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Sample records for high-throughput screen identifies

  1. High-throughput screening to identify selective inhibitors of microbial sulfate reduction (and beyond)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.; Deutschbauer, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The selective perturbation of complex microbial ecosystems to predictably influence outcomes in engineered and industrial environments remains a grand challenge for geomicrobiology. In some industrial ecosystems, such as oil reservoirs, sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) produce hydrogen sulfide which is toxic, explosive and corrosive. Current strategies to selectively inhibit sulfidogenesis are based on non-specific biocide treatments, bio-competitive exclusion by alternative electron acceptors or sulfate-analogs which are competitive inhibitors or futile/alternative substrates of the sulfate reduction pathway. Despite the economic cost of sulfidogenesis, there has been minimal exploration of the chemical space of possible inhibitory compounds, and very little work has quantitatively assessed the selectivity of putative souring treatments. We have developed a high-throughput screening strategy to target SRM, quantitatively ranked the selectivity and potency of hundreds of compounds and identified previously unrecognized SRM selective inhibitors and synergistic interactions between inhibitors. Once inhibitor selectivity is defined, high-throughput characterization of microbial community structure across compound gradients and identification of fitness determinants using isolate bar-coded transposon mutant libraries can give insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby compounds structure microbial communities. The high-throughput (HT) approach we present can be readily applied to target SRM in diverse environments and more broadly, could be used to identify and quantify the potency and selectivity of inhibitors of a variety of microbial metabolisms. Our findings and approach are relevant for engineering environmental ecosystems and also to understand the role of natural gradients in shaping microbial niche space.

  2. A BSL-4 high-throughput screen identifies sulfonamide inhibitors of Nipah virus.

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    Tigabu, Bersabeh; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Tower, Nichole; Saeed, Mohammad; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2014-04-01

    Nipah virus is a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen that causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. To identify novel small molecules that target Nipah virus replication as potential therapeutics, Southern Research Institute and Galveston National Laboratory jointly developed an automated high-throughput screening platform that is capable of testing 10,000 compounds per day within BSL-4 biocontainment. Using this platform, we screened a 10,080-compound library using a cell-based, high-throughput screen for compounds that inhibited the virus-induced cytopathic effect. From this pilot effort, 23 compounds were identified with EC50 values ranging from 3.9 to 20.0 μM and selectivities >10. Three sulfonamide compounds with EC50 values <12 μM were further characterized for their point of intervention in the viral replication cycle and for broad antiviral efficacy. Development of HTS capability under BSL-4 containment changes the paradigm for drug discovery for highly pathogenic agents because this platform can be readily modified to identify prophylactic and postexposure therapeutic candidates against other BSL-4 pathogens, particularly Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses.

  3. High-Throughput Screening to Identify Regulators of Meiosis-Specific Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Kassir, Yona

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis and gamete formation are processes that are essential for sexual reproduction in all eukaryotic organisms. Multiple intracellular and extracellular signals feed into pathways that converge on transcription factors that induce the expression of meiosis-specific genes. Once triggered the meiosis-specific gene expression program proceeds in a cascade that drives progress through the events of meiosis and gamete formation. Meiosis-specific gene expression is tightly controlled by a balance of positive and negative regulatory factors that respond to a plethora of signaling pathways. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an outstanding model for the dissection of gametogenesis owing to the sophisticated genetic manipulations that can be performed with the cells. It is possible to use a variety selection and screening methods to identify genes and their functions. High-throughput screening technology has been developed to allow an array of all viable yeast gene deletion mutants to be screened for phenotypes and for regulators of gene expression. This chapter describes a protocol that has been used to screen a library of homozygous diploid yeast deletion strains to identify regulators of the meiosis-specific IME1 gene.

  4. Corifungin, a New Drug Lead against Naegleria, Identified from a High-Throughput Screen

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    Debnath, Anjan; Tunac, Josefino B.; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko

    2012-01-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rapidly fatal infection caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. The drug of choice in treating PAM is the antifungal antibiotic amphotericin B, but its use is associated with severe adverse effects. Moreover, few patients treated with amphotericin B have survived PAM. Therefore, fast-acting and efficient drugs are urgently needed for the treatment of PAM. To facilitate drug screening for this pathogen, an automated, high-throughput screening methodology was developed and validated for the closely related species Naegleria gruberi. Five kinase inhibitors and an NF-kappaB inhibitor were hits identified in primary screens of three compound libraries. Most importantly for a preclinical drug discovery pipeline, we identified corifungin, a water-soluble polyene macrolide with a higher activity against Naegleria than that of amphotericin B. Transmission electron microscopy of N. fowleri trophozoites incubated with different concentrations of corifungin showed disruption of cytoplasmic and plasma membranes and alterations in mitochondria, followed by complete lysis of amebae. In vivo efficacy of corifungin in a mouse model of PAM was confirmed by an absence of detectable amebae in the brain and 100% survival of mice for 17 days postinfection for a single daily intraperitoneal dose of 9 mg/kg of body weight given for 10 days. The same dose of amphotericin B did not reduce ameba growth, and mouse survival was compromised. Based on these results, the U.S. FDA has approved orphan drug status for corifungin for the treatment of PAM. PMID:22869574

  5. Yeast-Based High-Throughput Screens to Identify Novel Compounds Active against Brugia malayi.

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    Elizabeth Bilsland

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the parasitic worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi or B. timori, which are transmitted via the bites from infected mosquitoes. Once in the human body, the parasites develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling of the affected tissues. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people in 58 countries are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis. Very few drugs are available to treat patients infected with these parasites, and these have low efficacy against the adult stages of the worms, which can live for 7-15 years in the human body. The requirement for annual treatment increases the risk of drug-resistant worms emerging, making it imperative to develop new drugs against these devastating diseases.We have developed a yeast-based, high-throughput screening system whereby essential yeast genes are replaced with their filarial or human counterparts. These strains are labeled with different fluorescent proteins to allow the simultaneous monitoring of strains with parasite or human genes in competition, and hence the identification of compounds that inhibit the parasite target without affecting its human ortholog. We constructed yeast strains expressing eight different Brugia malayi drug targets (as well as seven of their human counterparts, and performed medium-throughput drug screens for compounds that specifically inhibit the parasite enzymes. Using the Malaria Box collection (400 compounds, we identified nine filarial specific inhibitors and confirmed the antifilarial activity of five of these using in vitro assays against Brugia pahangi.We were able to functionally complement yeast deletions with eight different Brugia malayi enzymes that represent potential drug targets. We demonstrated that our yeast-based screening platform is efficient in identifying compounds that can discriminate between human and filarial enzymes. Hence, we are confident

  6. Yeast-Based High-Throughput Screens to Identify Novel Compounds Active against Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsland, Elizabeth; Bean, Daniel M; Devaney, Eileen; Oliver, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the parasitic worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi or B. timori, which are transmitted via the bites from infected mosquitoes. Once in the human body, the parasites develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling of the affected tissues. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people in 58 countries are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis. Very few drugs are available to treat patients infected with these parasites, and these have low efficacy against the adult stages of the worms, which can live for 7-15 years in the human body. The requirement for annual treatment increases the risk of drug-resistant worms emerging, making it imperative to develop new drugs against these devastating diseases. We have developed a yeast-based, high-throughput screening system whereby essential yeast genes are replaced with their filarial or human counterparts. These strains are labeled with different fluorescent proteins to allow the simultaneous monitoring of strains with parasite or human genes in competition, and hence the identification of compounds that inhibit the parasite target without affecting its human ortholog. We constructed yeast strains expressing eight different Brugia malayi drug targets (as well as seven of their human counterparts), and performed medium-throughput drug screens for compounds that specifically inhibit the parasite enzymes. Using the Malaria Box collection (400 compounds), we identified nine filarial specific inhibitors and confirmed the antifilarial activity of five of these using in vitro assays against Brugia pahangi. We were able to functionally complement yeast deletions with eight different Brugia malayi enzymes that represent potential drug targets. We demonstrated that our yeast-based screening platform is efficient in identifying compounds that can discriminate between human and filarial enzymes. Hence, we are confident that we can

  7. A high-throughput drug screen for Entamoeba histolytica identifies a new lead and target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Anjan; Parsonage, Derek; Andrade, Rosa M; He, Chen; Cobo, Eduardo R; Hirata, Ken; Chen, Steven; García-Rivera, Guillermina; Orozco, Esther; Martínez, Máximo B; Gunatilleke, Shamila S; Barrios, Amy M; Arkin, Michelle R; Poole, Leslie B; McKerrow, James H; Reed, Sharon L

    2012-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan intestinal parasite, is the causative agent of human amebiasis. Amebiasis is the fourth leading cause of death and the third leading cause of morbidity due to protozoan infections worldwide(1), resulting in ~70,000 deaths annually. E. histolytica has been listed by the National Institutes of Health as a category B priority biodefense pathogen in the United States. Treatment relies on metronidazole(2), which has adverse effects(3), and potential resistance of E. histolytica to the drug is an increasing concern(4,5). To facilitate drug screening for this anaerobic protozoan, we developed and validated an automated, high-throughput screen (HTS). This screen identified auranofin, a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug used therapeutically for rheumatoid arthritis, as active against E. histolytica in culture. Auranofin was ten times more potent against E. histolytica than metronidazole. Transcriptional profiling and thioredoxin reductase assays suggested that auranofin targets the E. histolytica thioredoxin reductase, preventing the reduction of thioredoxin and enhancing sensitivity of trophozoites to reactive oxygen-mediated killing. In a mouse model of amebic colitis and a hamster model of amebic liver abscess, oral auranofin markedly decreased the number of parasites, the detrimental host inflammatory response and hepatic damage. This new use of auranofin represents a promising therapy for amebiasis, and the drug has been granted orphan-drug status from the FDA.

  8. High-Throughput Screening of Myometrial Calcium-Mobilization to Identify Modulators of Uterine Contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herington, Jennifer L.; Swale, Daniel R.; Brown, Naoko; Shelton, Elaine L.; Choi, Hyehun; Williams, Charles H.; Hong, Charles C.; Paria, Bibhash C.; Denton, Jerod S.; Reese, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The uterine myometrium (UT-myo) is a therapeutic target for preterm labor, labor induction, and postpartum hemorrhage. Stimulation of intracellular Ca2+-release in UT-myo cells by oxytocin is a final pathway controlling myometrial contractions. The goal of this study was to develop a dual-addition assay for high-throughput screening of small molecular compounds, which could regulate Ca2+-mobilization in UT-myo cells, and hence, myometrial contractions. Primary murine UT-myo cells in 384-well plates were loaded with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent probe, and then screened for inducers of Ca2+-mobilization and inhibitors of oxytocin-induced Ca2+-mobilization. The assay exhibited robust screening statistics (Z´ = 0.73), DMSO-tolerance, and was validated for high-throughput screening against 2,727 small molecules from the Spectrum, NIH Clinical I and II collections of well-annotated compounds. The screen revealed a hit-rate of 1.80% for agonist and 1.39% for antagonist compounds. Concentration-dependent responses of hit-compounds demonstrated an EC50 less than 10μM for 21 hit-antagonist compounds, compared to only 7 hit-agonist compounds. Subsequent studies focused on hit-antagonist compounds. Based on the percent inhibition and functional annotation analyses, we selected 4 confirmed hit-antagonist compounds (benzbromarone, dipyridamole, fenoterol hydrobromide and nisoldipine) for further analysis. Using an ex vivo isometric contractility assay, each compound significantly inhibited uterine contractility, at different potencies (IC50). Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that high-throughput small-molecules screening of myometrial Ca2+-mobilization is an ideal primary approach for discovering modulators of uterine contractility. PMID:26600013

  9. A high-throughput phenotypic screen identifies clofazimine as a potential treatment for cryptosporidiosis.

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    Melissa S Love

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis has emerged as a leading cause of non-viral diarrhea in children under five years of age in the developing world, yet the current standard of care to treat Cryptosporidium infections, nitazoxanide, demonstrates limited and immune-dependent efficacy. Given the lack of treatments with universal efficacy, drug discovery efforts against cryptosporidiosis are necessary to find therapeutics more efficacious than the standard of care. To date, cryptosporidiosis drug discovery efforts have been limited to a few targeted mechanisms in the parasite and whole cell phenotypic screens against small, focused collections of compounds. Using a previous screen as a basis, we initiated the largest known drug discovery effort to identify novel anticryptosporidial agents. A high-content imaging assay for inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum proliferation within a human intestinal epithelial cell line was miniaturized and automated to enable high-throughput phenotypic screening against a large, diverse library of small molecules. A screen of 78,942 compounds identified 12 anticryptosporidial hits with sub-micromolar activity, including clofazimine, an FDA-approved drug for the treatment of leprosy, which demonstrated potent and selective in vitro activity (EC50 = 15 nM against C. parvum. Clofazimine also displayed activity against C. hominis-the other most clinically-relevant species of Cryptosporidium. Importantly, clofazimine is known to accumulate within epithelial cells of the small intestine, the primary site of Cryptosporidium infection. In a mouse model of acute cryptosporidiosis, a once daily dosage regimen for three consecutive days or a single high dose resulted in reduction of oocyst shedding below the limit detectable by flow cytometry. Recently, a target product profile (TPP for an anticryptosporidial compound was proposed by Huston et al. and highlights the need for a short dosing regimen (< 7 days and formulations for children < 2

  10. Quantitative high-throughput screen identifies inhibitors of the Schistosoma mansoni redox cascade.

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    Anton Simeonov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease associated with high morbidity and mortality, currently affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Praziquantel is the only drug used to treat the disease, and with its increased use the probability of developing drug resistance has grown significantly. The Schistosoma parasites can survive for up to decades in the human host due in part to a unique set of antioxidant enzymes that continuously degrade the reactive oxygen species produced by the host's innate immune response. Two principal components of this defense system have been recently identified in S. mansoni as thioredoxin/glutathione reductase (TGR and peroxiredoxin (Prx and as such these enzymes present attractive new targets for anti-schistosomiasis drug development. Inhibition of TGR/Prx activity was screened in a dual-enzyme format with reducing equivalents being transferred from NADPH to glutathione via a TGR-catalyzed reaction and then to hydrogen peroxide via a Prx-catalyzed step. A fully automated quantitative high-throughput (qHTS experiment was performed against a collection of 71,028 compounds tested as 7- to 15-point concentration series at 5 microL reaction volume in 1536-well plate format. In order to generate a robust data set and to minimize the effect of compound autofluorescence, apparent reaction rates derived from a kinetic read were utilized instead of end-point measurements. Actives identified from the screen, along with previously untested analogues, were subjected to confirmatory experiments using the screening assay and subsequently against the individual targets in secondary assays. Several novel active series were identified which inhibited TGR at a range of potencies, with IC(50s ranging from micromolar to the assay response limit ( approximately 25 nM. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a large-scale HTS to identify lead compounds for a helminthic disease, and provides a paradigm that can be used to jump

  11. NSC23925, identified in a high-throughput cell-based screen, reverses multidrug resistance.

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    Zhenfeng Duan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major factor which contributes to the failure of cancer chemotherapy, and numerous efforts have been attempted to overcome MDR. To date, none of these attempts have yielded a tolerable and effective therapy to reverse MDR; thus, identification of new agents would be useful both clinically and scientifically.To identify small molecule compounds that can reverse chemoresistance, we developed a 96-well plate high-throughput cell-based screening assay in a paclitaxel resistant ovarian cancer cell line. Coincubating cells with a sublethal concentration of paclitaxel in combination with each of 2,000 small molecule compounds from the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set Library, we identified a previously uncharacterized molecule, NSC23925, that inhibits Pgp1 and reverses MDR1 (Pgp1 but does not inhibit MRP or BCRP-mediated MDR. The cytotoxic activity of NSC23925 was further evaluated using a panel of cancer cell lines expressing Pgp1, MRP, and BCRP. We found that at a concentration of >10 microM NSC23925 moderately inhibits the proliferation of both sensitive and resistant cell lines with almost equal activity, but its inhibitory effect was not altered by co-incubation with the Pgp1 inhibitor, verapamil, suggesting that NSC23925 itself is not a substrate of Pgp1. Additionally, NSC23925 increases the intracellular accumulation of Pgp1 substrates: calcein AM, Rhodamine-123, paclitaxel, mitoxantrone, and doxorubicin. Interestingly, we further observed that, although NSC23925 directly inhibits the function of Pgp1 in a dose-dependent manner without altering the total expression level of Pgp1, NSC23925 actually stimulates ATPase activity of Pgp, a phenomenon seen in other Pgp inhibitors.The ability of NSC23925 to restore sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy or to prevent resistance could significantly benefit cancer patients.

  12. Quantitative high-throughput screening identifies inhibitors of anthrax-induced cell death.

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    Zhu, Ping Jun; Hobson, John P; Southall, Noel; Qiu, Cunping; Thomas, Craig J; Lu, Jiamo; Inglese, James; Zheng, Wei; Leppla, Stephen H; Bugge, Thomas H; Austin, Christopher P; Liu, Shihui

    2009-07-15

    Here, we report the results of a quantitative high-throughput screen (qHTS) measuring the endocytosis and translocation of a beta-lactamase-fused-lethal factor and the identification of small molecules capable of obstructing the process of anthrax toxin internalization. Several small molecules protect RAW264.7 macrophages and CHO cells from anthrax lethal toxin and protected cells from an LF-Pseudomonas exotoxin fusion protein and diphtheria toxin. Further efforts demonstrated that these compounds impaired the PA heptamer pre-pore to pore conversion in cells expressing the CMG2 receptor, but not the related TEM8 receptor, indicating that these compounds likely interfere with toxin internalization.

  13. Organ-targeted high-throughput in vivo biologics screen identifies materials for RNA delivery.

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    Chang, Tsung-Yao; Shi, Peng; Steinmeyer, Joseph D; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Tillberg, Paul; Love, Kevin T; Eimon, Peter M; Anderson, Daniel G; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2014-10-01

    Therapies based on biologics involving delivery of proteins, DNA, and RNA are currently among the most promising approaches. However, although large combinatorial libraries of biologics and delivery vehicles can be readily synthesized, there are currently no means to rapidly characterize them in vivo using animal models. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput in vivo screening of biologics and delivery vehicles by automated delivery into target tissues of small vertebrates with developed organs. Individual zebrafish larvae are automatically oriented and immobilized within hydrogel droplets in an array format using a microfluidic system, and delivery vehicles are automatically microinjected to target organs with high repeatability and precision. We screened a library of lipid-like delivery vehicles for their ability to facilitate the expression of protein-encoding RNAs in the central nervous system. We discovered delivery vehicles that are effective in both larval zebrafish and rats. Our results showed that the in vivo zebrafish model can be significantly more predictive of both false positives and false negatives in mammals than in vitro mammalian cell culture assays. Our screening results also suggest certain structure-activity relationships, which can potentially be applied to design novel delivery vehicles.

  14. An AlphaScreen-based high-throughput screen to identify inhibitors of Hsp90-cochaperone interaction.

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    Yi, Fang; Zhu, Pingjun; Southall, Noel; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Zheng, Wei; Regan, Lynne

    2009-03-01

    Hsp90 has emerged as an important anticancer drug target because of its essential role in promoting the folding and maturation of many oncogenic proteins. The authors describe the development of the first high-throughput screen, based on AlphaScreen technology, to identify a novel type of Hsp90 inhibitors that interrupt its interaction with the cochaperone HOP. The assay used the 20-mer C-terminal peptide of Hsp90 and the TPR2A domain of HOP. Assay specificity was demonstrated by measuring different interactions using synthetic peptides, with measured IC50s in good agreement with reported values. The assay was stable over 12 h and tolerated DMSO up to 5%. The authors first validated the assay by screening against 20,000 compounds in a 384-well format. After further optimization into a 1536-well format, it was screened against an NIH Chemical Genomics Center library of 76,134 compounds, with a signal-to-background ratio of 78 and Z' factor of 0.77. The present assay can be used for discovery of novel small-molecule Hsp90 inhibitors that can be used as chemical probes to investigate the role of cochaperones in Hsp90 function. Such molecules have the potential to be developed into novel anticancer drugs, for use alone or in combination with other Hsp90 inhibitors.

  15. High throughput protein production screening

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    Beernink, Peter T [Walnut Creek, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Segelke, Brent W [San Ramon, CA

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  16. An AlphaScreen™ Based High-throughput Screen to Identify Inhibitors of Hsp90 and Cochaperone Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Fang; Zhu, Pingjun; Southall, Noel; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Zheng, Wei; Regan, Lynne

    2009-01-01

    Hsp90 has emerged as an important anti-cancer drug target because of its essential role in promoting the folding and maturation of many oncogenic proteins. Here we describe the development of the first high throughput screen, based on AlphaScreen™ technology, to identify a novel type of Hsp90 inhibitors that interrupt its interaction with the cochaperone HOP. The assay uses the 20-mer C-terminal peptide of Hsp90 and the TPR2A domain of HOP. Assay specificity was demonstrated by measuring diff...

  17. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

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    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  18. IspE inhibitors identified by a combination of in silico and in vitro high-throughput screening.

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    Naomi Tidten-Luksch

    Full Text Available CDP-ME kinase (IspE contributes to the non-mevalonate or deoxy-xylulose phosphate (DOXP pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis found in many species of bacteria and apicomplexan parasites. IspE has been shown to be essential by genetic methods and since it is absent from humans it constitutes a promising target for antimicrobial drug development. Using in silico screening directed against the substrate binding site and in vitro high-throughput screening directed against both, the substrate and co-factor binding sites, non-substrate-like IspE inhibitors have been discovered and structure-activity relationships were derived. The best inhibitors in each series have high ligand efficiencies and favourable physico-chemical properties rendering them promising starting points for drug discovery. Putative binding modes of the ligands were suggested which are consistent with established structure-activity relationships. The applied screening methods were complementary in discovering hit compounds, and a comparison of both approaches highlights their strengths and weaknesses. It is noteworthy that compounds identified by virtual screening methods provided the controls for the biochemical screens.

  19. Leishmania genome analysis and high-throughput immunological screening identifies tuzin as a novel vaccine candidate against visceral leishmaniasis.

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    Lakshmi, Bhavana Sethu; Wang, Ruobing; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-06-24

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania species. It is a major health concern affecting 88 countries and threatening 350 million people globally. Unfortunately, there are no vaccines and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. The emerging cases of drug-resistance further aggravate the situation, demanding rapid drug and vaccine development. The genome sequence of Leishmania, provides access to novel genes that hold potential as chemotherapeutic targets or vaccine candidates. In this study, we selected 19 antigenic genes from about 8000 common Leishmania genes based on the Leishmania major and Leishmania infantum genome information available in the pathogen databases. Potential vaccine candidates thus identified were screened using an in vitro high throughput immunological platform developed in the laboratory. Four candidate genes coding for tuzin, flagellar glycoprotein-like protein (FGP), phospholipase A1-like protein (PLA1) and potassium voltage-gated channel protein (K VOLT) showed a predominant protective Th1 response over disease exacerbating Th2. We report the immunogenic properties and protective efficacy of one of the four antigens, tuzin, as a DNA vaccine against Leishmania donovani challenge. Our results show that administration of tuzin DNA protected BALB/c mice against L. donovani challenge and that protective immunity was associated with higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 production in comparison to IL-4 and IL-10. Our study presents a simple approach to rapidly identify potential vaccine candidates using the exhaustive information stored in the genome and an in vitro high-throughput immunological platform. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Quantitative high-throughput screening: a titration-based approach that efficiently identifies biological activities in large chemical libraries.

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    Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L; Simeonov, Anton; Yasgar, Adam; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P

    2006-08-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical compounds to identify modulators of molecular targets is a mainstay of pharmaceutical development. Increasingly, HTS is being used to identify chemical probes of gene, pathway, and cell functions, with the ultimate goal of comprehensively delineating relationships between chemical structures and biological activities. Achieving this goal will require methodologies that efficiently generate pharmacological data from the primary screen and reliably profile the range of biological activities associated with large chemical libraries. Traditional HTS, which tests compounds at a single concentration, is not suited to this task, because HTS is burdened by frequent false positives and false negatives and requires extensive follow-up testing. We have developed a paradigm, quantitative HTS (qHTS), tested with the enzyme pyruvate kinase, to generate concentration-response curves for >60,000 compounds in a single experiment. We show that this method is precise, refractory to variations in sample preparation, and identifies compounds with a wide range of activities. Concentration-response curves were classified to rapidly identify pyruvate kinase activators and inhibitors with a variety of potencies and efficacies and elucidate structure-activity relationships directly from the primary screen. Comparison of qHTS with traditional single-concentration HTS revealed a high prevalence of false negatives in the single-point screen. This study demonstrates the feasibility of qHTS for accurately profiling every compound in large chemical libraries (>10(5) compounds). qHTS produces rich data sets that can be immediately mined for reliable biological activities, thereby providing a platform for chemical genomics and accelerating the identification of leads for drug discovery.

  1. A high throughput screen identifies Nefopam as targeting cell proliferation in β-catenin driven neoplastic and reactive fibroproliferative disorders.

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    Raymond Poon

    Full Text Available Fibroproliferative disorders include neoplastic and reactive processes (e.g. desmoid tumor and hypertrophic scars. They are characterized by activation of β-catenin signaling, and effective pharmacologic approaches are lacking. Here we undertook a high throughput screen using human desmoid tumor cell cultures to identify agents that would inhibit cell viability in tumor cells but not normal fibroblasts. Agents were then tested in additional cell cultures for an effect on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and β-catenin protein level. Ultimately they were tested in Apc1638N mice, which develop desmoid tumors, as well as in wild type mice subjected to full thickness skin wounds. The screen identified Neofopam, as an agent that inhibited cell numbers to 42% of baseline in cell cultures from β-catenin driven fibroproliferative disorders. Nefopam decreased cell proliferation and β-catenin protein level to 50% of baseline in these same cell cultures. The half maximal effective concentration in-vitro was 0.5 uM and there was a plateau in the effect after 48 hours of treatment. Nefopam caused a 45% decline in tumor number, 33% decline in tumor volume, and a 40% decline in scar size when tested in mice. There was also a 50% decline in β-catenin level in-vivo. Nefopam targets β-catenin protein level in mesenchymal cells in-vitro and in-vivo, and may be an effective therapy for neoplastic and reactive processes driven by β-catenin mediated signaling.

  2. High Throughput Screen to Identify Novel Drugs that Inhibit Prostate Cancer Metastasis

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    2007-10-01

    subjected to MALDI-TOF after complete trypsin digestion . This analysis identified the band in C4-2 cells as being TFII-I. v-Src-mediated Down...primers (Table 1), digested with KpnI and XhoI, and inserted into TKm-pGL3B plasmid cut with KpnI/XhoI. Reverse Transcription (RT)-PCR—Total RNA was...for 24 h) (Sigma) using TRIzol ( Invitro - gen). 1 g of total RNA was subjected to reverse transcription using SuperScript first-strand synthesis system

  3. A novel high-throughput in vivo molecular screen for shade avoidance mutants identifies a novel phyA mutation.

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    Wang, Xuewen; Roig-Villanova, Irma; Khan, Safina; Shanahan, Hugh; Quail, Peter H; Martinez-Garcia, Jaime F; Devlin, Paul F

    2011-05-01

    The shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) allows plants to anticipate and avoid shading by neighbouring plants by initiating an elongation growth response. The phytochrome photoreceptors are able to detect a reduction in the red:far red ratio in incident light, the result of selective absorption of red and blue wavelengths by proximal vegetation. A shade-responsive luciferase reporter line (PHYB::LUC) was used to carry out a high-throughput screen to identify novel SAS mutants. The dracula 1 (dra1) mutant, that showed no avoidance of shade for the PHYB::LUC response, was the result of a mutation in the PHYA gene. Like previously characterized phyA mutants, dra1 showed a long hypocotyl in far red light and an enhanced hypocotyl elongation response to shade. However, dra1 additionally showed a long hypocotyl in red light. Since phyB levels are relatively unaffected in dra1, this gain-of-function red light phenotype strongly suggests a disruption of phyB signalling. The dra1 mutation, G773E within the phyA PAS2 domain, occurs at a residue absolutely conserved among phyA sequences. The equivalent residue in phyB is absolutely conserved as a threonine. PAS domains are structurally conserved domains involved in molecular interaction. Structural modelling of the dra1 mutation within the phyA PAS2 domain shows some similarity with the structure of the phyB PAS2 domain, suggesting that the interference with phyB signalling may be the result of non-functional mimicry. Hence, it was hypothesized that this PAS2 residue forms a key distinction between the phyA and phyB phytochrome species.

  4. High-throughput crystallization screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarina, Tatiana; Xu, Xiaohui; Evdokimova, Elena; Savchenko, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure determination by X-ray crystallography is dependent on obtaining a single protein crystal suitable for diffraction data collection. Due to this requirement, protein crystallization represents a key step in protein structure determination. The conditions for protein crystallization have to be determined empirically for each protein, making this step also a bottleneck in the structure determination process. Typical protein crystallization practice involves parallel setup and monitoring of a considerable number of individual protein crystallization experiments (also called crystallization trials). In these trials the aliquots of purified protein are mixed with a range of solutions composed of a precipitating agent, buffer, and sometimes an additive that have been previously successful in prompting protein crystallization. The individual chemical conditions in which a particular protein shows signs of crystallization are used as a starting point for further crystallization experiments. The goal is optimizing the formation of individual protein crystals of sufficient size and quality to make them suitable for diffraction data collection. Thus the composition of the primary crystallization screen is critical for successful crystallization.Systematic analysis of crystallization experiments carried out on several hundred proteins as part of large-scale structural genomics efforts allowed the optimization of the protein crystallization protocol and identification of a minimal set of 96 crystallization solutions (the "TRAP" screen) that, in our experience, led to crystallization of the maximum number of proteins.

  5. A novel cell-based high-throughput screen for inhibitors of HIV-1 gene expression and budding identifies the cardiac glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Gregory M; Eisele, Evelyn E; Rabi, S Alireza; Nikolaeva, Daria; Siliciano, Robert F

    2014-04-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is the mainstay of treatment for HIV-1 infection. While current HAART regimens have been extremely effective, issues of associated toxicity, cost and resistance remain and there is a need for novel antiretroviral compounds to complement the existing therapy. We sought to develop a novel high-throughput method for identifying compounds that block later steps in the life cycle not targeted by current therapy. We designed a high-throughput screen to identify inhibitors of post-integration steps in the HIV-1 life cycle. The screening method was applied to a library of compounds that included numerous FDA-approved small molecules. Among the small molecules that inhibited late stages in HIV-1 replication were members of the cardiac glycoside family. We demonstrate that cardiac glycosides potently inhibit HIV-1 gene expression, thereby reducing the production of infectious HIV-1. We demonstrate that this inhibition is dependent upon the human Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, but independent of cardiac glycoside-induced increases in intracellular Ca(2+). We have validated a novel high-throughput screen to identify small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 gene expression, virion assembly and budding. Using this screen, we have demonstrated that a number of FDA-approved compounds developed for other purposes potently inhibit HIV-1 replication, including the cardiac glycosides. Our work indicates that the entire cardiac glycoside family of drugs shows potential for antiretroviral drug development.

  6. An in silico high-throughput screen identifies potential selective inhibitors for the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirson T

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tomer Meirson, Abraham O Samson, Hava Gil-Henn Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, Israel Abstract: The non-receptor tyrosine kinase proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2 is a critical mediator of signaling from cell surface growth factor and adhesion receptors to cell migration, proliferation, and survival. Emerging evidence indicates that signaling by Pyk2 regulates hematopoietic cell response, bone density, neuronal degeneration, angiogenesis, and cancer. These physiological and pathological roles of Pyk2 warrant it as a valuable therapeutic target for invasive cancers, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and inflammatory cellular response. Despite its potential as a therapeutic target, no potent and selective inhibitor of Pyk2 is available at present. As a first step toward discovering specific potential inhibitors of Pyk2, we used an in silico high-throughput screening approach. A virtual library of six million lead-like compounds was docked against four different high-resolution Pyk2 kinase domain crystal structures and further selected for predicted potency and ligand efficiency. Ligand selectivity for Pyk2 over focal adhesion kinase (FAK was evaluated by comparative docking of ligands and measurement of binding free energy so as to obtain 40 potential candidates. Finally, the structural flexibility of a subset of the docking complexes was evaluated by molecular dynamics simulation, followed by intermolecular interaction analysis. These compounds may be considered as promising leads for further development of highly selective Pyk2 inhibitors. Keywords: virtual screen, efficiency metrics, MM-GBSA, molecular dynamics

  7. Data from Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — High-throughput screening for potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge...

  8. A Class of Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase 1 Inhibitors Identified by a Combination of Phenotypic High-throughput Screening, Genomics, and Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Tschapalda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Excess lipid storage is an epidemic problem in human populations. Thus, the identification of small molecules to treat or prevent lipid storage-related metabolic complications is of great interest. Here we screened >320.000 compounds for their ability to prevent a cellular lipid accumulation phenotype. We used fly cells because the multifarious tools available for this organism should facilitate unraveling the mechanism-of-action of active small molecules. Of the several hundred lipid storage inhibitors identified in the primary screen we concentrated on three structurally diverse and potent compound classes active in cells of multiple species (including human and negligible cytotoxicity. Together with Drosophila in vivo epistasis experiments, RNA-Seq expression profiles suggested that the target of one of the small molecules was diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1, a key enzyme in the production of triacylglycerols and prominent human drug target. We confirmed this prediction by biochemical and enzymatic activity tests.

  9. Screening and synthesis: high throughput technologies applied to parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R E; Westwood, N J

    2004-01-01

    High throughput technologies continue to develop in response to the challenges set by the genome projects. This article discusses how the techniques of both high throughput screening (HTS) and synthesis can influence research in parasitology. Examples of the use of targeted and phenotype-based HTS using unbiased compound collections are provided. The important issue of identifying the protein target(s) of bioactive compounds is discussed from the synthetic chemist's perspective. This article concludes by reviewing recent examples of successful target identification studies in parasitology.

  10. High-Throughput Genetic Screens Identify a Large and Diverse Collection of New Sporulation Genes in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Jacqueline; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Bernhardt, Thomas G.; Rudner, David Z.

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis into a dormant spore is among the most well-characterized developmental pathways in biology. Classical genetic screens performed over the past half century identified scores of factors involved in every step of this morphological process. More recently, transcriptional profiling uncovered additional sporulation-induced genes required for successful spore development. Here, we used transposon-sequencing (Tn-seq) to assess whether there were any sporulation genes left to be discovered. Our screen identified 133 out of the 148 genes with known sporulation defects. Surprisingly, we discovered 24 additional genes that had not been previously implicated in spore formation. To investigate their functions, we used fluorescence microscopy to survey early, middle, and late stages of differentiation of null mutants from the B. subtilis ordered knockout collection. This analysis identified mutants that are delayed in the initiation of sporulation, defective in membrane remodeling, and impaired in spore maturation. Several mutants had novel sporulation phenotypes. We performed in-depth characterization of two new factors that participate in cell–cell signaling pathways during sporulation. One (SpoIIT) functions in the activation of σE in the mother cell; the other (SpoIIIL) is required for σG activity in the forespore. Our analysis also revealed that as many as 36 sporulation-induced genes with no previously reported mutant phenotypes are required for timely spore maturation. Finally, we discovered a large set of transposon insertions that trigger premature initiation of sporulation. Our results highlight the power of Tn-seq for the discovery of new genes and novel pathways in sporulation and, combined with the recently completed null mutant collection, open the door for similar screens in other, less well-characterized processes. PMID:26735940

  11. A high-throughput screening campaign to identify inhibitors of DXP reductoisomerase (IspC) and MEP cytidylyltransferase (IspD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymond, Amanda; Dowdy, Tyrone; Johny, Chinchu; Johnson, Claire; Ball, Haley; Dailey, Allyson; Schweibenz, Brandon; Villarroel, Karen; Young, Richard; Mantooth, Clark J; Patel, Trishal; Bases, Jessica; Dowd, Cynthia S; Couch, Robin D

    2017-11-24

    The rise of antibacterial resistance among human pathogens represents a problem that could change the landscape of healthcare unless new antibiotics are developed. The methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway represents an attractive series of targets for novel antibiotic design, considering each enzyme of the pathway is both essential and has no human homologs. Here we describe a pilot scale high-throughput screening (HTS) campaign against the first and second committed steps in the pathway, catalyzed by DXP reductoisomerase (IspC) and MEP cytidylyltransferase (IspD), using compounds present in the commercially available LOPAC1280 library as well as in an in-house natural product extract library. Hit compounds were characterized to deduce their mechanism of inhibition; most function through aggregation. The HTS workflow outlined here is useful for quickly screening a chemical library, while effectively identifying false positive compounds associated with assay constraints and aggregation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Sulfonamides identified as plant immune-priming compounds in high-throughput chemical screening increase disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiteru eNoutoshi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant activators are agrochemicals that protect crops from diseases by activating the plant immune system. To isolate lead compounds for use as practical plant activators, we screened 2 different chemical libraries composed of various bioactive substances by using an established screening procedure that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. We identified and characterized a group of sulfonamide compounds—sulfameter, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfabenzamide, and sulfachloropyridazine—among the various isolated candidate molecules. These sulfonamide compounds enhanced the avirulent Pseudomonas-induced cell death of Arabidopsis suspension cell cultures and increased disease resistance in Arabidopsis plants against both avirulent and virulent strains of the bacterium. These compounds did not prevent the growth of pathogenic bacteria in minimal liquid media at 200 µM. They also did not induce the expression of defense-related genes in Arabidopsis seedlings, at least not at 24 and 48 h after treatment, suggesting that they do not act as salicylic acid analogs. In addition, although sulfonamides are known to be folate biosynthesis inhibitors, the application of folate did not restore the potentiation effects of the sulfonamides on pathogen-induced cell death. Our data suggest that sulfonamides potentiate Arabidopsis disease resistance by their novel chemical properties.

  13. High-Throughput Chemical Screening Identifies Compounds that Inhibit Different Stages of the Phytophthora agathidicida and Phytophthora cinnamomi Life Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Scott A; Armstrong, Charlotte B; Patrick, Wayne M; Gerth, Monica L

    2017-01-01

    Oomycetes in the genus Phytophthora are among the most damaging plant pathogens worldwide. Two important species are Phytophthora cinnamomi, which causes root rot in thousands of native and agricultural plants, and Phytophthora agathidicida, which causes kauri dieback disease in New Zealand. As is the case for other Phytophthora species, management options for these two pathogens are limited. Here, we have screened over 100 compounds for their anti-oomycete activity, as a potential first step toward identifying new control strategies. Our screening identified eight compounds that showed activity against both Phytophthora species. These included five antibiotics, two copper compounds and a quaternary ammonium cation. These compounds were tested for their inhibitory action against three stages of the Phytophthora life cycle: mycelial growth, zoospore germination, and zoospore motility. The inhibitory effects of the compounds were broadly similar between the two Phytophthora species, but their effectiveness varied widely among life cycle stages. Mycelial growth was most successfully inhibited by the antibiotics chlortetracycline and paromomycin, and the quaternary ammonium salt benzethonium chloride. Copper chloride and copper sulfate were most effective at inhibiting zoospore germination and motility, whereas the five antibiotics showed relatively poor zoospore inhibition. Benzethonium chloride was identified as a promising antimicrobial, as it is effective across all three life cycle stages. While further testing is required to determine their efficacy and potential phytotoxicity in planta, we have provided new data on those agents that are, and those that are not, effective against P. agathidicida and P. cinnamomi. Additionally, we present here the first published protocol for producing zoospores from P. agathidicida, which will aid in the further study of this emerging pathogen.

  14. Novel Inducers of Fetal Globin Identified through High Throughput Screening (HTS Are Active In Vivo in Anemic Baboons and Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Boosalis

    Full Text Available High-level fetal (γ globin expression ameliorates clinical severity of the beta (β hemoglobinopathies, and safe, orally-bioavailable γ-globin inducing agents would benefit many patients. We adapted a LCR-γ-globin promoter-GFP reporter assay to a high-throughput robotic system to evaluate five diverse chemical libraries for this activity. Multiple structurally- and functionally-diverse compounds were identified which activate the γ-globin gene promoter at nanomolar concentrations, including some therapeutics approved for other conditions. Three candidates with established safety profiles were further evaluated in erythroid progenitors, anemic baboons and transgenic mice, with significant induction of γ-globin expression observed in vivo. A lead candidate, Benserazide, emerged which demonstrated > 20-fold induction of γ-globin mRNA expression in anemic baboons and increased F-cell proportions by 3.5-fold in transgenic mice. Benserazide has been used chronically to inhibit amino acid decarboxylase to enhance plasma levels of L-dopa. These studies confirm the utility of high-throughput screening and identify previously unrecognized fetal globin inducing candidates which can be developed expediently for treatment of hemoglobinopathies.

  15. Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) for potential thyroid–disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge on perturbed thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. Screening for MIEs specific to TH-disrupting pathways is limi...

  16. A Sensitive in Vitro High-Throughput Screen To Identify Pan-filoviral Replication Inhibitors Targeting the VP35–NP Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gai; Nash, Peter J.; Johnson, Britney; Pietzsch, Colette; Ilagan, Ma. Xenia G.; Bukreyev, Alexander; Basler, Christopher F.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Moir, Donald T.; Leung, Daisy W.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K. (WU-MED); (GSU); (Texas-MED); (Microbiotix)

    2017-01-24

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the largest outbreak on record, highlighted the need for novel approaches to therapeutics targeting Ebola virus (EBOV). Within the EBOV replication complex, the interaction between polymerase cofactor, viral protein 35 (VP35), and nucleoprotein (NP) is critical for viral RNA synthesis. We recently identified a peptide at the N-terminus of VP35 (termed NPBP) that is sufficient for interaction with NP and suppresses EBOV replication, suggesting that the NPBP binding pocket can serve as a potential drug target. Here we describe the development and validation of a sensitive high-throughput screen (HTS) using a fluorescence polarization assay. Initial hits from this HTS include the FDA-approved compound tolcapone, whose potency against EBOV infection was validated in a nonfluorescent secondary assay. High conservation of the NP–VP35 interface among filoviruses suggests that this assay has the capacity to identify pan-filoviral inhibitors for development as antivirals.

  17. A FluoPol-ABPP PAD2 high-throughput screen identifies the first calcium site inhibitor targeting the PADs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Daniel M; Bicker, Kevin L; Madoux, Franck; Chase, Peter; Anguish, Lynne; Coonrod, Scott; Hodder, Peter; Thompson, Paul R

    2014-04-18

    The protein arginine deiminases (PADs) catalyze the post-translational hydrolysis of peptidyl-arginine to form peptidyl-citrulline in a process termed deimination or citrullination. PADs likely play a role in the progression of a range of disease states because dysregulated PAD activity is observed in a host of inflammatory diseases and cancer. For example, recent studies have shown that PAD2 activates ERα target gene expression in breast cancer cells by citrullinating histone H3 at ER target promoters. To date, all known PAD inhibitors bind directly to the enzyme active site. PADs, however, also require calcium ions to drive a conformational change between the inactive apo-state and the fully active calcium bound holoenzyme, suggesting that it would be possible to identify inhibitors that bind the apoenzyme and prevent this conformational change. As such, we set out to develop a screen that can identify PAD2 inhibitors that bind to either the apo or calcium bound form of PAD2. Herein, we provide definitive proof of concept for this approach and report the first PAD inhibitor, ruthenium red (Ki of 17 μM), to preferentially bind the apoenzyme.

  18. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Chan Young; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P; Stamer, W Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2014-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signaling intermediates with poorly defined relationship to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we screened libraries to identify novel drug candidates in the case of human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma, and also in the case of Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery.

  19. High Throughput Spectroscopic Catalyst Screening via Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 26-June-2014 to 25-March-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Throughput Catalyst Screening via Surface...TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Throughput Catalyst Screening via Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4064 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...AOARD Grant 144064 FA2386-14-1-4064 “High Throughput Spectroscopic Catalyst Screening by Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy” Date July 15, 2015

  20. A High-Throughput Cell-Based Screen Identified a 2-[(E)-2-Phenylvinyl]-8-Quinolinol Core Structure That Activates p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechill, John; Zhong, Rong; Zhang, Chen; Solomaha, Elena; Spiotto, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    p53 function is frequently inhibited in cancer either through mutations or by increased degradation via MDM2 and/or E6AP E3-ubiquitin ligases. Most agents that restore p53 expression act by binding MDM2 or E6AP to prevent p53 degradation. However, fewer compounds directly bind to and activate p53. Here, we identified compounds that shared a core structure that bound p53, caused nuclear localization of p53 and caused cell death. To identify these compounds, we developed a novel cell-based screen to redirect p53 degradation to the Skip-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex in cells expressing high levels of p53. In a multiplexed assay, we coupled p53 targeted degradation with Rb1 targeted degradation in order to identify compounds that prevented p53 degradation while not inhibiting degradation through the SCF complex or other proteolytic machinery. High-throughput screening identified several leads that shared a common 2-[(E)-2-phenylvinyl]-8-quinolinol core structure that stabilized p53. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that these compounds bound p53 with a KD of 200 ± 52 nM. Furthermore, these compounds increased p53 nuclear localization and transcription of the p53 target genes PUMA, BAX, p21 and FAS in cancer cells. Although p53-null cells had a 2.5±0.5-fold greater viability compared to p53 wild type cells after treatment with core compounds, loss of p53 did not completely rescue cell viability suggesting that compounds may target both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to inhibit cell proliferation. Thus, we present a novel, cell-based high-throughput screen to identify a 2-[(E)-2-phenylvinyl]-8-quinolinol core structure that bound to p53 and increased p53 activity in cancer cells. These compounds may serve as anti-neoplastic agents in part by targeting p53 as well as other potential pathways.

  1. High-throughput targeted screening in triple-negative breast cancer cells identifies Wnt-inhibiting activities in Pacific brittle stars

    OpenAIRE

    Blagodatski, Artem; Cherepanov, Vsevolod; Koval, Alexey; Kharlamenko, Vladimir I.; Khotimchenko, Yuri S.; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2017-01-01

    Pro-proliferative oncogenic signaling is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Specific targeting of such signaling pathways is one of the main approaches to modern anti-cancer drug discovery, as opposed to more traditional search for general cytotoxic agents. Natural products, especially from marine sources, represent a largely untapped source of chemical diversity, which so far have mostly been screened for cytotoxicity. Here we present a pioneering pipeline of high-throughput screening of marine...

  2. A multi-parameter, high-content, high-throughput screening platform to identify natural compounds that modulate insulin and Pdx1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hill

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a devastating disease that is ultimately caused by the malfunction or loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells. Drugs capable of inducing the development of new beta-cells or improving the function or survival of existing beta-cells could conceivably cure this disease. We report a novel high-throughput screening platform that exploits multi-parameter high-content analysis to determine the effect of compounds on beta-cell survival, as well as the promoter activity of two key beta-cell genes, insulin and pdx1. Dispersed human pancreatic islets and MIN6 beta-cells were infected with a dual reporter lentivirus containing both eGFP driven by the insulin promoter and mRFP driven by the pdx1 promoter. B-score statistical transformation was used to correct systemic row and column biases. Using this approach and 5 replicate screens, we identified 7 extracts that reproducibly changed insulin and/or pdx1 promoter activity from a library of 1319 marine invertebrate extracts. The ability of compounds purified from these extracts to significantly modulate insulin mRNA levels was confirmed with real-time PCR. Insulin secretion was analyzed by RIA. Follow-up studies focused on two lead compounds, one that stimulates insulin gene expression and one that inhibits insulin gene expression. Thus, we demonstrate that multi-parameter, high-content screening can identify novel regulators of beta-cell gene expression, such as bivittoside D. This work represents an important step towards the development of drugs to increase insulin expression in diabetes and during in vitro differentiation of beta-cell replacements.

  3. AOPs & Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening and Regulatory Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    As high throughput screening (HTS) approaches play a larger role in toxicity testing, computational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models for this purpose are becoming increasingly more sophisticated...

  4. Materiomics - High-Throughput Screening of Biomaterial Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    This complete, yet concise, guide introduces you to the rapidly developing field of high throughput screening of biomaterials: materiomics. Bringing together the key concepts and methodologies used to determine biomaterial properties, you will understand the adaptation and application of materomics

  5. Essential attributes identified in the design of a Laboratory Information Management System for a high throughput siRNA screening laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Geoffrey; Graham, Ryan; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey

    2011-11-01

    In recent years high throughput screening operations have become a critical application in functional and translational research. Although a seemingly unmanageable amount of data is generated by these high-throughput, large-scale techniques, through careful planning, an effective Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) can be developed and implemented in order to streamline all phases of a workflow. Just as important as data mining and analysis procedures at the end of complex processes is the tracking of individual steps of applications that generate such data. Ultimately, the use of a customized LIMS will enable users to extract meaningful results from large datasets while trusting the robustness of their assays. To illustrate the design of a custom LIMS, this practical example is provided to highlight the important aspects of the design of a LIMS to effectively modulate all aspects of an siRNA screening service. This system incorporates inventory management, control of workflow, data handling and interaction with investigators, statisticians and administrators. All these modules are regulated in a synchronous manner within the LIMS. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers

  6. High throughput combinatorial screening of semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-11-01

    This article provides an overview of an advanced combinatorial material discovery platform developed recently for screening semiconductor materials with properties that may have applications ranging from radiation detectors to solar cells. Semiconductor thin-film libraries, each consisting of 256 materials of different composition arranged into a 16×16 matrix, were fabricated using laser-assisted evaporation process along with a combinatorial mechanism to achieve variations. The composition and microstructure of individual materials on each thin-film library were characterized with an integrated scanning micro-beam x-ray fluorescence and diffraction system, while the band gaps were determined by scanning optical reflection and transmission of the libraries. An ultrafast ultraviolet photon-induced charge probe was devised to measure the mobility and lifetime of individual thin-film materials on semiconductor libraries. Selected results on the discovery of semiconductors with desired band gaps and transport properties are illustrated.

  7. High-throughput root phenotyping screens identify genetic loci associated with root architectural traits in Brassica napus under contrasting phosphate availabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Shi, Taoxiong; Broadley, Martin R; White, Philip J; Long, Yan; Meng, Jinling; Xu, Fangsen; Hammond, John P

    2013-07-01

    Phosphate (Pi) deficiency in soils is a major limiting factor for crop growth worldwide. Plant growth under low Pi conditions correlates with root architectural traits and it may therefore be possible to select these traits for crop improvement. The aim of this study was to characterize root architectural traits, and to test quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with these traits, under low Pi (LP) and high Pi (HP) availability in Brassica napus. Root architectural traits were characterized in seedlings of a double haploid (DH) mapping population (n = 190) of B. napus ['Tapidor' × 'Ningyou 7' (TNDH)] using high-throughput phenotyping methods. Primary root length (PRL), lateral root length (LRL), lateral root number (LRN), lateral root density (LRD) and biomass traits were measured 12 d post-germination in agar at LP and HP. In general, root and biomass traits were highly correlated under LP and HP conditions. 'Ningyou 7' had greater LRL, LRN and LRD than 'Tapidor', at both LP and HP availability, but smaller PRL. A cluster of highly significant QTL for LRN, LRD and biomass traits at LP availability were identified on chromosome A03; QTL for PRL were identified on chromosomes A07 and C06. High-throughput phenotyping of Brassica can be used to identify root architectural traits which correlate with shoot biomass. It is feasible that these traits could be used in crop improvement strategies. The identification of QTL linked to root traits under LP and HP conditions provides further insights on the genetic basis of plant tolerance to P deficiency, and these QTL warrant further dissection.

  8. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology - Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to chemical profiling to address sensitivity and specificity of molecular targets, biological pathways, cellular and developmental processes. EPA’s ToxCast project is testing 960 uniq...

  9. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to profile thousands of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. EPA’s ToxCast™ project, and the broader Tox21 consortium, in addition to projects worldwide,...

  10. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Using a Coincidence Reporter Biocircuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Brittany W; MacArthur, Ryan; Inglese, James

    2017-04-10

    Reporter-biased artifacts-i.e., compounds that interact directly with the reporter enzyme used in a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay and not the biological process or pharmacology being interrogated-are now widely recognized to reduce the efficiency and quality of HTS used for chemical probe and therapeutic development. Furthermore, narrow or single-concentration HTS perpetuates false negatives during primary screening campaigns. Titration-based HTS, or quantitative HTS (qHTS), and coincidence reporter technology can be employed to reduce false negatives and false positives, respectively, thereby increasing the quality and efficiency of primary screening efforts, where the number of compounds investigated can range from tens of thousands to millions. The three protocols described here allow for generation of a coincidence reporter (CR) biocircuit to interrogate a biological or pharmacological question of interest, generation of a stable cell line expressing the CR biocircuit, and qHTS using the CR biocircuit to efficiently identify high-quality biologically active small molecules. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P.; Go, Eden P.; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods.

  13. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-07-29

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches.

  14. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated...... maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content...... and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers...

  15. High-throughput optical screening of cellular mechanotransduction

    OpenAIRE

    Compton, JL; Luo, JC; Ma, H.; Botvinick, E; Venugopalan, V

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an optical platform for rapid, high-throughput screening of exogenous molecules that affect cellular mechanotransduction. Our method initiates mechanotransduction in adherent cells using single laser-microbeam generated microcavitation bubbles without requiring flow chambers or microfluidics. These microcavitation bubbles expose adherent cells to a microtsunami, a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress, which stimulates cells over areas approaching 1 mm2. We demo...

  16. Spectrophotometric Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Reymond

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews high-throughput screening enzyme assays developed in our laboratory over the last ten years. These enzyme assays were initially developed for the purpose of discovering catalytic antibodies by screening cell culture supernatants, but have proved generally useful for testing enzyme activities. Examples include TLC-based screening using acridone-labeled substrates, fluorogenic assays based on the β-elimination of umbelliferone or nitrophenol, and indirect assays such as the back-titration method with adrenaline and the copper-calcein fluorescence assay for aminoacids.

  17. Optimisation and validation of a high throughput screening compatible assay to identify inhibitors of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase pump--a novel therapeutic target for contraception and malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tamer M A; Zakeri, Simon A; Baudoin, Florence; Wolf, Markus; Oceandy, Delvac; Cartwright, Elizabeth J; Gul, Sheraz; Neyses, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    ATPases, which constitute a major category of ion transporters in the human body, have a variety of significant biological and pathological roles. However, the lack of high throughput assays for ATPases has significantly limited drug discovery in this area. We have recently found that the genetic deletion of the ATP dependent calcium pump PMCA4 (plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin dependent ATPase, isoform 4) results in infertility in male mice due to a selective defect in sperm motility. In addition, recent discoveries in humans have indicated that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the PMCA4 gene determines the susceptibility towards malaria plasmodium infection. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop specific PMCA4 inhibitors. In the current study, we aim to optimise and validate a high throughput screening compatible assay using recombinantly expressed PMCA4 and the HTRF® Transcreener® ADP (TR-FRET) assay to screen a drug library. PMCA4 membrane microsomes were prepared from HEK293 cells overexpressing PMCA4. Western blot quantification revealed nearly nine-fold increased expression of PMCA4 compared to LacZ (control virus)-infected cells. Maximal PMCA4 microsomal activity was achieved in the TR-FRET assay with 15ng/μl microsomal concentration, 30-minute pre-incubation with compounds at 37°C, and calcium buffering with 1mM EGTA providing 1μM free-calcium. Finally a dose-response curve for carboxyeosin (a non-specific PMCA inhibitor) under optimised conditions showed significant PMCA4 inhibition. Upon confirmation that the assay was suitable for high-throughput screening, we have screened the ChemBioNet small molecule library (~21,000 compounds) against the PMCA4 assay to identify those that are its apparent inhibitors. This screening yielded 1,494 primary hits. We have optimised the HTRF® Transcreener® ADP assay for high-throughput screening to identify PMCA4 inhibitors. The output of the screening campaign has provided preliminary chemical

  18. Use of High Throughput Screening Data in IARC Monograph ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in IARC monograph evaluations, and can lead to “upgrade” or “downgrade” of the carcinogenicity conclusions based on human and animal evidence alone. Three recent IARC monograph Working Groups (110, 112, and 113) pioneered analysis of high throughput in vitro screening data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program in evaluations of carcinogenic mechanisms. Methods: For monograph 110, ToxCast assay data across multiple nuclear receptors were used to test the hypothesis that PFOA acts exclusively through the PPAR family of receptors, with activity profiles compared to several prototypical nuclear receptor-activating compounds. For monographs 112 and 113, ToxCast assays were systematically evaluated and used as an additional data stream in the overall evaluation of the mechanistic evidence. Specifically, ToxCast assays were mapped to 10 “key characteristics of carcinogens” recently identified by an IARC expert group, and chemicals’ bioactivity profiles were evaluated both in absolute terms (number of relevant assays positive for bioactivity) and relative terms (ranking with respect to other compounds evaluated by IARC, using the ToxPi methodology). Results: PFOA activates multiple nuclear receptors in addition to the PPAR family in the ToxCast assays. ToxCast assays offered substantial coverage for 5 of the 10 “key characteristics,” with the greates

  19. High throughput screening for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alonso-Padilla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti-T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti-T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here.

