procurement network. The same network was being used to market other dairy products and essential items like fodder and medicine for the cattle to the milk suppliers. The company had recently chosen to sell tea using the same procurement network. The e...

  18. Impact of Organic Loading Rate on Psychrophilic Anaerobic Digestion of Solid Dairy Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori M. Cata Saady

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the feed total solids to anaerobic digester improves the process economics and decreases the volume of liquid effluent from current wet anaerobic digestion. The objective of this study was to develop a novel psychrophilic (20 °C anaerobic digestion technology of undiluted cow feces (total solids of 11%–16%. Two sets of duplicate laboratory-scale sequence batch bioreactors have been operated at organic loading rates (OLR of 6.0 to 8.0 g total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD kg−1 inoculum day−1 (d−1 during 210 days. The results demonstrated that the process is feasible at treatment cycle length (TCL of 21 days; however, the quality of cow feces rather than the OLR had a direct influence on the specific methane yield (SMY. The SMY ranged between 124.5 ± 1.4 and 227.9 ± 4.8 normalized liter (NL CH4 kg−1 volatile solids (VS fed d−1. Substrate-to-inoculum mass ratio (SIR was 0.63 ± 0.05, 0.90 ± 0.09, and 1.06 ± 0.07 at OLR of 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 g TCOD kg−1 inoculum d−1, respectively. No volatile fatty acids (VFAs accumulation has been observed which indicated that hydrolysis was the rate limiting step and VFAs have been consumed immediately. Bioreactors performance consistency in terms of the level of SMYs, VFAs concentrations at end of the TCL, pH stability and volatile solids reduction indicates a stable and reproducible process during the entire operation.

  19. Effect of protein concentrate supplementation on the composition of amino acids in milk from dairy cows in an organic farming system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Horký

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our experiment examined the effect of feeding a protein concentrate supplement on the composition of amino acids in milk from dairy cows managed in an organic farming system. The experiment included two groups of cows. Animals in both groups received an identical basic feed ration composed of maize silage, clover-grass haylage from the first cutting, grass haylage from the first cutting, winter wheat and spring barley. The first group of dairy cows (n = 10 served as a control without the addition of protein concentrate to the feed ration. The second experimental group (n = 10 received in addition to the basic feed ration a protein concentrate composed of soybean, sunflower and linseed cakes at rate 1 kg per head per day. The experiment lasted 30 days. Milk analysed for amino acid content was sampled at 10-day intervals. Addition of the protein concentrate significantly increased milk contents of aspartic acid, proline, threonine, glycine, alanine and glutamic acid. A significant decrease of valine also was recorded in milk from the experimental group. The results of our experiment show that a protein concentrate supplement can affect concentrations of some amino acids in milk from dairy cows. 

  20. Energy status of dairy cows determined by biochemical analysis of organic components of milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šamanc Horea

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Valid indicators of the energy status of cows are the body condition, parameters of the metabolic profile, hormonal status, and organic components of milk. The energy status of cows of the Holstein-Friesian breed from four farms was estimated on the grounds of urea, protein and fat concentration in milk. Investigations covered 62 samples of milk (11 from farm A, 16 from farm B, 15 from farm C, and 20 from farm D. All cows were in the first stage of lactation and fed rations recommended for that category of animal. The average fat concentration in all milk samples was 23±13 g/l, the average protein concentration was 29±3 g/l, while the average urea concentration was 4.6±1.3 mmol/l. It could be concluded on the basis of the value for the milk fat concentration alone that a decreased milk fat syndrome was present. In addition, graphic presentations are given for the relation between urea concentration and protein concentration, as well as protein and fat concentrations in the individual milk samples. Such an analysis provided a more detailed picture of the energy status of the examined cows. It was established that cows on farm A had a deficiency of energy and protein, and cows on farms B and C a deficiency of energy with a relative surplus of proteins. It was established that cows from farm D had a deficiency of energy, and there was an equal number of cows with a deficiency and with a relative surplus of proteins. The obtained results provide grounds for making recommendations for correcting the feed rations and improving the health of the cows. It stems from the obtained results that the determination of urea, fat and protein concentrations in milk is a reliable indicator of the energy status of cows, that it is rational and financially acceptable for every producer, regardless of whether it is implemented in small or large cattle farms. The diagnostic procedures used so far have been implemented in a limited form in daily practice because of

  1. dairy cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Friesian dairy cows from Bunda Dairy Farm. Early lactation (yields in week 1 and 2 and peak milk yields were correlated with total (305-day) lactation yields. Peak yield fac- tors were computed based on total lactation yields and peak yields. I. To predict peak yields from average daily yields of week 1 and week 2, factors ...

  2. Sustaining dairy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villarreal Herrera, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Dairy in Europe has undergone many changes in the last few years—the abolition of milk production quotas being a fundamental one. This study explores these changes in relation to the sustained social and environmental viability of the sector and how dairy processors' sustainability

  3. Dairy development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegwater, P.; Hoorweg, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    The growth of the dairy sector as it has occurred in Kilifi and Malindi Districts is one of the few examples of successful agricultural development in the coastal region in the past decades. Between 1985 and 1997 dairy cattle have more than doubled in number. Three livestock systems are described:

  4. Viability of probiotic micro-organism Lactobacillus acidophilus in dairy chocolate dessert and its action against foodborne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Justo Beserra Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:The ability to produce antimicrobial factors is considered an important feature of probiotic microorganisms. Bacteriocins, hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid and lactic acid are examples of these substances. The present research aimed to develop probiotic dairy desserts (DD with Lactobacillus acidophilusand evaluate the viability of this strain, as well as its action on food pathogens. Treatments with and without interactions between L. acidophilusand pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonellasp. andEscherichiacoli O157:H7 and Gram positive (Bacillus cereusand Staphylococcus aureus were produced. The products were stored at a temperature of 8°C and analyzed at the times 24, 48, 72 hours, 7 days and 28 days (at 28 days, only T1 was analyzed because the other products were deteriorated. In an analysis of the potential for development of new products, the dairy dessert with L. acidophiluswas considered a probiotic product. Assessment of the counts of pathogens in dairy desserts with or without L. acidophilusshowed different behaviors of these products in response to pathogens, which could be justified by a possible action of bacteriocins or microbial competition, but there has been no overall reduction or reduction up to a safe level. It is concluded that the probiotic products developed reduced significant food pathogens, but not up to safe levels. Thus, we emphasize the importance of the use of quality tools in the development and monitoring of dairy desserts.

  5. Optimal barn characteristics for high-yielding Holstein cows as derived by a new heat-stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshani, E; Hetzroni, A

    2013-01-01

    Meticulous planning is required to minimize heat-stress conditions in barns. The objective of this study was to determine optimum barn characteristics for high-yielding dairy cows under Israeli (Mediterranean) summer ambient conditions, by using a new stress model that takes ambient temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity into account. During the summers of 2004 and 2005, three meteorological stations were alternately installed in 39 barns: two stations inside the barn at the prevailing downwind direction, and a third station outside the upwind end of the barn. Ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction were measured and recorded every 10 min for 3 to 5 consecutive days at each barn in turn. The data were collected at different geographical and climatic conditions. Therefore, the data collected by an outside station were used as covariates. A heat-stress model was used to determine the threshold temperature (THRT) at which a cow begins to increase its respiratory rate; THRT was the response variable in the statistical model. The THRT model takes in account assumed values of a cow's physiological characteristics: daily milk yield of 45 kg, containing 3.5% fat, and 3 mm fur depth. The independent variables were: orientation, barn type, roof slope, roof ridge, marginal height, roof type (fixed or sliding) and barn width. Results showed that the optimal barn for high-yielding cows is the loose-housing type, oriented with its long axis perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. Advantageous to the design would be an open ridge or pagoda with marginal height of over 4.7 m for north-south orientation and over 5 m for east-west orientation, roof slope over 11%, and barn width between 43 and 51 m for north-south orientation but lower than 42 m for east-west orientation. A sliding roof was also found to be an excellent solution when outside yards are banned by environmental regulations.

  6. Growth, behavior, and economics of group-fed dairy calves fed once or twice daily in an organic production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienitz, M J; Heins, B J; Chester-Jones, H

    2017-04-01

    (988 min/d) and 2× (995 min/d) did not differ. During the evening hours, 2× calves had lesser lying times (34 min/h for 1×; 28 min/h for 2×) because they were fed at 1800 h every evening. The average cost per kilogram of gain for the 2× ($4.03/kg) calves was greater than that for the 1× ($3.56/kg) calves. In summary, group-fed calves fed once a day in an organic production system had similar average daily gains and body dimensions compared with calves fed twice a day. Our results indicated that there is no need for twice-daily milk feeding under the conditions of the present study. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk factors for clinical mastitis, ketosis, and pneumonia in dairy cattle on organic and small conventional farms in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richert, R M; Cicconi, K M; Gamroth, M J; Schukken, Y H; Stiglbauer, K E; Ruegg, P L

    2013-07-01

    The US regulations for production of organic milk include a strict prohibition against the use of antimicrobials and other synthetic substances. The effect of these regulations on dairy animal health has not been previously reported. The objective of this study was to characterize disease detection and identify risk factors for selected diseases on organic (ORG) and similarly sized conventional (CON) farms. Dairy herds (n=292) were enrolled across 3 states (New York, Oregon, Wisconsin) with CON herds matched to ORG herds based on location and herd size. During a single herd visit, information was collected about herd management practices and animal disease occurring in the previous 60 d, and paperwork was left for recording disease occurrences during 60 d after the visit. For analysis, CON herds were further divided into grazing and nongrazing. Poisson regression models were used to assess risk factors for rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of clinical mastitis, ketosis, and pneumonia. An increased rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of clinical mastitis was associated with use of CON management, use of forestripping, presence of contagious pathogens in the bulk tank culture, proactive detection of mastitis in postpartum cows, and stall barn housing. An increased rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of ketosis was associated with having a more sensitive definition of ketosis, using stall barn housing, and feeding a greater amount of concentrates. An increased rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of pneumonia was associated with a lack of grazing, small or medium herd size, and Jersey as the predominant breed. Overall, disease definitions and perceptions were similar among grazing systems and were associated with the rate of farmer-identified and recorded cases of disease. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutrient Prioritization in Dairy Cows Early Postpartum: Mismatch Between Metabolism and Fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leroy, J.L.M.R.; Vanholder, T.; Knegsel, van A.T.M.; Garcia-Ispierto, I.; Bols, P.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    For several decades, researchers worldwide report a decrease in fertility in high-yielding dairy cows, most probably based on conflicting metabolic and reproductive needs. The dairy herd manager's success at improving milk production has been accompanied by a negative trend for the most visible

  9. How Does Live Yeast Differ from Sodium Bicarbonate to Stabilize Ruminal pH in High-Yielding Dairy Cows?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marden, J. P; Julien, C; Monteils, V; Auclair, E; Moncoulon, R; Bayourthe, C

    2008-01-01

    * INRA, and Université de Toulouse, INPT-ENSAT, UMR 1289 TANDEM, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France ENVT, UMR 1289 TANDEM, F-31076 Toulouse, France Lesaffre Feed Additives, 90 rue de Lille, F-59520 Marquette-Lez-Lille...

  10. Comparing the effect of homogenization and heat processing on the properties and in vitro digestion of milk from organic and conventional dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hekken, D L; Tunick, M H; Ren, D X; Tomasula, P M

    2017-08-01

    herds responded in similar ways to typical homogenization and heat processing used in United States dairy plants and showed only minor differences in chemical traits and in vitro digestion. Findings from this research enhance our knowledge of the effect of processing on the quality traits and digestibility of milk from organic/pasture-fed and confined conventional herds and will help health-conscious consumers make informed decisions about dairy selections. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of supranutritional organic selenium supplementation on postpartum blood micronutrients, antioxidants, metabolites, and inflammation biomarkers in selenium-replete dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jean A; Bobe, Gerd; Vorachek, William R; Kasper, Katherine; Traber, Maret G; Mosher, Wayne D; Pirelli, Gene J; Gamroth, Mike

    2014-12-01

    Dairy cows have increased nutritional requirements for antioxidants postpartum. Supranutritional organic Se supplementation may be beneficial because selenoproteins are involved in regulating oxidative stress and inflammation. Our objective was to determine whether feeding Se-yeast above requirements to Se-replete dairy cows during late gestation affects blood micronutrients, antioxidants, metabolites, and inflammation biomarkers postpartum. During the last 8-weeks before calving, dairy cows at a commercial farm were fed either 0 (control) or 105 mg Se-yeast once weekly (supranutritional Se-yeast), in addition to Na selenite at 0.3 mg Se/kg dry matter in their rations. Concentrations of whole-blood (WB) Se and serum Se, erythrocyte glutathione (GSH), and serum albumin, cholesterol, α-tocopherol, haptoglobin, serum amyloid A (SAA), calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, non-esterified fatty acids, and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured directly after calving, at 48 h, and 14 days of lactation in 10 cows of each group. Supranutritional Se-yeast supplementation affected indicators of antioxidant status and inflammation. Cows fed a supranutritional Se-yeast supplement during the last 8-weeks of gestation had higher Se concentrations in WB (overall 52 % higher) and serum (overall 36 % higher) at all-time points, had higher SAA concentrations at 48 h (98 % higher), had higher erythrocyte GSH (38 % higher) and serum albumin concentrations (6.6 % higher) at 14 days, and had lower serum cholesterol concentrations and higher α-tocopherol/cholesterol ratios at calving and at 48 h compared with control cows. In conclusion, feeding Se-replete cows during late gestation a supranutritional Se-yeast supplement improves antioxidant status and immune responses after calving without negatively impacting other micronutrients and energy status.

  12. Resistance to penicillin of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with high somatic cell counts in organic and conventional dairy herds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsgaard, Torben W.; Thamsborg, Stig M.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2006-01-01

    Background: Quarter milk samples from cows with high risk of intramammary infection were examined to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and penicillin resistant SA (SAr) in conventional and organic dairy herds and herds converting to organic farming in a combined longitudinal......: 2%-5%) respectively. The prevalence of penicillin resistance among SA infected cows was 12% (95% confidence interval: 6%-19%) when calculated from the first herd visits. No statistically significant differences were observed in the prevalence of SAr or the proportion of isolates resistant...... to penicillin between herd groups. Conclusion: The proportion of isolates resistant to penicillin was low compared to studies in other countries except Norway and Sweden. Based on the low prevalence of penicillin resistance of SA, penicillin should still be the first choice of antimicrobial agent for treatment...

  13. Bovine somatotropin and rumen-undegradable protein effects in prepubertal dairy heifers: effects on body composition and organ and tissue weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moallem, U; Dahl, G E; Duffey, E K; Capuco, A V; Wood, D L; McLeod, K R; Baldwin, R L; Erdman, R A

    2004-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of recombinant bovine somatotropin (bST) and added dietary rumen undegradable protein (RUP) on organ and tissue weights and body composition in growing dairy heifers. Thirty-two Holstein heifers were in the experiment, 8 killed initially at 3 mo of age, with the remaining 24 Holstein heifers randomly assigned to treatments (n = 6) consisting of 0.1 mg/kg of body weight per day of bST and 2% added dietary RUP (dry matter basis) applied in a 2 x2 factorial design. A total of 6 heifers per treatment group (3 each at 5 and 10 mo of age), were slaughtered to determine body composition and organ masses. Feed intake measured from group intakes were increased by 0.25 and 0.35 kg/d with bST and RUP, respectively. Administration of bST tended to increase the weights of visceral organs including heart, kidney, and spleen by 16, 16, and 38%, respectively. At 10 mo of age, there was a trend for increased empty body weights (EBW) and non-carcass components for heifers treated with bST, but there were no effects of RUP. Body components and organ weights, expressed as a percentage of BW were not affected by RUP or bST. Somatotropin increased ash weight at 10 mo without affecting amounts of protein, fat, and energy. Rates of ash deposition between 3 and 10 mo of age were increased 7 and 4 g/d by bST and RUP, respectively. There were no treatment effects on rates of body fat, protein, and energy deposition. Bovine somatotropin and RUP altered the metabolism of growing heifers in a manner that was consistent with increased rates of skeletal growth. This suggests that nutritional and endocrine manipulations could increase growth rates of skeletal tissues without increasing fat deposition in prepubertal dairy heifers.

  14. Antibodies to major pasture borne helminth infections in bulk-tank milk samples from organic and nearby conventional dairy herds in south-central Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Johan; Dahlström, Frida; Engström, Annie; Hessle, Anna; Jakubek, Eva-Britt; Schnieder, Thomas; Strube, Christina; Sollenberg, Sofia

    2010-08-04

    The objective of this randomised pairwise survey was to compare the regional distribution of antibody levels against the three most important helminth infections in organic and conventional dairy herds in Sweden. Bulk-tank milk from 105 organic farms and 105 neighbouring conventional dairy farms with access to pasture in south-central Sweden were collected in September 2008. Samples were also collected from 8 organic and 8 conventional herds located in a much more restricted area, on the same as well as 3 additional occasions during the grazing season, to reveal evidence for seasonal patterns against cattle stomach worm (Ostertagia ostertagi). Antibody levels to the stomach worm (O. ostertagi), liver fluke (Fasciola hepatica) and lungworm (Dictyocaulus viviparus) were then determined by detection of specific antibodies using three different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). According to the Svanovir Ostertagia ELISA, the mean optical density ratio (ODR) was significantly higher in the milk from organic compared to conventional herds, i.e. 0.82 (95% CL=0.78-0.86) versus 0.66 (0.61-0.71). However, no significant differences were observed in the samples collected at different time points from the same 16 herds (F(3,39)=1.18, P=0.32). Antibodies to D. viviparus infection were diagnosed with an ELISA based on recombinant major sperm protein (MSP), and seropositivity was found in 21 (18%) of the 113 organic herds and 11 (9%) of the 113 conventional herds. The seroprevalence of D. viviparus was somewhat higher in the organic herds (Chi-square=3.65, P=0.056), but with the positive conventional herds were located in the vicinity of infected organic herds. Of the 16 herds that were sampled on repeated occasions, as many as 10 (63%), were seropositive on at least one sampling occasion. Many of these turned positive towards the end of the grazing season. Only one herd was positive in all 4 samples and 3 were positive only at turn-out. Considering F. hepatica there

  15. Farm Management in Organic and Conventional Dairy Production Systems Based on Pasture in Southern Brazil and Its Consequences on Production and Milk Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Kuhnen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pasture-based dairy production is used widely on family dairy farms in Southern Brazil. This study investigates conventional high input (C-HI, conventional low input (C-LI, and organic low input (O-LI pasture-based systems and their effects on quantity and quality of the milk produced. We conducted technical site visits and interviews monthly over one year on 24 family farms (n = 8 per type. C-HI farms had the greatest total area (28.9 ha, greatest percentage of area with annual pasture (38.7%, largest number of lactating animals (26.2 and greatest milk yield per cow (22.8 kg·day−1. O-LI farms had the largest perennial pasture area (52.3%, with the greatest botanical richness during all seasons. Area of perennial pasture was positively correlated with number of species consumed by the animals (R2 = 0.74. Milk from O-LI farms had higher levels of fat and total solids only during the winter. Hygienic and microbiological quality of the milk was poor for all farms and need to be improved. C-HI farms had high milk yield related to high input, C-LI had intermediate characteristics and O-LI utilized a year round perennial pasture as a strategy to diminish the use of supplements in animal diets, which is an important aspect in ensuring production sustainability.

  16. Udder Health in Organic Dairy Herds in the US with a Strategy of Non-use of Antimicrobial Drugs - Evaluated on the basis of systematic clinical examinations, test day results, bulk tank milk samples, treatment protocols and interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Solgaard, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    Mastitis is often considered the most common production disease in organic and conventional dairy herds and most antibiotic treatnments in cattle are due to mastitis. Moreover, mastitis is of great importance for animal welfare. One of the main goals in organic livestock farmin is the promotion of health and welfare. Use of antimicrobial drugs to treat sick animals are considered to be in controversy with th organic aims of a production based on naturalness and the risk of antimicrobial r...

  17. Comparative risk assessment for new cow-level Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infections between 3 dairy production types: Organic, conventional, and conventional-grazing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, A; Ruegg, P L; Gröhn, Y T; Schukken, Y H

    2016-12-01

    Johne's disease, a granulomatous enteritis of ruminant animals, is a hidden threat on dairy farms, adversely affecting animal welfare as well as herd productivity. Control programs in the United States advocate for specific management practices to temper the spread of the causal organism (Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, MAP), such as improving calving area hygiene and limiting introduction of replacement stock with unknown infection status. A need remains for direct exploration of Johne's disease prevention strategies in the United States with respect to production type. Alongside the growing demand for organic products, the safety of organic dairy practices with respect to MAP control is warranted. Further, conventional herds for which organic practices such as pasture grazing are used should be situated within the risk spectrum. We developed a risk assessment model using the US Voluntary Bovine Johne's Disease Control Program as a framework, with the goal of evaluating the risk of new cow-level MAP infections. A total of 292 organic and conventional farms in 3 states were surveyed on management practices, and an overall analysis was conducted in which each farm was first scored on individual practices using a range of "no risk" to "high risk," according to the literature. The sum of all risk factors was then analyzed to quantify and compare the risk burden for each production type. Organic herds received higher overall risk scores compared with both conventional grazing and nongrazing subtypes. To identify which factors contributed to the overall increased risk for organic herds, the management practices were categorized and evaluated by logistic regression. We determined that the increased risk incurred by organic herds was predominantly due to decisions made in the calving area and preweaned calf group. However, although certain individual risk factors related to calf management are commonly involved in prevention strategies (e.g., cow

  18. High-yield expression of heterologous [FeFe] hydrogenases in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon M Kuchenreuther

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The realization of hydrogenase-based technologies for renewable H(2 production is presently limited by the need for scalable and high-yielding methods to supply active hydrogenases and their required maturases. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, we describe an improved Escherichia coli-based expression system capable of producing 8-30 mg of purified, active [FeFe] hydrogenase per liter of culture, volumetric yields at least 10-fold greater than previously reported. Specifically, we overcame two problems associated with other in vivo production methods: low protein yields and ineffective hydrogenase maturation. The addition of glucose to the growth medium enhances anaerobic metabolism and growth during hydrogenase expression, which substantially increases total yields. Also, we combine iron and cysteine supplementation with the use of an E. coli strain upregulated for iron-sulfur cluster protein accumulation. These measures dramatically improve in vivo hydrogenase activation. Two hydrogenases, HydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and HydA (CpI from Clostridium pasteurianum, were produced with this improved system and subsequently purified. Biophysical characterization and FTIR spectroscopic analysis of these enzymes indicate that they harbor the H-cluster and catalyze H(2 evolution with rates comparable to those of enzymes isolated from their respective native organisms. SIGNIFICANCE: The production system we describe will facilitate basic hydrogenase investigations as well as the development of new technologies that utilize these prolific H(2-producing enzymes. These methods can also be extended for producing and studying a variety of oxygen-sensitive iron-sulfur proteins as well as other proteins requiring anoxic environments.

  19. Effect of short-term versus long-term grassland management and seasonal variation in organic and conventional dairy farming on the composition of bulk tank milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S A; Jensen, S K; Govasmark, E; Steinshamn, H

    2013-09-01

    Bulk tank milk from 28 dairy farms was sampled every second month for 2 yr to assess the effects of grassland management, production system and season on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins, Se, and milk sensory quality. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Within ORG farms, SG farms differed from LG farms in herbage botanical composition, but not in concentrate FA concentrations, dry matter intake, or milk yield. Within CON farms, herbage composition, concentrate FA concentrations, dry matter intake, and milk yield showed no or insignificant variations. The ORG farms differed from CON farms in herbage botanical composition, concentrate FA concentrations, concentrate intake, and milk yield. Compared with ORG-LG farms, ORG-SG farms produced milk fat with higher proportions of C10:0 and C12:0 associated with higher herbage proportions of legumes (Fabaceae) and lower proportions of other dicotyledon families. Compared with milk from CON farms, milk fat from ORG farms had higher proportions of most saturated FA and all n-3 FA, but lower proportions of C18:0 and C18:1 cis-9 associated with higher forage proportion and differences in concentrations of FA in concentrates. Compared with the outdoor-feeding periods, the indoor feeding periods yielded milk fat with higher proportions of most short-chain and medium-chain FA and lower proportions of most C18-FA associated with grazing and higher forage proportions. Milk concentrations of α-tocopherol and β-carotene were lower during the grazing periods. Inclusion of fishmeal in

  20. Resistance to penicillin of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with high somatic cell counts in organic and conventional dairy herds in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaarst Mette

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quarter milk samples from cows with high risk of intramammary infection were examined to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (SA and penicillin resistant SA (SAr in conventional and organic dairy herds and herds converting to organic farming in a combined longitudinal and cross-sectional study. Methods 20 conventional herds, 18 organic herds that converted before 1995, and 19 herds converting to organic farming in 1999 or 2000 were included in the study. Herds converting to organic farming were sampled three times one year apart; the other herds were sampled once. Risk of infection was estimated based on somatic cell count, milk production, breed, age and lactation stage. Results The high-risk cows represented about 49 % of the cows in the herds. The overall prevalence of SA and SAr among these cows was 29% (95% confidence interval: 24%–34% and 4% (95% confidence interval: 2%–5% respectively. The prevalence of penicillin resistance among SA infected cows was 12% (95% confidence interval: 6%–19% when calculated from the first herd visits. No statistically significant differences were observed in the prevalence of SAr or the proportion of isolates resistant to penicillin between herd groups. Conclusion The proportion of isolates resistant to penicillin was low compared to studies in other countries except Norway and Sweden. Based on the low prevalence of penicillin resistance of SA, penicillin should still be the first choice of antimicrobial agent for treatment of bovine intramammary infection in Denmark.

  1. Prevalence of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli stx1, stx2, eaeA, and rfbE genes and survival of E. coli O157:H7 in manure from organic and low-input conventional dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, E.; Klerks, M.M.; Vos, de O.J.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Manure samples were collected from 16 organic (ORG) and 9 low-input conventional (LIC) Dutch dairy farms during August and September 2004 to determine the prevalence of the STEC virulence genes stx(1) (encoding Shiga toxin 1), stx(2) (encoding Shiga toxin 2), and eaeA (encoding intimin), as well as

  2. Evaluation of the impact of a Herd Health and Production Management programme in organic dairy cattle farms: a process evaluation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, J E; Bareille, N; Madouasse, A; de Joybert, M; Sjöström, K; Emanuelson, U; Bonnet-Beaugrand, F; Fourichon, C

    2017-11-06

    Animal health planning activities are not always providing a satisfactory positive impact on herd health and welfare. Moreover, evaluating the impact of advisory programmes is complex due to multiple interacting elements that influence its outcome. Therefore, measuring solely health outcomes is not sufficient: the whole process of the implementation and use of such programmes should be evaluated. In order to evaluate the impact of an intervention with a Herd Health and Production Management (HHPM) programme a process evaluation framework was designed and used. The intervention involved 20 organic dairy cattle farmers and their advisors, in both France and Sweden. In both countries 20 organic dairy farms were selected as control herds. The evaluation of the HHPM programme was based on: (a) the compliance to the programme; (b) the programme's functions influencing herd health management practices and stimulating dialogue between farmers and advisors; (c) its effectiveness in terms of improving herd health compared with control farms. Complete compliance to the programme was fulfilled by 21 out of 40 farmers-advisors. Results from a questionnaire showed that the programme functioned as intended (e.g. by allowing early identification of herd health problems), stimulated change in farmers' herd health management practices and farmer-advisor dialogue. Even though the majority of the users perceived that the programme contributed to herd health improvements, no significant differences in health outcomes were found when compared with control farms 12 months after the start of the intervention. The programme allowed creating an environment promoting the exchange of information between farmers and advisors, necessary to define pertinent advice in a farm-specific situation. Future research should aim at improving methods for the evaluation of the effect of advisory programmes, by identifying early indicators for effective advice and developing methods to evaluate the quality

  3. Effect of organic loading on the microbiota in a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Abraham, Christopher; Nelson, Michael C; Chen, Po-Hsu; Graf, Joerg; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-10-01

    Temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) has gained increasing attention because it provides the flexibility to operate digesters under conditions that enhance overall digester performance. However, research on impact of organic overloading rate (OLR) to microbiota of TPAD systems was limited. In this study, we investigated the composition and successions of the microbiota in both the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of a laboratory-scale TPAD system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey before and during organic overloading. The thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters were operated at 50 and 35 °C, respectively, with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days for each digester. High OLR (dairy manure with 5 % total solid and waste whey of ≥60.4 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/l/day) resulted in decrease in pH and in biogas production and accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in the thermophilic digester, while the mesophilic digester remained unchanged except a transient increase in biogas production. Both denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons showed dramatic change in microbiota composition and profound successions of both bacterial and methanogenic communities. During the overloading, Thermotogae was replaced by Proteobacteria, while Methanobrevibacter and archaeon classified as WCHD3-02 grew in predominance at the expense of Methanoculleus in the thermophilic digester, whereas Methanosarcina dominated the methanogenic community, while Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter became less predominant in the mesophilic digester. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that digester temperature and pH were the most influential environmental factors that explained much of the variations of the microbiota in this TPAD system when it was overloaded.

  4. Relationships between physiological indicators in blood, and their yield, as well as chemical composition of milk obtained from organic dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Tomasz; Kuczyńska, Beata; Puppel, Kamila; Metera, Ewa; Słoniewski, Krzysztof; Barszczewski, Jerzy

    2012-11-01

    The occurrence of metabolic overload in cows maintained in organic herds is very likely, because organic production promotes feeding with high roughage diets and discourages supplementation with concentrates supplementation. It has the potential to negatively affect milk quality. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of physiological indicators in blood, reflecting the energy metabolism and liver status of dairy cows kept in organic herds, on the content of bioactive components in milk and the influence of lactation stage and feeding season on changes in milk components. A significant positive correlation was found between β-hydroxybutyric acid and the daily milk yield of lactating cows. β-Hydroxybutyric acid was negatively correlated with lactation phase and polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as saturated fatty acids content in milk. A significant negative correlation was observed between average daily milk yield and alanine aminotransferase concentration in blood. A low level of production in organic farms had a positive impact on the content of conjugated linoleic acid (20% increase), vitamin A (21% increase) and vitamin E (11% increase). The study has shown significant correlations between metabolic profiles and milk yields, as well as milk composition. In addition, there is evidence that the intensity of the production system significantly influences the metabolic profile and chemical composition of cow's milk. It could even be concluded that the ecological system affects not only the quality of milk, but also the health of cows. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Mutation breeding of Bacillus subtilis YTB4 with high yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helium-neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation is a highly efficient mutation breeding technology and is widely applied to various fields of biological science. Using Bacillus subtilis YTB4 with high yield of multienzyme complex as original strain, mutation breeding was carried out by He-Ne laser irradiation in this study. Based on the ...

  6. 31 CFR 356.21 - How are awards at the high yield or discount rate calculated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... discount rate calculated? 356.21 Section 356.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... high yield or discount rate calculated? (a) Awards to submitters. We generally prorate bids at the highest accepted yield or discount rate under § 356.20(a)(2) of this part. For example, if 80.15% is the...

  7. Response of high yielding rice varieties to NaCl salinity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinity is one the biggest constraint to obtain crop potential yield throughout paddy fields in some part of the coastal line of rice cultivated area in Iran. In order to find resistant varieties and study the reaction of some newly released high yielding varieties to different levels of salinity of irrigation water an experiment was ...

  8. Mutation breeding of Bacillus subtilis YTB4 with high yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    2012-07-17

    Jul 17, 2012 ... activity, bacteria of Bacillus are generally of poor cellulase and amylase activities. Furthermore, there are few reports about the strain of Bacillus of multienzyme complex. In this study, using Bacillus subtilis YTB4 with high yield of multienzyme complex as original strain, we reported our recent attempt to ...

  9. CRSM-38, a new high yielding coupled with CLCuV tolerance cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-06

    Mar 6, 2012 ... CRSM-38 is a high yielding and leaf curl virus tolerant cotton variety, developed in Pakistan. Hybridization and subsequent pedigree method's selection work was carried out under natural field conditions at Cotton Research Station, Multan during the year 2001 and 2002 by using a virus tolerant.

  10. Reassortment of high-yield influenza viruses in vero cells and safety assessment as candidate vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Yang, Fan; Yang, Jinghui; Ma, Lei; Cun, Yina; Song, Shaohui; Liao, Guoyang

    2017-01-02

    Vaccination is the practiced and accessible measure for preventing influenza infection. Because chicken embryos used for vaccine production have various insufficiencies, more efficient methods are needed. African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells are recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a safe substitute for influenza vaccine production for humans. However, the influenza virus usually had low-yield in Vero cells, which limits the usage of Vero cellular vaccines. This study used 2 high-yield influenza viruses in Vero cells: A/Yunnan/1/2005Va (H3N2) and B/Yunnan/2/2005Va (B) as donor viruses. It used 3 wild strain viruses to reassort new adaptation viruses, including: A/Tianjin/15/2009(H1N1), A/Fujian/196/2009(H3N2), and B/Chongqing/1384/2010(B). These three new viruses could maintain the characteristic of high-yield in Vero cells. Furthermore, they could keep the immunogenic characteristics of the original wild influenza viruses. Importantly, these viruses were shown as safe in chicken embryo and guinea pigs assessment systems. These results provide an alternative method to produce influenza vaccine based on Vero cells.

  11. Assessing the impact of natural service bulls and genotype by environment interactions on genetic gain and inbreeding in organic dairy cattle genomic breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, T; Wensch-Dorendorf, M; Simianer, H; Swalve, H H; König, S

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare genetic gain and inbreeding coefficients of dairy cattle in organic breeding program designs by applying stochastic simulations. Evaluated breeding strategies were: (i) selecting bulls from conventional breeding programs, and taking into account genotype by environment (G×E) interactions, (ii) selecting genotyped bulls within the organic environment for artificial insemination (AI) programs and (iii) selecting genotyped natural service bulls within organic herds. The simulated conventional population comprised 148 800 cows from 2976 herds with an average herd size of 50 cows per herd, and 1200 cows were assigned to 60 organic herds. In a young bull program, selection criteria of young bulls in both production systems (conventional and organic) were either 'conventional' estimated breeding values (EBV) or genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) for two traits with low (h 2=0.05) and moderate heritability (h 2=0.30). GEBV were calculated for different accuracies (r mg), and G×E interactions were considered by modifying originally simulated true breeding values in the range from r g=0.5 to 1.0. For both traits (h 2=0.05 and 0.30) and r mg⩾0.8, genomic selection of bulls directly in the organic population and using selected bulls via AI revealed higher genetic gain than selecting young bulls in the larger conventional population based on EBV; also without the existence of G×E interactions. Only for pronounced G×E interactions (r g=0.5), and for highly accurate GEBV for natural service bulls (r mg>0.9), results suggests the use of genotyped organic natural service bulls instead of implementing an AI program. Inbreeding coefficients of selected bulls and their offspring were generally lower when basing selection decisions for young bulls on GEBV compared with selection strategies based on pedigree indices.

  12. Dairy development in the Philippines : Visions for the future: uniformity and/or diversity, community and/or commodity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiere, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Although milk has been produced and processed in the Philippines for a long time, the country does not have a strong dairy tradition. Climate and ecology are not very favourable for high yields. Moreover, policies have been erratic and the country has not used the momentum towards dairy development

  13. Impact of cow strain and concentrate supplementation on grazing behaviour, milk yield and metabolic state of dairy cows in an organic pasture-based feeding system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heublein, C; Dohme-Meier, F; Südekum, K-H; Bruckmaier, R M; Thanner, S; Schori, F

    2017-07-01

    As ruminants are able to digest fibre efficiently and assuming that competition for feed v. food use would intensify in the future, cereals and other field crops should primarily be destined to cover the dietary needs of humans and monogastric animals such as poultry and pigs. Farming systems with a reduced or absent concentrate supplementation, as postulated by organic agriculture associations, require adapted dairy cows. The aim of this experiment was to examine the impact of concentrate supplementation on milk production, grazing and rumination behaviour, feed intake, physical activity and blood traits with two Holstein-Friesian cow strains and to conclude the consequences for sustainable and organic farming. The experiment was a cross-over study and took place on an organic farm in Switzerland. In all, 12 Swiss Holstein-Friesian (HCH) cows and 12 New Zealand Holstein-Friesian (HNZ) cows, which were paired according to lactation number, days in milk and age for primiparous cows, were used. All cows grazed full time and were supplemented either with 6 kg/day of a commercial, organic cereal-grain mix or received no supplement. After an adaptation period of 21 days, a measurement period of 7 days followed, where milk yield and composition, pasture dry matter intake estimated with the n-alkane double-indicator technique, physical activity based on pedometer measurements, grazing behaviour recorded by automatic jaw movement recorder and blood samples were investigated. Non-supplemented cows had a lower milk yield and supplemented HCH cows produced more milk than supplemented HNZ cows. Grazing time and physical activity were greater for non-supplemented cows. Supplementation had no effect on rumination behaviour, but HNZ cows spent longer ruminating compared with HCH cows. Pasture dry matter intake decreased with the concentrate supplementation. Results of blood analysis did not indicate a strong negative energy balance for either non-supplemented or supplemented cows

  14. Converting to organic dairy farming: Consequences for production, somatic cell scores and calving interval of first parity Holstein cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, W.J.; Baars, T.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the changes prompted by conversion to organic farming for milk production and fertility of first parity Holstein cows. Data was collected for Dutch organic farms, with a distinction made between long-standing-organic farms, converted organic farms and a reference group of

  15. Organic and inorganic sources of zinc, copper and selenium in diets for dairy cows: intake, blood metabolic profile, milk yield and composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Simões Cortinhas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with the objective of evaluating the effects of feeding dairy cows with organic or inorganic sources of zinc (Zn, copper (Cu and selenium (Se on blood concentrations of these minerals, blood metabolic profiles, nutrient intake and milk yield and composition. Nineteen Holstein cows were selected and randomly assigned to two groups for receiving organic (n = 9 or inorganic (n = 10 sources of Zn, Cu and Se from 60 days before the expected date of calving to 80 days of lactation. Samples of feed, orts and milk were collected for analysis. Body condition score (BCS was determined and blood samples were collected for analysis of Zn, Cu and Se concentrations, as well as for metabolic profile. Supplying organic or inorganic sources of Zn, Cu, and Se did not affect dry matter and nutrient intake, blood metabolic profile, milk yield and composition, plasma concentration of these minerals, and BCS or change the BCS in cows from 60 days before the expected date of calving to 80 days of lactation. An effect of time was observed on all feed intake variables, plasma concentrations of Zn and Se, milk yield, milk protein content, BCS and change in BCS.

  16. Dairy cow disability weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnel, Craig S; McNeil, Ashleigh A; Hadrich, Joleen C; Lombard, Jason E; Garry, Franklyn B; Heller, Jane

    2017-08-01

    Over the past 175 years, data related to human disease and death have progressed to a summary measure of population health, the Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY). As dairies have intensified there has been no equivalent measure of the impact of disease on the productive life and well-being of animals. The development of a disease-adjusted metric requires a consistent set of disability weights that reflect the relative severity of important diseases. The objective of this study was to use an international survey of dairy authorities to derive disability weights for primary disease categories recorded on dairies. National and international dairy health and management authorities were contacted through professional organizations, dairy industry publications and conferences, and industry contacts. Estimates of minimum, most likely, and maximum disability weights were derived for 12 common dairy cow diseases. Survey participants were asked to estimate the impact of each disease on overall health and milk production. Diseases were classified from 1 (minimal adverse effects) to 10 (death). The data was modelled using BetaPERT distributions to demonstrate the variation in these dynamic disease processes, and to identify the most likely aggregated disability weights for each disease classification. A single disability weight was assigned to each disease using the average of the combined medians for the minimum, most likely, and maximum severity scores. A total of 96 respondents provided estimates of disability weights. The final disability weight values resulted in the following order from least to most severe: retained placenta, diarrhea, ketosis, metritis, mastitis, milk fever, lame (hoof only), calving trauma, left displaced abomasum, pneumonia, musculoskeletal injury (leg, hip, back), and right displaced abomasum. The peaks of the probability density functions indicated that for certain disease states such as retained placenta there was a relatively narrow range of

  17. Regular-fat dairy and human health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Arne; Bradley, Beth H Rice; Brenna, J Thomas

    2016-01-01

    to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014......) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular...

  18. Fast, high-yield synthesis of amphiphilic Ag nanoclusters and the sensing of Hg(2+) in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Nan; Yang, Jie; Wu, Zhikun

    2015-06-14

    We report the high-yield (74%) synthesis of Ag30(Capt)18 (abbreviated as Ag30) in a very time-saving fashion (half an hour). The cluster composition was determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry combined with TG analysis, and the structure was probed by 1D and 2D NMR. Interestingly, the nanoclusters can dissolve in water and methanol, as well as in most organic solvents such as ethanol, acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate with the assistance of acetic acid. Such a good solubility in a range of various polar solvents was not reported previously in nanoclusters' research and is important for applications. An important result from this work is that Ag30 can sense a low concentration of Hg(2+) in environmental samples (including lake water and soil solution), indicating that Ag30 can be a potential colorimetric probe for Hg(2+). The sensing mechanism was revealed to be related to the anti-galvanic reduction process.

  19. Breeding high-yielding drought-tolerant rice: genetic variations and conventional and molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Dixit, Shalabh; Ram, T; Yadaw, R B; Mishra, K K; Mandal, N P

    2014-11-01

    The increased occurrence and severity of drought stress have led to a high yield decline in rice in recent years in drought-affected areas. Drought research at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) over the past decade has concentrated on direct selection for grain yield under drought. This approach has led to the successful development and release of 17 high-yielding drought-tolerant rice varieties in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa. In addition to this, 14 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) showing a large effect against high-yielding drought-susceptible popular varieties were identified using grain yield as a selection criterion. Six of these (qDTY 1.1 , qDTY 2.2 , qDTY 3.1 , qDTY 3.2 , qDTY 6.1 , and qDTY 12.1 ) showed an effect against two or more high-yielding genetic backgrounds in both the lowland and upland ecosystem, indicating their usefulness in increasing the grain yield of rice under drought. The yield of popular rice varieties IR64 and Vandana has been successfully improved through a well-planned marker-assisted backcross breeding approach, and QTL introgression in several other popular varieties is in progress. The identification of large-effect QTLs for grain yield under drought and the higher yield increase under drought obtained through the use of these QTLs (which has not been reported in other cereals) indicate that rice, because of its continuous cultivation in two diverse ecosystems (upland, drought tolerant, and lowland, drought susceptible), has benefited from the existence of larger genetic variability than in other cereals. This can be successfully exploited using marker-assisted breeding. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Fluoro-Julia Olefination as a Mild, High-Yielding Route to α-Fluoro Acrylonitriles†

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Solar, Maria; Ghosh, Arun K.; Zajc, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of a novel, stable reagent (1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfonyl)fluoroacetonitrile from readily available ethyl α-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfanyl)- α-fluoroacetate is reported. Aldehydes undergo condensations with (1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfonyl)fluoroacetonitrile in the presence of DBU leading to α-fluoro acrylonitriles in high yields and with good Z-stereoselectivity. Lowering of reaction temperature increases the Z selectivity. PMID:18841918

  1. Fluoro-Julia olefination as a mild, high-yielding route to alpha-fluoro acrylonitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Solar, Maria; Ghosh, Arun K; Zajc, Barbara

    2008-11-07

    Synthesis of a novel, stable reagent (1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfonyl)fluoroacetonitrile from readily synthesized ethyl alpha-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfanyl)-alpha-fluoroacetate is reported. Aldehydes undergo condensations with (1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfonyl)fluoroacetonitrile in the presence of DBU leading to alpha-fluoro acrylonitriles in high yields and with good Z-stereoselectivity. Lowering of reaction temperature increases the Z selectivity.

  2. Intramammary antibiotics in dairy goats : effect of stage of lactation, parity and milk volume on withdrawal periods, and the effect of treatment on milk compositional quality

    OpenAIRE

    J. Karzis; E.F. Donkin; I.M. Petzer

    2007-01-01

    The length of the antibiotic withdrawal period after intramammary treatment was influenced by the milk yield of dairy goats during this trial. Shorter withdrawal periods were seen in relatively high yielding dairy goats (production above 1.5 ℓ per day) compared to low producers (less than 1.3 ℓ per day). High yielding goats treated with Curaclox LC (Norbrook [Pharmacia AH]) had a withdrawal period of 42 h, while low yielding goats, treated with the same product, had a withdrawal period ...

  3. Construction high-yield candidate influenza vaccine viruses in Vero cells by reassortment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Yang, Fan; Yang, Jinghui; Ma, Lei; Cun, Yina; Song, Shaohui; Liao, Guoyang

    2016-11-01

    Usage of influenza vaccine is the best choice measure for preventing and conclusion of influenza virus infection. Although it has been used of chicken embryo to produce influenza vaccine, following with WHO recommended vaccine strain, there were uncontrollable factors and its deficiencies, specially, during an influenza pandemic in the world. The Vero cells are used for vaccine production of a few strains including influenza virus, because of its homology with human, recommended by WHO. However, as known most of the influenza viruses strains could not culture by Vero cells. It was used two high-yield influenza viruses adapted in Vero cells as donor viruses, such as A/Yunnan/1/2005Va (H3N2) and B/Yunnan/2/2005Va (B), to construct high-yield wild influenza virus in Vero cells under antibody selection pressure. After reassortment and passages, it obtained the new Vaccine strains with A/Tianjin/15/2009Va (H1N1), A/Fujian/196/2009Va (H3N2) and B/Chongqing/1384/2010Va (B), which was not only completely keeping their original antigenic (HA and NA), but also grown well in Vero cells with high-yield. All results of gene analysis and HA, HI shown that this reassortment method could be used to find new direction to product the influenza vaccine. J. Med. Virol. 88:1914-1921, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A high throughput DNA extraction method with high yield and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhanguo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preparation of large quantity and high quality genomic DNA from a large number of plant samples is a major bottleneck for most genetic and genomic analyses, such as, genetic mapping, TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesion IN Genome, and next-generation sequencing directly from sheared genomic DNA. A variety of DNA preparation methods and commercial kits are available. However, they are either low throughput, low yield, or costly. Here, we describe a method for high throughput genomic DNA isolation from sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench] leaves and dry seeds with high yield, high quality, and affordable cost. Results We developed a high throughput DNA isolation method by combining a high yield CTAB extraction method with an improved cleanup procedure based on MagAttract kit. The method yielded large quantity and high quality DNA from both lyophilized sorghum leaves and dry seeds. The DNA yield was improved by nearly 30 fold with 4 times less consumption of MagAttract beads. The method can also be used in other plant species, including cotton leaves and pine needles. Conclusion A high throughput system for DNA extraction from sorghum leaves and seeds was developed and validated. The main advantages of the method are low cost, high yield, high quality, and high throughput. One person can process two 96-well plates in a working day at a cost of $0.10 per sample of magnetic beads plus other consumables that other methods will also need.

  5. A high throughput DNA extraction method with high yield and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhanguo; Chen, Junping

    2012-07-28

    Preparation of large quantity and high quality genomic DNA from a large number of plant samples is a major bottleneck for most genetic and genomic analyses, such as, genetic mapping, TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesion IN Genome), and next-generation sequencing directly from sheared genomic DNA. A variety of DNA preparation methods and commercial kits are available. However, they are either low throughput, low yield, or costly. Here, we describe a method for high throughput genomic DNA isolation from sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] leaves and dry seeds with high yield, high quality, and affordable cost. We developed a high throughput DNA isolation method by combining a high yield CTAB extraction method with an improved cleanup procedure based on MagAttract kit. The method yielded large quantity and high quality DNA from both lyophilized sorghum leaves and dry seeds. The DNA yield was improved by nearly 30 fold with 4 times less consumption of MagAttract beads. The method can also be used in other plant species, including cotton leaves and pine needles. A high throughput system for DNA extraction from sorghum leaves and seeds was developed and validated. The main advantages of the method are low cost, high yield, high quality, and high throughput. One person can process two 96-well plates in a working day at a cost of $0.10 per sample of magnetic beads plus other consumables that other methods will also need.

  6. Surrogate models for identifying robust, high yield regions of parameter space for ICF implosion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbird, Kelli; Peterson, J. Luc; Brandon, Scott; Field, John; Nora, Ryan; Spears, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation supercomputer architecture and in-transit data analysis have been used to create a large collection of 2-D ICF capsule implosion simulations. The database includes metrics for approximately 60,000 implosions, with x-ray images and detailed physics parameters available for over 20,000 simulations. To map and explore this large database, surrogate models for numerous quantities of interest are built using supervised machine learning algorithms. Response surfaces constructed using the predictive capabilities of the surrogates allow for continuous exploration of parameter space without requiring additional simulations. High performing regions of the input space are identified to guide the design of future experiments. In particular, a model for the yield built using a random forest regression algorithm has a cross validation score of 94.3% and is consistently conservative for high yield predictions. The model is used to search for robust volumes of parameter space where high yields are expected, even given variations in other input parameters. Surrogates for additional quantities of interest relevant to ignition are used to further characterize the high yield regions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-697277.

  7. The effect of dairy farm management regime on swallow (Hirundo rustica) abundance in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbe, S.K.; Snoo, de G.R.

    2007-01-01

    Aim To identify differences in Swallow abundance between organically and conventionally managed dairy farms, by examining three factors: farm buildings, food availability and farmer attitudes to Swallows. Methods Organic and conventional dairy farm holdings were compared in pairwise fashion. On

  8. Exposure to Inhalable Dust, Endotoxin, and Total Volatile Organic Carbons on Dairy Farms Using Manual and Automated Feeding Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basinas, Ioannis; Cronin, Garvin; Hogan, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Agricultural workers tend to have high exposures to organic dusts which may induce or exacerbate respiratory disorders. Studies investigating the effect of work tasks and farm characteristics on organic dust exposures among farm workers suggest that handling of animal feed is an imp...... feeding. Until effective permanent engineering controls are established farm workers should be encouraged to wear respiratory protective equipment during these tasks.......Introduction: Agricultural workers tend to have high exposures to organic dusts which may induce or exacerbate respiratory disorders. Studies investigating the effect of work tasks and farm characteristics on organic dust exposures among farm workers suggest that handling of animal feed...... of inhalable dust and endotoxin and may be at risk of respiratory disease. Results from this study suggest that exposure control strategies for organic dusts and TVOCs exposures should consider building ventilation and work tasks such as spreading of bedding material, using spray disinfectants and animal...

  9. Farming strategies in organic dairy farming: Effects on breeding goal and choice of breed. An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, W.J.; Baars, T.; Saatkamp, H.W.; Weenink, D.; Roep, D.

    2009-01-01

    Organic farming principles give rise to multifunctionality: different activities are combined at farm level to create ecological and economic synergies. These principles do however allow for different operationalisations and different farm development strategies, for example with regard to the use

  10. Registration of a High Yielding Malt Barley Variety HB1454 for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    else

    Registration of a High Yielding Malt Barley Variety. HB1454 for the Potential Highlands of Ethiopia. Berhane Lakew and Wondimu Fekadu. EIAR, Holetta Research Center, P O Box- 2003, Addis Ababa. አህፅርኦት. ኤች ቢ1454 የተባሇው ባሇሁሇት መስመር የብቅል ገብስ ዝርያ የተመዘገበበት ስም EH 1847/F4.2P.5.2). ሲሆን በሆሇታ ...

  11. High confinement, high yield Si3N4 waveguides for nonlinear optical application

    CERN Document Server

    Epping, Jörn P; Mateman, Richard; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René G; van Rees, Albert; van der Slot, Peter J M; Lee, Chris J; Boller, Klaus-J

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel fabrication technique for silicon nitride (Si3N4) waveguides with a thickness of up to 900 nm, which are suitable for nonlinear optical applications. The fabrication method is based on etching trenches in thermally oxidized silicon and filling the trenches with Si3N4. Using this technique no stress-induced cracks in the Si3N4 layer were observed resulting in a high yield of devices on the wafer. The propagation losses of the obtained waveguides were measured to be as low as 0.4 dB/cm at a wavelength of around 1550 nm.

  12. Protein efficiency in intensive dairy production: a Swedish example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensson, Christian; Lindmark-Månsson, Helena; Smedman, Annika; Henriksson, Maria; Modin Edman, Anna-Karin

    2017-11-01

    Animal agriculture has been criticised in terms of its sustainability from several perspectives. Ruminants such as dairy cows can transform inedible, low-quality protein in roughage and by-products from the food industry into the high-quality protein found in milk and meat. Evaluation of the protein conversion efficiency of dairy production from a sustainability and resource perspective must be based on the proportion of the animal feed edible to humans. A relevant metric is thus edible feed protein conversion ratio (eFPCR), i.e. human-edible protein output in cow's milk per unit human-edible protein input in feed. In this study, eFPCR was calculated for five regionally adapted and realistic feed rations fed to Swedish dairy cows producing different annual milk yields typical for high-yielding, intensive dairy production. All scenarios except one showed a protein efficiency ratio of >1 for human-edible protein. Thus, depending on the composition of their diet, most Swedish dairy cows can convert human-inedible protein into edible, high-value protein. However, higher milk yield led to a decrease in eFPCR, regardless of diet. Dairy cows in high-yielding, intensive production systems such as those used in Sweden have the capacity to convert low-value inedible protein into high-value edible protein. However, a minor part of the dairy cow diet is edible for humans and this fraction must be minimised to justify dairy production. These results are in line with previous findings on protein conversion efficiency and add scientific input to the debate on sustainable food systems and sustainable diets. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Extractive Fermentation of Sugarcane Juice to Produce High Yield and Productivity of Bioethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofiqah, U.; Widjaja, T.; Altway, A.; Bramantyo, A.

    2017-04-01

    Ethanol production by batch fermentation requires a simple process and it is widely used. Batch fermentation produces ethanol with low yield and productivity due to the accumulation of ethanol in which poisons microorganisms in the fermenter. Extractive fermentation technique is applied to solve the microorganism inhibition problem by ethanol. Extractive fermentation technique can produce ethanol with high yield and productivity. In this process raffinate still, contains much sugar because conversion in the fermentation process is not perfect. Thus, to enhance ethanol yield and productivity, recycle system is applied by returning the raffinate from the extraction process to the fermentation process. This raffinate also contains ethanol which would inhibit the performance of microorganisms in producing ethanol during the fermentation process. Therefore, this study aims to find the optimum condition for the amount of solvent to broth ratio (S: B) and recycle to fresh feed ratio (R: F) which enter the fermenter to produce high yield and productivity. This research was carried out by experiment. In the experiment, sugarcane juice was fermented using Zymomonasmobilis mutant. The fermentation broth was extracted using amyl alcohol. The process was integrated with the recycle system by varying the recycle ratio. The highest yield and productivity is 22.3901% and 103.115 g / L.h respectively, obtained in a process that uses recycle to fresh feed ratio (R: F) of 50:50 and solvents to both ratio of 1.

  14. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  15. CONCEPTUAL AND LEGAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING AND COST CALCULATION IN INDUSTRY OF MANUFACTURING DAIRY PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiana Bogdanoiu

    2012-01-01

    According to the legal framework of our country, economic units are responsible for organizing the management accounting adjusted to the specific activity. Economic and social transformations after 1989 led to significant changes in financial accounting, this being in a continuous process of harmonization with the principles, rules, conventions and accounting standards in countries with developed market economy. Legal framework in our country favored and still favors notable changes in accoun...

  16. Feasibility Studies on Static Pile Co Composting of Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste With Dairy Waste Water

    OpenAIRE

    Manjula Gopinathan; Meenambal Thirumurthy

    2012-01-01

    Milk processing consumes a large amount of water and generates 6–10 liters of effluent per liter of milk processed. An effluent volume is approximately four times the volume of processed milk. Since the pollutants generated by industry are great losses of production, improvements in production efficiency are recommended to reduce pollutant loads. In this research a series of experimental studies were conducted with regard to bioconversion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste along wit...

  17. Properties and evolution of dissolved organic matter during co-composting of dairy manure and Chinese herbal residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qunliang; Lu, Yanyu; Guo, Xiaobo; Shan, Guangchun; Huang, Junhao

    2017-03-01

    Composting is an effective method in treating solid organic wastes, in which dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in transformation of organic matter and microbial activity. Therefore, an understanding of the properties and evolution of DOM during composting is crucial. In this study, DOM was studied using elemental analysis, spectroscopic analysis (UV-vis, FTIR, and pyrolysis-GC/MS), and colloidal analysis during a 120-day composting. Results showed that the content of N and O in DOM increased while C and H content declined progressively over the composting time. Aliphatic C-H stretching, aromatic C=C or C=O stretching of amide groups, and C-O stretch (carbohydrates) showed an obvious decrease, while COO- and C-N groups had a significant increase. The evolution of DOM indicated a gradual decrease of the lipid and polysaccharide fractions, whereas an increase of aromatic and nitrogenous compounds was observed. The DOM also showed a more stable status, and an accumulation of small molecular compounds occurred with composting proceeded. Taken together, these results shed a good insight into the properties and evolution of DOM during a composting process.

  18. Comparison of Management Styles in Organic and Conventional Farming with Respect to Disruptive External Influences. The Case of Organic Dairy Farming and Conventional Horticulture in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, M.; Gremmen, H.G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional Dutch farming systems are constantly improving their technology to withstand disruptive external influences, while organic farming tends to focus on methods that stress conservation of natural and nonrenewable resources. We hypothesize that management styles to withstand disruptive

  19. Dairy development in the Philippines : Visions for the future: uniformity and/or diversity, community and/or commodity

    OpenAIRE

    Schiere, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Although milk has been produced and processed in the Philippines for a long time, the country does not have a strong dairy tradition. Climate and ecology are not very favourable for high yields. Moreover, policies have been erratic and the country has not used the momentum towards dairy development like some of its neighbours. This report reviews the current state of the dairy sector, with a view to developing visions for the future. Dairy sector fragmentation is partly due to the fact that t...

  20. Sward characteristics and performance of dairy cows in organic grass-legume pastures shaded by tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciullo, D S C; Pires, M F A; Aroeira, L J M; Morenz, M J F; Maurício, R M; Gomide, C A M; Silveira, S R

    2014-08-01

    The silvopastoral system (SPS) has been suggested to ensure sustainability in animal production systems in tropical ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate pasture characteristics, herbage intake, grazing activity and milk yield of Holstein×Zebu cows managed in two grazing systems (treatments): SPS dominated by a graminaceous forage (Brachiaria decumbens) intercropped with different leguminous herbaceous forages (Stylosanthes spp., Pueraria phaseoloides and Calopogonium mucunoides) and legume trees (Acacia mangium, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala), and open pasture (OP) of B. decumbens intercropped only with Stylosanthes spp. Pastures were managed according to the rules for organic cattle production. The study was carried out by following a switch back format with 12 cows, 6 for each treatment, over 3 experimental years. Herbage mass was similar (P>0.05) for both treatments, supporting an average stocking rate of 1.23 AU/ha. Daily dry matter intake did not vary (P>0.05) between treatments (average of 11.3±1.02 kg/cow per day, corresponding to 2.23±0.2% BW). Milk yield was higher (P0.05) in subsequent years. The highest (P0.05) milk yields. Low persistence of Stylosanthes guianensis was observed over the experimental period, indicating that the persistence of forage legumes under grazing could be improved using adapted cultivars that have higher annual seed production. The SPS and a diversified botanical composition of the pasture using legume species mixed with grasses are recommended for organic milk production.

  1. High-Yield Synthesis of Helical Carbon Nanofibers Using Iron Oxide Fine Powder as a Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Suda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanocoil (CNC, which is synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD method, has a coil diameter of 300–900 nm and a length of several tens of μm. Although it is very small, CNC is predicted to have a high mechanical strength and hence is expected to have a use in nanodevices such as electromagnetic wave absorbers and field emitters. For nanodevice applications, it is necessary to synthesize CNC in high yield and purity. In this study, we improved the conditions of catalytic layer formation and CCVD. Using optimized CVD conditions, a CNC layer with a thickness of >40 μm was grown from a SnO2/Fe2O3/SnO2 catalyst on a substrate, and its purity increased to 81% ± 2%.

  2. Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-09-01

    Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40, is capable of converting various biomass-derived substrates to formic acid and acetic acid with high selectivity in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere. Under optimized reaction conditions, H4PVMo11O40 gave an exceptionally high yield of formic acid (67.8%) from cellulose, far exceeding the values achieved in previous catalytic systems. Our study demonstrates that heteropoly acids are generally effective catalysts for biomass conversion due to their strong acidities, whereas the composition of metal addenda atoms in the catalysts has crucial influence on the reaction pathway and the product selectivity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Improvement of production of high-yield poplar varieties seedlings by mycorrhiza application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galić Zoran A.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Research related to the effects of treatment by mycorrhiza preparations Ectovit, Rhodovit (preparations Symbio-m Ltd., Czech Rep. and their combination on growth of four high-yield poplar clones of Populus deltoides and one variety of Populus x euramericana are presented in this paper. In order to make more accurate assessment of mycorrhiza effect, soil characteristics such as morphology, texture and chemical composition were determined. The study results indicate that mycorrhized cuttings had the same or the better survival in all the study clones compared to the control. The application of the preparation Ectovit and Rhodovit resulted averagely in the first class planting stock of all the study clones. The combination of the preparations Ectovit and Rhodovit produced averagely the first class planting stock only of the clone Populus x euramericana.

  4. Effect of intrauterine infusion of an organic-certified product on uterine health, survival, and fertility of dairy cows with toxic puerperal metritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, P J; Velez, J S; Bothe, H; Merchan, D; Piñeiro, J M; Risco, C A

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of intrauterine infusion of an organic certified product (Optimum UterFlush, Van Beek Natural Science, Orange City, IA) on uterine health, survival, and fertility of cows affected with toxic puerperal metritis (TPM) in an organic dairy farm. Cows with TPM were defined as having an abnormally enlarged uterus and a fetid watery red-brown vaginal discharge, associated with systemic illness and fever (rectal temperature ≥39.5°C), within 12 d postpartum. Cows diagnosed with TPM (n=220; study d 0) were blocked by parity (1 and ≥2) and randomly assigned into 1 of 2 intrauterine treatments applied every other day for a total of 3 applications: (1) control (CON)=200mL of povidone iodine diluted in 2L of distilled water (n=113); (2) Optimum UterFlush (UF)=3.75mL diluted in 117mL of distilled water (n=107). All enrolled cows received hypertonic saline solution (500mL 7.2% i.v.), dextrose (500mL 50% i.v.), and oral aspirin (5 boluses/d). Outcome variables for treatment efficacy included fever and presence of fetid vaginal discharge at study d 6 and 14, survival at study d 6 and 14 and at 30 and 100 DIM, and reproductive performance. Control variables were parity, BCS at enrollment, calving season, and milk yield. Occurrence of fever at d 6 and 14 was not different between the 2 treatment groups. Presence of fetid vaginal discharge at d 6 and 14 was lower in cows treated with UF compared with cows in the CON group (10.7 vs. 28% and 1.1 vs. 9.1%). The odds (95% confidence interval) for survival and remaining in the farm at study d 6 and 14 and at 30 and 100 DIM for cows in the UF treatment were 4.67 (1.38-15.8), 2.77 (1.25-6.10), 3.13 (1.22-8.02), and 2.82 (1.38-5.71) times the odds of cows in the CON group, respectively. The odds of AI until 150 DIM and the interval from calving to first AI were not different between the 2 treatments. However, pregnancy was affected by treatment; the odds (95% confidence interval) of pregnancy at

  5. Functionally Active Fc Mutant Antibodies Recognizing Cancer Antigens Generated Rapidly at High Yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Ilieva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies find broad application as therapy for various types of cancer by employing multiple mechanisms of action against tumors. Manipulating the Fc-mediated functions of antibodies that engage immune effector cells, such as NK cells, represents a strategy to influence effector cell activation and to enhance antibody potency and potentially efficacy. We developed a novel approach to generate and ascertain the functional attributes of Fc mutant monoclonal antibodies. This entailed coupling single expression vector (pVitro1 antibody cloning, using polymerase incomplete primer extension (PIPE polymerase chain reaction, together with simultaneous Fc region point mutagenesis and high yield transient expression in human mammalian cells. Employing this, we engineered wild type, low (N297Q, NQ, and high (S239D/I332E, DE FcR-binding Fc mutant monoclonal antibody panels recognizing two cancer antigens, HER2/neu and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4. Antibodies were generated with universal mutagenic primers applicable to any IgG1 pVitro1 constructs, with high mutagenesis and transfection efficiency, in small culture volumes, at high yields and within 12 days from design to purified material. Antibody variants conserved their Fab-mediated recognition of target antigens and their direct anti-proliferative effects against cancer cells. Fc mutations had a significant impact on antibody interactions with Fc receptors (FcRs on human NK cells, and consequently on the potency of NK cell activation, quantified by immune complex-mediated calcium mobilization and by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC of tumor cells. This strategy for manipulation and testing of Fc region engagement with cognate FcRs can facilitate the design of antibodies with defined effector functions and potentially enhanced efficacy against tumor cells.

  6. High yield polyol synthesis of round- and sharp-end silver nanowires with high aspect ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekahi, A.; Marashi, S.P.H., E-mail: pmarashi@aut.ac.ir; Fatmesari, D. Haghshenas

    2016-12-01

    Long silver nanowires (average length of 28 μm, average aspect ratio of 130) with uniform diameter along their length were produced by polyol synthesis of AgNO{sub 3} in ethylene glycol in the presence of PVP as preferential growth agent. Nanowires were produced with no addition of chloride salts such as NaCl or CuCl{sub 2} (or other additives such as Na{sub 2}S) which are usually used for lowering reduction rate of Ag ions by additional etchant of O{sub 2}/Cl{sup −}. Lower reduction rate was obtained by increasing the injection time of PVP and AgNO{sub 3} solutions, which was the significant factor in the formation of nanowires. Therefore, there was enough time for reduced Ag atoms to be deposited preferentially in the direction of PVP chains, resulting in high yield (the fraction of nanowires in the products) of nanowires (more than 95%) with high aspect ratio. The produced nanowires had both round- and sharp-ends with pentagonal cross section. Higher energy level of Ag atoms in borders of MTPs, which increases the dissolution rate of precipitated atoms, in addition to partial melting of MTPs at high synthesis temperatures, leads to the curving of the surfaces of exposed (111) crystalline planes in some MTPs and the formation of round-end silver nanowires. - Highlights: • Long silver nanowires with high aspect ratio of 130 were produced. • More than 95% nanowires were produced in products. • The produced nanowires had round- and sharp-ends with pentagonal cross section. • Additives were needed neither for high yield synthesis nor for round-end nanowires. • Melting and etching of MTPs in high energy borders resulted to round-end nanowires.

  7. ECONOMICS OF DAIRY FARMING IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Bor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study dairy farming activities in Turkey are employed to prove that small-scale agricultural production is disappearing rapidly due to costly investment and mechanization needs. For that purpose the cost structure and the investment needs in starting a dairy farm are analyzed. The results show that the capital requirements of building a dairy farm with optimal capacity are hard to reach for small farmers unless a system of marketing and production agricultural cooperatives and/or institutions are organized.

  8. Creating high yield water soluble luminescent graphene quantum dots via exfoliating and disintegrating carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liangxu; Zhang, Shaowei

    2012-10-21

    We have developed an effective method to exfoliate and disintegrate multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes. With this technique, high yield production of luminescent graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield and low oxidization can be achieved.