  20. Advances in High Throughput Screening of Biomass Recalcitrance (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, G. B.; Decker, S. R.; Tucker, M. P.; Law, C.; Doeppke, C.; Sykes, R. W.; Davis, M. F.; Ziebell, A.

    2012-06-01

    This was a poster displayed at the Symposium. Advances on previous high throughput screening of biomass recalcitrance methods have resulted in improved conversion and replicate precision. Changes in plate reactor metallurgy, improved preparation of control biomass, species-specific pretreatment conditions, and enzymatic hydrolysis parameters have reduced overall coefficients of variation to an average of 6% for sample replicates. These method changes have improved plate-to-plate variation of control biomass recalcitrance and improved confidence in sugar release differences between samples. With smaller errors plant researchers can have a higher degree of assurance more low recalcitrance candidates can be identified. Significant changes in plate reactor, control biomass preparation, pretreatment conditions and enzyme have significantly reduced sample and control replicate variability. Reactor plate metallurgy significantly impacts sugar release aluminum leaching into reaction during pretreatment degrades sugars and inhibits enzyme activity. Removal of starch and extractives significantly decreases control biomass variability. New enzyme formulations give more consistent and higher conversion levels, however required re-optimization for switchgrass. Pretreatment time and temperature (severity) should be adjusted to specific biomass types i.e. woody vs. herbaceous. Desalting of enzyme preps to remove low molecular weight stabilizers and improved conversion levels likely due to water activity impacts on enzyme structure and substrate interactions not attempted here due to need to continually desalt and validate precise enzyme concentration and activity.

  1. Compound Cytotoxicity Profiling Using Quantitative High-Throughput Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Witt, Kristine L.; Southall, Noel; Fostel, Jennifer; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Jadhav, Ajit; Smith, Cynthia S.; Inglese, James; Portier, Christopher J.; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    Background The propensity of compounds to produce adverse health effects in humans is generally evaluated using animal-based test methods. Such methods can be relatively expensive, low-throughput, and associated with pain suffered by the treated animals. In addition, differences in species biology may confound extrapolation to human health effects. Objective The National Toxicology Program and the National Institutes of Health Chemical Genomics Center are collaborating to identify a battery of cell-based screens to prioritize compounds for further toxicologic evaluation. Methods A collection of 1,408 compounds previously tested in one or more traditional toxicologic assays were profiled for cytotoxicity using quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) in 13 human and rodent cell types derived from six common targets of xenobiotic toxicity (liver, blood, kidney, nerve, lung, skin). Selected cytotoxicants were further tested to define response kinetics. Results qHTS of these compounds produced robust and reproducible results, which allowed cross-compound, cross-cell type, and cross-species comparisons. Some compounds were cytotoxic to all cell types at similar concentrations, whereas others exhibited species- or cell type–specific cytotoxicity. Closely related cell types and analogous cell types in human and rodent frequently showed different patterns of cytotoxicity. Some compounds inducing similar levels of cytotoxicity showed distinct time dependence in kinetic studies, consistent with known mechanisms of toxicity. Conclusions The generation of high-quality cytotoxicity data on this large library of known compounds using qHTS demonstrates the potential of this methodology to profile a much broader array of assays and compounds, which, in aggregate, may be valuable for prioritizing compounds for further toxicologic evaluation, identifying compounds with particular mechanisms of action, and potentially predicting in vivo biological response. PMID:18335092

  2. High-Throughput Screening Using iPSC-Derived Neuronal Progenitors to Identify Compounds Counteracting Epigenetic Gene Silencing in Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Markus; Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Fruh, Isabelle; Klein, Jessica; Thiemeyer, Anke; Rigo, Pierre; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Heidinger-Millot, Valerie; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Schopfer, Ulrich; Mueller, Matthias; Fodor, Barna D; Cobos-Correa, Amanda

    2015-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited mental retardation, and it is caused in most of cases by epigenetic silencing of the Fmr1 gene. Today, no specific therapy exists for FXS, and current treatments are only directed to improve behavioral symptoms. Neuronal progenitors derived from FXS patient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a unique model to study the disease and develop assays for large-scale drug discovery screens since they conserve the Fmr1 gene silenced within the disease context. We have established a high-content imaging assay to run a large-scale phenotypic screen aimed to identify compounds that reactivate the silenced Fmr1 gene. A set of 50,000 compounds was tested, including modulators of several epigenetic targets. We describe an integrated drug discovery model comprising iPSC generation, culture scale-up, and quality control and screening with a very sensitive high-content imaging assay assisted by single-cell image analysis and multiparametric data analysis based on machine learning algorithms. The screening identified several compounds that induced a weak expression of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and thus sets the basis for further large-scale screens to find candidate drugs or targets tackling the underlying mechanism of FXS with potential for therapeutic intervention. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  3. In Vitro High Throughput Screening, What Next? Lessons from the Screening for Aurora Kinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-My-Nhung Hoang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on in vitro assays, we performed a High Throughput Screening (HTS to identify kinase inhibitors among 10,000 small chemical compounds. In this didactic paper, we describe step-by-step the approach to validate the hits as well as the major pitfalls encountered in the development of active molecules. We propose a decision tree that could be adapted to most in vitro HTS.

  4. In vitro high throughput screening, what next? Lessons from the screening for aurora kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thi-My-Nhung; Vu, Hong-Lien; Le, Ly-Thuy-Tram; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Molla, Annie

    2014-02-27

    Based on in vitro assays, we performed a High Throughput Screening (HTS) to identify kinase inhibitors among 10,000 small chemical compounds. In this didactic paper, we describe step-by-step the approach to validate the hits as well as the major pitfalls encountered in the development of active molecules. We propose a decision tree that could be adapted to most in vitro HTS.

  5. Efficient Management of High-Throughput Screening Libraries with SAVANAH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; Schmidt, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis for such scr......High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis...... for such screens are molecular libraries, that is, microtiter plates with solubilized reagents such as siRNAs, shRNAs, miRNA inhibitors or mimics, and sgRNAs, or small compounds, that is, drugs. These reagents are typically condensed to provide enough material for covering several screens. Library plates thus need...... to be serially diluted before they can be used as assay plates. This process, however, leads to an explosion in the number of plates and samples to be tracked. Here, we present SAVANAH, the first tool to effectively manage molecular screening libraries across dilution series. It conveniently links (connects...

  6. Hypoxia-sensitive reporter system for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujita, Tadayuki; Kawaguchi, Shin-ichi; Dan, Takashi; Baird, Liam; Miyata, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-02-01

    The induction of anti-hypoxic stress enzymes and proteins has the potential to be a potent therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of ischemic heart, kidney or brain diseases. To realize this idea, small chemical compounds, which mimic hypoxic conditions by activating the PHD-HIF-α system, have been developed. However, to date, none of these compounds were identified by monitoring the transcriptional activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Thus, to facilitate the discovery of potent inducers of HIF-α, we have developed an effective high-throughput screening (HTS) system to directly monitor the output of HIF-α transcription. We generated a HIF-α-dependent reporter system that responds to hypoxic stimuli in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This system was developed through multiple optimization steps, resulting in the generation of a construct that consists of the secretion-type luciferase gene (Metridia luciferase, MLuc) under the transcriptional regulation of an enhancer containing 7 copies of 40-bp hypoxia responsive element (HRE) upstream of a mini-TATA promoter. This construct was stably integrated into the human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-BE(2)c, to generate a reporter system, named SKN:HRE-MLuc. To improve this system and to increase its suitability for the HTS platform, we incorporated the next generation luciferase, Nano luciferase (NLuc), whose longer half-life provides us with flexibility for the use of this reporter. We thus generated a stably transformed clone with NLuc, named SKN:HRE-NLuc, and found that it showed significantly improved reporter activity compared to SKN:HRE-MLuc. In this study, we have successfully developed the SKN:HRE-NLuc screening system as an efficient platform for future HTS.

  7. High-Throughput Microfluidics for the Screening of Yeast Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingtao; Joensson, Haakan N; Nielsen, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Cell factory development is critically important for efficient biological production of chemicals, biofuels, and pharmaceuticals. Many rounds of the Design-Build-Test-Learn cycles may be required before an engineered strain meeting specific metrics required for industrial application. The bioindustry prefer products in secreted form (secreted products or extracellular metabolites) as it can lower the cost of downstream processing, reduce metabolic burden to cell hosts, and allow necessary modification on the final products , such as biopharmaceuticals. Yet, products in secreted form result in the disconnection of phenotype from genotype, which may have limited throughput in the Test step for identification of desired variants from large libraries of mutant strains. In droplet microfluidic screening, single cells are encapsulated in individual droplet and enable high-throughput processing and sorting of single cells or clones. Encapsulation in droplets allows this technology to overcome the throughput limitations present in traditional methods for screening by extracellular phenotypes. In this chapter, we describe a protocol/guideline for high-throughput droplet microfluidics screening of yeast libraries for higher protein secretion . This protocol can be adapted to screening by a range of other extracellular products from yeast or other hosts.

  8. Marine natural product libraries for high-throughput screening and rapid drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugni, Tim S; Richards, Burt; Bhoite, Leen; Cimbora, Daniel; Harper, Mary Kay; Ireland, Chris M

    2008-06-01

    There is a need for diverse molecular libraries for phenotype-selective and high-throughput screening. To make marine natural products (MNPs) more amenable to newer screening paradigms and shorten discovery time lines, we have created an MNP library characterized online using MS. To test the potential of the library, we screened a subset of the library in a phenotype-selective screen to identify compounds that inhibited the growth of BRCA2-deficient cells.

  9. High-throughput cultivation and screening platform for unicellular phototrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillich, Ulrich M; Wolter, Nick; Schulze, Katja; Kramer, Dan; Brödel, Oliver; Frohme, Marcus

    2014-09-16

    High-throughput cultivation and screening methods allow a parallel, miniaturized and cost efficient processing of many samples. These methods however, have not been generally established for phototrophic organisms such as microalgae or cyanobacteria. In this work we describe and test high-throughput methods with the model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The required technical automation for these processes was achieved with a Tecan Freedom Evo 200 pipetting robot. The cultivation was performed in 2.2 ml deepwell microtiter plates within a cultivation chamber outfitted with programmable shaking conditions, variable illumination, variable temperature, and an adjustable CO2 atmosphere. Each microtiter-well within the chamber functions as a separate cultivation vessel with reproducible conditions. The automated measurement of various parameters such as growth, full absorption spectrum, chlorophyll concentration, MALDI-TOF-MS, as well as a novel vitality measurement protocol, have already been established and can be monitored during cultivation. Measurement of growth parameters can be used as inputs for the system to allow for periodic automatic dilutions and therefore a semi-continuous cultivation of hundreds of cultures in parallel. The system also allows the automatic generation of mid and long term backups of cultures to repeat experiments or to retrieve strains of interest. The presented platform allows for high-throughput cultivation and screening of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The platform should be usable for many phototrophic microorganisms as is, and be adaptable for even more. A variety of analyses are already established and the platform is easily expandable both in quality, i.e. with further parameters to screen for additional targets and in quantity, i.e. size or number of processed samples.

  10. High-throughput screening: update on practices and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Sandra; Farr-Jones, Shauna; Sopchak, Lynne; Boggs, Amy; Nicely, Helen Wang; Khoury, Richard; Biros, Michael

    2006-10-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an important part of drug discovery at most pharmaceutical and many biotechnology companies worldwide, and use of HTS technologies is expanding into new areas. Target validation, assay development, secondary screening, ADME/Tox, and lead optimization are among the areas in which there is an increasing use of HTS technologies. It is becoming fully integrated within drug discovery, both upstream and downstream, which includes increasing use of cell-based assays and high-content screening (HCS) technologies to achieve more physiologically relevant results and to find higher quality leads. In addition, HTS laboratories are continually evaluating new technologies as they struggle to increase their success rate for finding drug candidates. The material in this article is based on a 900-page HTS industry report involving 54 HTS directors representing 58 HTS laboratories and 34 suppliers.

  11. High-Throughput Genetic Screening of 51 Pediatric Cataract Genes Identifies Causative Mutations in Inherited Pediatric Cataract in South Eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari Javadiyan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cataract is a leading cause of childhood blindness. This study aimed to determine the genetic cause of pediatric cataract in Australian families by screening known disease-associated genes using massively parallel sequencing technology. We sequenced 51 previously reported pediatric cataract genes in 33 affected individuals with a family history (cases with previously known or published mutations were excluded using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Variants were prioritized for validation if they were predicted to alter the protein sequence and were absent or rare with minor allele frequency 60% of familial pediatric cataract in Australia, indicating that still more causative genes remain to be identified.

  12. High-Throughput Screening Using Fourier-Transform Infrared Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Sasmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficient parallel screening of combinatorial libraries is one of the most challenging aspects of the high-throughput (HT heterogeneous catalysis workflow. Today, a number of methods have been used in HT catalyst studies, including various optical, mass-spectrometry, and gas-chromatography techniques. Of these, rapid-scanning Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR imaging is one of the fastest and most versatile screening techniques. Here, the new design of the 16-channel HT reactor is presented and test results for its accuracy and reproducibility are shown. The performance of the system was evaluated through the oxidation of CO over commercial Pd/Al2O3 and cobalt oxide nanoparticles synthesized with different reducer-reductant molar ratios, surfactant types, metal and surfactant concentrations, synthesis temperatures, and ramp rates.

  13. A high-throughput screen against pantothenate synthetase (PanC identifies 3-biphenyl-4-cyanopyrrole-2-carboxylic acids as a new class of inhibitor with activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Kumar

    Full Text Available The enzyme pantothenate synthetase, PanC, is an attractive drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is essential for the in vitro growth of M. tuberculosis and for survival of the bacteria in the mouse model of infection. PanC is absent from mammals. We developed an enzyme-based assay to identify inhibitors of PanC, optimized it for high-throughput screening, and tested a large and diverse library of compounds for activity. Two compounds belonging to the same chemical class of 3-biphenyl-4- cyanopyrrole-2-carboxylic acids had activity against the purified recombinant protein, and also inhibited growth of live M. tuberculosis in manner consistent with PanC inhibition. Thus we have identified a new class of PanC inhibitors with whole cell activity that can be further developed.

  14. High-throughput chemical screen identifies a novel potent modulator of cellular circadian rhythms and reveals CKIα as a clock regulatory kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Hirota

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock underlies daily rhythms of diverse physiological processes, and alterations in clock function have been linked to numerous pathologies. To apply chemical biology methods to modulate and dissect the clock mechanism with new chemical probes, we performed a circadian screen of ∼120,000 uncharacterized compounds on human cells containing a circadian reporter. The analysis identified a small molecule that potently lengthens the circadian period in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequent analysis showed that the compound also lengthened the period in a variety of cells from different tissues including the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus, the central clock controlling behavioral rhythms. Based on the prominent period lengthening effect, we named the compound longdaysin. Longdaysin was amenable for chemical modification to perform affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis to identify target proteins. Combined with siRNA-mediated gene knockdown, we identified the protein kinases CKIδ, CKIα, and ERK2 as targets of longdaysin responsible for the observed effect on circadian period. Although individual knockdown of CKIδ, CKIα, and ERK2 had small period effects, their combinatorial knockdown dramatically lengthened the period similar to longdaysin treatment. We characterized the role of CKIα in the clock mechanism and found that CKIα-mediated phosphorylation stimulated degradation of a clock protein PER1, similar to the function of CKIδ. Longdaysin treatment inhibited PER1 degradation, providing insight into the mechanism of longdaysin-dependent period lengthening. Using larval zebrafish, we further demonstrated that longdaysin drastically lengthened circadian period in vivo. Taken together, the chemical biology approach not only revealed CKIα as a clock regulatory kinase but also identified a multiple kinase network conferring robustness to the clock. Longdaysin provides novel possibilities in manipulating clock

  15. Reverse Phase Protein Arrays for High-throughput Toxicity Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marlene Lemvig; Block, Ines; List, Markus

    RNAs with known killing effects as a model system to demonstrate that RPPA-based protein quantification can serve as substitute readout of cell viability, hereby reliably reflecting toxicity. In terms of automation, cell exposure, protein harvest, serial dilution and sample reformatting were performed using...... beneficially in automated high-throughput toxicity testing. An advantage of using RPPAs is that, in addition to the baseline toxicity readout, they allow testing of multiple markers of toxicity, such as inflammatory responses, which do not necessarily cumulate in cell death. We used transfection of si...... a robotic screening platform. Furthermore, we automated sample tracking and data analysis by developing a bundled bioinformatics tool named “MIRACLE”. Automation and RPPA-based viability/toxicity readouts enable rapid testing of large sample numbers, while granting the possibility for flexible consecutive...

  16. Efficient Management of High-Throughput Screening Libraries with SAVANAH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Markus; Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; Schmidt, Steffen; Christiansen, Helle; Tan, Qihua; Mollenhauer, Jan; Baumbach, Jan

    2017-02-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis for such screens are molecular libraries, that is, microtiter plates with solubilized reagents such as siRNAs, shRNAs, miRNA inhibitors or mimics, and sgRNAs, or small compounds, that is, drugs. These reagents are typically condensed to provide enough material for covering several screens. Library plates thus need to be serially diluted before they can be used as assay plates. This process, however, leads to an explosion in the number of plates and samples to be tracked. Here, we present SAVANAH, the first tool to effectively manage molecular screening libraries across dilution series. It conveniently links (connects) sample information from the library to experimental results from the assay plates. All results can be exported to the R statistical environment or piped into HiTSeekR ( http://hitseekr.compbio.sdu.dk ) for comprehensive follow-up analyses. In summary, SAVANAH supports the HTS community in managing and analyzing HTS experiments with an emphasis on serially diluted molecular libraries.

  17. High-Throughput Screening to Identify Compounds That Increase Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Expression in Neural Stem Cells Differentiated From Fragile X Syndrome Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Daman; Swaroop, Manju; Southall, Noel; Huang, Wenwei; Zheng, Wei; Usdin, Karen

    2015-07-01

    : Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited cognitive disability, is caused by a deficiency of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). In most patients, the absence of FMRP is due to an aberrant transcriptional silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. FXS has no cure, and the available treatments only provide symptomatic relief. Given that FMR1 gene silencing in FXS patient cells can be partially reversed by treatment with compounds that target repressive epigenetic marks, restoring FMRP expression could be one approach for the treatment of FXS. We describe a homogeneous and highly sensitive time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for FMRP detection in a 1,536-well plate format. Using neural stem cells differentiated from an FXS patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line that does not express any FMRP, we screened a collection of approximately 5,000 known tool compounds and approved drugs using this FMRP assay and identified 6 compounds that modestly increase FMR1 gene expression in FXS patient cells. Although none of these compounds resulted in clinically relevant levels of FMR1 mRNA, our data provide proof of principle that this assay combined with FXS patient-derived neural stem cells can be used in a high-throughput format to identify better lead compounds for FXS drug development. In this study, a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for fragile X mental retardation protein detection was developed and optimized for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compound libraries using fragile X syndrome (FXS) patient-derived neural stem cells. The data suggest that this HTS format will be useful for the identification of better lead compounds for developing new therapeutics for FXS. This assay can also be adapted for FMRP detection in clinical and research settings. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. Applications of Biophysics in High-Throughput Screening Hit Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genick, Christine Clougherty; Barlier, Danielle; Monna, Dominique; Brunner, Reto; Bé, Céline; Scheufler, Clemens; Ottl, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    For approximately a decade, biophysical methods have been used to validate positive hits selected from high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns with the goal to verify binding interactions using label-free assays. By applying label-free readouts, screen artifacts created by compound interference and fluorescence are discovered, enabling further characterization of the hits for their target specificity and selectivity. The use of several biophysical methods to extract this type of high-content information is required to prevent the promotion of false positives to the next level of hit validation and to select the best candidates for further chemical optimization. The typical technologies applied in this arena include dynamic light scattering, turbidometry, resonance waveguide, surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning fluorimetry, mass spectrometry, and others. Each technology can provide different types of information to enable the characterization of the binding interaction. Thus, these technologies can be incorporated in a hit-validation strategy not only according to the profile of chemical matter that is desired by the medicinal chemists, but also in a manner that is in agreement with the target protein's amenability to the screening format. Here, we present the results of screening strategies using biophysics with the objective to evaluate the approaches, discuss the advantages and challenges, and summarize the benefits in reference to lead discovery. In summary, the biophysics screens presented here demonstrated various hit rates from a list of ~2000 preselected, IC50-validated hits from HTS (an IC50 is the inhibitor concentration at which 50% inhibition of activity is observed). There are several lessons learned from these biophysical screens, which will be discussed in this article. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  19. High-throughput, image-based screening of pooled genetic-variant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, George; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2017-12-01

    We report a high-throughput screening method that allows diverse genotypes and corresponding phenotypes to be imaged in individual cells. We achieve genotyping by introducing barcoded genetic variants into cells as pooled libraries and reading the barcodes out using massively multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization. To demonstrate the power of image-based pooled screening, we identified brighter and more photostable variants of the fluorescent protein YFAST among 60,000 variants.

  20. Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: further evidence high throughput screening is feasible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theda, Christiane; Gibbons, Katy; Defor, Todd E; Donohue, Pamela K; Golden, W Christopher; Kline, Antonie D; Gulamali-Majid, Fizza; Panny, Susan R; Hubbard, Walter C; Jones, Richard O; Liu, Anita K; Moser, Ann B; Raymond, Gerald V

    2014-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is characterized by adrenal insufficiency and neurologic involvement with onset at variable ages. Plasma very long chain fatty acids are elevated in ALD; even in asymptomatic patients. We demonstrated previously that liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry measuring C26:0 lysophosphatidylcholine reliably identifies affected males. We prospectively applied this method to 4689 newborn blood spot samples; no false positives were observed. We show that high throughput neonatal screening for ALD is methodologically feasible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High-throughput optical screening of cellular mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jonathan L.; Luo, Justin C.; Ma, Huan; Botvinick, Elliot; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-09-01

    We introduce an optical platform for rapid, high-throughput screening of exogenous molecules that affect cellular mechanotransduction. Our method initiates mechanotransduction in adherent cells using single laser-microbeam generated microcavitation bubbles without requiring flow chambers or microfluidics. These microcavitation bubbles expose adherent cells to a microtsunami, a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress, which stimulates cells over areas approaching 1 mm2. We demonstrate microtsunami-initiated mechanosignalling in primary human endothelial cells. This observed signalling is consistent with G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, resulting in Ca2+ release by the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, we demonstrate the dose-dependent modulation of microtsunami-induced Ca2+ signalling by introducing a known inhibitor to this pathway. The imaging of Ca2+ signalling and its modulation by exogenous molecules demonstrates the capacity to initiate and assess cellular mechanosignalling in real time. We utilize this capability to screen the effects of a set of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction in 96-well plates using standard imaging cytometry.

  2. Assessing the utility and limitations of high throughput virtual screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Daniel Phillips

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to low cost, speed, and unmatched ability to explore large numbers of compounds, high throughput virtual screening and molecular docking engines have become widely utilized by computational scientists. It is generally accepted that docking engines, such as AutoDock, produce reliable qualitative results for ligand-macromolecular receptor binding, and molecular docking results are commonly reported in literature in the absence of complementary wet lab experimental data. In this investigation, three variants of the sixteen amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin MII, were docked to a homology model of the a3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. DockoMatic version 2.0 was used to perform a virtual screen of each peptide ligand to the receptor for ten docking trials consisting of 100 AutoDock cycles per trial. The results were analyzed for both variation in the calculated binding energy obtained from AutoDock, and the orientation of bound peptide within the receptor. The results show that, while no clear correlation exists between consistent ligand binding pose and the calculated binding energy, AutoDock is able to determine a consistent positioning of bound peptide in the majority of trials when at least ten trials were evaluated.

  3. High-throughput clone screening followed by protein expression cross-check: A visual assay platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Partha Pratim; Kumar, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    In high-throughput biotechnology and structural biology, molecular cloning is an essential prerequisite for attaining high yields of recombinant protein. However, a rapid, cost-effective, easy clone screening protocol is still required to identify colonies with desired insert along with a cross check method to certify the expression of the desired protein as the end product. We report an easy, fast, sensitive and cheap visual clone screening and protein expression cross check protocol employing gold nanoparticle based plasmonic detection phenomenon. This is a non-gel, non-PCR based visual detection technique, which can be used as simultaneous high throughput clone screening followed by the determination of expression of desired protein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Generation of RNAi Libraries for High-Throughput Screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Clark

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The completion of the genome sequencing for several organisms has created a great demand for genomic tools that can systematically analyze the growing wealth of data. In contrast to the classical reverse genetics approach of creating specific knockout cell lines or animals that is time-consuming and expensive, RNA-mediated interference (RNAi has emerged as a fast, simple, and cost-effective technique for gene knockdown in large scale. Since its discovery as a gene silencing response to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA with homology to endogenous genes in Caenorhabditis elegans (C elegans, RNAi technology has been adapted to various high-throughput screens (HTS for genome-wide loss-of-function (LOF analysis. Biochemical insights into the endogenous mechanism of RNAi have led to advances in RNAi methodology including RNAi molecule synthesis, delivery, and sequence design. In this article, we will briefly review these various RNAi library designs and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of each library strategy.

  5. Development of a high-throughput screening-compatible assay to identify inhibitors of the CK2alpha/CK2beta interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochscherf, Jennifer; Lindenblatt, Dirk; Steinkrueger, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Increased activity of protein kinase CK2 is associated with various types of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and chronic inflammation. In the search for CK2 inhibitors, attention has expanded toward compounds disturbing the interaction between CK2alpha and CK2beta in addition to established...... active site-directed approaches. The current article describes the development of a fluorescence anisotropy-based assay that mimics the principle of CK2 subunit interaction by using CK2alpha1-335 and the fluorescent probe CF-Ahx-Pc as a CK2beta analog. In addition, we identified new inhibitors able...... to displace the fluorescent probe from the subunit interface on CK2alpha1-335. Both CF-Ahx-Pc and the inhibitors I-Pc and Cl-Pc were derived from the cyclic peptide Pc, a mimetic of the C-terminal CK2alpha-binding motif of CK2beta. The design of the two inhibitors was based on docking studies using the known...

  6. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  7. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2015-12-14

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  8. High-throughput screening for novel anti-infectives using a C. elegans pathogenesis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conery, Annie L; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Ausubel, Frederick M; Kirienko, Natalia V

    2014-03-14

    In recent history, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has provided a compelling platform for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. In this protocol, we present an automated, high-throughput C. elegans pathogenesis assay, which can be used to screen for anti-infective compounds that prevent nematodes from dying due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. New antibiotics identified from such screens would be promising candidates for treatment of human infections, and also can be used as probe compounds to identify novel targets in microbial pathogenesis or host immunity. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. A cell-based high-throughput screening assay for radiation susceptibility using automated cell counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodzic, Jasmina; Dingjan, Ilse; Maas, Mariëlle Jp; van der Meulen-Muileman, Ida H; de Menezes, Renee X; Heukelom, Stan; Verheij, Marcel; Gerritsen, Winald R; Geldof, Albert A; van Triest, Baukelien; van Beusechem, Victor W

    2015-02-27

    Radiotherapy is one of the mainstays in the treatment for cancer, but its success can be limited due to inherent or acquired resistance. Mechanisms underlying radioresistance in various cancers are poorly understood and available radiosensitizers have shown only modest clinical benefit. There is thus a need to identify new targets and drugs for more effective sensitization of cancer cells to irradiation. Compound and RNA interference high-throughput screening technologies allow comprehensive enterprises to identify new agents and targets for radiosensitization. However, the gold standard assay to investigate radiosensitivity of cancer cells in vitro, the colony formation assay (CFA), is unsuitable for high-throughput screening. We developed a new high-throughput screening method for determining radiation susceptibility. Fast and uniform irradiation of batches up to 30 microplates was achieved using a Perspex container and a clinically employed linear accelerator. The readout was done by automated counting of fluorescently stained nuclei using the Acumen eX3 laser scanning cytometer. Assay performance was compared to that of the CFA and the CellTiter-Blue homogeneous uniform-well cell viability assay. The assay was validated in a whole-genome siRNA library screening setting using PC-3 prostate cancer cells. On 4 different cancer cell lines, the automated cell counting assay produced radiation dose response curves that followed a linear-quadratic equation and that exhibited a better correlation to the results of the CFA than did the cell viability assay. Moreover, the cell counting assay could be used to detect radiosensitization by silencing DNA-PKcs or by adding caffeine. In a high-throughput screening setting, using 4 Gy irradiated and control PC-3 cells, the effects of DNA-PKcs siRNA and non-targeting control siRNA could be clearly discriminated. We developed a simple assay for radiation susceptibility that can be used for high-throughput screening. This will

  10. High-Throughput Multiplex Flow Cytometry Screening for Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Light Chain Protease Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Given their medical importance, proteases have been studied by diverse approaches and screened for small molecule protease inhibitors. Here, we present a multiplexed microsphere-based protease assay that uses high-throughput flow cytometry to screen for inhibitors of the light chain protease of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTALC). Our assay uses a full-length substrate and several deletion mutants screened in parallel to identify small molecule inhibitors. The use of multiplex flow cytometry has the advantage of using full-length substrates, which contain already identified distal-binding elements for the BoNTALC, and could lead to a new class of BoNTALC inhibitors. In this study, we have screened 880 off patent drugs and bioavailable compounds to identify ebselen as an in vitro inhibitor of BoNTALC. This discovery demonstrates the validity of our microsphere-based approach and illustrates its potential for high-throughput screening for inhibitors of proteases in general. PMID:20035615

  11. Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays DE DeGroot, RS Thomas, and SO SimmonsNational Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC USAThe EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput s...

  12. Neuraminidase activity provides a practical read-out for a high throughput influenza antiviral screening assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of influenza strains that are resistant to commonly used antivirals has highlighted the need to develop new compounds that target viral gene products or host mechanisms that are essential for effective virus replication. Existing assays to identify potential antiviral compounds often use high throughput screening assays that target specific viral replication steps. To broaden the search for antivirals, cell-based replication assays can be performed, but these are often labor intensive and have limited throughput. Results We have adapted a traditional virus neutralization assay to develop a practical, cell-based, high throughput screening assay. This assay uses viral neuraminidase (NA as a read-out to quantify influenza replication, thereby offering an assay that is both rapid and sensitive. In addition to identification of inhibitors that target either viral or host factors, the assay allows simultaneous evaluation of drug toxicity. Antiviral activity was demonstrated for a number of known influenza inhibitors including amantadine that targets the M2 ion channel, zanamivir that targets NA, ribavirin that targets IMP dehydrogenase, and bis-indolyl maleimide that targets protein kinase A/C. Amantadine-resistant strains were identified by comparing IC50 with that of the wild-type virus. Conclusion Antivirals with specificity for a broad range of targets are easily identified in an accelerated viral inhibition assay that uses NA as a read-out of replication. This assay is suitable for high throughput screening to identify potential antivirals or can be used to identify drug-resistant influenza strains.

  13. High-Throughput Yeast-Based Reporter Assay to Identify Compounds with Anti-inflammatory Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G; Santos, C Nunes do; Menezes, R

    2016-01-01

    The association between altered proteostasis and inflammatory responses has been increasingly recognized, therefore the identification and characterization of novel compounds with anti-inflammatory potential will certainly have a great impact in the therapeutics of protein-misfolding diseases such as degenerative disorders. Although cell-based screens are powerful approaches to identify potential therapeutic compounds, establishing robust inflammation models amenable to high-throughput screening remains a challenge. To bridge this gap, we have exploited the use of yeasts as a platform to identify lead compounds with anti-inflammatory properties. The yeast cell model described here relies on the high-degree homology between mammalian and yeast Ca(2+)/calcineurin pathways converging into the activation of NFAT and Crz1 orthologous proteins, respectively. It consists of a recombinant yeast strain encoding the lacZ gene under the control of Crz1-recongition elements to facilitate the identification of compounds interfering with Crz1 activation through the easy monitoring of β-galactosidase activity. Here, we describe in detail a protocol optimized for high-throughput screening of compounds with potential anti-inflammatory activity as well as a protocol to validate the positive hits using an alternative β-galactosidase substrate.

  14. Transcriptomic profiling and quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) drug screening of CDH1 deficient hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) cells identify treatment leads for familial gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ina; Mathews-Greiner, Lesley; Li, Dandan; Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Ray, Satyajit; Bian, Yansong; Shukla, Vivek; Zhang, Xiaohu; Guha, Raj; Thomas, Craig; Gryder, Berkley; Zacharia, Athina; Beane, Joal D; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Ferrer, Marc; Rudloff, Udo

    2017-05-01

    Patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), a cancer predisposition syndrome associated with germline mutations of the CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene, have few effective treatment options. Despite marked differences in natural history, histopathology, and genetic profile to patients afflicted by sporadic gastric cancer, patients with HDGC receive, in large, identical systemic regimens. The lack of a robust preclinical in vitro system suitable for effective drug screening has been one of the obstacles to date which has hampered therapeutic advances in this rare disease. In order to identify therapeutic leads selective for the HDGC subtype of gastric cancer, we compared gene expression profiles and drug phenotype derived from an oncology library of 1912 compounds between gastric cancer cells established from a patient with metastatic HDGC harboring a c.1380delA CDH1 germline variant and sporadic gastric cancer cells. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis shows select gene expression alterations in c.1380delA CDH1 SB.mhdgc-1 cells compared to a panel of sporadic gastric cancer cell lines with enrichment of ERK1-ERK2 (extracellular signal regulated kinase) and IP3 (inositol trisphosphate)/DAG (diacylglycerol) signaling as the top networks in c.1380delA SB.mhdgc-1 cells. Intracellular phosphatidylinositol intermediaries were increased upon direct measure in c.1380delA CDH1 SB.mhdgc-1 cells. Differential high-throughput drug screening of c.1380delA CDH1 SB.mhdgc-1 versus sporadic gastric cancer cells identified several compound classes with enriched activity in c.1380 CDH1 SB.mhdgc-1 cells including mTOR (Mammalian Target Of Rapamycin), MEK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase), c-Src kinase, FAK (Focal Adhesion Kinase), PKC (Protein Kinase C), or TOPO2 (Topoisomerase II) inhibitors. Upon additional drug response testing, dual PI3K (Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase)/mTOR and topoisomerase 2A inhibitors displayed up to >100-fold increased activity in hereditary c.1380

  15. A High-Throughput Screening Assay to Detect ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In support of the Endocrine Disruption Screening Program (EDSP21), the US EPA ToxCast program is developing assays to enable screening for chemicals that may disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is critical for TH synthesis and is a known target of thyroid-disrupting chemicals that adversely impact neurodevelopment. The AUR-TPO assay was recently developed to screen >1,900 ToxCast chemicals for potential TPO inhibition activity. Parallel assays were used to determine which AUR-TPO actives were more selective for TPO inhibition. Additionally, the TPO inhibition activities of 150 chemicals were compared between the AUR-TPO assay and an orthogonal peroxidase oxidation assay using guaiacol as substrate to confirm putative TPO inhibition profiles. Bioactivity results from the AUR-TPO assay were used to identify chemical substructures associated with in vitro TPO inhibition. Substructure profiles were generated for each chemical in the ToxCast test set using the publicly-available ToxPrint 2.0 chemotypes. Chemotypes enriched among the putative TPO inhibitors were identified using a cumulative hypergeometric probability (p assay:

  16. High-throughput system-wide engineering and screening for microbial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, Yannick; Linares, Alicia Gutiérrez; Roncoroni, Miguel; Liu, Chengxun; Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2017-08-01

    Genetic engineering and screening of large number of cells or populations is a crucial bottleneck in today's systems biology and applied (micro)biology. Instead of using standard methods in bottles, flasks or 96-well plates, scientists are increasingly relying on high-throughput strategies that miniaturize their experiments to the nanoliter and picoliter scale and the single-cell level. In this review, we summarize different high-throughput system-wide genome engineering and screening strategies for microbes. More specifically, we will emphasize the use of multiplex automated genome evolution (MAGE) and CRISPR/Cas systems for high-throughput genome engineering and the application of (lab-on-chip) nanoreactors for high-throughput single-cell or population screening. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay for High-Throughput Screening of ADAMTS1 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I motifs-1 (ADAMTS1 plays a crucial role in inflammatory joint diseases and its inhibitors are potential candidates for anti-arthritis drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, we reported the development and validation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of the ADAMTS1 inhibitors. A FRET substrate was designed for a quantitative assay of ADAMTS1 activity and enzyme kinetics studies. The assay was developed into a 50-µL, 384-well assay format for high throughput screening of ADAMTS1 inhibitors with an overall Z’ factor of 0.89. ADAMTS1 inhibitors were screened against a diverse library of 40,960 total compounds with the established HTS system. Four structurally related hits, naturally occurring compounds, kuwanon P, kuwanon X, albafuran C and mulberrofuran J, extracted from the Chinese herb Morus alba L., were identified for further investigation. The results suggest that this FRET assay is an excellent tool, not only for measurement of ADAMTS1 activity but also for discovery of novel ADAMTS1 inhibitors with HTS.

  18. Lessons from high-throughput protein crystallization screening: 10 years of practical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    JR, Luft; EH, Snell; GT, DeTitta

    2011-01-01

    Introduction X-ray crystallography provides the majority of our structural biological knowledge at a molecular level and in terms of pharmaceutical design is a valuable tool to accelerate discovery. It is the premier technique in the field, but its usefulness is significantly limited by the need to grow well-diffracting crystals. It is for this reason that high-throughput crystallization has become a key technology that has matured over the past 10 years through the field of structural genomics. Areas covered The authors describe their experiences in high-throughput crystallization screening in the context of structural genomics and the general biomedical community. They focus on the lessons learnt from the operation of a high-throughput crystallization screening laboratory, which to date has screened over 12,500 biological macromolecules. They also describe the approaches taken to maximize the success while minimizing the effort. Through this, the authors hope that the reader will gain an insight into the efficient design of a laboratory and protocols to accomplish high-throughput crystallization on a single-, multiuser-laboratory or industrial scale. Expert Opinion High-throughput crystallization screening is readily available but, despite the power of the crystallographic technique, getting crystals is still not a solved problem. High-throughput approaches can help when used skillfully; however, they still require human input in the detailed analysis and interpretation of results to be more successful. PMID:22646073

  19. High-throughput knockout screen in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregan, Juraj; Rabitsch, Peter K; Rumpf, Cornelia; Novatchkova, Maria; Schleiffer, Alexander; Nasmyth, Kim

    2006-01-01

    We have designed the most efficient strategy to knock out genes in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe on a large scale. Our technique is based on knockout constructs that contain regions homologous to the target gene cloned into vectors carrying dominant drug-resistance markers. Most of the steps are carried out in a 96-well format, allowing simultaneous deletion of 96 genes in one batch. Based on our knockout technique, we designed a strategy for cloning knockout constructs for all predicted fission yeast genes, which is available in a form of a searchable database http://mendel.imp.ac.at/Pombe_deletion/. We validated this technique in a screen where we identified novel genes required for chromosome segregation during meiosis. Here, we present our protocol with detailed instructions. Using this protocol, one person can knock out 96 S. pombe genes in 8 days.

  20. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  1. High-throughput screening with nanoimprinting 3D culture for efficient drug development by mimicking the tumor environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Waki, Atsuo; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masahiro; Itoh, Manabu; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Sogawa, Chizuru; Kiyono, Yasushi; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-05-01

    Anti-cancer drug development typically utilizes high-throughput screening with two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. However, 2D culture induces cellular characteristics different from tumors in vivo, resulting in inefficient drug development. Here, we report an innovative high-throughput screening system using nanoimprinting 3D culture to simulate in vivo conditions, thereby facilitating efficient drug development. We demonstrated that cell line-based nanoimprinting 3D screening can more efficiently select drugs that effectively inhibit cancer growth in vivo as compared to 2D culture. Metabolic responses after treatment were assessed using positron emission tomography (PET) probes, and revealed similar characteristics between the 3D spheroids and in vivo tumors. Further, we developed an advanced method to adopt cancer cells from patient tumor tissues for high-throughput drug screening with nanoimprinting 3D culture, which we termed Cancer tissue-Originated Uniformed Spheroid Assay (COUSA). This system identified drugs that were effective in xenografts of the original patient tumors. Nanoimprinting 3D spheroids showed low permeability and formation of hypoxic regions inside, similar to in vivo tumors. Collectively, the nanoimprinting 3D culture provides easy-handling high-throughput drug screening system, which allows for efficient drug development by mimicking the tumor environment. The COUSA system could be a useful platform for drug development with patient cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial Microcolonies in Gel Beads for High-Throughput Screening of Libraries in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, José M; Barbier, Içvara; Schaerli, Yolanda

    2017-11-17

    Synthetic biologists increasingly rely on directed evolution to optimize engineered biological systems. Applying an appropriate screening or selection method for identifying the potentially rare library members with the desired properties is a crucial step for success in these experiments. Special challenges include substantial cell-to-cell variability and the requirement to check multiple states (e.g., being ON or OFF depending on the input). Here, we present a high-throughput screening method that addresses these challenges. First, we encapsulate single bacteria into microfluidic agarose gel beads. After incubation, they harbor monoclonal bacterial microcolonies (e.g., expressing a synthetic construct) and can be sorted according their fluorescence by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). We determine enrichment rates and demonstrate that we can measure the average fluorescent signals of microcolonies containing phenotypically heterogeneous cells, obviating the problem of cell-to-cell variability. Finally, we apply this method to sort a pBAD promoter library at ON and OFF states.

  3. [High throughput screening of active and stereoselective carbonyl reductases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Chen, Xi; Feng, Jinhui; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a fast carbonyl reductases colorimetric screening method for discovering stereoselective carbonyl reductases was established by combining the reverse alcohol oxidation with the azoreductase-catalyzed reduction of azo dye. When azo dye (Orange I , 4-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo) benzenesulfonic acid) and azoreductase (AzoB) were added into the reaction system of alcohol oxidation catalyzed by carbonyl reductase, the produced NAD(P)H served as electron donor for the azoreductase to reduce the azo dye, resulting the color fade. Hence, the carbonyl reductases can be screened by the obvious color change. When chiral alcohol was used as the substrate, the activity and stereoselectivity of carbonyl reductases can be screened at the same time.

  4. High-throughput bubble screening method for combinatorial discovery of electrocatalysts for water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Guevarra, Dan W; Soedarmadji, Ed; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2014-02-10

    Combinatorial synthesis and screening for discovery of electrocatalysts has received increasing attention, particularly for energy-related technologies. High-throughput discovery strategies typically employ a fast, reliable initial screening technique that is able to identify active catalyst composition regions. Traditional electrochemical characterization via current-voltage measurements is inherently throughput-limited, as such measurements are most readily performed by serial screening. Parallel screening methods can yield much higher throughput and generally require the use of an indirect measurement of catalytic activity. In a water-splitting reaction, the change of local pH or the presence of oxygen and hydrogen in the solution can be utilized for parallel screening of active electrocatalysts. Previously reported techniques for measuring these signals typically function in a narrow pH range and are not suitable for both strong acidic and basic environments. A simple approach to screen the electrocatalytic activities by imaging the oxygen and hydrogen bubbles produced by the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is reported here. A custom built electrochemical cell was employed to record the bubble evolution during the screening, where the testing materials were subject to desired electrochemical potentials. The transient of the bubble intensity obtained from the screening was quantitatively analyzed to yield a bubble figure of merit (FOM) that represents the reaction rate. Active catalysts in a pseudoternary material library, (Ni-Fe-Co)Ox, which contains 231 unique compositions, were identified in less than one minute using the bubble screening method. An independent, serial screening method on the same material library exhibited excellent agreement with the parallel bubble screening. This general approach is highly parallel and is independent of solution pH.

  5. A high-throughput colorimetric assay for screening halohydrin dehalogenase saturation mutagenesis libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lixia; Li, Yang; Wang, Xiong

    2010-06-01

    Here we have reported a high throughput pH indicator-based assay to measure the activity of halohydrin dehalogenases (HheC). The assay relies upon the absorbance change at 560nm and the visual color change of phenol red in a weakly buffered system, due to the release of protons from the enzyme-catalyzed ring-closure reactions. The assay can be performed in a microplate format using whole cells, making the assay simple and robust. Thus, it is suitable for library screening. The assay has been further validated using two previously studied HheC variants, D80N and W249F, which exhibit 200-fold lower and 2-fold higher k(cat) values, respectively, toward 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol than the wild-type HheC. In addition, a saturation mutagenesis library of HheC was screened using the developed assay for its ability to efficiently catalyze the conversion of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol. After screening of 500 colonies, one mutant W139C was identified and was further purified and characterized. Kinetic analysis indicates that the resulting mutant shows 2- and 5-fold improvement in k(cat) value toward 1,3-DCP and (R,S)-p-nitro-2-bromo-1-phenylethanol, respectively, although it exhibits higher K(m) values than the wild-type enzyme. The method described herein represents a useful tool given the need for the high throughput screening of halohydrin dehalogenase mutants. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High-throughput screen for novel antimicrobials using a whole animal infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Terence I; Conery, Annie L; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Wu, Gang; Mazitschek, Ralph; Casadei, Gabriele; Lewis, Kim; Carpenter, Anne E; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2009-07-17

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a unique whole animal model system for identifying small molecules with in vivo anti-infective properties. C. elegans can be infected with a broad range of human pathogens, including Enterococcus faecalis, an important human nosocomial pathogen. Here, we describe an automated, high-throughput screen of 37,200 compounds and natural product extracts for those that enhance survival of C. elegans infected with E. faecalis. Using a robot to dispense live, infected animals into 384-well plates and automated microscopy and image analysis, we identified 28 compounds and extracts not previously reported to have antimicrobial properties, including six structural classes that cure infected C. elegans animals but do not affect the growth of the pathogen in vitro, thus acting by a mechanism of action distinct from antibiotics currently in clinical use.

  7. Alternative to the soft-agar assay that permits high-throughput drug and genetic screens for cellular transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Asaf; Janzer, Andreas; Izar, Benjamin; Ji, Zhe; Doench, John G.; Garraway, Levi A.; Struhl, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation in soft agar is the gold-standard assay for cellular transformation in vitro, but it is unsuited for high-throughput screening. Here, we describe an assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the soft-agar assay. Using GILA, we describe high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. Such molecules are unlikely to be found through conventional drug screening, and they include kinase inhibitors and drugs for noncancer diseases. In addition to known oncogenes, the genetic screen identifies genes that contribute to cellular transformation. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of Food and Drug Administration-approved noncancer drugs to selectively kill ovarian cancer cells derived from patients with chemotherapy-resistant disease, suggesting this approach may provide useful information for personalized cancer treatment. PMID:25902495

  8. Assay development and high-throughput screening of caspases in microfluidic format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ge; Irvine, Jennifer; Luft, Chris; Pressley, David; Hodge, C Nicholas; Janzen, Bill

    2003-06-01

    Caspase proteases are familiar targets in drug discovery. A common format for screening to identify caspase inhibitors employs fluorogenic or colorimetric tetra-peptide substrates in 96, 384, or 1536 -well microtiter plates. The primary motivation for increasing the number of wells per plate is to reduce the reagent cost per test and increase the throughput of HTS operations. There are significant challenges, however, to moving into or beyond the 1536-well format, such as submicroliter liquid handling, liquid evaporation, increased surface area-to-volume ratios, and the potential for artifacts and interference from small air-borne particles such as lint. Therefore, HTS scientists remain keenly interested in technologies that offer alternatives to the ever-shrinking microtiter plate well. Microfluidic assay technology represents an attractive option that, in theory, consumes only subnanoliter volumes of reagents per test. We have successfully employed a microfluidic assay technology in fluorogenic screening assays for several caspase isoforms utilizing the Caliper Technologies Labchip platform. Caspase-3 is used as a representative case to describe microfluidic assay development and initial high-throughput screening results. In addition, microfluidic screening and plate-based screening are compared in terms of reagent consumption, data quality, and ease of operation.

  9. Rapid identification of antifungal compounds against Exserohilum rostratum using high throughput drug repurposing screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Park, Yoon-Dong; Sugui, Janyce A; Fothergill, Annette; Southall, Noel; Shinn, Paul; McKew, John C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Zheng, Wei; Williamson, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    A recent large outbreak of fungal infections by Exserohilum rostratum from contaminated compounding solutions has highlighted the need to rapidly screen available pharmaceuticals that could be useful in therapy. The present study utilized two newly-developed high throughput assays to screen approved drugs and pharmaceutically active compounds for identification of potential antifungal agents. Several known drugs were found that have potent effects against E. rostratum including the triazole antifungal posaconazole. Posaconazole is likely to be effective against infections involving septic joints and may provide an alternative for refractory central nervous system infections. The anti-E. rostratum activities of several other drugs including bithionol (an anti-parasitic drug), tacrolimus (an immunosuppressive agent) and floxuridine (an antimetabolite) were also identified from the drug repurposing screens. In addition, activities of other potential antifungal agents against E. rostratum were excluded, which may avoid unnecessary therapeutic trials and reveals the limited therapeutic alternatives for this outbreak. In summary, this study has demonstrated that drug repurposing screens can be quickly conducted within a useful time-frame. This would allow clinical implementation of identified alternative therapeutics and should be considered as part of the initial public health response to new outbreaks or rapidly-emerging microbial pathogens.

  10. Rapid identification of antifungal compounds against Exserohilum rostratum using high throughput drug repurposing screens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available A recent large outbreak of fungal infections by Exserohilum rostratum from contaminated compounding solutions has highlighted the need to rapidly screen available pharmaceuticals that could be useful in therapy. The present study utilized two newly-developed high throughput assays to screen approved drugs and pharmaceutically active compounds for identification of potential antifungal agents. Several known drugs were found that have potent effects against E. rostratum including the triazole antifungal posaconazole. Posaconazole is likely to be effective against infections involving septic joints and may provide an alternative for refractory central nervous system infections. The anti-E. rostratum activities of several other drugs including bithionol (an anti-parasitic drug, tacrolimus (an immunosuppressive agent and floxuridine (an antimetabolite were also identified from the drug repurposing screens. In addition, activities of other potential antifungal agents against E. rostratum were excluded, which may avoid unnecessary therapeutic trials and reveals the limited therapeutic alternatives for this outbreak. In summary, this study has demonstrated that drug repurposing screens can be quickly conducted within a useful time-frame. This would allow clinical implementation of identified alternative therapeutics and should be considered as part of the initial public health response to new outbreaks or rapidly-emerging microbial pathogens.

  11. High-throughput screening for novel inhibitors of Neisseria gonorrhoeae penicillin-binding protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Fedarovich

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae strains exhibiting decreased susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and the recent isolation of two distinct strains with high-level resistance to cefixime or ceftriaxone heralds the possible demise of β-lactam antibiotics as effective treatments for gonorrhea. To identify new compounds that inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, which are proven targets for β-lactam antibiotics, we developed a high-throughput assay that uses fluorescence polarization (FP to distinguish the fluorescent penicillin, Bocillin-FL, in free or PBP-bound form. This assay was used to screen a 50,000 compound library for potential inhibitors of N. gonorrhoeae PBP 2, and 32 compounds were identified that exhibited >50% inhibition of Bocillin-FL binding to PBP 2. These included a cephalosporin that provided validation of the assay. After elimination of compounds that failed to exhibit concentration-dependent inhibition, the antimicrobial activity of the remaining 24 was tested. Of these, 7 showed antimicrobial activity against susceptible and penicillin- or cephalosporin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. In molecular docking simulations using the crystal structure of PBP 2, two of these inhibitors docked into the active site of the enzyme and each mediate interactions with the active site serine nucleophile. This study demonstrates the validity of a FP-based assay to find novel inhibitors of PBPs and paves the way for more comprehensive high-throughput screening against highly resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. It also provides a set of lead compounds for optimization of anti-gonococcal agents.

  12. Liquid Phase Multiplex High-Throughput Screening of Metagenomic Libraries Using p-Nitrophenyl-Linked Substrates for Accessory Lignocellulosic Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Mariette; Huddy, Robert J; Cowan, Don A; Trindade, Marla

    2017-01-01

    To access the genetic potential contained in large metagenomic libraries, suitable high-throughput functional screening methods are required. Here we describe a high-throughput screening approach which enables the rapid identification of metagenomic library clones expressing functional accessory lignocellulosic enzymes. The high-throughput nature of this method hinges on the multiplexing of both the E. coli metagenomic library clones and the colorimetric p-nitrophenyl linked substrates which allows for the simultaneous screening for β-glucosidases, β-xylosidases, and α-L-arabinofuranosidases. This method is readily automated and compatible with high-throughput robotic screening systems.

  13. Functional characterisation of human glycine receptors in a fluorescence-based high throughput screening assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.

    2005-01-01

    receptors in this assay were found to be in good agreement with those from electrophysiology studies of the receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes or mammalian cell lines. Hence, this high throughput screening assay will be of great use in future pharmacological studies of glycine receptors, particular...

  14. tcpl: The ToxCast Pipeline for High-Throughput Screening Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motivation: The large and diverse high-throughput chemical screening efforts carried out by the US EPAToxCast program requires an efficient, transparent, and reproducible data pipeline.Summary: The tcpl R package and its associated MySQL database provide a generalized platform fo...

  15. 20170913 - Retrofit Strategies for Incorporating Xenobiotic Metabolism into High Throughput Screening Assays (EMGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA’s ToxCast program is designed to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints using a variety of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. However, existing HTS assays have limited or no xenobiotic metabolism which could lead to a mischaracteri...

  16. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  17. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluores...

  18. The Complete Automation of Cell Culture: Improvements for High-Throughput and High-Content Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, S.; Sondervan, D.; Rizzu, P.; Bochdanovits, Z.; Caminada, D.; Heutink, P.

    2011-01-01

    Genomic approaches provide enormous amounts of raw data with regard to genetic variation, the diversity of RNA species, and protein complement. high-throughput (HT) and high-content (HC) cellular screens are ideally suited to contextualize the information gathered from other "omic" approaches into

  19. High-throughput siRNA screening applied to the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Nielsen, Sofie V.; Pietras, Elin J.

    2016-01-01

    that are not genetically tractable as, for instance, a yeast model system. Here, we describe a method relying on high-throughput cellular imaging of cells transfected with a targeted siRNA library to screen for components involved in degradation of a protein of interest. This method is a rapid and cost-effective tool...

  20. New approach for high-throughput screening of drug activity on Plasmodium liver stages.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gego, A.; Silvie, O.; Franetich, J.F.; Farhati, K.; Hannoun, L.; Luty, A.J.F.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Boucheix, C.; Rubinstein, E.; Mazier, D.

    2006-01-01

    Plasmodium liver stages represent potential targets for antimalarial prophylactic drugs. Nevertheless, there is a lack of molecules active on these stages. We have now developed a new approach for the high-throughput screening of drug activity on Plasmodium liver stages in vitro, based on an

  1. The complete automation of cell culture: improvements for high-throughput and high-content screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shushant; Sondervan, David; Rizzu, Patrizia; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Caminada, Daniel; Heutink, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Genomic approaches provide enormous amounts of raw data with regard to genetic variation, the diversity of RNA species, and protein complement. High-throughput (HT) and high-content (HC) cellular screens are ideally suited to contextualize the information gathered from other "omic" approaches into networks and can be used for the identification of therapeutic targets. Current methods used for HT-HC screens are laborious, time-consuming, and prone to human error. The authors thus developed an automated high-throughput system with an integrated fluorescent imager for HC screens called the AI.CELLHOST. The implementation of user-defined culturing and assay plate setup parameters allows parallel operation of multiple screens in diverse mammalian cell types. The authors demonstrate that such a system is able to successfully maintain different cell lines in culture for extended periods of time as well as significantly increasing throughput, accuracy, and reproducibility of HT and HC screens.

  2. A platform for high-throughput screening of DNA-encoded catalyst libraries in organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, K Delaney; Chambers, John T; Hili, Ryan

    2017-10-01

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening platform for the discovery of small-molecules catalysts for bond-forming reactions. The method employs an in vitro selection for bond-formation using amphiphilic DNA-encoded small molecules charged with reaction substrate, which enables selections to be conducted in a variety of organic or aqueous solvents. Using the amine-catalysed aldol reaction as a catalytic model and high-throughput DNA sequencing as a selection read-out, we demonstrate the 1200-fold enrichment of a known aldol catalyst from a library of 16.7-million uncompetitive library members.

  3. A sandwiched microarray platform for benchtop cell-based high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinhui; Wheeldon, Ian; Guo, Yuqi; Lu, Tingli; Du, Yanan; Wang, Ben; He, Jiankang; Hu, Yiqiao; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of combinatorial chemistries and the increased discovery of natural compounds have led to the production of expansive libraries of drug candidates and vast numbers of compounds with potentially interesting biological activities. Despite broad interest in high throughput screening (HTS) across varied fields of biological research, there has not been an increase in accessible HTS technologies. Here, we present a simple microarray sandwich system suitable for screening chemical libraries in cell-based assays at the benchtop. The microarray platform delivers chemical compounds to isolated cell cultures by 'sandwiching' chemical-laden arrayed posts with cell-seeded microwells. In this way, an array of sealed cell-based assays was generated without cross-contamination between neighbouring assays. After chemical exposure, cell viability was analyzed by fluorescence detection of cell viability assays on a per microwell basis using a standard microarray scanner. We demonstrate the efficacy of the system by generating four hits from toxicology screens towards MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Three of the hits were identified in a combinatorial screen of a library of natural compounds in combination with verapamil, a P-glycoprotein inhibitor. A fourth hit, 9-methoxy-camptothecin, was identified by screening the natural compound library in the absence of verapamil. The method developed here miniaturizes existing HTS systems and enables the screening of a wide array of individual or combinatorial libraries in a reproducible and scalable manner. We anticipate broad application of such a system as it is amenable to combinatorial drug screening in a simple, robust and portable platform. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CrossCheck: an open-source web tool for high-throughput screen data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafov, Jamil; Najafov, Ayaz

    2017-07-19

    Modern high-throughput screening methods allow researchers to generate large datasets that potentially contain important biological information. However, oftentimes, picking relevant hits from such screens and generating testable hypotheses requires training in bioinformatics and the skills to efficiently perform database mining. There are currently no tools available to general public that allow users to cross-reference their screen datasets with published screen datasets. To this end, we developed CrossCheck, an online platform for high-throughput screen data analysis. CrossCheck is a centralized database that allows effortless comparison of the user-entered list of gene symbols with 16,231 published datasets. These datasets include published data from genome-wide RNAi and CRISPR screens, interactome proteomics and phosphoproteomics screens, cancer mutation databases, low-throughput studies of major cell signaling mediators, such as kinases, E3 ubiquitin ligases and phosphatases, and gene ontological information. Moreover, CrossCheck includes a novel database of predicted protein kinase substrates, which was developed using proteome-wide consensus motif searches. CrossCheck dramatically simplifies high-throughput screen data analysis and enables researchers to dig deep into the published literature and streamline data-driven hypothesis generation. CrossCheck is freely accessible as a web-based application at http://proteinguru.com/crosscheck.

  5. High-Throughput Screen of Natural Product Libraries for Hsp90 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Davenport

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 has become the target of intensive investigation, as inhibition of its function has the ability to simultaneously incapacitate proteins that function in pathways that represent the six hallmarks of cancer. While a number of Hsp90 inhibitors have made it into clinical trials, a number of short-comings have been noted, such that the search continues for novel Hsp90 inhibitors with superior pharmacological properties. To identify new potential Hsp90 inhibitors, we have utilized a high-throughput assay based on measuring Hsp90-dependent refolding of thermally denatured luciferase to screen natural compound libraries. Over 4,000 compounds were screen with over 100 hits. Data mining of the literature indicated that 51 compounds had physiological effects that Hsp90 inhibitors also exhibit, and/or the ability to downregulate the expression levels of Hsp90-dependent proteins. Of these 51 compounds, seven were previously characterized as Hsp90 inhibitors. Four compounds, anthothecol, garcinol, piplartine, and rottlerin, were further characterized, and the ability of these compounds to inhibit the refolding of luciferase, and reduce the rate of growth of MCF7 breast cancer cells, correlated with their ability to suppress the Hsp90-dependent maturation of the heme-regulated eIF2α kinase, and deplete cultured cells of Hsp90-dependent client proteins. Thus, this screen has identified an additional 44 compounds with known beneficial pharmacological properties, but with unknown mechanisms of action as possible new inhibitors of the Hsp90 chaperone machine.

  6. A new versatile microarray-based method for high throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G T

    2015-04-03

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. A New Versatile Microarray-based Method for High Throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-active Enzymes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L.; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B.; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. PMID:25657012

  8. High Throughput Screen for Novel Antimicrobials using a Whole Animal Infection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Terence I.; Conery, Annie L.; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Wu, Gang; Mazitschek, Ralph; Casadei, Gabriele; Lewis, Kim; Carpenter, Anne E.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2009-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a unique whole animal model system for identifying small molecules with in vivo anti-infective properties. C. elegans can be infected with a broad range of human pathogens, including Enterococcus faecalis, an important human nosocomial pathogen with a mortality rate of up to 37% that is increasingly acquiring resistance to antibiotics. Here, we describe an automated, high throughput screen of 37,200 compounds and natural product extracts for those that enhance survival of C. elegans infected with E. faecalis. The screen uses a robot to accurately dispense live, infected animals into 384-well plates, and automated microscopy and image analysis to generate quantitative, high content data. We identified 28 compounds and extracts that were not previously reported to have antimicrobial properties, including 6 structural classes that cure infected C. elegans animals but do not affect the growth of the pathogen in vitro, thus acting by a mechanism of action distinct from antibiotics currently in clinical use. Our versatile and robust screening system can be easily adapted for other whole animal assays to probe a broad range of biological processes. PMID:19572548

  9. A High-Throughput Small Molecule Screen for C. elegans Linker Cell Death Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendeman, Andrew R; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process in metazoan development. Apoptosis, one cell death form, has been studied extensively. However, mutations inactivating key mammalian apoptosis regulators do not block most developmental cell culling, suggesting that other cell death pathways are likely important. Recent work in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans identified a non-apoptotic cell death form mediating the demise of the male-specific linker cell. This cell death process (LCD, linker cell-type death) is morphologically conserved, and its molecular effectors also mediate axon degeneration in mammals and Drosophila. To develop reagents to manipulate LCD, we established a simple high-throughput screening protocol for interrogating the effects of small molecules on C. elegans linker cell death in vivo. From 23,797 compounds assayed, 11 reproducibly block linker cell death onset. Of these, five induce animal lethality, and six promote a reversible developmental delay. These results provide proof-of principle validation of our screening protocol, demonstrate that developmental progression is required for linker cell death, and suggest that larger scale screens may identify LCD-specific small-molecule regulators that target the LCD execution machinery.

  10. Click-Chemistry Based High Throughput Screening Platform for Modulators of Ras Palmitoylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Lakshmi; Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Levental, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Palmitoylation is a widespread, reversible lipid modification that has been implicated in regulating a variety of cellular processes. Approximately one thousand proteins are annotated as being palmitoylated, and for some of these, including several oncogenes of the Ras and Src families, palmitoylation is indispensable for protein function. Despite this wealth of disease-relevant targets, there are currently few effective pharmacological tools to interfere with protein palmitoylation. One reason for this lack of development is the dearth of assays to efficiently screen for small molecular inhibitors of palmitoylation. To address this shortcoming, we have developed a robust, high-throughput compatible, click chemistry-based approach to identify small molecules that interfere with the palmitoylation of Ras, a high value therapeutic target that is mutated in up to a third of human cancers. This assay design shows excellent performance in 384-well format and is sensitive to known, non-specific palmitoylation inhibitors. Further, we demonstrate an ideal counter-screening strategy, which relies on a target peptide from an unrelated protein, the Src-family kinase Fyn. The screening approach described here provides an integrated platform to identify specific modulators of palmitoylated proteins, demonstrated here for Ras and Fyn, but potentially applicable to pharmaceutical targets involved in a variety of human diseases. PMID:28112226

  11. Inhibitors of the salicylate synthase (MbtI) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis discovered by high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Neres, João; Williams, Jessica; Wilson, Daniel J; Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Remmel, Rory P; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2010-12-03

    A simple steady-state kinetic high-throughput assay was developed for the salicylate synthase MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis. The mycobactins are small-molecule iron chelators produced by M. tuberculosis, and their biosynthesis has been identified as a promising target for the development of new antitubercular agents. The assay was miniaturized to a 384-well plate format and high-throughput screening was performed at the National Screening Laboratory for the Regional Centers of Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (NSRB). Three classes of compounds were identified comprising the benzisothiazolones (class I), diarylsulfones (class II), and benzimidazole-2-thiones (class III). Each of these compound series was further pursued to investigate their biochemical mechanism and structure-activity relationships. Benzimidazole-2-thione 4 emerged as the most promising inhibitor owing to its potent reversible inhibition.

  12. DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    OpenAIRE

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) techniq...

  13. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fenglei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  14. Using Weighted Entropy to Rank Chemicals in Quantitative High Throughput Screening Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) experiments can simultaneously produce concentration-response profiles for thousands of chemicals. In a typical qHTS study, a large chemical library is subjected to a primary screen in order to identify candidate hits for secondary screening, validation studies or prediction modeling. Different algorithms, usually based on the Hill equation logistic model, have been used to classify compounds as active or inactive (or inconclusive). However, observed concentration-response activity relationships may not adequately fit a sigmoidal curve. Furthermore, it is unclear how to prioritize chemicals for follow-up studies given the large uncertainties that often accompany parameter estimates from nonlinear models. Weighted Shannon entropy can address these concerns by ranking compounds according to profile-specific statistics derived from estimates of the probability mass distribution of response at the tested concentration levels. This strategy can be used to rank all tested chemicals in the absence of a pre-specified model structure or the approach can complement existing activity call algorithms by ranking the returned candidate hits. The weighted entropy approach was evaluated here using data simulated from the Hill equation model. The procedure was then applied to a chemical genomics profiling data set interrogating compounds for androgen receptor agonist activity. PMID:24056003

  15. Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzes, Eric; Medkova, Martina; Savenelli, Neal; Marran, Dave; Twardowski, Mariusz; Hutchison, J Brian; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Link, Darren R; Perrimon, Norbert; Samuels, Michael L

    2009-08-25

    We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high-throughput screening of single mammalian cells. This integrated platform allows for the encapsulation of single cells and reagents in independent aqueous microdroplets (1 pL to 10 nL volumes) dispersed in an immiscible carrier oil and enables the digital manipulation of these reactors at a very high-throughput. Here, we validate a full droplet screening workflow by conducting a droplet-based cytotoxicity screen. To perform this screen, we first developed a droplet viability assay that permits the quantitative scoring of cell viability and growth within intact droplets. Next, we demonstrated the high viability of encapsulated human monocytic U937 cells over a period of 4 days. Finally, we developed an optically-coded droplet library enabling the identification of the droplets composition during the assay read-out. Using the integrated droplet technology, we screened a drug library for its cytotoxic effect against U937 cells. Taken together our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range of potential applications including high-throughput single-cell analyses, combinatorial screening, and facilitating small sample analyses.

  16. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human ATAD5 is an excellent biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATADS protein levels increase post-transcriptionally following exposure to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Here we report a novel quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-Iuciferase assay that can moni...

  17. tcpl: the ToxCast pipeline for high-throughput screening data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filer, Dayne L; Kothiya, Parth; Setzer, R Woodrow; Judson, Richard S; Martin, Matthew T

    2017-02-15

    Large high-throughput screening (HTS) efforts are widely used in drug development and chemical toxicity screening. Wide use and integration of these data can benefit from an efficient, transparent and reproducible data pipeline. Summary: The tcpl R package and its associated MySQL database provide a generalized platform for efficiently storing, normalizing and dose-response modeling of large high-throughput and high-content chemical screening data. The novel dose-response modeling algorithm has been tested against millions of diverse dose-response series, and robustly fits data with outliers and cytotoxicity-related signal loss. tcpl is freely available on the Comprehensive R Archive Network under the GPL-2 license. martin.matt@epa.gov.

  18. High-Throughput Screening of Myxoid Liposarcoma Cell Lines: Survivin Is Essential for Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke A. de Graaff

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Myxoid liposarcoma (MLS is a soft tissue sarcoma characterized by a recurrent t(12;16 translocation. Although tumors are initially radio- and chemosensitive, the management of inoperable or metastatic MLS can be challenging. Therefore, our aim was to identify novel targets for systemic therapy. We performed an in vitro high-throughput drug screen using three MLS cell lines (402091, 1765092, DL-221, which were treated with 273 different drugs at four different concentrations. Cell lines and tissue microarrays were used for validation. As expected, all cell lines revealed a strong growth inhibition to conventional chemotherapeutic agents, such as anthracyclines and taxanes. A good response was observed to compounds interfering with Src and the mTOR pathway, which are known to be affected in these tumors. Moreover, BIRC5 was important for MLS survival because a strong inhibitory effect was seen at low concentration using the survivin inhibitor YM155, and siRNA for BIRC5 decreased cell viability. Immunohistochemistry revealed abundant expression of survivin restricted to the nucleus in all 32 tested primary tumor specimens. Inhibition of survivin in 402-91 and 1765-92 by YM155 increased the percentage S-phase but did not induce apoptosis, which warrants further investigation before application in the treatment of metastatic MLS. Thus, using a 273-compound drug screen, we confirmed previously identified targets (mTOR, Src in MLS and demonstrate survivin as essential for MLS survival.

  19. High-throughput screening for growth inhibitors using a yeast model of familial paraganglioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Bancos

    Full Text Available Classical tumor suppressor genes block neoplasia by regulating cell growth and death. A remarkable puzzle is therefore presented by familial paraganglioma (PGL, a neuroendocrine cancer where the tumor suppressor genes encode subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, an enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle of central metabolism. Loss of SDH initiates PGL through mechanisms that remain unclear. Could this metabolic defect provide a novel opportunity for chemotherapy of PGL? We report the results of high throughput screening to identify compounds differentially toxic to SDH mutant cells using a powerful S. cerevisiae (yeast model of PGL. Screening more than 200,000 compounds identifies 12 compounds that are differentially toxic to SDH-mutant yeast. Interestingly, two of the agents, dequalinium and tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram, are anti-malarials with the latter reported to be a glycolysis inhibitor. We show that four of the additional hits are potent inhibitors of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Because alcohol dehydrogenase regenerates NAD(+ in glycolytic cells that lack TCA cycle function, this result raises the possibility that lactate dehydrogenase, which plays the equivalent role in human cells, might be a target of interest for PGL therapy. We confirm that human cells deficient in SDH are differentially sensitive to a lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor.

  20. A strategy for primary high throughput cytotoxicity screening in pharmaceutical toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugelski, P J; Atif, U; Molton, S; Toeg, I; Lord, P G; Morgan, D G

    2000-10-01

    Recent advances in combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screens for pharmacologic activity have created an increasing demand for in vitro high throughput screens for toxicological evaluation in the early phases of drug discovery. To develop a strategy for such a screen, we have conducted a data mining study of the National Cancer Institute's Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) cytotoxicity database. Using hierarchical cluster analysis, we confirmed that the different tissues of origin and individual cell lines showed differential sensitivity to compounds in the DTP Standard Agents database. Surprisingly, however, approaching the data globally, linear regression analysis showed that the differences were relatively minor. Comparison with the literature on acute toxicity in mice showed that the predictive power of growth inhibition was marginally superior to that of cell death. This datamining study suggests that in designing a strategy for high throughput cytotoxicity screening: a single cell line, the choice of which may not be critical, can be used as a primary screen; a single end point may be an adequate measure and a cut off value for 50% growth inhibition between 10(-6) and 10(-8) M may be a reasonable starting point for accepting a cytotoxic compound for scale up and further study.

  1. Identification of new drug candidates against Borrelia burgdorferi using high-throughput screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pothineni VR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Venkata Raveendra Pothineni,1 Dhananjay Wagh,1 Mustafeez Mujtaba Babar,1 Mohammed Inayathullah,1 David Solow-Cordero,2 Kwang-Min Kim,1 Aneesh V Samineni,1 Mansi B Parekh,1 Lobat Tayebi,3 Jayakumar Rajadas1 1Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford Cardiovascular Pharmacology Division, Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, 2Chemical & Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 3Department of Developmental Sciences, Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI, USA Abstract: Lyme disease is the most common zoonotic bacterial disease in North America. It is estimated that >300,000 cases per annum are reported in USA alone. A total of 10%–20% of patients who have been treated with antibiotic therapy report the recrudescence of symptoms, such as muscle and joint pain, psychosocial and cognitive difficulties, and generalized fatigue. This condition is referred to as posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. While there is no evidence for the presence of viable infectious organisms in individuals with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome, some researchers found surviving Borrelia burgdorferi population in rodents and primates even after antibiotic treatment. Although such observations need more ratification, there is unmet need for developing the therapeutic agents that focus on removing the persisting bacterial form of B. burgdorferi in rodent and nonhuman primates. For this purpose, high-throughput screening was done using BacTiter-Glo assay for four compound libraries to identify candidates that stop the growth of B. burgdorferi in vitro. The four chemical libraries containing 4,366 compounds (80% Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approved that were screened are Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC1280, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection, the Microsource Spectrum, and the Biomol FDA. We subsequently identified 150

  2. Post-high-throughput screening analysis: an empirical compound prioritization scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea, Tudor I; Bologa, Cristian G; Edwards, Bruce S; Prossnitz, Eric R; Sklar, Larry A

    2005-08-01

    An empirical scheme to evaluate and prioritize screening hits from high-throughput screening (HTS) is proposed. Negative scores are given when chemotypes found in the HTS hits are present in annotated databases such as MDDR and WOMBAT or for testing positive in toxicity-related experiments reported in TOXNET. Positive scores were given for higher measured biological activities, for testing negative in toxicity-related literature, and for good overlap when profiled against drug-related properties. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating aqueous solubility to prioritize in vivo experiments. This empirical scheme is given as an illustration to assist the decision-making process in selecting chemotypes and individual compounds for further experimentation, when confronted with multiple hits from high-throughput experiments. The decision-making process is discussed for a set of G-protein coupled receptor antagonists and validated on a literature example for dihydrofolate reductase inhibition.

  3. Discovery of Bile Salt Hydrolase Inhibitors Using an Efficient High-Throughput Screening System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katie; Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS) system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration) and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate) were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth. PMID:24454844

  4. Discovery of bile salt hydrolase inhibitors using an efficient high-throughput screening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katie; Zeng, Ximin; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of restricting the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) in animal production necessitates the need to develop valid alternatives to maintain productivity and sustainability of food animals. Previous studies suggest inhibition of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization, is a promising approach to promote animal growth performance. To achieve the long term goal of developing novel alternatives to AGPs, in this study, a rapid and convenient high-throughput screening (HTS) system was developed and successfully used for identification of BSH inhibitors. With the aid of a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we optimized various screening conditions (e.g. BSH concentration, reaction buffer pH, incubation temperature and length, substrate type and concentration) and establish a precipitation-based screening approach to identify BSH inhibitors using 96-well or 384-well microplates. A pilot HTS was performed using a small compound library comprised of 2,240 biologically active and structurally diverse compounds. Among the 107 hits, several promising and potent BSH inhibitors (e.g. riboflavin and phenethyl caffeate) were selected and validated by standard BSH activity assay. Interestingly, the HTS also identified a panel of antibiotics as BSH inhibitor; in particular, various tetracycline antibiotics and roxarsone, the widely used AGP, have been demonstrated to display potent inhibitory effect on BSH. Together, this study developed an efficient HTS system and identified several BSH inhibitors with potential as alternatives to AGP. In addition, the findings from this study also suggest a new mode of action of AGP for promoting animal growth.

  5. Acanthamoeba castellanii: a new high-throughput method for drug screening in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega-Rivas, Antonio; Padrón, José M; Valladares, Basilio; Elsheikha, Hany M

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant public health impact, there is no specific antiprotozoal therapy for prevention and treatment of Acanthamoeba castellanii infection. There is a need for new and efficient anti-Acanthamoeba drugs that are less toxic and can reduce treatment duration and frequency of administration. In this context a new, rapid and sensitive assay is required for high-throughput activity testing and screening of new therapeutic compounds. A colorimetric assay based on sulforhodamine B (SRB) ...

  6. Peranan Biologi Molekuler Dan Hts (High Throughput Screening) Dalam Pengembangan Obat Sintetik Baru

    OpenAIRE

    Nurrochmad, Arief

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the discovery of new drugs uses the new concept by modern techniques instead ofthe convenstional techniques. In the development of scientific knowledge, the role of molecularbiology and the modern techniques in the investigations and discovery new drug becomes theimportant things. Many methods and modern techniques use in the discovery of new drugs, i.e,genetic enginering, DNA recombinant, radioligand binding assay technique, HTS techniques (HighThroughput Screening), and mass ligan...

  7. Rapid 2,2'-bicinchoninic-based xylanase assay compatible with high throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Kenealy; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    High-throughput screening requires simple assays that give reliable quantitative results. A microplate assay was developed for reducing sugar analysis that uses a 2,2'-bicinchoninic-based protein reagent. Endo-1,4-â-D-xylanase activity against oat spelt xylan was detected at activities of 0.002 to 0.011 IU ml−1. The assay is linear for sugar...

  8. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Kim, Rosalind [Moraga, CA; Jancarik, Jamila [Walnut Creek, CA

    2012-01-31

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  9. Prioritizing Environmental Chemicals for Obesity and Diabetes Outcomes Research: A Screening Approach Using ToxCast™ High-Throughput Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Scott; Filer, Dayne; Reif, David; Walker, Vickie; Holloway, Alison C; Schlezinger, Jennifer; Srinivasan, Supriya; Svoboda, Daniel; Judson, Richard; Bucher, John R; Thayer, Kristina A

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes and obesity are major threats to public health in the United States and abroad. Understanding the role that chemicals in our environment play in the development of these conditions is an emerging issue in environmental health, although identifying and prioritizing chemicals for testing beyond those already implicated in the literature is challenging. This review is intended to help researchers generate hypotheses about chemicals that may contribute to diabetes and to obesity-related health outcomes by summarizing relevant findings from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast™ high-throughput screening (HTS) program. Our aim was to develop new hypotheses around environmental chemicals of potential interest for diabetes- or obesity-related outcomes using high-throughput screening data. We identified ToxCast™ assay targets relevant to several biological processes related to diabetes and obesity (insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissue, pancreatic islet and β cell function, adipocyte differentiation, and feeding behavior) and presented chemical screening data against those assay targets to identify chemicals of potential interest. The results of this screening-level analysis suggest that the spectrum of environmental chemicals to consider in research related to diabetes and obesity is much broader than indicated by research papers and reviews published in the peer-reviewed literature. Testing hypotheses based on ToxCast™ data will also help assess the predictive utility of this HTS platform. More research is required to put these screening-level analyses into context, but the information presented in this review should facilitate the development of new hypotheses. Auerbach S, Filer D, Reif D, Walker V, Holloway AC, Schlezinger J, Srinivasan S, Svoboda D, Judson R, Bucher JR, Thayer KA. 2016. Prioritizing environmental chemicals for obesity and diabetes outcomes research: a screening approach using ToxCast™ high-throughput data. Environ

  10. Bis-benzimidazole hits against Naegleria fowleri discovered with new high-throughput screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Christopher A; Colon, Beatrice L; Alp, Mehmet; Göker, Hakan; Boykin, David W; Kyle, Dennis E

    2015-04-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba (FLA) that causes an acute fatal disease known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The major problem for infections with any pathogenic FLA is a lack of effective therapeutics, since PAM has a case mortality rate approaching 99%. Clearly, new drugs that are potent and have rapid onset of action are needed to enhance the treatment regimens for PAM. Diamidines have demonstrated potency against multiple pathogens, including FLA, and are known to cross the blood-brain barrier to cure other protozoan diseases of the central nervous system. Therefore, amidino derivatives serve as an important chemotype for discovery of new drugs. In this study, we validated two new in vitro assays suitable for medium- or high-throughput drug discovery and used these for N. fowleri. We next screened over 150 amidino derivatives of multiple structural classes and identified two hit series with nM potency that are suitable for further lead optimization as new drugs for this neglected disease. These include both mono- and diamidino derivatives, with the most potent compound (DB173) having a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 177 nM. Similarly, we identified 10 additional analogues with IC50s of 500 times more potent than pentamidine. In summary, the mono- and diamidino derivatives offer potential for lead optimization to develop new drugs to treat central nervous system infections with N. fowleri. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. High Throughput Screening in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Drug Discovery to Functional Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.J. Gintjee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Centers for the screening of biologically active compounds and genomic libraries are becoming common in the academic setting and have enabled researchers devoted to developing strategies for the treatment of diseases or interested in studying a biological phenomenon to have unprecedented access to libraries that, until few years ago, were accessible only by pharmaceutical companies. As a result, new drugs and genetic targets have now been identified for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, the most prominent of the neuromuscular disorders affecting children. Although the work is still at an early stage, the results obtained to date are encouraging and demonstrate the importance that these centers may have in advancing therapeutic strategies for DMD as well as other diseases. This review will provide a summary of the status and progress made toward the development of a cure for this disorder and implementing high-throughput screening (HTS technologies as the main source of discovery. As more academic institutions are gaining access to HTS as a valuable discovery tool, the identification of new biologically active molecules is likely to grow larger. In addition, the presence in the academic setting of experts in different aspects of the disease will offer the opportunity to develop novel assays capable of identifying new targets to be pursued as potential therapeutic options. These assays will represent an excellent source to be used by pharmaceutical companies for the screening of larger libraries providing the opportunity to establish strong collaborations between the private and academic sectors and maximizing the chances of bringing into the clinic new drugs for the treatment of DMD.

  12. Development of a high-throughput screen for inhibitors of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Scott; Messick, Troy; Schultz, David C; Reichman, Melvin; Lieberman, Paul M

    2010-10-01

    Latent infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a carcinogenic cofactor in several lymphoid and epithelial cell malignancies. At present, there are no small-molecule inhibitors that specifically target EBV latent infection or latency-associated oncoproteins. EBNA1 is an EBV-encoded sequence-specific DNA binding protein that is consistently expressed in EBV-associated tumors and required for stable maintenance of the viral genome in proliferating cells. EBNA1 is also thought to provide cell survival function in latently infected cells. In this work, the authors describe the development of a biochemical high-throughput screening (HTS) method using a homogeneous fluorescence polarization (FP) assay monitoring EBNA1 binding to its cognate DNA binding site. An FP-based counterscreen was developed using another EBV-encoded DNA binding protein, Zta, and its cognate DNA binding site. The authors demonstrate that EBNA1 binding to a fluorescent-labeled DNA probe provides a robust assay with a Z factor consistently greater than 0.6. A pilot screen of a small-molecule library of ~14,000 compounds identified 3 structurally related molecules that selectively inhibit EBNA1 but not Zta. All 3 compounds had activity in a cell-based assay specific for the disruption of EBNA1 transcription repression function. One of the compounds was effective in reducing EBV genome copy number in Raji Burkitt lymphoma cells. These experiments provide a proof of concept that small-molecule inhibitors of EBNA1 can be identified by biochemical HTS of compound libraries. Further screening in conjunction with medicinal chemistry optimization may provide a selective inhibitor of EBNA1 and EBV latent infection.

  13. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Luo, Kathy Qian, E-mail: kluo@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  14. Genome-scale RNAi screens for high-throughput phenotyping in bloodstream-form African trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Lucy; Alsford, Sam; Baker, Nicola; Turner, Daniel J; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Berriman, Matthew; Horn, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability to simultaneously assess every gene in a genome for a role in a particular process has obvious appeal. This protocol describes how to perform genome-scale RNAi library screens in bloodstream-form African trypanosomes, a family of parasites that causes lethal human and animal diseases and also serves as a model for studies on basic aspects of eukaryotic biology and evolution. We discuss strain assembly, screen design and implementation, the RNAi target sequencing approach and hit validation, and we provide a step-by-step protocol. A screen can yield from one to thousands of 'hits' associated with the phenotype of interest. The screening protocol itself takes 2 weeks or less to be completed, and high-throughput sequencing may also be completed within weeks. Pre- and post-screen strain assembly, validation and follow-up can take several months, depending on the type of screen and the number of hits analyzed.

  15. Experimentally validated novel inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase discovered by virtual high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Sheng; Jia, Kai-Fan; Chen, Ting; Chang, Shun-Ya; Lin, Ming-Shen; Yin, Hsien-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major etiologic agent associated with the development and maintenance of human gastritis. The goal of this study was to develop novel antibiotics against H. pylori, and we thus targeted H. pylori phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (HpPPAT). PPAT catalyzes the penultimate step in coenzyme A biosynthesis. Its inactivation effectively prevents bacterial viability, making it an attractive target for antibacterial drug discovery. We employed virtual high-throughput screening and the HpPPAT crystal structure to identify compounds in the PubChem database that might act as inhibitors of HpPPAT. d-amethopterin is a potential inhibitor for blocking HpPPAT activity and suppressing H. pylori viability. Following treatment with d-amethopterin, H. pylori exhibited morphological characteristics associated with cell death. d-amethopterin is a mixed inhibitor of HpPPAT activity; it simultaneously occupies the HpPPAT 4'-phosphopantetheine- and ATP-binding sites. Its binding affinity is in the micromolar range, implying that it is sufficiently potent to serve as a lead compound in subsequent drug development. Characterization of the d-amethopterin and HpPPAT interaction network in a docked model will allow us to initiate rational drug optimization to improve the inhibitory efficacy of d-amethopterin. We anticipate that novel, potent, and selective HpPPAT inhibitors will emerge for the treatment of H. pylori infection.

  16. Experimentally validated novel inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase discovered by virtual high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Sheng Cheng

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a major etiologic agent associated with the development and maintenance of human gastritis. The goal of this study was to develop novel antibiotics against H. pylori, and we thus targeted H. pylori phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (HpPPAT. PPAT catalyzes the penultimate step in coenzyme A biosynthesis. Its inactivation effectively prevents bacterial viability, making it an attractive target for antibacterial drug discovery. We employed virtual high-throughput screening and the HpPPAT crystal structure to identify compounds in the PubChem database that might act as inhibitors of HpPPAT. d-amethopterin is a potential inhibitor for blocking HpPPAT activity and suppressing H. pylori viability. Following treatment with d-amethopterin, H. pylori exhibited morphological characteristics associated with cell death. d-amethopterin is a mixed inhibitor of HpPPAT activity; it simultaneously occupies the HpPPAT 4'-phosphopantetheine- and ATP-binding sites. Its binding affinity is in the micromolar range, implying that it is sufficiently potent to serve as a lead compound in subsequent drug development. Characterization of the d-amethopterin and HpPPAT interaction network in a docked model will allow us to initiate rational drug optimization to improve the inhibitory efficacy of d-amethopterin. We anticipate that novel, potent, and selective HpPPAT inhibitors will emerge for the treatment of H. pylori infection.

  17. High-throughput identification of potential minor histocompatibility antigens by MHC tetramer-based screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hombrink, Pleun; Hadrup, Sine R; Bakker, Arne

    2011-01-01

    T-cell recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) plays an important role in the graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, the number of MiHA identified to date remains limited, making clinical application of MiHA reactive T......-cell infusion difficult. This study represents the first attempt of genome-wide prediction of MiHA, coupled to the isolation of T-cell populations that react with these antigens. In this unbiased high-throughput MiHA screen, both the possibilities and pitfalls of this approach were investigated. First, 973......MHC-tetramer-based enrichment and multi-color flow cytometry. Using this approach, 71 peptide-reactive T-cell populations were generated. The isolation of a T-cell line specifically recognizing target cells expressing the MAP4K1(IMA) antigen demonstrates that identification of MiHA through this approach is in principle...

  18. High-throughput screening for potent and selective inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Jeffrey; Michnoff, Carolyn H; Malmquist, Nicholas A; White, John; Roth, Michael G; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Phillips, Margaret A

    2005-06-10

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of the most serious and fatal malarial infections, and it has developed resistance to commonly employed chemotherapeutics. The de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis enzymes offer potential as targets for drug design, because, unlike the host, the parasite does not have pyrimidine salvage pathways. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a flavin-dependent mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the fourth reaction in this essential pathway. Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is utilized as the oxidant. Potent and species-selective inhibitors of malarial DHODH were identified by high-throughput screening of a chemical library, which contained 220,000 drug-like molecules. These novel inhibitors represent a diverse range of chemical scaffolds, including a series of halogenated phenyl benzamide/naphthamides and urea-based compounds containing napthyl or quinolinyl substituents. Inhibitors in these classes with IC(50) values below 600 nm were purified by high pressure liquid chromatography, characterized by mass spectroscopy, and subjected to kinetic analysis against the parasite and human enzymes. The most active compound is a competitive inhibitor of CoQ with an IC(50) against malarial DHODH of 16 nm, and it is 12,500-fold less active against the human enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues in the CoQ-binding site significantly reduced inhibitor potency. The structural basis for the species selective enzyme inhibition is explained by the variable amino acid sequence in this binding site, making DHODH a particularly strong candidate for the development of new anti-malarial compounds.

  19. A recombinant fusion protein-based, fluorescent protease assay for high throughput-compatible substrate screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozóki, Beáta; Gazda, Lívia; Tóth, Ferenc; Miczi, Márió; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2018-01-01

    In connection with the intensive investigation of proteases, several methods have been developed for analysis of the substrate specificity. Due to the great number of proteases and the expected target molecules to be analyzed, time- and cost-efficient high-throughput screening (HTS) methods are preferred. Here we describe the development and application of a separation-based HTS-compatible fluorescent protease assay, which is based on the use of recombinant fusion proteins as substrates of proteases. The protein substrates used in this assay consists of N-terminal (hexahistidine and maltose binding protein) fusion tags, cleavage sequences of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) and HIV-1 proteases, and a C-terminal fluorescent protein (mApple or mTurquoise2). The assay is based on the fluorimetric detection of the fluorescent proteins, which are released from the magnetic bead-attached substrates by the proteolytic cleavage. The protease assay has been applied for activity measurements of TEV and HIV-1 proteases to test the suitability of the system for enzyme kinetic measurements, inhibition studies, and determination of pH optimum. We also found that denatured fluorescent proteins can be renatured after SDS-PAGE of denaturing conditions, but showed differences in their renaturation abilities. After in-gel renaturation both substrates and cleavage products can be identified by in-gel UV detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A high throughput screen for 17 Dermorphin peptides in equine and human urine and equine plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Rohan; Timms, Mark; Levina, Vita; Vine, John

    2014-09-01

    The Dermorphins are a family of peptides that act as potent agonists of the opioid μ receptor. Originally identified as a seven amino acid peptide on the skin of the South American Phyllomedusa frog, peptide chemists have since developed a large number of Dermorphin variants, many with superior opioid activity to the original peptide. Dermorphins are unique among the peptide opioid agonists as they appear to have a limited ability to cross the blood brain barrier, producing effects on both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is this ability of Dermorphins to provide central anaesthesia after intravenous or subcutaneous administration that allows their use as analogues of the opioid class of drugs. Recently, illicit use of the Dermorphin peptide in the racing industry has shown the need for an analytical method to control the use of these peptides. We present a high-throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry screen for 17 Dermorphin peptides in equine urine and plasma with limits of detection down to 5 pg/mL. The peptide extraction technique is also suitable for use in human urine. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  2. High-throughput enzyme screening platform for the IPP-bypass mevalonate pathway for isopentenol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Aram; Meadows, Corey W.; Canu, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    ATP requirements and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) toxicity pose immediate challenges for engineering bacterial strains to overproduce commodities utilizing IPP as an intermediate. To overcome these limitations, we developed an “IPP-bypass� isopentenol pathway using the promiscuous activity...... the endogenous non-mevalonate pathway, we developed a high-throughput screening platform that correlated promiscuous PMD activity toward MVAP with cellular growth. Successful identification of mutants that altered PMD activity demonstrated the sensitivity and specificity of the screening platform. Strains...

  3. Plate-based diversity subset screening: an efficient paradigm for high throughput screening of a large screening file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Andrew S; Bradley, Joseph; Everett, Jeremy R; Knight, Michelle; Loesel, Jens; Mathias, John; McLoughlin, David; Mills, James; Sharp, Robert E; Williams, Christine; Wood, Terence P

    2013-05-01

    The screening files of many large companies, including Pfizer, have grown considerably due to internal chemistry efforts, company mergers and acquisitions, external contracted synthesis, or compound purchase schemes. In order to screen the targets of interest in a cost-effective fashion, we devised an easy-to-assemble, plate-based diversity subset (PBDS) that represents almost the entire computed chemical space of the screening file whilst comprising only a fraction of the plates in the collection. In order to create this file, we developed new design principles for the quality assessment of screening plates: the Rule of 40 (Ro40) and a plate selection process that insured excellent coverage of both library chemistry and legacy chemistry space. This paper describes the rationale, design, construction, and performance of the PBDS, that has evolved into the standard paradigm for singleton (one compound per well) high-throughput screening in Pfizer since its introduction in 2006.

  4. Identification of new drug candidates against Borrelia burgdorferi using high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Wagh, Dhananjay; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Solow-Cordero, David; Kim, Kwang-Min; Samineni, Aneesh V; Parekh, Mansi B; Tayebi, Lobat; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common zoonotic bacterial disease in North America. It is estimated that >300,000 cases per annum are reported in USA alone. A total of 10%-20% of patients who have been treated with antibiotic therapy report the recrudescence of symptoms, such as muscle and joint pain, psychosocial and cognitive difficulties, and generalized fatigue. This condition is referred to as posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. While there is no evidence for the presence of viable infectious organisms in individuals with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome, some researchers found surviving Borrelia burgdorferi population in rodents and primates even after antibiotic treatment. Although such observations need more ratification, there is unmet need for developing the therapeutic agents that focus on removing the persisting bacterial form of B. burgdorferi in rodent and nonhuman primates. For this purpose, high-throughput screening was done using BacTiter-Glo assay for four compound libraries to identify candidates that stop the growth of B. burgdorferi in vitro. The four chemical libraries containing 4,366 compounds (80% Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approved) that were screened are Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC1280), the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection, the Microsource Spectrum, and the Biomol FDA. We subsequently identified 150 unique compounds, which inhibited >90% of B. burgdorferi growth at a concentration of <25 µM. These 150 unique compounds comprise many safe antibiotics, chemical compounds, and also small molecules from plant sources. Of the 150 unique compounds, 101 compounds are FDA approved. We selected the top 20 FDA-approved molecules based on safety and potency and studied their minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. The promising safe FDA-approved candidates that show low minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values can be chosen as lead

  5. Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adissu, Hibret A; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hooks, Yvette; Carragher, Damian M; Clarke, Kay; Karp, Natasha A; Newbigging, Susan; Jones, Nora; Morikawa, Lily; White, Jacqueline K; McKerlie, Colin

    2014-05-01

    The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD) we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30) or without (n=20) clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3%) in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14%) presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice.

  6. Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hibret A. Adissu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30 or without (n=20 clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3% in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14% presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice.

  7. [Pain of high-throughput screening--pan assay interference compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tao; Du, Guan-hua

    2015-08-01

    High-throughput screening is a regular approach available for identitying new lead compounds for the growing validated drug targets in drug screening. However, it has also introduced a large number of peculiar molecules which interfere drug screening. Pan assay interference compounds (PAINS) interfere with the progress of drug screening in various ways, such as interfering with a biochemical assay, modifying the protein, aggregate-based inhibitors and so on. So it is of vital significance to remove them. This paper has consulted the concept, category of PAINS and reviewed the way of PAINS interfering and the countermeasures to cope with them to direct the approach of high through screening and improve the hits percent.

  8. A High-Throughput Mechanofluidic Screening Platform for Investigating Tumor Cell Adhesion During Metastasis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, A.; Spruell, C.; Nandi, S.; Wong, M.; Crexiell, M.; Baker, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The metastatic spread of cancer is a major barrier to effective and curative therapies for cancer. During metastasis, tumor cells intravasate into the vascular system, survive in the shear forces and immunological environment of the circulation, and then extravasate into secondary tumor sites. Biophysical forces are potent regulators of cancer biology and are key in many of the steps of metastasis. In particular, the adhesion of circulating cells is highly dependent upon competing forces between cell adhesion receptors and the shear stresses due to fluid flow. Conventional in vitro assays for drug development and the mechanistic study of metastasis are often carried out in the absence of fluidic forces and, consequently, are poorly representative of the true biology of metastasis. Here, we present a novel high-throughput approach to studying cell adhesion under flow that uses a multi-well, mechanofluidic flow system to interrogate adhesion of cancer cell to endothelial cells, extracellular matrix and platelets under physiological shear stresses. We use this system to identify pathways and compounds that can potentially be used to inhibit cancer adhesion under flow by screening anti-inflammatory compounds, integrin inhibitors and a kinase inhibitor library. In particular, we identify several small molecule inhibitors of FLT-3 and AKT that are potent inhibitors of cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells and platelets under flow. In addition, we found that many kinase inhibitors lead to increased adhesion of cancer cells in flow-based but not static assays. This finding suggests that even compounds that reduce cell proliferation might also enhance cancer cell adhesion during metastasis. Overall, our results validate a novel platform for investigating the mechanisms of cell adhesion under biophysical flow conditions and identify several potential inhibitors of cancer cell adhesion during metastasis. PMID:26584160

  9. Design of new plasmepsin inhibitors: a virtual high throughput screening approach on the EGEE grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasam, Vinod; Zimmermann, Marc; Maass, Astrid; Schwichtenberg, Horst; Wolf, Antje; Jacq, Nicolas; Breton, Vincent; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Though different species of the genus Plasmodium may be responsible for malaria, the variant caused by P. falciparum is often very dangerous and even fatal if untreated. Hemoglobin degradation is one of the key metabolic processes for the survival of the Plasmodium parasite in its host. Plasmepsins, a family of aspartic proteases encoded by the Plasmodium genome, play a prominent role in host hemoglobin cleavage. In this paper we demonstrate the use of virtual screening, in particular molecular docking, employed at a very large scale to identify novel inhibitors for plasmepsins II and IV. A large grid infrastructure, the EGEE grid, was used to address the problem of large computation resources required for docking hundreds of thousands of chemical compounds on different plasmepsin targets of P. falciparum. A large compound library of about 1 million chemical compounds was docked on 5 different targets of plasmepsins using two different docking software, namely FlexX and AutoDock. Several strategies were employed to analyze the results of this virtual screening approach including docking scores, ideal binding modes, and interactions to key residues of the protein. Three different classes of structures with thiourea, diphenylurea, and guanidino scaffolds were identified to be promising hits. While the identification of diphenylurea compounds is in accordance with the literature and thus provides a sort of "positive control", the identification of novel compounds with a guanidino scaffold proves that high throughput docking can be effectively used to identify novel potential inhibitors of P. falciparum plasmepsins. Thus, with the work presented here, we do not only demonstrate the relevance of computational grids in drug discovery but also identify several promising small molecules which have the potential to serve as candidate inhibitors for P. falciparum plasmepsins. With the use of the EGEE grid infrastructure for the virtual screening campaign against the malaria

  10. State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet (Presented by Dr. Marilyn J. Aardema, Chief Scientific Advisor, Toxicology, Dr. Leon Stankowski, et. al. (6/28/2012)

  11. CRISPR-Cas9 epigenome editing enables high-throughput screening for functional regulatory elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Tyler S; Black, Joshua B; Chellappan, Malathi; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Hilton, Isaac B; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2017-06-01

    Large genome-mapping consortia and thousands of genome-wide association studies have identified non-protein-coding elements in the genome as having a central role in various biological processes. However, decoding the functions of the millions of putative regulatory elements discovered in these studies remains challenging. CRISPR-Cas9-based epigenome editing technologies have enabled precise perturbation of the activity of specific regulatory elements. Here we describe CRISPR-Cas9-based epigenomic regulatory element screening (CERES) for improved high-throughput screening of regulatory element activity in the native genomic context. Using dCas9KRAB repressor and dCas9p300 activator constructs and lentiviral single guide RNA libraries to target DNase I hypersensitive sites surrounding a gene of interest, we carried out both loss- and gain-of-function screens to identify regulatory elements for the β-globin and HER2 loci in human cells. CERES readily identified known and previously unidentified regulatory elements, some of which were dependent on cell type or direction of perturbation. This technology allows the high-throughput functional annotation of putative regulatory elements in their native chromosomal context.

  12. High-Throughput Raman Spectroscopy Screening of Excipients for the Stabilization of Amorphous Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Stoneburner, Kris; Ladika, Mladen; Kuo, Tzu-Chi; Kalantar, Thomas H

    2015-11-01

    Low aqueous solubility of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) is an enduring problem in pharmaceutical development, and it is becoming increasingly prevalent among new drug candidates. It is estimated that about 40% of drugs in the development pipeline and approximately 60% of the drugs coming directly from discovery suffer from poor aqueous solubility and slow dissolution, thereby reducing their bioavailability and efficacy and thus preventing their commercialization. It is well known that utilizing the amorphous form of a drug can be a useful approach to improve the dissolution rate and solubility of poorly water-soluble APIs. Amorphous compounds are thermodynamically unstable, but they can be stabilized by combining them with a carrier polymer (excipient) to form a solid dispersion. High-throughput Raman spectroscopy was used in this study to identify excipients that promote formation and stabilization of the amorphous drug form in solid dispersions. Four model APIs were used as poorly soluble drug candidates: ketoprofen, danazol, griseofulvin, and probucol. The Raman signals of excipients were generally negligible, and therefore Raman bands from the drugs were used with minimal spectral pre-processing. By comparing Raman spectra collected from the APIs in the crystalline and molten state, appropriate spectral features and regions were identified for the development of semi-quantitative methods to determine the amorphous content for each API. It is demonstrated that methods based on peak intensity ratio, peak width, peak distance, and classical least squares can all be effective methods for the screening of excipients. Interesting excipient-dependent phase transformation behavior was also observed for probucol.

  13. Filtration improves the performance of a high-throughput screen for anti-mycobacterial compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Cheng

    Full Text Available The tendency for mycobacteria to aggregate poses a challenge for their use in microplate based assays. Good dispersions have been difficult to achieve in high-throughput screening (HTS assays used in the search for novel antibacterial drugs to treat tuberculosis and other related diseases. Here we describe a method using filtration to overcome the problem of variability resulting from aggregation of mycobacteria. This method consistently yielded higher reproducibility and lower variability than conventional methods, such as settling under gravity and vortexing.

  14. Screening and Crystallization Plates for Manual and High-throughput Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Berejnov, Viatcheslav (Inventor); Kalinin, Yevgeniy (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In one embodiment, a crystallization and screening plate comprises a plurality of cells open at a top and a bottom, a frame that defines the cells in the plate, and at least two films. The first film seals a top of the plate and the second film seals a bottom of the plate. At least one of the films is patterned to strongly pin the contact lines of drops dispensed onto it, fixing their position and shape. The present invention also includes methods and other devices for manual and high-throughput protein crystal growth.

  15. High-Throughput Screening of the Asymmetric Decarboxylative Alkylation Reaction of Enolate-Stabilized Enol Carbonates

    KAUST Repository

    Stoltz, Brian

    2010-06-14

    The use of high-throughput screening allowed for the optimization of reaction conditions for the palladium-catalyzed asymmetric decarboxylative alkylation reaction of enolate-stabilized enol carbonates. Changing to a non-polar reaction solvent and to an electron-deficient PHOX derivative as ligand from our standard reaction conditions improved the enantioselectivity for the alkylation of a ketal-protected,1,3-diketone-derived enol carbonate from 28% ee to 84% ee. Similar improvements in enantioselectivity were seen for a β-keto-ester derived- and an α-phenyl cyclohexanone-derived enol carbonate.

  16. Curating and Preparing High-Throughput Screening Data for Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Marlene T; Wang, Wenyi; Sedykh, Alexander; Zhu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Publicly available bioassay data often contains errors. Curating massive bioassay data, especially high-throughput screening (HTS) data, for Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) modeling requires the assistance of automated data curation tools. Using automated data curation tools are beneficial to users, especially ones without prior computer skills, because many platforms have been developed and optimized based on standardized requirements. As a result, the users do not need to extensively configure the curation tool prior to the application procedure. In this chapter, a freely available automatic tool to curate and prepare HTS data for QSAR modeling purposes will be described.

  17. Assay development and high-throughput screening for small molecule inhibitors of a Vibrio cholerae stress response pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanbery L

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laura Stanbery, Jyl S Matson Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine and Life Sciences, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: Antibiotics are important adjuncts to oral rehydration therapy in cholera disease management. However, due to the rapid emergence of resistance to the antibiotics used to treat cholera, therapeutic options are becoming limited. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop additional therapeutics to aid in the treatment of cholera. Previous studies showed that the extracytoplasmic stress response (σE pathway of Vibrio cholerae is required for full virulence of the organism. The pathway is also required for bacterial growth in the presence of ethanol. Therefore, we exploited this ethanol sensitivity phenotype in order to develop a screen for inhibitors of the pathway, with the aim of also inhibiting virulence of the pathogen. Here we describe the optimization and implementation of our high-throughput screening strategy. From a primary screen of over 100,000 compounds, we have identified seven compounds that validated the growth phenotypes from the primary and counterscreens. These compounds have the potential to be developed into therapeutic agents for cholera and will also be valuable probes for uncovering basic molecular mechanisms of an important cause of diarrheal disease. Keywords: Vibrio cholerae, stress response, σE, high-throughput screening

  18. High throughput screening of hydrolytic enzymes from termites using a natural substrate derived from sugarcane bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucena Severino A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The description of new hydrolytic enzymes is an important step in the development of techniques which use lignocellulosic materials as a starting point for fuel production. Sugarcane bagasse, which is subjected to pre-treatment, hydrolysis and fermentation for the production of ethanol in several test refineries, is the most promising source of raw material for the production of second generation renewable fuels in Brazil. One problem when screening hydrolytic activities is that the activity against commercial substrates, such as carboxymethylcellulose, does not always correspond to the activity against the natural lignocellulosic material. Besides that, the macroscopic characteristics of the raw material, such as insolubility and heterogeneity, hinder its use for high throughput screenings. Results In this paper, we present the preparation of a colloidal suspension of particles obtained from sugarcane bagasse, with minimal chemical change in the lignocellulosic material, and demonstrate its use for high throughput assays of hydrolases using Brazilian termites as the screened organisms. Conclusions Important differences between the use of the natural substrate and commercial cellulase substrates, such as carboxymethylcellulose or crystalline cellulose, were observed. This suggests that wood feeding termites, in contrast to litter feeding termites, might not be the best source for enzymes that degrade sugarcane biomass.

  19. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS) for high throughput screening facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolopko, Andrew N; Sullivan, John P; Erickson, Sean D; Wrobel, David; Chiang, Su L; Rudnicki, Katrina; Rudnicki, Stewart; Nale, Jennifer; Selfors, Laura M; Greenhouse, Dara; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Shamu, Caroline E

    2010-05-18

    Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS) facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS), to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  20. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS for high throughput screening facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nale Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS, to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  1. High-throughput cell-based screening reveals a role for ZNF131 as a repressor of ERalpha signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Peige

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen receptor α (ERα is a transcription factor whose activity is affected by multiple regulatory cofactors. In an effort to identify the human genes involved in the regulation of ERα, we constructed a high-throughput, cell-based, functional screening platform by linking a response element (ERE with a reporter gene. This allowed the cellular activity of ERα, in cells cotransfected with the candidate gene, to be quantified in the presence or absence of its cognate ligand E2. Results From a library of 570 human cDNA clones, we identified zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131 as a repressor of ERα mediated transactivation. ZNF131 is a typical member of the BTB/POZ family of transcription factors, and shows both ubiquitous expression and a high degree of sequence conservation. The luciferase reporter gene assay revealed that ZNF131 inhibits ligand-dependent transactivation by ERα in a dose-dependent manner. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay clearly demonstrated that the interaction between ZNF131 and ERα interrupts or prevents ERα binding to the estrogen response element (ERE. In addition, ZNF131 was able to suppress the expression of pS2, an ERα target gene. Conclusion We suggest that the functional screening platform we constructed can be applied for high-throughput genomic screening candidate ERα-related genes. This in turn may provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ERα regulation in mammalian cells.

  2. High-throughput bioaffinity mass spectrometry for screening and identification of designer anabolic steroids in dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqai, Payam; Cevik, Ebru; Gerssen, Arjen; Haasnoot, Willem; Nielen, Michel W F

    2013-03-19

    A generic high-throughput bioaffinity liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (BioMS) approach was developed and applied for the screening and identification of known and unknown recombinant human sex hormone-binding globulin (rhSHBG)-binding designer steroids in dietary supplements. For screening, a semi-automated competitive inhibition binding assay was combined with fast ultrahigh-performance-LC-electrospray ionization-triple-quadrupole-MS (UPLC-QqQ-MS). 17β-Testosterone-D3 was used as the stable isotope label of which the binding to rhSHBG-coated paramagnetic microbeads was inhibited by any other binding (designer) steroid. The assay was performed in a 96-well plate and combined with the fast LC-MS, 96 measurements could be performed within 4 h. The concentration-dependent inhibition of the label by steroids in buffer and dietary supplements was demonstrated. Following an adjusted bioaffinity isolation procedure, suspect extracts were injected into a chip-UPLC(NanoTile)-Q-time-of-flight-MS system for full-scan accurate mass identification. Next to known steroids, 1-testosterone was identified in three of the supplements studied and the designer steroid tetrahydrogestrinone was identified in a spiked supplement. The generic steroid-binding assay can be used for high-throughput screening of androgens, estrogens, and gestagens in dietary supplements to fight doping. When combined with chip-UPLC-MS, it is a powerful tool for early warning of unknown emerging rhSHBG bioactive designer steroids in dietary supplements.

  3. Upscaling and automation of electrophysiology: toward high throughput screening in ion channel drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Margit; Oswald, Nicholas; Krzywkowski, Karen M

    2003-01-01

    Effective screening of large compound libraries in ion channel drug discovery requires the development of new electrophysiological techniques with substantially increased throughputs compared to the conventional patch clamp technique. Sophion Bioscience is aiming to meet this challenge by develop......Effective screening of large compound libraries in ion channel drug discovery requires the development of new electrophysiological techniques with substantially increased throughputs compared to the conventional patch clamp technique. Sophion Bioscience is aiming to meet this challenge...... by developing two lines of automated patch clamp products, a traditional pipette-based system called Apatchi-1, and a silicon chip-based system QPatch. The degree of automation spans from semi-automation (Apatchi-1) where a trained technician interacts with the system in a limited way, to a complete automation...... (QPatch 96) where the system works continuously and unattended until screening of a full compound library is completed. The performance of the systems range from medium to high throughputs....

  4. High-throughput screening for industrial enzyme production hosts by droplet microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjostrom, Staffan L.; Bai, Yunpeng; Huang, Mingtao

    2014-01-01

    A high-throughput method for single cell screening by microfluidic droplet sorting is applied to a whole-genome mutated yeast cell library yielding improved production hosts of secreted industrial enzymes. The sorting method is validated by enriching a yeast strain 14 times based on its α......-amylase production, close to the theoretical maximum enrichment. Furthermore, a 105 member yeast cell library is screened yielding a clone with a more than 2-fold increase in α-amylase production. The increase in enzyme production results from an improvement of the cellular functions of the production host......) with the genotype (contained in the cell) inside a droplet enables selection of single cells with improved enzyme production capacity by droplet sorting. The platform has a throughput over 300 times higher than that of the current industry standard, an automated microtiter plate screening system. At the same time...