  9. Development of High Yield Feedstocks and Biomass Conversion Technology for Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Andrew G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Crow, Susan [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); DeBeryshe, Barbara [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ha, Richard [Hamakua Springs County Farms, Hilo, HI (United States); Jakeway, Lee [Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company, Puunene, HI (United States); Khanal, Samir [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Nakahata, Mae [Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company, Puunene, HI (United States); Ogoshi, Richard [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Shimizu, Erik [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Stern, Ivette [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turano, Brian [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turn, Scott [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Yanagida, John [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This project had two main goals. The first goal was to evaluate several high yielding tropical perennial grasses as feedstock for biofuel production, and to characterize the feedstock for compatible biofuel production systems. The second goal was to assess the integration of renewable energy systems for Hawaii. The project focused on high-yield grasses (napiergrass, energycane, sweet sorghum, and sugarcane). Field plots were established to evaluate the effects of elevation (30, 300 and 900 meters above sea level) and irrigation (50%, 75% and 100% of sugarcane plantation practice) on energy crop yields and input. The test plots were extensive monitored including: hydrologic studies to measure crop water use and losses through seepage and evapotranspiration; changes in soil carbon stock; greenhouse gas flux (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from the soil surface; and root morphology, biomass, and turnover. Results showed significant effects of environment on crop yields. In general, crop yields decrease as the elevation increased, being more pronounced for sweet sorghum and energycane than napiergrass. Also energy crop yields were higher with increased irrigation levels, being most pronounced with energycane and less so with sweet sorghum. Daylight length greatly affected sweet sorghum growth and yields. One of the energy crops (napiergrass) was harvested at different ages (2, 4, 6, and 8 months) to assess the changes in feedstock characteristics with age and potential to generate co-products. Although there was greater potential for co-products from younger feedstock, the increased production was not sufficient to offset the additional cost of harvesting multiple times per year. The feedstocks were also characterized to assess their compatibility with biochemical and thermochemical conversion processes. The project objectives are being continued through additional support from the Office of Naval Research, and the Biomass Research and Development

  10. Molecular signature of high yield (growth influenza a virus reassortants prepared as candidate vaccine seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojkumar Ramanunninair

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human influenza virus isolates generally grow poorly in embryonated chicken eggs. Hence, gene reassortment of influenza A wild type (wt viruses is performed with a highly egg adapted donor virus, A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8, to provide the high yield reassortant (HYR viral 'seeds' for vaccine production. HYR must contain the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of wt virus and one to six 'internal' genes from PR8. Most studies of influenza wt and HYRs have focused on the HA gene. The main objective of this study is the identification of the molecular signature in all eight gene segments of influenza A HYR candidate vaccine seeds associated with high growth in ovo. METHODOLOGY: The genomes of 14 wt parental viruses, 23 HYRs (5 H1N1; 2, 1976 H1N1-SOIV; 2, 2009 H1N1pdm; 2 H2N2 and 12 H3N2 and PR8 were sequenced using the high-throughput sequencing pipeline with big dye terminator chemistry. RESULTS: Silent and coding mutations were found in all internal genes derived from PR8 with the exception of the M gene. The M gene derived from PR8 was invariant in all 23 HYRs underlining the critical role of PR8 M in high yield phenotype. None of the wt virus derived internal genes had any silent change(s except the PB1 gene in X-157. The highest number of recurrent silent and coding mutations was found in NS. With respect to the surface antigens, the majority of HYRs had coding mutations in HA; only 2 HYRs had coding mutations in NA. SIGNIFICANCE: In the era of application of reverse genetics to alter influenza A virus genomes, the mutations identified in the HYR gene segments associated with high growth in ovo may be of great practical benefit to modify PR8 and/or wt virus gene sequences for improved growth of vaccine 'seed' viruses.

  11. Effects of milk production capacity and metabolic status on HPA function in early postpartum dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerda, B.; Kornalijnslijper, J.E.; Werf, van der J.T.N.; Noordhuizen-Stassen, E.N.; Hopster, H.

    2004-01-01

    Increasing milk yields in modern dairy cows cause concern that high yield may impair the cows' health and welfare, for example, via negative effects on metabolic status and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) function. This study aims to investigate whether a high level of milk production,

  12. Feed intake and production in dairy breeds dependent on the ration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, S.

    1982-01-01

    Selection applied to populations of dairy cattle has produced a genetic increase in milk production. This will be increased further in the Netherlands by the introduction of Holstein Friesians. In general the high yielding cow is not capable of taking in enough nutrients to meet the requirements for

  13. Development of small Enterprises through Networking : A case study from the Danish Dairy Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2003-01-01

    The article analyses how a small organic dairy uses networking to knowledge creation, getting new subcontractors and customers. In addition the realtions between vision, strategy and practice are analysed as well as the small dairies possibilities to survive in niche markets.......The article analyses how a small organic dairy uses networking to knowledge creation, getting new subcontractors and customers. In addition the realtions between vision, strategy and practice are analysed as well as the small dairies possibilities to survive in niche markets....

  14. Dairy farming and dairy industry in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beldman, A.; Berkum, van S.; Kortstee, H.; Zijlstra, J.

    2017-01-01

    Iran is a country with a long dairy tradition. Dairy production has increased to a level of about 9bn kg of milk per year. The ambition in the sector is to further increase production and to improve the quality of the milk to be able to export. Based on the analysis of available data and on a field

  15. Impact of grazing dairy steers on winter rye (Secale cereale) versus winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) and effects on meat quality, fatty acid and amino acid profiles, and consumer acceptability of organic beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Hannah N; Heins, Bradley J; Delate, Kathleen; Turnbull, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Meat from Holstein and crossbred organic dairy steers finished on winter rye and winter wheat pastures was evaluated and compared for meat quality, fatty acid and amino acid profiles, and consumer acceptability. Two adjacent 4-ha plots were established with winter rye or winter wheat cover crops in September 2015 at the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center (Morris, MN). During spring of 2015, 30 steers were assigned to one of three replicate breed groups at birth. Breed groups were comprised of: Holstein (HOL; n = 10), crossbreds comprised of Montbéliarde, Viking Red, and HOL (MVH; n = 10), and crossbreds comprised of Normande, Jersey, and Viking Red (NJV; n = 10). Dairy steers were maintained in their respective replicate breed group from three days of age until harvest. After weaning, steers were fed an organic total mixed ration of organic corn silage, alfalfa silage, corn, soybean meal, and minerals until spring 2016. Breed groups were randomly assigned to winter rye or winter wheat and rotationally grazed from spring until early summer of 2016. For statistical analysis, independent variables were fixed effects of breed, forage, and the interaction of breed and forage, with replicated group as a random effect. Specific contrast statements were used to compare HOL versus crossbred steers. Fat from crossbreds had 13% greater omega-3 fatty acids than HOL steers. Furthermore, the omega-6/3 ratio was 14% lower in fat from crossbreds than HOL steers. For consumer acceptability, steaks from steers grazed on winter wheat had greater overall liking than steers grazed on winter rye. Steak from crossbreeds had greater overall liking than HOL steers. The results suggest improvement in fatty acids and sensory attributes of beef from crossbred dairy steers compared to HOL steers, as well as those finished on winter wheat compared to winter rye.

  16. Impact of grazing dairy steers on winter rye (Secale cereale versus winter wheat (Triticum aestivum and effects on meat quality, fatty acid and amino acid profiles, and consumer acceptability of organic beef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah N Phillips

    Full Text Available Meat from Holstein and crossbred organic dairy steers finished on winter rye and winter wheat pastures was evaluated and compared for meat quality, fatty acid and amino acid profiles, and consumer acceptability. Two adjacent 4-ha plots were established with winter rye or winter wheat cover crops in September 2015 at the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center (Morris, MN. During spring of 2015, 30 steers were assigned to one of three replicate breed groups at birth. Breed groups were comprised of: Holstein (HOL; n = 10, crossbreds comprised of Montbéliarde, Viking Red, and HOL (MVH; n = 10, and crossbreds comprised of Normande, Jersey, and Viking Red (NJV; n = 10. Dairy steers were maintained in their respective replicate breed group from three days of age until harvest. After weaning, steers were fed an organic total mixed ration of organic corn silage, alfalfa silage, corn, soybean meal, and minerals until spring 2016. Breed groups were randomly assigned to winter rye or winter wheat and rotationally grazed from spring until early summer of 2016. For statistical analysis, independent variables were fixed effects of breed, forage, and the interaction of breed and forage, with replicated group as a random effect. Specific contrast statements were used to compare HOL versus crossbred steers. Fat from crossbreds had 13% greater omega-3 fatty acids than HOL steers. Furthermore, the omega-6/3 ratio was 14% lower in fat from crossbreds than HOL steers. For consumer acceptability, steaks from steers grazed on winter wheat had greater overall liking than steers grazed on winter rye. Steak from crossbreeds had greater overall liking than HOL steers. The results suggest improvement in fatty acids and sensory attributes of beef from crossbred dairy steers compared to HOL steers, as well as those finished on winter wheat compared to winter rye.

  17. Identification of potentially high yielding irradiated cassava ‘Gajah’ genotype with different geographic coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subekti, I.; Khumaida, N.; Ardie, SW

    2017-01-01

    Cassava is one of the main and important carbohydrate producing crops in Indonesia. Thus cassava production and its tuber quality need to be improved. ‘Gajah’ genotype is a local genotypes cassava from East Kalimantan, has high potential yield (> 60 ton Ha-1). However, the harvest time of this genotype is quite long (>= 12 months). The objective of this research was to identify the high yielding cassava mutants from the gamma rays irradiated ‘Gajah’ genotype at M1V3 population and potential yield at different location. Several putative cassava mutants (12 mutants) were planted in Cikabayan Experimental Field, IPB from March 2015 to March 2016 and the yields compared with the same genotype grown at different location by seeing its coordinates to observe the potential yield. Our result showed that the fresh tuber weight per plant of some putative mutants could reach more than 8 kg (yield potential of 64 ton Ha-1). The harvested tubers also had sweet flavor, although the tubers of some putative mutants were bitter. Based on previous research study, the different geographic coordinate has resulted variability on fresh tuber yield. It seems that it needs to observe the stability of ‘Gajah’- irradiated mutants in several location in Java Island.

  18. Single-step, high yield synthesis of gold nanoworms and their surface enhanced Raman scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Waqqar; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M.

    Rod-shaped gold nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention owing to their interesting optical properties arising from the surface plasmon resonances. Slight deviation from the rod morphology can markedly change the optical properties. For-example, worm-shaped gold nanoparticles can have more than two plasmon peaks. Furthermore, they show much higher local field enhancements as compared to their rod-shaped counterparts. We have devised a simple seedless, high-yield protocol for the synthesis of gold nanoworms (NWs). NWs were grown simply by reducing HAuCl4 with ascorbic acid in a high pH reaction medium, and in the presence of growth directional agents, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and AgNO3. In contrast to the seed-mediated growth of gold nanorods where a seed grows into a rod, NWs grow by oriental attachment of nanoparticles. By varying different reaction parameters we were able to control the length of NWs from a few nanometers to micrometers. Furthermore, the aspect ratio can also be tuned over a wide range. Gold NWs show excellent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties. Ultra-low concentrations of various target molecules were detected using NWs based SERS substrates.

  19. Photosynthesis of the flag leaf blade and its sheath in high-yielding hybrid rice 'Liangyoupeijiu'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhao-Wu; Li, He-Song; Wang, Ruo-Zhong; Xiao, Lang-Tao

    2007-12-01

    Using high-yielding hybrid rice 'Liangyoupeijiu' (LYP9) and hybrid rice 'Shanyou 63' (SY63) as the experimental materials and using (14)C radio-autography, the photosynthetic capacities and distribution of photosynthates in flag leaf blades and sheaths of LYP9 were studied. The results showed that net photosynthetic rates (Pn) of the flag leaf blades and sheaths of LYP9 were much higher than those of SY63; the light transmissivity rates (LT) measured at the medium height of the flag leaf sheaths and the penultimate leaf sheaths were also significantly higher than those of SY63. The incipient activities, total activities and activation percentages of Rubisco in the flag leaf blade and sheath of LYP9 were all higher than those of SY63. The photosynthate transport rate in the sheaths of LYP9, and the quantity of photosynthate transported to the spikes and transformed to economic yield of LYP9 were all higher than those of SY63. The photosynthates produced by the sheaths were mainly transported to spike to make a certain contribution (about 15%) to yield.

  20. Genetic Linkage Map of a High Yielding FELDA Deli×Yangambi Oil Palm Cross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Tzer-Ying; Mohamed Saad, Siti Hawa; Chin, Cheuk-Weng; Ting, Ngoot-Chin; Harminder Singh, Rajinder Singh; Qamaruz Zaman, Faridah; Tan, Soon-Guan; Syed Alwee, Sharifah Shahrul Rabiah

    2011-01-01

    Enroute to mapping QTLs for yield components in oil palm, we constructed the linkage map of a FELDA high yielding oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), hybrid cross. The parents of the mapping population are a Deli dura and a pisifera of Yangambi origin. The cross out-yielded the average by 8–21% in four trials all of which yielded comparably to the best current commercial planting materials. The higher yield derived from a higher fruit oil content. SSR markers in the public domain - from CIRAD and MPOB, as well as some developed in FELDA - were used for the mapping, augmented by locally-designed AFLP markers. The female parent linkage map comprised 317 marker loci and the male parent map 331 loci, both in 16 linkage groups each. The number of markers per group ranged from 8–47 in the former and 12–40 in the latter. The integrated map was 2,247.5 cM long and included 479 markers and 168 anchor points. The number of markers per linkage group was 15–57, the average being 29, and the average map density 4.7 cM. The linkage groups ranged in length from 77.5 cM to 223.7 cM, with an average of 137 cM. The map is currently being validated against a closely related population and also being expanded to include yield related QTLs. PMID:22069457

  1. High Yield of Adult Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells Obtained from Meningeal Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sissi Dolci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte loss can lead to cognitive and motor deficits. Current remyelinating therapeutic strategies imply either modulation of endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors or transplantation of in vitro expanded oligodendrocytes. Cell therapy, however, still lacks identification of an adequate source of oligodendrocyte present in adulthood and able to efficiently produce transplantable cells. Recently, a neural stem cell-like population has been identified in meninges. We developed a protocol to obtain high yield of oligodendrocyte lineage cells from one single biopsy of adult rat meningeal tissue. From 1 cm2 of adult rat spinal cord meninges, we efficiently expanded a homogenous culture of 10 millions of meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells in a short period of time (approximately 4 weeks. Meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells show typical mature oligodendrocyte morphology and express specific oligodendrocyte markers, such as galactosylceramidase and myelin basic protein. Moreover, when transplanted in a chemically demyelinated spinal cord model, meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells display in vivo-remyelinating potential. This oligodendrocyte lineage cell population derives from an accessible and adult source, being therefore a promising candidate for autologous cell therapy of demyelinating diseases. In addition, the described method to differentiate meningeal-derived neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte lineage cells may represent a valid in vitro model to dissect oligodendrocyte differentiation and to screen for drugs capable to promote oligodendrocyte regeneration.

  2. Accelerated high-yield generation of limb-innervating motor neurons from human stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Mackenzie W.; Croft, Gist F.; Williams, Damian J.; O’Keeffe, Sean; Carrasco, Monica A.; Davis, Anne R.; Roybon, Laurent; Oakley, Derek H.; Maniatis, Tom; Henderson, Christopher E.; Wichterle, Hynek

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of differentiated cells for developmental studies, cell transplantation, disease modeling, and drug testing. However, their widespread use even for intensely studied cell types like spinal motor neurons is hindered by the long duration and low yields of existing protocols for in vitro differentiation and by the molecular heterogeneity of the populations generated. We report a combination of small molecules that within 3 weeks induce motor neurons at up to 50% abundance and with defined subtype identities of relevance to neurodegenerative disease. Despite their accelerated differentiation, motor neurons expressed combinations of HB9, ISL1 and column-specific markers that mirror those observed in vivo in human fetal spinal cord. They also exhibited spontaneous and induced activity, and projected axons towards muscles when grafted into developing chick spinal cord. Strikingly, this novel protocol preferentially generates motor neurons expressing markers of limb-innervating lateral motor column motor neurons (FOXP1+/LHX3−). Access to high-yield cultures of human limb-innervating motor neuron subtypes will facilitate in-depth study of motor neuron subtype-specific properties, disease modeling, and development of large-scale cell-based screening assays. PMID:23303937

  3. High-yield electrosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen reduction by hierarchically porous carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xie; Fan, Xinfei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Shuo

    2015-06-01

    H2O2 production by electroreduction of O2 is an attractive alternative to the current anthraquinone process, which is highly desirable for chemical industries and environmental remediation. However, it remains a great challenge to develop cost-effective electrocatalysts for H2O2 synthesis. Here, hierarchically porous carbon (HPC) was proposed for the electrosynthesis of H2O2 from O2 reduction. It exhibited high activity for O2 reduction and good H2O2 selectivity (95.0-70.2%, most of them >90.0% at pH 1-4 and >80.0% at pH 7). High-yield H2O2 generation has been achieved on HPC with H2O2 concentrations of 222.6-62.0 mmol L(-1) (2.5 h) and corresponding H2O2 production rates of 395.7-110.2 mmol h(-1)  g(-1) at pH 1-7 and -0.5 V. Moreover, HPC was energy-efficient for H2O2 production with current efficiency of 81.8-70.8%. The exceptional performance of HPC for electrosynthesis of H2O2 could be attributed to its high content of sp(3)-C and defects, large surface area and fast mass transfer. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A High Yield and Cost-efficient Expression System of Human Granzymes in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotiwala, Farokh; Fellay, Isabelle; Filgueira, Luis; Martinvalet, Denis; Lieberman, Judy; Walch, Michael

    2015-06-10

    When cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) or natural killer (NK) cells recognize tumor cells or cells infected with intracellular pathogens, they release their cytotoxic granule content to eliminate the target cells and the intracellular pathogen. Death of the host cells and intracellular pathogens is triggered by the granule serine proteases, granzymes (Gzms), delivered into the host cell cytosol by the pore forming protein perforin (PFN) and into bacterial pathogens by the prokaryotic membrane disrupting protein granulysin (GNLY). To investigate the molecular mechanisms of target cell death mediated by the Gzms in experimental in-vitro settings, protein expression and purification systems that produce high amounts of active enzymes are necessary. Mammalian secreted protein expression systems imply the potential to produce correctly folded, fully functional protein that bears posttranslational modification, such as glycosylation. Therefore, we used a cost-efficient calcium precipitation method for transient transfection of HEK293T cells with human Gzms cloned into the expression plasmid pHLsec. Gzm purification from the culture supernatant was achieved by immobilized nickel affinity chromatography using the C-terminal polyhistidine tag provided by the vector. The insertion of an enterokinase site at the N-terminus of the protein allowed the generation of active protease that was finally purified by cation exchange chromatography. The system was tested by producing high levels of cytotoxic human Gzm A, B and M and should be capable to produce virtually every enzyme in the human body in high yields.

  5. High yielding biomass genotypes of willow (Salix spp.) show differences in below ground biomass allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniff, Jennifer; Purdy, Sarah J; Barraclough, Tim J P; Castle, March; Maddison, Anne L; Jones, Laurence E; Shield, Ian F; Gregory, Andrew S; Karp, Angela

    2015-09-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) grown as short rotation coppice (SRC) are viewed as a sustainable source of biomass with a positive greenhouse gas (GHG) balance due to their potential to fix and accumulate carbon (C) below ground. However, exploiting this potential has been limited by the paucity of data available on below ground biomass allocation and the extent to which it varies between genotypes. Furthermore, it is likely that allocation can be altered considerably by environment. To investigate the role of genotype and environment on allocation, four willow genotypes were grown at two replicated field sites in southeast England and west Wales, UK. Above and below ground biomass was intensively measured over two two-year rotations. Significant genotypic differences in biomass allocation were identified, with below ground allocation differing by up to 10% between genotypes. Importantly, the genotype with the highest below ground biomass also had the highest above ground yield. Furthermore, leaf area was found to be a good predictor of below ground biomass. Growth environment significantly impacted allocation; the willow genotypes grown in west Wales had up to 94% more biomass below ground by the end of the second rotation. A single investigation into fine roots showed the same pattern with double the volume of fine roots present. This greater below ground allocation may be attributed primarily to higher wind speeds, plus differences in humidity and soil characteristics. These results demonstrate that the capacity exists to breed plants with both high yields and high potential for C accumulation.

  6. Research Advances in High-Yielding Cultivation and Physiology of Super Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing FU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1996, China launched a program to breed super rice or super hybrid rice by combining intersubspecific heterosis with ideal plant types. Today, approximately 80 super rice varieties have been released and some of them show high grain yields of 12–21 t/hm2 in field experiments. The main reasons for the high yields of super rice varieties, compared with those of conventional varieties, can be summarized as follows: more spikelets per panicle and larger sink size (number of spikelets per square meter; larger leaf area index, longer duration of green leaf, greater photosynthetic rate, higher lodging resistance, greater dry matter accumulation before the heading stage, greater remobilization of pre-stored carbohydrates from stems and leaves to grains during the grain-filling period; and larger root system and greater root activity. However, there are two main problems in super rice production: poor grain-filling of the later-flowering inferior spikelets (in contrast to earlier-flowering superior spikelets, and low and unstable seed-setting rate. Here, we review recent research advances in the crop physiology of super rice, focusing on biological features, formation of yield components, and population quality. Finally, we suggest further research on crop physiology of super rice.

  7. Clostridium botulinum in cattle and dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Miia; Myllykoski, Jan; Sivelä, Seppo; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    The use of plastic-wrapped and nonacidified silage as cattle feed has led to an increasing number of botulism outbreaks due to Clostridium botulinum Groups I-III in dairy cattle. The involvement of Groups I and II organisms in cattle botulism has raised concern of human botulism risk associated with the consumption of dairy products. Multiplication of C. botulinum in silage and in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with botulism has been reported, thus contamination of the farm environment and raw milk, and further transmission through the dairy chain, are possible. The standard milk pasteurization treatment does not eliminate spores, and the intrinsic factors of many dairy products allow botulinal growth and toxin production. Although rare, several large botulism outbreaks due to both commercial and home-prepared dairy products have been reported. Factors explaining these outbreaks include most importantly temperature abuse, but also unsafe formulation, inadequate fermentation, insufficient thermal processing, post-process contamination, and lack of adequate quality control for adjunct ingredients were involved. The small number of outbreaks is probably explained by a low incidence of spores in milk, the presence of competitive bacteria in pasteurized milk and other dairy products, and growth-inhibitory combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cultured and processed dairy products.

  8. Dairy manure and plant nutrient management issues affecting water quality and the dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, L E

    1994-07-01

    Specific requirements for dairy manure management to protect water quality from nutrient pollution depend on the organization of individual farms. Further, the management requirements and options are different for point (farmstead) and nonpoint (field-applied) sources of pollution from farms. A formal management process can guide decisions about existing crop nutrient utilization potential, provide a framework for tracking nutrients supplied to crops, and identify future requirements for dairy manure management to protect water quality. Farm managers can use the process to plan daily activities, to assess annual nutrient management performance, and to chart future requirements as herd size increases. Agronomic measures of nutrient balance and tracking of inputs and outputs for various farm management units can provide the quantitative basis for management to allocate better manure to fields, to modify dairy rations, or to develop alternatives to on-farm manure application. Changes in agricultural production since World War II have contributed to a shift from land-based dairy production to a reliance on capital factors of production supplied by the dairy industry. Meanwhile, management of dairy manure to meet increasingly stringent water quality protection requirements is still a land-based activity. Involving the dairy industry and off-farm stakeholders as participants in the management process for field, farm, and regional dairy production can be the basis for decision-making to reconcile the sometimes conflicting demands of production and water quality protection.

  9. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman de Villoria, R; Hart, A J; Steiner, S A III; Wardle, B L [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Figueredo, S L; Slocum, A H, E-mail: rguzman@mit.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of {approx}1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s{sup -1}. Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport.

  10. Optimization of Escherichia coli cultivation methods for high yield neuropeptide Y receptor type 2 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christian; Montag, Cindy; Berndt, Sandra; Huster, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    The recombinant expression of human G protein-coupled receptors usually yields low production levels using commonly available cultivation protocols. Here, we describe the development of a high yield production protocol for the human neuropeptide Y receptor type 2 (Y2R), which provides the determination of expression levels in a time, media composition, and process parameter dependent manner. Protein was produced by Escherichia coli in a defined medium composition suitable for isotopic labeling required for investigations by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The Y2 receptor was fused to a C-terminal 8x histidine tag by means of the pET vector system for easy one-step purification via affinity chromatography, yielding a purity of 95-99% for every condition tested, which was determined by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. The Y2 receptor was expressed as inclusion body aggregates in complex media and minimal media, using different carbon sources. We investigated the influences of media composition, temperature, pH, and set specific growth rate on cell behavior, biomass wet weight specific and culture volume specific amounts of the target protein, which had been identified by inclusion body preparation, solubilization, followed by purification and spectrometric determination of the protein concentration. The developed process control strategy led to very high reproducibility of cell growth and protein concentrations with a maximum yield of 800 μg purified Y2 receptor per gram wet biomass when glycerol was used as carbon source in the mineral salt medium composition (at 38 °C, pH 7.0, and a set specific growth rate of 0.14 g/(gh)). The maximum biomass specific amount of purified Y2 receptor enabled the production of 35 mg Y2R per liter culture medium at an optical density (600 nm) of 25. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Short communication: Telomere lengths in different tissues of dairy cows during early and late lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubenthal, L; Hoelker, M; Frahm, J; Dänicke, S; Gerlach, K; Südekum, K-H; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres create a protective cap on the ends of chromosomes that shorten with cell division and are influenced by stressful conditions. With the onset of lactation, high-yielding dairy cows are exposed to metabolic stress. In the present study, we aimed to analyze telomere length (TL) in key metabolic organs, such as liver, subcutaneous (sc) adipose tissue (AT), and mammary gland, as well as in peripheral blood cells during early and late lactation in German Holstein cows (n=21). Animals were fed according to their requirement, and biopsies from scAT, liver, and mammary gland as well as blood cells were collected in early and late lactation. The relative quantity of telomere products (qT), which is proportional to the average TL, was determined in genomic DNA by multiplex quantitative PCR. In this study, relative qT varied widely in the investigated tissues and blood. In late lactation, slowly proliferating tissues, such as liver and scAT, had the highest qT, whereas peripheral blood cells and in the mammary gland had the lowest qT. Comparing early with late lactation, relative qT attrition was limited to blood and mammary gland. Relationships between relative qT in blood, mammary gland, scAT, and liver suggest that blood qT might serve as a surrogate marker for tissue-specific qT. Cows with high initial qT in tissues and blood in early lactation had greater qT attrition during the course of lactation than cows with lower qT. The determination of qT could be included when phenotyping dairy cattle to test for associations with performance and fitness traits. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in rice agriculture driven by high yields and nitrogen use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Xu, Xin; Liu, Yinglie; Wang, Jinyang; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of how global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) is affected by management practices aimed at food security with respect to rice agriculture remains limited. In the present study, a field experiment was conducted in China to evaluate the effects of integrated soil-crop system management (ISSM) on GWP and GHGI after accounting for carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent emissions from all sources, including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, agrochemical inputs and farm operations and sinks (i.e., soil organic carbon sequestration). The ISSM mainly consisted of different nitrogen (N) fertilization rates and split, manure, Zn and Na2SiO3 fertilization and planting density for the improvement of rice yield and agronomic nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). Four ISSM scenarios consisting of different chemical N rates relative to the local farmers' practice (FP) rate were carried out, namely, ISSM-N1 (25 % reduction), ISSM-N2 (10 % reduction), ISSM-N3 (FP rate) and ISSM-N4 (25 % increase). The results showed that compared with the FP, the four ISSM scenarios significantly increased the rice yields by 10, 16, 28 and 41 % and the agronomic NUE by 75, 67, 35 and 40 %, respectively. In addition, compared with the FP, the ISSM-N1 and ISSM-N2 scenarios significantly reduced the GHGI by 14 and 18 %, respectively, despite similar GWPs. The ISSM-N3 and ISSM-N4 scenarios remarkably increased the GWP and GHGI by an average of 69 and 39 %, respectively. In conclusion, the ISSM strategies are promising for both food security and environmental protection, and the ISSM scenario of ISSM-N2 is the optimal strategy to realize high yields and high NUE together with low environmental impacts for this agricultural rice field.

  13. High-yield synthesis of few-layer graphene flakes through electrochemical expansion of graphite in propylene carbonate electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junzhong; Manga, Kiran Kumar; Bao, Qiaoliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-06-15

    High-yield production of few-layer graphene flakes from graphite is important for the scalable synthesis and industrial application of graphene. However, high-yield exfoliation of graphite to form graphene sheets without using any oxidation process or super-strong acid is challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution route inspired by the lithium rechargeable battery for the high-yield (>70%) exfoliation of graphite into highly conductive few-layer graphene flakes (average thickness graphene sheets with the aid of sonication. The dispersible graphene can be ink-brushed to form highly conformal coatings of conductive films (15 ohm/square at a graphene loading of <1 mg/cm(2)) on commercial paper. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Prioritisation of farm scale remediation efforts for reducing losses of nutrients and faecal indicator organisms to waterways: a case study of New Zealand dairy farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, R M; de Klein, C A M; Muirhead, R W

    2008-06-01

    The international competitiveness of the New Zealand (NZ) dairy industry is built on low cost clover-based systems and a favourable temperate climate that enables cows to graze pastures mostly all year round. Whilst this grazed pasture farming system is very efficient at producing milk, it has also been identified as a significant source of nutrients (N and P) and faecal bacteria which have contributed to water quality degradation in some rivers and lakes. In response to these concerns, a tool-box of mitigation measures that farmers can apply on farm to reduce environmental emissions has been developed. Here we report the potential reduction in nutrient losses and costs to farm businesses arising from the implementation of individual best management practices (BMPs) within this tool-box. Modelling analysis was carried out for a range of BMPs targeting pollutant source reduction on case-study dairy farms, located in four contrasting catchments. Due to the contrasting physical resources and management systems present in the four dairy catchments evaluated, the effectiveness and costs of BMPs varied. Farm managements that optimised soil Olsen P levels or used nitrification inhibitors were observed to result in win-win outcomes whereby nutrient losses were consistently reduced and farm profitability was increased in three of the four case study farming systems. Other BMPs generally reduced nutrient and faecal bacteria losses but at a small cost to the farm business. Our analysis indicates that there are a range of technological measures that can deliver substantial reductions in nutrient losses to waterways from dairy farms, whilst not increasing or even reducing other environmental impacts (e.g. greenhouse gas emissions and energy use). Their implementation will first require clearly defined environmental goals for the catchment/water body that is to be protected. Secondly, given that the major sources of water pollutants often differed between catchments, it is

  15. High-yield synthesis and electrochemical and photovoltaic properties of indene-C{sub 70} bisadduct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Youjun; Zhao, Guangjin; Peng, Bo; Li, Yongfang [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-10-08

    [6, 6]-Phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 60}BM) is the widely used acceptor material in polymer solar cells (PSCs). Nevertheless, the low LUMO energy level and weak absorption in visible region are its two weak points. For enhancing the solar light harvest, the soluble C{sub 70} derivative PC{sub 70}BM has been used as acceptor instead of PC{sub 60}BM in high efficiency PSCs in recent years. But, the LUMO level of PC{sub 70}BM is the same as that of PC{sub 60}BM, which is too low for the PSCs based on the polymer donors with higher HOMO level, such as poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Here, a new soluble C{sub 70} derivative, indene-C{sub 70} bisadduct (IC{sub 70}BA), is synthesized with high yield of 58% by a one-pot reaction of indene and C{sub 70} at 180 C for 72 h. The electrochemical properties and electronic energy levels of the fullerene derivatives are measured by cyclic voltammetry. The LUMO energy level of IC{sub 70}BA is 0.19 eV higher than that of PC{sub 70}BM. The PSC based on P3HT with IC{sub 70}BA as acceptor shows a higher V{sub oc} of 0.84 V and higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5.64%, while the PSC based on P3HT/PC{sub 60}BM and P3HT/PC{sub 70}BM displays V{sub oc} of 0.59 V and 0.58 V, and PCE of 3.55% and 3.96%, respectively, under the illumination of AM1.5G, 100 mW cm{sup -2}. The results indicate that IC{sub 70}BA is an excellent acceptor for the P3HT-based PSCs and could be a promising new acceptor instead of PC{sub 70}BM for the high performance PSCs based on narrow bandgap conjugated polymer donor. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Innovations in papermaking: an LCA of printing and writing paper from conventional and high yield pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, B M Krishna; Blok, Kornelis; Patel, Martin K

    2012-11-15

    Pulp and paper industry is facing challenges such as resource scarcity and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The objective of this research is to investigate whether the use of new coatings (micro or nano TiO(2)) and different pulp types could bring savings in wood, energy, GHG emissions and other environmental impacts in comparison with conventional printing and writing paper. We studied three types of pulp, namely i) unbleached virgin kraft pulp, ii) recovered fiber, and iii) high yield virgin chemithermo-mechanical pulp (CTMP). A life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted from cradle to grave. Applying attributional modeling, we found that wood savings amount to 60% for the nanoparticle coated recovered fiber paper and 35% for the micro TiO(2) coated CTMP paper. According to the ReCiPe single score impact assessment method, the new product configurations allow the reduction of the environmental impacts by 10-35% compared to conventional kraft paper. Applying consequential modeling, we found larger energy and GHG emission savings compared to attributional modeling because the saved wood is used for producing energy, thereby replacing fossil fuels. The nanoparticle coated recovered fiber paper offered savings of non-renewable energy use (NREU) by 100% (13GJ/ton paper) and GHG emission reduction by 75% (0.6 tonCO(2)eq./ton paper). Micro TiO(2) coated CTMP paper offered NREU savings by 25% (3GJ/ton paper) and savings of GHG emissions by 10% (0.1 tonCO(2)eq./ton paper). The taking into account of all environmental impacts with the ReCiPe single score method leads to comparable results as that of attributional modeling. We conclude that the nanoparticle coated recovered fiber paper offered the highest savings and lowest environmental impacts. However, human toxicity and ecotoxicity impacts of the nanoparticles were not included in this analysis and need further research. If this leads to the conclusion that the toxicity impacts of the nanoparticles are serious, then the

  17. Induction of embryogenic callus and plantlet regeneration from young leaves of high yielding mature oil palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeedum, I.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Callus induction and plantlet regeneration from young leaves of high-yielding mature oil palm were carried out using 10-year and 20-year-old trees from Thepa Research Station, Faculty of Natural Resources,Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, and Trang Agricultural College, respectively. Culture media used in this experiment were Murashige and Skoog (1962 and Oil Palm supplemented with various concentrations of α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA or 2,4- dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D or dicamba (Di and antioxidants.Young leaves from 6th to 11st frond were excised, sterilized, cut into 5x5 mm pieces and cultured in the dark at 26±4ºC or 28±0.5ºC for 3 months. The results revealed that MS medium with 200 mg/l ascorbic acid (As and 1 mg/l Di (MS-AsDi gave the highest callus induction percentage (7.93 after culture for 3 months at 28±0.5ºC. Leaf segments from 6th - 8th frond yielded callus forming percentage at 10% (averaged from 1, 2.5 and 5 mg/l Di containing MS medium. Ascorbic acid as an antioxidant at concentration of 200 mg/l supplemented in MS medium in the presence of 2.5 mg/l Di produced the highest callus induction percentage (11.2 and number of nodules (7.06. A high percentage of embryogenic callus formation (66.67 was obtained when the calli were transferred to the same medium component supplemented with 0.5 mg/l Di and 1,000 mg/l casein hydrolysate (CH (MS-AsDiCH. Haustorial-staged embryos were observed to be isolated as an individual embryo and germinated on MS medium without plant growth regulator (MS-free. Development of root could be classified into two distinct types, fibrous and tap root.