  5. A new pooling strategy for high-throughput screening: the Shifted Transversal Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry-Mieg Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In binary high-throughput screening projects where the goal is the identification of low-frequency events, beyond the obvious issue of efficiency, false positives and false negatives are a major concern. Pooling constitutes a natural solution: it reduces the number of tests, while providing critical duplication of the individual experiments, thereby correcting for experimental noise. The main difficulty consists in designing the pools in a manner that is both efficient and robust: few pools should be necessary to correct the errors and identify the positives, yet the experiment should not be too vulnerable to biological shakiness. For example, some information should still be obtained even if there are slightly more positives or errors than expected. This is known as the group testing problem, or pooling problem. Results In this paper, we present a new non-adaptive combinatorial pooling design: the "shifted transversal design" (STD. It relies on arithmetics, and rests on two intuitive ideas: minimizing the co-occurrence of objects, and constructing pools of constant-sized intersections. We prove that it allows unambiguous decoding of noisy experimental observations. This design is highly flexible, and can be tailored to function robustly in a wide range of experimental settings (i.e., numbers of objects, fractions of positives, and expected error-rates. Furthermore, we show that our design compares favorably, in terms of efficiency, to the previously described non-adaptive combinatorial pooling designs. Conclusion This method is currently being validated by field-testing in the context of yeast-two-hybrid interactome mapping, in collaboration with Marc Vidal's lab at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Many similar projects could benefit from using the Shifted Transversal Design.

  6. DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2016-11-10

    Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Results Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemann–Pick type C disease. Conclusion We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between existing

  7. DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2016-01-01

    Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemann-Pick type C disease. We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between existing experimental confirmatory HTS

  8. No Time To Lose - High Throughput Screening To Assess Nanomaterial Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoiseaux, R; George, S; Li, M; Pokhrel, S; Ji, Z; France, B; Xia, T; Suarez, E; Rallo, R; Mädler, L; Cohen, Y; Hoek, EMV; Nel, A

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials hold great promise for medical, technological and economical benefits. Knowledge concerning the toxicological properties of these novel materials is typically lacking. At the same time, it is becoming evident that some nanomaterials could have a toxic potential in humans and the environment. Animal based systems lack the needed capacity to cope with the abundance of novel nanomaterials being produced, and thus we have to employ in vitro methods with high throughput to manage the rush logistically and use high content readouts wherever needed in order to gain more depth of information. Towards this end, high throughput screening (HTS) and high content screening (HCS) approaches can be used to speed up the safety analysis on a scale that commensurate with the rate of expansion of new materials and new properties. The insights gained from HTS/HCS should aid in our understanding of the tenets of nanomaterial hazard at biological level as well as asset the development of safe-by-design approaches. This review aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to the HTS/HCS methodology employed for safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), including data analysis and prediction of potentially hazardous material properties. Given the current pace of nanomaterial development, HTS/HCS is a potentially effective means of keeping up with the rapid progress in this field – we have literally no time to lose. PMID:21301704

  9. Acanthamoeba castellanii: A new high-throughput method for drug screening in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Rivas, Antonio; Padrón, José M; Valladares, Basilio; Elsheikha, Hany M

    2016-12-01

    Despite significant public health impact, there is no specific antiprotozoal therapy for prevention and treatment of Acanthamoeba castellanii infection. There is a need for new and efficient anti-Acanthamoeba drugs that are less toxic and can reduce treatment duration and frequency of administration. In this context a new, rapid and sensitive assay is required for high-throughput activity testing and screening of new therapeutic compounds. A colorimetric assay based on sulforhodamine B (SRB) staining has been developed for anti-Acanthamoeba drug susceptibility testing and adapted to a 96-well microtiter plate format. Under these conditions chlorhexidine was tested to validate the assay using two clinical strains of A. castellanii (Neff strain, T4 genotype [IC50 4.68±0.6μM] and T3 genotype [IC50 5.69±0.9μM]). These results were in good agreement with those obtained by the conventional Alamar Blue assay, OCR cytotoxicity assay and manual cell counting method. Our new assay offers an inexpensive and reliable method, which complements current assays by enhancing high-throughput anti-Acanthamoeba drug screening capabilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High-throughput physiological phenotyping and screening system for the characterization of plant-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Ofer; Gebremedhin, Alem; Wallach, Rony; Moshelion, Menachem

    2017-02-01

    We present a simple and effective high-throughput experimental platform for simultaneous and continuous monitoring of water relations in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum of numerous plants under dynamic environmental conditions. This system provides a simultaneously measured, detailed physiological response profile for each plant in the array, over time periods ranging from a few minutes to the entire growing season, under normal, stress and recovery conditions and at any phenological stage. Three probes for each pot in the array and a specially designed algorithm enable detailed water-relations characterization of whole-plant transpiration, biomass gain, stomatal conductance and root flux. They also enable quantitative calculation of the whole plant water-use efficiency and relative water content at high resolution under dynamic soil and atmospheric conditions. The system has no moving parts and can fit into many growing environments. A screening of 65 introgression lines of a wild tomato species (Solanum pennellii) crossed with cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum), using our system and conventional gas-exchange tools, confirmed the accuracy of the system as well as its diagnostic capabilities. The use of this high-throughput diagnostic screening method is discussed in light of the gaps in our understanding of the genetic regulation of whole-plant performance, particularly under abiotic stress. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. High-throughput screening of filamentous fungi using nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneyton, Thomas; Wijaya, I. Putu Mahendra; Postros, Prexilia; Najah, Majdi; Leblond, Pascal; Couvent, Angélique; Mayot, Estelle; Griffiths, Andrew D.; Drevelle, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous fungi are an extremely important source of industrial enzymes because of their capacity to secrete large quantities of proteins. Currently, functional screening of fungi is associated with low throughput and high costs, which severely limits the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and better production strains. Here, we describe a nanoliter-range droplet-based microfluidic system specially adapted for the high-throughput sceening (HTS) of large filamentous fungi libraries for secreted enzyme activities. The platform allowed (i) compartmentalization of single spores in ~10 nl droplets, (ii) germination and mycelium growth and (iii) high-throughput sorting of fungi based on enzymatic activity. A 104 clone UV-mutated library of Aspergillus niger was screened based on α-amylase activity in just 90 minutes. Active clones were enriched 196-fold after a single round of microfluidic HTS. The platform is a powerful tool for the development of new production strains with low cost, space and time footprint and should bring enormous benefit for improving the viability of biotechnological processes.

  12. High-throughput screening of PLGA thin films utilizing hydrophobic fluorescent dyes for hydrophobic drug compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Terry W J; Huang, Charlotte L; Kumar, Saranya; Widjaja, Effendi; Chiang Boey, Freddy Yin; Loo, Joachim S C; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2011-10-01

    Hydrophobic, antirestenotic drugs such as paclitaxel (PCTX) and rapamycin are often incorporated into thin film coatings for local delivery using implantable medical devices and polymers such as drug-eluting stents and balloons. Selecting the optimum coating formulation through screening the release profile of these drugs in thin films is time consuming and labor intensive. We describe here a high-throughput assay utilizing three model hydrophobic fluorescent compounds: fluorescein diacetate (FDAc), coumarin-6, and rhodamine 6G that were incorporated into poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and PLGA-polyethylene glycol films. Raman microscopy determined the hydrophobic fluorescent dye distribution within the PLGA thin films in comparison with that of PCTX. Their subsequent release was screened in a high-throughput assay and directly compared with HPLC quantification of PCTX release. It was observed that PCTX controlled-release kinetics could be mimicked by a hydrophobic dye that had similar octanol-water partition coefficient values and homogeneous dissolution in a PLGA matrix as the drug. In particular, FDAc was found to be the optimal hydrophobic dye at modeling the burst release as well as the total amount of PCTX released over a period of 30 days. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. An automated high-throughput system for phenotypic screening of chemical libraries on C. elegans and parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Frederick A; Brown, Anwen E; Buckingham, Steven D; Willis, Nicky J; Wynne, Graham M; Forman, Ruth; Else, Kathryn J; Morrison, Alison A; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Russell, Angela J; Lomas, David A; Sattelle, David B

    2017-12-02

    Parasitic nematodes infect hundreds of millions of people and farmed livestock. Further, plant parasitic nematodes result in major crop damage. The pipeline of therapeutic compounds is limited and parasite resistance to the existing anthelmintic compounds is a global threat. We have developed an INVertebrate Automated Phenotyping Platform (INVAPP) for high-throughput, plate-based chemical screening, and an algorithm (Paragon) which allows screening for compounds that have an effect on motility and development of parasitic worms. We have validated its utility by determining the efficacy of a panel of known anthelmintics against model and parasitic nematodes: Caenorhabditis elegans, Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta, and Trichuris muris. We then applied the system to screen the Pathogen Box chemical library in a blinded fashion and identified compounds already known to have anthelmintic or anti-parasitic activity, including tolfenpyrad, auranofin, and mebendazole; and 14 compounds previously undescribed as anthelmintics, including benzoxaborole and isoxazole chemotypes. This system offers an effective, high-throughput system for the discovery of novel anthelmintics. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the Droplet-Microarray Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Suspension Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Anna A; Depew, Claire; Permana, Katya Manuella; Trubitsyn, Alexander; Peravali, Ravindra; Ordiano, Jorge Ángel González; Reischl, Markus; Levkin, Pavel A

    2017-04-01

    Phenotypic cell-based high-throughput screenings play a central role in drug discovery and toxicology. The main tendency in cell screenings is the increase of the throughput and decrease of reaction volume in order to accelerate the experiments, reduce the costs, and enable screenings of rare cells. Conventionally, cell-based assays are performed in microtiter plates, which exist in 96- to 1536-wells formats and cannot be further miniaturized. In addition, performing screenings of suspension cells is associated with risk of losing cell content during the staining procedures and incompatibility with high-content microscopy. Here, we evaluate the Droplet-Microarray screening platform for culturing, screening, and imaging of suspension cells. We demonstrate pipetting-free cell seeding and proliferation of cells in individual droplets of 3-80 nL in volume. We developed a methodology to perform parallel treatment, staining, and fixation of suspension cells in individual droplets. Automated imaging of live suspension cells directly in the droplets combined with algorithms for pattern recognition for image analysis is demonstrated. We evaluated the developed methodology by performing a dose-response study with antineoplastic drugs. We believe that the DMA screening platform carries great potential to be adopted for broad spectrum of screenings of suspension cells.

  15. Environmental impact on vascular development predicted by high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, Nicole C; Judson, Richard S; Reif, David M; Sipes, Nisha S; Singh, Amar V; Chandler, Kelly J; Dewoskin, Rob; Dix, David J; Kavlock, Robert J; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Understanding health risks to embryonic development from exposure to environmental chemicals is a significant challenge given the diverse chemical landscape and paucity of data for most of these compounds. High-throughput screening (HTS) in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast™ project provides vast data on an expanding chemical library currently consisting of > 1,000 unique compounds across > 500 in vitro assays in phase I (complete) and Phase II (under way). This public data set can be used to evaluate concentration-dependent effects on many diverse biological targets and build predictive models of prototypical toxicity pathways that can aid decision making for assessments of human developmental health and disease. We mined the ToxCast phase I data set to identify signatures for potential chemical disruption of blood vessel formation and remodeling. ToxCast phase I screened 309 chemicals using 467 HTS assays across nine assay technology platforms. The assays measured direct interactions between chemicals and molecular targets (receptors, enzymes), as well as downstream effects on reporter gene activity or cellular consequences. We ranked the chemicals according to individual vascular bioactivity score and visualized the ranking using ToxPi (Toxicological Priority Index) profiles. Targets in inflammatory chemokine signaling, the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway, and the plasminogen-activating system were strongly perturbed by some chemicals, and we found positive correlations with developmental effects from the U.S. EPA ToxRefDB (Toxicological Reference Database) in vivo database containing prenatal rat and rabbit guideline studies. We observed distinctly different correlative patterns for chemicals with effects in rabbits versus rats, despite derivation of in vitro signatures based on human cells and cell-free biochemical targets, implying conservation but potentially differential contributions of developmental pathways among species

  16. New catalysts for carboxylation of propylene glycol to propylene carbonate via high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Osma, José A; Comerford, James W; Heyn, Richard H; North, Michael; Tangstad, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    High throughput methodologies screened 81 different metal salts and metal salt combinations as catalysts for the carboxylation of propylene glycol to propylene carbonate, as compared to a 5 mol% Zn(OAc)2/p-chlorobenzene sulfonic acid benchmark catalyst. The reactions were run with added acetonitrile (MeCN) as a chemical water trap. Two new catalysts were thereby discovered, zinc trifluoromethanesulfonate (Zn(OTf)2) and zinc p-toluenesulfonate. The optimal reaction parameters for the former catalyst were screened. Zn(OTf)2 gave an overall propylene carbonate yield of greater than 50% in 24 h, twice as large as the previous best literature yield with MeCN as a water trap, with 69% selectivity and 75% conversion of propylene glycol at 145 °C and 50 bar CO2 pressure.

  17. High Throughput Screening of Valganciclovir in Acidic Microenvironments of Polyester Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teilo Schaller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ganciclovir and valganciclor are antiviral agents used for the treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis. The conventional method for administering ganciclovir in cytomegalovirus retinitis patients is repeated intravitreal injections. In order to obviate the possible detrimental effects of repeated intraocular injections, to improve compliance and to eliminate systemic side-effects, we investigated the tuning of the ganciclovir pro-drug valganciclovir and the release from thin films of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, polycaprolactone (PCL, or mixtures of both, as a step towards prototyping periocular valganciclovir implants. To investigate the drug release, we established and evaluated a high throughput fluorescence-based quantification screening assay for the detection of valganciclovir. Our protocol allows quantifying as little as 20 ng of valganciclovir in 96-well polypropylene plates and a 50× faster analysis compared to traditional HPLC measurements. This improvement can hence be extrapolated to other polyester matrix thin film formulations using a high-throughput approach. The acidic microenvironment within the polyester matrix was found to protect valganciclovir from degradation with resultant increases in the half-life of the drug in the periocular implant to 100 days. Linear release profiles were obtained using the pure polyester polymers for 10 days and 60 days formulations; however, gross phase separations of PCL and acid-terminated PLGA prevented tuning within these timeframes due to the phase separation of the polymer, valganciclovir, or both.

  18. A high-throughput liquid bead array-based screening technology for Bt presence in GMO manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei; Wang, Huiyu; Wang, Chenguang; Mei, Lin; Lin, Xiangmei; Han, Xueqing; Zhu, Shuifang

    2016-03-15

    The number of species and planting areas of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has been rapidly developed during the past ten years. For the purpose of GMO inspection, quarantine and manipulation, we have now devised a high-throughput Bt-based GMOs screening method based on the liquid bead array. This novel method is based on the direct competitive recognition between biotinylated antibodies and beads-coupled antigens, searching for Bt presence in samples if it contains Bt Cry1 Aa, Bt Cry1 Ab, Bt Cry1 Ac, Bt Cry1 Ah, Bt Cry1 B, Bt Cry1 C, Bt Cry1 F, Bt Cry2 A, Bt Cry3 or Bt Cry9 C. Our method has a wide GMO species coverage so that more than 90% of the whole commercialized GMO species can be identified throughout the world. Under our optimization, specificity, sensitivity, repeatability and availability validation, the method shows a high specificity and 10-50 ng/mL sensitivity of quantification. We then assessed more than 1800 samples in the field and food market to prove capacity of our method in performing a high throughput screening work for GMO manipulation. Our method offers an applicant platform for further inspection and research on GMO plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunoassays: biological tools for high throughput screening and characterisation of combinatorial libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipa, M Angela

    2008-05-01

    In the demanding field of proteomics, there is an urgent need for affinity-catcher molecules to implement effective and high throughput methods for analysing the human proteome or parts of it. Antibodies have an essential role in this endeavour, and selection, isolation and characterisation of specific antibodies represent a key issue to meet success. Alternatively, it is expected that new, well-characterised affinity reagents generated in rapid and cost-effective manners will also be used to facilitate the deciphering of the function, location and interactions of the high number of encoded protein products. Combinatorial approaches combined with high throughput screening (HTS) technologies have become essential for the generation and identification of robust affinity reagents from biological combinatorial libraries and the lead discovery of active/mimic molecules in large chemical libraries. Phage and yeast display provide the means for engineering a multitude of antibody-like molecules against any desired antigen. The construction of peptide libraries is commonly used for the identification and characterisation of ligand-receptor specific interactions, and the search for novel ligands for protein purification. Further improvement of chemical and biological resistance of affinity ligands encouraged the "intelligent" design and synthesis of chemical libraries of low-molecular-weight bio-inspired mimic compounds. No matter what the ligand source, selection and characterisation of leads is a most relevant task. Immunological assays, in microtiter plates, biosensors or microarrays, are a biological tool of inestimable value for the iterative screening of combinatorial ligand libraries for tailored specificities, and improved affinities. Particularly, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays are frequently the method of choice in a large number of screening strategies, for both biological and chemical libraries.

  20. Antileishmanial high-throughput drug screening reveals drug candidates with new scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair L Siqueira-Neto

    Full Text Available Drugs currently available for leishmaniasis treatment often show parasite resistance, highly toxic side effects and prohibitive costs commonly incompatible with patients from the tropical endemic countries. In this sense, there is an urgent need for new drugs as a treatment solution for this neglected disease. Here we show the development and implementation of an automated high-throughput viability screening assay for the discovery of new drugs against Leishmania. Assay validation was done with Leishmania promastigote forms, including the screening of 4,000 compounds with known pharmacological properties. In an attempt to find new compounds with leishmanicidal properties, 26,500 structurally diverse chemical compounds were screened. A cut-off of 70% growth inhibition in the primary screening led to the identification of 567 active compounds. Cellular toxicity and selectivity were responsible for the exclusion of 78% of the pre-selected compounds. The activity of the remaining 124 compounds was confirmed against the intramacrophagic amastigote form of the parasite. In vitro microsomal stability and cytochrome P450 (CYP inhibition of the two most active compounds from this screening effort were assessed to obtain preliminary information on their metabolism in the host. The HTS approach employed here resulted in the discovery of two new antileishmanial compounds, bringing promising candidates to the leishmaniasis drug discovery pipeline.

  1. Transcriptional biomarkers--high throughput screening, quantitative verification, and bioinformatical validation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmaier, Irmgard; Pfaffl, Michael W

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biomarkers found their way into many research fields, especially in molecular medicine, medical diagnostics, disease prognosis, risk assessment but also in other areas like food safety. Different definitions for the term biomarker exist, but on the whole biomarkers are measureable biological molecules that are characteristic for a specific physiological status including drug intervention, normal or pathological processes. There are various examples for molecular biomarkers that are already successfully used in clinical diagnostics, especially as prognostic or diagnostic tool for diseases. Molecular biomarkers can be identified on different molecular levels, namely the genome, the epigenome, the transcriptome, the proteome, the metabolome and the lipidome. With special "omic" technologies, nowadays often high throughput technologies, these molecular biomarkers can be identified and quantitatively measured. This article describes the different molecular levels on which biomarker research is possible including some biomarker candidates that have already been identified. Hereby the transcriptomic approach will be described in detail including available high throughput methods, molecular levels, quantitative verification, and biostatistical requirements for transcriptional biomarker identification and validation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Field-based high throughput phenotyping rapidly identifies genomic regions controlling yield components in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanger, Paul; Klassen, Stephen; Mojica, Julius P; Lovell, John T; Moyers, Brook T; Baraoidan, Marietta; Naredo, Maria Elizabeth B; McNally, Kenneth L; Poland, Jesse; Bush, Daniel R; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E; McKay, John K

    2017-02-21

    To ensure food security in the face of population growth, decreasing water and land for agriculture, and increasing climate variability, crop yields must increase faster than the current rates. Increased yields will require implementing novel approaches in genetic discovery and breeding. Here we demonstrate the potential of field-based high throughput phenotyping (HTP) on a large recombinant population of rice to identify genetic variation underlying important traits. We find that detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) with HTP phenotyping is as accurate and effective as traditional labor-intensive measures of flowering time, height, biomass, grain yield, and harvest index. Genetic mapping in this population, derived from a cross of an modern cultivar (IR64) with a landrace (Aswina), identified four alleles with negative effect on grain yield that are fixed in IR64, demonstrating the potential for HTP of large populations as a strategy for the second green revolution.

  3. Human IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene for high-throughput screening of engineered mouse embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Benjamin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing a suitable level of exogenous gene expression in mammalian cells in general, and embryonic stem (ES cells in particular, is an important aspect of understanding pathways of cell differentiation, signal transduction and cell physiology. Despite its importance, this process remains challenging because of the poor correlation between the presence of introduced exogenous DNA and its transcription. Consequently, many transfected cells must be screened to identify those with an appropriate level of expression. To improve the screening process, we investigated the utility of the human interleukin 12 (IL-12 p40 cDNA as a reporter gene for studies of mammalian gene expression and for high-throughput screening of engineered mouse embryonic stem cells. Results A series of expression plasmids were used to study the utility of IL-12 p40 as an accurate reporter of gene activity. These studies included a characterization of the IL-12 p40 expression system in terms of: (i a time course of IL-12 p40 accumulation in the medium of transfected cells; (ii the dose-response relationship between the input DNA and IL-12 p40 mRNA levels and IL-12 p40 protein secretion; (iii the utility of IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene for analyzing the activity of cis-acting genetic elements; (iv expression of the IL-12 p40 reporter protein driven by an IRES element in a bicistronic mRNA; (v utility of IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene in a high-throughput screening strategy to identify successful transformed mouse embryonic stem cells; (vi demonstration of pluripotency of IL-12 p40 expressing ES cells in vitro and in vivo; and (vii germline transmission of the IL-12 p40 reporter gene. Conclusion IL-12 p40 showed several advantages as a reporter gene in terms of sensitivity and ease of the detection procedure. The IL-12 p40 assay was rapid and simple, in as much as the reporter protein secreted from the transfected cells was accurately measured by ELISA using

  4. Resonant waveguide grating imagers for single cell analysis and high throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resonant waveguide grating (RWG) systems illuminate an array of diffractive nanograting waveguide structures in microtiter plate to establish evanescent wave for measuring tiny changes in local refractive index arising from the dynamic mass redistribution of living cells upon stimulation. Whole-plate RWG imager enables high-throughput profiling and screening of drugs. Microfluidics RWG imager not only manifests distinct receptor signaling waves, but also differentiates long-acting agonism and antagonism. Spatially resolved RWG imager allows for single cell analysis including receptor signaling heterogeneity and the invasion of cancer cells in a spheroidal structure through 3-dimensional extracellular matrix. High frequency RWG imager permits real-time detection of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. The wide coverage in target, pathway, assay, and cell phenotype has made RWG systems powerful tool in both basic research and early drug discovery process.

  5. High-Throughput Spheroid Screens Using Volume, Resazurin Reduction, and Acid Phosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Grabowska, Anna M; Garnett, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Mainstream adoption of physiologically relevant three-dimensional models has been slow in the last 50 years due to long, manual protocols with poor reproducibility, high price, and closed commercial platforms. This chapter describes high-throughput, low-cost, open methods for spheroid viability assessment which use readily available reagents and open-source software to analyze spheroid volume, metabolism, and enzymatic activity. We provide two ImageJ macros for automated spheroid size determination-for both single images and images in stacks. We also share an Excel template spreadsheet allowing users to rapidly process spheroid size data, analyze plate uniformity (such as edge effects and systematic seeding errors), detect outliers, and calculate dose-response. The methods would be useful to researchers in preclinical and translational research planning to move away from simplistic monolayer studies and explore 3D spheroid screens for drug safety and efficacy without substantial investment in money or time.

  6. On-chip polarimetry for high-throughput screening of nanoliter and smaller sample volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhop, Darryl J. (Inventor); Dotson, Stephen (Inventor); Bachmann, Brian O. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A polarimetry technique for measuring optical activity that is particularly suited for high throughput screening employs a chip or substrate (22) having one or more microfluidic channels (26) formed therein. A polarized laser beam (14) is directed onto optically active samples that are disposed in the channels. The incident laser beam interacts with the optically active molecules in the sample, which slightly alter the polarization of the laser beam as it passes multiple times through the sample. Interference fringe patterns (28) are generated by the interaction of the laser beam with the sample and the channel walls. A photodetector (34) is positioned to receive the interference fringe patterns and generate an output signal that is input to a computer or other analyzer (38) for analyzing the signal and determining the rotation of plane polarized light by optically active material in the channel from polarization rotation calculations.

  7. Accessible high-throughput virtual screening molecular docking software for students and educators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed B Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We survey low cost high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS computer programs for instructors who wish to demonstrate molecular docking in their courses. Since HTVS programs are a useful adjunct to the time consuming and expensive wet bench experiments necessary to discover new drug therapies, the topic of molecular docking is core to the instruction of biochemistry and molecular biology. The availability of HTVS programs coupled with decreasing costs and advances in computer hardware have made computational approaches to drug discovery possible at institutional and non-profit budgets. This paper focuses on HTVS programs with graphical user interfaces (GUIs that use either DOCK or AutoDock for the prediction of DockoMatic, PyRx, DockingServer, and MOLA since their utility has been proven by the research community, they are free or affordable, and the programs operate on a range of computer platforms.

  8. In silico prediction and screening of modular crystal structures via a high-throughput genomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Li, Xu; Liu, Jiancong; Duan, Fangzheng; Yu, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput computational methods capable of predicting, evaluating and identifying promising synthetic candidates with desired properties are highly appealing to today's scientists. Despite some successes, in silico design of crystalline materials with complex three-dimensionally extended structures remains challenging. Here we demonstrate the application of a new genomic approach to ABC-6 zeolites, a family of industrially important catalysts whose structures are built from the stacking of modular six-ring layers. The sequences of layer stacking, which we deem the genes of this family, determine the structures and the properties of ABC-6 zeolites. By enumerating these gene-like stacking sequences, we have identified 1,127 most realizable new ABC-6 structures out of 78 groups of 84,292 theoretical ones, and experimentally realized 2 of them. Our genomic approach can extract crucial structural information directly from these gene-like stacking sequences, enabling high-throughput identification of synthetic targets with desired properties among a large number of candidate structures. PMID:26395233

  9. A high-throughput screening approach to discovering good forms of biologically inspired visual representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pinto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available While many models of biological object recognition share a common set of "broad-stroke" properties, the performance of any one model depends strongly on the choice of parameters in a particular instantiation of that model--e.g., the number of units per layer, the size of pooling kernels, exponents in normalization operations, etc. Since the number of such parameters (explicit or implicit is typically large and the computational cost of evaluating one particular parameter set is high, the space of possible model instantiations goes largely unexplored. Thus, when a model fails to approach the abilities of biological visual systems, we are left uncertain whether this failure is because we are missing a fundamental idea or because the correct "parts" have not been tuned correctly, assembled at sufficient scale, or provided with enough training. Here, we present a high-throughput approach to the exploration of such parameter sets, leveraging recent advances in stream processing hardware (high-end NVIDIA graphic cards and the PlayStation 3's IBM Cell Processor. In analogy to high-throughput screening approaches in molecular biology and genetics, we explored thousands of potential network architectures and parameter instantiations, screening those that show promising object recognition performance for further analysis. We show that this approach can yield significant, reproducible gains in performance across an array of basic object recognition tasks, consistently outperforming a variety of state-of-the-art purpose-built vision systems from the literature. As the scale of available computational power continues to expand, we argue that this approach has the potential to greatly accelerate progress in both artificial vision and our understanding of the computational underpinning of biological vision.

  10. High-throughput screening approaches and combinatorial development of biomaterials using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, David; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Habibovic, Pamela

    2016-04-01

    From the first microfluidic devices used for analysis of single metabolic by-products to highly complex multicompartmental co-culture organ-on-chip platforms, efforts of many multidisciplinary teams around the world have been invested in overcoming the limitations of conventional research methods in the biomedical field. Close spatial and temporal control over fluids and physical parameters, integration of sensors for direct read-out as well as the possibility to increase throughput of screening through parallelization, multiplexing and automation are some of the advantages of microfluidic over conventional, 2D tissue culture in vitro systems. Moreover, small volumes and relatively small cell numbers used in experimental set-ups involving microfluidics, can potentially decrease research cost. On the other hand, these small volumes and numbers of cells also mean that many of the conventional molecular biology or biochemistry assays cannot be directly applied to experiments that are performed in microfluidic platforms. Development of different types of assays and evidence that such assays are indeed a suitable alternative to conventional ones is a step that needs to be taken in order to have microfluidics-based platforms fully adopted in biomedical research. In this review, rather than providing a comprehensive overview of the literature on microfluidics, we aim to discuss developments in the field of microfluidics that can aid advancement of biomedical research, with emphasis on the field of biomaterials. Three important topics will be discussed, being: screening, in particular high-throughput and combinatorial screening; mimicking of natural microenvironment ranging from 3D hydrogel-based cellular niches to organ-on-chip devices; and production of biomaterials with closely controlled properties. While important technical aspects of various platforms will be discussed, the focus is mainly on their applications, including the state-of-the-art, future perspectives and

  11. High-Throughput 3D Tumor Spheroid Screening Method for Cancer Drug Discovery Using Celigo Image Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Sarah; Cribbes, Scott; Déry, Olivier; Kuksin, Dmitry; Sincoff, Eric; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2017-08-01

    Oncologists have investigated the effect of protein or chemical-based compounds on cancer cells to identify potential drug candidates. Traditionally, the growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of the drugs are first measured in 2D in vitro models, and then further tested in 3D xenograft in vivo models. Although the drug candidates can demonstrate promising inhibitory or cytotoxicity results in a 2D environment, similar effects may not be observed under a 3D environment. In this work, we developed an image-based high-throughput screening method for 3D tumor spheroids using the Celigo image cytometer. First, optimal seeding density for tumor spheroid formation was determined by investigating the cell seeding density of U87MG, a human glioblastoma cell line. Next, the dose-response effects of 17-AAG with respect to spheroid size and viability were measured to determine the IC50 value. Finally, the developed high-throughput method was used to measure the dose response of four drugs (17-AAG, paclitaxel, TMZ, and doxorubicin) with respect to the spheroid size and viability. Each experiment was performed simultaneously in the 2D model for comparison. This detection method allowed for a more efficient process to identify highly qualified drug candidates, which may reduce the overall time required to bring a drug to clinical trial.

  12. Microengineering methods for cell-based microarrays and high-throughput drug-screening applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Feng; Wu Jinhui; Wang Shuqi; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Demirci, Utkan [Department of Medicine, Demirci Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine (BAMM) Laboratory, Center for Biomedical Engineering, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Durmus, Naside Gozde, E-mail: udemirci@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [School of Engineering and Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Screening for effective therapeutic agents from millions of drug candidates is costly, time consuming, and often faces concerns due to the extensive use of animals. To improve cost effectiveness, and to minimize animal testing in pharmaceutical research, in vitro monolayer cell microarrays with multiwell plate assays have been developed. Integration of cell microarrays with microfluidic systems has facilitated automated and controlled component loading, significantly reducing the consumption of the candidate compounds and the target cells. Even though these methods significantly increased the throughput compared to conventional in vitro testing systems and in vivo animal models, the cost associated with these platforms remains prohibitively high. Besides, there is a need for three-dimensional (3D) cell-based drug-screening models which can mimic the in vivo microenvironment and the functionality of the native tissues. Here, we present the state-of-the-art microengineering approaches that can be used to develop 3D cell-based drug-screening assays. We highlight the 3D in vitro cell culture systems with live cell-based arrays, microfluidic cell culture systems, and their application to high-throughput drug screening. We conclude that among the emerging microengineering approaches, bioprinting holds great potential to provide repeatable 3D cell-based constructs with high temporal, spatial control and versatility.

  13. Polydiacetylene-Based High-Throughput Screen for Surfactin Producing Strains of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyan; Xu, Qing; Jiang, Ling; Huang, He; Li, Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional mutation is still an attractive approach for strain improvement, it is tedious, time-consuming, and inefficient to screen for surfactin producing strains. To overcome this, we developed a high-throughput screening method for surfactin producing mutants by applying polydiacetylene (PDA) vesicles as sensors with visible chromatic change from blue to red, detected as colorimetric response (CR%) signal, which can even semi-quantify the yields of surfactin. Bacillus subtilis 723 was used as parent strain and multiply mutated with atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP). Mutants were cultured in MicroFlask by Duetz (24 square deepwell plates, Applikon Biotechnology) and surfactin titers were tested in 96-well plates with PDA vesicles. Mutants with surfactin titers above150 mg/L (CR% value above 26%) were selected as high-yield strains and further quantified by HPLC. By integrating MicroFlask cultivation and the PDA vesicles detection, we screened 27,000 mutants and found 37 high-yield strains. From these, one mutant produced 473.6 mg/L surfactin (including 353.1 mg/L C15 surfactin), which was 5.4-fold than that of the parent strain. This method is efficient, cost-effective and provides wider application in screening for various surfactants. PMID:24498439

  14. Application of Titration-Based Screening for the Rapid Pilot Testing of High-Throughput Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Hu; Kang, Zhao B; Ardayfio, Ophelia; Ho, Pei-i; Smith, Thomas; Wallace, Iain; Bowes, Scott; Hill, W Adam; Auld, Douglas S

    2014-06-01

    Pilot testing of an assay intended for high-throughput screening (HTS) with small compound sets is a necessary but often time-consuming step in the validation of an assay protocol. When the initial testing concentration is less than optimal, this can involve iterative testing at different concentrations to further evaluate the pilot outcome, which can be even more time-consuming. Quantitative HTS (qHTS) enables flexible and rapid collection of assay performance statistics, hits at different concentrations, and concentration-response curves in a single experiment. Here we describe the qHTS process for pilot testing in which eight-point concentration-response curves are produced using an interplate asymmetric dilution protocol in which the first four concentrations are used to represent the range of typical HTS screening concentrations and the last four concentrations are added for robust curve fitting to determine potency/efficacy values. We also describe how these data can be analyzed to predict the frequency of false-positives, false-negatives, hit rates, and confirmation rates for the HTS process as a function of screening concentration. By taking into account the compound pharmacology, this pilot-testing paradigm enables rapid assessment of the assay performance and choosing the optimal concentration for the large-scale HTS in one experiment. © 2013 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  15. Uncertainty Quantification in High Throughput Screening: Applications to Models of Endocrine Disruption, Cytotoxicity, and Zebrafish Development (GRC Drug Safety)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using uncertainty quantification, we aim to improve the quality of modeling data from high throughput screening assays for use in risk assessment. ToxCast is a large-scale screening program that analyzes thousands of chemicals using over 800 assays representing hundreds of bioche...

  16. High-throughput screening for enzyme inhibitors using frontal affinity chromatography with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ella S M; Yang, Feng; Kameyama, Akihiko; Palcic, Monica M; Hindsgaul, Ole; Schriemer, David C

    2005-10-01

    This work presents new frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) methodologies for high-throughput screening of compound libraries, designed to increase screening rates and improve sensitivity and ruggedness in performance. A FAC column constructed around the enzyme N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V) was implemented in the identification of potential enzyme inhibitors from two libraries of trisaccharides. Effluent from the FAC column was fractionated, sequentially processed via LC/MS, and referenced to a similar analysis through a control FAC column lacking the enzyme. The resulting multidimensional data sets were compared across corresponding sample and control fractions to identify binders, in a semiautomated approach. A strong binder in the protonated form at m/z 795 was identified from the first library of 81 compounds, exhibiting an estimated Kd value of 0.3 microM. Other binders yielded Kd values ranging from 0.35 to 3.35 microM. To demonstrate the improvement in performance of this FAC-LC/MS approach over the conventional online FAC/MS approach, 15 compounds from this library were blended with a second library of 1000 synthetic trisaccharides and screened against GnT-V. All ligands in the 15-compound set were identified in this larger screen, and no ligands of greater affinity than compound 1 were found. Our results show that FAC-LC/MS is a reliable method for screening large compound libraries directly and useful for large-scale ligand discovery initiatives.

  17. High throughput screening for small molecule therapy for Gaucher disease using patient tissue as the source of mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Goldin

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, results from the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Previously, wildtype GCase was used for high throughput screening (HTS of large collections of compounds to identify small molecule chaperones that could be developed as new therapies for GD. However, the compounds identified from HTS usually showed reduced potency later in confirmatory cell-based assays. An alternate strategy is to perform HTS on mutant enzyme to identify different lead compounds, including those enhancing mutant enzyme activities. We developed a new screening assay using enzyme extract prepared from the spleen of a patient with Gaucher disease with genotype N370S/N370S. In tissue extracts, GCase is in a more native physiological environment, and is present with the native activator saposin C and other potential cofactors. Using this assay, we screened a library of 250,000 compounds and identified novel modulators of mutant GCase including 14 new lead inhibitors and 30 lead activators. The activities of some of the primary hits were confirmed in subsequent cell-based assays using patient-derived fibroblasts. These results suggest that primary screening assays using enzyme extracted from tissues is an alternative approach to identify high quality, physiologically relevant lead compounds for drug development.

  18. poolHiTS: A Shifted Transversal Design based pooling strategy for high-throughput drug screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Peter J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key goal of drug discovery is to increase the throughput of small molecule screens without sacrificing screening accuracy. High-throughput screening (HTS in drug discovery involves testing a large number of compounds in a biological assay to identify active compounds. Normally, molecules from a large compound library are tested individually to identify the activity of each molecule. Usually a small number of compounds are found to be active, however the presence of false positive and negative testing errors suggests that this one-drug one-assay screening strategy can be significantly improved. Pooling designs are testing schemes that test mixtures of compounds in each assay, thereby generating a screen of the whole compound library in fewer tests. By repeatedly testing compounds in different combinations, pooling designs also allow for error-correction. These pooled designs, for specific experiment parameters, can be simply and efficiently created using the Shifted Transversal Design (STD pooling algorithm. However, drug screening contains a number of key constraints that require specific modifications if this pooling approach is to be useful for practical screen designs. Results In this paper, we introduce a pooling strategy called poolHiTS (Pooled High-Throughput Screening which is based on the STD algorithm. In poolHiTS, we implement a limit on the number of compounds that can be mixed in a single assay. In addition, we show that the STD-based pooling strategy is limited in the error-correction that it can achieve. Due to the mixing constraint, we show that it is more efficient to split a large library into smaller blocks of compounds, which are then tested using an optimized strategy repeated for each block. We package the optimal block selection algorithm into poolHiTS. The MATLAB codes for the poolHiTS algorithm and the corresponding decoding strategy are also provided. Conclusion We have produced a practical version

  19. A new versatile microarray-based method for high-throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Schückel, Julia

    2015-01-01

    and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high-throughput and versatile......Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatic tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate degrading and modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases...... that the technique can be used to analyse both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified un-characterised enzymes...

  20. Identification of several high-risk HPV inhibitors and drug targets with a novel high-throughput screening assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Männik, Andres; Mumm, Karl; Tämm, Kaido; Tamm, Tarmo; Ustav, Mart

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are oncogenic viruses that cause numerous different cancers as well as benign lesions in the epithelia. To date, there is no effective cure for an ongoing HPV infection. Here, we describe the generation process of a platform for the development of anti-HPV drugs. This system consists of engineered full-length HPV genomes that express reporter genes for evaluation of the viral copy number in all three HPV replication stages. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system by conducting high-throughput screens to identify novel high-risk HPV-specific inhibitors. At least five of the inhibitors block the function of Tdp1 and PARP1, which have been identified as essential cellular proteins for HPV replication and promising candidates for the development of antivirals against HPV and possibly against HPV-related cancers. PMID:28182794

  1. A paper-based microbial fuel cell array for rapid and high-throughput screening of electricity-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gihoon; Hassett, Daniel J; Choi, Seokheun

    2015-06-21

    There is a large global effort to improve microbial fuel cell (MFC) techniques and advance their translational potential toward practical, real-world applications. Significant boosts in MFC performance can be achieved with the development of new techniques in synthetic biology that can regulate microbial metabolic pathways or control their gene expression. For these new directions, a high-throughput and rapid screening tool for microbial biopower production is needed. In this work, a 48-well, paper-based sensing platform was developed for the high-throughput and rapid characterization of the electricity-producing capability of microbes. 48 spatially distinct wells of a sensor array were prepared by patterning 48 hydrophilic reservoirs on paper with hydrophobic wax boundaries. This paper-based platform exploited the ability of paper to quickly wick fluid and promoted bacterial attachment to the anode pads, resulting in instant current generation upon loading of the bacterial inoculum. We validated the utility of our MFC array by studying how strategic genetic modifications impacted the electrochemical activity of various Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant strains. Within just 20 minutes, we successfully determined the electricity generation capacity of eight isogenic mutants of P. aeruginosa. These efforts demonstrate that our MFC array displays highly comparable performance characteristics and identifies genes in P. aeruginosa that can trigger a higher power density.

  2. A high-throughput screen for endothelial lipase using HDL as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Paul M; Rust, Timothy; Murphy, Dennis J; Matico, Rosalie; Trill, John J; Krawiec, John A; Jurewicz, Anthony; Jaye, Michael; Harpel, Mark; Thrall, Sara; Schwartz, Benjamin

    2008-07-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a 482-amino-acid protein from the triglyceride lipase gene family that uses a Ser-His-Asp triad for catalysis. Its expression in endothelial cells and preference for phospholipids rather than triglycerides are unique. Animal models in which it is overexpressed or knocked out indicate EL levels are inversely correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). HDL-C is commonly referred to as the good form of cholesterol because it is involved in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway, in which excess cholesterol is effluxed from peripheral tissues for excretion or reabsorption. Thus, EL inhibition in humans is expected to lead to increases in HDL levels and possibly a decrease in cardiovascular disease. To discover inhibitors of EL, a coupled assay for EL has been developed, using its native substrate, HDL. Hydrolysis of HDL by EL yields free fatty acids, which are coupled through acyl-CoA synthetase, acyl-CoA oxidase, and horseradish peroxidase to produce the fluorescent species resorufin. This assay was developed into a 5-microL, 1536-well assay format, and a high-throughput screen was executed against the GSK collection. In addition to describing the screening results, novel post-HTS mechanism-of-action studies were developed for EL and applied to 1 of the screening hits as an example.

  3. An Efficient High Throughput Metabotyping Platform for Screening of Biomass Willows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia I. Corol

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Future improvement of woody biomass crops such as willow and poplar relies on our ability to select for metabolic traits that sequester more atmospheric carbon into biomass, or into useful products to replace petrochemical streams. We describe the development of metabotyping screens for willow, using combined 1D 1H-NMR-MS. A protocol was developed to overcome 1D 1H-NMR spectral alignment problems caused by variable pH and peak broadening arising from high organic acid levels and metal cations. The outcome was a robust method to allow direct statistical comparison of profiles arising from source (leaf and sink (stem tissues allowing data to be normalised to a constant weight of the soluble metabolome. We also describe the analysis of two willow biomass varieties, demonstrating how fingerprints from 1D 1H-NMR-MS vary from the top to the bottom of the plant. Automated extraction of quantitative data of 56 primary and secondary metabolites from 1D 1H-NMR spectra was realised by the construction and application of a Salix metabolite spectral library using the Chenomx software suite. The optimised metabotyping screen in conjunction with automated quantitation will enable high-throughput screening of genetic collections. It also provides genotype and tissue specific data for future modelling of carbon flow in metabolic networks.

  4. Development of a phenotyping platform for high throughput screening of nodal root angle in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Dinesh C; Singh, Vijaya; Hunt, Colleen; Mace, Emma; van Oosterom, Erik; Sulman, Richard; Jordan, David; Hammer, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    In sorghum, the growth angle of nodal roots is a major component of root system architecture. It strongly influences the spatial distribution of roots of mature plants in the soil profile, which can impact drought adaptation. However, selection for nodal root angle in sorghum breeding programs has been restricted by the absence of a suitable high throughput phenotyping platform. The aim of this study was to develop a phenotyping platform for the rapid, non-destructive and digital measurement of nodal root angle of sorghum at the seedling stage. The phenotyping platform comprises of 500 soil filled root chambers (50 × 45 × 0.3 cm in size), made of transparent perspex sheets that were placed in metal tubs and covered with polycarbonate sheets. Around 3 weeks after sowing, once the first flush of nodal roots was visible, roots were imaged in situ using an imaging box that included two digital cameras that were remotely controlled by two android tablets. Free software (openGelPhoto.tcl) allowed precise measurement of nodal root angle from the digital images. The reliability and efficiency of the platform was evaluated by screening a large nested association mapping population of sorghum and a set of hybrids in six independent experimental runs that included up to 500 plants each. The platform revealed extensive genetic variation and high heritability (repeatability) for nodal root angle. High genetic correlations and consistent ranking of genotypes across experimental runs confirmed the reproducibility of the platform. This low cost, high throughput root phenotyping platform requires no sophisticated equipment, is adaptable to most glasshouse environments and is well suited to dissect the genetic control of nodal root angle of sorghum. The platform is suitable for use in sorghum breeding programs aiming to improve drought adaptation through root system architecture manipulation.

  5. MICROSPHERE-BASED FLOW CYTOMETRY PROTEASE ASSAYS FOR USE IN PROTEASE ACTIVITY DETECTION AND HIGH-THROUGHPUT SCREENING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Zhu, Jingshu; Sklar, Larry A.; Graves, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes microsphere-based protease assays for use in flow cytometry and high-throughput screening. This platform measures a loss of fluorescence from the surface of a microsphere due to the cleavage of an attached fluorescent protease substrate by a suitable protease enzyme. The assay format can be adapted to any site or protein specific protease of interest and results can be measured in both real time and as end point fluorescence assays on a flow cytometer. End point assays are easily adapted to microplate format for flow cytometry high-throughput analysis and inhibitor screening. PMID:20938917

  6. A target-based high throughput screen yields Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase small molecule inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK, an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the gamma-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay.Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were approximately 20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome.

  7. High-throughput screening of high-capacity electrodes for hybrid Li-ion-Li-O₂ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirklin, S; Chan, M K Y; Trahey, L; Thackeray, M M; Wolverton, C

    2014-10-28

    Recent experiments have shown that lithium and oxygen can be electrochemically removed from Li5FeO4 (5Li2O·Fe2O3) and re-accommodated during discharge, creating the possibility of its use as a high-capacity electrode in a hybrid Li-ion/Li-O2 electrochemical cell. Taking this novel chemistry as a model, we use density functional theory (DFT) within a high-throughput framework to screen for analogous reactions in other materials. We search for candidate materials possessing high capacity, voltages compatible with existing electrolytes, and reasonable electrical conductivity. We identify several promising candidate materials that may operate by a similar reaction mechanism and are worthy of investigation, such as Li6MnO4, Li6CoO4, Li4MoO5 and Li8IrO6. This work paves the way for accelerated exploration of this intriguing new battery chemistry.

  8. A high-throughput colorimetric screening assay for terpene synthase activity based on substrate consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Furubayashi

    Full Text Available Terpene synthases catalyze the formation of a variety of terpene chemical structures. Systematic mutagenesis studies have been effective in providing insights into the characteristic and complex mechanisms of C-C bond formations and in exploring the enzymatic potential for inventing new chemical structures. In addition, there is growing demand to increase terpene synthase activity in heterologous hosts, given the maturation of metabolic engineering and host breeding for terpenoid synthesis. We have developed a simple screening method for the cellular activities of terpene synthases by scoring their substrate consumption based on the color loss of the cell harboring carotenoid pathways. We demonstrate that this method can be used to detect activities of various terpene synthase or prenyltransferase genes in a high-throughput manner, irrespective of the product type, enabling the mutation analysis and directed evolution of terpene synthases. We also report the possibility for substrate-specific screening system of terpene synthases by taking advantage of the substrate-size specificity of C30 and C40 carotenoid pathways.

  9. Benchmarking Ligand-Based Virtual High-Throughput Screening with the PubChem Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Butkiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapidly increasing availability of High-Throughput Screening (HTS data in the public domain, such as the PubChem database, methods for ligand-based computer-aided drug discovery (LB-CADD have the potential to accelerate and reduce the cost of probe development and drug discovery efforts in academia. We assemble nine data sets from realistic HTS campaigns representing major families of drug target proteins for benchmarking LB-CADD methods. Each data set is public domain through PubChem and carefully collated through confirmation screens validating active compounds. These data sets provide the foundation for benchmarking a new cheminformatics framework BCL::ChemInfo, which is freely available for non-commercial use. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR models are built using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs, Support Vector Machines (SVMs, Decision Trees (DTs, and Kohonen networks (KNs. Problem-specific descriptor optimization protocols are assessed including Sequential Feature Forward Selection (SFFS and various information content measures. Measures of predictive power and confidence are evaluated through cross-validation, and a consensus prediction scheme is tested that combines orthogonal machine learning algorithms into a single predictor. Enrichments ranging from 15 to 101 for a TPR cutoff of 25% are observed.

  10. A cell-based high-throughput protocol to screen entry inhibitors of highly pathogenic viruses with Traditional Chinese Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Cheng, Han; Yan, Hui; Wang, Peng-Zhan; Rong, Rong; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Cheng-Bo; Du, Rui-Kun; Rong, Li-Jun

    2017-05-01

    Emerging viruses such as Ebola virus (EBOV), Lassa virus (LASV), and avian influenza virus H5N1 (AIV) are global health concerns. Since there is very limited options (either vaccine or specific therapy) approved for humans against these viruses, there is an urgent need to develop prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. Previously we reported a high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol to identify entry inhibitors for three highly pathogenic viruses (EBOV, LASV, and AIV) using a human immunodeficiency virus-based pseudotyping platform which allows us to perform the screening in a BSL-2 facility. In this report, we have adopted this screening protocol to evaluate traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) in an effort to discover entry inhibitors against these viruses. Here we show that extracts of the following Chinese medicinal herbs exhibit potent anti-Ebola viral activities: Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, Citrus aurantium L., Viola yedoensis Makino, Prunella vulgaris L., Coix lacryma-jobi L. var. mayuen (Roman.) Stapf, Pinellia ternata (Thunb.) Breit., and Morus alba L. This study represents a proof-of-principle investigation supporting the suitability of this assay for rapid screening TCMs and identifying putative entry inhibitors for these viruses. J. Med. Virol. 89:908-916, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Activity-enhancing mutations in an E3 ubiquitin ligase identified by high-throughput mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita, Lea M; Pruneda, Jonathan N; Lo, Russell S; Fowler, Douglas M; Kim, Helen J; Hiatt, Joseph B; Shendure, Jay; Brzovic, Peter S; Fields, Stanley; Klevit, Rachel E

    2013-04-02

    Although ubiquitination plays a critical role in virtually all cellular processes, mechanistic details of ubiquitin (Ub) transfer are still being defined. To identify the molecular determinants within E3 ligases that modulate activity, we scored each member of a library of nearly 100,000 protein variants of the murine ubiquitination factor E4B (Ube4b) U-box domain for auto-ubiquitination activity in the presence of the E2 UbcH5c. This assay identified mutations that enhance activity both in vitro and in cellular p53 degradation assays. The activity-enhancing mutations fall into two distinct mechanistic classes: One increases the U-box:E2-binding affinity, and the other allosterically stimulates the formation of catalytically active conformations of the E2∼Ub conjugate. The same mutations enhance E3 activity in the presence of another E2, Ube2w, implying a common allosteric mechanism, and therefore the general applicability of our observations to other E3s. A comparison of the E3 activity with the two different E2s identified an additional variant that exhibits E3:E2 specificity. Our results highlight the general utility of high-throughput mutagenesis in delineating the molecular basis of enzyme activity.

  12. Comparison of Points of Departure for Health Risk Assessment Based on High-Throughput Screening Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Salomon; Parham, Fred; Portier, Christopher J.; Tice, Raymond R.; Krewski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: The National Research Council’s vision for toxicity testing in the 21st century anticipates that points of departure (PODs) for establishing human exposure guidelines in future risk assessments will increasingly be based on in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) data. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare different PODs for HTS data. Specifically, benchmark doses (BMDs) were compared to the signal-to-noise crossover dose (SNCD), which has been suggested as the lowest dose applicable as a POD. Methods: Hill models were fit to > 10,000 in vitro concentration–response curves, obtained for > 1,400 chemicals tested as part of the U.S. Tox21 Phase I effort. BMDs and lower confidence limits on the BMDs (BMDLs) corresponding to extra effects (i.e., changes in response relative to the maximum response) of 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% were estimated for > 8,000 curves, along with BMDs and BMDLs corresponding to additional effects (i.e., absolute changes in response) of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%. The SNCD, defined as the dose where the ratio between the additional effect and the difference between the upper and lower bounds of the two-sided 90% confidence interval on absolute effect was 1, 0.67, and 0.5, respectively, was also calculated and compared with the BMDLs. Results: The BMDL40, BMDL25, and BMDL18, defined in terms of extra effect, corresponded to the SNCD1.0, SNCD0.67, and SNCD0.5, respectively, at the median. Similarly, the BMDL25, BMDL17, and BMDL13, defined in terms of additional effect, corresponded to the SNCD1.0, SNCD0.67, and SNCD0.5, respectively, at the median. Conclusions: The SNCD may serve as a reference level that guides the determination of standardized BMDs for risk assessment based on HTS concentration–response data. The SNCD may also have application as a POD for low-dose extrapolation. Citation: Sand S, Parham F, Portier CJ, Tice RR, Krewski D. 2017. Comparison of points of departure for health risk assessment based on

  13. Sensitivity of neuroprogenitor cells to chemical-induced apoptosis using a multiplexed assay suitable for high-throughput screening*

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractHigh-throughput methods are useful for rapidly screening large numbers of chemicals for biological activity, including the perturbation of pathways that may lead to adverse cellular effects. In vitro assays for the key events of neurodevelopment, including apoptosis, may ...

  14. Plant cell wall glycosyltransferases: High-throughput recombinant expression screening and general requirements for these challenging enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Ditte Hededam; Shin, David; Tomaleri, Giovani P.

    2017-01-01

    knowledge of the enzyme(s) being studied. We have developed a rational approach to this process. We devise a pipeline comprising in silico selection of targets and construct design, and high-throughput expression screening, target enrichment, and hit identification. We have applied this pipeline to a test...

  15. High-throughput screening of chromatographic separations: IV. Ion-exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian D; Switzer, Mary; Bastek, Patrick; Kramarczyk, Jack F; Molnar, Kathleen; Yu, Tianning; Coffman, Jon

    2008-08-01

    Ion-exchange (IEX) chromatography steps are widely applied in protein purification processes because of their high capacity, selectivity, robust operation, and well-understood principles. Optimization of IEX steps typically involves resin screening and selection of the pH and counterion concentrations of the load, wash, and elution steps. Time and material constraints associated with operating laboratory columns often preclude evaluating more than 20-50 conditions during early stages of process development. To overcome this limitation, a high-throughput screening (HTS) system employing a robotic liquid handling system and 96-well filterplates was used to evaluate various operating conditions for IEX steps for monoclonal antibody (mAb) purification. A screening study for an adsorptive cation-exchange step evaluated eight different resins. Sodium chloride concentrations defining the operating boundaries of product binding and elution were established at four different pH levels for each resin. Adsorption isotherms were measured for 24 different pH and salt combinations for a single resin. An anion-exchange flowthrough step was then examined, generating data on mAb adsorption for 48 different combinations of pH and counterion concentration for three different resins. The mAb partition coefficients were calculated and used to estimate the characteristic charge of the resin-protein interaction. Host cell protein and residual Protein A impurity levels were also measured, providing information on selectivity within this operating window. The HTS system shows promise for accelerating process development of IEX steps, enabling rapid acquisition of large datasets addressing the performance of the chromatography step under many different operating conditions. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Development of Drugs for Epstein - Barr virus using High-Throughput in silico Virtual Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Thompson, Scott; Jiang, Hualiang; Lieberman, Paul M.; Luo, Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitious human herpesvirus that is causally associated with endemic forms of Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and lymphoproliferative disease in immunosuppressed individuals. On a global scale, EBV infects over 90% of the adult population and is responsible for ~1% of all human cancers. To date, there is no efficacious drug or therapy for the treatment of EBV infection and EBV-related diseases. Areas covered in this review In this review, we discuss the existing anti-EBV inhibitors and those under development. We discuss the value of different molecular targets, including EBV lytic DNA replication enzymes, as well as proteins that are expressed exclusively during latent infection, like EBNA1 and LMP1. Since the atomic structure of the EBNA1 DNA binding domain has been described, it is an attractive target for in silico methods of drug design and small molecule screening. We discuss the use of computational methods that can greatly facilitate the development of novel inhibitors and how in silico screening methods can be applied to target proteins with known structures, like EBNA1, to treat EBV infection and disease. What the reader will gain The reader will be familiarized with the problems in targeting of EBV for inhibition by small molecules and how computational methods can greatly facilitate this process. Take home message Despite the impressive efficacy of nucleoside analogues for the treatment of herpesvirus lytic infection, there remain few effective treatments for latent infections. Since EBV-latent infection persists within and contributes to the formation of EBV-associated cancers, targeting EBV latent proteins is an unmet medical need. High throughput in silico screening can accelerate the process of drug discovery for novel and selective agents that inhibit EBV latent infection and associated disease. PMID:22822721

  17. Process automation toward ultra-high-throughput screening of combinatorial one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Junhoe; Lim, Jaehong; Zheng, Yiran; Tan, Sylvia; Ang, Yi Li; Oon, Jessica; Ang, Mei Wei; Ling, Jingjing; Bode, Marcus; Lee, Su Seong

    2012-06-01

    With an aim to develop peptide-based protein capture agents that can replace antibodies for in vitro diagnosis, an ultra-high-throughput screening strategy has been investigated by automating labor-intensive, time-consuming processes that are the construction of peptide libraries, sorting of positive beads, and peptide sequencing through analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. Although instruments for automation, such as peptide synthesizers and automatic bead sorters, have been used in some groups, the overall process has not been well optimized to minimize time, cost, and efforts, as well as to maximize product quality and performance. Herein we suggest and explore several solutions to the existing problems with the automation of the key processes. The overall process optimization has been done successfully in orchestration with the technologies such as rapid cleavage of peptides from beads and semiautomatic peptide sequencing that we have developed previously. This optimization allowed one-round screening, from peptide library construction to peptide sequencing, to be completed within 4 to 5 days. We also successfully identified a 6-mer ligand for carcinoembryonic antigen-cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM 5) through three-round screenings, including one-round screening of a focused library.

  18. Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Carpentier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs including embryonic (ESC and induced pluripotent (iPSC stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs creates new opportunities to study liver metabolism, genetic diseases and infection of hepatotropic viruses (hepatitis B and C viruses in the context of specific genetic background. While supporting efficient differentiation to HLCs, the published protocols are limited in terms of differentiation into fully mature hepatocytes and in a smaller-well format. This limitation handicaps the application of these cells to high-throughput assays. Here we describe a protocol allowing efficient and consistent hepatic differentiation of hPSCs in 384-well plates into functional hepatocyte-like cells, which remain differentiated for more than 3 weeks. This protocol affords the unique opportunity to miniaturize the hPSC-based differentiation technology and facilitates screening for molecules in modulating liver differentiation, metabolism, genetic network, and response to infection or other external stimuli.

  19. Mechanisms of Antigen Adsorption Onto an Aluminum-Hydroxide Adjuvant Evaluated by High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jully, Vanessa; Mathot, Frédéric; Moniotte, Nicolas; Préat, Véronique; Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption mechanism of antigen on aluminum adjuvant can affect antigen elution at the injection site and hence the immune response. Our aim was to evaluate adsorption onto aluminum hydroxide (AH) by ligand exchange and electrostatic interactions of model proteins and antigens, bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-casein, ovalbumin (OVA), hepatitis B surface antigen, and tetanus toxin (TT). A high-throughput screening platform was developed to measure adsorption isotherms in the presence of electrolytes and ligand exchange by a fluorescence-spectroscopy method that detects the catalysis of 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate by free hydroxyl groups on AH. BSA adsorption depended on predominant electrostatic interactions. Ligand exchange contributes to the adsorption of β-casein, OVA, hepatitis B surface antigen, and TT onto AH. Based on relative surface phosphophilicity and adsorption isotherms in the presence of phosphate and fluoride, the capacities of the proteins to interact with AH by ligand exchange followed the trend: OVA aluminum-containing adjuvant. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Bayesian framework to identify methylcytosines from high-throughput bisulfite sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput bisulfite sequencing technologies have provided a comprehensive and well-fitted way to investigate DNA methylation at single-base resolution. However, there are substantial bioinformatic challenges to distinguish precisely methylcytosines from unconverted cytosines based on bisulfite sequencing data. The challenges arise, at least in part, from cell heterozygosis caused by multicellular sequencing and the still limited number of statistical methods that are available for methylcytosine calling based on bisulfite sequencing data. Here, we present an algorithm, termed Bycom, a new Bayesian model that can perform methylcytosine calling with high accuracy. Bycom considers cell heterozygosis along with sequencing errors and bisulfite conversion efficiency to improve calling accuracy. Bycom performance was compared with the performance of Lister, the method most widely used to identify methylcytosines from bisulfite sequencing data. The results showed that the performance of Bycom was better than that of Lister for data with high methylation levels. Bycom also showed higher sensitivity and specificity for low methylation level samples (<1% than Lister. A validation experiment based on reduced representation bisulfite sequencing data suggested that Bycom had a false positive rate of about 4% while maintaining an accuracy of close to 94%. This study demonstrated that Bycom had a low false calling rate at any methylation level and accurate methylcytosine calling at high methylation levels. Bycom will contribute significantly to studies aimed at recalibrating the methylation level of genomic regions based on the presence of methylcytosines.

  1. High-Throughput Genetic Screen for Synaptogenic Factors: Identification of LRP6 as Critical for Excitatory Synapse Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Sharma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic screens in invertebrates have discovered many synaptogenic genes and pathways. However, similar genetic studies have not been possible in mammals. We have optimized an automated high-throughput platform that employs automated liquid handling and imaging of primary mammalian neurons. Using this platform, we have screened 3,200 shRNAs targeting 800 proteins. One of the hits identified was LRP6, a coreceptor for canonical Wnt ligands. LRP6 regulates excitatory synaptogenesis and is selectively localized to excitatory synapses. In vivo knockdown of LRP6 leads to a reduction in the number of functional synapses. Moreover, we show that the canonical Wnt ligand, Wnt8A, promotes synaptogenesis via LRP6. These results provide a proof of principle for using a high-content approach to screen for synaptogenic factors in the mammalian nervous system and identify and characterize a Wnt ligand receptor complex that is critical for the development of functional synapses in vivo.

  2. Fluorescence imaging-based high-throughput screening of fast- and slow-cycling LOV proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuun Kawano

    Full Text Available Light-oxygen-voltage (LOV domains function as blue light-inducible molecular switches. The photosensory LOV domains derived from plants and fungi have provided an indispensable tool for optogenetics. Here we develop a high-throughput screening system to efficiently improve switch-off kinetics of LOV domains. The present system is based on fluorescence imaging of thermal reversion of a flavin cofactor bound to LOV domains. We conducted multi site-directed random mutagenesis of seven amino acid residues surrounding the flavin cofactor of the second LOV domain derived from Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2. The gene library was introduced into Escherichia coli cells. Then thermal reversion of AsLOV2 variants, respectively expressed in different bacterial colonies on agar plate, was imaged with a stereoscopic fluorescence microscope. Based on the mutagenesis and imaging-based screening, we isolated 12 different variants showing substantially faster thermal reversion kinetics than wild-type AsLOV2. Among them, AsLOV2-V416T exhibited thermal reversion with a time constant of 2.6 s, 21-fold faster than wild-type AsLOV2. With a slight modification of the present approach, we also have efficiently isolated 8 different decelerated variants, represented by AsLOV2-V416L that exhibited thermal reversion with a time constant of 4.3 × 10(3 s (78-fold slower than wild-type AsLOV2. The present approach based on fluorescence imaging of the thermal reversion of the flavin cofactor is generally applicable to a variety of blue light-inducible molecular switches and may provide a new opportunity for the development of molecular tools for emerging optogenetics.

  3. Activity in vivo of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds selected from a high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriani, Grasiella; Chessler, Anne-Danielle C; Courtemanche, Gilles; Burleigh, Barbara A; Rodriguez, Ana

    2011-08-01

    Novel technologies that include recombinant pathogens and rapid detection methods are contributing to the development of drugs for neglected diseases. Recently, the results from the first high throughput screening (HTS) to test compounds for activity against Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote infection of host cells were reported. We have selected 23 compounds from the hits of this HTS, which were reported to have high anti-trypanosomal activity and low toxicity to host cells. These compounds were highly purified and their structures confirmed by HPLC/mass spectrometry. The compounds were tested in vitro, where about half of them confirmed the anti-T. cruzi activity reported in the HTS, with IC50 values lower than 5 µM. We have also adapted a rapid assay to test anti-T. cruzi compounds in vivo using mice infected with transgenic T. cruzi expressing luciferase as a model for acute infection. The compounds that were active in vitro were also tested in vivo using this assay, where we found two related compounds with a similar structure and low in vitro IC50 values (0.11 and 0.07 µM) that reduce T. cruzi infection in the mouse model more than 90% after five days of treatment. Our findings evidence the benefits of novel technologies, such as HTS, for the drug discovery pathway of neglected diseases, but also caution about the need to confirm the results in vitro. We also show how rapid methods of in vivo screening based in luciferase-expressing parasites can be very useful to prioritize compounds early in the chain of development.

  4. Activity in vivo of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds selected from a high throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasiella Andriani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel technologies that include recombinant pathogens and rapid detection methods are contributing to the development of drugs for neglected diseases. Recently, the results from the first high throughput screening (HTS to test compounds for activity against Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote infection of host cells were reported. We have selected 23 compounds from the hits of this HTS, which were reported to have high anti-trypanosomal activity and low toxicity to host cells. These compounds were highly purified and their structures confirmed by HPLC/mass spectrometry. The compounds were tested in vitro, where about half of them confirmed the anti-T. cruzi activity reported in the HTS, with IC50 values lower than 5 µM. We have also adapted a rapid assay to test anti-T. cruzi compounds in vivo using mice infected with transgenic T. cruzi expressing luciferase as a model for acute infection. The compounds that were active in vitro were also tested in vivo using this assay, where we found two related compounds with a similar structure and low in vitro IC50 values (0.11 and 0.07 µM that reduce T. cruzi infection in the mouse model more than 90% after five days of treatment. Our findings evidence the benefits of novel technologies, such as HTS, for the drug discovery pathway of neglected diseases, but also caution about the need to confirm the results in vitro. We also show how rapid methods of in vivo screening based in luciferase-expressing parasites can be very useful to prioritize compounds early in the chain of development.

  5. Fluorescence Imaging-Based High-Throughput Screening of Fast- and Slow-Cycling LOV Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Fuun; Aono, Yuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sato, Moritoshi

    2013-01-01

    Light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domains function as blue light-inducible molecular switches. The photosensory LOV domains derived from plants and fungi have provided an indispensable tool for optogenetics. Here we develop a high-throughput screening system to efficiently improve switch-off kinetics of LOV domains. The present system is based on fluorescence imaging of thermal reversion of a flavin cofactor bound to LOV domains. We conducted multi site-directed random mutagenesis of seven amino acid residues surrounding the flavin cofactor of the second LOV domain derived from Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2). The gene library was introduced into Escherichia coli cells. Then thermal reversion of AsLOV2 variants, respectively expressed in different bacterial colonies on agar plate, was imaged with a stereoscopic fluorescence microscope. Based on the mutagenesis and imaging-based screening, we isolated 12 different variants showing substantially faster thermal reversion kinetics than wild-type AsLOV2. Among them, AsLOV2-V416T exhibited thermal reversion with a time constant of 2.6 s, 21-fold faster than wild-type AsLOV2. With a slight modification of the present approach, we also have efficiently isolated 8 different decelerated variants, represented by AsLOV2-V416L that exhibited thermal reversion with a time constant of 4.3×103 s (78-fold slower than wild-type AsLOV2). The present approach based on fluorescence imaging of the thermal reversion of the flavin cofactor is generally applicable to a variety of blue light-inducible molecular switches and may provide a new opportunity for the development of molecular tools for emerging optogenetics. PMID:24367542

  6. Common fusion transcripts identified in colorectal cancer cell lines by high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nome, Torfinn; Thomassen, Gard Os; Bruun, Jarle; Ahlquist, Terje; Bakken, Anne C; Hoff, Andreas M; Rognum, Torleiv; Nesbakken, Arild; Lorenz, Susanne; Sun, Jinchang; Barros-Silva, João Diogo; Lind, Guro E; Myklebost, Ola; Teixeira, Manuel R; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer disease in the Western world, and about 40% of the patients die from this disease. The cancer cells are commonly genetically unstable, but only a few low-frequency recurrent fusion genes have so far been reported for this disease. In this study, we present a thorough search for novel fusion transcripts in CRC using high-throughput RNA sequencing. From altogether 220 million paired-end sequence reads from seven CRC cell lines, we identified 3391 candidate fused transcripts. By stringent requirements, we nominated 11 candidate fusion transcripts for further experimental validation, of which 10 were positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Six were intrachromosomal fusion transcripts, and interestingly, three of these, AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2, were present in, respectively, 18, 18, and 20 of 21 analyzed cell lines and in, respectively, 18, 61, and 48 (17%-58%) of 106 primary cancer tissues. These three fusion transcripts were also detected in 2 to 4 of 14 normal colonic mucosa samples (14%-28%). Whole-genome sequencing identified a specific genomic breakpoint in COMMD10-AP3S1 and further indicates that both the COMMD10-AP3S1 and AKAP13-PDE8A fusion transcripts are due to genomic duplications in specific cell lines. In conclusion, we have identified AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2 as novel intrachromosomal fusion transcripts and the most highly recurring chimeric transcripts described for CRC to date. The functional and clinical relevance of these chimeric RNA molecules remains to be elucidated.

  7. Common Fusion Transcripts Identified in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines by High-Throughput RNA Sequencing12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nome, Torfinn; Thomassen, Gard OS; Bruun, Jarle; Ahlquist, Terje; Bakken, Anne C; Hoff, Andreas M; Rognum, Torleiv; Nesbakken, Arild; Lorenz, Susanne; Sun, Jinchang; Barros-Silva, João Diogo; Lind, Guro E; Myklebost, Ola; Teixeira, Manuel R; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer disease in the Western world, and about 40% of the patients die from this disease. The cancer cells are commonly genetically unstable, but only a few low-frequency recurrent fusion genes have so far been reported for this disease. In this study, we present a thorough search for novel fusion transcripts in CRC using high-throughput RNA sequencing. From altogether 220 million paired-end sequence reads from seven CRC cell lines, we identified 3391 candidate fused transcripts. By stringent requirements, we nominated 11 candidate fusion transcripts for further experimental validation, of which 10 were positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Six were intrachromosomal fusion transcripts, and interestingly, three of these, AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2, were present in, respectively, 18, 18, and 20 of 21 analyzed cell lines and in, respectively, 18, 61, and 48 (17%-58%) of 106 primary cancer tissues. These three fusion transcripts were also detected in 2 to 4 of 14 normal colonic mucosa samples (14%–28%). Whole-genome sequencing identified a specific genomic breakpoint in COMMD10-AP3S1 and further indicates that both the COMMD10-AP3S1 and AKAP13-PDE8A fusion transcripts are due to genomic duplications in specific cell lines. In conclusion, we have identified AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2 as novel intrachromosomal fusion transcripts and the most highly recurring chimeric transcripts described for CRC to date. The functional and clinical relevance of these chimeric RNA molecules remains to be elucidated. PMID:24151535

  8. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP+ to NAD+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD+, and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP+ to NAD+. This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT. PMID:27587230

  9. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP(+) to NAD(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-09-02

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD(+), and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT.

  10. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  11. SNP high-throughput screening in grapevine using the SNPlex genotyping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindo, Massimo; Vezzulli, Silvia; Coppola, Giuseppina; Cartwright, Dustin A; Zharkikh, Andrey; Velasco, Riccardo; Troggio, Michela

    2008-01-28

    Until recently, only a small number of low- and mid-throughput methods have been used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and genotyping in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.). However, following completion of the sequence of the highly heterozygous genome of Pinot Noir, it has been possible to identify millions of electronic SNPs (eSNPs) thus providing a valuable source for high-throughput genotyping methods. Herein we report the first application of the SNPlexgenotyping system in grapevine aiming at the anchoring of an eukaryotic genome. This approach combines robust SNP detection with automated assay readout and data analysis. 813 candidate eSNPs were developed from non-repetitive contigs of the assembled genome of Pinot Noir and tested in 90 progeny of Syrah x Pinot Noir cross. 563 new SNP-based markers were obtained and mapped. The efficiency rate of 69% was enhanced to 80% when multiple displacement amplification (MDA) methods were used for preparation of genomic DNA for the SNPlex assay. Unlike other SNP genotyping methods used to investigate thousands of SNPs in a few genotypes, or a few SNPs in around a thousand genotypes, the SNPlex genotyping system represents a good compromise to investigate several hundred SNPs in a hundred or more samples simultaneously. Therefore, the use of the SNPlex assay, coupled with whole genome amplification (WGA), is a good solution for future applications in well-equipped laboratories.

  12. SNP high-throughput screening in grapevine using the SNPlex™ genotyping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindo, Massimo; Vezzulli, Silvia; Coppola, Giuseppina; Cartwright, Dustin A; Zharkikh, Andrey; Velasco, Riccardo; Troggio, Michela

    2008-01-01

    Background Until recently, only a small number of low- and mid-throughput methods have been used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and genotyping in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.). However, following completion of the sequence of the highly heterozygous genome of Pinot Noir, it has been possible to identify millions of electronic SNPs (eSNPs) thus providing a valuable source for high-throughput genotyping methods. Results Herein we report the first application of the SNPlex™ genotyping system in grapevine aiming at the anchoring of an eukaryotic genome. This approach combines robust SNP detection with automated assay readout and data analysis. 813 candidate eSNPs were developed from non-repetitive contigs of the assembled genome of Pinot Noir and tested in 90 progeny of Syrah × Pinot Noir cross. 563 new SNP-based markers were obtained and mapped. The efficiency rate of 69% was enhanced to 80% when multiple displacement amplification (MDA) methods were used for preparation of genomic DNA for the SNPlex assay. Conclusion Unlike other SNP genotyping methods used to investigate thousands of SNPs in a few genotypes, or a few SNPs in around a thousand genotypes, the SNPlex genotyping system represents a good compromise to investigate several hundred SNPs in a hundred or more samples simultaneously. Therefore, the use of the SNPlex assay, coupled with whole genome amplification (WGA), is a good solution for future applications in well-equipped laboratories. PMID:18226250

  13. SNP high-throughput screening in grapevine using the SNPlex™ genotyping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velasco Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, only a small number of low- and mid-throughput methods have been used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP discovery and genotyping in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.. However, following completion of the sequence of the highly heterozygous genome of Pinot Noir, it has been possible to identify millions of electronic SNPs (eSNPs thus providing a valuable source for high-throughput genotyping methods. Results Herein we report the first application of the SNPlex™ genotyping system in grapevine aiming at the anchoring of an eukaryotic genome. This approach combines robust SNP detection with automated assay readout and data analysis. 813 candidate eSNPs were developed from non-repetitive contigs of the assembled genome of Pinot Noir and tested in 90 progeny of Syrah × Pinot Noir cross. 563 new SNP-based markers were obtained and mapped. The efficiency rate of 69% was enhanced to 80% when multiple displacement amplification (MDA methods were used for preparation of genomic DNA for the SNPlex assay. Conclusion Unlike other SNP genotyping methods used to investigate thousands of SNPs in a few genotypes, or a few SNPs in around a thousand genotypes, the SNPlex genotyping system represents a good compromise to investigate several hundred SNPs in a hundred or more samples simultaneously. Therefore, the use of the SNPlex assay, coupled with whole genome amplification (WGA, is a good solution for future applications in well-equipped laboratories.

  14. Enhancement of enzymatic colorimetric response by silver island films on high throughput screening microplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Biebele; Clement, Travis C; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we report the use of an enzyme-based hybrid platform, which is comprised of silver island films, enzymes (HRP and AP) and high-throughput screening (HTS) microplates, to enhance the colorimetric response of enzymatic reactions. The hybrid platform was designed in a two-step process: (i) deposition of SIFs onto HTS microplates with low, medium, and high loading (refers to the extent of the surface plasmon resonance peak of SIFs at 460 nm) using Tollen's reaction scheme; and (ii) attachment of b-BSA or BEA as linkers for the immobilization of enzymes. The presence of SIFs within the wells of the HTS microplates was confirmed using an optical spectrophotometer and real-color photography. Control experiments, where SIFs were omitted from the surfaces were carried out to confirm the effect of SIFs on the enzymatic colorimetric response. Significant colorimetric signal enhancement was observed for HRP or AP on SIFs (high loading) deposited HTS microplates using b-BSA (up to ~3-fold for AP and ~6-fold HRP) or BEA (up to ~7-fold for both HRP and AP), as compared to our control samples. The observed increase in colorimetric response can be attributed to the nature of BEA, which exposes surface-bound enzymes to the substrate present in bulk more efficiently than b-BSA. This study proves that SIFs can serve as a valuable tool to improve the signal output of existing bioassays carried out in HTS microplates, which can be applicable to the field biosensors and plasmonics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A high throughput Cre–lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Anthony M. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Cheung, Pamela [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Swartz, Talia H.; Li, Hongru [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Tsibane, Tshidi [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Durham, Natasha D. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Basler, Christopher F. [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Felsenfeld, Dan P. [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Benjamin K., E-mail: benjamin.chen@mssm.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes. - Highlights: • Cre recombinase viral fusion assay screens cell-free or cell–cell entry inhibitors. • This Gag-iCre based assay is specific for the entry step of HIV replication. • Screened a library of known pharmacologic compounds for HIV fusion antagonists. • Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but here are classified as entry antagonists. Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but not as entry antagonists. • The assay is compatible with pseudotyping with HIV and heterologous viruses.

  16. Identification of novel compounds inhibiting chikungunya virus-induced cell death by high throughput screening of a kinase inhibitor library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deu John M Cruz

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne arthrogenic alphavirus that causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting weeks to years. The re-emergence of CHIKV has resulted in numerous outbreaks in the eastern hemisphere, and threatens to expand in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, no effective treatment is currently available. The present study reports the use of resazurin in a cell-based high-throughput assay, and an image-based high-content assay to identify and characterize inhibitors of CHIKV-infection in vitro. CHIKV is a highly cytopathic virus that rapidly kills infected cells. Thus, cell viability of HuH-7 cells infected with CHIKV in the presence of compounds was determined by measuring metabolic reduction of resazurin to identify inhibitors of CHIKV-associated cell death. A kinase inhibitor library of 4,000 compounds was screened against CHIKV infection of HuH-7 cells using the resazurin reduction assay, and the cell toxicity was also measured in non-infected cells. Seventy-two compounds showing ≥50% inhibition property against CHIKV at 10 µM were selected as primary hits. Four compounds having a benzofuran core scaffold (CND0335, CND0364, CND0366 and CND0415, one pyrrolopyridine (CND0545 and one thiazol-carboxamide (CND3514 inhibited CHIKV-associated cell death in a dose-dependent manner, with EC50 values between 2.2 µM and 7.1 µM. Based on image analysis, these 6 hit compounds did not inhibit CHIKV replication in the host cell. However, CHIKV-infected cells manifested less prominent apoptotic blebs typical of CHIKV cytopathic effect compared with the control infection. Moreover, treatment with these compounds reduced viral titers in the medium of CHIKV-infected cells by up to 100-fold. In conclusion, this cell-based high-throughput screening assay using resazurin, combined with the image-based high content assay approach identified compounds against

  17. Host gene targets for novel influenza therapies elucidated by high-throughput RNA interference screens

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meliopoulos, VA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available targets and strategies for antiviral therapy. RNAi genome screening technologies together with bioinformatics can provide the ability to rapidly identify specific host factors involved in resistance and susceptibility to influenza virus, allowing for novel...

  18. A High-Throughput Screening Platform of Microbial Natural Products for the Discovery of Molecules with Antibiofilm Properties against Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paytubi, Sonia; de La Cruz, Mercedes; Tormo, Jose R; Martín, Jesús; González, Ignacio; González-Menendez, Victor; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando; Vicente, Francisca; Madrid, Cristina; Balsalobre, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we describe a High-Throughput Screening (HTS) to identify compounds that inhibit biofilm formation or cause the disintegration of an already formed biofilm using the Salmonella Enteritidis 3934 strain. Initially, we developed a new methodology for growing Salmonella biofilms suitable for HTS platforms. The biomass associated with biofilm at the solid-liquid interface was quantified by staining both with resazurin and crystal violet, to detect living cells and total biofilm mass, respectively. For a pilot project, a subset of 1120 extracts from the Fundación MEDINA's collection was examined to identify molecules with antibiofilm activity. This is the first validated HTS assay of microbial natural product extracts which allows for the detection of four types of activities which are not mutually exclusive: inhibition of biofilm formation, detachment of the preformed biofilm and antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells or biofilm embedded cells. Currently, several extracts have been selected for further fractionation and purification of the active compounds. In one of the natural extracts patulin has been identified as a potent molecule with antimicrobial activity against both, planktonic cells and cells within the biofilm. These findings provide a proof of concept that the developed HTS can lead to the discovery of new natural compounds with antibiofilm activity against Salmonella and its possible use as an alternative to antimicrobial therapies and traditional disinfectants.

  19. A high-throughput method to examine protein-nucleotide interactions identifies targets of the bacterial transcriptional regulatory protein fur.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao Yu

    Full Text Available The Ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur is a transcriptional regulatory protein that functions to control gene transcription in response to iron in a number of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we applied a label-free, quantitative and high-throughput analysis method, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS, to rapidly characterize Fur-DNA interactions in vitro with predicted Fur binding sequences in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. IRIS can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide complexes simultaneously and demonstrated here that seventy percent of the predicted Fur boxes in promoter regions of iron-induced genes bound to Fur in vitro with a range of affinities as observed using this microarray screening technology. Combining binding data with mRNA expression levels in a gonococcal fur mutant strain allowed us to identify five new gonococcal genes under Fur-mediated direct regulation.

  20. Functional Metagenomics: Construction and High-Throughput Screening of Fosmid Libraries for Discovery of Novel Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufarté, Lisa; Bozonnet, Sophie; Laville, Elisabeth; Cecchini, Davide A; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure; Veronese, Gabrielle Potocki

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based metagenomics is one of the most efficient approaches to boost the discovery of novel biocatalysts from the huge reservoir of uncultivated bacteria. In this chapter, we describe a highly generic procedure of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput screening for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applicable to any bacterial ecosystem, it enables the swift identification of functional enzymes that are highly efficient, alone or acting in synergy, to break down polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  1. A Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe for lipid droplets and its application in image-based high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunha; Lee, Sanghee; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-02-25

    We developed a novel fluorescent bioprobe (SF44) that can specifically visualize the cellular lipid droplets in in vitro and in vivo systems and illustrated the mechanistic rationale of its fluorogenic property. Its application to image-based high throughput screening led us to the identification of a new small-molecule modulator of lipid droplet formation. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  2. Development and implementation of a high-throughput compound screening assay for targeting disrupted ER calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Honarnejad

    Full Text Available Disrupted intracellular calcium homeostasis is believed to occur early in the cascade of events leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Particularly familial AD mutations linked to Presenilins result in exaggerated agonist-evoked calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Here we report the development of a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay utilizing a genetically-encoded FRET-based calcium indicator at single cell resolution for compound screening. The established high-throughput screening assay offers several advantages over conventional high-throughput calcium imaging technologies. We employed this assay for drug discovery in AD by screening compound libraries consisting of over 20,000 small molecules followed by structure-activity-relationship analysis. This led to the identification of Bepridil, a calcium channel antagonist drug in addition to four further lead structures capable of normalizing the potentiated FAD-PS1-induced calcium release from ER. Interestingly, it has recently been reported that Bepridil can reduce Aβ production by lowering BACE1 activity. Indeed, we also detected lowered Aβ, increased sAPPα and decreased sAPPβ fragment levels upon Bepridil treatment. The latter findings suggest that Bepridil may provide a multifactorial therapeutic modality for AD by simultaneously addressing multiple aspects of the disease.

  3. Coupled high-throughput functional screening and next generation sequencing for identification of plant polymer decomposing enzymes in metagenomic libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari eNyyssönen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sequencing technologies generate new predictions and hypotheses about the functional roles of environmental microorganisms. Yet, until we can test these predictions at a scale that matches our ability to generate them, most of them will remain as hypotheses. Function-based mining of metagenomic libraries can provide direct linkages between genes, metabolic traits and microbial taxa and thus bridge this gap between sequence data generation and functional predictions. Here we developed high-throughput screening assays for function-based characterization of activities involved in plant polymer decomposition from environmental metagenomic libraries. The multiplexed assays use fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, combine automated liquid handling and use a genetically modified expression host to enable simultaneous screening of 12,160 clones for 14 activities in a total of 170,240 reactions. Using this platform we identified 374 (0.26 % cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin, starch, phosphate and protein hydrolyzing clones from fosmid libraries prepared from decomposing leaf litter. Sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, followed by assembly and gene prediction of a subset of 95 fosmid clones, identified a broad range of bacterial phyla, including Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, multiple Proteobacteria sub-phyla in addition to some Fungi. Carbohydrate-active enzyme genes from 20 different glycoside hydrolase families were detected. Using tetranucleotide frequency binning of fosmid sequences, multiple enzyme activities from distinct fosmids were linked, demonstrating how biochemically-confirmed functional traits in environmental metagenomes may be attributed to groups of specific organisms. Overall, our results demonstrate how functional screening of metagenomic libraries can be used to connect microbial functionality to community composition and, as a result, complement large-scale metagenomic sequencing efforts.

  4. Development of a high-throughput cell-based reporter assay for screening of JAK3 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chang-Hong; Bach, Erika A; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2011-04-01

    JAK3 is an ideal target for the treatment of immune-related diseases and the prevention of organ allograft rejection. Several JAK3 inhibitors have been identified by biochemical enzymatic assays, but the majority display significant off-target effects on JAK2. Therefore, there is a need to develop new experimental approaches to identify compounds that specifically inhibit JAK3. Here, we show that in 32D/IL-2Rβ cells, STAT5 becomes phosphorylated by an IL-3/JAK2- or IL-2/JAK3-dependent pathway. Importantly, the selective JAK3 inhibitor CP-690,550 blocked the phosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of STAT5 following treatment of cells with IL-2 but not with IL-3. In an attempt to use the cells for large-scale chemical screens to identify JAK3 inhibitors, we established a cell line, 32D/IL-2Rβ/6xSTAT5, stably expressing a STAT5 reporter gene. Treatment of this cell line with IL-2 or IL-3 dramatically increased the reporter activity in a high-throughput format. As expected, CP-690,550 selectively inhibited the activity of the 6xSTAT5 reporter following treatment with IL-2. By contrast, the pan-JAK inhibitor curcumin inhibited the activity of this reporter following treatment with either IL-2 or IL-3. Thus, this study indicates that the STAT5 reporter cell line can be used as an efficacious cellular model for chemical screens to identify selective JAK3 inhibitors.

  5. High-throughput screening of Australian marine organism extracts for bioactive molecules affecting the cellular storage of neutral lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rae

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids in specialised organelles called lipid droplets (LDs. Using a simple cell-based assay and open-source software we established a high throughput screen for LD formation in A431 cells in order to identify small bioactive molecules affecting lipid storage. Screening an n-butanol extract library from Australian marine organisms we identified 114 extracts that produced either an increase or a decrease in LD formation in fatty acid-treated A431 cells with varying degrees of cytotoxicity. We selected for further analysis a non-cytotoxic extract derived from the genus Spongia (Heterofibria. Solvent partitioning, HPLC fractionation and spectroscopic analysis (NMR, MS identified a family of related molecules within this extract with unique structural features, a subset of which reduced LD formation. We selected one of these molecules, heterofibrin A1, for more detailed cellular analysis. Inhibition of LD biogenesis by heterofibrin A1 was observed in both A431 cells and AML12 hepatocytes. The activity of heterofibrin A1 was dose dependent with 20 µM inhibiting LD formation and triglyceride accumulation by ∼50% in the presence of 50 µM oleic acid. Using a fluorescent fatty acid analogue we found that heterofibrin A1 significantly reduces the intracellular accumulation of fatty acids and results in the formation of distinct fatty acid metabolites in both cultured cells and in embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio. In summary we have shown using readily accessible software and a relatively simple assay system that we can identify and isolate bioactive molecules from marine extracts, which affect the formation of LDs and the metabolism of fatty acids both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. High throughput screening for small molecule enhancers of the interferon signaling pathway to drive next-generation antiviral drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhara A Patel

    Full Text Available Most of current strategies for antiviral therapeutics target the virus specifically and directly, but an alternative approach to drug discovery might be to enhance the immune response to a broad range of viruses. Based on clinical observation in humans and successful genetic strategies in experimental models, we reasoned that an improved interferon (IFN signaling system might better protect against viral infection. Here we aimed to identify small molecular weight compounds that might mimic this beneficial effect and improve antiviral defense. Accordingly, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS assay to identify small molecules that enhance the IFN signaling pathway components. The assay is based on a phenotypic screen for increased IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE activity in a fully automated and robust format (Z'>0.7. Application of this assay system to a library of 2240 compounds (including 2160 already approved or approvable drugs led to the identification of 64 compounds with significant ISRE activity. From these, we chose the anthracycline antibiotic, idarubicin, for further validation and mechanism based on activity in the sub-µM range. We found that idarubicin action to increase ISRE activity was manifest by other members of this drug class and was independent of cytotoxic or topoisomerase inhibitory effects as well as endogenous IFN signaling or production. We also observed that this compound conferred a consequent increase in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression and a significant antiviral effect using a similar dose-range in a cell-culture system inoculated with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The antiviral effect was also found at compound concentrations below the ones observed for cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results provide proof of concept for using activators of components of the IFN signaling pathway to improve IFN efficacy and antiviral immune defense as well as a validated HTS approach to identify

  7. One-Step Seeding of Neural Stem Cells with Vitronectin-Supplemented Medium for High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Li, Rong; Long, Yan; Titus, Steve; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Human neuronal cells differentiated from induced pluripotent cells have emerged as a new model system for the study of disease pathophysiology and evaluation of drug efficacy. Differentiated neuronal cells are more similar in genetics and biological content to human brain cells than other animal disease models. However, culture of neuronal cells in assay plates requires a labor-intensive procedure of plate precoating, hampering its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS). We developed a simplified method with one-step seeding of neural stem cells in assay plates by supplementing the medium with a recombinant human vitronectin (VTN), thus avoiding plate precoating. Robust results were obtained from cell viability, calcium response, and neurite outgrowth assays using this new method. Our data demonstrate that this approach greatly simplifies high-throughput assays using neuronal cells differentiated from human stem cells for translational research.

  8. Automated phenotype recognition for zebrafish embryo based in vivo high throughput toxicity screening of engineered nano-materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Lin, Sijie; Rallo, Robert; Zhao, Yan; Damoiseaux, Robert; Xia, Tian; Lin, Shuo; Nel, Andre; Cohen, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    A phenotype recognition model was developed for high throughput screening (HTS) of engineered Nano-Materials (eNMs) toxicity using zebrafish embryo developmental response classified, from automatically captured images and without manual manipulation of zebrafish positioning, by three basic phenotypes (i.e., hatched, unhatched, and dead). The recognition model was built with a set of vectorial descriptors providing image color and texture information. The best performing model was attained with three image descriptors (color histogram, representative color, and color layout) identified as most suitable from an initial pool of six descriptors. This model had an average recognition accuracy of 97.40±0.95% in a 10-fold cross-validation and 93.75% in a stress test of low quality zebrafish images. The present work has shown that a phenotyping model can be developed with accurate recognition ability suitable for zebrafish-based HTS assays. Although the present methodology was successfully demonstrated for only three basic zebrafish embryonic phenotypes, it can be readily adapted to incorporate more subtle phenotypes.

  9. Automated phenotype recognition for zebrafish embryo based in vivo high throughput toxicity screening of engineered nano-materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Liu

    Full Text Available A phenotype recognition model was developed for high throughput screening (HTS of engineered Nano-Materials (eNMs toxicity using zebrafish embryo developmental response classified, from automatically captured images and without manual manipulation of zebrafish positioning, by three basic phenotypes (i.e., hatched, unhatched, and dead. The recognition model was built with a set of vectorial descriptors providing image color and texture information. The best performing model was attained with three image descriptors (color histogram, representative color, and color layout identified as most suitable from an initial pool of six descriptors. This model had an average recognition accuracy of 97.40±0.95% in a 10-fold cross-validation and 93.75% in a stress test of low quality zebrafish images. The present work has shown that a phenotyping model can be developed with accurate recognition ability suitable for zebrafish-based HTS assays. Although the present methodology was successfully demonstrated for only three basic zebrafish embryonic phenotypes, it can be readily adapted to incorporate more subtle phenotypes.

  10. Rapid Generation of miRNA Inhibitor Leads by Bioinformatics and Efficient High-Throughput Screening Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Christopher L; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Strivelli, Jacqueline; Disney, Matthew D; Phinney, Donald G

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) has opened an entire new avenue for drug development. These short (15-22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs, which function in RNA silencing and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, have been shown to critically affect numerous pathways in both development and disease progression. Current miRNA drug development focuses on either reintroducing the miRNA into cells through the use of a miRNA mimic or inhibiting its function via use of a synthetic antagomir. Although these methods have shown some success as therapeutics, they face challenges particularly with regard to cellular uptake and for use as systemic reagents. We recently presented a novel mechanism of inhibiting miR-544 by directed inhibition of miRNA biogenesis. We found that inhibition of DICER processing of miR-544 through the use of a small molecule abolished miR-544 function in regulating adaptation of breast cancer cells to hypoxic stress. Herein, we describe a protocol that utilizes bioinformatics to first identify lead small molecules that bind to DICER cleavage sites in pre-miRNAs and then employ an efficient, high-throughput fluorescent-based screening system to determine the inhibitory potential of the lead compounds and their derivatives.

  11. High-throughput Screening of Recalcitrance Variations in Lignocellulosic Biomass: Total Lignin, Lignin Monomers, and Enzymatic Sugar Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Stephen R.; Sykes, Robert W.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Lupoi, Jason S.; Doepkke, Crissa; Tucker, Melvin P.; Schuster, Logan A.; Mazza, Kimberly; Himmel, Michael E.; Davis, Mark F.; Gjersing, Erica

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels, chemicals, and other commodities has been explored as one possible pathway toward reductions in the use of non-renewable energy sources. In order to identify which plants, out of a diverse pool, have the desired chemical traits for downstream applications, attributes, such as cellulose and lignin content, or monomeric sugar release following an enzymatic saccharification, must be compared. The experimental and data analysis protocols of the standard methods of analysis can be time-consuming, thereby limiting the number of samples that can be measured. High-throughput (HTP) methods alleviate the shortcomings of the standard methods, and permit the rapid screening of available samples to isolate those possessing the desired traits. This study illustrates the HTP sugar release and pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry pipelines employed at the National Renewable Energy Lab. These pipelines have enabled the efficient assessment of thousands of plants while decreasing experimental time and costs through reductions in labor and consumables. PMID:26437006

  12. High-throughput Screening of Recalcitrance Variations in Lignocellulosic Biomass: Total Lignin, Lignin Monomers, and Enzymatic Sugar Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Stephen R; Sykes, Robert W; Turner, Geoffrey B; Lupoi, Jason S; Doepkke, Crissa; Tucker, Melvin P; Schuster, Logan A; Mazza, Kimberly; Himmel, Michael E; Davis, Mark F; Gjersing, Erica

    2015-09-15

    The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels, chemicals, and other commodities has been explored as one possible pathway toward reductions in the use of non-renewable energy sources. In order to identify which plants, out of a diverse pool, have the desired chemical traits for downstream applications, attributes, such as cellulose and lignin content, or monomeric sugar release following an enzymatic saccharification, must be compared. The experimental and data analysis protocols of the standard methods of analysis can be time-consuming, thereby limiting the number of samples that can be measured. High-throughput (HTP) methods alleviate the shortcomings of the standard methods, and permit the rapid screening of available samples to isolate those possessing the desired traits. This study illustrates the HTP sugar release and pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry pipelines employed at the National Renewable Energy Lab. These pipelines have enabled the efficient assessment of thousands of plants while decreasing experimental time and costs through reductions in labor and consumables.

  13. High-Throughput Screening of Recalcitrance Variations in Lignocellulosic Biomass: Total Lignin, Lignin Monomers, and Enzymatic Sugar Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, Stephen R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sykes, Robert W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Turner, Geoffrey B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lupoi, Jason S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Doepkke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tucker, Melvin P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schuster, Logan A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mazza, Kimberly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Himmel, Michael E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davis, Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gjersing, Erica [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels, chemicals, and other commodities has been explored as one possible pathway toward reductions in the use of non-renewable energy sources. In order to identify which plants, out of a diverse pool, have the desired chemical traits for downstream applications, attributes, such as cellulose and lignin content, or monomeric sugar release following an enzymatic saccharification, must be compared. The experimental and data analysis protocols of the standard methods of analysis can be time-consuming, thereby limiting the number of samples that can be measured. High-throughput (HTP) methods alleviate the shortcomings of the standard methods, and permit the rapid screening of available samples to isolate those possessing the desired traits. This study illustrates the HTP sugar release and pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry pipelines employed at the National Renewable Energy Lab. These pipelines have enabled the efficient assessment of thousands of plants while decreasing experimental time and costs through reductions in labor and consumables.

  14. Chiral amine synthesis using ω-transaminases: an amine donor that displaces equilibria and enables high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Anthony P; Turner, Nicholas J; O'Reilly, Elaine

    2014-09-26

    The widespread application of ω-transaminases as biocatalysts for chiral amine synthesis has been hampered by fundamental challenges, including unfavorable equilibrium positions and product inhibition. Herein, an efficient process that allows reactions to proceed in high conversion in the absence of by-product removal using only one equivalent of a diamine donor (ortho-xylylenediamine) is reported. This operationally simple method is compatible with the most widely used (R)- and (S)-selective ω-TAs and is particularly suitable for the conversion of substrates with unfavorable equilibrium positions (e.g., 1-indanone). Significantly, spontaneous polymerization of the isoindole by-product generates colored derivatives, providing a high-throughput screening platform to identify desired ω-TA activity. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  15. High-Throughput Synthesis, Screening, and Scale-Up of Optimized Conducting Indium Tin Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, P; Makwana, N. M.; Tighe, C. J.; Gruar, R. I.; Parkin, I. P.; Carmalt, C. J.; Darr, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    A high-throughput optimization and subsequent scale-up methodology has been used for the synthesis of conductive tin-doped indium oxide (known as ITO) nanoparticles. ITO nanoparticles with up to 12 at % Sn were synthesized using a laboratory scale (15 g/hour by dry mass) continuous hydrothermal synthesis process, and the as-synthesized powders were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscop...

  16. Second-generation high-throughput forward genetic screen in mice to isolate subtle behavioral mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Kim, Kyungin; Joseph, Chryshanthi; Thomas, Lisa C; Hong, Heekyung; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2011-09-13

    Forward genetic screens have been highly successful in revealing roles of genes and pathways in complex biological events. Traditionally these screens have focused on isolating mutants with the greatest phenotypic deviance, with the hopes of discovering genes that are central to the biological event being investigated. Behavioral screens in mice typically use simple activity-based assays as endophenotypes for more complex emotional states of the animal. They generally set the selection threshold for a putative mutant at 3 SDs (z score of 3) from the average behavior of normal animals to minimize false-positive results. Behavioral screens using a high threshold for detection have generally had limited success, with high false-positive rates and subtle phenotypic differences that have made mapping and cloning difficult. In addition, targeted reverse genetic approaches have shown that when genes central to behaviors such as open field behavior, psychostimulant response, and learning and memory tasks are mutated, they produce subtle phenotypes that differ from wild-type animals by 1 to 2 SDs (z scores of 1 to 2). We have conducted a second-generation (G2) dominant N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen especially designed to detect subtle behavioral mutants for open field activity and psychostimulant response behaviors. We successfully detect mutant lines with only 1 to 2 SD shifts in mean response compared with wild-type control animals and present a robust statistical and methodological framework for conducting such forward genetic screens. Using this methodology we have screened 229 ENU mutant lines and have identified 15 heritable mutant lines. We conclude that for screens in mice that use activity-based endophenotypic measurements for complex behavioral states, this G2 screening approach yields better results.

  17. Quantitative digital image analysis of chromogenic assays for high throughput screening of alpha-amylase mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Manoharan; Priyadharshini, Ramachandran; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis-based method for high throughput screening of an alpha-amylase mutant library using chromogenic assays was developed. Assays were performed in microplates and high resolution images of the assay plates were read using the Virtual Microplate Reader (VMR) script to quantify the concentration of the chromogen. This method is fast and sensitive in quantifying 0.025-0.3 mg starch/ml as well as 0.05-0.75 mg glucose/ml. It was also an effective screening method for improved alpha-amylase activity with a coefficient of variance of 18%.

  18. Identification of β-hematin inhibitors in a high-throughput screening effort reveals scaffolds with in vitro antimalarial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca D. Sandlin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of drug resistant strains of Plasmodium spp. creates a critical need for the development of novel antimalarials. Formation of hemozoin, a crystalline heme detoxification process vital to parasite survival serves as an important drug target. The quinoline antimalarials including chloroquine and amodiaquine owe their antimalarial activity to inhibition of hemozoin formation. Though in vivo formation of hemozoin occurs within the presence of neutral lipids, the lipophilic detergent NP-40 was previously shown to serve as a surrogate in the β-hematin (synthetic hemozoin formation process. Consequently, an NP-40 mediated β-hematin formation assay was developed for use in high-throughput screening. Here, the assay was utilized to screen 144,330 compounds for the identification of inhibitors of crystallization, resulting in 530 hits. To establish the effectiveness of these target-based β-hematin inhibitors against Plasmodium falciparum, each hit was further tested in cultures of parasitized red blood cells. This effort revealed that 171 of the β-hematin inhibitors are also active against the parasite. Dose–response data identified 73 of these β-hematin inhibitors have IC50 values ⩽5 μM, including 25 compounds with nanomolar activity against P. falciparum. A scaffold-based analysis of this data identified 14 primary scaffolds that represent 46% of the 530 total hits. Representative compounds from each of the classes were further assessed for hemozoin inhibitory activity in P. falciparum infected human erythrocytes. Each of the hit compounds tested were found to be positive inhibitors, while a negative control did not perturb this biological pathway in culture.

  19. MCentridFS: a tool for identifying module biomarkers for multi-phenotypes from high-throughput data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhenshu; Zhang, Wanwei; Zeng, Tao; Chen, Luonan

    2014-11-01

    Systematically identifying biomarkers, in particular, network biomarkers, from high-throughput data is an important and challenging task, and many methods for two-class comparison have been developed to exploit information of high-throughput data. However, as the high-throughput data with multi-phenotypes are available, there is a great need to develop effective multi-classification models. In this study, we proposed a novel approach, called MCentridFS (Multi-class Centroid Feature Selection), to systematically identify responsive modules or network biomarkers for classifying multi-phenotypes from high-throughput data. MCentridFS formulated the multi-classification model by network modules as a binary integer linear programming problem, which can be solved efficiently and effectively in an accurate manner. The approach is evaluated with respect to two diseases, i.e., multi-stages HCV-induced dysplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma and multi-tissues breast cancer, both of which demonstrated the high classification rate and the cross-validation rate of the approach. The computational results of the five-fold cross-validation of the two data show that MCentridFS outperforms the state-of-the-art multi-classification methods. We further verified the effectiveness of MCentridFS to characterize the multi-phenotype processes using module biomarkers by two independent datasets. In addition, functional enrichment analysis revealed that the identified network modules are strongly related to the corresponding biological processes and pathways. All these results suggest that it can serve as a useful tool for module biomarker detection in multiple biological processes or multi-classification problems by exploring both big biological data and network information. The Matlab code for MCentridFS is freely available from http://www.sysbio.ac.cn/cb/chenlab/images/MCentridFS.rar.

  20. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10 to 20 mAcm(2). The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150 mAcm(2), respectively.

  1. A high-throughput, restriction-free cloning and screening strategy based on ccdB-gene replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Bjarte Aarmo; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti Schrøder; Bjerga, Gro Elin Kjæreng

    2014-03-10

    In high-throughput demanding fields, such as biotechnology and structural biology, molecular cloning is an essential tool in obtaining high yields of recombinant protein. Here, we address recently developed restriction-free methods in cloning, and present a more cost-efficient protocol that has been optimized to improve both cloning and clone screening. In our case study, three homologous β-lactamase genes were successfully cloned using these restriction-free protocols. To clone the genes, we chose a gene replacement strategy, where the recombinant genes contained overhangs that targeted a region of the expression vector including a cytotoxin-encoding ccdB-gene. We provide further evidence that gene replacement can be applied with high-throughput cloning protocols. Targeting a replacement of the ccdB-gene was found to be very successful for counterselection using these protocols. This eliminated the need for treatment with the restriction enzyme DpnI that has so far been the preferred clone selection approach. We thus present an optimized cloning protocol using a restriction-free ccdB-gene replacement strategy, which allows for parallel cloning at a high-throughput level.

  2. High-throughput micro-plate HCI-vanillin assay for screening tannin content in sorghum grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herald, Thomas J; Gadgil, Priyadarshini; Perumal, Ramasamy; Bean, Scott R; Wilson, Jeff D

    2014-08-01

    The HCI-vanillin assay is a well-accepted method for determining tannin content in sorghum but is limited to small sample sets due to the time-consuming nature of the method. The objective was to develop an accurate and repeatable high-throughput 96-well plate assay for breeders to screen large sample sets of sorghum for tannin content. Validation of the high-throughput assay was tested on 25 sorghums suspected to contain tannin. Approximately 30 measurements per day were completed using the conventional assay compared to 224 measurements using the 96-well platform. The correlation between the two tannin assays was 0.98. The coefficient of variation (CV) was 3.54% and 3.21% for the 96-well and conventional method, respectively. The 96-well assay exhibited good repeatability, with the inter-plate CV between 2.77% and 4.85%. The high-throughput 96-well HCI-vanillin assay exhibited an eightfold increase in the number of measurements completed and was as accurate as the conventional HCI-vanillin assay. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. High throughput quantitative expression screening and purification applied to recombinant disulfide-rich venom proteins produced in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez, Natalie J; Nozach, Hervé; Blemont, Marilyne; Vincentelli, Renaud

    2014-07-30

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, purifying proteins is sometimes challenging since many proteins are expressed in an insoluble form. When working with difficult or multiple targets it is therefore recommended to use high throughput (HTP) protein expression screening on a small scale (1-4 ml cultures) to quickly identify conditions for soluble expression. To cope with the various structural genomics programs of the lab, a quantitative (within a range of 0.1-100 mg/L culture of recombinant protein) and HTP protein expression screening protocol was implemented and validated on thousands of proteins. The protocols were automated with the use of a liquid handling robot but can also be performed manually without specialized equipment. Disulfide-rich venom proteins are gaining increasing recognition for their potential as therapeutic drug leads. They can be highly potent and selective, but their complex disulfide bond networks make them challenging to produce. As a member of the FP7 European Venomics project (www.venomics.eu), our challenge is to develop successful production strategies with the aim of producing thousands of novel venom proteins for functional characterization. Aided by the redox properties of disulfide bond isomerase DsbC, we adapted our HTP production pipeline for the expression of oxidized, functional venom peptides in the E. coli cytoplasm. The protocols are also applicable to the production of diverse disulfide-rich proteins. Here we demonstrate our pipeline applied to the production of animal venom proteins. With the protocols described herein it is likely that soluble disulfide-rich proteins will be obtained in as little as a week. Even from a small scale, there is the potential to use the purified proteins for validating the oxidation state by mass spectrometry, for characterization in pilot studies, or for sensitive

  4. Plant cell wall glycosyltransferases: High-throughput recombinant expression screening and general requirements for these challenging enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte Hededam Welner

    Full Text Available Molecular characterization of plant cell wall glycosyltransferases is a critical step towards understanding the biosynthesis of the complex plant cell wall, and ultimately for efficient engineering of biofuel and agricultural crops. The majority of these enzymes have proven very difficult to obtain in the needed amount and purity for such molecular studies, and recombinant cell wall glycosyltransferase production efforts have largely failed. A daunting number of strategies can be employed to overcome this challenge, including optimization of DNA and protein sequences, choice of expression organism, expression conditions, co-expression partners, purification methods, and optimization of protein solubility and stability. Hence researchers are presented with thousands of potential conditions to test. Ultimately, the subset of conditions that will be sampled depends on practical considerations and prior knowledge of the enzyme(s being studied. We have developed a rational approach to this process. We devise a pipeline comprising in silico selection of targets and construct design, and high-throughput expression screening, target enrichment, and hit identification. We have applied this pipeline to a test set of Arabidopsis thaliana cell wall glycosyltransferases known to be challenging to obtain in soluble form, as well as to a library of cell wall glycosyltransferases from other plants including agricultural and biofuel crops. The screening results suggest that recombinant cell wall glycosyltransferases in general have a very low soluble:insoluble ratio in lysates from heterologous expression cultures, and that co-expression of chaperones as well as lysis buffer optimization can increase this ratio. We have applied the identified preferred conditions to Reversibly Glycosylated Polypeptide 1 from Arabidopsis thaliana, and processed this enzyme to near-purity in unprecedented milligram amounts. The obtained preparation of Reversibly Glycosylated

  5. Isolation, Identification and High-Throughput Screening of Neutral Lipid Producing Indigenous Microalgae from South African Aquatic Habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbi, S T; Majeke, B M; Olaniran, A O; Mutanda, T

    2017-05-01

    Exploring indigenous microalgae capable of producing significant amounts of neutral lipids through high-throughput screening is crucial for sustainable biodiesel production. In this study, 31 indigenous microalgal strains were isolated from diverse aquatic habitats in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Eight superior lipid-producing strains were selected for further analysis, based on Nile red fluorescence microscopy screening. The microalgal isolates were identified to belong to the genera Chlorella, Neochloris and Chlamydomonas via morpho-taxonomic and molecular approach by 18S rRNA gene sequencing. Chlorella vulgaris PH2 had the highest specific growth rate (μ) and lowest doubling time of 0.24 day -1 and 2.89 ± 0.05 day -1 , respectively. Chlorella vulgaris T4 had the highest biomass productivity of 35.71 ± 0.03 mg L -1 day -1 . Chlorella vulgaris PH2 had the highest lipid content of 34.28 ± 0.47 and 38 ± 9.2% (dcw) as determined by gravimetric analysis and the sulfo-phospho-vanillin (SPV) method, respectively. Chlorella vulgaris PH2 exhibited a high content of saturated fatty acids, while Chlorella sp. T4 exhibited a high total content of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids with a low content of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The preponderance of neutral lipids suggests that Chlorella sp. T4 is a suitable candidate for biomass feedstock for biodiesel production.

  6. Identification and use of fluorescent dyes for plant cell wall imaging using high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles T; Carroll, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls define cell shape during development and are composed of interlaced carbohydrate and protein networks. Fluorescent dyes have long been used to label plant cell walls, enabling optical microscopy-based interrogation of cell wall structure and composition. However, the specific cell wall components to which these dyes bind are often poorly defined. The availability of fluorescent compound libraries provides the potential to screen for and identify new fluorescent compounds that interact with specific plant cell wall components, enabling the study of cell wall architecture in intact, living tissues. Here, we describe a technique for screening fluorescent compound libraries for enhanced fluorescence upon interaction with plant cell walls, a secondary screening method to identify which cell wall components interact with a given dye, and a protocol for staining and observing Arabidopsis seedlings using a fluorescent cell wall-labeling dye. These methods have the potential to be applied to screening for differences in cell wall structure and composition among genetically diverse plant varieties or species.

  7. Semi-High Throughput Screening for Potential Drought-tolerance in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) Germplasm Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepper, Caleb; Mou, Beiquan

    2015-04-17

    This protocol describes a method by which a large collection of the leafy green vegetable lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) germplasm was screened for likely drought-tolerance traits. Fresh water availability for agricultural use is a growing concern across the United States as well as many regions of the world. Short-term drought events along with regulatory intervention in the regulation of water availability coupled with the looming threat of long-term climate shifts that may lead to reduced precipitation in many important agricultural regions has increased the need to hasten the development of crops adapted for improved water use efficiency in order to maintain or expand production in the coming years. This protocol is not meant as a step-by-step guide to identifying at either the physiological or molecular level drought-tolerance traits in lettuce, but rather is a method developed and refined through the screening of thousands of different lettuce varieties. The nature of this screen is based in part on the streamlined measurements focusing on only three water-stress indicators: leaf relative water content, wilt, and differential plant growth following drought-stress. The purpose of rapidly screening a large germplasm collection is to narrow the candidate pool to a point in which more intensive physiological, molecular, and genetic methods can be applied to identify specific drought-tolerant traits in either the lab or field. Candidates can also be directly incorporated into breeding programs as a source of drought-tolerance traits.