  18. Applying ontologies in the dairy farming domain for big data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoosel, J.P.C.; Spek, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    In the Dutch SmartDairyFarming project, main dairy industry organizations like FrieslandCampina, AgriFirm and CRV work together on better decision support for the dairy farmer on daily questions around feeding, insemination, calving and milk production processes. This paper is concerned with the

  19. Sprouted barley for dairy cows: Is it worth it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprouted grains have gained renewed interest among grazing dairy farmers in response to high grain prices, grain scarcity (in the organic dairy sector) and challenges in producing high-quality forages. This interest has been spurred by high-profile advertising by companies selling the systems, as we...

  20. Policies and Strategies for Eco-Friendly Dairy Product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziggers, G.W.; Conte, F.; Del Nobile, M.A.; Faccia, M.; Zambrini, A.V.; Conte, A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in, and market for, eco-friendly dairy production, a large-scale transition is not taking place. This is partly explained by the institutional context, since dairy production is organized in supply chains that generate interdependencies and, in turn, are subject to

  1. Ultrafiltration with size-exclusion liquid chromatography for high yield isolation of extracellular vesicles preserving intact biophysical and functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordin, Joel Z.; Lee, Yi; Vader, Pieter; Mäger, Imre; Johansson, Henrik J.; Heusermann, Wolf; Wiklander, Oscar P B; Hällbrink, Mattias; Seow, Yiqi; Bultema, Jarred J.; Gilthorpe, Jonathan; Davies, Tim; Fairchild, Paul J.; Gbrielsson, Susanne; Meisner-Kober, Nicole C.; Lehtiö, Janne; Smith, C. I Edvard; Wood, Matthew J A; Andaloussi, Samir E L

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are natural nanoparticles that mediate intercellular transfer of RNA and proteins and are of great medical interest; serving as novel biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. However, there is little consensus on the most appropriate method to isolate high-yield and

  2. BRS 369RF and BRS 370RF: Glyphosate tolerant, high-yielding upland cotton cultivars for central Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo de Lelis Morello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BRS 369RF and BRS 370RF were developed by the EMBRAPA as a part of efforts to create high-yielding germplasm with combinations of transgenic traits. BRS 369RF and BRS 370RF are midseason cultivars and have yield stability, adaptation to the central Brazilian savanna, good fiber quality and tolerance to glyphosate herbicide.

  3. BRS FC402: high-yielding common bean cultivar with carioca grain, resistance to anthracnose and fusarium wilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Cunha Melo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BRS FC402 is a common bean cultivar of the carioca-grain group with commercial grain quality, suitable for cultivation in 21 Brazilian states. Cultivar has a normal cycle (85-94 days, high yield potential (4479 kg ha-1, 10.1% higher mean yield than the controls (2462 kg ha-1 and resistance to fusarium wilt and anthracnose.

  4. High yield purification of full-length functional hERG K+ channels produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molbaek, Karen; Scharff-Poulsen, Peter; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    knowledge this is the first reported high-yield production and purification of full length, tetrameric and functional hERG. This significant breakthrough will be paramount in obtaining hERG crystal structures, and in establishment of new high-throughput hERG drug safety screening assays....

  5. Growth, livability, feed consumption, and carcass composition of the Athens Canadian Random Bred 1955 meat-type chicken versus the 2012 high-yielding Cobb 500 broiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, K E; Kiepper, B H; Ritz, C W; McLendon, B L; Wilson, J L

    2014-12-01

    A flock of the Athens Canadian Random Bred (ACRB), a 1955 meat-type chicken control strain, was raised alongside a flock of 2012 Cobb 500 fast feathering high-yielding broilers to determine selection changes over the past 57 yr. All birds were reared under management practices appropriate for the Cobb 500. Birds were weighed weekly and processed at 6, 8, and 10 wk. Whole carcass, carcass parts, and organs were weighed. Modern broilers outweighed ACRB at every age, ranging from 3.7 to 4.7 times the size of the ACRB. All parts and organs were compared as a percentage of live fasted BW. The ACRB had significantly heavier feet, wings, internal organs, and feathers. The modern Cobb broiler had double the breast and larger leg muscles and had a significantly greater fat pad. Despite the larger muscle mass, the supply organs, the heart and lungs, were significantly smaller in the Cobb broiler than the ACRB as a percentage of BW. Relative size of supply and other vital organs should be given consideration for genetic selection of the future broiler. Comparisons of ACRB weights and organ percentages with past published data indicates that the ACRB remains a consistent control strain. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. Invited review: Changes in the dairy industry affecting dairy cattle health and welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkema, H W; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Kastelic, J P; Lam, T J G M; Luby, C; Roy, J-P; LeBlanc, S J; Keefe, G P; Kelton, D F

    2015-11-01

    organic dairy farms has increased globally and, given the pressure to decrease the use of antimicrobials and hormones, conventional farms may be able to learn from well-managed organic farms. The possibilities of using milk for disease diagnostics and monitoring are considerable, and dairy herd improvement associations will continue to expand the number of tests offered to diagnose diseases and pregnancy. Genetic and genomic selection for increased resistance to disease offers substantial potential but requires collection of additional phenotypic data. There is every expectation that changes in the dairy industry will be further accentuated and additional novel technologies and different management practices will be adopted in the future. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasonic treatment to improve anaerobic digestibility of dairy waste streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmowski, L; Simons, L; Brooks, R

    2006-01-01

    The dairy-processing industry generates various types of organic wastes, which are utilised as stock feed, for anaerobic digestion, spread on land or alternatively land-filled at high costs. Owing to the generation of renewable energy, anaerobic digestion is an attractive option for many factories. To enhance the biological degradation process, a mechanical disintegration of various waste dairy streams was undertaken. While the successful application of ultrasonic treatment has been reported for various municipal waste streams, limited information was available for dairy industry applications. The results of this study showed that ultrasonic treatment can improve the digestibility of the more problematic dairy waste streams, such as sludges, by breaking down micro-organisms' cell walls and releasing soluble cell compounds. For more soluble streams, such as dairy factory effluent, an increased gas production was observed and attributed to the reduced particle size of the fat globules.

  8. Improving smallholder livelihoods: Dairy production in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Ulicky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tanzania is primarily an agro-based economy, characterized by subsistence agricultural production that employs more than 80% of the population and contributes up to 45% of the GDP (2005. This country is endowed with a cattle population of 21.3 M, composed mainly of indigenous Zebu breeds and about 680 000 improved dairy animals. About 70% of the milk produced comes from the traditional sector (indigenous cattle kept in rural areas, while the remaining 30% comes from improved cattle, mainly kept by smallholder producers. In Northern Tanzania and particularly in Hai district of Kilimanjaro Region, some dairy farmers organize themselves into small producer groups for the purpose of milk collecting, marketing and general promotion of the dairy sector in their community. Nronga Women Dairy Cooperative Society (NWDCS Limited is one of such organizations dedicated to improve the well-being of the Nronga village community through promoting small-scale dairy farming and its flow-on benefits. Milk flows out of the village, and services for investment and dairy production flow into the village, ensuring a sustainable financial circulation necessary for poverty reduction, rural development and better life for the rural community. In 2001 NWDCS introduced a school milk feeding program that has attracted Australian donors since 2005. Guided by Global Development Group, a multi-faceted project, integrating micro-enterprises, business, education and child health/nutrition, was proposed and initiated by building a dairy plant in Hai District headquarters, the Boma plant. In March 2013, the Australian High Commission to East Africa approved Direct Aid Program funding of AUD 30 000 towards the NWDCS - Biogas Pilot Project in Tanzania, which included the renovation of zero-grazing cow shade units, the construction of 6-m3 biodigester plants on each farm, and encouragement of the use of bioslurry for pasture production and home gardens.

  9. High-yield synthesis of brookite TiO.sub.2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Dale L [Albuquerque, NM; Monson, Todd C [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-05-17

    A method for forming non-agglomerated brookite TiO.sub.2 nanoparticles without the use of expensive organic surfactants or high temperature processing. Embodiments of this invention use titanium isopropoxide as the titanium precursor and isopropanol as both the solvent and ligand for ligand-stabilized brookite-phase titania. Isopropanol molecules serve as the ligands interacting with the titania surfaces that stabilize the titania nanoparticles. The isopropanol ligands can be exchanged with other alcohols and other ligands during or after the nanoparticle formation reaction.

  10. High-yielding cascade enzymatic synthesis of 5-methyluridine using a novel combination of nucleoside phosphorylases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, Daniel F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available that organism (BhUP). Klebsiella Pneumoniae and Bacillus Lichniformis were identified as good UPase producers in a previous screening experiment (unpublished). The PNPase gene designated BhPNP1 was amplified and cloned as described previously (Visser et al... then harvested after a further 2 h growth under the same conditions. B. halodurans, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Bacillus licheniformis were cultivated in TYG media (Tryptone, 5 g.l-1; yeast extract, 2 g.l-1; glucose, 1 g.l-1) at 40°C with shaking at 200 rpm...

  11. Productivity, Profitability and Resource Use Efficiency: A Comparative Analysis between Conventional and High Yielding Rice in Rajbari District, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Yahia Bapari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was analyzed the determinants, costs and benefits and resources allocation of both conventional and high yielding rice cultivation over the Rajbari district of Bangladesh. Data were accumulated from 300 regular rice growers of conventional and high yielding varieties and random sampling technique was applied for selecting the respondents from the study area from which information was collected through pre-tested questionnaire. Cobb – Douglas production function and gross margin were mainly used to determine the productivities and profits of both rice and the marginal value of the product was highly recommended to derive the optimal use of the resources. Results obtained by applying ordinary least square method showed that the most important factors of production in the study area were irrigation, labor, fertilizer and insecticide costs whose elasticities were 0.904, 0.048, 0.045 and 0.044 respectively and insignificant factors were seed and ploughing costs whose elasticities were – 0.009 and 0.030 respectively for high yielding rice. On the other hand, irrigation, insecticide, seed and ploughing costs of elasticities 0.880, 0.589, 0.116 and – 0.127 respectively were the important factors and minor role playing factors were labor and fertilizer costs whose elasticities were 0.098 and 0.077 respectively for conventional yielding rice. The core message from productivity analysis was that the irrigation was key variable which played a positive and vital role in producing rice of both varieties. All variables (resources were economically misallocated in the production activities of both varieties along the study area but high yielding rice was more profitable than conventional one. Results also showed that the farmers of the study area produced rice of both varieties in the inefficient range of production. Continuous supply of electricity, flexible credit and improving the existing resources were the prime policy recommendations of

  12. A high-yielding, generic fed-batch process for recombinant antibody production of GS-engineered cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Li; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Yating

    2009-01-01

    . Compared to batch cultures, the fed-batch technology generated the magnitude of the increase in cell yields (5 fold) and final antibody concentrations (4-8 fold). The majority of the increase in final antibody concentration was functions of the increased cell density and the prolonged culture time....... This generic and high-yielding fed-batch process would shorten development time, and ensure process stability, thereby facilitating the manufacture of therapeutic antibodies by GS-engineered cell lines....

  13. Selection for longevity in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollema, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis deals with several aspects of longevity of dairy cattle. When breeding organizations want to implement longevity in their breeding programs they have to make several decisions. This thesis aims to give tools to make those decisions.

    Chapter 2 gives an overview

  14. High-yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos Martinez, Erick Miguel; Fimognari, Lorenzo; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2017-01-01

    reinhardtii, a widely used green microalga as a model organism and a potential industrial biotechnology platform. We demonstrated that the putative signal sequence from C. reinhardtii gametolysin can assist the secretion of the yellow fluorescent protein Venus into the culture media. To increase the secretion...... yields, Venus was C-terminally fused with synthetic glycomodules comprised of tandem serine (Ser) and proline (Pro) repeats of 10 and 20 units [hereafter (SP)n , wherein n = 10 or 20]. The yields of the (SP)n -fused Venus were higher than Venus without the glycomodule by up to 12-fold, with the maximum...... yield of 15 mg/L. Moreover, the presence of the glycomodules conferred an enhanced proteolytic protein stability. The Venus-(SP)n proteins were shown to be glycosylated, and a treatment of the cells with brefeldin A led to a suggestion that glycosylation of the (SP)n glycomodules starts...

  15. The Effects of Dairy Management on Milk Quality Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Pylyp Petrov; Yaroslava Zhukova; Demikhov Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the impact of different dairy management types on quality characteristics of organic and conventional milk. The study was conducted during 9 months (spring-autumn), raw milk samples were collected from organic and conventional dairy farms from two Ukrainian regions. The milk samples were analyzed for dry matter, total protein and non-protein nitrogen, ammonia content and values of stable isotopes 13С/12С were measured in fat and milk protein fractions. The values of dry...

  16. Mineral elements in milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimun Zamberlin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral elements occur in milk and dairy products as inorganic ions and salts, as well as part of organic molecules, such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. The chemical form of mineral elements is important because it determines their absorption in the intestine and their biological utilization. The mineral composition of milk is not constant because it depends on lactation phase, nutritional status of the animal, and environmental and genetic factors. The objective of this research is to point out the research results of chemical form, content and nutritional importance of individual mineral elements that are present in various milks and dairy products.

  17. Growth and Performance of the Ugandan Dairy Sector: Elites, Conflict and Bargaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Mwebaze, Tom

    2013-01-01

    elites who wanted to build a support base in their home area. In addition, the elites had special interest in dairy farming, since key elite members owned dairy cattle themselves hence have played key role in promoting the dairy sector. Liberalisation enhanced the competitiveness of the dairy sector......) established to promote efficiency in marketing of milk. With the existence of DDA, to a considerable extent there has been an improved organization of dairy farmers and traders and also the quality and safety of milk enhanced amidst conflicts....

  18. EFFECT ON LIFESPAN OF HIGH YIELD NONMYELOABLATING TRANSPLANTATION OF BONE MARROW FROM YOUNG TO OLD MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eKovina

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tissue renewal is a well-known phenomenon by which old and dying-off cells of various tissues of the body are replaced by progeny of local or circulating stem cells (SC. An interesting question is whether donor stem cells are capable to prolong the lifespan of an ageing organism by tissue renewal.. In this work we investigated the possible use of bone marrow SC for lifespan extension. To this purpose, chimeric C57BL/6 mice were created by transplanting bone marrow from young 1.5-month donors to 21.5-month-old recipients. Transplantation was carried out by means of a recently developed method which allowed to transplant without myeloablation up to 1.5×108 cells, that is, about 25 % of the total BM cells of the mouse. As a result, the mean survival time, counting from the age of 21.5 months, the start of the experiment, was +3.6 and +5.0 (± 0.1 months for the control and experimental groups, respectively, corresponding to a 39% ± 4% increase in the experimental group over the control. In earlier studies on BM transplantation a considerably smaller quantity of donor cells (5×106 was used, about 1 % of the total own BM cells. The recipients before transplantation were exposed to a lethal (for control animals X-ray dose which eliminated the possibility of studying the lifespan extension by this method.

  19. Harnessing the respiration machinery for high-yield production of chemicals in metabolically engineered Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianming; Wang, Zhihao; Kandasamy, Vijayalakshmi

    2017-01-01

    When modifying the metabolism of living organisms with the aim of achieving biosynthesis of useful compounds, it is essential to ensure that it is possible to achieve overall redox balance. We propose a generalized strategy for this, based on fine-tuning of respiration. The strategy was applied...... on metabolically engineered Lactococcus lactis strains to optimize the production of acetoin and (R,R)−2,3-butanediol (R-BDO). In the absence of an external electron acceptor, a surplus of two NADH per acetoin molecule is produced. We found that a fully activated respiration was able to efficiently regenerate NAD...... is converted into R-BDO per mole, only the excess of NADH needs to be oxidized via respiration. Either by fine-tuning the respiration capacity or by using a dual-phase fermentation approach involving a switch from fully respiratory to non-respiratory conditions, we obtained 361 mM (32 g/L) R-BDO with a yield...

  20. Evaluation of low-cost cathode catalysts for high yield biohydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Chen, Y; Ye, Y; Lu, B; Zhu, S; Shen, S

    2011-01-01

    As an ideal fuel due to the advantages of no pollution, high combustion heat and abundant sources, hydrogen gas can be produced from organic matter through the electrohydrogenesis process in microbial electrolysis cells. But in many MECs, platinum is often used as catalyst, which limits the practical applications of MECs. To reduce the cost of the MECs, Ni-based alloy cathodes were developed by electrodepositing. In this paper hydrogen production using Ni-W-P cathode was studied for the first time in a single-chamber membrane-free MEC. At an applied voltage of 0.9 V, MECs with Ni-W-P cathodes obtained a hydrogen production rate of 1.09 m3/m3/day with an cathodic hydrogen recovery of 74%, a Coulombic efficiency of 56% and an electrical energy efficiency relative to electrical input of 139%, which was the best result of reports in this study. The Ni-W-P cathode demonstrated a better electrocatalytic activity than the Ni-Ce-P cathode and achieved a comparable performance to the Pt cathode in terms of hydrogen production rate, Coulombic efficiency, cathodic hydrogen recovery and electrical energy efficiency at 0.9 V.

  1. Dairy Products and Health: Recent Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunick, Michael H; Van Hekken, Diane L

    2015-11-04

    Milk, cheese, yogurt, and other dairy products have long been known to provide good nutrition. Major healthful contributors to the diets of many people include the protein, minerals, vitamins, and fatty acids present in milk. Recent studies have shown that consumption of dairy products appears to be beneficial in muscle building, lowering blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and preventing tooth decay, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Additional benefits might be provided by organic milk and by probiotic microorganisms using milk products as a vehicle. New research on dairy products and nutrition will improve our understanding of the connections between these products, the bioactive compounds in them, and their effects on the human body.

  2. The potential of dairy wastewater for denitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibela Landeka Dragičević

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the potential of dairy wastewater for denitrification process by means of a microbial culture of nitrificants and denitrificants was investigated. The aim of this work was to remove nitrate by using organic compounds from the dairy wastewater as an electron donors. The minimal ratio of COD/NO3-N of 10 (COD-chemical oxygen demand/NO3-N-nitrate nitrogen was required to achieve complete reduction of NO3-N. The microbial culture of nitrificants and denitrificants, that was previously adapted on the dairy wastewater, carried out nitrate reduction with a different substrate utilization rate. The denitrification rate of 5.75 mg NO3-N/Lh was achieved at the beginning of denitrification when the microbial culture utilizes readily biodegradable COD. Further degradation occurred with the denitrification rate of 1.7 mg NO3-N/Lh.

  3. Harnessing the respiration machinery for high-yield production of chemicals in metabolically engineered Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Wang, Zhihao; Kandasamy, Vijayalakshmi; Lee, Sang Yup; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2017-11-01

    When modifying the metabolism of living organisms with the aim of achieving biosynthesis of useful compounds, it is essential to ensure that it is possible to achieve overall redox balance. We propose a generalized strategy for this, based on fine-tuning of respiration. The strategy was applied on metabolically engineered Lactococcus lactis strains to optimize the production of acetoin and (R,R)-2,3-butanediol (R-BDO). In the absence of an external electron acceptor, a surplus of two NADH per acetoin molecule is produced. We found that a fully activated respiration was able to efficiently regenerate NAD+, and a high titer of 371mM (32g/L) of acetoin was obtained with a yield of 82% of the theoretical maximum. Subsequently, we extended the metabolic pathway from acetoin to R-BDO by introducing the butanediol dehydrogenase gene from Bacillus subtilis. Since one mole of NADH is consumed when acetoin is converted into R-BDO per mole, only the excess of NADH needs to be oxidized via respiration. Either by fine-tuning the respiration capacity or by using a dual-phase fermentation approach involving a switch from fully respiratory to non-respiratory conditions, we obtained 361mM (32g/L) R-BDO with a yield of 81% or 365mM (33g/L) with a yield of 82%, respectively. These results demonstrate the great potential in using finely-tuned respiration machineries for bio-production. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High-yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martinez, Erick Miguel; Fimognari, Lorenzo; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2017-09-01

    Microalga-based biomanufacturing of recombinant proteins is attracting growing attention due to its advantages in safety, metabolic diversity, scalability and sustainability. Secretion of recombinant proteins can accelerate the use of microalgal platforms by allowing post-translational modifications and easy recovery of products from the culture media. However, currently, the yields of secreted recombinant proteins are low, which hampers the commercial application of this strategy. This study aimed at expanding the genetic tools for enhancing secretion of recombinant proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a widely used green microalga as a model organism and a potential industrial biotechnology platform. We demonstrated that the putative signal sequence from C. reinhardtii gametolysin can assist the secretion of the yellow fluorescent protein Venus into the culture media. To increase the secretion yields, Venus was C-terminally fused with synthetic glycomodules comprised of tandem serine (Ser) and proline (Pro) repeats of 10 and 20 units [hereafter (SP)n , wherein n = 10 or 20]. The yields of the (SP)n -fused Venus were higher than Venus without the glycomodule by up to 12-fold, with the maximum yield of 15 mg/L. Moreover, the presence of the glycomodules conferred an enhanced proteolytic protein stability. The Venus-(SP)n proteins were shown to be glycosylated, and a treatment of the cells with brefeldin A led to a suggestion that glycosylation of the (SP)n glycomodules starts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Taken together, the results demonstrate the utility of the gametolysin signal sequence and (SP)n glycomodule to promote a more efficient biomanufacturing of microalgae-based recombinant proteins. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Biogas production from high-yielding energy crops in boreal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppala, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this thesis, the methane production potential of traditional and novel energy crops was evaluated in boreal conditions. The highest methane yield per hectare was achieved with maize (4 000-9 200 m{sup 3}CH{sub 4} ha{sup -1} a{sup -1}) and the second highest with brown knapweed (2 700-6 100 m{sup 3}CH{sub 4} ha{sup -1} a{sup -1}). Recently, the most feasible energy crop, grass, produced 1 200-3 600 m{sup 3}CH{sub 4} ha{sup -1} a{sup -1}. The specific methane yields of traditional and novel energy crops varied from 170-500 l kg{sup -1} volatile solid (VS). The highest specific methane yields were obtained with maize, while the novel energy crops were at a lower range. The specific methane yields decreased in the later harvest time with maize and brown knapweed, and the specific methane yield of the grasses decreased from the 1st to 2nd harvests. Maize and brown knapweed produced the highest total solid (TS) yields per hectare 13-23 tTS ha{sup -1}, which were high when compared with the TS yields of grasses (6-13 tTS ha{sup -1}). The feasibility of maize and brown knapweed in co-digestion with liquid cow manure, in continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR), was evaluated. According to the CSTR runs, maize and brown knapweed are suitable feeds and have stable processes, producing the highest methane yields (organic loading rate 2 kgVS m{sup -3}d{sup -1}), with maize at 259 l kgVS{sup -1} and brown knapweed at 254 l kgVS{sup -1}. The energy balance (input/output) of the cultivation of the grasses, maize and brown knapweed was calculated in boreal conditions, and it was better when the digestate was used as a fertilizer (1.8-4.8 %) than using chemical fertilizers (3.7-16.2 %), whose production is the most energy demanding process in cultivation. In conclusion, the methane production of maize, grasses and novel energy crops can produce high methane yields and are suitable feeds for anaerobic digestion. The cultivation managements of maize and novel energy crops for

  6. Dairy production medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Risco, Carlos A; Melendez Retamal, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    ... Insemination José Eduardo P . Santos Applications of Ultrasonography in Dairy Cattle Reproductive Management Jill D. Colloton 3 7 19 27 33 73 81 99 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Diseases that Affect the Reprod...

  7. Genomic dairy cattle breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Thomas; Sandøe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential consequences of modern dairy cattle breeding for the welfare of dairy cows. The paper focuses on so-called genomic selection, which deploys thousands of genetic markers to estimate breeding values. The discussion should help to structure...... the thoughts of breeders and other stakeholders on how to best make use of genomic breeding in the future. Intensive breeding has played a major role in securing dramatic increases in milk yield since the Second World War. Until recently, the main focus in dairy cattle breeding was on production traits......, unfavourable genetic trends for metabolic, reproductive, claw and leg diseases indicate that these attempts have been insufficient. Today, novel genome-wide sequencing techniques are revolutionising dairy cattle breeding; these enable genetic changes to occur at least twice as rapidly as previously. While...

  8. Unravelling the mechanisms behind mixed catalysts for the high yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetali, Sailaja; Zaka, Mujtaba; Schönfelder, Ronny; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Börrnert, Felix; Ibrahim, Imad; Lin, Jarrn H; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2009-12-22

    The use of mixed catalysts for the high-yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes is well-known. The mechanisms behind the improved yield are poorly understood. In this study, we systematically explore different catalyst combinations from Ni, Co, and Mo for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via laser evaporation. Our findings reveal that the mixing of catalysts alters the catalyst cluster size distribution, maximizing the clusters' potential to form a hemispherical cap at nucleation and, hence, form a single-walled carbon nanotube. This process significantly improves the single-walled carbon nanotube yields.

  9. Avaliação da eficiência do reator UASB tratando efluente de laticínio sob diferentes cargas orgânicas The efficiency of UASB reactor treating dairy effluent at diferent organic loading rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Milton Montenegro Campos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o desempenho de um reator anaeróbio de manta de lodo (UASB em escala laboratorial quanto à eficiência na remoção da carga poluidora, utilizando como substrato leite tipo B, diluído com concentração média de 2.500 mg.L-1, similar aos efluentes de laticínios quando descartado o soro. Durante os 205 dias de operação, o reator foi avaliado em relação à eficiência, de acordo com a carga orgânica volumétrica (COV aplicada. O incremento da COV aplicada foi realizado com a redução do tempo de detenção hidráulica; com isso, os TDH(s médios aplicados no reator foram de 12, 20, 18 e 16 horas. A carga orgânica biológica (COB inicial, ou seja, de partida, foi de 0,054 kgDBO.kgSVT-1.dia-1. O reator apresentou eficiências de 24, 43, 52 e 39%, na remoção de DQOT, e 22, 22, 17 e 17% na remoção de sólidos totais para os respectivos TDH(s aplicados. Os melhores resultados do reator UASB na remoção de matéria orgânica foram obtidos com os TDH (s de 20 e 18 horas. Nas condições de temperatura, carga orgânica volumétrica (COV e tempo de detenção hidráulica (TDH aplicados, o reator demonstrou boas condições de tamponamento, sendo desnecessária a correção do pH, o que significa minimização de custos.In this research it was evaluated the performance of a laboratory scale UASB reactor (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket treating a simulated dairy wastewater. In order to obtain the same concentration of an ordinary dairy, in terms of COD substrate, it was carried out the dilution of type B pasteurized milk with drinking water at a mean concentration of 2,500 mg.L-1, similar to a dairy wastewater without milk serum. During 205 days of operation the reactor was evaluated considering the efficiency related to the organic loading rate, which varied according to the hydraulic detention time applied. The UASB reactor was operated at different hydraulic retention times, of about 12, 20, 18 and 16 hours. The initial (start

  10. A High-Yield Synthesis of Chalcopyrite CuInS2 Nanoparticles with Exceptional Size Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chivin Sun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report high-yield and efficient size-controlled syntheses of Chalcopyrite CuInS2 nanoparticles by decomposing molecular single source precursors (SSPs via microwave irradiation in the presence of 1,2-ethanedithiol at reaction temperatures as low as 100°C and times as short as 30 minutes. The nanoparticles sizes were 1.8 nm to 10.8 nm as reaction temperatures were varied from 100°C to 200°C with the bandgaps from 2.71 eV to 1.28 eV with good size control and high yields (64%–95%. The resulting nanoparticles were analyzed by XRD, UV-Vis, ICP-OES, XPS, SEM, EDS, and HRTEM. Titration studies by 1H NMR using SSP 1 with 1,2-ethanedithiol and benzyl mercaptan were conducted to elucidate the formation of Chalcopyrite CuInS2 nanoparticles.

  11. A natural variant of NAL1, selected in high-yield rice breeding programs, pleiotropically increases photosynthesis rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Toshiyuki; Adachi, Shunsuke; Taguchi-Shiobara, Fumio; Sanoh-Arai, Yumiko; Iwasawa, Norio; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Hirose, Sakiko; Taniguchi, Yojiro; Yamanouchi, Utako; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Ikka, Takashi; Ando, Tsuyu; Kono, Izumi; Ito, Sachie; Shomura, Ayahiko; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Yano, Masahiro; Kondo, Motohiko; Yamamoto, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Improvement of leaf photosynthesis is an important strategy for greater crop productivity. Here we show that the quantitative trait locus GPS (GREEN FOR PHOTOSYNTHESIS) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) controls photosynthesis rate by regulating carboxylation efficiency. Map-based cloning revealed that GPS is identical to NAL1 (NARROW LEAF1), a gene previously reported to control lateral leaf growth. The high-photosynthesis allele of GPS was found to be a partial loss-of-function allele of NAL1. This allele increased mesophyll cell number between vascular bundles, which led to thickened leaves, and it pleiotropically enhanced photosynthesis rate without the detrimental side effects observed in previously identified nal1 mutants, such as dwarf plant stature. Furthermore, pedigree analysis suggested that rice breeders have repeatedly selected the high-photosynthesis allele in high-yield breeding programs. The identification and utilization of NAL1 (GPS) can enhance future high-yield breeding and provides a new strategy for increasing rice productivity. PMID:23985993

  12. Transcriptome analysis suggests that starch synthesis may proceed via multiple metabolic routes in high yielding potato cultivars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacper Piotr Kaminski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucose-6-phosphate is imported into the amyloplast of potato tubers and thought to constitute the precursor for starch synthesis in potato tubers. However, recently it was shown that glucose-1-phosphate can also be imported into the amyloplast and incorporated into starch via an ATP independent mechanism under special conditions. Nonetheless, glucose-6-phosphate is believed to be the quantitatively important precursor for starch synthesis in potato. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Potato tubers of the high yielding cv Kuras had low gene expression of plastidial phophoglucomutase (PGM and normal levels of transcripts for other enzymes involved in starch metabolism in comparison with medium and low yielding cultivars as determined by DeepSAGE transcriptome profiling. The decrease in PGM activity in Kuras was confirmed by measuring the enzyme activity from potato tuber extracts. Contrary to expectations, this combination lead to a higher level of intracellular glucose-1-phosphate (G1P in Kuras suggesting that G1P is directly imported into plastids and can be quantitatively important for starch synthesis under normal conditions in high yielding cultivars. SIGNIFICANCE: This could open entirely new possibilities for metabolic engineering of the starch metabolism in potato via the so far uncharacterized G1P transporter. The perspectives are to increase yield and space efficiency of this important crop. In the light of the increasing demands imposed on agriculture to support a growing global population this presents an exciting new possibility.

  13. Coalition-driven initiatives in the Ugandan dairy sector: Elites, conflict, and bargaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Muhumuza, Fred; Mwebaze, Tom

    The dairy sector is one of the only agricultural sectors in Uganda that has enjoyed sustained high growth since the late 1980s. Milk and the cold dairy chain developed especially in the south-western part of the country. This paper explains why this is so by the sector’s relation to the ruling co...... was enforced to a considerable extent was the organization of dairy farmers and traders and the bargaining and compromise with the Dairy Development Authority this organization of industry actors enabled...

  14. Dairy goat health management and milk production on organic and conventional system in BrazilEstudo comparativo da produção e manejo sanitário entre cabras leiteiras orgânica e convencional no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenevaldo Barbosa da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aimed of this article is to measure risk factors on health and milk production on organic and conventional dairy goats in Brazil. Two experimental groups (organic and conventional were evaluated simultaneously. The study design was completely randomized. The organic herd consisted of 25 goats and 15 kids. In the conventional production system, a dairy herd comprising 40 goats and 20 kids participated in the study. Data on milk production and health management were available from January 2007 to December 2009. The abortion rate in the conventional system was 5% (2/40 whereas in organic system no abortion was diagnosed (0/25. The mortality rate at weaning in the conventional system was 5% (2/40 and in the organic system was 8% (2/25. Milk production was lower (2.20 kg/day in organic than conventional system (2.66 kg/day. Goats and kids in organic farm had a higher FEC (386±104 and 900±204, respectively (p O objetivo do artigo foi mensurar os fatores de risco referentes ao manejo sanitário e a produção entre cabras leiteiras sob sistema orgânico e convencional. Dois grupos experimentais (orgânico e convencional foram conduzidos simultaneamente. O desenho do estudo foi o inteiramente casualizado. O rebanho orgânico consistiu de 25 cabras e 15 cabritos e o sistema convencional por 40 cabras e 20 cabritos. Os parâmetros produtivos e sanitários foram monitorados entre janeiro de 2007 a dezembro de 2009. No sistema convencional, houve uma taxa de aborto de 5% (2/40, enquanto que no sistema orgânico nenhum aborto foi diagnosticado (0/25. A taxa de mortalidade ao desmame no sistema convencional foi de 5% (2/40 e no sistema orgânico foi de 8% (2/25. A produção de leite média diária por cabra no rebanho leiteiro orgânico (2,20 kg/dia foi mais baixa do que a do rebanho convencional (2,66 kg/dia. Os resultados indicaram que as cabras e cabritos mantidos em fazenda orgânica (386±104 e 900±204, respectivamente apresentaram maiores

  15. Comparing the impact of homogenization and heat processing on the properties and in vitro digestion of milk from organic and conventional dairy herds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of homogenization and heat processing on the chemical and in vitro digestion traits of milk from organic and conventional herds were compared. Raw milk from organic (>50% of dry matter intake from pasture) and conventional (no access to pasture) farms were adjusted to commercial whole a...

  16. Modeling the Adequacy of Dietary Fiber in Dairy Cows Based on the Responses of Ruminal pH and Milk Fat Production to Composition of the Diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zebeli, Q.; Dijkstra, J.; Tafaj, M.; Steingass, H.; Ametaj, B.N.; Drochner, W.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop practical models to assess and predict the adequacy of dietary fiber in high-yielding dairy cows. We used quantitative methods to analyze relevant research data and critically evaluate and determine the responses of ruminal pH and production

  17. Relationship Between Dietary Fatty Acids and Reproductive Functions in Dairy Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan Soydan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Selection of dairy cattle for higher milk yield, without considering important non-production traits, has decreased reproductive efficiency. Thus, low reproductive performance is a major problem in high yielding dairy cattle. Previous studies showed that dietary manipulation to improve fertility holds much promise and dietary fats have positive effects on reproductive functions in high yielding dairy cattle. Positive effects of fats on reproductive performance due to the fatty acids, which are the precursors of progesterone and prostaglandins. Progesterone and prostaglandins hormones are most important factors that play a role on the control of reproductive functions. The amount of linoleic, linolenic and arachidonic fattty acids in ration can be increase or decrease progesterone and prostaglandins synthesis especially PGF2α from ovary and uterus, respectively. Also fatty acids can be influence follicular development, ovulation, embryonic implantation and maternal recognition of pregnancy. This review focuses on the relationships between dietary fatty acids and reproductive functions such as hormone profiles, ovarian function and follicular development, oocyte quality, embryo development, embryonic implantation and maternal recognition of pregnancy in dairy cattle.

  18. Homogeneity analysis of high yield manufacturing process of mems-based pzt thick film vibrational energy harvesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Anders; Xu, Ruichao; Pedersen, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a high yield wafer scale fabrication of MEMS-based unimorph silicon/PZT thick film vibrational energy harvesters aimed towards vibration sources with peak frequencies in the range of a few hundred Hz. By combining KOH etching with mechanical front side protection, SOI wafer...... to accurately define the thickness of the silicon part of the harvester and a silicon compatible PZT thick film screen-printing technique, we are able to fabricate energy harvesters on wafer scale with a yield higher than 90%. The characterization of the fabricated harvesters is focused towards the full wafer....../mass-production aspect; hence the analysis of uniformity in harvested power and resonant frequency....

  19. Continuous high-yield production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on 2D and 3D substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán de Villoria, Roberto; Hart, A John; Wardle, Brian L

    2011-06-28

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) have certain advantages over bulk CNT powders and randomly oriented CNT mats for applications in flexible electronic devices, filtration membranes, biosensors and multifunctional aerospace materials. Here, a machine and a process to synthesize VACNTs in a continuous manner are presented showing uniform growth on 2D and 3D substrates, including alumina fibers, silicon wafer pieces, and stainless steel foils. Aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) are synthesized at substrate feed rates of up to 6.8 cm/min, and the CNTs reach up to 60 μm in length depending on residence time in the reactor. In addition to the aligned morphology indicative of high yield growth, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy reveal that the CNTs are of comparable quality to CNTs grown via a similar batch process. A significant reduction in time, reaction products, gases, and energy is demonstrated relative to batch processing, paving the way for industrial production of VACNTs.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis Suggests That Starch Synthesis May Proceed via Multiple Metabolic Routes in High Yielding Potato Cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaminski, Kacper Piotr; Høgh Petersen, Annabeth; Sønderkær, Mads

    2012-01-01

    new possibilities for metabolic engineering of the starch metabolism in potato via the so far uncharacterized G1P transporter. The perspectives are to increase yield and space efficiency of this important crop. In the light of the increasing demands imposed on agriculture to support a growing global......Background: Glucose-6-phosphate is imported into the amyloplast of potato tubers and thought to constitute the precursor for starch synthesis in potato tubers. However, recently it was shown that glucose-1-phosphate can also be imported into the amyloplast and incorporated into starch via an ATP...... independent mechanism under special conditions. Nonetheless, glucose 6-phosphate is believed to be the quantitatively important precursor for starch synthesis in potato. Principal Finding: Potato tubers of the high yielding cv Kuras had low gene expression of plastidial phophoglucomutase (PGM) and normal...

  1. High yielding tropical energy crops for bioenergy production: Effects of plant components, harvest years and locations on biomass composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, K C; Ogoshi, Richard; Zaleski, Halina M; Hashimoto, Andrew G; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2017-12-18

    The composition of lignocellulosic feedstock, which depends on crop type, crop management, locations and plant parts, significantly affects the conversion efficiency of biomass into biofuels and biobased products. Thus, this study examined the composition of different parts of two high yielding tropical energy crops, Energycane and Napier grass, collected across three locations and years. Significantly higher fiber content was found in the leaves of Energycane than stems, while fiber content was significantly higher in the stems than the leaves of Napier grass. Similarly, fiber content was higher in Napier grass than Energycane. Due to significant differences in biomass composition between the plant parts within a crop type, neither biological conversion, including anaerobic digestion, nor thermochemical pretreatment alone is likely to efficiently convert biomass components into biofuels and biobased products. However, combination of anaerobic digestion with thermochemical conversion technologies could efficiently utilize biomass components in generating biofuels and biobased products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Design and Experiment of the Track-Type Equipment for Feeding Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping LI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As one of the effective ways of reducing the cost and increase the revenue, feeding dairy cows with individual precision in quantity could further develop the production potential of high- yield dairy cows and improve the milk yield of every dairy cow. Therefore, based on three kinds of technologies of radio frequency identification technology, wireless transmission technology and infrared technology and grounded on the foundation of previous studies, this thesis has completed the track- type equipment for feeding dairy cows with individual precision in quantity. The equipment takes the computer as the information management platform, adopts the singly chip microcomputer as the control platform, uses the wireless module and U disk to conduct the transmission of individual feeding data of dairy cows and guides the whole process with the track. This kind of equipment could advance automatically, identify and feed dairy cows precisely during the feeding process. This thesis also designs the matching feeding technology of the equipment, and accomplishes the test of feeding outside the cowshed, which takes “TMR + precise feeding with concentrated feed” as the feeding model, so that the feeding process could be more effective and further steady.

  3. Treatment of dairy wastewater by water hyacinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munavalli, G R; Saler, P S

    2009-01-01

    The present study addresses potential of water hyacinth for treating small-scale dairy wastewater to satisfy effluent standards for disposal into public sewers. The batch experiments were conducted on dairy wastewater using reactor with water hyacinth and without water hyacinth. The Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) was varied from 507 mg/L to 4,672 mg/L and the maximum Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) adopted was 8 days. The loss of water due to evapo-transpiration and evaporation was also measured. The water hyacinth system performed better when initial COD concentration was maintained less than 1,672 mg/L for six days HRT. The performance of water hyacinth system was more effective than reference by 30% to 45% for COD removal. However, water hyacinth had no significant impact in reducing Total Dissolved Solids (TDS). The evapo-transpiration loss was almost double than the evaporation loss. The first order reaction kinetics was applicable and reaction rate parameters were estimated for various organic strengths of wastewater. The reaction rate parameters for water hyacinth system were three times higher than a system without water hyacinth and also found to vary with initial COD values. Water hyacinth can be adopted to treat dairy wastewater from small-scale dairy effectively for disposal into public sewers.

  4. Anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure in a single continuously stirred tank reactor process: Limits in co-substrate ratios and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Carlos; Muñoz, Noelia; Rico, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure was investigated with the aim of determining the treatment limits in terms of the cheese whey fraction in feed and the organic loading rate. The results of a continuous stirred tank reactor that was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 days showed that the co-digestion process was possible with a cheese whey fraction as high as 85% in the feed. The efficiency of the process was similar within the range of the 15-85% cheese whey fraction. To study the effect of the increasing loading rate, the HRT was progressively shortened with the 65% cheese whey fraction in the feed. The reactor efficiency dropped as the HRT decreased but enabled a stable operation over 8.7 days of HRT. At these operating conditions, a volumetric methane production rate of 1.37 m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) was achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a high-yield via-last through silicon via process using notchless silicon etching and wet cleaning of the first metal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Naoya; Kikuchi, Hidekazu; Yanagisawa, Azusa; Shimamoto, Haruo; Kikuchi, Katsuya; Aoyagi, Masahiro; Nakamura, Akio

    2017-07-01

    A high-yield via-last through silicon via (TSV) process has been developed using notchless Si etching and wet cleaning of the first metal layer. In this process, the notching was suppressed by optimizing the deep Si etching conditions and wet cleaning was performed using an organic alkaline solution to remove reaction products generated by the etchback step on the first metal layer. By this process, a number of small TSVs (TSV diameter: 6 µm TSV depth: 22 µm number of TSVs: 20,000/chip) could be formed uniformly on an 8-in. wafer. The electrical characteristics of small TSVs formed by this via-last TSV process were investigated. The TSV resistance determined by four-terminal measurements was approximately 24 mΩ. The leakage current between the TSV and the Si substrate was 2.5 pA at 5 V. The TSV capacitance determined using an inductance-capacitance-resistance (LCR) meter was 54 fF, while the TSV yield determined from TSV chain measurements was high (83%) over an 8-in. wafer.

  6. Precision Dairy Farming 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, C.; Steeneveld, W.

    2016-01-01

    The supply of new innovative precision dairy farming technologies is steadily increasing. It aims to help farmers to be more labour efficient and to support them in their daily management decisions. At the same time, since many technologies are developed from an engineering perspective, adoption of

  7. 7 CFR 1170.4 - Dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Dairy products. 1170.4 Section 1170.4 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.4 Dairy products. Dairy Products means: (a) Manufactured dairy products that are used by the Secretary to establish...

  8. 7 CFR 1150.112 - Dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Dairy products. 1150.112 Section 1150.112 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1150.112 Dairy products. Dairy products means products manufactured for human...

  9. A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-02-21

    The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass

  10. The effect of inorganic and organic form of zinc on digestibility of nutrients in dairy cows in three stages of reproductive cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Balabánová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our experiment was to compare the effect of feeding inorganic and organic forms of zinc in premix on the coefficient of digestibility of nutrients in the feeding ration for cows in three stages of reproductive cycle – 14 d before calving and 30 and 60 d after calving. The experiment was carried out on 19 Holstein cows that were divided into two groups. A control group of nine cows designated as “Inorganic zinc form” (IZF was fed a diet supplemented with mineral premix containing inorganic form of zinc (ZnO. An experimental group of ten cows designated as “Organic zinc form” (OZF had zinc oxide replaced with zinc fixed to methionine (Khei-chelate Zn powder 15% by Kheiron. The experiment was divided into three periods - the first period lasted from 14th day before calving until 2nd day after calving, the second period lasted from 3rd day to 30th day after calving and the third period lasted from 31st day to 60th day after calving. Cows were fed the diet based on maize silage, lucerne haylage, sugar beet pulp silage, grass or lucerne hay and concentrate containing premix with either inorganic or organic zinc form. During the experiment samples of feeding ration and faeces were taken in 3 intervals, it si on 14th day before calving, on 30th day and on 60th day after calving to determine nutrients content. Digestibility of nutrients was calculated using indicator method (ash insoluble in 3 M HCl.After feeding organic forms of zinc a tendency to higher digestibility of crude protein, fat, crude fiber, nitrogen-free extracts, ash and zinc was observed in cows regardless of stage of reproductive cycle. The digestibility of the zinc and fiber were the most increased. Digestibility of zinc in OZF on 14th day before calving was higher than in IZF (P < 0.05. Feeding of organic zinc forms had downward effect only on the digestibility of copper.

  11. Coastal Mudflat Saline Soil Amendment by Dairy Manure and Green Manuring

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Yanchao; Yan, Yiyun; Zuo, Wengang; Gu, Chuanhui; Xue, Weijie; Mei, Lijuan; Shan, Yuhua; Feng, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Dairy manure or green manuring has been considered as popular organic amendment to cropland in many countries. However, whether dairy manure combined with green manuring can effectively amend mudflat saline soil remains unclear. This paper was one of first studies to fill this knowledge gap by investigating impact of dairy manure combined with green manuring on soil chemical properties of mudflat saline soil. Dairy manure was used by one-time input, with the rates of 0, 30, 75, 150, and 300 t...

  12. Worldwide trends in dairy production and consumption and calcium intake: is promoting consumption of dairy products a sustainable solution for inadequate calcium intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youfa; Li, Shiru

    2008-09-01

    Adequate calcium intake is critical for good health. Inadequate calcium intake is a worldwide problem and is more serious in countries where consumption of dairy products is low. To analyze worldwide trends in production and consumption of dairy products and in calcium intake. Data were taken from Food and Agriculture Organization food balance sheets, from published studies, and from surveys of four countries with large populations and large dairy production (China, India, the United States, and Russia). Linear regression models were fitted to estimate average annual changes and to project future trends. Overall global dairy production and supply (total and per capita) have increased since 1980, especially in developing countries. There are large between-region and between-country differences in the levels of production, supply, and consumption and in the trends. In 1997 India surpassed the United States to become the largest dairy producer. Consumption of dairy products in China has more than tripled since 1982 and has increased sevenfold among urban residents. The increase has been more dramatic during recent years. In spite of increases in dairy production and consumption in China and India, calcium intake has decreased in these countries. The average daily per capita consumption of dairy products was more than 200 g in the United States in 1999-2004 but less than 27g in China in 2002; the average daily per capita intake of calcium was 962 mg in US men and 756 mg in US women in 1999-2004, but less than 400 mg in China in 2002. Global production and supply of dairy products have been increasing since 1980, which has an impact on the environment. Dairy consumption and calcium intake remain low in most countries examined as compared with recommended amounts of dairy products and calcium. Promotion of consumption of dairy products does not necessarily increase total calcium intake.

  13. Development of crossbreeding high-yield-potential strains for commercial cultivation in the medicinal mushroom Wolfiporia cocos (Higher Basidiomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiaozhao; Wang, Xiaoxia; Bian, Yinbing; Xu, Zhangyi

    2016-07-01

    Wolfiporia cocos is a well-known medicinal mushroom, and its dried sclerotia has been widely used as a traditional medicine in China, Japan, and other Asian countries for centuries. However, long-term asexual reproduction of the breeding system in W. cocos results in a current universal degeneration of cultivated strains. To develop a W. cocos breeding program that will benefit commercial cultivation, we previously developed an optimum method for indoor induction of W. cocos fruiting bodies and clarified the nature of preponderant binuclear sexual basidiospores. In this paper, we first show that the majority of W. cocos single-spore isolates cannot form sclerotium in field cultivation. We then investigated the possibility of breeding new strains by crossbreeding. Three types of mating reactions were observed in both intra-strain pairings and inter-strain pairings, and a total of fifty-five hybrids were selected by antagonistic testing and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Field cultivation of hybrids demonstrated that some hybrids can form sclerotium via two cultivated methods. Two new high-yield strains were identified. This report will stimulate new thinking on W. cocos and promote further extensive studies on crossbreeding in W. cocos, a new topic related to the development of more efficient protocols for the discrimination of hybrids in W. cocos.

  14. A cDNA Clone-Launched Platform for High-Yield Production of Inactivated Zika Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujiao Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A purified inactivated vaccine (PIV using the Zika virus (ZIKV Puerto Rico strain PRVABC59 showed efficacy in monkeys, and is currently in a phase I clinical trial. High-yield manufacture of this PIV is essential for its development and vaccine access. Here we report an infectious cDNA clone-launched platform to maximize its yield. A single NS1 protein substitution (K265E was identified to increase ZIKV replication on Vero cells (a cell line approved for vaccine production for both Cambodian FSS13025 and Puerto Rico PRVABC59 strains. The NS1 mutation did not affect viral RNA synthesis, but significantly increased virion assembly through an increased interaction between NS1 and NS2A (a known regulator of flavivirus assembly. The NS1 mutant virus retained wild-type virulence in the A129 mouse model, but decreased its competence to infect Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. To further increase virus yield, we constructed an infectious cDNA clone of the clinical trial PIV strain PRVABC59 containing three viral replication-enhancing mutations (NS1 K265E, prM H83R, and NS3 S356F. The mutant cDNA clone produced >25-fold more ZIKV than the wild-type parent on Vero cells. This cDNA clone-launched manufacture platform has the advantages of higher virus yield, shortened manufacture time, and minimized chance of contamination.

  15. High-yield production of a chimeric glycoprotein based on permuted E1 and E2 HCV envelope ectodomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Daniel; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mar; Yélamos, Belén; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Julián; Peterson, Darrell L; Gavilanes, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    In this report it is described for the first time the expression and purification of large quantities of a soluble and correctly folded chimeric recombinant protein, E2661E1340, containing the permuted Hepatitis C virus (HCV) glycoprotein ectodomains E1 (amino acids 192-340) and E2 (amino acids 384-661). Using the baculovirus/insect cell expression system, 8mg of secreted protein were purified from 1L of culture media, a yield 4 times higher than the described for its counterpart E1341E2661. This permuted chimeric protein is glycosylated and possesses a high tendency to self-associate. The fluorescence emission spectrum indicates that Trp residues occupy a relatively low hydrophobic environment. The secondary structure was determined by deconvolution of the far-UV circular dichroism spectrum yielding 13% α-helix structure, 49% extended structure and 38% non-ordered structure. E2661E1340 binds to antibodies present in human sera from HCV-positive patients, a binding that is blocked at different levels by a rabbit anti-E2661 antibody. All these structural and antigenic features of E2661E1340 are very similar to those described for E1340E2661, Thus, this high-yield isolated chimeric protein may be a valuable tool to study the first steps of the HCV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High Yields of Hydrogen Production Induced by Meta-Substituted Dichlorophenols Biodegradation from the Green Alga Scenedesmus obliquus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Andronis, Efthimios; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E.; Chaniotakis, Nikolaos; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen is a highly promising energy source with important social and economic implications. The ability of green algae to produce photosynthetic hydrogen under anaerobic conditions has been known for years. However, until today the yield of production has been very low, limiting an industrial scale use. In the present paper, 73 years after the first report on H2-production from green algae, we present a combinational biological system where the biodegradation procedure of one meta-substituted dichlorophenol (m-dcp) is the key element for maintaining continuous and high rate H2-production (>100 times higher than previously reported) in chloroplasts and mitochondria of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. In particular, we report that reduced m-dcps (biodegradation intermediates) mimic endogenous electron and proton carriers in chloroplasts and mitochondria, inhibit Photosystem II (PSII) activity (and therefore O2 production) and enhance Photosystem I (PSI) and hydrogenase activity. In addition, we show that there are some indications for hydrogen production from sources other than chloroplasts in Scenedesmus obliquus. The regulation of these multistage and highly evolved redox pathways leads to high yields of hydrogen production and paves the way for an efficient application to industrial scale use, utilizing simple energy sources and one meta-substituted dichlorophenol as regulating elements. PMID:23145057

  17. Zhongdanyaozhi No. 1 and Zhongdanyaozhi No. 2 Are Hybrid Cultivars of Salvia miltiorrhiza with High Yield and Active Compounds Content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chen

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge is an important medicinal plant used for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Intraspecific hybridization between a male sterile line and inbred lines was followed by 39 F1 crossings. Cultivars "Zhongdanyaozhi No. 1" (ZD1 and "Zhongdanyaozhi No. 2" (ZD2 were obtained. In 2012 and 2013 tests in Beijing, the two cultivars were compared with three widely accepted types, SDCK, SXCK and HNCK from Shandong, Shanxi and Henan provinces. The yield of ZD1 and ZD2 exceeded the three CKs by more than 48.2% and 39.2%, respectively; the composition of the two hybrid cultivars was similar to the control, although the content of some compounds varied to some extent. The content of salvianolic acid B and tanshinone II A of both ZD1 and ZD2 could measure up the requirement of Chinese Pharmacopoeia. The former showed no obvious advantage than the three CKs, while the later's tanshinone II A was 29.6% higher than the three CKs. Taken together, ZD1 is a high yielding and thick-root-type cultivar which is suitable for decoction pieces; while ZD2 is suitable for component especially lipophilic component extraction. ZD1 and ZD2 reported here are the first cultivars obtained by the hybridization of S. miltiorrhiza.

  18. High Precision and High Yield Fabrication of Dense Nanoparticle Arrays onto DNA Origami at Statistically Independent Binding Sites †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Sadao; Klein, William P.; Onodera, Craig; Rapp, Blake; Flores-Estrada, Juan; Lindau, Elias; Snowball, Lejmarc; Sam, Joseph Tyler; Padilla, Jennifer E.; Lee, Jeunghoon; Knowlton, William B.; Graugnard, Elton; Yurke, Bernard; Kuang, Wan; Hughes, William L.

    2015-01-01

    High precision, high yield, and high density self-assembly of nanoparticles into arrays is essential for nanophotonics. Spatial deviations as small as a few nanometers can alter the properties of near-field coupled optical nanostructures. Several studies have reported assemblies of few nanoparticle structures with controlled spacing using DNA nanostructures with variable yield. Here, we report multi-tether design strategies and attachment yields for homo- and hetero-nanoparticle arrays templated by DNA origami nanotubes. Nanoparticle attachment yield via DNA hybridization is comparable with streptavidin-biotin binding. Independent of the number of binding sites, >97% site-occupation was achieved with four tethers and 99.2% site-occupation is theoretically possible with five tethers. The interparticle distance was within 2 nm of all design specifications and the nanoparticle spatial deviations decreased with interparticle spacing. Modified geometric, binomial, and trinomial distributions indicate that site-bridging, steric hindrance, and electrostatic repulsion were not dominant barriers to self-assembly and both tethers and binding sites were statistically independent at high particle densities. PMID:25311051

  19. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Hot-Rolled Extra High-Yield-Strength Steel Plates for Offshore Structure and Shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongsheng; Li, Qingliang; Emi, Toshihiko

    2011-05-01

    Key parameters for a thermomechanically controlled processing and accelerated cooling process (TMCP-AcC) were determined for integrated mass production to produce extra high-yield-strength microalloyed low carbon SiMnCrNiCu steel plates for offshore structure and bulk shipbuilding. Confocal scanning microscopy was used to make in-situ observations on the austenite grain growth during reheating. A Gleeble 3800 thermomechanical simulator was employed to investigate the flow stress behavior, static recrystallization (SRX) of austenite, and decomposition behavior of the TMCP conditioned austenite during continuous cooling. The Kocks-Mecking model was employed to describe the constitutive behavior, while the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) approach was used to predict the SRX kinetics. The effects of hot rolling schedule and AcC on microstructure and properties were investigated by test-scale rolling trials. The bridging between the laboratory observations and the process parameter determination to optimize the mass production was made by integrated industrial production trials on a set of a 5-m heavy plate mill equipped with an accelerated cooling system. Successful production of 60- and 50-mm-thick plates with yield strength in excess of 460 MPa and excellent toughness at low temperature (213 K (-60 °C)) in the parent metal and the simulated coarse-grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) provides a useful integrated database for developing advanced high-strength steel plates via TMCP-AcC.

  20. High yield purification and characterization of engineered human P450 1A2 and generation of immuno-inhibitor antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louërat-Oriou, B; Flinois, J P; Beaune, P H; Pompon, D

    1999-02-01

    P450 S12, an engineered human P450 1A2 containing the 88-first amino-acids of the P450 1A1, demonstrates particularly high expression level in yeast while exhibiting catalytic properties very similar to the moderately expressed natural human P450 1A2. To facilitate P450 purification by nickel chelate chromatography, C-terminal extensions including histidine tags were tested. The -G(H)4 extension was found to be particularly efficient for permitting high expression levels without any catalytic alteration. This engineered P450 was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity (18 nmol/mg of protein) at a very high yield (87%) without any detectable formation of P420. P450 S12 activities were reconstituted in the presence of yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana (ATR1) NADPH-P450 reductases. The plant reductase supported better ethoxyresorufin-, methoxyresorufin- and phenacetin-O-dealkylase activities than the yeast reductase in reconstituted systems. Interestingly, polyclonal antibodies raised against purified P450 S12 selectively recognized in Western blot and fully immuno-inhibited the natural or recombinant P450 1A2 with very limited or no cross-reaction with P450 1A1 and other isoenzymes.

  1. A cDNA Clone-Launched Platform for High-Yield Production of Inactivated Zika Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yujiao; Shan, Chao; Zou, Jing; Muruato, Antonio E; Bruno, Diniz Nunes; de Almeida Medeiros Daniele, Barbosa; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Rossi, Shannan L; Weaver, Scott C; Xie, Xuping; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2017-03-01

    A purified inactivated vaccine (PIV) using the Zika virus (ZIKV) Puerto Rico strain PRVABC59 showed efficacy in monkeys, and is currently in a phase I clinical trial. High-yield manufacture of this PIV is essential for its development and vaccine access. Here we report an infectious cDNA clone-launched platform to maximize its yield. A single NS1 protein substitution (K265E) was identified to increase ZIKV replication on Vero cells (a cell line approved for vaccine production) for both Cambodian FSS13025 and Puerto Rico PRVABC59 strains. The NS1 mutation did not affect viral RNA synthesis, but significantly increased virion assembly through an increased interaction between NS1 and NS2A (a known regulator of flavivirus assembly). The NS1 mutant virus retained wild-type virulence in the A129 mouse model, but decreased its competence to infect Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. To further increase virus yield, we constructed an infectious cDNA clone of the clinical trial PIV strain PRVABC59 containing three viral replication-enhancing mutations (NS1 K265E, prM H83R, and NS3 S356F). The mutant cDNA clone produced >25-fold more ZIKV than the wild-type parent on Vero cells. This cDNA clone-launched manufacture platform has the advantages of higher virus yield, shortened manufacture time, and minimized chance of contamination. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Biocontrol potential of Halotolerant bacterial chitinase from high yielding novel Bacillus Pumilus MCB-7 autochthonous to mangrove ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishad, K S; Rebello, Sharrel; Shabanamol, P S; Jisha, M S

    2017-04-01

    The multifaceted role of chitinase in medicine, agriculture, environmental remediation and various other industries greatly demands the isolation of high yielding chitinase producing microorganisms with improved properties. The current study aimed to investigate the isolation, characterization and biocontrol prospective of chitinase producing bacterial strains autochthonous to the extreme conditions of mangrove ecosystems. Among the 51 bacterial isolates screened, Bacillus pumilus MCB-7 with highest chitinase production potential was identified and confirmed by 16S rDNA typing. Chitinase enzyme of MCB-7 was purified; the chitin degradation was evaluated by SEM and LC-MS. Unlike previously reported B.pumilus isolates, MCB-7 exhibited highest chitinase activity of 3.36U/mL, active even at high salt concentrations and temperature up to 60°C. The crude as well as purified enzyme showed significant antimycotic activity against agricultural pathogens such as Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Ceratorhiza hydrophila and Fusarium oxysporum. The enzyme also exhibited biopesticidal role against larvae of Scirpophaga incertulas (Walker). [Lep.: Pyralidae], a serious agricultural pest of rice. The high chitinolytic and antimycotic potential of MCB-7 increases the prospects of the isolate as an excellent biocontrol agent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high chitinase yielding Bacillus pumilus strain from mangrove ecosystem with a biocontrol role against phytopathogenic fungi and insect larval pests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Powder, paper and foam of few-layer graphene prepared in high yield by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation of expanded graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liqiong; Li, Weiwei; Li, Peng; Liao, Shutian; Qiu, Shengqiang; Chen, Mingliang; Guo, Yufen; Li, Qi; Zhu, Chao; Liu, Liwei

    2014-04-09

    A facile and high-yield approach to the preparation of few-layer graphene (FLG) by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation (EIE) of expanded graphite in sulfuric acid electrolyte is reported. Stage-1 H2SO4-graphite intercalation compound is used as a key intermediate in EIE to realize the efficient exfoliation. The yield of the FLG sheets (flakes enables them to disperse effectively, which contributes to the film-forming characteristics of the FLG flakes. These electrochemically exfoliated FLG flakes are integrated into several kinds of macroscopic graphene structures. Flexible and freestanding graphene papers made of the FLG flakes retain excellent conductivity (≈24,500 S m(-1)). Three-dimensional (3D) graphene foams with light weight are fabricated from the FLG flakes by the use of Ni foams as self-sacrifice templates. Furthermore, 3D graphene/Ni foams without any binders, which are used as supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolyte, provide the specific capacitance of 113.2 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), retaining 90% capacitance after 1000 cycles. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Directed breeding of an Arthrobacter mutant for high-yield production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate by N + ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, He; Chen, Xiaochun; Cao, Jiaming; Fang, Ting; Bai, Jianxin; Xiong, Jian; Ying, Hanjie

    2010-08-01

    To obtain a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) high-yield production strain, Arthrobacter NG-1 was mutated by N + ion implantation with an energy level of 10 keV and dose of 7×10 15 ions/cm 2. Combined with directed screening methods, a xanthine-defective and 8-azaguanine (8-AG)-resistant mutant Arthrobacter A302 was selected. The concentration of cAMP produced by this mutant was 41.7% higher than that of the original strain and reached 9.78 g/L. Through ten-generation investigation, the capability of cAMP production of A302 was found to be stable. Compared with the original strain, the special activities of key enzymes in A302, which influenced the cAMP biosynthesis, was analyzed. IMP dehydrogenase activity was defective, whereas PRPP amidotransferase, sAMP synthetase and adenylate cyclase activities were increased by 61.5%, 147% and 21.7%, respecitively, which might explain the mutagenesis mechanism by N + ions implantation under the enzymatic level.

  5. Planning and scheduling of the make-and-pack dairy production under lifetime uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sel, Çağrı; Bilgen, Bilge; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    In the dairy processing, the rapid quality decay of milk-based intermediate mixture to make and pack restricts productivity and, forces organizations to carefully plan and schedule their production. Hereby, in this study, we consider a planning and scheduling problem encountered in the dairy

  6. Impact of organic loading rate on the performance of psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion of dairy manure and wheat straw: long-term operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saady, Noori M Cata; Massé, Daniel I

    2015-04-01

    Development of efficient processes for valorising animal wastes would be a major advancement in cold-climate regions. This paper reports the results of long term (315 days experiment) of novel psychrophilic (20°C) dry anaerobic digestion (PDAD) of cow feces and wheat straw in laboratory scale sequence batch reactor operated at increasing organic loading rate. The PDAD process fed with a mixture of feces and straw (TS of 27%) over a treatment cycle length of 21 days at organic loading rate (OLR) 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 g TCOD kg(-1) inoculum d(-1) (of 2.9 ± 0.1, 3.7 ± 0.1, and 4.4 ± 0.1g VS kg(-1) inoculum d(-1), respectively) resulted in average specific methane yield (SMY) of 187.3 ± 18.1, 163.6 ± 39.5, 150.8 ± 32.9 N L CH4 kg(-1)VS fed, respectively. PDAD of cow feces and wheat straw is possible with VS-based inoculum-to-substrate ratio of 1.4 at OLR of 6.0 g TCOD kg(-1) inoculum d(-1). Hydrolysis was the limiting step reaction. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. U.S. DAIRY FORAGE RESEARCH CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision: Leading the world in integrated dairy forage systems research. Mission: Providing dairy industry solutions for food security, environmental sustainability,...

  8. U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision: Leading the world in integrated dairy forage systems research. Mission: Providing dairy industry solutions for food security, environmental sustainability,...

  9. High yield production and refolding of the double-knot toxin, an activator of TRPV1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanhyung Bae

    Full Text Available A unique peptide toxin, named double-knot toxin (DkTx, was recently purified from the venom of the tarantula Ornithoctonus huwena and was found to stably activate TRPV1 channels by targeting the outer pore domain. DkTx has been shown to consist of two inhibitory cysteine-knot (ICK motifs, referred to as K1 and K2, each containing six cysteine residues. Beyond this initial characterization, however, the structural and functional details about DkTx remains elusive in large part due to the lack of a high yielding methodology for the synthesis and folding of this cysteine-rich peptide. Here, we overcome this obstacle by generating pure DkTx in quantities sufficient for structural and functional analyses. Our methodology entails expression of DkTx in E. coli followed by oxidative folding of the isolated linear peptide. Upon screening of various oxidative conditions for optimizing the folding yield of the toxin, we observed that detergents were required for efficient folding of the linear peptide. Our synthetic DkTx co-eluted with the native toxin on HPLC, and irreversibly activated TRPV1 in a manner identical to native DkTx. Interestingly, we find that DkTx has two interconvertible conformations present in a 1∶6 ratio at equilibrium. Kinetic analysis of DkTx folding suggests that the K1 and K2 domains influence each other during the folding process. Moreover, the CD spectra of the toxins shows that the secondary structures of K1 and K2 remains intact even after separating the two knots. These findings provide a starting point for detailed studies on the structural and functional characterization of DkTx and utilization of this toxin as a tool to explore the elusive mechanisms underlying the polymodal gating of TRPV1.