  8. High-throughput virtual screening with e-pharmacophore and molecular simulations study in the designing of pancreatic lipase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeramachaneni GK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ganesh Kumar Veeramachaneni, K Kranthi Raj, Leela Madhuri Chalasani, Jayakumar Singh Bondili, Venkateswara Rao Talluri Department of Biotechnology, K L University, Guntur, India Background: Obesity is a progressive metabolic disorder in the current world population, and is characterized by the excess deposition of fat in the adipose tissue. Pancreatic lipase is one of the key enzymes in the hydrolysis of triglycerides into monoglycerides and free fatty acids, and is thus considered a promising target for the treatment of obesity. The present drugs used for treating obesity do not give satisfactory results, and on prolonged usage result in severe side effects. In view of the drastic increase in the obese population day-to-day, there is a greater need to discover new drugs with lesser side effects.Materials and methods: High-throughput virtual screening combined with e-pharmacophore screening and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion and PAINS (pan-assay interference compounds filters were applied to screen out the ligand molecules from the ZINC natural molecule database. The screened molecules were subjected to Glide XP docking to study the molecular interactions broadly. Further, molecular dynamic simulations were used to validate the stability of the enzyme–ligand complexes. Finally, the molecules with better results were optimized for in vitro testing.Results: The screening protocols identified eight hits from the natural molecule database, which were further filtered through pharmacological filters. The final four hits were subjected to extra precision docking, and the complexes were finally studied with molecular dynamic simulations. The results pointed to the zinc 85893731 molecule as the most stable in the binding pocket, producing consistent H-bond interaction with Ser152 (G=-7.18. The optimized lead molecule exhibited good docking score, better fit, and improved ADME profile.Conclusion: The present study specifies

  9. Identifying models of dielectric breakdown strength from high-throughput data via genetic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fenglin; Mueller, Tim

    2017-12-14

    The identification of models capable of rapidly predicting material properties enables rapid screening of large numbers of materials and facilitates the design of new materials. One of the leading challenges for computational researchers is determining the best ways to analyze large material data sets to identify models that can rapidly predict a given property. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of genetic programming to generate simple models of dielectric breakdown based on 82 representative dielectric materials. We identified the band gap Eg and phonon cut-off frequency ωmax as the two most relevant features, and new classes of models featuring functions of Eg and ωmax were uncovered. The genetic programming approach was found to outperform other approaches for generating models, and we discuss some of the advantages of this approach.

  10. Utilizing high throughput screening data for predictive toxicology models: protocols and application to MLSCN assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Rajarshi; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2008-06-01

    Computational toxicology is emerging as an encouraging alternative to experimental testing. The Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network (MLSCN) as part of the NIH Molecular Libraries Roadmap has recently started generating large and diverse screening datasets, which are publicly available in PubChem. In this report, we investigate various aspects of developing computational models to predict cell toxicity based on cell proliferation screening data generated in the MLSCN. By capturing feature-based information in those datasets, such predictive models would be useful in evaluating cell-based screening results in general (for example from reporter assays) and could be used as an aid to identify and eliminate potentially undesired compounds. Specifically we present the results of random forest ensemble models developed using different cell proliferation datasets and highlight protocols to take into account their extremely imbalanced nature. Depending on the nature of the datasets and the descriptors employed we were able to achieve percentage correct classification rates between 70% and 85% on the prediction set, though the accuracy rate dropped significantly when the models were applied to in vivo data. In this context we also compare the MLSCN cell proliferation results with animal acute toxicity data to investigate to what extent animal toxicity can be correlated and potentially predicted by proliferation results. Finally, we present a visualization technique that allows one to compare a new dataset to the training set of the models to decide whether the new dataset may be reliably predicted.

  11. A cell-free fluorometric high-throughput screen for inhibitors of Rtt109-catalyzed histone acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme L Dahlin

    Full Text Available The lysine acetyltransferase (KAT Rtt109 forms a complex with Vps75 and catalyzes the acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56ac in the Asf1-H3-H4 complex. Rtt109 and H3K56ac are vital for replication-coupled nucleosome assembly and genotoxic resistance in yeast and pathogenic fungal species such as Candida albicans. Remarkably, sequence homologs of Rtt109 are absent in humans. Therefore, inhibitors of Rtt109 are hypothesized as potential and minimally toxic antifungal agents. Herein, we report the development and optimization of a cell-free fluorometric high-throughput screen (HTS for small-molecule inhibitors of Rtt109-catalyzed histone acetylation. The KAT component of the assay consists of the yeast Rtt109-Vps75 complex, while the histone substrate complex consists of full-length Drosophila histone H3-H4 bound to yeast Asf1. Duplicated assay runs of the LOPAC demonstrated day-to-day and plate-to-plate reproducibility. Approximately 225,000 compounds were assayed in a 384-well plate format with an average Z' factor of 0.71. Based on a 3σ cut-off criterion, 1,587 actives (0.7% were identified in the primary screen. The assay method is capable of identifying previously reported KAT inhibitors such as garcinol. We also observed several prominent active classes of pan-assay interference compounds such as Mannich bases, catechols and p-hydroxyarylsulfonamides. The majority of the primary active compounds showed assay signal interference, though most assay artifacts can be efficiently removed by a series of straightforward counter-screens and orthogonal assays. Post-HTS triage demonstrated a comparatively small number of confirmed actives with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. This assay, which utilizes five label-free proteins involved in H3K56 acetylation in vivo, can in principle identify compounds that inhibit Rtt109-catalyzed H3K56 acetylation via different mechanisms. Compounds discovered via this assay or adaptations thereof could

  12. High-throughput screening for compounds that modulate the cellular c-di-GMP level in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groizeleau, Julie; Andersen, Jens Bo; Givskov, Michael

    2017-01-01

    . The secondary messenger c-di-GMP is a positive regulator of biofilm formation in many clinically relevant bacteria, and it is assumed that drugs that lower the intracellular level of c-di-GMP will force biofilm bacteria into a more treatable planktonic lifestyle. We describe a protocol for high......-throughput screening of chemical libraries for compounds that lower the c-di-GMP level in bacteria, and potentially can serve as lead compounds in the development of novel biofilm dismantling drugs....

  13. A novel small molecule target in human airway smooth muscle for potential treatment of obstructive lung diseases: a staged high-throughput biophysical screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Rechenberg Moritz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A newly identified mechanism of smooth muscle relaxation is the interaction between the small heat shock protein 20 (HSP20 and 14-3-3 proteins. Focusing upon this class of interactions, we describe here a novel drug target screening approach for treating airflow obstruction in asthma. Methods Using a high-throughput fluorescence polarization (FP assay, we screened a library of compounds that could act as small molecule modulators of HSP20 signals. We then applied two quantitative, cell-based biophysical methods to assess the functional efficacy of these molecules and rank-ordered their abilities to relax isolated human airway smooth muscle (ASM. Scaling up to the level of an intact tissue, we confirmed in a concentration-responsive manner the potency of the cell-based hit compounds. Results Among 58,019 compound tested, 268 compounds caused 20% or more reduction of the polarized emission in the FP assay. A small subset of these primary screen hits, belonging to two scaffolds, caused relaxation of isolated ASM cell in vitro and attenuated active force development of intact tissue ex vivo. Conclusions This staged biophysical screening paradigm provides proof-of-principle for high-throughput and cost-effective discovery of new small molecule therapeutic agents for obstructive lung diseases.

  14. Discovery of selective inhibitors against EBNA1 via high throughput in silico virtual screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV latent infection is associated with several human malignancies and is a causal agent of lymphoproliferative diseases during immunosuppression. While inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA polymerases, like gancyclovir, reduce EBV lytic cycle infection, these treatments have limited efficacy for treating latent infection. EBNA1 is an EBV-encoded DNA-binding protein required for viral genome maintenance during latent infection.Here, we report the identification of a new class of small molecules that inhibit EBNA1 DNA binding activity. These compounds were identified by virtual screening of 90,000 low molecular mass compounds using computational docking programs with the solved crystal structure of EBNA1. Four structurally related compounds were found to inhibit EBNA1-DNA binding in biochemical assays with purified EBNA1 protein. Compounds had a range of 20-100 microM inhibition of EBNA1 in fluorescence polarization assays and were further validated for inhibition using electrophoresis mobility shift assays. These compounds exhibited no significant inhibition of an unrelated DNA binding protein. Three of these compounds inhibited EBNA1 transcription activation function in cell-based assays and reduced EBV genome copy number when incubated with a Burkitt lymphoma cell line.These experiments provide a proof-of-principle that virtual screening can be used to identify specific inhibitors of EBNA1 that may have potential for treatment of EBV latent infection.

  15. Supplementary Material for: DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Results Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemannâ Pick type C disease. Conclusion We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between

  16. High-content, high-throughput screening for the identification of cytotoxic compounds based on cell morphology and cell proliferation markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Martin

    Full Text Available Toxicity is a major cause of failure in drug discovery and development, and whilst robust toxicological testing occurs, efficiency could be improved if compounds with cytotoxic characteristics were identified during primary compound screening. The use of high-content imaging in primary screening is becoming more widespread, and by utilising phenotypic approaches it should be possible to incorporate cytotoxicity counter-screens into primary screens. Here we present a novel phenotypic assay that can be used as a counter-screen to identify compounds with adverse cellular effects. This assay has been developed using U2OS cells, the PerkinElmer Operetta high-content/high-throughput imaging system and Columbus image analysis software. In Columbus, algorithms were devised to identify changes in nuclear morphology, cell shape and proliferation using DAPI, TOTO-3 and phosphohistone H3 staining, respectively. The algorithms were developed and tested on cells treated with doxorubicin, taxol and nocodazole. The assay was then used to screen a novel, chemical library, rich in natural product-like molecules of over 300 compounds, 13.6% of which were identified as having adverse cellular effects. This assay provides a relatively cheap and rapid approach for identifying compounds with adverse cellular effects during screening assays, potentially reducing compound rejection due to toxicity in subsequent in vitro and in vivo assays.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of high-throughput screens with HiTSeekR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Schmidt, Steffen; Christiansen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    TSeekR as a one-stop solution for chemical compound screens, siRNA knock-down and CRISPR/Cas9 knock-out screens, as well as microRNA inhibitor and -mimics screens. We chose three use cases that demonstrate the potential of HiTSeekR to fully exploit HTS screening data in quite heterogeneous contexts to generate...

  18. Using iterative cluster merging with improved gap statistics to perform online phenotype discovery in the context of high-throughput RNAi screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Youxian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent emergence of high-throughput automated image acquisition technologies has forever changed how cell biologists collect and analyze data. Historically, the interpretation of cellular phenotypes in different experimental conditions has been dependent upon the expert opinions of well-trained biologists. Such qualitative analysis is particularly effective in detecting subtle, but important, deviations in phenotypes. However, while the rapid and continuing development of automated microscope-based technologies now facilitates the acquisition of trillions of cells in thousands of diverse experimental conditions, such as in the context of RNA interference (RNAi or small-molecule screens, the massive size of these datasets precludes human analysis. Thus, the development of automated methods which aim to identify novel and biological relevant phenotypes online is one of the major challenges in high-throughput image-based screening. Ideally, phenotype discovery methods should be designed to utilize prior/existing information and tackle three challenging tasks, i.e. restoring pre-defined biological meaningful phenotypes, differentiating novel phenotypes from known ones and clarifying novel phenotypes from each other. Arbitrarily extracted information causes biased analysis, while combining the complete existing datasets with each new image is intractable in high-throughput screens. Results Here we present the design and implementation of a novel and robust online phenotype discovery method with broad applicability that can be used in diverse experimental contexts, especially high-throughput RNAi screens. This method features phenotype modelling and iterative cluster merging using improved gap statistics. A Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM is employed to estimate the distribution of each existing phenotype, and then used as reference distribution in gap statistics. This method is broadly applicable to a number of different types of

  19. Large-scale microfluidics providing high-resolution and high-throughput screening of Caenorhabditis elegans poly-glutamine aggregation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sudip; Hegarty, Evan; Martin, Chris; Gökçe, Sertan Kutal; Ghorashian, Navid; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-10-01

    Next generation drug screening could benefit greatly from in vivo studies, using small animal models such as Caenorhabditis elegans for hit identification and lead optimization. Current in vivo assays can operate either at low throughput with high resolution or with low resolution at high throughput. To enable both high-throughput and high-resolution imaging of C. elegans, we developed an automated microfluidic platform. This platform can image 15 z-stacks of ~4,000 C. elegans from 96 different populations using a large-scale chip with a micron resolution in 16 min. Using this platform, we screened ~100,000 animals of the poly-glutamine aggregation model on 25 chips. We tested the efficacy of ~1,000 FDA-approved drugs in improving the aggregation phenotype of the model and identified four confirmed hits. This robust platform now enables high-content screening of various C. elegans disease models at the speed and cost of in vitro cell-based assays.

  20. High throughput, colorimetric screening of microbial ester biosynthesis reveals high ethyl acetate production from Kluyveromyces marxianus on C5, C6, and C12 carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbs, Ann-Kathrin; Lin, Jyun-Liang; Cook, Megan; Wheeldon, Ian

    2016-10-01

    Advances in genome and metabolic pathway engineering have enabled large combinatorial libraries of mutant microbial hosts for chemical biosynthesis. Despite these advances, strain development is often limited by the lack of high throughput functional assays for effective library screening. Recent synthetic biology efforts have engineered microbes that synthesize acetyl and acyl esters and many yeasts naturally produce esters to significant titers. Short and medium chain volatile esters have value as fragrance and flavor compounds, while long chain acyl esters are potential replacements for diesel fuel. Here, we developed a biotechnology method for the rapid screening of microbial ester biosynthesis. Using a colorimetric reaction scheme, esters extracted from fermentation broth were quantitatively converted to a ferric hydroxamate complex with strong absorbance at 520 nm. The assay was validated for ethyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate, and achieved a z-factor of 0.77. Screening of ethyl acetate production from a combinatorial library of four Kluyveromyces marxianus strains on seven carbon sources revealed ethyl acetate biosynthesis from C5, C6, and C12 sugars. This newly adapted method rapidly identified novel properties of K. marxianus metabolism and promises to advance high throughput microbial strain engineering for ester biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. High-Throughput Cysteine Scanning To Identify Stable Antibody Conjugation Sites for Maleimide- and Disulfide-Based Linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, Rachana; Bhakta, Sunil; Fourie-O'Donohue, Aimee; Dela Cruz-Chuh, Josefa; Tsai, Siao Ping; Cook, Ryan; Wei, Binqing; Ng, Carl; Wong, Athena W; Bos, Aaron B; Farahi, Farzam; Bhakta, Jiten; Pillow, Thomas H; Raab, Helga; Vandlen, Richard; Polakis, Paul; Liu, Yichin; Erickson, Hans; Junutula, Jagath R; Kozak, Katherine R

    2018-02-09

    THIOMAB antibody technology utilizes cysteine residues engineered onto an antibody to allow for site-specific conjugation. The technology has enabled the exploration of different attachment sites on the antibody in combination with small molecules, peptides, or proteins to yield antibody conjugates with unique properties. As reported previously ( Shen , B. Q. , et al. ( 2012 ) Nat. Biotechnol. 30 , 184 - 189 ; Pillow , T. H. , et al. ( 2017 ) Chem. Sci. 8 , 366 - 370 ), the specific location of the site of conjugation on an antibody can impact the stability of the linkage to the engineered cysteine for both thio-succinimide and disulfide bonds. High stability of the linkage is usually desired to maximize the delivery of the cargo to the intended target. In the current study, cysteines were individually substituted into every position of the anti-HER2 antibody (trastuzumab), and the stabilities of drug conjugations at those sites were evaluated. We screened a total of 648 THIOMAB antibody-drug conjugates, each generated from a trastuzamab prepared by sequentially mutating non-cysteine amino acids in the light and heavy chains to cysteine. Each THIOMAB antibody variant was conjugated to either maleimidocaproyl-valine-citrulline-p-aminobenzyloxycarbonyl-monomethyl auristatin E (MC-vc-PAB-MMAE) or pyridyl disulfide monomethyl auristatin E (PDS-MMAE) using a high-throughput, on-bead conjugation and purification method. Greater than 50% of the THIOMAB antibody variants were successfully conjugated to both MMAE derivatives with a drug to antibody ratio (DAR) of >0.5 and <50% aggregation. The relative in vitro plasma stabilities for approximately 750 conjugates were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and stable sites were confirmed with affinity-capture LC/MS-based detection methods. Highly stable conjugation sites for the two types of MMAE derivatives were identified on both the heavy and light chains. Although the stabilities of maleimide conjugates were

  2. Development of a High Throughput Platform for Screening Glycoside Hydrolases based on Oxime-NIMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eDeng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cost effective hydrolysis of biomass into sugars for biofuel production requires high-performance low-cost glycoside hydrolase (GH cocktails that are active under demanding process conditions. Improving the performance of GH cocktails depends knowledge of many critical parameters including individual enzyme stabilities, optimal reaction conditions, kinetics and specificity of reaction. With this information, rate- and/or yield-limiting reactions that can be potentially improved through substitution, synergistic complementation, or protein engineering. Given the wide range of substrates and methods used for GH characterization, it is difficult to compare results across a myriad of approaches to identify high performance and synergistic combinations of enzymes. Here we describe a platform for systematic screening of GH activities using automatic biomass handling, bioconjugate chemistry, robotic liquid handling, and nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS. Twelve well-characterized substrates spanning the types of glycosidic linkages found in plant cell walls are included in the experimental workflow. To test the application of this platform and substrate panel, we studied the reactivity of three engineered cellulases and their synergy of combination across a range of reaction conditions and enzyme concentrations. We anticipate that large-scale screening using the standardized platform and substrates will generate critical datasets to enable direct comparison of enzyme activities for cocktail design.

  3. Searching for resistance genes to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus using high throughput screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Carla S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pine wilt disease (PWD, caused by the pinewood nematode (PWN; Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, damages and kills pine trees and is causing serious economic damage worldwide. Although the ecological mechanism of infestation is well described, the plant’s molecular response to the pathogen is not well known. This is due mainly to the lack of genomic information and the complexity of the disease. High throughput sequencing is now an efficient approach for detecting the expression of genes in non-model organisms, thus providing valuable information in spite of the lack of the genome sequence. In an attempt to unravel genes potentially involved in the pine defense against the pathogen, we hereby report the high throughput comparative sequence analysis of infested and non-infested stems of Pinus pinaster (very susceptible to PWN and Pinus pinea (less susceptible to PWN. Results Four cDNA libraries from infested and non-infested stems of P. pinaster and P. pinea were sequenced in a full 454 GS FLX run, producing a total of 2,083,698 reads. The putative amino acid sequences encoded by the assembled transcripts were annotated according to Gene Ontology, to assign Pinus contigs into Biological Processes, Cellular Components and Molecular Functions categories. Most of the annotated transcripts corresponded to Picea genes-25.4-39.7%, whereas a smaller percentage, matched Pinus genes, 1.8-12.8%, probably a consequence of more public genomic information available for Picea than for Pinus. The comparative transcriptome analysis showed that when P. pinaster was infested with PWN, the genes malate dehydrogenase, ABA, water deficit stress related genes and PAR1 were highly expressed, while in PWN-infested P. pinea, the highly expressed genes were ricin B-related lectin, and genes belonging to the SNARE and high mobility group families. Quantitative PCR experiments confirmed the differential gene expression between the two pine species

  4. High throughput, non-invasive and dynamic toxicity screening on adherent cells using respiratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Simone; Noor, Fozia; Müller-Vieira, Ursula; Mayer, Manuela; Strigun, Alexander; Heinzle, Elmar

    2010-03-01

    A dynamic respiration assay based on luminescence decay time detection of oxygen for high throughput toxicological assessment is presented. The method uses 24-well plates (OxoDishes) read with the help of a sensor dish reader placed in a humidified CO(2)-incubator. Adherent primary rat hepatocytes and the human hepatic cell line Hep G2 were exposed to known toxic compounds. Dissolved oxygen concentration, a measure of respiration, was measured with an oxygen sensor optode immobilized in the centre of each well. The cells were maintained in the dishes during the assay period and can afterwards be processed for further analyses. This dynamic, non-invasive measurement allowed calculation of 50% lethal concentrations (LC(50)) for any incubation time point giving concentration-time-dependent responses without further manipulation or removal of the cells from the incubator. Toxicokinetic profiles are compared with Sulforhodamine B assay, a common cytotoxicity assay. The novel assay is robust and flexible, very easy to carry out and provides continuous online respiration data reflecting dynamic toxicity responses. It can be adapted to any cell-based system and the calculated kinetics contributes to understanding of cell death mechanisms. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High throughput methodology for synthesis, screening, and optimization of solid state lithium ion electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Mark S; Hayden, Brian E; Le Gall, Thierry; Lee, Christopher E; Lu, Xiaojuan; Mirsaneh, Mehdi; Mormiche, Claire; Pasero, Denis; Smith, Duncan C A; Weld, Andrew; Yada, Chihiro; Yokoishi, Shoji

    2011-07-11

    A study of the lithium ion conductor Li(3x)La(2/3-x)TiO(3) solid solution and the surrounding composition space was carried out using a high throughput physical vapor deposition system. An optimum total ionic conductivity value of 5.45 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) was obtained for the composition Li(0.17)La(0.29)Ti(0.54) (Li(3x)La(2/3-x)TiO(3)x = 0.11). This optimum value was calculated using an artificial neural network model based on the empirical data. Due to the large scale of the data set produced and the complexity of synthesis, informatics tools were required to analyze the data. Partition analysis was carried out to determine the synthetic parameters of importance and their threshold values. Multivariate curve resolution and principal component analysis were applied to the diffraction data set. This analysis enabled the construction of phase distribution diagrams, illustrating both the phases obtained and the compositional zones in which they occur. The synthetic technique presented has significant advantages over other thin film and bulk methodologies, in terms of both the compositional range covered and the nature of the materials produced.

  6. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay for Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Iván; Lafuente, María José; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a mitochondrial membrane-associated flavoenzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. DHODH is a validated target for malaria, and DSM265, a potent inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate using flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor in the first half of the reaction. Reoxidation of FMN to regenerate the active enzyme is mediated by ubiquinone (CoQD), which is the physiological final electron acceptor and second substrate of the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence-based high-throughput enzymatic assay to find DHODH inhibitors. In this assay, the CoQD has been replaced by a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye, resazurin, which changes to a fluorescent state on reduction to resorufin. Remarkably, the assay sensitivity to find competitive inhibitors of the second substrate is higher than that reported for the standard colorimetric assay. It is amenable to 1536-well plates with Z' values close to 0.8. The fact that the human enzyme can also be assayed in the same format opens additional applications of this assay to the discovery of inhibitors to treat cancer, transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases, and other diseases mediated by rapid cellular growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Introducing Discrete Frequency Infrared Technology for High-Throughput Biofluid Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Caryn; Clemens, Graeme; Bird, Benjamin; Dawson, Timothy; Ashton, Katherine M; Jenkinson, Michael D; Brodbelt, Andrew; Weida, Miles; Fotheringham, Edeline; Barre, Matthew; Rowlette, Jeremy; Baker, Matthew J

    2016-02-04

    Accurate early diagnosis is critical to patient survival, management and quality of life. Biofluids are key to early diagnosis due to their ease of collection and intimate involvement in human function. Large-scale mid-IR imaging of dried fluid deposits offers a high-throughput molecular analysis paradigm for the biomedical laboratory. The exciting advent of tuneable quantum cascade lasers allows for the collection of discrete frequency infrared data enabling clinically relevant timescales. By scanning targeted frequencies spectral quality, reproducibility and diagnostic potential can be maintained while significantly reducing acquisition time and processing requirements, sampling 16 serum spots with 0.6, 5.1 and 15% relative standard deviation (RSD) for 199, 14 and 9 discrete frequencies respectively. We use this reproducible methodology to show proof of concept rapid diagnostics; 40 unique dried liquid biopsies from brain, breast, lung and skin cancer patients were classified in 2.4 cumulative seconds against 10 non-cancer controls with accuracies of up to 90%.

  8. getDEG: A Versatile Matlab Tool for Identifying Differentially Expressed Genes from High-Throughput Biomedical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs is an important initial step for characterizing critical regulators and associated signaling profiles under specific conditions. Yet, a sophisticated computational tool to detect DEGs in a fully automatic manner is still lacking. Here we describe getDEG, a versatile Matlab program to fill this gap by offering efficient solutions of the most needed functions. Particularly, getDEG adopts user-designated statistical test and ranking method to prioritize probes/genes assayed. Furthermore, getDEG allows preliminary filtering by the machine detection p-value, and collapsing multiple probes to their associated gene. Taken together, getDEG is a powerful and automatic tool which satisfies basic and advanced needs in searching for most relevant candidates from microarray assays or other high-throughput screens. The toolgetDEG and test examples are freely available online at https://sites.google.com/site/differentiallyexpressedgene.

  9. Rapid screening of classic galactosemia patients: a proof-of-concept study using high-throughput FTIR analysis of plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Caroline; Untereiner, Valérie; Gobinet, Cyril; Zater, Mokhtar; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Garnotel, Roselyne

    2015-04-07

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease involving the galactose pathway, caused by the deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Galactose accumulation induces in newborns many symptoms, such as liver disease, cataracts, and sepsis leading to death if untreated. Neonatal screening is developed and applied in many countries using several methods to detect galactose or its derived product accumulation in blood or urine. High-throughput FTIR spectroscopy was investigated as a potential tool in the current screening methods. IR spectra were obtained from blood plasma of healthy, diabetic, and galactosemic patients. The major spectral differences were in the carbohydrate region, which was first analysed in an exploratory manner using principal component analysis (PCA). PCA score plots showed a clear discrimination between diabetic and galactosemic patients and this was more marked as a function of the glucose and galactose increased concentration in these patients' plasma respectively. Then, a support vector machine leave-one-out cross-validation (SVM-LOOCV) classifier was built with the PCA scores as the input and the model was tested on median, mean and all spectra from the three population groups. This classifier was able to discriminate healthy/diabetic, healthy/galactosemic, and diabetic/galactosemic patients with sensitivity and specificity rates ranging from 80% to 94%. The total accuracy rate ranged from 87% to 96%. High-throughput FTIR spectroscopy combined with the SVM-LOOCV classification procedure appears to be a promising tool in the screening of galactosemia patients, with good sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, this approach presents the advantages of being cost-effective, fast, and straightforward in the screening of galactosemic patients.

  10. High-throughput label-free screening of euglena gracilis with optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Ito, Takuro; Yaxiaer, Yalikun; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Jiang, Yiyue; Tanaka, Yo; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-02-01

    The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels is an important, but challenging goal for the world. As an alternative to liquid fossil fuels, microalgal biofuel is expected to play a key role in reducing the detrimental effects of global warming since microalgae absorb atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. Unfortunately, conventional analytical methods only provide population-averaged lipid contents and fail to characterize a diverse population of microalgal cells with single-cell resolution in a noninvasive and interference-free manner. Here we demonstrate high-throughput label-free single-cell screening of lipid-producing microalgal cells with optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy. In particular, we use Euglena gracilis - an attractive microalgal species that produces wax esters (suitable for biodiesel and aviation fuel after refinement) within lipid droplets. Our optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscope is based on an integration of a hydrodynamic-focusing microfluidic chip, an optical time-stretch phase-contrast microscope, and a digital image processor equipped with machine learning. As a result, it provides both the opacity and phase contents of every single cell at a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s. We characterize heterogeneous populations of E. gracilis cells under two different culture conditions to evaluate their lipid production efficiency. Our method holds promise as an effective analytical tool for microalgaebased biofuel production.

  11. ChemHTPS - A virtual high-throughput screening program suite for the chemical and materials sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Mohammad Atif Faiz; Evangelista, William; Hachmann, Johannes

    The discovery of new compounds, materials, and chemical reactions with exceptional properties is the key for the grand challenges in innovation, energy and sustainability. This process can be dramatically accelerated by means of the virtual high-throughput screening (HTPS) of large-scale candidate libraries. The resulting data can further be used to study the underlying structure-property relationships and thus facilitate rational design capability. This approach has been extensively used for many years in the drug discovery community. However, the lack of openly available virtual HTPS tools is limiting the use of these techniques in various other applications such as photovoltaics, optoelectronics, and catalysis. Thus, we developed ChemHTPS, a general-purpose, comprehensive and user-friendly suite, that will allow users to efficiently perform large in silico modeling studies and high-throughput analyses in these applications. ChemHTPS also includes a massively parallel molecular library generator which offers a multitude of options to customize and restrict the scope of the enumerated chemical space and thus tailor it for the demands of specific applications. To streamline the non-combinatorial exploration of chemical space, we incorporate genetic algorithms into the framework. In addition to implementing smarter algorithms, we also focus on the ease of use, workflow, and code integration to make this technology more accessible to the community.

  12. High-Throughput Synthesis, Screening, and Scale-Up of Optimized Conducting Indium Tin Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Peter; Makwana, Neel M; Tighe, Christopher J; Gruar, Robert I; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J; Darr, Jawwad A

    2016-02-08

    A high-throughput optimization and subsequent scale-up methodology has been used for the synthesis of conductive tin-doped indium oxide (known as ITO) nanoparticles. ITO nanoparticles with up to 12 at % Sn were synthesized using a laboratory scale (15 g/hour by dry mass) continuous hydrothermal synthesis process, and the as-synthesized powders were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under standard synthetic conditions, either the cubic In2O3 phase, or a mixture of InO(OH) and In2O3 phases were observed in the as-synthesized materials. These materials were pressed into compacts and heat-treated in an inert atmosphere, and their electrical resistivities were then measured using the Van der Pauw method. Sn doping yielded resistivities of ∼ 10(-2) Ω cm for most samples with the lowest resistivity of 6.0 × 10(-3) Ω cm (exceptionally conductive for such pressed nanopowders) at a Sn concentration of 10 at %. Thereafter, the optimized lab-scale composition was scaled-up using a pilot-scale continuous hydrothermal synthesis process (at a rate of 100 g/hour by dry mass), and a comparable resistivity of 9.4 × 10(-3) Ω cm was obtained. The use of the synthesized TCO nanomaterials for thin film fabrication was finally demonstrated by deposition of a transparent, conductive film using a simple spin-coating process.

  13. Expression and refolding of the protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis: A model for high-throughput screening of antigenic recombinant protein refolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, María Elisa; Pavan, Esteban Enrique; Cairó, Fabián Martín; Pettinari, María Julia

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) is a well known and relevant immunogenic protein that is the basis for both anthrax vaccines and diagnostic methods. Properly folded antigenic PA is necessary for these applications. In this study a high level of PA was obtained in recombinant Escherichia coli. The protein was initially accumulated in inclusion bodies, which facilitated its efficient purification by simple washing steps; however, it could not be recognized by specific antibodies. Refolding conditions were subsequently analyzed in a high-throughput manner that enabled nearly a hundred different conditions to be tested simultaneously. The recovery of the ability of PA to be recognized by antibodies was screened by dot blot using a coefficient that provided a measure of properly refolded protein levels with a high degree of discrimination. The best refolding conditions resulted in a tenfold increase in the intensity of the dot blot compared to the control. The only refolding additive that consistently yielded good results was L-arginine. The statistical analysis identified both cooperative and negative interactions between the different refolding additives. The high-throughput approach described in this study that enabled overproduction, purification and refolding of PA in a simple and straightforward manner, can be potentially useful for the rapid screening of adequate refolding conditions for other overexpressed antigenic proteins. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. A high-throughput screening system for barley/powdery mildew interactions based on automated analysis of light micrographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweizer Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To find candidate genes that potentially influence the susceptibility or resistance of crop plants to powdery mildew fungi, an assay system based on transient-induced gene silencing (TIGS as well as transient over-expression in single epidermal cells of barley has been developed. However, this system relies on quantitative microscopic analysis of the barley/powdery mildew interaction and will only become a high-throughput tool of phenomics upon automation of the most time-consuming steps. Results We have developed a high-throughput screening system based on a motorized microscope which evaluates the specimens fully automatically. A large-scale double-blind verification of the system showed an excellent agreement of manual and automated analysis and proved the system to work dependably. Furthermore, in a series of bombardment experiments an RNAi construct targeting the Mlo gene was included, which is expected to phenocopy resistance mediated by recessive loss-of-function alleles such as mlo5. In most cases, the automated analysis system recorded a shift towards resistance upon RNAi of Mlo, thus providing proof of concept for its usefulness in detecting gene-target effects. Conclusion Besides saving labor and enabling a screening of thousands of candidate genes, this system offers continuous operation of expensive laboratory equipment and provides a less subjective analysis as well as a complete and enduring documentation of the experimental raw data in terms of digital images. In general, it proves the concept of enabling available microscope hardware to handle challenging screening tasks fully automatically.

  15. High-throughput screening of suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries using DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Noëlani; Crampton, Bridget G; Hein, Ingo; Birch, Paul R J; Berger, Dave K

    2004-11-01

    Efficient construction of cDNA libraries enriched for differentially expressed transcripts is an important first step in many biological investigations. We present a quantitative procedure for screening cDNA libraries constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The methodology was applied to two independent SSHs from pearl millet and banana. Following two-color cyanin dye labeling and hybridization of subtracted tester with either unsubtracted driver or unsubtracted tester cDNAs to the SSH libraries arrayed on glass slides, two values were calculated for each clone, an enrichment ratio 1 (ER1) and an enrichment ratio 2 (ER2). Graphical representation of ER1 and ER2 enabled the identification of clones that were likely to represent up-regulated transcripts. Normalization of each clone by the SSH process was determined from the ER2 values, thereby indicating whether clones represented rare or abundant transcripts. Differential expression of pearl millet and banana clones identified from both libraries by this quantitative approach was verified by inverse Northern blot analysis.

  16. Engineering a promiscuous pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase by a high throughput FACS screen

    KAUST Repository

    Hohl, Adrian

    2017-12-06

    The Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl are used to facilitate the incorporation of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into the genetic code of bacterial and eukaryotic cells by orthogonally reassigning the amber codon. Currently, the incorporation of new ncAAs requires a cumbersome engineering process composed of several positive and negative selection rounds to select the appropriate PylRS/tRNAPyl pair. Our fast and sensitive engineering approach required only a single FACS selection round to identify 110 orthogonal PylRS variants for the aminoacylation of 20 ncAAs. Pocket-substrate relationship from these variants led to the design of a highly promiscuous PylRS (HpRS), which catalyzed the aminoacylation of 31 structurally diverse lysine derivatives bearing clickable, fluorinated, fluorescent, and biotinylated entities. The high speed and sensitivity of our approach provides a competitive alternative to existing screening methodologies, and delivers insights into the complex PylRS-substrate interactions to facilitate the generation of additional promiscuous variants.

  17. Identification of novel drug scaffolds for inhibition of SARS-CoV 3-Chymotrypsin-like protease using virtual and high-throughput screenings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun; Mittal, Anuradha; Patel, Kavankumar; Gatuz, Joseph L; Truong, Lena; Torres, Jaime; Mulhearn, Debbie C; Johnson, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    We have used a combination of virtual screening (VS) and high-throughput screening (HTS) techniques to identify novel, non-peptidic small molecule inhibitors against human SARS-CoV 3CLpro. A structure-based VS approach integrating docking and pharmacophore based methods was employed to computationally screen 621,000 compounds from the ZINC library. The screening protocol was validated using known 3CLpro inhibitors and was optimized for speed, improved selectivity, and for accommodating receptor flexibility. Subsequently, a fluorescence-based enzymatic HTS assay was developed and optimized to experimentally screen approximately 41,000 compounds from four structurally diverse libraries chosen mainly based on the VS results. False positives from initial HTS hits were eliminated by a secondary orthogonal binding analysis using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The campaign identified a reversible small molecule inhibitor exhibiting mixed-type inhibition with a K(i) value of 11.1 μM. Together, these results validate our protocols as suitable approaches to screen virtual and chemical libraries, and the newly identified compound reported in our study represents a promising structural scaffold to pursue for further SARS-CoV 3CLpro inhibitor development. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. High-throughput CRISPRi phenotyping identifies new essential genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Gallay, Clement; Kjos, Morten; Domenech, Arnau; Slager, Jelle; van Kessel, Sebastiaan P; Knoops, Kèvin; Sorg, Robin A; Zhang, Jing-Ren; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2017-05-10

    Genome-wide screens have discovered a large set of essential genes in the opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae However, the functions of many essential genes are still unknown, hampering vaccine development and drug discovery. Based on results from transposon sequencing (Tn-seq), we refined the list of essential genes in S. pneumoniae serotype 2 strain D39. Next, we created a knockdown library targeting 348 potentially essential genes by CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) and show a growth phenotype for 254 of them (73%). Using high-content microscopy screening, we searched for essential genes of unknown function with clear phenotypes in cell morphology upon CRISPRi-based depletion. We show that SPD_1416 and SPD_1417 (renamed to MurT and GatD, respectively) are essential for peptidoglycan synthesis, and that SPD_1198 and SPD_1197 (renamed to TarP and TarQ, respectively) are responsible for the polymerization of teichoic acid (TA) precursors. This knowledge enabled us to reconstruct the unique pneumococcal TA biosynthetic pathway. CRISPRi was also employed to unravel the role of the essential Clp-proteolytic system in regulation of competence development, and we show that ClpX is the essential ATPase responsible for ClpP-dependent repression of competence. The CRISPRi library provides a valuable tool for characterization of pneumococcal genes and pathways and revealed several promising antibiotic targets. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Ultra-high-throughput screening of an in vitro-synthesized horseradish peroxidase displayed on microbeads using cell sorter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhu

    Full Text Available The C1a isoenzyme of horseradish peroxidase (HRP is an industrially important heme-containing enzyme that utilizes hydrogen peroxide to oxidize a wide variety of inorganic and organic compounds for practical applications, including synthesis of fine chemicals, medical diagnostics, and bioremediation. To develop a ultra-high-throughput screening system for HRP, we successfully produced active HRP in an Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis system, by adding disulfide bond isomerase DsbC and optimizing the concentrations of hemin and calcium ions and the temperature. The biosynthesized HRP was fused with a single-chain Cro (scCro DNA-binding tag at its N-terminal and C-terminal sites. The addition of the scCro-tag at both ends increased the solubility of the protein. Next, HRP and its fusion proteins were successfully synthesized in a water droplet emulsion by using hexadecane as the oil phase and SunSoft No. 818SK as the surfactant. HRP fusion proteins were displayed on microbeads attached with double-stranded DNA (containing the scCro binding sequence via scCro-DNA interactions. The activities of the immobilized HRP fusion proteins were detected with a tyramide-based fluorogenic assay using flow cytometry. Moreover, a model microbead library containing wild type hrp (WT and inactive mutant (MUT genes was screened using fluorescence-activated cell-sorting, thus efficiently enriching the WT gene from the 1:100 (WT:MUT library. The technique described here could serve as a novel platform for the ultra-high-throughput discovery of more useful HRP mutants and other heme-containing peroxidases.

  20. Formulation, high throughput in vitro screening and in vivo functional characterization of nanoemulsion-based intranasal vaccine adjuvants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela T Wong

    Full Text Available Vaccine adjuvants have been reported to induce both mucosal and systemic immunity when applied to mucosal surfaces and this dual response appears important for protection against certain pathogens. Despite the potential advantages, however, no mucosal adjuvants are currently approved for human use. Evaluating compounds as mucosal adjuvants is a slow and costly process due to the need for lengthy animal immunogenicity studies. We have constructed a library of 112 intranasal adjuvant candidate formulations consisting of oil-in-water nanoemulsions that contain various cationic and nonionic surfactants. To facilitate adjuvant development we first evaluated this library in a series of high-throughput, in vitro assays for activities associated with innate and adaptive immune activation in vivo. These in vitro assays screened for the ability of the adjuvant to bind to mucin, induce cytotoxicity, facilitate antigen uptake in epithelial and dendritic cells, and activate cellular pathways. We then sought to determine how these parameters related to adjuvant activity in vivo. While the in vitro assays alone were not enough to predict the in vivo adjuvant activity completely, several interesting relationships were found with immune responses in mice. Furthermore, by varying the physicochemical properties of the surfactant components (charge, surfactant polar head size and hydrophobicity and the surfactant blend ratio of the formulations, the strength and type of the immune response generated (TH1, TH2, TH17 could be modulated. These findings suggest the possibility of using high-throughput screens to aid in the design of custom adjuvants with unique immunological profiles to match specific mucosal vaccine applications.

  1. PubChem BioAssay: A Decade's Development toward Open High-Throughput Screening Data Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Cheng, Tiejun; Bryant, Stephen H

    2017-07-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is now routinely conducted for drug discovery by both pharmaceutical companies and screening centers at academic institutions and universities. Rapid advance in assay development, robot automation, and computer technology has led to the generation of terabytes of data in screening laboratories. Despite the technology development toward HTS productivity, fewer efforts were devoted to HTS data integration and sharing. As a result, the huge amount of HTS data was rarely made available to the public. To fill this gap, the PubChem BioAssay database ( https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pcassay/ ) was set up in 2004 to provide open access to the screening results tested on chemicals and RNAi reagents. With more than 10 years' development and contributions from the community, PubChem has now become the largest public repository for chemical structures and biological data, which provides an information platform to worldwide researchers supporting drug development, medicinal chemistry study, and chemical biology research. This work presents a review of the HTS data content in the PubChem BioAssay database and the progress of data deposition to stimulate knowledge discovery and data sharing. It also provides a description of the database's data standard and basic utilities facilitating information access and use for new users.

  2. Droplet-based microfluidics for high-throughput screening of a metagenomic library for isolation of microbial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Masahito; Hoshino, Yuri; Nishikawa, Yohei; Hirose, Tomotada; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Mori, Tetsushi; Sekiguchi, Tetsushi; Shoji, Shuichi; Takeyama, Haruko

    2015-05-15

    This paper proposes a high-throughput, function-based screening approach of a metagenomic library for isolating novel microbial enzymes by droplet-based microfluidics. We used gel microdroplets (GMDs) dispersed in oil as picoliter-volume reaction vessels for lipolytic enzyme by encapsulating cells in individual GMDs. Using this approach, we monitored the growth of individual cells encapsulated in GMDs and assessed the enzyme reaction activities at the level of an individual GMD. We then applied this method to screen lipolytic enzyme genes from the metagenomic library constructed from soil collected from a quercus serrate forest of Mount Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. In the workflow presented in this study, metagenomic library clones were encapsulated in 100-pL GMDs with a fluorogenic reporter substrate. A total of 67,000 metagenomic library clones can be screened in only 24 h with reduced consumption of reagents (i.e., metagenomic library screening of industrially relevant enzymes with the potential of significantly reducing the cost and time factors involved in successful practical application of microbial enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Receptor-based high-throughput screening and identification of estrogens in dietary supplements using bioaffinity liquid-chromatography ion mobility mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aqai, P.; Gómez Blesa, N.; Major, H.; Pedotti, P.; Varani, L.; Ferrero, V.E.V.; Haasnoot, W.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    A high-throughput bioaffinity liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (BioMS) approach was developed and applied for the screening and identification of recombinant human estrogen receptor a (ERa) ligands in dietary supplements. For screening, a semi-automated mass spectrometric ligand binding assay

  4. A whole-cell assay for the high throughput screening of calmodulin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikici, Emre; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2008-04-01

    Cell-based screening systems for pharmaceuticals are desired over molecular biosensing systems because of the information they provide on toxicity and bioavailability. However, the majority of sensing systems developed are molecular biosensing type screening systems and cannot be easily adapted to cell-based screening. In this study, we demonstrate that protein-based molecular sensing systems that employ a fluorescent protein as a signal transducer are amenable to cell-based sensing by expressing the protein molecular sensing system in the cell and employing these cells for screening of desired molecules. To achieve this, we expressed a molecular sensing system based on the fusion protein of calmodulin (CaM) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in bacterial cells, and utilized these cells for the screening of CaM antagonists. In the presence of Ca(2+), CaM undergoes a conformational change exposing a hydrophobic pocket that interacts with CaM-binding proteins, peptides, and drugs. This conformational change induced in CaM leads to a change in the microenvironment of EGFP, resulting in a change in its fluorescence intensity. The observed change in fluorescence intensity of EGFP can be correlated to the concentration of the analyte present in the sample. Dose-response curves for various tricyclic antidepressants were generated using cells containing CaM-EGFP fusion protein. Additionally, we demonstrate the versatility of our system for studying protein-protein interactions by using cells to study the binding of a peptide to CaM. The study showed that the CaM-EGFP fusion protein within the intact cells responds similarly to that of the isolated fusion protein, hence eliminating the need for any isolation and purification steps. We have demonstrated that this system can be used for the rapid screening of various CaM antagonists that are potential antipsychotic drugs.

  5. A high-throughput small-molecule ligand screen targeted to agonists and antagonists of the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuohung, Wendy; Burnett, Maria; Mukhtyar, Deepa; Schuman, Eli; Ni, Jake; Crowley, William F; Glicksman, Marcie A; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2010-06-01

    Recent data have shown that the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (also known as KiSS-1 receptor) regulates GnRH release from the hypothalamus. This essential role of GPR54 in controlling the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in reproductive and cancer medicine. Currently, there are no small-molecule modulators of GPR54 function for experimental or clinical use. To identify small-molecule compounds that modify GPR54 signal transduction, the authors have adapted a cell-based functional assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) using a commercially available homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay for inositol phosphate accumulation. They generated stable Chinese hamster ovary cell transfectants that express human GPR54 for use in this assay. After optimization in an automated HTS environment, they screened a library of 110,000 small-molecule compounds using 2 protocols, one to identify agonists and one to identify antagonists. Hits obtained in the primary screen were confirmed to be active in secondary in vitro assays. Compounds identified as agonists or antagonists from HTS and secondary screening will be characterized to identify agents with the potential to be developed as novel orally active agents to treat hormone-dependent disorders such as abnormal puberty, infertility, endometriosis, and sex steroid-dependent tumors.

  6. High-throughput screens in mammalian cells using the CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jingyu; Zhou, Yuexin; Zhu, Shiyou; Wei, Wensheng

    2015-06-01

    As a powerful genome-editing tool, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has been quickly developed into a large-scale function-based screening strategy in mammalian cells. This new type of genetic library is constructed through the lentiviral delivery of single-guide RNA collections that direct Cas9 or inactive dead Cas9 fused with effectors to interrogate gene function or regulate gene transcription in targeted cells. Compared with RNA interference screening, the CRISPR-Cas9 system demonstrates much higher levels of effectiveness and reliability with respect to both loss-of-function and gain-of-function screening. Unlike the RNA interference strategy, a CRISPR-Cas9 library can target both protein-coding sequences and regulatory elements, including promoters, enhancers and elements transcribing microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs. This powerful genetic tool will undoubtedly accelerate the mechanistic discovery of various biological processes. In this mini review, we summarize the general procedure of CRISPR-Cas9 library mediated functional screening, system optimization strategies and applications of this new genetic toolkit. © 2015 FEBS.

  7. Integrated Automation of High-Throughput Screening and Reverse Phase Protein Array Sample Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marlene Lemvig; Block, Ines; List, Markus

    multiplexing readouts, but this has a natural limitation. High-content screening via image acquisition and analysis allows multiplexing of few parameters, but is connected to substantial time consumption and complex logistics. We report on integration of Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA)-based readouts...

  8. High-throughput screening of tick-borne pathogens in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelet, Lorraine; Delannoy, Sabine; Devillers, Elodie

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased travel, climatic, and environmental changes, the incidence of tick-borne disease in both humans and animals is increasing throughout Europe. Therefore, extended surveillance tools are desirable. To accurately screen tick-borne pathogens, a large scale epidemiological study was co...

  9. Screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in clinical swabs using a high-throughput real-time PCR-based method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornskov, D; Kolmos, B; Bendix Horn, P

    2008-01-01

    The presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals and the community is a serious problem. Accordingly, a comprehensive plan has been implemented in the County of Vejle, Denmark, to identify colonised and/or infected individuals and to control the spread of MRSA. Since...... 2005, all patients and healthcare personnel have been screened for MRSA colonisation, involving analysis of 300-400 samples daily. To deal with this number of samples, a PCR-based method customised for high-throughput analysis and a system for fast reporting of MRSA carrier status were developed. Swab...... samples were incubated overnight in a selective tryptone soya broth and were analysed by PCR the following day. Using this strategy, non-colonised individuals were identified within 24 h, while MRSA-positive samples were analysed further by traditional microbiological methods to determine the resistance...

  10. Combinatorial synthesis and high-throughput screening of alkyl amines for nonviral gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linxian; Wang, Fengjian; Wu, Yihang; Davidson, Gary; Levkin, Pavel A

    2013-09-18

    Efficient delivery of plasmid DNA and siRNA into cells is essential for biological and biomedical research. Although significant efforts have been made to develop efficient nonviral vectors, such as cationic lipids and polymers, most of the vectors require multistep synthesis, which complicates both fast structural optimizations and combinatorial synthesis of such vectors. Here, we present a facile, single-step method based on an alkylation of amines, allowing for the fast parallel synthesis of libraries of cationic lipid-like molecules (lipidoids). We exploited the method to synthesize 200 lipidoids, which were screened for their transfection efficiency in HEK293T cells. The screen resulted in about 2% of new lipidoids capable of efficient cell transfection similar or higher than the efficiency of Lipofectamine 2000. In addition, we observed an enhancement of cellular transfection by combining single- with double-chain lipidoids, which was attributed to the different roles of the single- and double-tailed lipids in the mixed liposomes.

  11. Discovering novel neuroactive drugs through high-throughput behavior-based chemical screening in the zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo eBruni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Most neuroactive drugs were discovered through unexpected behavioral observations. Systematic behavioral screening is inefficient in most model organisms. But, automated technologies are enabling a new phase of discovery-based research in central nervous system (CNS pharmacology. Researchers are using large-scale behavior based chemical screens in zebrafish to discover compounds with new structures, targets and functions. These compounds are powerful tools for understanding CNS signaling pathways. Substantial differences between human and zebrafish biology will make it difficult to translate these discoveries to clinical medicine. However, given the molecular genetic similarities between humans and zebrafish, it is likely that some of these compounds will have translational utility. We predict that the greatest new successes in CNS drug discovery will leverage many model systems, including in vitro assays, cells, rodents, and zebrafish.

  12. Combinatorial Biomolecular Nanopatterning for High-Throughput Screening of Stem-Cell Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Yacoub Y I; Runager, Kasper; Simoes, Fabio; Celiz, Adam; Taresco, Vincenzo; Rossi, Roberto; Enghild, Jan J; Abildtrup, Lisbeth A; Kraft, David C E; Sutherland, Duncan S; Alexander, Morgan R; Foss, Morten; Ogaki, Ryosuke

    2016-02-17

    A novel combinatorial biomolecular nanopatterning method is reported, in which multiple biomolecular ligands can be patterned in multiple nanoscale dimensions on a single surface. The applicability of the combinatorial platform toward cell-biology applications is demonstrated by screening the adhesion behavior of a population of human dental pulp stem cell (hDPSC) on 64 combinations of nanopatterned extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in parallel. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Identification of Mannich Base as a Novel Inhibitor of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Isocitrate by High-Throughput Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lei; Long, Quanxin; Yang, Dacheng; Xie, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) remains one of the most significant human pathogens since its discovery in 1882. An estimated 1.5 million people died from tubercle bacillus (TB) in 2006, and globally, there were an estimated 9.27 million incident cases of TB in 2007. Glyoxylate bypass pathway occurs in a wide range of pathogens and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Isocitrate lyase (ICL) can catalyses the first step of this pathway, and reversibly cleaves isocitrate into succinate and glyoxylate. So, ICL may represent a good drug target for the treatment of tuberculosis. ICL was cloned, expressed, and purified, and a high-throughput screen (HTS) developed to screen active molecule from a mannich base compounds library for inhibition of ICL. This assay had signal to noise (S/N) of 650.6990 and Z' factor of 0.8141, indicating that the assay was suitable for HTS. Screening of a collection of 124 mannich base compounds resulted in the identification of one mannich base compound, which has a significant inhibitory activity. So, a new family of compound was first reported to inhibit the activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ICL. This family of compound might offer new avenue to explore better anti-tuberculosis and fungi drugs. PMID:21494431

  14. Automated reporter quantification in vivo: high-throughput screening method for reporter-based assays in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven L; Ariga, Junko; Mathias, Jonathan R; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Xie, Xiayang; Distel, Martin; Köster, Reinhard W; Parsons, Michael J; Bhalla, Kapil N; Saxena, Meera T; Mumm, Jeff S

    2012-01-01

    Reporter-based assays underlie many high-throughput screening (HTS) platforms, but most are limited to in vitro applications. Here, we report a simple whole-organism HTS method for quantifying changes in reporter intensity in individual zebrafish over time termed, Automated Reporter Quantification in vivo (ARQiv). ARQiv differs from current "high-content" (e.g., confocal imaging-based) whole-organism screening technologies by providing a purely quantitative data acquisition approach that affords marked improvements in throughput. ARQiv uses a fluorescence microplate reader with specific detection functionalities necessary for robust quantification of reporter signals in vivo. This approach is: 1) Rapid; achieving true HTS capacities (i.e., >50,000 units per day), 2) Reproducible; attaining HTS-compatible assay quality (i.e., Z'-factors of ≥0.5), and 3) Flexible; amenable to nearly any reporter-based assay in zebrafish embryos, larvae, or juveniles. ARQiv is used here to quantify changes in: 1) Cell number; loss and regeneration of two different fluorescently tagged cell types (pancreatic beta cells and rod photoreceptors), 2) Cell signaling; relative activity of a transgenic Notch-signaling reporter, and 3) Cell metabolism; accumulation of reactive oxygen species. In summary, ARQiv is a versatile and readily accessible approach facilitating evaluation of genetic and/or chemical manipulations in living zebrafish that complements current "high-content" whole-organism screening methods by providing a first-tier in vivo HTS drug discovery platform.

  15. High-throughput migration modelling for estimating exposure to chemicals in food packaging in screening and prioritization tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstoff, Alexi S; Fantke, Peter; Huang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Specialty software and simplified models are often used to estimate migration of potentially toxic chemicals from packaging into food. Current models, however, are not suitable for emerging applications in decision-support tools, e.g. in Life Cycle Assessment and risk-based screening and prioriti...... to uncertainty and dramatically decreased model performance (R2 = 0.4, Se = 1). In all, this study provides a rapid migration modelling approach to estimate exposure to chemicals in food packaging for emerging screening and prioritization approaches.......Specialty software and simplified models are often used to estimate migration of potentially toxic chemicals from packaging into food. Current models, however, are not suitable for emerging applications in decision-support tools, e.g. in Life Cycle Assessment and risk-based screening...... and prioritization, which require rapid computation of accurate estimates for diverse scenarios. To fulfil this need, we develop an accurate and rapid (high-throughput) model that estimates the fraction of organic chemicals migrating from polymeric packaging materials into foods. Several hundred step...

  16. High-throughput screening of high Monascus pigment-producing strain based on digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Meng-lei; Wang, Lan; Yang, Zhi-xia; Chen, Hong-zhang

    2016-04-01

    This work proposed a new method which applied image processing and support vector machine (SVM) for screening of mold strains. Taking Monascus as example, morphological characteristics of Monascus colony were quantified by image processing. And the association between the characteristics and pigment production capability was determined by SVM. On this basis, a highly automated screening strategy was achieved. The accuracy of the proposed strategy is 80.6 %, which is compatible with the existing methods (81.1 % for microplate and 85.4 % for flask). Meanwhile, the screening of 500 colonies only takes 20-30 min, which is the highest rate among all published results. By applying this automated method, 13 strains with high-predicted production were obtained and the best one produced as 2.8-fold (226 U/mL) of pigment and 1.9-fold (51 mg/L) of lovastatin compared with the parent strain. The current study provides us with an effective and promising method for strain improvement.