  10. High yield purification of full-length functional hERG K+ channels produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molbaek, Karen; Scharff-Poulsen, Peter; Helix-Nielsen, Claus; Klaerke, Dan A; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2015-02-07

    The hERG potassium channel is essential for repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Due to this vital function, absence of unintended and potentially life-threatening interactions with hERG is required for approval of new drugs. The structure of hERG is therefore one of the most sought-after. To provide purified hERG for structural studies and new hERG biomimetic platforms for detection of undesirable interactions, we have developed a hERG expression platform generating unprecedented amounts of purified and functional hERG channels. Full-length hERG, with or without a C-terminally fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) His 8-tag was produced from a codon-optimized hERG cDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both constructs complemented the high potassium requirement of a knock-out Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, indicating correct tetramer assembly in vivo. Functionality was further demonstrated by Astemizole binding to membrane embedded hERG-GFP-His 8 with a stoichiometry corresponding to tetramer assembly. The 156 kDa hERG-GFP protein accumulated to a membrane density of 1.6%. Fluorescence size exclusion chromatography of hERG-GFP-His 8 solubilized in Fos-Choline-12 supplemented with cholesteryl-hemisuccinate and Astemizole resulted in a monodisperse elution profile demonstrating a high quality of the hERG channels. hERG-GFP-His 8 purified by Ni-affinity chromatography maintained the ability to bind Astemizole with the correct stoichiometry indicating that the native, tetrameric structure was preserved. To our knowledge this is the first reported high-yield production and purification of full length, tetrameric and functional hERG. This significant breakthrough will be paramount in obtaining hERG crystal structures, and in establishment of new high-throughput hERG drug safety screening assays.

  11. [A hydroponic cultivation system for rapid high-yield transient protein expression in Nicotiana plants under laboratory conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Qianzhen; Mai, Rongjia; Yang, Zhixiao; Chen, Minfang; Yang, Tiezhao; Lai, Huafang; Yang, Peiliang; Chen, Qiang; Zhou, Xiaohong

    2012-06-01

    To develop a hydroponic Nicotiana cultivation system for rapid and high-yield transient expression of recombinant proteins under laboratory conditions. To establish the hydroponic cultivation system, several parameters were examined to define the optimal conditions for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants. We used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the geminiviral plant transient expression vector as the model protein/expression vector. We examined the impact of Nicotiana species, the density and time of Agrobacterium infiltration, and the post-infiltration growth period on the accumulation of GFP. The expression levels of GFP in Nicotiana leaves were then examined by Western blotting and ELISA. Our data indicated that a hydroponic Nicotiana cultivation system with a light intensity of 9000 LX/layer, a light cycle of 16 h day/8 h night, a temperature regime of 28 degrees celsius; day/21 degrees celsius; night, and a relative humidity of 80% could support the optimal plant growth and protein expression. After agroinfiltration with pBYGFPDsRed.R/LBA4404, high levels of GFP expression were observed in both N. benthamiana and N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) plants cultured with this hydroponic cultivation system. An optimal GFP expression was achieved in both Nicotiana species leaves 4 days after infiltration by Agrobacterium with an OD(600) of 0.8. At a given time point, the average biomass of N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) was significantly higher than that of N. benthamiana. The leaves from 6-week-old N. benthamiana plants and 5-week-old N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) plants could be the optimal material for agroinfiltration. We have established a hydroponic cultivation system that allows robust growth of N. benthamiana and N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) plants and the optimal GFP expression in the artificial climate box.

  12. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Soon Lee, Taek

    2015-01-01

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulation by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Finally, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol. PMID:26052683

  13. Caring Dairy: A Sustainable Dairy Farming Initiative in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calker, van K.J.; Hooch Antink, R.H.J.; Beldman, A.C.G.; Mauser, A.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in the concept of sustainability in dairy farming has grown as a result of the continuous pressure on farm incomes, occurrence of animal diseases with a major impact on the image of dairy farming, concerns about animal welfare, and environmental problems caused by agriculture. There are,

  14. Preparation of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles in high yield by DC arc discharge and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Cui, Lan; Lin, Kui [Center of Analysis, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Jin, Feng-min; Wang, Bin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Shi, Shu-xiu [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yang, De-an [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Hui [Center of Analysis, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); He, Fei [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Chen, Xiao-ping [Center of Analysis, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Cui, Shen, E-mail: cuishen@tju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► CEINPs with core–shell structure and high Fe content were prepared in high yield by DC arc discharge. ► The anode II with a mass ratio of total iron to carbon 8:1 was used in DC arc discharge. ► The possible process of formation of CEINPs is briefly discussed. ► The uniformity of composition of anode is very important for the formation of CEINPs. ► The MEF and MMF of iron element may also play an important role in the formation of CEINPs. -- Abstract: Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles (CEINPs) were prepared by DC arc discharge under nitrogen atmosphere of high temperature. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), and their magnetic properties were measured by physical property measurement system (PPMS). The product B{sub I}, obtained from the anode I, contains the nanoparticles of iron and iron carbide, and carbon coating with imperfect and disordered layer structure. The product B{sub II}, obtained from the anode II, mainly consists of CEINPs, whose cores mainly consist of iron and iron carbide and shells contain about 3–7 graphitic layers. The iron contents in the products B{sub I} and B{sub II} are 44.8 and 82.6 wt.%, respectively. The products B{sub I} and B{sub II} have similar phase composition which includes carbon, iron, iron carbide, ferrous and ferric oxide, iron nitride, and carbon nitride. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the products B{sub I} and B{sub II} are 29.35 and 88.66 emu/g and their coercivity (Hc) are 220 and 240 Oe, respectively. The total yields of all the products formed in the arc discharge chamber from anodes I and II, except for the cylinder-shaped deposits formed on the top of the cathode, are 25.8 and 22.3 wt.%, respectively. The possible process of formation of CEINPs is briefly discussed on

  15. High-yield synthesis of single-crystal short Eu 2O 3 nanorods through a facile sol-gel template approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Jiu, Hongfang; Luo, Jia; Chen, Qianwang

    2007-12-01

    High-yield Eu 2O 3 short nanorods have been prepared by a facile sol-gel method with polystyrene/polyelectrolyte (PS/PE) microreactor as template in an aqueous solution of europium nitrate in the presence of ammonia and urea. The properties of Eu 2O 3 nanorods were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The particle sizes measured from TEM and FESEM are about 200 nm×500 nm ( W× L). A possible mechanism for the formation of such high-yield oxide nanorods is discussed.

  16. Colours used in Dairy Products.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of pH and heat treatment processing on stability and natural food colours used in dairy products. A repeated laboratory experiment was conducted in which loss of colour intensity or change in shade of natural food colours used in acid and nearly neutral dairy ...

  17. Entrepreneurship of Dutch dairy farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergevoet, R.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Several developments in the Netherlands as well as in the other countries within the EU are forcing dairy farmers to reconsider their involvement in dairy production. Farmers are being called to account more for the entrepreneurial element of their farming behaviour. Up till now it was unclear how

  18. Dairy cluster design for Myanmar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, J.; Lee, van der J.

    2015-01-01

    At the request of the Dutch and Myanmar governments, a project team consisting of researchers from Wageningen University & Research centre and experts from dairy processor Royal FrieslandCampina, feed company Royal De Heus and AgriWorks consultancy have developed a design for a dairy cluster in

  19. Skin injuries on the body and thigh of dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Carsten; Gröhn, Y.T.; Thysen, Iver

    1994-01-01

    An epidemiological study was conducted in 18 dairy herds with the objective to characterize those groups of cows where skin injuries to the body and thighs occurred most frequently. Data were analyzed with multivariable logistic regression. The epidemiologic patterns were different in first...... and later lactations. In first lactation some degree of injury occurred among 7.7% of 1793 cows. For most cows occurrence of sole ulcer was positively associated with injury while occurrence of heel horn erosion was negatively associated with injury. The association between injury and body weight differed...... depending on month of calving (significant interaction). Injuries occurred most frequently among high yielding cows. Severe reproductive, metabolic, and/or infectious diseases were associated with injuries. In later lactations some degree of injury occurred among 13.4% of 832 cows in lactations 2 to 9 where...

  20. The high-producing dairy cow and its reproductive performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, H; Smith, Rf; Royal, Md

    2007-01-01

    There is evidence that the reproductive performance of dairy cows has declined as milk yields have increased over the last 40 years. Identifying the precise cause(s) of this problem may provide focused solutions. Intensive genetic selection for very high yields has reduced fertility, due mainly...... to an increase in postpartum clinical problems, poor expression of oestrus, defective oocytes/embryos and uterine infections. It is a challenge to solve the problem by getting enough food into these cows to meet the high demands of peak milk yields in early lactation, as well as providing the considerable...... veterinary attention required in the early period after calving. Both these aspects also pose welfare issues. A better solution would be to make genetic and management changes to increase the persistency of lactations to reduce the number and intensity of clinical risk periods throughout a cow's life without...

  1. Dairy Proteins and Energy Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist

    High protein diets affect energy balance beneficially through decreased hunger, enhanced satiety and increased energy expenditure. Dairy products are a major source of protein. Dairy proteins are comprised of two classes, casein (80%) and whey proteins (20%), which are both of high quality......, but casein is absorbed slowly and whey is absorbed rapidly. The present PhD study investigated the effects of total dairy proteins, whey, and casein, on energy balance and the mechanisms behind any differences in the effects of the specific proteins. The results do not support the hypothesis that dairy...... proteins, whey or casein are more beneficial than other protein sources in the regulation of energy balance, and suggest that dairy proteins, whey or casein seem to play only a minor role, if any, in the prevention and treatment of obesity....

  2. Study on the relationship between milk urea nitrogen (MUN and fertility in dairy cattle houses in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mosaferi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between milk urea nitrogen (MUN level and reproductive performance in high yielding dairy cattle houses in Tabriz, Iran. Among 213 selected dairy cattle, 76 heads (35.7% have MUN 16 mg/dl (mean = 17.46 mg/dl. Our results indicated that MUN level in 81 heads of dairy cattle (total 124 heads with mastitis, dystocia, laminitis, uterine infections or placenta replacement was higher than 16 mg/dl. We only observed a significantly positive association between MUN levels and dystocia (p= 0.032, while the association between MUN levels and incidence of other diseases was not statistically significant. The results of this study indicated that MUN level significantly influences the reproductive parameters including days open, calving to first service, first service conception risk, and number of services per conception (p

  3. The Dairy - Business Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    The Bachelor thesis in question has been composed to help the founders of a small start-up company, in the holiday rental industry, succeed in running a sustainable business. The purpose was to create a practical plan for setting up and running the Dairy, a two-bedroom holiday rental in the rural Devon countryside. The business plan discussed the location and facilities of the holiday rental along with a comprehensive account of its competitors. The Dairy’s marketing activity and risk asses...

  4. Patterns of dairy manure management in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Chen Yan; Qiao, Wei; Melse, Roland W.; Li, Lu Jun; Buisonjé, De Fridtjof E.; Wang, Ya Jing; Dong, Renjie

    2017-01-01

    The dairy industry in China is rapidly developing, particularly in terms of the upscaling of dairy farms. However, nutrient-rich manure brings challenges to the sustainability of the dairy industry. This study investigated and reviewed the patterns of dairy manure management in China, and the

  5. Frequency of cardiac arrhythmias in high and low- yielding dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Jafari Dehkordi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrocardiography (ECG may be used to recognize cardiac disorders. Levels of milk production may change the serum electrolytes which its imbalance has a role in cardiac arrhythmia. Fifty high yielding and fifty low yielding Holstein dairy cows were used in this study. Electrocardiography was recorded by base-apex lead and blood samples were collected from jugular vein for measurement of serum elements such as sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, iron and magnesium. Cardiac dysrhythmias were detected more frequent in low yielding Holstein cows (62.00% compared to high yielding Holstein cows (46.00%. The cardiac dysrhythmias that were observed in low yielding Holstein cows included sinus arrhythmia (34.70%, wandering pacemaker (22.45 %, bradycardia (18.37%, tachycardia (10.20%, atrial premature beat (2.04%, sinoatrial block (2.04%, atrial fibrillation (8.16% and atrial tachycardia (2.04%. The cardiac dysrhythmias were observed in high yielding Holstein cows including, sinus arrhythmia (86.95% and wandering pacemaker (13.05%. Also, notched P wave was observed to be 30% and 14% in high- and low- yielding Holstein cows respectively. The serum calcium concentration of low yielding Holstein cows was significantly lower than that of high yielding Holstein cows. There was not any detectable significant difference in other serum elements between high- and low- yielding Holstein cows. Based on the result of present study, could be concluded that low serum concentration of calcium results to more frequent dysrhythmias in low yielding Holstein cows.

  6. Growth, livability, feed consumption, and carcass composition of the Athens Canadian Random Bred 1955 meat-type chicken versus the 2012 high-yielding Cobb 500 broiler

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collins, K E; Kiepper, B H; Ritz, C W; McLendon, B L; Wilson, J L

    2014-01-01

    A flock of the Athens Canadian Random Bred (ACRB), a 1955 meat-type chicken control strain, was raised alongside a flock of 2012 Cobb 500 fast feathering high-yielding broilers to determine selection changes over the past 57 yr...

  7. Complete Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli KRX, a Strain for Efficient Cloning and High-Yield Expression of Proteins under Control of the T7 RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzhans, Jan-Philipp; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Kalinowski, Jörn; Friehs, Karl

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli KRX is a strain offering both a high transformation efficiency and the possibility to produce the target protein to high yields in one host, avoiding additional cloning steps. Here, the draft genome sequence of E. coli KRX is presented and provides the genetic basis for additional biotechnological applications.

  8. Prospects of performing multiple-country comparison of dairy sires ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International trade with genetic material has lead to the foundation of Interbull, an international organization that performs international evaluations of dairy bulls, enabling countries to obtain breeding values of foreign bulls on their on scale. Not all countries have the possibility to participate in the evaluations with their own ...

  9. assessment of dairy wastewater treatment and its potential for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    The extent of pollution of dairy wastewater treated in a septic tank and its potential for biogas production was investigated. ... effluent displaying higher values of organic matter than the allowed discharge limits according to the national standards. ..... consuming-bacteria in anaerobic digestion at the wastewater ponds (Wang ...

  10. Performance of Improved Dairy Cattle Technologies Among Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    countries, such as Nigeria are improved dairy cattle. Similar finding has been reported by Heinrichs et al. (2009) who stated that one of the excellent ways to improve herd productivity is to cross local cows to the exotic bulls and/or the introduction of semen from exotic breed into the female organ of local cow through artificial ...

  11. Feeding toasted field beans to dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, K.F.; Kjeldsen, A.M.; Askegaard, M.

    2013-01-01

    Toasting field beans can improve the protein quality of field beans markedly. In the feed demonstrations carried out in Project EcoProtein testing a new method of toasting with a drum dryer, showed, however, only reduced effect on the protein quality due to a lower than optimal temperature. The toasted field beans were fed in two organic dairy herds, replacing a part of the concentrates in the ration in a cross-over design. Preliminary results showed no milk yield difference in herd 1, but a ...

  12. The influence of elevated feed stalls on feeding behaviour of lactating dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Benz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The performance level of high yielding cows can only be guaranteed by high quality forage and high feed intake. An about 15–20 cm elevated and 160 cm long feed stall with rubber flooring doesn’t only offer undisturbed meals but also a yielding and dry standing surface. In a pilot stable with 130 dairy cows (German Simmental the feeding alley was subsequently equipped with elevated feed stalls. The results show that animals frequented the feeding barn less often while the duration of single meals prolonged. The specific behavioural changes differed depending on milk yield and number of lactation.

  13. High yields of active Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase are obtained using maltose-binding protein as a solubility tag.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbers, M.M.E.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) catalyzes the FAD-dependent oxidation of proline to ¿1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate, the first step of proline catabolism in many organisms. Next to being involved in a number of physiological processes, ProDH is of interest for practical applications because the proline

  14. Current strategies for dairy waste management: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S; Giakoundis, Antonios

    2006-01-01

    Industrial waste management is nowadays one of the main issues for ensuring a sustainable environment. Dairy waste management in particular, is very crucial in view of the high organic matter and high nutrient levels contained in dairy effluents. Dairy waste can be effectively treated either with aerobic or anaerobic processes. The main advantages of the former consist of low yield, high kinetics, pathogen free product, and high temperature operation whereas the latter is a simple, low budget and conservative technology. Occasionally, pre-treatment strategies (i.e. wetlands) are required in order to improve the efficiency of treatment methodology. Wetlands are a promising technology applied in order to remove the greater part of nutrients and minerals contained in milk based products.

  15. Probiotic Delivery through Fermentation: Dairy vs. Non-Dairy Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaminda Senaka Ranadheera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host, mainly through the process of replacing or including beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Fermented dairy foods such as yogurt, fermented milk and cheese are the major vehicle in delivering probiotics, and probiotic delivery have been traditionally associated with these fermented dairy foods. Additionally, many other non-dairy probiotic products and non-food form such as capsules, pills and tablets are also available and some of these non-food forms are highly popular among the consumers. Certain non-dairy probiotic foods, especially beverages that are non-fermented products, can also play an important role in probiotic delivery. There is an increasing demand for non-dairy probiotic foods (both fermented and non-fermented including fruit and vegetable juices, soy and certain cereal products due to vegetarianism, lactose intolerance and dairy allergies, as well as interest in low cholesterol foods. In this context, this review mainly focus on the different types of probiotic food products including beverages with special reference to their viability followed by a brief account on the applicability of using fermented and non-fermented beverage products in probiotic delivery.

  16. Assessing the sustainability of EU dairy farms with different management systems and husbandry practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leach, Katharine; Gerrard, Catherine; Kudahl, Anne Margrethe Braad

    on farm management practices collected in face to face interviews with farmers were entered and the tool then calculated a composite score for each of 11 separate “spurs” or dimensions contributing to sustainability. The results can be used to stimulate discussion between farmers and point to areas where......The EU funded SOLID project supports research which will contribute to the competitiveness of organic and low input dairy systems, and increase their sustainability. There are many aspects of the sustainability of dairy farms, relating to economic, environmental and social dimensions, and methods...... of animal husbandry can affect all of these. A UK spreadsheet based tool for rapid assessment of the whole farm was adapted for application on a range of organic and low input dairy farms across the EU. This tool was used to assess approximately ten organic dairy farms in each of four EU countries. Data...

  17. Lameness detection in dairy cattle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hertem, Van, T; Bahr, C; Schlageter Tello, A; Viazzi, S; Steensels, M; Romanini, C.E.B; Lokhorst, C; Maltz, E; Halachmi, I; Berckmans, D

    2016-01-01

    ...) was a better classifier for lameness than the single-sensor-based detection models. Between September 2013 and August 2014, 3629 cow observations were collected on a commercial dairy farm in Belgium...

  18. Dairy goats feeding and nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pulina, Giuseppe; Cannas, Antonello; Francesconi, Ana Helena Dias

    2008-01-01

    ... on Mediterranean Shrublands M. Decandia, M.D. Yiakoulaki, G. Pinna, A. Cabiddu and G. Molle 161 vvi Contents 9 Grazing Management of Dairy Goats on Mediterranean Herbaceous Pastures A. Bonanno, V. F...

  19. Seroprevalence of chlamydial infection in dairy goats in Shaanxi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seroprevalence of chlamydial infection in dairy goats in Shaanxi Province, Northwestern China. ... samples from 729 dairy goats (263 Saanen dairy goats and 466 Guanzhong dairy goats). ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  20. Bioconversion of dairy manure by black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) for biodiesel and sugar production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zheng, Longyu; Qiu, Ning; Cai, Hao; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-06-01

    Modern dairies cause the accumulation of considerable quantity of dairy manure which is a potential hazard to the environment. Dairy manure can also act as a principal larval resource for many insects such as the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens. The black soldier fly larvae (BSFL) are considered as a new biotechnology to convert dairy manure into biodiesel and sugar. BSFL are a common colonizer of large variety of decomposing organic material in temperate and tropical areas. Adults do not need to be fed, except to take water, and acquired enough nutrition during larval development for reproduction. Dairy manure treated by BSFL is an economical way in animal facilities. Grease could be extracted from BSFL by petroleum ether, and then be treated with a two-step method to produce biodiesel. The digested dairy manure was hydrolyzed into sugar. In this study, approximately 1248.6g fresh dairy manure was converted into 273.4 g dry residue by 1200 BSFL in 21 days. Approximately 15.8 g of biodiesel was gained from 70.8 g dry BSFL, and 96.2g sugar was obtained from the digested dairy manure. The residual dry BSFL after grease extraction can be used as protein feedstuff. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  2. Development of a high-yielding bioprocess for 11-α hydroxylation of canrenone under conditions of oxygen-enriched air supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contente, Martina Letizia; Guidi, Benedetta; Serra, Immacolata; De Vitis, Valerio; Romano, Diego; Pinto, Andrea; Lenna, Roberto; de Souza Oliveira, Ricardo Pinheiro; Molinari, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    A high yielding bioprocess for 11-α hydroxylation of canrenone (1a) using Aspergillus ochraceus ATCC 18500 was developed. The optimization of the biotransformation involved both fermentation (for achieving highly active mycelium of A. ochraceus) and biotransformation with the aim to obtain 11-α hydroxylation with high selectivity and yield. A medium based on sucrose as C-source resulted particularly suitable for conversion of canrenone into the corresponding 11-hydroxy derivative, whereas the use of O2-enriched air and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a co-solvent for increasing substrate solubility played a crucial role for obtaining high yields (>95%) of the desired product in high chemical purity starting from 30mM (10.2g/L) of substrate. The structure of the hydroxylated product was confirmed by a combination of two-dimensional NMR proton-proton correlation techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CULTIVAR RELEASE - BRS Notável: a medium-early-maturing, disease-resistant Carioca common bean cultivar with high yield potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Prucoli Posse

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BRS Notável is a common bean cultivar with carioca grain, suitable for cultivation in 20 Brazilian states. It is a mediumearly-maturing cultivar, with an average yield of 2,261 kg ha-1, 8.5% higher than the controls, a high yield potential (4,472 kg ha-1, lodging tolerance and resistance to anthracnose, fusarium wilt, common bacterial blight, and curtobacterium wilt.

  4. Find_tfSBP: find thermodynamics-feasible and smallest balanced pathways with high yield from large-scale metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zixiang; Sun, Jibin; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2017-12-11

    Biologically meaningful metabolic pathways are important references in the design of industrial bacterium. At present, constraint-based method is the only way to model and simulate a genome-scale metabolic network under steady-state criteria. Due to the inadequate assumption of the relationship in gene-enzyme-reaction as one-to-one unique association, computational difficulty or ignoring the yield from substrate to product, previous pathway finding approaches can't be effectively applied to find out the high yield pathways that are mass balanced in stoichiometry. In addition, the shortest pathways may not be the pathways with high yield. At the same time, a pathway, which exists in stoichiometry, may not be feasible in thermodynamics. By using mixed integer programming strategy, we put forward an algorithm to identify all the smallest balanced pathways which convert the source compound to the target compound in large-scale metabolic networks. The resulting pathways by our method can finely satisfy the stoichiometric constraints and non-decomposability condition. Especially, the functions of high yield and thermodynamics feasibility have been considered in our approach. This tool is tailored to direct the metabolic engineering practice to enlarge the metabolic potentials of industrial strains by integrating the extensive metabolic network information built from systems biology dataset.

  5. High-yield production of a stable Vero cell-based vaccine candidate against the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fangye; Zhou, Jian; Ma, Lei; Song, Shaohui; Zhang, Xinwen; Li, Weidong; Jiang, Shude [No. 5, Department of Bioproducts, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Pecking Union Medical College, Jiaoling Avenue 935, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650102, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yue, E-mail: euy-tokyo@umin.ac.jp [National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Yingxin Lane 100, Xicheng District, Beijing 100052, People' s Republic of China (China); Liao, Guoyang, E-mail: liaogy@21cn.com [No. 5, Department of Bioproducts, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Pecking Union Medical College, Jiaoling Avenue 935, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650102, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine with stable high yield. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable high yield derived from the YNVa H3N2 backbone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H5N1/YNVa has a similar safety and immunogenicity to H5N1delta. -- Abstract: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses pose a global pandemic threat, for which rapid large-scale vaccine production technology is critical for prevention and control. Because chickens are highly susceptible to HPAI viruses, the supply of chicken embryos for vaccine production might be depleted during a virus outbreak. Therefore, developing HPAI virus vaccines using other technologies is critical. Meeting vaccine demand using the Vero cell-based fermentation process has been hindered by low stability and yield. In this study, a Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine candidate (H5N1/YNVa) with stable high yield was achieved by reassortment of the Vero-adapted (Va) high growth A/Yunnan/1/2005(H3N2) (YNVa) virus with the A/Anhui/1/2005(H5N1) attenuated influenza vaccine strain (H5N1delta) using the 6/2 method. The reassorted H5N1/YNVa vaccine maintained a high hemagglutination (HA) titer of 1024. Furthermore, H5N1/YNVa displayed low pathogenicity and uniform immunogenicity compared to that of the parent virus.

  6. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  7. An integrated method for improving the dairy production sector in developing countries: the case of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayemi, P H; Webb, E C

    2009-04-01

    During the past six years, ten research topics were carried out with the aim of developing an integrated method to improve production and sustainability of dairy systems in Cameroon. This involved reviewing dairy research done in the country, carrying out a participatory rural appraisal and an economic opportunity survey in selected dairy farms, setting up on-farm interventions, investigating cow reproduction, evaluating milk quality and the impact of integrated interventions. Guidelines for improvement of the dairy sector were set up. It was found that the developed integrated method had a positive impact on dairy farms. Farmers who adopted interventions had nearly 200% higher economic returns. In order to boost the Cameroonian dairy sector, it is suggested that the government acts as a motivating force by organizing the market, ensuring the monitoring of epizootic diseases and providing artificial insemination services and organizing breeding societies. It is also suggested that the integrated method becomes a discipline in dairy science and be applied in other developing countries.

  8. Genome sequence and plasmid transformation of the model high-yield bacterial cellulose producer Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Reeve, Benjamin; Abbott, James; Freemont, Paul S.; Ellis, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong, highly pure form of cellulose that is used in a range of applications in industry, consumer goods and medicine. Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582 is one of the highest reported bacterial cellulose producing strains and has been used as a model organism in numerous studies of bacterial cellulose production and studies aiming to increased cellulose productivity. Here we present a high-quality draft genome sequence for G. hansenii ATCC 53582 and find that in addition to the previously described cellulose synthase operon, ATCC 53582 contains two additional cellulose synthase operons and several previously undescribed genes associated with cellulose production. In parallel, we also develop optimized protocols and identify plasmid backbones suitable for transformation of ATCC 53582, albeit with low efficiencies. Together, these results provide important information for further studies into cellulose synthesis and for future studies aiming to genetically engineer G. hansenii ATCC 53582 for increased cellulose productivity.

  9. Genome sequence and plasmid transformation of the model high-yield bacterial cellulose producer Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Reeve, Benjamin; Abbott, James; Freemont, Paul S; Ellis, Tom

    2016-03-24

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong, highly pure form of cellulose that is used in a range of applications in industry, consumer goods and medicine. Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582 is one of the highest reported bacterial cellulose producing strains and has been used as a model organism in numerous studies of bacterial cellulose production and studies aiming to increased cellulose productivity. Here we present a high-quality draft genome sequence for G. hansenii ATCC 53582 and find that in addition to the previously described cellulose synthase operon, ATCC 53582 contains two additional cellulose synthase operons and several previously undescribed genes associated with cellulose production. In parallel, we also develop optimized protocols and identify plasmid backbones suitable for transformation of ATCC 53582, albeit with low efficiencies. Together, these results provide important information for further studies into cellulose synthesis and for future studies aiming to genetically engineer G. hansenii ATCC 53582 for increased cellulose productivity.

  10. 76 FR 26930 - Dairy Promotion and Research Program; Importer Nominations to the Dairy Promotion and Research Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    .... SUMMARY: This action is pursuant to the Dairy Production Stabilization Act of 1983 (Dairy Act), as amended....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This document is being issued pursuant to the Dairy Production...]. The Dairy Board was established under the Dairy Production Stabilization Act of 1983 (Dairy Act) to...

  11. Dairy farmers' attitudes and intentions towards improving dairy cow foot health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnis, M.R.N.; Hogeveen, H.; Garforth, C.J.; Stassen, E.N.

    2013-01-01

    Dairy cow foot health is a subject of concern because it is considered to be the most important welfare problem in dairy farming and causes economic losses for the farmer. In order to improve dairy cow foot health it is important to take into account the attitude and intention of dairy farmers. In

  12. Value-Added Dairy Products from Grass-Based Dairy Farms: A Case Study in Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingbin; Parsons, Robert; Colby, Jennifer; Castle, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    On-farm processing of value-added dairy products can be a way for small dairy farms to diversify production and increase revenue. This article examines characteristics of three groups of Vermont farmers who have grass-based dairy farms--those producing value-added dairy products, those interested in such products, and those not interested in such…

  13. Costs of Producing Biogas at Dairy Farms in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomie A. Gebrezgabher

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available By 2020, Dutch dairy chains envisage to be self-sufficient with regard to energy used by dairy farms and dairy processors. This would require dairy farms to produce 25 PJ per year, possibly by a combination of wind, solar and biogas. This paper focuses on biogas. To evaluate the project’s viability we estimated the expected technical and financial performance of 4 types of business models, i.e. “CHP-farm”, “CHP-large”, “green gas” and “central upgrading of green gas”. Data stem from among others 23 biogas plants in the Netherlands. Anticipating that CHP-models and green gas models occur with a likelihood of 40% and 60% respectively, the total number of biogas plants would amount to 232 (1% of dairy farms, including a total of 5 million tons of manure per year (14% of all cattle manure in the Netherlands and annual government subsidies of Euro 295 million. Aggregated annual profits are expected to be positive, but over the project’s total life time there is an expected deficit of Euro 262. For this to change costs of feedstocks or digestate disposal costs would for instance have to go down. Also fully switching to green gas models dampens the deficit. Results are used in current stakeholders debates on the organization of an “energy neutral dairy chain” in the Netherlands. Further analyses incorporating uncertainty around key technical and economic parameters including financial impacts of CO2-reductions are underway.

  14. Production and Characterization of Alkaline Protease from a High Yielding and Moderately Halophilic Strain of SD11 Marine Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A marine bacterium SD11, which was isolated from sea muds (Geziwo Qinhuangdao Sea area, China, was used to produce thermostable alkaline serine nonmetal protease in the skim milk agar plate medium with 10% NaCl. The optimal temperature about the manufacture of the extracellular protease was ~60°C. The crude enzyme was stable at 20–50°C. The activity was retained to 60% and 45% after heating for 1 h at 60 and 70°C, respectively. The protease was highly active in a wide pH scope (8.0–10.0 and maximum protease activity exhibited at pH 10.0. The activity was restrained by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF but mildly increased (~107% in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, indicating that the production contains serine-protease(s and nonmetal protease(s. Moreover, the crude alkaline protease was active with the 5 mM Ca2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Na+, and K+ that existed separately. In addition, the protease showed superduper stability when exposed to an anionic surfactant (5 mM SDS, an oxidizing agent (1% H2O2, and several organic solvents (methanol, isopropanol, and acetone. These results suggest that the marine bacterium SD11 is significant in the industry from the prospects of its ability to produce thermally stable alkaline protease.

  15. High-Yield Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles by Precipitation in a High-Aqueous Phase Content Reverse Microemulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Sosa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles were precipitated at 70°C in a reverse microemulsion containing a high concentration of 0.5 M silver nitrate aqueous solution, toluene as organic phase, and a mixture of surfactants sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate/sodium dodecyl sulfate (2/1, w/w. Nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In spite of the high-water/surfactant molar ratio and concentration of silver nitrate solution used in this study, characterizations demonstrated that nanoparticles were silver crystals (purity >99% with 8.6–8.8 nm in average diameter and 2.9–4.7 nm in standard deviation. It is proposed that slow dosing rate of aqueous solution of precipitating agent and the small molecular volume of toluene attenuated both particle aggregation and polydispersity widening. Experimental yield of silver nanoparticles obtained in this study was much higher than theoretical yields calculated from available data in the literature on preparation of silver nanoparticles in reverse microemulsions.

  16. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Clausen, Morten R.; Dalsgaard, Trine K.; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health. PMID:26091233

  17. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Clausen, Morten R; Dalsgaard, Trine K; Bertram, Hanne C

    2015-06-17

    Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health.

  18. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health.

  19. Milk and dairy products: a unique micronutrient combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucheron, Frédéric

    2011-10-01

    Milk and dairy products contain micronutrients such as minerals and vitamins, which contribute to multiple and different vital functions in the organism. The mineral fraction is composed of macroelements (Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, and Cl) and oligoelements (Fe, Cu, Zn, and Se). From a physicochemical point of view, the chemical forms, the associations with other ions or organic molecules, and the location of macroelements such as Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, and Cl in milk are relatively well described and understood. Thus, it is admitted that these macroelements are differently distributed into aqueous and micellar phases of milk, depending on their nature. K, Na, and Cl ions are essentially in the aqueous phase, whereas Ca, P, and Mg are partly bound to the casein micelles. About one third of the Ca, half of the P, and two thirds of the Mg are located in the aqueous phase of milk. Dairy products are more or less rich in these different minerals. In cheeses, mineral content depends mainly on their processing. The Ca content is strongly related to the acidification step. Moreover, if acidification is associated with the draining step, the Ca content in the cheese will be reduced. Thus, the Ca content varies in the following increasing order: milks/fermented milks/fresh cheeses milk. Concerning Ca, the formation of insoluble calcium phosphate, carbonate, and lactate is reported in some ripened cheeses. The NaCl content in cheeses depends on the salting of the curd. From a nutritional point of view, it is largely admitted that milk and dairy products are important sources of Ca, Mg, Zn, and Se. The vitamin fraction of milk and dairy products is composed of lipophilic (A, D, E, and K) and hydrophilic (B(1), B(2), B(3), B(5), B(6), B(8), B(9), B(12), and C) vitamins. Because of their hydrophobic properties, the lipophilic vitamins are mainly in the milk fat fraction (cream, butter). The hydrophilic vitamins are in the aqueous phase of milk. For one part of these vitamins, the

  20. A tale of two dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Milk has always been susceptible to price fluctuations. Farmers are used to putting away money during good times to see themselves through lean times. Recently, however, the cycles have become more violent, with lows falling lower and highs rising not quite so high and the intervals between peaks and valleys shrinking. In 1970, when milk was bringing farmers the same amount that it is today, there were nearly 650,000 dairy farms in the United States. Now there are fewer than one tenth as many, only about 54,000. The largest 1 percent of dairy farms (a figure than includes only enormous factory farms with over 2,000 cows) produced nearly one quarter of the milk we consume. Recently, dairy farmers banded together to propose a radical solution to the dairy crisis. In order to survive, they concluded, American dairy farmers would have to join together to control the supply of milk, an approach along lines similar to the one taken in Canada.