  17. High-Throughput Accurate Single-Cell Screening of Euglena gracilis with Fluorescence-Assisted Optofluidic Time-Stretch Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Ito, Takuro; Jiang, Yiyue; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels is an important, but challenging goal for the world. As an alternative to liquid fossil fuels, algal biofuel is expected to play a key role in alleviating global warming since algae absorb atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. Among various algae for fuel production, Euglena gracilis is an attractive microalgal species as it is known to produce wax ester (good for biodiesel and aviation fuel) within lipid droplets. To date, while there exist many techniques for inducing microalgal cells to produce and accumulate lipid with high efficiency, few analytical methods are available for characterizing a population of such lipid-accumulated microalgae including E. gracilis with high throughout, high accuracy, and single-cell resolution simultaneously. Here we demonstrate high-throughput, high-accuracy, single-cell screening of E. gracilis with fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscopy-a method that combines the strengths of microfluidic cell focusing, optical time-stretch microscopy, and fluorescence detection used in conventional flow cytometry. Specifically, our fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscope consists of an optical time-stretch microscope and a fluorescence analyzer on top of a hydrodynamically focusing microfluidic device and can detect fluorescence from every E. gracilis cell in a population and simultaneously obtain its image with a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s. With the multi-dimensional information acquired by the system, we classify nitrogen-sufficient (ordinary) and nitrogen-deficient (lipid-accumulated) E. gracilis cells with a low false positive rate of 1.0%. This method holds promise for evaluating cultivation techniques and selective breeding for microalgae-based biofuel production.

  18. A novel high throughput assay for anthelmintic drug screening and resistance diagnosis by real-time monitoring of parasite motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Smout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helminth parasites cause untold morbidity and mortality to billions of people and livestock. Anthelmintic drugs are available but resistance is a problem in livestock parasites, and is a looming threat for human helminths. Testing the efficacy of available anthelmintic drugs and development of new drugs is hindered by the lack of objective high-throughput screening methods. Currently, drug effect is assessed by observing motility or development of parasites using laborious, subjective, low-throughput methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a novel application for a real-time cell monitoring device (xCELLigence that can simply and objectively assess anthelmintic effects by measuring parasite motility in real time in a fully automated high-throughput fashion. We quantitatively assessed motility and determined real time IC(50 values of different anthelmintic drugs against several developmental stages of major helminth pathogens of humans and livestock, including larval Haemonchus contortus and Strongyloides ratti, and adult hookworms and blood flukes. The assay enabled quantification of the onset of egg hatching in real time, and the impact of drugs on hatch rate, as well as discriminating between the effects of drugs on motility of drug-susceptible and -resistant isolates of H. contortus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that this technique will be suitable for discovery and development of new anthelmintic drugs as well as for detection of phenotypic resistance to existing drugs for the majority of helminths and other pathogens where motility is a measure of pathogen viability. The method is also amenable to use for other purposes where motility is assessed, such as gene silencing or antibody-mediated killing.

  19. High-Throughput Accurate Single-Cell Screening of Euglena gracilis with Fluorescence-Assisted Optofluidic Time-Stretch Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoshan Guo

    Full Text Available The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels is an important, but challenging goal for the world. As an alternative to liquid fossil fuels, algal biofuel is expected to play a key role in alleviating global warming since algae absorb atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. Among various algae for fuel production, Euglena gracilis is an attractive microalgal species as it is known to produce wax ester (good for biodiesel and aviation fuel within lipid droplets. To date, while there exist many techniques for inducing microalgal cells to produce and accumulate lipid with high efficiency, few analytical methods are available for characterizing a population of such lipid-accumulated microalgae including E. gracilis with high throughout, high accuracy, and single-cell resolution simultaneously. Here we demonstrate high-throughput, high-accuracy, single-cell screening of E. gracilis with fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscopy-a method that combines the strengths of microfluidic cell focusing, optical time-stretch microscopy, and fluorescence detection used in conventional flow cytometry. Specifically, our fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscope consists of an optical time-stretch microscope and a fluorescence analyzer on top of a hydrodynamically focusing microfluidic device and can detect fluorescence from every E. gracilis cell in a population and simultaneously obtain its image with a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s. With the multi-dimensional information acquired by the system, we classify nitrogen-sufficient (ordinary and nitrogen-deficient (lipid-accumulated E. gracilis cells with a low false positive rate of 1.0%. This method holds promise for evaluating cultivation techniques and selective breeding for microalgae-based biofuel production.

  20. Expanding the mammalian phenotype ontology to support automated exchange of high throughput mouse phenotyping data generated by large-scale mouse knockout screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-01-01

    A vast array of data is about to emerge from the large scale high-throughput mouse knockout phenotyping projects worldwide. It is critical that this information is captured in a standardized manner, made accessible, and is fully integrated with other phenotype data sets for comprehensive querying and analysis across all phenotype data types. The volume of data generated by the high-throughput phenotyping screens is expected to grow exponentially, thus, automated methods and standards to exchange phenotype data are required. The IMPC (International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium) is using the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) ontology in the automated annotation of phenodeviant data from high throughput phenotyping screens. 287 new term additions with additional hierarchy revisions were made in multiple branches of the MP ontology to accurately describe the results generated by these high throughput screens. Because these large scale phenotyping data sets will be reported using the MP as the common data standard for annotation and data exchange, automated importation of these data to MGI (Mouse Genome Informatics) and other resources is possible without curatorial effort. Maximum biomedical value of these mutant mice will come from integrating primary high-throughput phenotyping data with secondary, comprehensive phenotypic analyses combined with published phenotype details on these and related mutants at MGI and other resources.

  1. Peptide Binding to HLA Class I Molecules: Homogenous, High-Throughput Screening, and Affinity Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    present a homogenous, proximity-based assay for detection of peptide binding to HLA class I molecules. It uses a conformation-dependent anti-HLA class I antibody, W6/32, as one tag and a biotinylated recombinant HLA class I molecule as the other tag, and a proximity-based signal is generated through...... the luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassay technology (abbreviated LOCI and commercialized as AlphaScreen (TM)). Compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based peptide-HLA class I binding assay, the LOCI assay yields virtually identical affinity measurements, although having a broader dynamic range...

  2. TLC bioautography: high throughput technique for screening of bioactive natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhihong; Wu, Tao

    2013-06-28

    TLC bioautography is a method that combines chromatographic separation and in situ biological activity determination. The antimicrobial, antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities can be performed on TLC bioautography. This method is mainly used for preliminary screening natural products possessing these biological activities and for the bioactivity-directed fractionation and isolation of active components from complex extracts. This review covers the mechanisms and methodology of the antimicrobial, antioxidant activities, and enzyme inhibition adopted on TLC. It will be in particular discuss the recent advances in these technologies and assess their applications in targeting natural products.

  3. Droplet-based microfluidic high-throughput screening of heterologous enzymes secreted by the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneyton, Thomas; Thomas, Stéphane; Griffiths, Andrew D; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Drevelle, Antoine; Rossignol, Tristan

    2017-01-31

    Droplet-based microfluidics is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to microtiter plate techniques for enzymatic high-throughput screening (HTS), especially for exploring large diversities with lower time and cost footprint. In this case, the assayed enzyme has to be accessible to the substrate within the water-in-oil droplet by being ideally extracellular or displayed at the cell surface. However, most of the enzymes screened to date are expressed within the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli cells, which means that a lysis step must take place inside the droplets for enzyme activity to be assayed. Here, we take advantage of the excellent secretion abilities of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica to describe a highly efficient expression system particularly suitable for the droplet-based microfluidic HTS. Five hydrolytic genes from Aspergillus niger genome were chosen and the corresponding five Yarrowia lipolytica producing strains were constructed. Each enzyme (endo-β-1,4-xylanase B and C; 1,4-β-cellobiohydrolase A; endoglucanase A; aspartic protease) was successfully overexpressed and secreted in an active form in the crude supernatant. A droplet-based microfluidic HTS system was developed to (a) encapsulate single yeast cells; (b) grow yeast in droplets; (c) inject the relevant enzymatic substrate; (d) incubate droplets on chip; (e) detect enzymatic activity; and (f) sort droplets based on enzymatic activity. Combining this integrated microfluidic platform with gene expression in Y. lipolytica results in remarkably low variability in the enzymatic activity at the single cell level within a given monoclonal population (Yarrowia lipolytica was used to express fungal genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes of interest. We developed a successful droplet-based microfluidic platform for the high-throughput screening (10(5) strains/h) of Y. lipolytica based on enzyme secretion and activity. This approach provides highly efficient tools for the HTS of recombinant enzymatic

  4. High-throughput screening of inorganic compounds for the discovery of novel dielectric and optical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis, Ioannis; Mrdjenovich, David; Ballouz, Eric; Liu, Miao; Winston, Donald; Chen, Wei; Graf, Tanja; Schladt, Thomas D; Persson, Kristin A; Prinz, Fritz B

    2017-01-31

    Dielectrics are an important class of materials that are ubiquitous in modern electronic applications. Even though their properties are important for the performance of devices, the number of compounds with known dielectric constant is on the order of a few hundred. Here, we use Density Functional Perturbation Theory as a way to screen for the dielectric constant and refractive index of materials in a fast and computationally efficient way. Our results constitute the largest dielectric tensors database to date, containing 1,056 compounds. Details regarding the computational methodology and technical validation are presented along with the format of our publicly available data. In addition, we integrate our dataset with the Materials Project allowing users easy access to material properties. Finally, we explain how our dataset and calculation methodology can be used in the search for novel dielectric compounds.

  5. Screening of Bacillus coagulans strains in lignin supplemented minimal medium with high throughput turbidity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Glaser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to extend the options for screening and characterization of microorganism through kinetic growth parameters. In order to obtain data, automated turbidimetric measurements were accomplished to observe the response of strains of Bacillus coagulans. For the characterization, it was decided to examine the influence of varying concentrations of lignin with respect to bacterial growth. Different mathematical models are used for comparison: logistic, Gompertz, Baranyi and Richards and Stannard. The growth response was characterized by parameters like maximum growth rate, maximum population, and the lag time. In this short analysis we present a mathematical approach towards a comparison of different microorganisms. Furthermore, it can be demonstrated that lignin in low concentrations can have a positive influence on the growth of B. coagulans.

  6. SSR_pipeline: a bioinformatic infrastructure for identifying microsatellites from paired-end Illumina high-throughput DNA sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark P.; Knaus, Brian J.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Haig, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    SSR_pipeline is a flexible set of programs designed to efficiently identify simple sequence repeats (e.g., microsatellites) from paired-end high-throughput Illumina DNA sequencing data. The program suite contains 3 analysis modules along with a fourth control module that can automate analyses of large volumes of data. The modules are used to 1) identify the subset of paired-end sequences that pass Illumina quality standards, 2) align paired-end reads into a single composite DNA sequence, and 3) identify sequences that possess microsatellites (both simple and compound) conforming to user-specified parameters. The microsatellite search algorithm is extremely efficient, and we have used it to identify repeats with motifs from 2 to 25bp in length. Each of the 3 analysis modules can also be used independently to provide greater flexibility or to work with FASTQ or FASTA files generated from other sequencing platforms (Roche 454, Ion Torrent, etc.). We demonstrate use of the program with data from the brine fly Ephydra packardi (Diptera: Ephydridae) and provide empirical timing benchmarks to illustrate program performance on a common desktop computer environment. We further show that the Illumina platform is capable of identifying large numbers of microsatellites, even when using unenriched sample libraries and a very small percentage of the sequencing capacity from a single DNA sequencing run. All modules from SSR_pipeline are implemented in the Python programming language and can therefore be used from nearly any computer operating system (Linux, Macintosh, and Windows).

  7. Evaluation of a novel high throughput screening tool for relative emissions of industrial chemicals used in chemical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undeman, Emma; Fischer, Stellan; McLachlan, Michael S

    2011-02-01

    Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently marketed worldwide, but only a small number of these compounds has been measured in effluents or the environment to date. The need for screening methodologies to select candidates for environmental monitoring is therefore significant. To meet this need, the Swedish Chemicals Agency developed the Exposure Index (EI), a model for ranking emissions to a number of environmental matrices based on chemical quantity used and use pattern. Here we evaluate the EI. Data on measured concentrations of organic chemicals in sewage treatment plants, one of the recipients considered in the EI model, were compiled from the literature, and the correlation between predicted emission levels and observed concentrations was assessed by linear regression analysis. The adequacy of the parameters employed in the EI was further explored by calibration of the model to measured concentrations. The EI was found to be of limited use for ranking contaminant levels in STPs; the r² values for the regressions between predicted and observed values ranged from 0.02 (p = 0.243) to 0.14 (p = 0.007) depending on the dataset. The calibrated version of the model produced only slightly better predictions although it was fitted to the experimental data. However, the model is a valuable first step in developing a high throughput screening tool for organic contaminants, and there is potential for improving the EI algorithm. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a magnetic 3D spheroid platform with potential application for high-throughput drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei Mei; Loh, Xian Jun; Tan, Ern Yu; Loo, Joachim S C; Ho, Vincent H B

    2014-07-07

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture has become increasingly adopted as a more accurate model of the complex in vivo microenvironment compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. Multicellular spheroids are important 3D cell culture models widely used in biological studies and drug screening. To facilitate simple spheroid manipulation, magnetic spheroids were generated from magnetically labeled cells using a scaffold-free approach. This method is applicable to a variety of cell types. The spheroids generated can be targeted and immobilized using magnetic field gradients, allowing media change or dilution to be performed with minimal disruption to the spheroids. Cells in magnetic spheroids showed good viability and displayed typical 3D morphology. Using this platform, a 28 day study was carried out using doxorubicin on magnetic MCF-7 spheroids. The results provided a proof-of-principle for using magnetic tumor spheroids in therapeutic studies. They can offer beneficial insights that help to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, this platform can be adapted for high-throughput screening in drug discovery.

  9. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay system for appetite-regulating gene and drug screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Shimada

    Full Text Available The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish. This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf, knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1, and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers.

  10. Automated Patch Clamp Meets High-Throughput Screening: 384 Cells Recorded in Parallel on a Planar Patch Clamp Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obergrussberger, Alison; Brüggemann, Andrea; Goetze, Tom A; Rapedius, Markus; Haarmann, Claudia; Rinke, Ilka; Becker, Nadine; Oka, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Atsushi; Stengel, Timo; Vogel, Marius; Steindl, Juergen; Mueller, Max; Stiehler, Johannes; George, Michael; Fertig, Niels

    2016-12-01

    We have developed an automated patch clamp module for high-throughput ion channel screening, recording from 384 cells simultaneously. The module is incorporated into a laboratory pipetting robot and uses a 384-channel pipettor head for application of cells and compounds. The module contains 384 amplifier channels for fully parallel recordings using a digital amplifier. Success rates for completed experiments (1- to 4-point concentration-response curves for cells satisfying defined quality control parameters) of greater than 85% have been routinely achieved with, for example, HEK, CHO, and RBL cell lines expressing hNaV1.7, hERG, Kir2.1, GABA, or glutamate receptors. Pharmacology experiments are recorded and analyzed using specialized software, and the pharmacology of hNaV1.7 and hERG is described. Fast external solution exchange rates of robot to minimize exposure of the ligand on the receptor. This ensures that ligand-gated ion channels, for example, GABA and glutamate described in this report, can be reproducibly recorded. Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes have also been used with success rates of 52% for cells that have a seal resistance of >200 MΩ, and recordings of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ are shown. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Use of a high-throughput screening approach coupled with in vivo zebrafish embryo screening to develop hazard ranking for engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Saji; Xia, Tian; Rallo, Robert; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Haiyuan; France, Bryan; Schoenfeld, David; Damoiseaux, Robert; Liu, Rong; Lin, Shuo; Bradley, Kenneth A; Cohen, Yoram; Nel, André E

    2011-03-22

    Because of concerns about the safety of a growing number of engineered nanomaterials (ENM), it is necessary to develop high-throughput screening and in silico data transformation tools that can speed up in vitro hazard ranking. Here, we report the use of a multiparametric, automated screening assay that incorporates sublethal and lethal cellular injury responses to perform high-throughput analysis of a batch of commercial metal/metal oxide nanoparticles (NP) with the inclusion of a quantum dot (QD1). The responses chosen for tracking cellular injury through automated epifluorescence microscopy included ROS production, intracellular calcium flux, mitochondrial depolarization, and plasma membrane permeability. The z-score transformed high volume data set was used to construct heat maps for in vitro hazard ranking as well as showing the similarity patterns of NPs and response parameters through the use of self-organizing maps (SOM). Among the materials analyzed, QD1 and nano-ZnO showed the most prominent lethality, while Pt, Ag, SiO2, Al2O3, and Au triggered sublethal effects but without cytotoxicity. In order to compare the in vitro with the in vivo response outcomes in zebrafish embryos, NPs were used to assess their impact on mortality rate, hatching rate, cardiac rate, and morphological defects. While QDs, ZnO, and Ag induced morphological abnormalities or interfered in embryo hatching, Pt and Ag exerted inhibitory effects on cardiac rate. Ag toxicity in zebrafish differed from the in vitro results, which is congruent with this material's designation as extremely dangerous in the environment. Interestingly, while toxicity in the initially selected QD formulation was due to a solvent (toluene), supplementary testing of additional QDs selections yielded in vitro hazard profiling that reflect the release of chalcogenides. In conclusion, the use of a high-throughput screening, in silico data handling and zebrafish testing may constitute a paradigm for rapid and

  12. Use of a High Throughput Screening Approach Coupled With In Vivo Zebrafish Embryo Screening to Develop Hazard Ranking for Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Saji; Xia, Tian; Rallo, Robert; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Haiyuan; France, Bryan; Schoenfeld, David; Damoiseaux, Robert; Liu, Rong; Lin, Shuo; Bradley, Kenneth A; Cohen, Yoram; Nel, André E

    2014-01-01

    Because of concerns about the safety of a growing number of engineered nanomaterials (ENM), it is necessary to develop high throughput screening and in silico data transformation tools that can speed up in vitro hazard ranking. Here, we report the use of a multi-parametric, automated screening assay that incorporates sub-lethal and lethal cellular injury responses to perform high throughput analysis of a batch of commercial metal/metal oxide nanoparticles (NP) with the inclusion of a quantum dot (QD1). The responses chosen for tracking cellular injury through automated epifluorescence microscopy included ROS production, intracellular calcium flux, mitochondrial depolarization, and plasma membrane permeability. The z-score transformed high volume data set was used to construct heat maps for in vitro hazard ranking as well as showing the similarity patterns of NPs and response parameters through the use of self-organizing maps (SOM). Among the materials analyzed, QD1 and nano-ZnO showed the most prominent lethality, while Pt, Ag, SiO2, Al2O3, and Au triggered sub-lethal effects but without cytotoxicity. In order to compare the in vitro with the in vivo response outcomes in zebrafish embryos, NPs were used to assess their impact on mortality rate, hatching rate, cardiac rate, and morphological defects. While QDs, ZnO, and Ag induced morphological abnormalities or interfered in embryo hatching, Pt and Ag exerted inhibitory effects on cardiac rate. Ag toxicity in zebrafish differed from the in vitro results, which is congruent with this material's designation as extremely dangerous in the environment. Interestingly, while toxicity in the initially selected QD formulation was due to a solvent (toluene), supplementary testing of additional QDs selections yielded in vitro hazard profiling that reflect the release of chalcogenides. In conclusion, the use of a high throughput screening, in silico data handling and zebrafish testing may constitute a paradigm for rapid and

  13. A high-throughput method for membrane protein solubility screening: the ultracentrifugation dispersity sedimentation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Daniel A P; Mizohata, Eiichi; Newstead, Simon; Ferrandon, Sebastian; Postis, Vincent; Xia, Xiaobing; Henderson, Peter J F; van Veen, Hendrik W; Byrne, Bernadette

    2007-07-01

    One key to successful crystallization of membrane proteins is the identification of detergents that maintain the protein in a soluble, monodispersed state. Because of their hydrophobic nature, membrane proteins are particularly prone to forming insoluble aggregates over time. This nonspecific aggregation of the molecules reduces the likelihood of the regular association of the protein molecules essential for crystal lattice formation. Critical buffer components affecting the aggregation of membrane proteins include detergent choice, salt concentration, and presence of glycerol. The optimization of these parameters is often a time- and protein-consuming process. Here we describe a novel ultracentrifugation dispersity sedimentation (UDS) assay in which ultracentrifugation of very small (5 microL) volumes of purified, soluble membrane protein is combined with SDS-PAGE analysis to rapidly assess the degree of protein aggregation. The results from the UDS method correlate very well with established methods like size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), while consuming considerably less protein. In addition, the UDS method allows rapid screening of detergents for membrane protein crystallization in a fraction of the time required by SEC. Here we use the UDS method in the identification of suitable detergents and buffer compositions for the crystallization of three recombinant prokaryotic membrane proteins. The implications of our results for membrane protein crystallization prescreening are discussed.

  14. From molecular engineering to process engineering: development of high-throughput screening methods in enzyme directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lidan; Yang, Chengcheng; Yu, Hongwei

    2018-01-01

    With increasing concerns in sustainable development, biocatalysis has been recognized as a competitive alternative to traditional chemical routes in the past decades. As nature's biocatalysts, enzymes are able to catalyze a broad range of chemical transformations, not only with mild reaction conditions but also with high activity and selectivity. However, the insufficient activity or enantioselectivity of natural enzymes toward non-natural substrates limits their industrial application, while directed evolution provides a potent solution to this problem, thanks to its independence on detailed knowledge about the relationship between sequence, structure, and mechanism/function of the enzymes. A proper high-throughput screening (HTS) method is the key to successful and efficient directed evolution. In recent years, huge varieties of HTS methods have been developed for rapid evaluation of mutant libraries, ranging from in vitro screening to in vivo selection, from indicator addition to multi-enzyme system construction, and from plate screening to computation- or machine-assisted screening. Recently, there is a tendency to integrate directed evolution with metabolic engineering in biosynthesis, using metabolites as HTS indicators, which implies that directed evolution has transformed from molecular engineering to process engineering. This paper aims to provide an overview of HTS methods categorized based on the reaction principles or types by summarizing related studies published in recent years including the work from our group, to discuss assay design strategies and typical examples of HTS methods, and to share our understanding on HTS method development for directed evolution of enzymes involved in specific catalytic reactions or metabolic pathways.

  15. Immobilized metal affinity cryogel-based high-throughput platform for screening bioprocess and chromatographic parameters of His6-GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Joyita; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-04-01

    Among various tools of product monitoring, chromatography is of vital importance as it also extends to the purification of product. Immobilized metal affinity cryogel (Cu(II)-iminodiacetic acid- and Ni(II)-nitrilotriacetic acid-polyacrylamide) minicolumns (diameter 8 mm, height 4 mm, void volume 250 μl) were inserted in open-ended 96-well plate and different chromatographic parameters and bioprocess conditions were analysed. The platform was first validated with lysozyme. Optimum binding of lysozyme (∼90%) was achieved when 50 μg of protein in 20 mM Tris, pH 8.0 was applied to the minicolumns with maximum recovery (∼90%) upon elution with 300 mM imidazole. Thereafter, the platform was screened for chromatographic conditions of His6-GTPase. Since cryogels have large pore size, they can easily process non-clarified samples containing debris and particulate matters. The bound enzymes on the gel retain its activity and therefore can be assayed on-column by adding substrate and then displacing the product. Highest binding of His6-GTPase was achieved when 50 μl of non-clarified cell lysate was applied to the cryogel and subsequently washed with 50 mM Tris, 150 mM NaCl, 5 mM MgCl2, 10 mM imidazole, pH 8.0 with dynamic and static binding capacities of ∼1.5 and 3 activity units. Maximum recovery was obtained upon elution with 300 mM imidazole with a purification fold of ∼10; the purity was also analysed by SDS-PAGE. The platform showed reproducible results which were validated by Bland-Altman plot. The minicolumn was also scaled up for chromatographic capture and recovery of His6-GTPase. The bioprocess conditions were monitored which displayed that optimum production of His6-GTPase was attained by induction with 200 μM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside at 25 °C for 12 h. It was concluded that immobilized metal affinity cryogel-based platform can be successfully used as a high-throughput platform for screening of bioprocess and chromatographic

  16. Computational Toxicology as Implemented by the U.S. EPA: Providing High Throughput Decision Support Tools for Screening and Assessing Chemical Exposure, Hazard and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational toxicology is the application of mathematical and computer models to help assess chemical hazards and risks to human health and the environment. Supported by advances in informatics, high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies, and systems biology, the U.S. Environ...

  17. Probe molecules (PrM) approach in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high throughput screening (HTS): in vivo discovery for developing in vitro target methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficient and accurate adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS) methods use a systems biology based approach to computationally model in vitro cellular and molecular data for rapid chemical prioritization; however, not all HTS assays are grounded by rel...

  18. Analysis of small-sample clinical genomics studies using multi-parameter shrinkage: application to high-throughput RNA interference screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wiel, M.; Menezes, R.; van Olst, E.; van Beusechem, V.W.

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput (HT) RNA interference (RNAi) screens are increasingly used for reverse genetics and drug discovery. These experiments are laborious and costly, hence sample sizes are often very small. Powerful statistical techniques to detect siRNAs that potentially enhance treatment are currently

  19. Development and validation of a chemiluminescent immunodetection assay amenable to high throughput screening of antiviral drugs for Nipah and Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljofan, Mohamad; Porotto, Matteo; Moscona, Anne; Mungall, Bruce A

    2008-04-01

    There are currently no antiviral drugs approved for the highly lethal Biosafety Level 4 pathogens Nipah and Hendra virus. A number of researchers are developing surrogate assays amenable to Biosafety Level 2 biocontainment but ultimately, the development of a high throughput screening method for directly quantifying these viruses in a Biosafety Level 4 environment will be critical for final evaluation of antiviral drugs identified in surrogate assays, in addition to reducing the time required for effective antiviral drug development. By adapting an existing immunoplaque assay and using enzyme linked immunodetection in a microtitre plate format, the current experiments describe a simple two step assay protocol involving an overnight virus inoculation of Vero cell monolayers (with or without antiviral drug treatment) at Biosafety Level 4, followed by cell fixation and virus inactivation enabling removal of plates from the Biosafety Level 4 laboratory and a subsequent immunodetection assay using a chemiluminescent horse radish peroxidase substrate to be performed at Biosafety Level 2. The analytical sensitivity (limit of detection) of this assay is 100 tissue culture infectious dose50/ml of either Nipah or Hendra virus. In addition this assay enables linear quantitation of virus over three orders of magnitude and is unaffected by dimethyl sulfoxide concentrations of 1% or less. Intra-assay coefficients of variation are acceptable (less than 20%) when detecting a minimum of 1000 tissue culture infectious dose50/ml of either virus although inter-assay variation is considerably greater. By an assessment of efficacies of the broad spectrum antiviral Ribavirin and an experimental fusion inhibitory peptide, this assay reveals a good correlation with previously published fluorescent immunodetection assays. The current experiments describe for the first time, a high throughput screening method amenable for direct assessment of live henipavirus antiviral drug activity.

  20. State-of-the-art automated patch clamp devices: Heat activation, action potentials and high throughput in ion channel screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja eStoelzle

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are essential in a wide range of cellular functions and their malfunction underlies many disease states making them important targets in drug discovery. Diverse automated patch clamp systems with high-throughput capabilities are available for drug screening, but there are limitations in the application range. For example, solution exchange time, temperature control and the availability of the current clamp mode can be limiting factors. However, further development of existing devices and introduction of new systems widen the range of possible experiments and increase throughput. Here we introduce new features and platforms that meet the needs of drug discovery researchers and basic researchers alike.The Patchliner is an automated patch clamp system capable of recording up to 8 cells simultaneously with high success rates. Novel features such as temperature control and recordings in the current clamp mode are described here. Standard cell lines and excitable cells such as stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes have been used in the voltage clamp and current clamp modes with the view to finding new drug candidates and safety testing methods in a more physiologically relevant environment. The SyncroPatch 96, is a screening platform capable of recording from 96 cells in parallel and offers a throughput of 5000 data points per day. Full dose response curves can be acquired from individual cells reducing the cost per data point. The system is an ideal tool for secondary screening efforts and for safety testing on ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels.The Patchliner and SyncroPatch 96 are ideal platforms for drug discovery, ion channel research and safety testing, combining long awaited features such as parallel action potential recordings and temperature control with extensively increased throughput.

  1. A High Throughput Screening Assay for Anti-Mycobacterial Small Molecules Based on Adenylate Kinase Release as a Reporter of Cell Lysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Forbes

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is well-established to be one of the most important bacterial pathogens for which new antimicrobial therapies are needed. Herein, we describe the development of a high throughput screening assay for the identification of molecules that are bactericidal against Mycobacteria. The assay utilizes the release of the intracellular enzyme adenylate kinase into the culture medium as a reporter of mycobacterial cell death. We demonstrate that the assay is selective for mycobactericidal molecules and detects anti-mycobacterial activity at concentrations below the minimum inhibitory concentration of many molecules. Thus, the AK assay is more sensitive than traditional growth assays. We have validated the AK assay in the HTS setting using the Mtb surrogate organism M. smegmatis and libraries of FDA approved drugs as well as a commercially available Diversity set. The screen of the FDA-approved library demonstrated that the AK assay is able to identify the vast majority of drugs with known mycobactericidal activity. Importantly, our screen of the Diversity set revealed that the increased sensitivity of the AK assay increases the ability of M. smegmatis-based screens to detect molecules with relatively poor activity against M. smegmatis but good to excellent activity against Mtb.

  2. In situ analysis and structural elucidation of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) tannins for high-throughput germplasm screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, An; Stringano, Elisabetta; Brown, Ron H; Mueller-Harvey, Irene

    2011-01-26

    A rapid thiolytic degradation and cleanup procedure was developed for analyzing tannins directly in chlorophyll-containing sainfoin ( Onobrychis viciifolia ) plants. The technique proved suitable for complex tannin mixtures containing catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, and epigallocatechin flavan-3-ol units. The reaction time was standardized at 60 min to minimize the loss of structural information as a result of epimerization and degradation of terminal flavan-3-ol units. The results were evaluated by separate analysis of extractable and unextractable tannins, which accounted for 63.6-113.7% of the in situ plant tannins. It is of note that 70% aqueous acetone extracted tannins with a lower mean degree of polymerization (mDP) than was found for tannins analyzed in situ. Extractable tannins had between 4 and 29 lower mDP values. The method was validated by comparing results from individual and mixed sample sets. The tannin composition of different sainfoin accessions covered a range of mDP values from 16 to 83, procyanidin/prodelphinidin (PC/PD) ratios from 19.2/80.8 to 45.6/54.4, and cis/trans ratios from 74.1/25.9 to 88.0/12.0. This is the first high-throughput screening method that is suitable for analyzing condensed tannin contents and structural composition directly in green plant tissue.

  3. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E; Hall, Seth E; Wieland, Jamie R; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C; Mulligan, Christopher C

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E.; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L.; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E.; Hall, Seth E.; Wieland, Jamie R.; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Quantitative high-throughput gene expression profiling of human striatal development to screen stem cell–derived medium spiny neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Straccia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic characterization of the spatio-temporal gene expression during human neurodevelopment is essential to understand brain function in both physiological and pathological conditions. In recent years, stem cell technology has provided an in vitro tool to recapitulate human development, permitting also the generation of human models for many diseases. The correct differentiation of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC into specific cell types should be evaluated by comparison with specific cells/tissue profiles from the equivalent adult in vivo organ. Here, we define by a quantitative high-throughput gene expression analysis the subset of specific genes of the whole ganglionic eminence (WGE and adult human striatum. Our results demonstrate that not only the number of specific genes is crucial but also their relative expression levels between brain areas. We next used these gene profiles to characterize the differentiation of hPSCs. Our findings demonstrate a temporal progression of gene expression during striatal differentiation of hPSCs from a WGE toward an adult striatum identity. Present results establish a gene expression profile to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the telencephalic hPSC-derived progenitors eventually used for transplantation and mature striatal neurons for disease modeling and drug-screening.

  6. Development of a high-throughput screening platform to study the adsorption of antigens onto aluminum-containing adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jully, Vanessa; Moniotte, Nicolas; Mathot, Frédéric; Lemoine, Dominique; Préat, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    Aluminum-containing salts are important adjuvants in the formulations of many licensed human vaccines. However, in the early stage of the design of a new vaccine, a thorough understanding of the adsorption mechanisms of an antigen onto an aluminum salt is required. Therefore, we have developed a robust, rapid, and reproducible high-throughput screening (HTS) platform to study the adsorption capacity of aluminum-containing vaccines. The adsorption isotherms on aluminum hydroxide and aluminum phosphate of two model proteins, β-casein, and bovine serum albumin, were evaluated using a liquid handling system, which permitted rapid sample preparation in a small volume without nonspecific adsorption. Highly reproducible adsorption capacities and adsorptive coefficients were estimated based on the Langmuir model. To demonstrate the potential of this HTS platform, we evaluated the adsorption isotherms for two antigens, hepatitis B surface antigen and a pneumococcal serotype polysaccharide conjugated to a protein-D carrier, onto aluminum-containing vaccines at either a constant protein or a constant aluminum concentration. The automated assay enabled the rapid quantification of antigen adsorption with a significant reduction in operator workload and reagent use. This platform should accelerate data acquisition during the development of a new vaccine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. High-throughput screening of silver nanoparticle stability and bacterial inactivation in aquatic media: influence of specific ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue; Li, Minghua; Wang, Jinwen; Marambio-Jones, Catalina; Peng, Fubing; Huang, Xiaofei; Damoiseaux, Robert; Hoek, Eric M V

    2010-10-01

    Although silver nanoparticles are being exploited widely in antimicrobial applications, the mechanisms underlying silver nanoparticle antimicrobial properties in environmentally relevant media are not fully understood. The latter point is critical for understanding potential environmental impacts of silver nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of inorganic aquatic chemistry on silver nanoparticle stability (aggregation, dissolution, reprecipitation) and bacterial viability. A synthetic "fresh water" matrix was prepared comprising various combinations of cations and anions while maintaining a fixed ionic strength. Aggregation and dissolution of silver nanoparticles was influenced by electrolyte composition; experimentally determined ionic silver concentrations were about half that predicted from a thermodynamic model and about 1000 times lower than the maximum dispersed silver nanoparticle concentration. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles was much lower than Ag(+) ions when compared on the basis of total mass added; however, the actual concentrations of dissolved silver were the same regardless of how silver was introduced. Bacterial inactivation also depended on bacteria cell type (Gram-positive/negative) as well as the hardness and alkalinity of the suspending media. These simple, but systematic studies--enabled by high-throughput screening--reveal the inherent complexity associated with understanding silver nanoparticle antibacterial efficacy as well as potential environmental impacts of silver nanoparticles.

  8. High-throughput oxidation screen of antibody-drug conjugates by analytical protein A chromatography following IdeS digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buecheler, Jakob W; Winzer, Matthias; Weber, Christian; Gieseler, Henning

    2018-01-30

    Oxidation of protein therapeutics is a major chemical degradation pathway which may impact bioactivity, serum half-life and stability. Therefore, oxidation is a relevant parameter which has to be monitored throughout formulation development. Methods such as HIC, RPLC and LC/MS achieve a separation of oxidized and non-oxidized species by differences in hydrophobicity. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) although are highly more complex due to the heterogeneity in linker, drug, drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR) and conjugation site. The analytical protein A chromatography can provide a simple and fast alternative to these common methods. A miniature analytical protein A chromatography method in combination with an IdeS digest was developed to analyse ADCs. The IdeS digest efficiency of an IgG1 was monitored using SEC-HPLC and non-reducing SDS-PAGE. An antibody-fluorescent dye conjugate was conjugated at different dye-to-antibody ratios as model construct to mimic an ADC. With IdeS, an almost complete digest of a model IgG1 can be achieved (digested protein amount >98%). This enables subsequent analytical protein A chromatography, which consequently eliminates any interference of payload with the stationary phase. A novel high-throughput method for an interchain cysteine-linked ADC oxidation screens during formulation development was developed. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Establishment of IL-7 Expression Reporter Human Cell Lines, and Their Feasibility for High-Throughput Screening of IL-7-Upregulating Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yeon Sook; Kim, Byung Soo; Sim, Chan Kyu; Kim, Inki; Lee, Myeong Sup

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine essential for T cell homeostasis, and is clinically important. However, the regulatory mechanism of IL-7 gene expression is not well known, and a systematic approach to screen chemicals that regulate IL-7 expression has not yet been developed. In this study, we attempted to develop human reporter cell lines using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing technology. For this purpose, we designed donor DNA that contains an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene, drug selection cassette, and modified homologous arms which are considered to enhance the translation of the eGFP reporter transcript, and also a highly efficient single-guide RNA with a minimal off-target effect to target the IL-7 start codon region. By applying this system, we established IL-7 eGFP reporter cell lines that could report IL-7 gene transcription based on the eGFP protein signal. Furthermore, we utilized the cells to run a pilot screen campaign for IL-7-upregulating chemicals in a high-throughput format, and identified a chemical that can up-regulate IL-7 gene transcription. Collectively, these results suggest that our IL-7 reporter system can be utilized in large-scale chemical library screening to reveal novel IL-7 regulatory pathways and to identify potential drugs for development of new treatments in immunodeficiency disease.

  10. The Candida Genome Database (CGD): incorporation of Assembly 22, systematic identifiers and visualization of high throughput sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Marek S; Binkley, Jonathan; Binkley, Gail; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Sherlock, Gavin

    2017-01-04

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD, http://www.candidagenome.org/) is a freely available online resource that provides gene, protein and sequence information for multiple Candida species, along with web-based tools for accessing, analyzing and exploring these data. The mission of CGD is to facilitate and accelerate research into Candida pathogenesis and biology, by curating the scientific literature in real time, and connecting literature-derived annotations to the latest version of the genomic sequence and its annotations. Here, we report the incorporation into CGD of Assembly 22, the first chromosome-level, phased diploid assembly of the C. albicans genome, coupled with improvements that we have made to the assembly using additional available sequence data. We also report the creation of systematic identifiers for C. albicans genes and sequence features using a system similar to that adopted by the yeast community over two decades ago. Finally, we describe the incorporation of JBrowse into CGD, which allows online browsing of mapped high throughput sequencing data, and its implementation for several RNA-Seq data sets, as well as the whole genome sequencing data that was used in the construction of Assembly 22. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. High throughput sequencing identifies an imprinted gene, Grb10, associated with the pluripotency state in nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Gao, Shuai; Huang, Hua; Liu, Wenqiang; Huang, Huanwei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Yawei; Le, Rongrong; Kou, Xiaochen; Zhao, Yanhong; Kou, Zhaohui; Li, Jia; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hailin; Cai, Tao; Sun, Qingyuan; Gao, Shaorong; Han, Zhiming

    2017-07-18

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer and transcription factor mediated reprogramming are two widely used techniques for somatic cell reprogramming. Both fully reprogrammed nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine, and evaluation of the stem cell pluripotency state is crucial for these applications. Previous reports have shown that the Dlk1-Dio3 region is associated with pluripotency in induced pluripotent stem cells and the incomplete somatic cell reprogramming causes abnormally elevated levels of genomic 5-methylcytosine in induced pluripotent stem cells compared to nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and embryonic stem cells. In this study, we compared pluripotency associated genes Rian and Gtl2 in the Dlk1-Dio3 region in exactly syngeneic nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells with same genomic insertion. We also assessed 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels and performed high-throughput sequencing in these cells. Our results showed that Rian and Gtl2 in the Dlk1-Dio3 region related to pluripotency in induced pluripotent stem cells did not correlate with the genes in nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells, and no significant difference in 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels were observed between fully and partially reprogrammed nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Through syngeneic comparison, our study identifies for the first time that Grb10 is associated with the pluripotency state in nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells.

  12. Combinatorial high-throughput experimental and bioinformatic approach identifies molecular pathways linked with the sensitivity to anticancer target drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkova, Larisa; Aliper, Alexander; Suntsova, Maria; Kholodenko, Roman; Shepelin, Denis; Borisov, Nicolas; Malakhova, Galina; Vasilov, Raif; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-09-29

    Effective choice of anticancer drugs is important problem of modern medicine. We developed a method termed OncoFinder for the analysis of new type of biomarkers reflecting activation of intracellular signaling and metabolic molecular pathways. These biomarkers may be linked with the sensitivity to anticancer drugs. In this study, we compared the experimental data obtained in our laboratory and in the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDS) project for testing response to anticancer drugs and transcriptomes of various human cell lines. The microarray-based profiling of transcriptomes was performed for the cell lines before the addition of drugs to the medium, and experimental growth inhibition curves were built for each drug, featuring characteristic IC50 values. We assayed here four target drugs - Pazopanib, Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus, and 238 different cell lines, of which 11 were profiled in our laboratory and 227 - in GDS project. Using the OncoFinder-processed transcriptomic data on ~600 molecular pathways, we identified pathways showing significant correlation between pathway activation strength (PAS) and IC50 values for these drugs. Correlations reflect relationships between response to drug and pathway activation features. We intersected the results and found molecular pathways significantly correlated in both our assay and GDS project. For most of these pathways, we generated molecular models of their interaction with known molecular target(s) of the respective drugs. For the first time, our study uncovered mechanisms underlying cancer cell response to drugs at the high-throughput molecular interactomic level.

  13. Identification of small molecules uncoupling the Notch::Jagged interaction through an integrated high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Platonova

    Full Text Available Notch signaling plays an important role in several cellular functions including growth, differentiation, cell fate determination and stemness. Increased Notch activity has been linked to several types of cancers. Activation of Notch signaling is triggered by the interaction of Notch receptors (Notch1-4 with 5 different ligands (Jagged1-2 and Dll1-3-4 expressed on the neighbouring cells. Currently, indirect approaches to inhibit Notch signalling are based on the inhibition of the key step of Notch activation catalyzed by the γ-Secretase and thereby affect several different γ-Secretase substrates; conversely direct strategies get advantage of antibody-based drugs. The evidence that Jagged-mediated Notch activation plays a key role in cancer cell biology and the interplay with the surrounding microenvironment prompted us to develop a strategy to directly inhibit Notch activation by uncoupling its interaction with the Jagged, using an unprecedented approach based on small molecules. We set-up a screening strategy based on: protein::protein docking of crystallographic structures of Notch1 with Jagged1; comparative modelling of the Notch2:Jagged2 complex, based on the Notch1::Jagged1 complex; in silico high-throughput screening directed to Notch2 interaction surface of a virtual chemical library containing a large variety of molecules commercially available. The predicted pharmacological activity of the selected compounds was validated in vitro by a gene reporter and a viability assay. This approach led to the successful identification of two candidates with different anti-proliferative potency and efficacy. This represents the first step towards the rational identification of candidate molecules for the development of entirely novel drugs directed to inhibit Notch signaling in cancer.

  14. High-throughput screening of cellulase F mutants from multiplexed plasmid sets using an automated plate assay on a functional proteomic robotic workcell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nasib

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The field of plasmid-based functional proteomics requires the rapid assay of proteins expressed from plasmid libraries. Automation is essential since large sets of mutant open reading frames are being cloned for evaluation. To date no integrated automated platform is available to carry out the entire process including production of plasmid libraries, expression of cloned genes, and functional testing of expressed proteins. Results We used a functional proteomic assay in a multiplexed setting on an integrated plasmid-based robotic workcell for high-throughput screening of mutants of cellulase F, an endoglucanase from the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces PC-2. This allowed us to identify plasmids containing optimized clones expressing mutants with improved activity at lower pH. A plasmid library of mutagenized clones of the celF gene with targeted variations in the last four codons was constructed by site-directed PCR mutagenesis and transformed into Escherichia coli. A robotic picker integrated into the workcell was used to inoculate medium in a 96-well deep well plate, combining the transformants into a multiplexed set in each well, and the plate was incubated on the workcell. Plasmids were prepared from the multiplexed culture on the liquid handler component of the workcell and used for in vitro transcription/translation. The multiplexed expressed recombinant proteins were screened for improved activity and stability in an azo-carboxymethylcellulose plate assay. The multiplexed wells containing mutants with improved activity were identified and linked back to the corresponding multiplexed cultures stored in glycerol. Spread plates were prepared from the glycerol stocks and the workcell was used to pick single colonies from the spread plates, prepare plasmid, produce recombinant protein, and assay for activity. The screening assay and subsequent deconvolution of the multiplexed wells resulted in identification of improved Cel

  15. High-throughput fermentation screening for the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica with real-time monitoring of biomass and lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Alexandre; Rossignol, Tristan; Krier, François; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Dhulster, Pascal

    2016-08-23

    Because the model yeast Yarrowia lipolytica can synthesize and store lipids in quantities up to 20 % of its dry weight, it is a promising microorganism for oil production at an industrial scale. Typically, optimization of the lipid production process is performed in the laboratory and later scaled up for industrial production. However, the scale-up process can be complicated by genetic modifications that are optimized for one set of growing conditions can confer a less-than-optimal phenotype in a different environment. To address this issue, small cultivation systems have been developed that mimic the conditions in benchtop bioreactors. In this work, we used one such microbioreactor system, the BioLector, to develop high-throughput fermentation procedures that optimize growth and lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. Using this system, we were able to monitor lipid and biomass production in real time throughout the culture duration. The BioLector can monitor the growth of Y. lipolytica in real time by evaluating scattered light; this produced accurate measurements until cultures reached an equivalent of OD600nm = 115 and a cell dry weight of 100 g L(-1). In addition, a lipid-specific fluorescent probe was applied which reliably monitored lipid production up to a concentration of 12 g L(-1). Through screening various growing conditions, we determined that a carbon/nitrogen ratio of 35 was the most efficient for lipid production. Further screening showed that ammonium chloride and glycerol were the most valuable nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively, for growth and lipid production. Moreover, a carbon concentration above 1 M appeared to impair growth and lipid accumulation. Finally, we used these optimized conditions to screen engineered strains of Y. lipolytica with high lipid-accumulation capability. The growth and lipid content of the strains cultivated in the BioLector were compared to those grown in benchtop bioreactors. To our knowledge, this is the

  16. Miniaturizing 3D assay for high-throughput drug and genetic screens for small patient-derived tumor samples (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Asaf; Garraway, Levi; Su, Mei-Ju; Basu, Anindita; Regev, Aviv; Struhl, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional growth conditions reflect the natural environment of cancer cells and are crucial to be performed at drug screens. We developed a 3D assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the 50-year old benchmark assay-soft agar. Using GILA, we performed high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. This phenotypic approach is complementary to our genetic approach that utilizes single-cell RNA-sequencing of a patient sample to identify putative oncogenes that confer sensitivity to drugs designed to specifically inhibit the identified oncoprotein. Currently, we are dealing with a big challenge in our field- the limited number of cells that might be extracted from a biopsy. Small patient-derived samples are hard to test in the traditional multiwell plate and it will be helpful to minimize the culture area and the experimental system. We managed to design a suitable microfluidic device for limited number of cells and perform the assay using image analysis. We aim to test drugs on tumor cells, outside of the patient body- and recommend on the ideal treatment that is tailored to the individual. This device will help to minimize biopsy-sampling volumes and minimize interventions in the patient's tumor.

  17. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yonghua [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an

  18. Fluorescence-based high throughput screening for noble metal-free and platinum-poor anode catalysts for the direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, F G; Stöwe, K; Maier, W F

    2011-09-12

    We describe here the results of a high throughput screening study for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) anode catalysts consisting of new elemental combinations with an optical high-throughput screening method, which allows the quantitative evaluation of the electrochemical activity of catalysts. The method is based on the fluorescence of protonated quinine generated during electrooxidation of methanol. The high-throughput screening included noble-metal free binary and ternary mixed oxides of the elements Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Ta, Ti, Zn, and Zr in the oxidized form as well as after prior reduction in hydrogen. In addition 318 ternary and quaternary Pt-containing materials composed out of the mixed oxides of Bi, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, In, La, Mn, Mo, Nb, Nd, Ni, Pr, Sb, Sn, Ta, Te, Ti, V, Zn, and Zr with a molar Pt-ratio of 10% and 30% were screened. Validation and long time experiments of the hits were performed by cyclovoltammetry (CV). The microstructural stability of the electrode preparations of the lead compositions was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern analysis.

  19. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Identification of novel open reading frames from metagenomic libraries generated from extremophilic organisms: application of metagenomics and high throughput screening for novel enzyme isolation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, Daniel F

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Frames from Metagenomic Libraries Generated from Extremophilic Organisms: Application of Metagenomics and High Throughput Screening for Novel Enzyme Isolation 1FRITHA HENNESSY, 1DANIEL F. VISSER, 1VARSHA P. CHHIBA, 1FRANCISCO LAKAY, 2ESTA VAN HEERDEN..., in particular proteases and lipases. Result- ant hits had plasmid DNA isolated; this DNA was sequenced and analysed using BLAST. CONCLUSIONS High variation in hits Duplicate results Smaller inserts still gave activity despite small ORF’s Weak correlation...

  1. An Automated Method for High-Throughput Screening of Arabidopsis Rosette Growth in Multi-Well Plates and Its Validation in Stress Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Diego, N.; Fürst, T.; Humplík, Jan; Ugena, L.; Podlešáková, K.; Spíchal, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, OCT 4 (2017), č. článku 1702. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : salt stress * chlorophyll fluorescence * salinity tolerance * plant -responses * cold-tolerance * water-deficit * thaliana * selection * platform * reveals * high-throughput screening assay * Arabidopsis * multi-well plates * rosette growth * stress conditions Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  2. High-throughput identification and screening of novel Methylobacterium species using whole-cell MALDI-TOF/MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Akio; Sahin, Nurettin; Matsuyama, Yumiko; Enomoto, Takashi; Nishimura, Naoki; Yokota, Akira; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2012-01-01

    Methylobacterium species are ubiquitous α-proteobacteria that reside in the phyllosphere and are fed by methanol that is emitted from plants. In this study, we applied whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (WC-MS) to evaluate the diversity of Methylobacterium species collected from a variety of plants. The WC-MS spectrum was reproducible through two weeks of cultivation on different media. WC-MS spectrum peaks of M. extorquens strain AM1 cells were attributed to ribosomal proteins, but those were not were also found. We developed a simple method for rapid identification based on spectra similarity. Using all available type strains of Methylobacterium species, the method provided a certain threshold similarity value for species-level discrimination, although the genus contains some type strains that could not be easily discriminated solely by 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Next, we evaluated the WC-MS data of approximately 200 methylotrophs isolated from various plants with MALDI Biotyper software (Bruker Daltonics). Isolates representing each cluster were further identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In most cases, the identification by WC-MS matched that by sequencing, and isolates with unique spectra represented possible novel species. The strains belonging to M. extorquens, M. adhaesivum, M. marchantiae, M. komagatae, M. brachiatum, M. radiotolerans, and novel lineages close to M. adhaesivum, many of which were isolated from bryophytes, were found to be the most frequent phyllospheric colonizers. The WC-MS technique provides emerging high-throughputness in the identification of known/novel species of bacteria, enabling the selection of novel species in a library and identification without 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  3. High-throughput identification and screening of novel Methylobacterium species using whole-cell MALDI-TOF/MS analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Tani

    Full Text Available Methylobacterium species are ubiquitous α-proteobacteria that reside in the phyllosphere and are fed by methanol that is emitted from plants. In this study, we applied whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (WC-MS to evaluate the diversity of Methylobacterium species collected from a variety of plants. The WC-MS spectrum was reproducible through two weeks of cultivation on different media. WC-MS spectrum peaks of M. extorquens strain AM1 cells were attributed to ribosomal proteins, but those were not were also found. We developed a simple method for rapid identification based on spectra similarity. Using all available type strains of Methylobacterium species, the method provided a certain threshold similarity value for species-level discrimination, although the genus contains some type strains that could not be easily discriminated solely by 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Next, we evaluated the WC-MS data of approximately 200 methylotrophs isolated from various plants with MALDI Biotyper software (Bruker Daltonics. Isolates representing each cluster were further identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In most cases, the identification by WC-MS matched that by sequencing, and isolates with unique spectra represented possible novel species. The strains belonging to M. extorquens, M. adhaesivum, M. marchantiae, M. komagatae, M. brachiatum, M. radiotolerans, and novel lineages close to M. adhaesivum, many of which were isolated from bryophytes, were found to be the most frequent phyllospheric colonizers. The WC-MS technique provides emerging high-throughputness in the identification of known/novel species of bacteria, enabling the selection of novel species in a library and identification without 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  4. Discovery by organism based high-throughput screening of new multi-stage compounds affecting Schistosoma mansoni viability, egg formation and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Alessandra; Lalli, Cristiana; Gimmelli, Roberto; Nizi, Emanuela; Andreini, Matteo; Gennari, Nadia; Saccoccia, Fulvio; Harper, Steven; Bresciani, Alberto; Ruberti, Giovina

    2017-10-01

    Schistosomiasis, one of the most prevalent neglected parasitic diseases affecting humans and animals, is caused by the Platyhelminthes of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomes are the only trematodes to have evolved sexual dimorphism and the constant pairing with a male is essential for the sexual maturation of the female. Pairing is required for the full development of the two major female organs, ovary and vitellarium that are involved in the production of different cell types such as oocytes and vitellocytes, which represent the core elements of the whole egg machinery. Sexually mature females can produce a large number of eggs each day. Due to the importance of egg production for both life cycle and pathogenesis, there is significant interest in the search for new strategies and compounds not only affecting parasite viability but also egg production. Here we use a recently developed high-throughput organism-based approach, based on ATP quantitation in the schistosomula larval stage of Schistosoma mansoni for the screening of a large compound library, and describe a pharmacophore-based drug selection approach and phenotypic analyses to identify novel multi-stage schistosomicidal compounds. Interestingly, worm pairs treated with seven of the eight compounds identified show a phenotype characterized by defects in eggshell assemblage within the ootype and egg formation with degenerated oocytes and vitelline cells engulfment in the uterus and/or oviduct. We describe promising new molecules that not only impair the schistosomula larval stage but also impact juvenile and adult worm viability and egg formation and production in vitro.

  5. High-Throughput, Signature-Tagged Mutagenic Approach To Identify Novel Virulence Factors of Yersinia pestis CO92 in a Mouse Model of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Kozlova, Elena V.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Tiner, Bethany L.; Andersson, Jourdan A.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new virulence factors in Yersinia pestis and understanding their molecular mechanisms during an infection process are necessary in designing a better vaccine or to formulate an appropriate therapeutic intervention. By using a high-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach, we created 5,088 mutants of Y. pestis strain CO92 and screened them in a mouse model of pneumonic plague at a dose equivalent to 5 50% lethal doses (LD50) of wild-type (WT) CO92. From this screen, we obtained 118 clones showing impairment in disseminating to the spleen, based on hybridization of input versus output DNA from mutant pools with 53 unique signature tags. In the subsequent screen, 20/118 mutants exhibited attenuation at 8 LD50 when tested in a mouse model of bubonic plague, with infection by 10/20 of the aforementioned mutants resulting in 40% or higher survival rates at an infectious dose of 40 LD50. Upon sequencing, six of the attenuated mutants were found to carry interruptions in genes encoding hypothetical proteins or proteins with putative functions. Mutants with in-frame deletion mutations of two of the genes identified from the screen, namely, rbsA, which codes for a putative sugar transport system ATP-binding protein, and vasK, a component of the type VI secretion system, were also found to exhibit some attenuation at 11 or 12 LD50 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. Likewise, among the remaining 18 signature-tagged mutants, 9 were also attenuated (40 to 100%) at 12 LD50 in a pneumonic plague mouse model. Previously, we found that deleting genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and acyltransferase (MsbB), the latter of which modifies lipopolysaccharide function, reduced the virulence of Y. pestis CO92 in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Deletion of rbsA and vasK genes from either the Δlpp single or the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant augmented the attenuation to provide 90 to 100% survivability to mice in a pneumonic plague model at 20

  6. Affinity imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS): high-throughput screening for specific small molecule interactions with frozen tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, T; Kawabata, S; Taira, S; Okuno, A; Mikawa, R; Murayama, S; Tanaka, K; Takikawa, O

    2015-11-07

    A novel screening system, using affinity imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS), has been developed to identify protein aggregates or organ structures in unfixed human tissue. Frozen tissue sections are positioned on small (millimetre-scale) stainless steel chips and incubated with an extensive library of small molecules. Candidate molecules showing specific affinity for the tissue section are identified by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). As an example application, we screened over a thousand compounds against Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue and identified several compounds with high affinity for AD brain sections containing tau deposits compared to age-matched controls. It should also be possible to use AIMS to isolate chemical compounds with affinity for tissue structures or components that have been extensively modified by events such as oxidation, phosphorylation, acetylation, aggregation, racemization or truncation, for example, due to aging. It may also be applicable to biomarker screening programs.