  1. Dairy cow monitoring by RFID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan Stankovski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dairy cows identification and monitoring on small cattle farms are usually based on the utilization of barcode technology. This kind of identification technology is unsuitable for dairy cows milking and feeding process automation. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology is a better solution in this case. This paper describes the research and implementation of the milking cycle´s automated monitoring with the use of RFID tags conducted on a small cattle farm in the Republic of Serbia. This solution is based on RFID system which consists of two parts. First part includes control box, two Ultra High Frequency (UHF RFID readers operating at frequency of 915 MHz and RFID tags glued onto the dairy cow ear labels. Second part includes software modules for acquisition and collecting data from RFID tags to build up an archive due to supervision and analysis of the milking cycle. Reading accuracy of RFID system in the observed period was 99.8 % in average. A group of dairy cows having a settled milking cycle within an interval of 12h ± 5 % had a 1.5 % better yield and a 0.08 better quality in comparison with a group of dairy cows having a milking cycle variance higher than 20 %. RFID system implemented in described way can be easily integrated into a new or existing farm management system in order to have better production results which depend on several factors including settled milking cycles.

  2. Organic and Other Environmentally Friendly Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that is grown without: pesticides fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge herbicides antibiotics bioengineering hormones ionizing radiation Organic animal products — meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy foods — come from animals that are fed 100% organic ...

  3. 7 CFR 58.519 - Dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dairy products. 58.519 Section 58.519 Agriculture..., GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General... Material § 58.519 Dairy products. (a) Raw skim milk. All raw skim milk obtained from a secondary source...

  4. Regular-Fat Dairy and Human Health: A Synopsis of Symposia Presented in Europe and North America (2014-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Arne; Rice Bradley, Beth H; Brenna, J Thomas; Delplanque, Bernadette; Ferry, Monique; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises

    2016-07-29

    In recent history, some dietary recommendations have treated dairy fat as an unnecessary source of calories and saturated fat in the human diet. These assumptions, however, have recently been brought into question by current research on regular fat dairy products and human health. In an effort to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular-fat dairy foods have on human health. The emerging scientific evidence indicates that the consumption of regular fat dairy foods is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and inversely associated with weight gain and the risk of obesity. Dairy foods, including regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, can be important components of an overall healthy dietary pattern. Systematic examination of the effects of dietary patterns that include regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt on human health is warranted.

  5. Regular-Fat Dairy and Human Health: A Synopsis of Symposia Presented in Europe and North America (2014–2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Arne; Rice Bradley, Beth H.; Brenna, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Bernadette; Ferry, Monique; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises

    2016-01-01

    In recent history, some dietary recommendations have treated dairy fat as an unnecessary source of calories and saturated fat in the human diet. These assumptions, however, have recently been brought into question by current research on regular fat dairy products and human health. In an effort to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular-fat dairy foods have on human health. The emerging scientific evidence indicates that the consumption of regular fat dairy foods is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and inversely associated with weight gain and the risk of obesity. Dairy foods, including regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, can be important components of an overall healthy dietary pattern. Systematic examination of the effects of dietary patterns that include regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt on human health is warranted. PMID:27483308

  6. Dairy beverages and energy balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Arne; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Gilbert, Jo-Anne

    2010-01-01

    to exist. We have found that high versus low calcium intakes from dairy products had no effect on 24-h energy expenditure or substrate oxidation rates, but fecal fat excretion increased approximately 2.5-fold on the high-calcium diets. In a meta-analysis of intervention studies we found that increasing...... dairy calcium intake by 1200mg/day resulted in increased fecal fat excretion by 5.2 (1.6-8.8) g/day. Newer research shows that humans possess taste receptors for calcium in the gastrointestinal tract and that signaling may be linked to appetite regulation. A new line of evidence suggests...... that an inadequate calcium intake during an energy restricted weight loss program may trigger hunger and impair compliance to the diet. These mechanisms may be part of the explanation for the protective effects of dairy products with regard to obesity and metabolic syndrome....

  7. Application of nitrate and water isotopes to assessment of groundwater quality beneath dairy farms in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. B.; Harter, T.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    In California’s Central Valley, nitrate contamination of drinking water wells is a significant concern, and there are multiple potential sources of nitrate in this area including septic discharge, synthetic and manure fertilizers, and concentrated animal feeding operations. Dairies represent the majority of animal feeding operations in California, and have been shown to be potential sources of nitrate, salinity, dissolved organic carbon, and pathogens to groundwater. Within individual dairies, different land use areas including barns and freestalls, corrals, liquid waste lagoons, and fields for forage crops (often fertilized with animal waste, synthetic fertilizer, or both), each of which may have different impacts on the groundwater. In this study, groundwater samples were collected from two dairies in the San Joaquin Valley, where the water table is fairly shallow, and from five dairies in the Tulare Lake Basin, where the water table is much deeper. In each dairy, nitrate isotopes, water isotopes, nutrient concentrations, and other chemical and physical parameters were measured in monitoring wells located within different land use areas of the dairies. Across all sampled dairy wells, δ15N-NO3 ranged from +3.2 to +49.4‰, and δ18O-NO3 ranged from -3.1 to +19.2‰. Mean nitrate concentrations, δ15N-NO3, and δ18O-NO3 were significantly higher in the northern (San Joaquin Valley) dairy wells in comparison to the southern (Tulare Lake Basin) dairy wells. No consistent differences in nitrate isotopic compositions were found between the different land use areas, and large spatial variability in both nitrate concentrations and nitrate isotopic composition was observed within most of the individual dairies. These results emphasize the challenges associated with monitoring groundwater beneath dairies due to high spatial heterogeneity in the aquifer and groundwater constituents. At four of the seven dairies, δ18O and δ2H of the ground water in wells located

  8. Prefermentation of liquid dairy manure to support biological nutrient removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Kerem; Müftügil, Mert B; Ogejo, Jactone Arogo; Knowlton, Katharine F; Love, Nancy G

    2009-04-01

    A continuously operated, intermittently fed reactor (fermenter) system with a 2-d solids retention time was proposed for supporting biological nutrient removal from liquid dairy manure. The first objective of this study was to select a material with high fermentation potential to be used as the fermenter feed. Primary sludge, liquid separated dairy manure, and flushed dairy manure were investigated for their fermentation potential. Liquid separated dairy manure had the highest fermentation potential, 0.73mg volatile fatty acid as chemical oxygen demand/mg of initial volatile suspended solids (VSS). The second objective was to investigate the performance of a pilot-scale fermenter operated under an average organic loading rate (OLR) of 3 kg-VSS/m(3)/d. The reactor utilized 18% of the manure fermentation potential. Performance comparison of the pilot-scale fermenter and a lab-scale fermenter with an average OLR of 7 kg-VSS/m(3)/d highlighted the need to increase the OLR of the pilot-scale fermenter so that it can exploit a higher fraction of the manure fermentation potential. A continuously operated, intermittently fed fermenter with 2-d SRT can utilize the majority of the manure fermentation potential and support a downstream BNR reactor provided that it receives a sufficiently high OLR.

  9. Photochemical properties in flag leaves of a super-high-yielding hybrid rice and a traditional hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) probed by chlorophyll a fluorescence transient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meiping; Shan, YongJie; Kochian, Leon; Strasser, Reto J; Chen, GuoXiang

    2015-12-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence of flag leaves in a super-high-yielding hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) LYPJ, and a traditional hybrid rice SY63 cultivar with lower grain yield, which were grown in the field, were investigated from emergence through senescence of flag leaves. As the flag leaf matured, there was an increasing trend in photosynthetic parameters such as quantum efficiency of primary photochemistry ([Formula: see text] Po) and efficiency of electron transport from PS II to PS I (Ψ Eo). The overall photosynthetic performance index (PIABS) was significantly higher in the high-yielding LYPJ compared to SY63 during the entire reproductive stage of the plant, the same to MDA content. However, [Formula: see text] Po(=F V/F M), an indicator of the primary photochemistry of the flag leaf, did not display significant changes with leaf age and was not significantly different between the two cultivars, suggesting that PIABS is a more sensitive parameter than [Formula: see text] Po (=F V/F M) during leaf age for distinguishing between cultivars differing in yield.

  10. Survey of management practices related to bovine respiratory disease in preweaned calves on California dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, W J; Lehenbauer, T W; Karle, B M; Hulbert, Lindsey E; Anderson, Randall J; Van Eenennaam, A L; Farver, T B; Aly, S S

    2016-02-01

    In the spring of 2013, a survey of California (CA) dairies was performed to characterize management practices related to bovine respiratory disease in preweaned calves, compare these practices across geographic regions of the state, and determine the principal components that explain the variability in management between herds. The questionnaire consisted of 53 questions divided into 6 sections to assess management practices affecting dairy calves from precalving to weaning. The questionnaire was mailed to 1,523 grade A licensed dairies in CA and 224 responses (14.7%) were collected. Survey response rates were similar over the 3 defined regions of CA: northern CA, northern San Joaquin Valley, and the greater southern CA region. The mean size of respondent herds was 1,423 milking cows. Most dairies reported raising preweaned calves on-site (59.7%). In 93.3% of dairies, preweaned calves were raised in some form of individual housing. Nonsaleable milk was the most frequent liquid diet fed to preweaned heifers (75.2%). Several important differences were identified between calf-raising practices in CA and practices reported in recent nationwide studies, including herd sizes, housing practices, and sources of milk fed to heifers. The differences between the CA and nationwide studies may be explained by differences in herd size. Regional differences within CA were also identified. Compared with the 2 other regions, northern CA dairies were found to have smaller herds, less Holstein cattle, calves remained with dams for longer periods of time after calving, were more likely to be certified organic dairies, and raised their own calves more often. Principal component analysis was performed and identified 11 components composed of 28 variables (questions) that explained 66.5% of the variability in the data. The identified components and questions will contribute to developing a risk assessment tool for bovine respiratory disease in preweaned dairy calves. Copyright © 2016

  11. The Evolving Role of Coliforms As Indicators of Unhygienic Processing Conditions in Dairy Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole H; Trmčić, Aljoša; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    dairy products, their sources and the future of this diverse group as indicator organisms in dairy products.

  12. The Evolving Role of Coliforms as Indicators of Unhygienic Processing Conditions in Dairy Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Helen Martin

    2016-09-01

    in raw and finished dairy products, their sources and the future of this diverse group as indicator organisms in dairy products.

  13. High Yielding Microbubble Production Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Fiabane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic approaches to microbubble production are generally disadvantaged by low yield and high susceptibility to (microchannel blockages. This paper presents an alternative method of producing microbubbles of 2.6 μm mean diameter at concentrations in excess of 30 × 106 mL−1. In this method, the nitrogen gas flowing inside the liquid jet is disintegrated into spray of microbubble when air surrounding this coflowing nitrogen gas-liquid jet passes through a 100 μm orifice at high velocity. Resulting microbubble foam has the polydispersity index of 16%. Moreover, a ratio of mean microbubble diameter to channel width ratio was found to be less than 0.025, which substantially alleviates the occurrence of blockages during production.

  14. Lameness detection in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertem, Van T.; Bahr, C.; Schlageter Tello, A.; Viazzi, S.; Steensels, M.; Romanini, C.E.B.; Lokhorst, C.; Maltz, E.; Halachmi, I.; Berckmans, D.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if a multi-sensor system (milk, activity, body posture) was a better classifier for lameness than the single-sensor-based detection models. Between September 2013 and August 2014, 3629 cow observations were collected on a commercial dairy farm in

  15. Udder health in dairy goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, monitoring and control of udder health in dairy goats was studied. The diagnostic properties of somatic cell count as a monitoring tool for udder health of a goat herd and of individual goats was evaluated. Furthermore, the diagnostic value of bacteriological culture of bulk milk and

  16. Metagenomic Analysis of Dairy Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammed, Musemma K.; Kot, Witold; Neve, Horst

    2017-01-01

    Despite their huge potential for characterizing the biodiversity of phages, metagenomic studies are currently not available for dairy bacteriophages, partly due to the lack of a standard procedure for phage extraction. We optimized an extraction method that allows to remove the bulk protein from...

  17. Coping strategies in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopster, H.

    1998-01-01

    The central aim of this thesis is to investigate whether individual dairy cows display different and coherent patterns of physiological and behavioural stress responses. Such responses enable them to successful adapt in a changing environment.

    In Chapter 1, current

  18. Teat condition in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijenhuis, Francesca

    2004-01-01

    The dairy cow's teat is the first line of defence against mastitis pathogens. The milking process may affect the teat's condition, increasing the risk of mastitis. It is well-proven that teat-ends with severe erosions or broken skin will have an increased risk of mastitis. However, more common

  19. Authenticity assessment of dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Miguel Angel; Juárez, Manuela

    2005-01-01

    The authenticity of dairy products has become a focal point, attracting the attention of scientists, producers, consumers, and policymakers. Among many others, some of the practices not allowed in milk and milk products are the substitution of part of the fat or proteins, admixtures of milk of different species, additions of low-cost dairy products (mainly whey derivatives), or mislabeling of products protected by denomination of origin. A range of analytical methods to detect frauds have been developed, modified, and continually reassessed to be one step ahead of manufacturers who pursue these illegal activities. Traditional procedures to assess the authenticity of dairy products include chromatographic, electrophoretic, and immunoenzymatic methods. New approaches such as capillary electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry have also emerged alongside the latest developments in the former procedures. This work intends to provide an updated and extensive overview since 1991 on the principal applications of all these techniques together with their advantages and disadvantages for detecting the authenticity of dairy products. The scope and limits of different tools are also discussed.

  20. The Tanga Dairy Platform: Fostering Innovations for more Efficient Dairy Chain Coordination in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Joseph Cadilhon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Tanga Dairy Platform, created in 2008, is an informal forum of different stakeholders involved in the dairy industry of Tanzania’s Northeastern Tanga region. The platform’s objective is to exchange knowledge and develop joint actions to common problems. Six years on, it is a sustainable example of a commodity association addressing the joint problems of the region’s dairy industry. The platform has achieved a common understanding among chain actors on dairy price structure; it has successfully lobbied policy makers to reduce value-added tax on dairy inputs and products, and to remove limitations on urban dairy farming in Tanga city.

  1. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing reveals considerable fungal diversity in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, A J; Evanowski, R L; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2017-11-01

    Fungi are important spoilage organisms in dairy products. However, little is known about the diversity of naturally occurring spoilage fungi in raw milk and processed dairy products, due at least in part to the fact that classical fungal identification methods require considerable expertise. To gain further insight into the fungal diversity in the dairy system, we isolated fungi from raw milk, raw and pasteurized milk cheese, and yogurt using the selective dichloran rose bengal chloramphenicol agar. In total, 361 fungal isolates were obtained and further characterized by DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the nuclear ribosomal large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene if needed. We conducted BLAST (https://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi) searches of the ITS region sequences against the UNITE Database (https://unite.ut.ee/analysis.php), and selected other databases if needed, which allowed identification to the species level of 183 isolates and to the genus level of 107 of the 346 isolates that were successfully ITS sequenced. The isolates characterized represented 3 phyla and 19 genera; the most common genera isolated were Penicillium (25% of isolates), Debaryomyces (18%), and Candida (9%). This study not only provides, by using modern molecular tools, a baseline understanding of the types of fungi in dairy products, but also confirms that ITS sequencing is a useful approach for identification of fungal organisms found in the dairy food chain. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of bacteremia in dairy cattle with acute puerperal metritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credille, B C; Woolums, A R; Giguère, S; Robertson, T; Overton, M W; Hurley, D J

    2014-01-01

    Acute puerperal metritis (APM) affects 30% of postpartum dairy cattle. Bacteremia negatively impacts survival in cattle with coliform mastitis. However, the prevalence of bacteremia in dairy cattle with APM is unknown. Bacteremia is detectable in a large proportion of cattle with APM. Seventeen dairy cows with APM and 17 healthy dairy cattle. Prospective case-control study. Cases were identified by daily monitoring of cattle in the first 10 days after calving. Controls were matched to cases by parity and days in milk. Cows were examined at the time of identification of APM. A complete blood count, serum biochemical analysis, and bacteriologic culture of blood and lochial fluid were performed on each animal at the time of diagnosis. The same samples were collected from healthy herdmates of a similar parity and days in milk. Blood culture results and clinicopathologic variables were compared between groups. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with APM, whereas multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with bacteremia. Bacteremia occurred in 53% (9/17) of cattle with APM and 53% (8/15) controls. Bacillus spp. was the organism most commonly isolated from the bloodstream in cattle of both groups. Bacteremic cattle in both groups were significantly less likely to have basophils in the peripheral circulation (P = .02) and more likely to have higher serum globulin concentrations (P = .02). Bacteremia is a common occurrence in postpartum dairy cattle. Further study is warranted to investigate the modes by which bacteria colonize the bloodstream in this population of animals and the importance of bacteremia on health and productivity of affected animals. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. Sub-clinical mastitis prevalent in dairy cows in Chittagong district of Bangladesh: detection by different screening tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukti Barua

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Mastitis is recognized as one of the most costly health disorder affecting dairy cows. An epidemiological study was carried out at some selected farms in Chittagong district of Bangladesh to determine the prevalence and risk factors of sub-clinical mastitis (SCM in dairy cows. Materials and Methods: For conducting the study, some dairy farms of Chittagong were selected from urban and periurban areas by stratified random sampling. A total of 444 quarter samples of 111 (56 from commercial dairy farms and 55 from backyards lactating dairy cows were considered. Sub-clinical mastitis (SCM was determined using three different indirect screening tests: California Mastitis Test (CMT, White Slide Test (WST and Surf Field Mastitis Test (SFMT. Sensitivity and specificity were also determined to measure the accuracy of those tests. Results: The prevalence of SCM by CMT, WST and SFMT were 32.43% (n=144, 33.56% (n=149 and 31.53% (n=140, respectively. Distribution of SCM in relation to different variables at quarter level and animal level was also recorded. The prevalence of SCM was significantly (P4 than others at quarter level. No significant difference (P>0.05 was found in relation to breed. Using CMT as a gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of WST and SFMT were also calculated at 95% confidence interval. The sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and disease prevalence by WST and SFMT were comparable. Conclusion: This study recommends that regular screening of sub-clinical mastitis will reduce the prevalence of sub-clinical mastitis. The most effective way to control sub-clinical mastitis is to take preventive measures such as regular cleaning of the floor, keeping the udder clean, milkman's cleanliness, dry cow therapy specially in high yielding dairy cows.

  4. One-step synthesis of high-yield biodiesel from waste cooking oils by a novel and highly methanol-tolerant immobilized lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiumei; Qin, Xiaoli; Li, Daoming; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-07-01

    This study reported a novel immobilized MAS1 lipase from marine Streptomyces sp. strain W007 for synthesizing high-yield biodiesel from waste cooking oils (WCO) with one-step addition of methanol in a solvent-free system. Immobilized MAS1 lipase was selected for the transesterification reactions with one-step addition of methanol due to its much more higher biodiesel yield (89.50%) when compared with the other three commercial immobilized lipases (lipase retained approximately 70% of its initial activity after being used for four batch cycles. Finally, the obtained biodiesel was further characterized using FT-IR, 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. These findings indicated that immobilized MAS1 lipase is a promising catalyst for biodiesel production from WCO with one-step addition of methanol under high methanol concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A timesaving, low-cost, high-yield method for the synthesis of ultrasmall uniform graphene oxide nanosheets and their application in surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Jia; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Zhang, Xing; Du, Baotan; Ding, Er-Xiong; Wang, Jing; Lu, Zhanguo; Sun, Baoquan; Wang, Jie; Liu, Juncheng

    2016-02-05

    Graphene oxide nanosheets (GONSs) with a lateral size less than 100 nm have attracted more and more attention for their wide range of potential applications, from bionanotechnology and nanobiomedicine to surfactants. However, at present GONSs are commonly prepared from graphite nanofibers or graphite nanopowders which are both expensive. Here, a timesaving, low-cost, high-yield method is proposed for preparing ultrasmall uniform GONSs with an average lateral size of ∼30 nm, utilizing common graphite powder as the raw material in the absence of a strong acid. The obtained GONSs are able to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) effectively, and the dispersion could withstand high-speed centrifugation. Consequently, GONSs could indeed serve as a superior surfactant for the dispersion of SWCNTs, and the dispersion could be further applied in electronics, as the GONSs may be further reduced to reduced GONSs or graphene nanosheets.

  6. High-Yield Method for Isolation and Culture of Endothelial Cells from Rat Coronary Blood Vessels Suitable for Analysis of Intracellular Calcium and Nitric Oxide Biosynthetic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nistri Silvia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a method for isolating endothelial cells from rat heart blood vessels by means of coronary microperfusion with collagenase. This methods makes it possible to obtain high amounts of endothelial cells in culture which retain the functional properties of their in vivo counterparts, including the ability to uptake fluorescently-labeled acetylated low-density lipoproteins and to respond to vasoactive agents by modulating intracellular calcium and by upregulating intrinsic nitric oxide generation. The main advantages of our technique are: (i good reproducibility, (ii accurate sterility that can be maintained throughout the isolation procedure and (iii high yield of pure endothelial cells, mainly due to microperfusion and temperature-controlled incubation with collagenase which allow an optimal distribution of this enzyme within the coronary vascular bed.

  7. Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle " Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

    2007-01-01

    Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO{sub 2} production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is

  8. Transient co-expression for fast and high-yield production of antibodies with human-like N-glycans in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vézina, Louis-P; Faye, Loïc; Lerouge, Patrice; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Marquet-Blouin, Estelle; Burel, Carole; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Bardor, Muriel; Gomord, Véronique

    2009-06-01

    Plant-based transient expression is potentially the most rapid and cost-efficient system for the production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins, but safety concerns associated with plant-specific N-glycosylation have hampered its adoption as a commercial production system. In this article, we describe an approach based on the simultaneous transient co-expression of an antibody, a suppressor of silencing and a chimaeric human beta1,4-galactosyltransferase targeted for optimal activity to the early secretory pathway in agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. This strategy allows fast and high-yield production of antibodies with human-like N-glycans and, more generally, provides solutions to many critical problems posed by the large-scale production of therapeutic and vaccinal proteins, specifically yield, volume and quality.

  9. Using an Active-Optical Sensor to Develop an Optimal NDVI Dynamic Model for High-Yield Rice Production (Yangtze, China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Ferguson, Richard B; Zheng, Hengbiao; Cao, Qiang; Tian, Yongchao; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan

    2017-03-24

    The successful development of an optimal canopy vegetation index dynamic model for obtaining higher yield can offer a technical approach for real-time and nondestructive diagnosis of rice (Oryza sativa L) growth and nitrogen (N) nutrition status. In this study, multiple rice cultivars and N treatments of experimental plots were carried out to obtain: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), leaf area index (LAI), above-ground dry matter (DM), and grain yield (GY) data. The quantitative relationships between NDVI and these growth indices (e.g., LAI, DM and GY) were analyzed, showing positive correlations. Using the normalized modeling method, an appropriate NDVI simulation model of rice was established based on the normalized NDVI (RNDVI) and relative accumulative growing degree days (RAGDD). The NDVI dynamic model for high-yield production in rice can be expressed by a double logistic model: RNDVI = ( 1 + e - 15.2829 × ( R A G D D i - 0.1944 ) ) - 1 - ( 1 + e - 11.6517 × ( R A G D D i - 1.0267 ) ) - 1 (R2 = 0.8577**), which can be used to accurately predict canopy NDVI dynamic changes during the entire growth period. Considering variation among rice cultivars, we constructed two relative NDVI (RNDVI) dynamic models for Japonica and Indica rice types, with R2 reaching 0.8764** and 0.8874**, respectively. Furthermore, independent experimental data were used to validate the RNDVI dynamic models. The results showed that during the entire growth period, the accuracy (k), precision (R2), and standard deviation of RNDVI dynamic models for the Japonica and Indica cultivars were 0.9991, 1.0170; 0.9084**, 0.8030**; and 0.0232, 0.0170, respectively. These results indicated that RNDVI dynamic models could accurately reflect crop growth and predict dynamic changes in high-yield crop populations, providing a rapid approach for monitoring rice growth status.

  10. Proteomics and metabolomics characterizing the pathophysiology of adaptive reactions to the metabolic challenges during the transition from late pregnancy to early lactation in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceciliani, Fabrizio; Lecchi, Cristina; Urh, Christiane; Sauerwein, Helga

    2017-10-18

    The transition from late pregnancy to early lactation is a critical period in a dairy cow's life due to the rapidly increasing drain of nutrients from the maternal organism towards the foetus and into colostrum and milk. In order to cope with the challenges of parturition and lactation, comprehensive adaptive reactions comprising the endocrine and the immune system need to be accomplished. There is high variation in this coping ability and both metabolic and infectious diseases, summarized as "production diseases", such as hypocalcaemia (milk fever), fatty liver syndrome, laminitis and ketosis, may occur and impact welfare, productive lifespan and economic outcomes. Proteomics and metabolomics have emerged as valuable techniques to characterize proteins and metabolite assets from tissue and biological fluids, such as milk, blood and urine. In this review we provide an overview on metabolic status and physiological changes during the transition period and the related production diseases in dairy cows, and summarize the state of art on proteomics and metabolomics of biological fluids and tissues involved in metabolic stress during the peripartum period. We also provide a current and prospective view of the application of the recent achievements generated by omics for biomarker discovery and their potential in diagnosis. For high-yielding dairy cows there are several "occupational diseases" that occur mainly during the metabolic challenges related to the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Such diseases and their sequelae form a major concern for dairy production, and often lead to early culling of animals. Beside the economical perspective, metabolic stress may severely influence animal welfare. There is a multitude of studies about the metabolic backgrounds of such so called production diseases like ketosis, fatty liver, or hypocalcaemia, although the investigations aiming to assess the complexity of the pathophysiological reactions are largely focused on gene

  11. Strengthening Dairy Cooperative through National Development of Livestock Region

    OpenAIRE

    Priyono; A.Priyanti

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of dairy cattle development region needs to be conducted in accordance with the national dairy industry development plan. Dairy cattle regions have been designed and equipped with infrastructure supplies, supporting facilities, technologies, finance, processing, marketing, institutional and human resources. Dairy cooperative is one of the marketing channels of milk and milk products which have strategic roles to support the national dairy industry. Collaborations between dairy c...

  12. Trends in dairy and non-dairy probiotic products - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Kumar, Bathal; Vijayendra, Sistla Venkata Naga; Reddy, Obulam Vijaya Sarathi

    2015-10-01

    Health awareness has grown to a greater extent among consumers and they are looking for healthy probiotic counterparts. Keeping in this view, the present review focuses recent developments in dairy and non-dairy probiotic products. All over the world, dairy probiotics are being commercialized in many different forms. However, the allergy and lactose intolerance are the major set-backs to dairy probiotics. Whereas, flavor and refreshing nature are the major advantages of non-dairy drinks, especially fruit juices. Phenotypic and genotypic similarities between dairy and non-dairy probiotics along with the matrix dependency of cell viability and cell functionality are reviewed. The heterogeneous food matrices of non-dairy food carriers are the major constraints for the survival of the probiotics, while the probiotic strains from non-dairy sources are satisfactory. Technological and functional properties, besides the viability of the probiotics used in fermented products of non-dairy origin are extremely important to get a competitive advantage in the world market. The functional attributes of dairy and non-dairy probiotic products are further enhanced by adding prebiotics such as galacto-oligosaccharide, fructo-oligosaccharide and inulin.

  13. Measures to improve dairy cow foot health: consequences for farmer income and dairy cow welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnis, M.R.N.; Hogeveen, H.; Stassen, E.N.

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farming in western countries with cubicle housing is an efficient way of dairy farming. Though, a disadvantage is the high prevalence and incidence of foot disorders (clinical and subclinical), which cause high economic losses and also seriously impair the welfare of dairy cattle. To point out

  14. Invited review : Changes in the dairy industry affecting dairy cattle health and welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barkema, H W; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Kastelic, J P; Lam, T J G M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14686820X; Luby, C; Roy, J-P; LeBlanc, S J; Keefe, G P; Kelton, D F

    2015-01-01

    The dairy industry in the developed world has undergone profound changes over recent decades. In this paper, we present an overview of some of the most important recent changes in the dairy industry that affect health and welfare of dairy cows, as well as the science associated with these changes.

  15. PRODUCTION OF BIOGAS FROM DAIRY WASTE WATER

    OpenAIRE

    S. Karthiyayini; A. Sivabharathy; Sreehari, C; M. Sreepoorani; V. Vinjth

    2017-01-01

    Pollution caused by dairy effluents is a serious problem throughout the world. The major source of waste water is from dairy industry. The effluent from dairy processing unit affects the environment. As a solution our aim is to produce bio-gas from diary wastewater. There are various treatment technologies, among them anaerobic treatment technology is simple and encouraged due to the following advantages such as low cost of construction, pH stability, low maintenance and repair. The biogas is...

  16. VIABILITY OF THE PROBIOTIC BACTERIA L. ACIDOPHILUS IN DAIRY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janka Koreňová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of health benefits have been claimed for probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus. Because of the potential health benefits, these organisms are increasingly incorporated into dairy foods. Viability of probiotic bacteria is important in order to provide health benefits. However, many studies have shown low viability of probiotics in market preparations. This study cover selective enumeration and survival of probiotic bacteria L. acidophilus in some dairy drinks. L. acidophilus was found in the range from 106 to 107 CFU.g-1 in five types of fermented milk products containing probiotic cultures. Two investigated products were up to standard according to Regulation of Ministry of Agriculture and Ministry of Health of Slovak Republic.doi: 10.5219/147

  17. Production of selenium-enriched milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csapó J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until the middle of the last century, selenium was considered to be toxic, but recently it turned out to be a micronutrient with important physiological effects, whose lack impedes the functioning of several enzymes, while in the case of a prolonged deficiency, disease processes can also occur in the body. Hungary belongs to the selenium-deficient regions in Europe; therefore, our aim was to contribute to the improvement of selenium supply of the population through increasing the selenium content of milk and dairy products. A daily supplementation of 1-6 mg organic selenium to the feed of dairy cows increases the selenium content of milk from the value of 18 μg/kg to 94 μg/kg in 8 weeks, decreasing again to the initial value in 6 weeks after stopping the supplementation.

  18. High seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii in dairy cattle in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mahallawy, Heba S; Kelly, Patrick; Zhang, Jilei; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Hui; Wei, Lanjing; Mao, Yongjiang; Yang, Zhangping; Zhang, Zhenwen; Fan, Weixing; Wang, Chengming

    2016-02-01

    Coxiella burnetii is the agent of Q fever, a zoonosis which occurs worldwide. As there is little reliable data on the organism in China, we investigated C. burnetii infections in dairy cattle herds around the country. Opportunistic whole blood samples were collected from 1140 dairy cattle in 19 herds, and antibodies to phase I and II C. burnetii antigens were detected using commercial ELISA kits. Seropositive cattle (381/1140, 33 %) were detected in 13 of the 15 surveyed provinces and in 16 of the 19 herds (84 %) studied. Our data indicates C. burnetii is widespread in China and that animal and human health workers should be aware of the possibility of Q fever infection in their patients.

  19. Probiotic bacteria: selective enumeration and survival in dairy foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N P

    2000-04-01

    A number of health benefits have been claimed for probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium spp., and Lactobacillus casei. Because of the potential health benefits, these organisms are increasingly incorporated into dairy foods. However, studies have shown low viability of probiotics in market preparations. In order to assess viability of probiotic bacteria, it is important to have a working method for selective enumeration of these probiotic bacteria. Viability of probiotic bacteria is important in order to provide health benefits. Viability of probiotic bacteria can be improved by appropriate selection of acid and bile resistant strains, use of oxygen impermeable containers, two-step fermentation, micro-encapsulation, stress adaptation, incorporation of micronutrients such as peptides and amino acids and by sonication of yogurt bacteria. This review will cover selective enumeration and survival of probiotic bacteria in dairy foods.

  20. Treatment of dairy waste water by coagulation and filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Choudhari, P K

    2013-01-01

    The dairy waste: effluent contains high COD, which indicates the presence of organic matter. Therefore, the studies were carried out to reduce this COD in the dairy waste water through a proper treatment. The COD reduction with alum coagulant dose 3.2 g/ dm3 within pH03 to 11 was obtained to be 438 mg/dmi at pH03, 348 mg/dm3 at pH05, 404 mg/dm3 at pH07, 295 mg/dm3 at pH08, 407 mg/dm3 at pH011 and 422 mg/dm3 at pH09 from the initial COD (COD0)1070 mg/dm3. Maximum COD reduction was 72.4% at pH08 and minimum COD reduction was 55.10 % at pH05.

  1. Freeze concentration of dairy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarnath, K.R. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Systems and Materials Dept.; Swinkels, W. [Holland Energy Technology BV (Netherlands)

    1992-12-31

    Freeze concentration as a separation process was discussed. It separates mixed liquids by converting one or more of them to a solid. The process is more energy efficient in many applications than either evaporation or distillation, the most common industrial separation methods today. An EPRI report has shown that annual heat energy consumption would decrease an estimated 1.4 quads if industry replaced evaporation and distillation in every feasible case where freezing can be used. The freeze concentration process was employed to replace thermal evaporation in the dairy industry. The goals of the project were to save energy by converting concentration processes to an efficient electrically powered refrigeration system, and to create higher quality dairy products. Tests showed equal or superior quality from freeze concentrates. 2 tabs.

  2. Microbiological Spoilage of Dairy Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledenbach, Loralyn H.; Marshall, Robert T.

    The wide array of available dairy foods challenges the microbiologist, engineer, and technologist to find the best ways to prevent the entry of microorganisms, destroy those that do get in along with their enzymes, and prevent the growth and activities of those that escape processing treatments. Troublesome spoilage microorganisms include aerobic psychrotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, molds, heterofermentative lactobacilli, and spore-forming bacteria. Psychrotrophic bacteria can produce large amounts of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, and the extent of recontamination of pasteurized fluid milk products with these bacteria is a major determinant of their shelf life. Fungal spoilage of dairy foods is manifested by the presence of a wide variety of metabolic by-products, causing off-odors and flavors, in addition to visible changes in color or texture.

  3. Nutritional and ecological evaluation of dairy farming systems based on concentrate feeding regimes in semi-arid environments of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqaisi, Othman; Hemme, Torsten; Hagemann, Martin; Susenbeth, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    between 0.90 and 1.88 kg CO2/kg ECM milk, where the enteric and manure CH4 contributed to 52% of the total CO2 equ emissions, followed by the indirect emissions of N2O and the direct emissions of CO2 gases which comprises 17% and 15%, respectively, from total CO2 equ emissions. Emissions per kg of milk were significantly driven by the level of milk production (r (2) = 0.93) and of eDMI (r (2) = 0.88), while the total emissions were not influenced by diet composition. A difference of 16 kg ECM/d in milk yield, 9% in N-eff and of 0.9 kg CO2 equ/kg in ECM milk observed between low and high yielding animals. To improve the nutritional status of the animals, protein requirements have to be met. Furthermore, low price by-products with a low carbon credit should be included in the diets to replace the high proportion of imported concentrate feeds and consequently improve the economic situation of dairy farms and mitigate CO2 equ emissions.

  4. Nutritional and ecological evaluation of dairy farming systems based on concentrate feeding regimes in semi-arid environments of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqaisi, Othman; Hemme, Torsten; Hagemann, Martin; Susenbeth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    between 0.90 and 1.88 kg CO2/kg ECM milk, where the enteric and manure CH4 contributed to 52% of the total CO2 equ emissions, followed by the indirect emissions of N2O and the direct emissions of CO2 gases which comprises 17% and 15%, respectively, from total CO2 equ emissions. Emissions per kg of milk were significantly driven by the level of milk production (r2 = 0.93) and of eDMI (r2 = 0.88), while the total emissions were not influenced by diet composition. A difference of 16 kg ECM/d in milk yield, 9% in N-eff and of 0.9 kg CO2 equ/kg in ECM milk observed between low and high yielding animals. To improve the nutritional status of the animals, protein requirements have to be met. Furthermore, low price by-products with a low carbon credit should be included in the diets to replace the high proportion of imported concentrate feeds and consequently improve the economic situation of dairy farms and mitigate CO2 equ emissions. PMID:24596499

  5. Features of the compost received by use of dairy whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Smolnikova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article features cjmposting of organic materials are considered at use of a traditional way and fermenting additives. Indicators of quality of the composts received with the use of dairy whey and a bacterial preparation as the fermenting additive are investigated. Comparison of the received samples of composts on such indicators of quality as is spent: humidity, acidity, the maintenance of organic substance in recalculation on dry weight, quantity of the general and fmmonium nitrogen.

  6. Udder health in dairy goats

    OpenAIRE

    Koop, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, monitoring and control of udder health in dairy goats was studied. The diagnostic properties of somatic cell count as a monitoring tool for udder health of a goat herd and of individual goats was evaluated. Furthermore, the diagnostic value of bacteriological culture of bulk milk and of individual milk samples was assessed. The importance of various udder health pathogens was studied. Staphylococcus aureus seems to be the most important udder health pathogen in goats. Somatic ...

  7. diets for lactating dairy cows

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I. & MERTENS, D.R.. l984. The use ofneutral detergent fibre versus acid detergent fibre in balancing dairy rations. Monsanto Technical Symposium, Fresno. Cal. March 14. 1984. VAN SOEST, P..I. & WlNE, R.H._ I967. Use ofdetergents in the analysis of fibrous feeds. lV. Determination of plant cell wall constituents. J. Assoc.

  8. New perspectives on dairy and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Julie A; Hobbs, Ditte A

    2016-08-01

    CVD are the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. One of the key dietary recommendations for CVD prevention is reduction of saturated fat intake. Yet, despite milk and dairy foods contributing on average 27 % of saturated fat intake in the UK diet, evidence from prospective cohort studies does not support a detrimental effect of milk and dairy foods on risk of CVD. The present paper provides a brief overview of the role of milk and dairy products in the diets of UK adults, and will summarise the evidence in relation to the effects of milk and dairy consumption on CVD risk factors and mortality. The majority of prospective studies and meta-analyses examining the relationship between milk and dairy product consumption and risk of CVD show that milk and dairy products, excluding butter, are not associated with detrimental effects on CVD mortality or risk biomarkers that include serum LDL-cholesterol. In addition, there is increasing evidence that milk and dairy products are associated with lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness. These apparent benefits of milk and dairy foods have been attributed to their unique nutritional composition, and suggest that the elimination of milk and dairy may not be the optimum strategy for CVD risk reduction.

  9. Dairy foods and body weight management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milna Tudor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The existing data about the role of dairy foods in body weight management, as a physiological explanation are shown in this paper. There is accumulating evidence about inverse association between body weight and dairy intake. Research showed that obese individuals consume fewer dairies than normal weight people. Also three servings of dairy foods per day in a reduced calorie diet may help accelerate body fat loss when compared to a calorie-restricted diet low in dairy foods. Calcium plays the main role and is present in great amounts in dairy foods. Its anti-obesity effect is attributed to its impact on lypogenesis and lipolysis in adipocytes. Calcium supplements do not have such effect as dairy calcium, possibly due to the effects of other bioactive components in dairy foods such as conjugated linoleic acid, whey peptides, branched aminoacids and lactose which amplify anti-obesity effect. Cross-sectional epidemiological studies confirmed the hypothesis that high dairy food intake can act in a weight management, but prospective studies and randomized controlled intervention trials have yielded inconsistent results. Therefore there is a need of conducting more large population-based clinical trials and meta-analysis.

  10. Twelve-year longitudinal study of respiratory status in dairy farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainet, M; Thaon, I; Westeel, V; Chaudemanche, H; Venier, A G; Dubiez, A; Laplante, J J; Dalphin, J-C

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate respiratory risk in dairy farmers, the present authors conducted a longitudinal study in the Doubs region of France. From a cohort constituted in 1986 (T1), 157 (62.8%) dairy farmers and 159 (63.6%) controls were re-evaluated in 1998 (T3). The study protocol comprised a medical and occupational questionnaire, spirometric tests at both evaluations, and noninvasive measure of blood oxygen saturation with pulse oximetry (S(p,O(2))) at T3. In 1998, the prevalence of chronic bronchitis was higher in dairy farmers. In cross-sectional analyses, all respiratory function parameters and S(p,O(2)) were significantly lower in dairy farmers. In a multiple linear regression model, farming, age, male sex and smoking were significantly and negatively correlated with S(p,O(2)). However, the mean annual decline in respiratory function parameters did not differ significantly between groups. After adjustment of covariables, accelerated decline in vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second was associated with age, smoking and male sex. Decline in vital capacity was accelerated in dairy farmers working in traditional farms and those currently foddering. The current study demonstrates that dairy farming is associated with an increased risk of lung disorders and a decrease in blood oxygen saturation and suggests that respiratory function impairment is correlated with cumulated exposure to organic dusts.

  11. Main causes of poor welfare in intensively reared dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Abeni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to summarise the main causes of poor welfare in intensively reared dairy cows. Intensive farming systems are considered, both from a structural and a managerial point of view, for their constraints that may limit animal welfare: possible physical activity; acceptable interactions with humans and other animals; feeding and watering, protection from climate, parasites, and diseases. The dairy farms managed according to the organic rules do not always guarantee, per se, better welfare conditions; organic or low input dairy farming needs to consider the right interaction among cattle breed and herd management, focusing on the actual quality of feedstuffs meet face cow requirements. The considered structural aspects evidence how special care must be given to the rest area (straw yard or cubicle; to the floors that should be not too hard or abrasive and not slippery; to the cubicle bedding material to ensure hygiene, softness, and dryness; to the feeding (and watering area to reduce conflicts; to a microclimate control system, to avoid heat stress during summer time. The importance of proper management for animal welfare is evidenced for buildings and equipment, to have clean and comfortable stables and well functioning milking machines; nutritive and storage quality of feeds; diet suitability (energy, protein, physically efficient fibre, buffers etc., in the different phases of a dairy cow’s life (dry period, close-up, transition, and lactation; feed distribution (frequency and time, and 24h availability. Special attention has to be paid to the social aspects, regarding both animal competition (stocking density, group size, and human/animal interactions (methods of management and manipulation. The interaction between welfare and health requires special attention. Poor welfare can cause immune depression, thus increasing the risk of disease. In turn, any disease that causes an inflammatory response may determine depression

  12. Comparison of claw health and milk yield in dairy cows on elastic or concrete flooring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, P V; Nueske, S; Scholz, A M; Foerster, M

    2007-10-01

    This article reports on the effects of elastic (rubber) flooring compared with concrete flooring on claw health and milk yield in dairy cows. Milk yield and activity data of 53 complete lactations from 49 cows were recorded by an automatic milking system in the University of Munich Livestock Center dairy herd. Cows were kept in a loose housing system on concrete-slatted or rubber-matted slatted flooring. Claws were trimmed and measured linearly in combination with claw lesion diagnosis 3 times during one lactation period (including the transition phase). An automatic milking system recorded milk yield and activity. The net horn growth of the claws increased on elastic flooring. Therefore, correct and frequent claw trimming is at least as important for claw health in dairy herds kept on rubber flooring as for those on concrete-slatted flooring. Cows housed on rubber had an increased incidence of sole ulcers. Sole hemorrhages (except for hemorrhages associated with sole ulcers) occurred less frequently on rubber than on concrete. Results concerning digital dermatitis were difficult to assess, because manual manure scraping on rubber required sprinkling the flooring twice daily, which additionally moistened the digital skin of the cows. This might explain the greater incidence of digital dermatitis on elastic flooring. The incidence of clinically lame cows did not differ between flooring types. Cows showed greater activity on rubber, most likely caused by the more comfortable walking surface compared with the concrete-slatted flooring. The greater activity may indicate better overall health of high-yielding dairy cows on rubber flooring. Milk yield, however, did not differ between flooring types.

  13. The Role of Dairy Cattle Husbandry in Supporting The Development of National Dairy Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Anggraeni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An intensive development in Indonesian dairy industry has expanded over two decades. During this period, the structure of the national dairy industry has progressed completely. The capacity of the national fresh milk production, however, has been able to supply only 35% of domestic milk demand. The milk domestic demand is predicted to be continous due to the increases in the national population and their welfare. Raising temperate dairy breed (Holstein-Friesian under tropical climate has resulted many deteriorates in productivity. More inferiority has been found under a semi-intensive management at small dairy farms. The existence of various changes in the global trade regulation for agriculture commodities has been a considerable factor directly affecting the future development of the national dairy industry. Increasing efficiency of various determinant components of the national dairy industry is required to produce domestic fresh milk in a good quality at a competitive price. This paper is dealing with the status of various determined factors especially for dairy livestock components to improve the future national dairy industry prospectively, involving for the national dairy cattle population, domestic milk yield, productivity of dairy cattle, breeding system and supporting reproduction technology. More over, other essential factors providing for dairy institution as well as distribution and marketing domestic milk production are also described.

  14. Parameters affecting the environmental impact of a range of dairy farming systems in Denmark, Germany and Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerci, Matteo; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman; Bava, L.

    2013-01-01

    The environmental impact of 12 dairy farms in Denmark, Germany and Italy was evaluated using an LCA approach and the most important parameters influencing their environmental sustainability were identified. The farms represent different production methods (organic vs. conventional), summer feeding...... of conventional soymeal in the feed concentrate. There were strong and positive correlations between the four impact categories, and overall the results indicate that improving greenhouse gas emissions would improve the general environmental sustainability of the dairy farm. The land occupation was lowest...

  15. A high-yield, one-step synthesis of surfactant-free gold nanostars and numerical study for single-molecule SERS application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, S.; Ringane, A. B.; Arya, A.; Das, G. M.; Dantham, V. R., E-mail: dantham@iitp.ac.in; Laha, R. [Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Department of Physics (India); Hussian, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2016-08-15

    We report a high-yield synthesis of star-shaped gold nanostructures in one step, using a new surfactant-free wet chemistry method. Compared to the existing reports, these nanostars were found to have longer and sharper spikes anchored uniformly on the surface of the spherical core, allowing at least a few hot spots irrespective of the incident light polarization. The average experimental values of core radius and spike length were found to be 88.5 and 72 nm, respectively. Using these values in numerical simulations, the local electric field enhancement (η) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectrum were obtained. Moreover, the single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factor was found to vary from 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 13} depending on the excitation wavelengths. Our theoretical calculations suggest that these nanostructures can be used to fabricate efficient SERS-based biosensors for the detection of single molecules in real time and for predicting structural information of single molecules.

  16. CHO-S antibody titers >1 gram/liter using flow electroporation-mediated transient gene expression followed by rapid migration to high-yield stable cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Krista; Brady, James; Wang, Weili; Duskin, Meg; Donato, Karen; Peshwa, Madhusudan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, researchers have turned to transient gene expression (TGE) as an alternative to CHO stable cell line generation for early-stage antibody development. Despite advances in transfection methods and culture optimization, the majority of CHO-based TGE systems produce insufficient antibody titers for extensive use within biotherapeutic development pipelines. Flow electroporation using the MaxCyte STX Scalable Transfection System is a highly efficient, scalable means of CHO-based TGE for gram-level production of antibodies without the need for specialized expression vectors or genetically engineered CHO cell lines. CHO cell flow electroporation is easily scaled from milligram to multigram quantities without protocol reoptimization while maintaining transfection performance and antibody productivity. In this article, data are presented that demonstrate the reproducibility, scalability, and antibody production capabilities of CHO-based TGE using the MaxCyte STX. Data show optimization of posttransfection parameters such as cell density, media composition, and feed strategy that result in secreted antibody titers >1 g/L and production of multiple grams of antibody within 2 weeks of a single CHO-S cell transfection. In addition, data are presented to demonstrate the application of scalable electroporation for the rapid generation of high-yield stable CHO cell lines to bridge the gap between early- and late-stage antibody development activities. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  17. A deficiency of manganese ions in the presence of high sugar concentrations is the critical parameter for achieving high yields of itaconic acid by Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaffa, Levente; Díaz, Rafael; Papp, Benedek; Fekete, Erzsébet; Sándor, Erzsébet; Kubicek, Christian P

    2015-10-01

    Itaconic acid (IA), an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid with a high potential as a platform for chemicals derived from sugars, is industrially produced by large-scale submerged fermentation by Aspergillus terreus. Although the biochemical pathway and the physiology leading to IA is almost the same as that leading to citric acid production in Aspergillus niger, published data for the volumetric (g L(-1)) and the specific yield (mol/mol carbon source) of IA are significantly lower than for citric acid. Citric acid is known to accumulate to high levels only when a number of nutritional parameters are carefully adjusted, of which the concentration of the carbon source and that of manganese ions in the medium are particularly important. We have therefore investigated whether a variation in these two parameters may enhance IA production and yield by A. terreus. We show that manganese ion concentrations parameters are varied in citric acid production by A. niger, thus showing that the physiology of both processes is widely identical. Consequently, applying the fermentation technology established for citric acid production by A. niger citric acid production to A. terreus should lead to high yields of IA, too.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a French bean hemagglutinin with antitumor, antifungal, and anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activities and an exceptionally high yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S K; Ng, T B

    2010-05-01

    A dimeric 64-kDa hemagglutinin was isolated with a high yield from dried Phaseolus vulgaris cultivar "French bean number 35" seeds using a chromatographic protocol that involved Blue-Sepharose, Q-Sepharose, and Superdex 75. The yield was exceptionally high (1.1g hemagglutinin per 100g seed), which is around 10-85 times higher than other Phaseolus cultivars. Its N-terminal sequence resembled those of other Phaseolus hemagglutinins. The hemagglutinating activity of the hemagglutinin was stable in the pH range 6-8, and in the temperature range 0 degrees C-50 degrees C. It inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 2microM. It suppressed mycelial growth in Valsa mali with an IC50 of 10microM. It inhibited proliferation of hepatoma HepG2 cells and breast cancer MCF-7 cells with an IC50 of 100 and 2microM, respectively. It had no antiproliferative effect on normal embryonic liver WRL68 cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Display of cellulases on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for high yield ethanol production from high-solid lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, Yuki; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-03-01

    Economically feasible processes for industrial cellulosic ethanol production requires increasing the final ethanol titer during fermentation due to the high energy demands of the subsequent ethanol distillation. In the present study, high-yield ethanol production was achieved by short-term liquefaction and fermentation of lignocellulose biomass in a novel drum-type rotary fermentation system using a yeast strain developed for cell-surface display of fungal endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, and β-glucosidase. In the presence of 10 FPU/g-biomass cellulase added, the recombinant cellulolytic strain produced 1.4-fold higher ethanol (89% of theoretical yield) from high-solid (200 g-dry weight/L) rice straw within 72 h of fermentation than wild type strain. Cell-surface engineering successfully reduced the amount of commercial enzyme required for the fermentation of cellulose. This study demonstrates that cellulases displayed on the yeast cell surface are capable of hydrolyzing cellulose that was not hydrolyzed by commercial cellulases, leading to increased sugar utilization for improved ethanol production. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Sequential dark-photo fermentation and autotrophic microalgal growth for high-yield and CO{sub 2}-free biohydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Yung-Chung [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 (China); Chen, Chun-Yen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Lee, Chi-Mei [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Center for Biosciences and Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China)

    2010-10-15

    Dark fermentation, photo fermentation, and autotrophic microalgae cultivation were integrated to establish a high-yield and CO{sub 2}-free biohydrogen production system by using different feedstock. Among the four carbon sources examined, sucrose was the most effective for the sequential dark (with Clostridium butyricum CGS5) and photo (with Rhodopseudomonas palutris WP3-5) fermentation process. The sequential dark-photo fermentation was stably operated for nearly 80 days, giving a maximum H{sub 2} yield of 11.61 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose and a H{sub 2} production rate of 673.93 ml/h/l. The biogas produced from the sequential dark-photo fermentation (containing ca. 40.0% CO{sub 2}) was directly fed into a microalga culture (Chlorella vulgaris C-C) cultivated at 30 C under 60 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}/s illumination. The CO{sub 2} produced from the fermentation processes was completely consumed during the autotrophic growth of C. vulgaris C-C, resulting in a microalgal biomass concentration of 1999 mg/l composed mainly of 48.0% protein, 23.0% carbohydrate and 12.3% lipid. (author)

  1. [High-yield reassortant virus containing hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of pandemic influenza A/Moscowl/01/2009 (H1N1) virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'eva, A V; Rudneva, I A; Timofeeva, T A; Shilov, A A; Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; Aliper, T I; Kaverin, N V; L'vov, D K

    2011-01-01

    The crossing of influenza A/Moscow/01/2009 (H1N1) virus and reassortant strain X31 (H3N2) containing the genes of internal and non-structural proteins of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) strain gave rise to reassortant virus ReM8. The reassortant contained hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of pandemic 2009 influenza virus and 6 genes of high-yield A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) strain. The reassortant ReM8 produced higher yields in the embryonated chicken eggs than the parent pandemic virus, as suggested by infectivity and HA activity titration as well as by ELISA and the measurement of HA protein content by scanning electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel slabs. High immunogenicity of ReM8 reassortant was demonstrated by immune protection studies in mice. The reassortant virus ReM8 is suitable as a candidate strain for the production of inactivated and subunit influenza vaccines.

  2. Bioproduction and optimization of rosmarinic acid production in Solenostemon scutellarioides through media manipulation and conservation of high yielding clone via encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ranabir; Dewanjee, Saikat; Gangopadhyay, Moumita

    2013-09-01

    The present study describes the role of different exogenous phytohormones, polyamines and sucrose on growth and rosmarinic acid (RA) production in whole plant culture of Solenostemon scutellarioides. It was further aimed to conserve elite clones via synthetic seed technology. S. scutellarioides was treated either singly or in combination with different phytohormones. Cultures incubated with NAA (0.5 mg L(-1)) yielded the highest RA accumulation (g(-1FW)), but negatively affected the growth. So, overall RA content was insignificant. Cultures incubated with IBA, BAP and GA3 at low concentration significantly improved growth and RA bioaccumulation. In the combinatorial study, IBA+BAP+GA3 (0.5 mg L(-1) each) was found optimum for plant biomass and RA production (65.2% improvement of total RA). Amongst polyamines, putrescine (1 mg L(-1)) exhibited 20.4% improvement of total RA content. The intracellular RA accumulation (g(-1FW)) was significantly higher between 5 and 7% of sucrose concentrations. However, the total increase in RA content was inhibited due to deterioration of the culture with increasing sucrose concentration. Based on the effect of different treatments on growth and RA accumulation, a high yielding and stable plant line was selected for conservation via alginate encapsulation. Uniform shaped alginate coated synthetic seeds conserved up to 6 months exhibited high regeneration potential and RA content.

  3. High-yield fermentation and a novel heat-precipitation purification method for hydrophobin HGFI from Grifola frondosa in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dongmin; Gao, Zhendong; Zhao, Liqiang; Wang, Xiangxiang; Xu, Haijin; Bai, Yanling; Zhang, Xiuming; Linder, Markus B; Feng, Hui; Qiao, Mingqiang

    2016-12-01

    Hydrophobins are proteins produced by filamentous fungi with high natural-surfactant activities and that can self-assemble in interfaces of air-water or solid-water to form amphiphilic membranes. Here, we reported a high-yield fermentation method for hydrophobin HGFI from Grifola frondosa in Pichia pastoris, attaining production of 300 mg/L by keeping the dissolved oxygen level at 15%-25% by turning the methanol-feeding speed. We also developed a novel HGFI-purification method enabling large-scare purification of HGFI, with >90% recovery. Additionally, we observed that hydrophobin HGFI in fermentation broth precipitated at pH 90 °C. We also identified the structure and properties of proteins purified by this method through atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and water-contact angle measurement, which is similar to protein purification by ultrafiltration without heating treatment that enables our method to maintain native HGFI structure and properties. Furthermore, the purification method presented here can be applied to large-scale purification of other type I hydrophobins. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. High-yield preparation of wax esters via lipase-catalyzed esterification using fatty acids and alcohols from crambe and camelina oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, G; Weitkamp, P; Klein, E; Mukherjee, K D

    2001-02-01

    Fatty acids obtained from seed oils of crambe (Crambe abyssinica) and camelina (Camelina sativa) via alkaline saponification or steam splitting were esterified using lipases as biocatalysts with oleyl alcohol and the alcohols derived from crambe and camelina oils via hydrogenolysis of their methyl esters. Long-chain wax esters were thus obtained in high yields when Novozym 435 (immobilized lipase B from Candida antarctica) and papaya (Carica papaya) latex lipase were used as biocatalysts and vacuum was applied to remove the water formed. The highest conversions to wax esters were obtained with Novozym 435 (> or =95%) after 4-6 h of reaction, whereas with papaya latex lipase such a high degree of conversion was attained after 24 h. Products obtained from stoichiometric amounts of substrates were almost exclusively (>95%) composed of wax esters having compositions approaching that of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) oil, especially when crambe fatty acids in combination with camelina alcohols or camelina fatty acids in combination with crambe alcohols were used as substrates.

  5. High-yield production of recombinant virus-like particles of enterovirus 71 in Pichia pastoris and their protective efficacy against oral viral challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Ku, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Chen, Tan; Ye, Xiaohua; Li, Dapeng; Jin, Xia; Huang, Zhong

    2015-05-11

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative pathogens of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), which is highly prevalent in the Asia-Pacific regions. Severe HFMD cases with neurological complications and even death are often associated with EV71 infections. However, no licensed EV71 vaccine is currently available. Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) of EV71 have been produced and shown to be a promising vaccine candidate in preclinical studies. However, the performance of current recombinant expression systems for EV71 VLP production remains unsatisfactory with regard to VLP yield and manufacturing procedure, and thus hinders further product development. In this study, we evaluated the expression of EV71 VLPs in Pichia pastoris and determined their protective efficacy in mouse models of EV71 infections. We showed that EV71 VLPs could be produced at high levels up to 4.9% of total soluble protein in transgenic P. pastoris yeast co-expressing P1 and 3CD proteins of EV71. The resulting yeast-produced VLPs potently induced neutralizing antibodies against homologous and heterologous EV71 strains in mice. More importantly, maternal immunization with VLPs protected neonatal mice in both intraperitoneal and oral challenge experiments. Collectively, these results demonstrated the success of simple, high-yield production of EV71 VLPs in transgenic P. pastoris, thus lifting the major roadblock in commercial development of VLP-based EV71 vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Terrorist Event Training in US Medical Schools. A Survey of Chemical, Biologic, Radiologic, Nuclear, and High-Yield Explosives Training in US Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, James M; Ziegler, Kristina; Armstrong, Jessica M; Shapiro, David

    2015-01-01

    September 11, 2001 saw the dawn of the US-led global war on terror, a combined diplomatic, military, social, and cultural war on terrorist activities. Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosives (CBRNE), as a group of tactics, are often the preferred weapons of terrorists across the globe. We undertook a survey of US medical schools to determine what their self-reported level of training for terrorist events encompasses during the four years of undergraduate medical education. We surveyed 170 medical schools in the US and Puerto Rico using a five-question, internet-based survey, followed by telephone calls to curriculum offices for initial nonresponders. We used simple descriptive statistics to analyze the data. A majority of US medical schools that completed the survey (79 schools or 65.3%) have no required lecture or course on CBRNE or terrorist activities during the first or second year (preclinical years). Ninety-eight out of the 121 respondents (81.0%), however, believed that CBRNE training was either very important or somewhat important, as reflected in survey answers. Most physician educators believe that training in CBRNE is important; however this belief has not resulted in widespread acceptance of a CBRNE curriculum in US medical schools.

  7. Planning of dairy farm and dairy plant based ecotourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnyoto, A. S.; Tama, I. P.; Tantrika, C. F. M.

    2017-06-01

    One of a dairy production company producing pasteurized milk and yoghurt drink, whose brand has widely known in East Java, has a factory plant in Batu City, one of tourism destinations in Indonesia. Behind the factory plant, there is a vacant land with an estimated total area of 2.3 ha and a vacant cowshed which had not been used for cattle ranching. Because of that, the company planned to develop the vacant land as a dairy farm and plant based ecotourism. In addition, dairy farm and dairy plant based tourism attractions are still rarely found in Batu. Thus, the first aim of this study was to analyse the potencies of the company that related to future plans of ecotourism built. The second aim was to set up the strategies that can be done in order to actualize the ecotourism project. The next aim was to plan the ecotourism, especially the facilities planning and the facilities arrangement on the vacant land. Strategic management approach was used to analyse the potencies and to determine the strategies. To select the proper facilities, tourists were asked to give appraisal by using questionnaire. Appraisal result was mapped onto four quadrants spatial map to see advantages and shortcomings of each facility along with choosing the right facilities to be built. Those facilities and tourist activities were compared with ecotourism criteria to make sure that the facilities were appropriate to provide not only entertainment but also ecotourism function. To arrange the chosen facilities, the step in Systematic Layout Planning were conducted to generate a propose layout of facilities arrangement. Based on potencies analysis, in Internal-External matrix, the company current position was on quadrant 2 (grow and build), with the most appropriate strategy was intensive or integrative. The proposed strategies were to build the new infrastructure, to renovate cowshed, and to add new tourism facilities on the land. There were 11 selected facilities based on MDS. Moreover, based

  8. Praktische kostprijs biologische melk = Practical cost price of organic milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, A.G.; Haan, de M.H.A.; Water, K.; Jager, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this report a calculation methodology was developed for defining the cost price of organic dairy products. This price is based on broad support, practical data and provides a practical cost price for organic milk production.

  9. Family Dairy Tech, India : advisory report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eweg, R.; Rankenberg, E.H.M.; Agrawal, P.; Verschuur, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    This advisory report describes the results and recommendations for Indian dairy farmers and Dutch and Indian companies, from the RAAK Family Dairy Tech India project. Researchers and students of two Dutch and one Indian University of Applied Sciences, together with ten Dutch companies, Indian

  10. Brief of requirements of the dairy cow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.M.R.; Ursinus, W.W.; Schepers, F.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.; Dixhoorn, van I.D.E.

    2009-01-01

    This report lists the brief of requirements of the dairy cow, based on her needs (also listed). The BoR indicates the actor’s needs with regards to the animal husbandry system. BoR of the main actors are incorporated in the redesign of a dairy husbandry system in the project Cow Power

  11. 76 FR 34004 - Dairy Product Mandatory Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... manufacturers of dairy products to report sales information for a mandatory dairy product reporting program. The... announces the intention of AMS to request approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) of... functions for the program. NASS publishes sales information for cheddar cheese, butter, dry whey, and nonfat...

  12. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body also needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Nutrition surveys have shown that most people in the U.S. aren’t getting the calcium they need. If you’re avoiding milk and dairy ... taking nutritional supplements and choosing reduced-lactose or non-dairy ...

  13. Crossbreeding in Dairy Cattle: A Danish Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M K; Norberg, E; Pedersen, J

    2008-01-01

    breeds. This review focuses on the practical and theoretical background of crossbreeding and describes the gain to be expected using systematic crossbreeding in dairy production. In Denmark, 24% of dairy farmers would consider starting crossbreeding programs within their herd. Evidence for the value...

  14. Determinants of dairy consumption expenditure in urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main purpose of the study was to examine the level of household expenditure on dairy products and to identify the principal factors that influence the level of consumption expenditure on dairy products across households in Accra and Kumasi. Structured questionnaire was used to elicit primary information from a total of ...

  15. Antibodies and longevity of dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, de B.

    2016-01-01

    The dairy sector has a big impact on food production for the growing world population and contributes substantially to the world economy. In order to produce food in a sustainable way, dairy cows need to be able to produce milk without problems and as long as possible. Therefore, breeding programs

  16. Efficiency of European dairy processing firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soboh, R.A.M.E.; Oude Lansink, A.; Dijk, van G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the technical efficiency and production frontier of dairy processing cooperatives and investor owned firms in six major dairy producing European countries. Two parametric production frontiers are estimated, i.e. for cooperatives and investor owned firms separately, which are used

  17. Efficiency of European Dairy Processing Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soboh, R.A.M.E.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Dijk, van G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the technical efficiency and production frontier of dairy processing cooperativesand investor owned firms in six major dairy producing European countries. Two parametric produc-tion frontiers are estimated, i.e. for cooperatives and investor owned firms separately, which are

  18. Dairy-manure derived biochar effectively sorbs lead and atrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinde; Ma, Lena; Gao, Bin; Harris, Willie

    2009-05-01

    Biochar (BC) produced from agricultural crop residues has proven effective in sorbing organic contaminants. This study evaluated the ability of dairy-manure derived biochar to sorb heavy metal Pb and organic contaminant atrazine. Two biochar samples were prepared by heating dairy manure at low temperature of 200 degrees C (BC200) and 350 degrees C (BC350). The untreated manure (BC25) and a commercial activated C (AC) were included as controls. Sorption of Pb by biochar followed a dual Langmuir-Langmuir model, attributing to Pb precipitation (84-87%) and surface sorption (13-16%). Chemical speciation, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy indicated that Pb was precipitated as beta-Pb9(PO4)6 in BC25 and BC200 treatment, and as Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2 in BC350. Lead sorption by AC obeyed a single Langmuir model, attributing mainly to surface sorption probably via coordination of Pb d-electron to C==C (pi-electron) and --0--Pb bonds. The biochar was 6 times more effective in Pb sorption than AC, with BC200 being the most effective (up to 680 mmol Pb kg(-1)). The biochar also effectively sorbed atrazine where atrazine was partitioned into its organic phase, whereas atrazine uptake by AC occurred via surface sorption. When Pb and atrazine coexisted, little competition occurred between the two for sorption on biochar, while strong competition was observed on AC. Results from this study indicated that dairy manure can be converted into value-added biochar as effective sorbent for metal and/or organic contaminants.

  19. "Not to intrude": a Danish perspective on gender and class in nineteenth-century dairying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    This study follows the thread of gender divisions in dairying in Denmark and the American Midwest in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Gender organization of dairying shifted at this time in diverse European and North American contexts. As agriculture mechanized and production scale increased, access to advanced education and international markets became critical. Women, who had been in the forefront of the development of dairying, ceded their leadership to men as these changes occurred. While some scholars see this shift as a strategic loss for women, this study finds that variables of class, marital status, rural demographics, and alternative occupations mediated the rural women's experience of change. Not all women experienced the change as a loss. The question of which women were invested in dairying is critical to understanding the course of change. Increasingly, middle-class farm women were turning away from the hard work of dairying and investing themselves in new ways in the upward mobility of their family farms. Rural life shaped distinct gender patterns in European and American history, and the rural experience shaped the larger trajectory of women's economic and political evolution, even though few rural women were involved in the organized women's movement.

  20. From field to fermentation: the origins of Lactococcus lactis and its domestication to the dairy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2015-05-01

    Lactococcus lactis is an organism of substantial economic importance, used extensively in the production of fermented foods and widely held to have evolved from plant strains. The domestication of this organism to the milk environment is associated with genome reduction and gene decay, and the acquisition of specific genes involved in protein and lactose utilisation by horizontal gene transfer. In recent years, numerous studies have focused on uncovering the physiology and molecular biology of lactococcal strains from the wider environment for exploitation in the dairy industry. This in turn has facilitated comparative genome analysis of lactococci from different environments and provided insight into the natural phenotypic and genetic diversity of L. lactis. This diversity may be exploited in dairy fermentations to develop products with improved quality and sensory attributes. In this review, we discuss the classification of L. lactis and the problems that arise with phenotype/genotype designation. We also discuss the adaptation of non-dairy lactococci to milk, the traits associated with this adaptation and the potential application of non-dairy lactococci to dairy fermentations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.