  7. An Automated Method for High-Throughput Screening of Arabidopsis Rosette Growth in Multi-Well Plates and Its Validation in Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria De Diego

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput plant phenotyping platforms provide new possibilities for automated, fast scoring of several plant growth and development traits, followed over time using non-invasive sensors. Using Arabidopsis as a model offers important advantages for high-throughput screening with the opportunity to extrapolate the results obtained to other crops of commercial interest. In this study we describe the development of a highly reproducible high-throughput Arabidopsis in vitro bioassay established using our OloPhen platform, suitable for analysis of rosette growth in multi-well plates. This method was successfully validated on example of multivariate analysis of Arabidopsis rosette growth in different salt concentrations and the interaction with varying nutritional composition of the growth medium. Several traits such as changes in the rosette area, relative growth rate, survival rate and homogeneity of the population are scored using fully automated RGB imaging and subsequent image analysis. The assay can be used for fast screening of the biological activity of chemical libraries, phenotypes of transgenic or recombinant inbred lines, or to search for potential quantitative trait loci. It is especially valuable for selecting genotypes or growth conditions that improve plant stress tolerance.

  8. An Automated Method for High-Throughput Screening of Arabidopsis Rosette Growth in Multi-Well Plates and Its Validation in Stress Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Diego, Nuria; Fürst, Tomáš; Humplík, Jan F.; Ugena, Lydia; Podlešáková, Kateřina; Spíchal, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping platforms provide new possibilities for automated, fast scoring of several plant growth and development traits, followed over time using non-invasive sensors. Using Arabidopsis as a model offers important advantages for high-throughput screening with the opportunity to extrapolate the results obtained to other crops of commercial interest. In this study we describe the development of a highly reproducible high-throughput Arabidopsis in vitro bioassay established using our OloPhen platform, suitable for analysis of rosette growth in multi-well plates. This method was successfully validated on example of multivariate analysis of Arabidopsis rosette growth in different salt concentrations and the interaction with varying nutritional composition of the growth medium. Several traits such as changes in the rosette area, relative growth rate, survival rate and homogeneity of the population are scored using fully automated RGB imaging and subsequent image analysis. The assay can be used for fast screening of the biological activity of chemical libraries, phenotypes of transgenic or recombinant inbred lines, or to search for potential quantitative trait loci. It is especially valuable for selecting genotypes or growth conditions that improve plant stress tolerance. PMID:29046681

  9. A high-throughput platform for population reformatting and mammalian expression of phage display libraries to enable functional screening as full-length IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Douthwaite, Julie A; Chen, Yan; Kemp, Ben; Kidd, Sara; Percival-Alwyn, Jennifer; Smith, Alison; Goode, Kate; Swerdlow, Bonnie; Lowe, David; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Chowdhury, Partha S

    Phage display antibody libraries are a rich resource for discovery of potential therapeutic antibodies. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries are the most common format due to the efficient display of scFv by phage particles and the ease by which soluble scFv antibodies can be expressed for high-throughput screening. Typically, a cascade of screening and triaging activities are performed, beginning with the assessment of large numbers of E. coli-expressed scFv, and progressing through additional assays with individual reformatting of the most promising scFv to full-length IgG. However, use of high-throughput screening of scFv for the discovery of full-length IgG is not ideal because of the differences between these molecules. Furthermore, the reformatting step represents a bottle neck in the process because each antibody has to be handled individually to preserve the unique VH and VL pairing. These problems could be resolved if populations of scFv could be reformatted to full-length IgG before screening without disrupting the variable region pairing. Here, we describe a novel strategy that allows the reformatting of diverse populations of scFv from phage selections to full-length IgG in a batch format. The reformatting process maintains the diversity and variable region pairing with high fidelity, and the resulted IgG pool enables high-throughput expression of IgG in mammalian cells and cell-based functional screening. The improved process led to the discovery of potent candidates that are comparable or better than those obtained by traditional methods. This strategy should also be readily applicable to Fab-based phage libraries. Our approach, Screening in Product Format (SiPF), represents a substantial improvement in the field of antibody discovery using phage display.

  10. Brush and Spray: A High-Throughput Systemic Acquired Resistance Assay Suitable for Large-Scale Genetic Screening1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Beibei; Xu, Shaohua; Xu, Mo; Li, Yan; Li, Shuxin; Ding, Jinmei; Zhang, Yuelin

    2011-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a defense mechanism induced in the distal parts of plants after primary infection. It confers long-lasting protection against a broad spectrum of microbial pathogens. Lack of high-throughput assays has hampered the forward genetic analysis of SAR. Here, we report the development of an easy and efficient assay for SAR and its application in a forward genetic screen for SAR-deficient mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using the new assay for SAR, we identified six flavin-dependent monooxygenase1, four AGD2-like defense response protein1, three salicylic acid induction-deficient2, one phytoalexin deficient4, and one avrPphB-susceptible3 alleles as well as a gain-of-function mutant of CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR3 designated camta3-3D. Like transgenic plants overexpressing CAMTA3, camta3-3D mutant plants exhibit compromised SAR and enhanced susceptibility to virulent pathogens, suggesting that CAMTA3 is a critical regulator of both basal resistance and SAR. PMID:21900483

  11. Accelerated Discovery of High-Refractive-Index Polymers Using First-Principles Modeling, Virtual High-Throughput Screening, and Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Mohammad Atif Faiz; Cheng, Chong; Hachmann, Johannes

    Organic materials with refractive index (RI) values higher than 1.7 have attracted considerable interest in recent years due to the tremendous potential for their application in optical, optometric, and optoelectronic devices, and thus for shaping technological innovation in numerous related areas. Our work is concerned with creating predictive models for the optical properties of organic polymers, which will guide our experimentalist partners and allow them to target the most promising candidates. The RI model is developed based on a synergistic combination of first-principles electronic structure theory and machine learning techniques. The RI values predicted for common polymers using this model are in very good agreement with the experimental values. We also benchmark different DFT approximations along with various basis sets for their predictive performance in this model. We demonstrate that this combination of first-principles and data modeling is both successful and highly economical in determining the RI values of a wide range of organic polymers. To accelerate the development process, we cast this modeling approach into the high-throughput screening, materials informatics, and rational design framework that is developed in the group. This framework is a powerful tool and has shown to be highly promising for rapidly identifying polymer candidates with exceptional RI values as well as discovering design rules for advanced materials.

  12. Octopus: a platform for the virtual high-throughput screening of a pool of compounds against a set of molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Eduardo Habib Bechelane; Campos, Vinícius Alves; Dos Reis Santos, Bianca; Costa, Marina Santos; Lima, Iann Gabriel; Greco, Sandro J; Ribeiro, Rosy I M A; Munayer, Felipe M; da Silva, Alisson Marques; Taranto, Alex Gutterres

    2017-01-01

    Octopus is an automated workflow management tool that is scalable for virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS). It integrates MOPAC2016, MGLTools, PyMOL, and AutoDock Vina. In contrast to other platforms, Octopus can perform docking simulations of an unlimited number of compounds into a set of molecular targets. After generating the ligands in a drawing package in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) format, Octopus can carry out geometry refinement using the semi-empirical method PM7 implemented in MOPAC2016. Docking simulations can be performed using AutoDock Vina and can utilize the Our Own Molecular Targets (OOMT) databank. Finally, the proposed software compiles the best binding energies into a standard table. Here, we describe two successful case studies that were verified by biological assay. In the first case study, the vHTS process was carried out for 22 (phenylamino)urea derivatives. The vHTS process identified a metalloprotease with the PDB code 1GKC as a molecular target for derivative LE&007. In a biological assay, compound LE&007 was found to inhibit 80% of the activity of this enzyme. In the second case study, compound Tx001 was submitted to the Octopus routine, and the results suggested that Plasmodium falciparum ATP6 (PfATP6) as a molecular target for this compound. Following an antimalarial assay, Tx001 was found to have an inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8.2 μM against PfATP6. These successful examples illustrate the utility of this software for finding appropriate molecular targets for compounds. Hits can then be identified and optimized as new antineoplastic and antimalarial drugs. Finally, Octopus has a friendly Linux-based user interface, and is available at www.drugdiscovery.com.br . Graphical Abstract Octopus: A platform for inverse virtual screening (IVS) to search new molecular targets for drugs.

  13. High Throughput Screening of Natural Phenolic Compounds Against Migration of Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrollahi, Samila

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we hypothesize that natural phenolic compounds may present a new class of chemotherapeutics against migration of metastatic triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). In this project we will screen a small library of phenolic compounds to test this hypothesis, identify compounds that show efficacy against TNBC cell migration, and elucidate underlying molecular mechanisms.

  14. High-Throughput Screening Across Quaternary Alloy Composition Space: Oxidation of (AlxFeyNi1-x-y)∼0.8Cr∼0.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Matthew A; Miller, James B; Gellman, Andrew J

    2016-09-12

    Composition spread alloy films (CSAFs) are commonly used as libraries for high-throughput screening of composition-property relationships in multicomponent materials science. Because lateral gradients afford two degrees of freedom, an n-component CSAF can, in principle, contain any composition range falling on a continuous two-dimensional surface through an (n - 1)-dimensional composition space. However, depending on the complexity of the CSAF gradients, characterizing and graphically representing this composition range may not be straightforward when n ≥ 4. The standard approach for combinatorial studies performed using quaternary or higher-order CSAFs has been to use fixed stoichiometric ratios of one or more components to force the composition range to fall on some well-defined plane in the composition space. In this work, we explore the synthesis of quaternary Al-Fe-Ni-Cr CSAFs with a rotatable shadow mask CSAF deposition tool, in which none of the component ratios are fixed. On the basis of the unique gradient geometry produced by the tool, we show that the continuous quaternary composition range of the CSAF can be rigorously represented using a set of two-dimensional "pseudoternary" composition diagrams. We then perform a case study of (AlxFeyNi1-x-y)∼0.8Cr∼0.2 oxidation in dry air at 427 °C to demonstrate how such CSAFs can be used to screen an alloy property across a continuous two-dimensional subspace of a quaternary composition space. We identify a continuous boundary through the (AlxFeyNi1-x-y)∼0.8Cr∼0.2 subspace at which the oxygen uptake into the CSAF between 1 and 16 h oxidation time increases abruptly with decreasing Al content. The results are compared to a previous study of the oxidation of AlxFeyNi1-x-y CSAFs in dry air at 427 °C.

  15. A Workflow to Investigate Exposure and Pharmacokinetic Influences on High-Throughput in Vitro Chemical Screening Based on Adverse Outcome Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Martin B; Leonard, Jeremy A; Grulke, Christopher M; Chang, Daniel T; Edwards, Stephen W; Brooks, Raina; Goldsmith, Michael-Rock; El-Masri, Hisham; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) link adverse effects in individuals or populations to a molecular initiating event (MIE) that can be quantified using in vitro methods. Practical application of AOPs in chemical-specific risk assessment requires incorporation of knowledge on exposure, along with absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties of chemicals. We developed a conceptual workflow to examine exposure and ADME properties in relation to an MIE. The utility of this workflow was evaluated using a previously established AOP, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Thirty chemicals found to inhibit human AChE in the ToxCast™ assay were examined with respect to their exposure, absorption potential, and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Structures of active chemicals were compared against structures of 1,029 inactive chemicals to detect possible parent compounds that might have active metabolites. Application of the workflow screened 10 "low-priority" chemicals of 30 active chemicals. Fifty-two of the 1,029 inactive chemicals exhibited a similarity threshold of ≥ 75% with their nearest active neighbors. Of these 52 compounds, 30 were excluded due to poor absorption or distribution. The remaining 22 compounds may inhibit AChE in vivo either directly or as a result of metabolic activation. The incorporation of exposure and ADME properties into the conceptual workflow eliminated 10 "low-priority" chemicals that may otherwise have undergone additional, resource-consuming analyses. Our workflow also increased confidence in interpretation of in vitro results by identifying possible "false negatives." Phillips MB, Leonard JA, Grulke CM, Chang DT, Edwards SW, Brooks R, Goldsmith MR, El-Masri H, Tan YM. 2016. A workflow to investigate exposure and pharmacokinetic influences on high-throughput in vitro chemical screening based on adverse outcome pathways. Environ Health Perspect 124:53-60; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409450.

  16. Membrane-on-a-chip: microstructured silicon/silicon-dioxide chips for high-throughput screening of membrane transport and viral membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Ilja; van Oijen, Antoine M; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2014-04-22

    Screening of transport processes across biological membranes is hindered by the challenge to establish fragile supported lipid bilayers and the difficulty to determine at which side of the membrane reactants reside. Here, we present a method for the generation of suspended lipid bilayers with physiological relevant lipid compositions on microstructured Si/SiO2 chips that allow for high-throughput screening of both membrane transport and viral membrane fusion. Simultaneous observation of hundreds of single-membrane channels yields statistical information revealing population heterogeneities of the pore assembly and conductance of the bacterial toxin α-hemolysin (αHL). The influence of lipid composition and ionic strength on αHL pore formation was investigated at the single-channel level, resolving features of the pore-assembly pathway. Pore formation is inhibited by a specific antibody, demonstrating the applicability of the platform for drug screening of bacterial toxins and cell-penetrating agents. Furthermore, fusion of H3N2 influenza viruses with suspended lipid bilayers can be observed directly using a specialized chip architecture. The presented micropore arrays are compatible with fluorescence readout from below using an air objective, thus allowing high-throughput screening of membrane transport in multiwell formats in analogy to plate readers.

  17. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  18. A high-throughput-compatible 3D microtissue co-culture system for phenotypic RNAi screening applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Claudio R; Stroebel, Simon; Rösch, Nora; Calpe, Blaise; Krek, Wilhelm; Kelm, Jens M

    2013-12-01

    Cancer cells in vivo are coordinately influenced by an interactive 3D microenvironment. However, identification of drug targets and initial target validations are usually performed in 2D cell culture systems. The opportunity to design 3D co-culture models that reflect, at least in part, these heterotypic interactions, when coupled with RNA interference, would enable investigations on the phenotypic impact of gene function in a model that more closely resembles tumor growth in vivo. Here we describe a high-throughput-compatible method to discover cancer gene functions in a co-culture 3D tumor microtissue model system composed of human DLD1 colon cancer cells together with murine fibroblasts. Strikingly, DLD1 cells in this model failed to expand upon siRNA-mediated depletion of Kif11/Eg5, a member of the mitotic kinesin-like motor protein family. In contrast, these cancer cells proved to be more resistant to Kif11/Eg5 depletion when grown as a 2D monolayer. These results suggest that growth of certain cancer cells in 3D versus 2D can unveil differential dependencies on specific genes for their survival. Moreover, they denote that the high-throughput-compatible, hanging drop technology-based 3D co-culture model will enable the discovery, characterization, and validation of gene functions in key biological and pathological processes.

  19. High throughput exopolysaccharide screening platform: from strain cultivation to monosaccharide composition and carbohydrate fingerprinting in one day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühmann, Broder; Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker

    2015-05-20

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPS) are multifunctional biogenic polymers, which exist in highly diverse chemical structures. To facilitate a fast determination of the carbohydrate composition of novel isolated strains or modified EPS variants a fast screening and analytical method is required. The platform as realized and described in this article is based on the fast carbohydrate analysis via liquid chromatography coupled with ultra violet and electrospray ionization ion trap detection in 96-well format to detect different sugars, sugar derivatives and substituents such as pyruvate. Monosaccharide analysis from hydrolyzed polysaccharides was validated successfully by 16 commercially available polymers with known structure. The method is sensitive enough to distinguish various types of sphingans which solely differ in small alterations in the monomer composition. Even a quantitative detection of single monomers as present in complex plant polysaccharides like karaya gum, with the lowest recovery, was in accordance with literature. Furthermore, 94 bacterial strains for the validation of the screening platform were completely analyzed and 41 EPS producing strains were efficiently identified. Using the method a carbohydrate-fingerprint of the strains was obtained even allowing a very fast differentiation between strains belonging to the same species. This method can become a valuable tool not only in the fast analysis of strain isolates but also in the targeted screening for polysaccharides containing special rare sugars as well in the screening of strain libraries from genetic engineering for altered structures. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Rozanov

    Full Text Available A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR, a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model.

  1. Genome-wide high-throughput screening to investigate essential genes involved in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type 398 survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette T Christiansen

    Full Text Available Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA Sequence Type 398 (ST398 is an opportunistic pathogen that is able to colonize and cause disease in several animal species including humans. To better understand the adaptation, evolution, transmission and pathogenic capacity, further investigations into the importance of the different genes harboured by LA-MRSA ST398 are required. In this study we generated a genome-wide transposon mutant library in an LA-MRSA ST398 isolate to evaluate genes important for bacterial survival in laboratory and host-specific environments. The transposon mutant library consisted of approximately 1 million mutants with around 140,000 unique insertion sites and an average number of unique inserts per gene of 44.8. We identified LA-MRSA ST398 essential genes comparable to other high-throughput S. aureus essential gene studies. As ST398 is the most common MRSA isolated from pigs, the transposon mutant library was screened in whole porcine blood. Twenty-four genes were specifically identified as important for bacterial survival in porcine blood. Mutations in 23 of these genes resulted in attenuated bacterial fitness. Seven of the 23 genes were of unknown function, whereas 16 genes were annotated with functions predominantly related to carbon metabolism, pH shock and a variety of regulations and only indirectly to virulence factors. Mutations in one gene of unknown function resulted in a hypercompetitive mutant. Further evaluation of these genes is required to determine their specific relevance in blood survival.

  2. Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of VEGF Expression in Tumor Cells Using a Cell-Based High Throughput Screening Platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangxian Cao

    Full Text Available Current anti-VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A therapies to treat various cancers indiscriminately block VEGF function in the patient resulting in the global loss of VEGF signaling which has been linked to dose-limiting toxicities as well as treatment failures due to acquired resistance. Accumulating evidence suggests that this resistance is at least partially due to increased production of compensatory tumor angiogenic factors/cytokines. VEGF protein production is differentially controlled depending on whether cells are in the normal "homeostatic" state or in a stressed state, such as hypoxia, by post-transcriptional regulation imparted by elements in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTR of the VEGF mRNA. Using the Gene Expression Modulation by Small molecules (GEMS™ phenotypic assay system, we performed a high throughput screen to identify low molecular weight compounds that target the VEGF mRNA UTR-mediated regulation of stress-induced VEGF production in tumor cells. We identified a number of compounds that potently and selectively reduce endogenous VEGF production under hypoxia in HeLa cells. Medicinal chemistry efforts improved the potency and pharmaceutical properties of one series of compounds resulting in the discovery of PTC-510 which inhibits hypoxia-induced VEGF expression in HeLa cells at low nanomolar concentration. In mouse xenograft studies, oral administration of PTC-510 results in marked reduction of intratumor VEGF production and single agent control of tumor growth without any evident toxicity. Here, we show that selective suppression of stress-induced VEGF production within tumor cells effectively controls tumor growth. Therefore, this approach may minimize the liabilities of current global anti-VEGF therapies.

  3. A virtual high-throughput screening approach to the discovery of novel inhibitors of the bacterial leucine transporter, LeuT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, Katie J; Gotfryd, Kamil; Billesbølle, Christian B

    2013-01-01

    to the elucidation of over 250 unique membrane protein crystal structures. The aim of the European Drug Initiative for Channels and Transporter (EDICT) project is to use the structures of clinically significant membrane proteins for the development of lead molecules. One of the approaches used to achieve...... this is a virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS) technique initially developed for soluble proteins. This paper describes application of this technique to the discovery of inhibitors of the leucine transporter (LeuT), a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family....

  4. Development and Application of a New Microarray- Based Method for High-Throughput Screening of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal Melgosa, Silvia

    . The applicability of the method to identify the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterised enzymes as well as for screening CAZyme activities in complex enzyme mixtures, such as crude culture broths and plant extracts, is shown by examples presented in this thesis. We envisage that the method......The effective and sustainable use of plant biomass for second generation biofuels is of vital importance for reducing dependence on fossil fuels. Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) that degrade lignocellulosic plant cell wall material are an important part of this effort. CAZymes have multiple......-quantitative screening technique is sensitive, reproducible and robust. The possibilities of the method, regarding both substrates and enzymes, have been extensively explored, demonstrating its broad versatility. The catalytic activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures and crude culture broths can be assessed against...

  5. Development of a high-throughput screening for nerve agent detoxifying materials using a fully-automated robot-assisted biological assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, T; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2010-04-01

    Developing improved medical countermeasures against chemical warfare agents (nerve agents) is urgently needed but time-consuming and costly. Here we introduce a robot-assisted liquid handling system with warming, cooling and incubating facilities to screen the detoxifying properties of biological and chemical materials against nerve agents. Two biological tests were established and plasma from various species, DFPase and three cyclodextrins were used as test materials. In test 1, plasma was mixed with sarin or VX and the inhibitory potency of the incubate was determined with human acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at 0, 30 and 60 min. In test 2, test materials and nerve agents were mixed and incubated. Between 0 and 40 min samples were taken and incubated for 3 min with AChE and the residual AChE inhibition was determined to enable the semi-quantitative evaluation of the detoxification kinetics. The automated assays proved to be highly reproducible. It was possible to pre-select detoxifying reagents with test 1 and to determine more detailed detoxifying kinetics with test 2. In conclusion, the automated assay may be considered as a versatile tool for the high-throughput screening of potential detoxifying materials against different nerve agents. With this two-step assay it is possible to screen effectively for detoxifying materials in a high-throughput system. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. High Throughput Transcriptomics @ USEPA (Toxicology ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ideal chemical testing approach will provide complete coverage of all relevant toxicological responses. It should be sensitive and specific It should identify the mechanism/mode-of-action (with dose-dependence). It should identify responses relevant to the species of interest. Responses should ideally be translated into tissue-, organ-, and organism-level effects. It must be economical and scalable. Using a High Throughput Transcriptomics platform within US EPA provides broader coverage of biological activity space and toxicological MOAs and helps fill the toxicological data gap. Slide presentation at the 2016 ToxForum on using High Throughput Transcriptomics at US EPA for broader coverage biological activity space and toxicological MOAs.

  7. High-throughput screening of a collection of known pharmacologically active small compounds for identification of Candida albicans biofilm inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, Samuel A; Srinivasan, Anand; Pierce, Christopher G; Lopez-Ribot, José L; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans is the most common etiologic agent of systemic fungal infections with unacceptably high mortality rates. The existing arsenal of antifungal drugs is very limited and is particularly ineffective against C. albicans biofilms. To address the unmet need for novel antifungals, particularly those active against biofilms, we have screened a small molecule library consisting of 1,200 off-patent drugs already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Prestwick Chemical Library, to identify inhibitors of C. albicans biofilm formation. According to their pharmacological applications that are currently known, we classified these bioactive compounds as antifungal drugs, as antimicrobials/antiseptics, or as miscellaneous drugs, which we considered to be drugs with no previously characterized antifungal activity. Using a 96-well microtiter plate-based high-content screening assay, we identified 38 pharmacologically active agents that inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. These drugs were subsequently tested for their potency and efficacy against preformed biofilms, and we identified three drugs with novel antifungal activity. Thus, repurposing FDA-approved drugs opens up a valuable new avenue for identification and potentially rapid development of antifungal agents, which are urgently needed.

  8. Discovery of ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of tRNAIle Lysidine Synthetase (TilS) by High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Plant, Helen; Walsh, Jarrod; Sylvester, Mark; Hu, Jun; Gao, Ning; Livchak, Stephania; Tentarelli, Sharon; Thresher, Jason

    2014-09-01

    A novel, ultrahigh-throughput, fluorescence anisotropy-based assay was developed and used to screen a 1.4-million-sample library for compounds that compete with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for binding to Escherichia coli tRNA(Ile) lysidine synthetase (TilS), an essential, conserved, ATP-dependent, tRNA-modifying enzyme of bacterial pathogens. TilS modifies a cytidine base in the anticodon loop of Ile2 tRNA by attaching lysine, thereby altering codon recognition of the CAU anticodon from AUG (methionine) to AUA (isoleucine). A scintillation proximity assay for the incorporation of lysine into Ile2 tRNA was used to eliminate false positives in the initial screen resulting from detection artifacts as well as compounds competitive with the fluorescent label instead of ATP, and to measure inhibitor potencies against E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa TilS isozymes. The tRNA(Ile) substrate for P. aeruginosa TilS was identified for the first time to enable these measurements. ATP-competitive binding of inhibitors was confirmed by one-dimensional ligand-observe nuclear magnetic resonance. A preliminary structure-activity relationship is shown for two inhibitor series. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  9. The application of a high throughput analysis method for the screening of potential biosurfactants from natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yen; Baker, Simon C; Darton, Richard C

    2007-09-01

    The presence of biosurfactants in growth media can be evaluated by a variety of methods, none of which are suitable for high throughput studies. The method described here is based on the effect of meniscus shape on the image of a grid viewed through the wells of a 96-well plate. The efficacy of the method was demonstrated by the selection of a bacterium (producing a biosurfactant able to reduce the surface tension of pure water from 72 to 28.75 mN m(-1)) from a culture collection isolated from aviation fuel-contaminated land. The assay was found to be more sensitive, rapid and easy to perform than other published methods. It does not need specialised equipment or chemicals and excludes the bias which results from the surfactant properties of medium used for bacterial growth.

  10. High-Throughput Functional Screening of Steroid Substrates with Wild-Type and Chimeric P450 Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Urban

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation.

  11. ImagePlane: an automated image analysis pipeline for high-throughput screens using the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Steven; Campbell, Michael; Ross, Robert Mars; Moore, Barry; Yandell, Mark

    2013-08-01

    ImagePlane is a modular pipeline for automated, high-throughput image analysis and information extraction. Designed to support planarian research, ImagePlane offers a self-parameterizing adaptive thresholding algorithm; an algorithm that can automatically segment animals into anterior-posterior/left-right quadrants for automated identification of region-specific differences in gene and protein expression; and a novel algorithm for quantification of morphology of animals, independent of their orientations and sizes. ImagePlane also provides methods for automatic report generation, and its outputs can be easily imported into third-party tools such as R and Excel. Here we demonstrate the pipeline's utility for identification of genes involved in stem cell proliferation in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Although designed to support planarian studies, ImagePlane will prove useful for cell-based studies as well.

  12. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyan P Ivanov

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  13. Multiplexing Spheroid Volume, Resazurin and Acid Phosphatase Viability Assays for High-Throughput Screening of Tumour Spheroids and Stem Cell Neurospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P.; Parker, Terry L.; Walker, David A.; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B.; Gellert, Paul R.; Garnett, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  14. Development of an efficient transformation method by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and high throughput spray assay to identify transgenic plants for woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) using NPTII selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, Christopher J; Fisk, Sarah; Mills, Kerri; Flinn, Barry S; Shulaev, Vladimir; Veilleux, Richard E; Dan, Yinghui

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We developed an efficient Agrobacterium -mediated transformation method using an Ac/Ds transposon tagging construct for F. vesca and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to identify its transformants for strawberry functional genomics. Genomic resources for Rosaceae species are now readily available, including the Fragaria vesca genome, EST sequences, markers, linkage maps, and physical maps. The Rosaceae Genomic Executive Committee has promoted strawberry as a translational genomics model due to its unique biological features and transformability for fruit trait improvement. Our overall research goal is to use functional genomic and metabolic approaches to pursue high throughput gene discovery in the diploid woodland strawberry. F. vesca offers several advantages of a fleshy fruit typical of most fruit crops, short life cycle (seed to seed in 12-16 weeks), small genome size (206 Mbb/C), small plant size, self-compatibility, and many seeds per plant. We have developed an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated strawberry transformation method using kanamycin selection, and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to efficiently identify transgenic strawberry plants. Using our kanamycin transformation method, we were able to produce up to 98 independent kanamycin resistant insertional mutant lines using a T-DNA construct carrying an Ac/Ds transposon Launchpad system from a single transformation experiment involving inoculation of 22 leaf explants of F. vesca accession 551572 within approx. 11 weeks (from inoculation to soil). Transgenic plants with 1-2 copies of a transgene were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Using our paromomycin spray assay, transgenic F. vesca plants were rapidly identified within 10 days after spraying.

  15. Quantitative RT-PCR assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of drugs against the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haili eZhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Our laboratory has previously developed a qRT-PCR assay to assess drug efficacy on the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro by detecting the levels of parasite 18S rRNA. This approach displayed up to four orders of magnitude of linear dynamic range and was much less labor-intensive than the traditional microscopic methods. However, conventional qRT-PCR protocol is not very amendable to high-throughput analysis when total RNA needs to be purified by lengthy, multi-step procedures. Recently, several commercial reagents are available for preparing cell lysates that could be directly used in downstream qRT-PCR analysis (e.g., Ambion Cell-to-cDNA kit and Bio-Rad iScript sample preparation reagent. Using these reagents, we are able to adapt the qRT-PCR assay into high-throughput screening of drugs in vitro (i.e., 96-well and 384-well formats for the cultivation of parasites and qRT-PCR detection, respectively. This qRT-PCR protocol is able to give a >150-fold linear dynamic range using samples isolated from cells infected with various numbers of parasites. The new assay is also validated by the NIH-recommended intra-plate, inter-plate and inter-day uniformity tests. The robustness and effectiveness of the assay are also confirmed by evaluating the anti-cryptosporidial efficacy of paromomycin and by a small scale screening of compounds.

  16. High-throughput phenotyping of multicellular organisms: finding the link between genotype and phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Sozzani, Rosangela; Benfey, Philip N

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput phenotyping approaches (phenomics) are being combined with genome-wide genetic screens to identify alterations in phenotype that result from gene inactivation. Here we highlight promising technologies for 'phenome-scale' analyses in multicellular organisms.

  17. High-throughput phenotyping of multicellular organisms: finding the link between genotype and phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput phenotyping approaches (phenomics) are being combined with genome-wide genetic screens to identify alterations in phenotype that result from gene inactivation. Here we highlight promising technologies for 'phenome-scale' analyses in multicellular organisms. PMID:21457493

  18. A holistic high-throughput screening framework for biofuel feedstock assessment that characterises variations in soluble sugars and cell wall composition in Sorghum bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Antony P; Palmer, William M; Byrt, Caitlin S; Furbank, Robert T; Grof, Christopher Pl

    2013-12-23

    A major hindrance to the development of high yielding biofuel feedstocks is the ability to rapidly assess large populations for fermentable sugar yields. Whilst recent advances have outlined methods for the rapid assessment of biomass saccharification efficiency, none take into account the total biomass, or the soluble sugar fraction of the plant. Here we present a holistic high-throughput methodology for assessing sweet Sorghum bicolor feedstocks at 10 days post-anthesis for total fermentable sugar yields including stalk biomass, soluble sugar concentrations, and cell wall saccharification efficiency. A mathematical method for assessing whole S. bicolor stalks using the fourth internode from the base of the plant proved to be an effective high-throughput strategy for assessing stalk biomass, soluble sugar concentrations, and cell wall composition and allowed calculation of total stalk fermentable sugars. A high-throughput method for measuring soluble sucrose, glucose, and fructose using partial least squares (PLS) modelling of juice Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra was developed. The PLS prediction was shown to be highly accurate with each sugar attaining a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.99 with a root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) of 11.93, 5.52, and 3.23 mM for sucrose, glucose, and fructose, respectively, which constitutes an error of <4% in each case. The sugar PLS model correlated well with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and brix measures. Similarly, a high-throughput method for predicting enzymatic cell wall digestibility using PLS modelling of FTIR spectra obtained from S. bicolor bagasse was developed. The PLS prediction was shown to be accurate with an R2 of 0.94 and RMSEP of 0.64 μg.mgDW-1.h-1. This methodology has been demonstrated as an efficient and effective way to screen large biofuel feedstock populations for biomass, soluble sugar concentrations, and cell wall digestibility simultaneously allowing a

  19. New Imidazole Inhibitors of Mycobacterial FtsZ: the Way from High-Throughput Molecular Screening in Grid up to in vitro Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpov, P.A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of UNG virtual organization CSLabGrid, high-throughput molecular screening was performed for new anti-TB compounds. Using program FlexX installed on IFBG Claster and models of four perspective ligand binding sites on the surface of FtsZ of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, virtual screening was performed for database containing 2886 compounds synthesized in the Institute of Organic Chemistry of NAS of Ukraine. Based on LE and ΔG score, docking scores of CCDC Gold, and results of molecular dynamics, we selected a group of perspective FtsZ inhibitors. In vitro validation have revealed 6 compounds with the highest inhibition of GTPase activity of FtsZ. Also, based on in vitro experiment, we have selected three compounds exhibiting both - strong inhibition of FtsZ polymerization and inhibition of GTPase activity.

  20. Identification and correction of spatial bias are essential for obtaining quality data in high-throughput screening technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogdan Mazoure; Robert Nadon; Vladimir Makarenkov

    2017-01-01

    .... Importantly, the bias affecting screening data can fit an additive or multiplicative model. We show that the use of appropriate statistical methods is essential for improving the quality of experimental screening data...

  1. An infrared optical pacing system for high-throughput screening of cardiac electrophysiology in human cardiomyocytes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPheeters, Matt T.; Wang, Yves T.; Laurita, Kenneth R.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2017-02-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS-HCM) have the potential to provide individualized therapies for patients and to test drug candidates for cardiac toxicity. In order for hiPS-CM to be useful for such applications, there is a need for high-throughput technology to rapidly assess cardiac electrophysiology parameters. Here, we designed and tested a fully contactless optical mapping (OM) and optical pacing (OP) system capable of imaging and point stimulation of hiPS-CM in small wells. OM allowed us to characterize cardiac electrophysiological parameters (conduction velocity, action potential duration, etc.) using voltage-sensitive dyes with high temporal and spatial resolution over the entire well. To improve OM signal-to-noise ratio, we tested a new voltage-sensitive dye (Fluovolt) for accuracy and phototoxicity. Stimulation is essential because most electrophysiological parameters are rate dependent; however, traditional methods utilizing electrical stimulation is difficult in small wells. To overcome this limitation, we utilized OP (λ = 1464 nm) to precisely control heart rate with spatial precision without the addition of exogenous agents. We optimized OP parameters (e.g., well size, pulse width, spot size) to achieve robust pacing and minimize the threshold radiant exposure. Finally, we tested system sensitivity using Flecainide, a drug with well described action on multiple electrophysiological properties.

  2. Large-scale tracking and classification for automatic analysis of cell migration and proliferation, and experimental optimization of high-throughput screens of neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Nathalie; Batra, Richa; Diessl, Nicolle; Gogolin, Sina; Eils, Roland; Westermann, Frank; König, Rainer; Rohr, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Computational approaches for automatic analysis of image-based high-throughput and high-content screens are gaining increased importance to cope with the large amounts of data generated by automated microscopy systems. Typically, automatic image analysis is used to extract phenotypic information once all images of a screen have been acquired. However, also in earlier stages of large-scale experiments image analysis is important, in particular, to support and accelerate the tedious and time-consuming optimization of the experimental conditions and technical settings. We here present a novel approach for automatic, large-scale analysis and experimental optimization with application to a screen on neuroblastoma cell lines. Our approach consists of cell segmentation, tracking, feature extraction, classification, and model-based error correction. The approach can be used for experimental optimization by extracting quantitative information which allows experimentalists to optimally choose and to verify the experimental parameters. This involves systematically studying the global cell movement and proliferation behavior. Moreover, we performed a comprehensive phenotypic analysis of a large-scale neuroblastoma screen including the detection of rare division events such as multi-polar divisions. Major challenges of the analyzed high-throughput data are the relatively low spatio-temporal resolution in conjunction with densely growing cells as well as the high variability of the data. To account for the data variability we optimized feature extraction and classification, and introduced a gray value normalization technique as well as a novel approach for automatic model-based correction of classification errors. In total, we analyzed 4,400 real image sequences, covering observation periods of around 120 h each. We performed an extensive quantitative evaluation, which showed that our approach yields high accuracies of 92.2% for segmentation, 98.2% for tracking, and 86.5% for

  3. Identification of potent chemotypes targeting Leishmania major using a high-throughput, low-stringency, computationally enhanced, small molecule screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients with clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis, including cutaneous leishmaniasis, have limited treatment options, and existing therapies frequently have significant untoward liabilities. Rapid expansion in the diversity of available cutaneous leishmanicidal chemotypes is the initial step in finding alternative efficacious treatments. To this end, we combined a low-stringency Leishmania major promastigote growth inhibition assay with a structural computational filtering algorithm. After a rigorous assay validation process, we interrogated approximately 200,000 unique compounds for L. major promastigote growth inhibition. Using iterative computational filtering of the compounds exhibiting > 50% inhibition, we identified 553 structural clusters and 640 compound singletons. Secondary confirmation assays yielded 93 compounds with EC(50s < or = 1 microM, with none of the identified chemotypes being structurally similar to known leishmanicidals and most having favorable in silico predicted bioavailability characteristics. The leishmanicidal activity of a representative subset of 15 chemotypes was confirmed in two independent assay formats, and L. major parasite specificity was demonstrated by assaying against a panel of human cell lines. Thirteen chemotypes inhibited the growth of a L. major axenic amastigote-like population. Murine in vivo efficacy studies using one of the new chemotypes document inhibition of footpad lesion development. These results authenticate that low stringency, large-scale compound screening combined with computational structure filtering can rapidly expand the chemotypes targeting in vitro and in vivo Leishmania growth and viability.

  4. Identification of Potent Chemotypes Targeting Leishmania major Using a High-Throughput, Low-Stringency, Computationally Enhanced, Small Molecule Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Close, David; Shun, Tongying; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Reed, Robyn; Mustata, Gabriela; Wipf, Peter; Johnson, Jacob; O'Neil, Michael; Grögl, Max; Magill, Alan J.; Lazo, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis, including cutaneous leishmaniasis, have limited treatment options, and existing therapies frequently have significant untoward liabilities. Rapid expansion in the diversity of available cutaneous leishmanicidal chemotypes is the initial step in finding alternative efficacious treatments. To this end, we combined a low-stringency Leishmania major promastigote growth inhibition assay with a structural computational filtering algorithm. After a rigorous assay validation process, we interrogated ∼200,000 unique compounds for L. major promastigote growth inhibition. Using iterative computational filtering of the compounds exhibiting >50% inhibition, we identified 553 structural clusters and 640 compound singletons. Secondary confirmation assays yielded 93 compounds with EC50s ≤ 1 µM, with none of the identified chemotypes being structurally similar to known leishmanicidals and most having favorable in silico predicted bioavailability characteristics. The leishmanicidal activity of a representative subset of 15 chemotypes was confirmed in two independent assay formats, and L. major parasite specificity was demonstrated by assaying against a panel of human cell lines. Thirteen chemotypes inhibited the growth of a L. major axenic amastigote-like population. Murine in vivo efficacy studies using one of the new chemotypes document inhibition of footpad lesion development. These results authenticate that low stringency, large-scale compound screening combined with computational structure filtering can rapidly expand the chemotypes targeting in vitro and in vivo Leishmania growth and viability. PMID:19888337

  5. High-Throughput Screening as a Supplemental Tool for the Development of Advanced Emission Control Catalysts: Methodological Approaches and Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Sundermann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-throughput (HT screening platform developed at hte with the application focus on automotive catalysis is described. hte HT units are configured for performing steady-state testing, as well as dynamic tests with fast feed switches, such as lean/rich excursions for the evaluation of NOx storage capacity and efficiency of lean NOx traps (LNT, ammonia storage capacity for selective catalytic reduction (SCR, evaluation of oxygen storage capacity (OSC, as well as lambda sweep tests for screening of three-way catalysts (TWC. Even though catalysts are screened on a rather small scale (~100 mg powder, experience showed that dosing rather complex gas mixtures in concentrations close to that found in real exhaust for the given application is mandatory to generate relevant data. The objective of this work is to give additional insight into HT technology. In the industrial research laboratory, HT screening has matured to become a reliable approach for rapid screening of both reaction parameter spaces, as well as material properties relevant for exhaust gas catalyst development. Due to the speed of optimized screening involving 48 parallel reactors, automated handling of primary data is an imported requirement. Software for data reduction, like estimation of light-off temperature, needs to be robust and handle results for diverse sample libraries in an unattended fashion. In combination with the statistical design of experiment and multivariate data analysis, HT testing has become a valuable enhancement to automotive catalyst development.

  6. Matrix-Based Activity Pattern Classification as a Novel Method for the Characterization of Enzyme Inhibitors Derived from High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Douglas S; Jimenez, Marta; Yue, Kimberley; Busby, Scott; Chen, Yu-Chi; Bowes, Scott; Wendel, Greg; Smith, Thomas; Zhang, Ji-Hu

    2016-12-01

    One of the central questions in the characterization of enzyme inhibitors is determining the mode of inhibition (MOI). Classically, this is done with a number of low-throughput methods in which inhibition models are fitted to the data. The ability to rapidly characterize the MOI for inhibitors arising from high-throughput screening in which hundreds to thousands of primary inhibitors may need to be characterized would greatly help in lead selection efforts. Here we describe a novel method for determining the MOI of a compound without the need for curve fitting of the enzyme inhibition data. We provide experimental data to demonstrate the utility of this new high-throughput MOI classification method based on nonparametric analysis of the activity derived from a small matrix of substrate and inhibitor concentrations (e.g., from a 4 S × 4 I matrix). Lists of inhibitors from four different enzyme assays are studied, and the results are compared with the previously described IC 50 -shift method for MOI classification. The MOI results from this method are in good agreement with the known MOI and compare favorably with those from the IC 50 -shift method. In addition, we discuss some advantages and limitations of the method and provide recommendations for utilization of this MOI classification method.

  7. Detection of N-acyl homoserine lactones using a traI-luxCDABE-based biosensor as a high-throughput screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Steve P; Beeston, Anne L; Sokol, Pamela A

    2008-07-30

    Bacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules to regulate the expression of genes in a density-dependent manner. Several biosensors have been developed and engineered to detect the presence of all types of AHLs. In this study, we describe the usefulness of a traI-luxCDABE-based biosensor to quickly detect AHLs from previously characterized mutants of Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both liquid and soft-agar co-culture assays in a high-throughput manner. The technique uses a co-culture system where the strain producing the AHLs is grown simultaneously with the reporter strain. Use of this assay in liquid co-culture allows the measurement of AHL activity in real time over growth. We tested this assay with Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but it should be applicable to a broad range of gram negative species that produce AHLs. The co-culture assays described enable the detection of AHL production in both P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia and should be applicable to AHL analysis in other bacterial species. The high-throughput adaptation of the liquid co-culture assay could facilitate the screening of large libraries for the identification of mutants or compounds that block the synthesis or activity of AHLs.

  8. Detection of N-acyl homoserine lactones using a traI-luxCDABE-based biosensor as a high-throughput screening tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beeston Anne L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL molecules to regulate the expression of genes in a density-dependent manner. Several biosensors have been developed and engineered to detect the presence of all types of AHLs. Results In this study, we describe the usefulness of a traI-luxCDABE-based biosensor to quickly detect AHLs from previously characterized mutants of Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both liquid and soft-agar co-culture assays in a high-throughput manner. The technique uses a co-culture system where the strain producing the AHLs is grown simultaneously with the reporter strain. Use of this assay in liquid co-culture allows the measurement of AHL activity in real time over growth. We tested this assay with Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but it should be applicable to a broad range of gram negative species that produce AHLs. Conclusion The co-culture assays described enable the detection of AHL production in both P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia and should be applicable to AHL analysis in other bacterial species. The high-throughput adaptation of the liquid co-culture assay could facilitate the screening of large libraries for the identification of mutants or compounds that block the synthesis or activity of AHLs.

  9. Development of a Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) Based, High Throughput Screening Feasible Method for the Identification of PDE12 Activity Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Samuel; Bucher, Hannes; Nickolaus, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology has been widely used to establish high throughput screens (HTS) for a range of targets in the pharmaceutical industry. PDE12 (aka. 2'- phosphodiesterase) has been published to participate in the degradation of oligoadenylates that are involved in the establishment of an antiviral state via the activation of ribonuclease L (RNAse-L). Degradation of oligoadenylates by PDE12 terminates these antiviral activities, leading to decreased resistance of cells for a variety of viral pathogens. Therefore inhibitors of PDE12 are discussed as antiviral therapy. Here we describe the use of the yttrium silicate SPA bead technology to assess inhibitory activity of compounds against PDE12 in a homogeneous, robust HTS feasible assay using tritiated adenosine-P-adenylate ([3H]ApA) as substrate. We found that the used [3H]ApA educt, was not able to bind to SPA beads, whereas the product [3H]AMP, as known before, was able to bind to SPA beads. This enables the measurement of PDE12 activity on [3H]ApA as a substrate using a wallac microbeta counter. This method describes a robust and high throughput capable format in terms of specificity, commonly used compound solvents, ease of detection and assay matrices. The method could facilitate the search for PDE12 inhibitors as antiviral compounds.

  10. High throughput screening of particle conditioning operations: II. Evaluation of scale-up heuristics with prokaryotically expressed polysaccharide vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Aaron; Huffman, Ben; Berrill, Alex; Merchant, Nick; Godavarti, Ranga; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; Coffman, Jonathan; Sunasara, Khurram; Mukhopadhyay, Tarit

    2015-08-01

    Multivalent polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are typically comprised of several different polysaccharides produced with distinct and complex production processes. Particle conditioning steps, such as precipitation and flocculation, may be used to aid the recovery and purification of such microbial vaccine products. An ultra scale-down approach to purify vaccine polysaccharides at the micro-scale would greatly enhance productivity, robustness, and speed the development of novel conjugate vaccines. In part one of this series, we described a modular and high throughput approach to develop particle conditioning processes (HTPC) for biologicals that combines flocculation, solids removal, and streamlined analytics. In this second part of the series, we applied HTPC to industrially relevant feedstreams comprised of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) from several bacterial species. The scalability of HTPC was evaluated between 0.8 mL and 13 L scales, with several different scaling methodologies examined. Clarification, polysaccharide yield, impurity clearance, and product quality achieved with HTPC were reproducible and comparable with larger scales. Particle sizing was the response with greatest sensitivity to differences in processing scale and enabled the identification of useful scaling rules. Scaling with constant impeller tip speed or power per volume in the impeller swept zone offered the most accurate scale up, with evidence that time integration of these values provided the optimal basis for scaling. The capability to develop a process at the micro-scale combined with evidence-based scaling metrics provide a significant advance for purification process development of vaccine processes. The USD system offers similar opportunities for HTPC of proteins and other complex biological molecules. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Microscopy-based Assays for High-throughput Screening of Host Factors Involved in Brucella Infection of Hela Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Alain; Low, Shyan H; Emmenlauer, Mario; Conde-Alvarez, Raquel; Salcedo, Suzana P; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Dehio, Christoph

    2016-08-05

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular pathogens that infect animals as their natural hosts. Transmission to humans is most commonly caused by direct contact with infected animals or by ingestion of contaminated food and can lead to severe chronic infections. Brucella can invade professional and non-professional phagocytic cells and replicates within endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vacuoles. The host factors required for Brucella entry into host cells, avoidance of lysosomal degradation, and replication in the ER-like compartment remain largely unknown. Here we describe two assays to identify host factors involved in Brucella entry and replication in HeLa cells. The protocols describe the use of RNA interference, while alternative screening methods could be applied. The assays are based on the detection of fluorescently labeled bacteria in fluorescently labeled host cells using automated wide-field microscopy. The fluorescent images are analyzed using a standardized image analysis pipeline in CellProfiler which allows single cell-based infection scoring. In the endpoint assay, intracellular replication is measured two days after infection. This allows bacteria to traffic to their replicative niche where proliferation is initiated around 12 hr after bacterial entry. Brucella which have successfully established an intracellular niche will thus have strongly proliferated inside host cells. Since intracellular bacteria will greatly outnumber individual extracellular or intracellular non-replicative bacteria, a strain constitutively expressing GFP can be used. The strong GFP signal is then used to identify infected cells. In contrast, for the entry assay it is essential to differentiate between intracellular and extracellular bacteria. Here, a strain encoding for a tetracycline-inducible GFP is used. Induction of GFP with simultaneous inactivation of extracellular bacteria by gentamicin enables the differentiation between intracellular and extracellular

  12. A Non-imaging High Throughput Approach to Chemical Library Screening at the Unmodified Adenosine-A3 Receptor in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Augusta Arruda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in fluorescent ligand technology have enabled the study of G protein-coupled receptors in their native environment without the need for genetic modification such as addition of N-terminal fluorescent or bioluminescent tags. Here, we have used a non-imaging plate reader (PHERAstar FS to monitor the binding of fluorescent ligands to the human adenosine-A3 receptor (A3AR; CA200645 and AV039, stably expressed in CHO-K1 cells. To verify that this method was suitable for the study of other GPCRs, assays at the human adenosine-A1 receptor, and β1 and β2 adrenoceptors (β1AR and β2AR; BODIPY-TMR-CGP-12177 were also carried out. Affinity values determined for the binding of the fluorescent ligands CA200645 and AV039 to A3AR for a range of classical adenosine receptor antagonists were consistent with A3AR pharmacology and correlated well (R2 = 0.94 with equivalent data obtained using a confocal imaging plate reader (ImageXpress Ultra. The binding of BODIPY-TMR-CGP-12177 to the β1AR was potently inhibited by low concentrations of the β1-selective antagonist CGP 20712A (pKi 9.68 but not by the β2-selective antagonist ICI 118551(pKi 7.40. Furthermore, in experiments conducted in CHO K1 cells expressing the β2AR this affinity order was reversed with ICI 118551 showing the highest affinity (pKi 8.73 and CGP20712A (pKi 5.68 the lowest affinity. To determine whether the faster data acquisition of the non-imaging plate reader (~3 min per 96-well plate was suitable for high throughput screening (HTS, we screened the LOPAC library for inhibitors of the binding of CA200645 to the A3AR. From the initial 1,263 compounds evaluated, 67 hits (defined as those that inhibited the total binding of 25 nM CA200645 by ≥40% were identified. All compounds within the library that had medium to high affinity for the A3AR (pKi ≥6 were successfully identified. We found three novel compounds in the library that displayed unexpected sub-micromolar affinity

  13. A High-Throughput Screening Method to Identify Potential Pesticides for Mosquito Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    inactive.Diluted chemicals (10l)were added to each well containing the larvae plus a total volume of 1 ml of food and water. As control treatments, 10 l of...dis- turbance of water and food by a pipette tip were scored as dead. To accurately compare the larval assay method to the topical application method...Abamectin Chloride channel activators 6 Permethrin Sodium channel modulators 3 Fipronil GABA-gated chloride channel antagonists 2 aGroup according to

  14. Using High Throughput Screens to Identify Lead Compounds for Alzheimer’s Disease Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans , herpes simplex virus, and influenza (Ann Arbor) virus, Infect. Immun. 15, 145-148. 30. Rooth, W., and...immunosuppressive drug, Journal of Chemical Crystallography 29, 1187- 1191. 31. Xie, Y., Deng, S., Chen, Z., Yan, S., and Landry, D. W. (2006) Identification of

  15. The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening laboratory. Part I: meeting drug-discovery needs in the heartland of America with entrepreneurial flair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Peter R; Roy, Anuradha; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2011-05-01

    The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening (KU HTS) core is a state-of-the-art drug-discovery facility with an entrepreneurial open-service policy, which provides centralized resources supporting public- and private-sector research initiatives. The KU HTS core applies pharmaceutical industry project-management principles in an academic setting by bringing together multidisciplinary teams to fill critical scientific and technology gaps, using an experienced team of industry-trained researchers and project managers. The KU HTS proactively engages in supporting grant applications for extramural funding, intellectual-property management and technology transfer. The KU HTS staff further provides educational opportunities for the KU faculty and students to learn cutting-edge technologies in drug-discovery platforms through seminars, workshops, internships and course teaching. This is the first instalment of a two-part contribution from the KU HTS laboratory.

  16. A cAMP Biosensor-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Identification of Gs-Coupled GPCR Ligands and Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is an important second messenger, and quantification of intracellular cAMP levels is essential in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The intracellular cAMP levels are regulated by the adenylate cyclase (AC) upon activation of either Gs- or Gi......-coupled GPCRs, which leads to increased or decreased cAMP levels, respectively. Here we describe a real-time Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for identification and characterization of Gs-coupled GPCR ligands and phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors...... also observed for the other representative Gs-coupled GPCRs tested, GLP-1R and GlucagonR. The FRET-based cAMP biosensor assay is robust, reproducible, and inexpensive with good Z factors and is highly applicable for HTS....

  17. High-throughput screening assay used in pharmacognosy: Selection, optimization and validation of methods of enzymatic inhibition by UV-visible spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Granados-Guzmán

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In research laboratories of both organic synthesis and extraction of natural products, every day a lot of products that can potentially introduce some biological activity are obtained. Therefore it is necessary to have in vitro assays, which provide reliable information for further evaluation in in vivo systems. From this point of view, in recent years has intensified the use of high-throughput screening assays. Such trials should be optimized and validated for accurate and precise results, i.e. reliable. The present review addresses the steps needed to develop and validate bioanalytical methods, emphasizing UV-Visible spectrophotometry as detection system. Particularly focuses on the selection of the method, the optimization to determine the best experimental conditions, validation, implementation of optimized and validated method to real samples, and finally maintenance and possible transfer it to a new laboratory.

  18. Trade-Off Analysis in High-Throughput Materials Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volety, Kalpana K; Huyberechts, Guido P J

    2017-03-13

    This Research Article presents a strategy to identify the optimum compositions in metal alloys with certain desired properties in a high-throughput screening environment, using a multiobjective optimization approach. In addition to the identification of the optimum compositions in a primary screening, the strategy also allows pointing to regions in the compositional space where further exploration in a secondary screening could be carried out. The strategy for the primary screening is a combination of two multiobjective optimization approaches namely Pareto optimality and desirability functions. The experimental data used in the present study have been collected from over 200 different compositions belonging to four different alloy systems. The metal alloys (comprising Fe, Ti, Al, Nb, Hf, Zr) are synthesized and screened using high-throughput technologies. The advantages of such a kind of approach compared to the limitations of the traditional and comparatively simpler approaches like ranking and calculating figures of merit are discussed.

  19. Integrated High Throughput Analysis Identifies GSK3 as a Crucial Determinant of p53-Mediated Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Chenyang; Sun, Bangyao; Lv, Jiawei; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Shengwang; Li, Hai

    2017-01-01

    p53 dysfunction is frequently observed in lung cancer. Although restoring the tumour suppressor function of p53 is recently approved as a putative strategy for combating cancers, the lack of understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying p53-mediated lung cancer suppression has limited the application of p53-based therapies in lung cancer. Using RNA sequencing, we determined the transcriptional profile of human non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells after treatment with two p53-activating chemical compounds, nutlin and RITA, which could induce A549 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of genome-wide gene expression data showed that distinct transcription profiles were induced by nutlin and RITA and 66 pathways were differentially regulated by these two compounds. However, only two of these pathways, 'Adherens junction' and 'Axon guidance', were found to be synthetic lethal with p53 re-activation, as determined via integrated analysis of genome-wide gene expression profile and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screening. Further functional protein association analysis of significantly regulated genes associated with these two synthetic lethal pathways indicated that GSK3 played a key role in p53-mediated A549 cell apoptosis, and then gene function study was performed, which revealed that GSK3 inhibition promoted p53-mediated A549 cell apoptosis in a p53 post-translational activity-dependent manner. Our findings provide us with new insights regarding the mechanism by which p53 mediates A549 apoptosis and may cast light on the development of more efficient p53-based strategies for treating lung cancer. © 201 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Fast Gradient Elution Reversed-Phase HPLC with Diode-Array Detection as a High Throughput Screening Method for Drugs of Abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter W. Carr; K.M. Fuller; D.R. Stoll; L.D. Steinkraus; M.S. Pasha; Glenn G. Hardin

    2005-12-30

    A new approach has been developed by modifying a conventional gradient elution liquid chromatograph for the high throughput screening of biological samples to detect the presence of regulated intoxicants. The goal of this work was to improve the speed of a gradient elution screening method over current approaches by optimizing the operational parameters of both the column and the instrument without compromising the reproducibility of the retention times, which are the basis for the identification. Most importantly, the novel instrument configuration substantially reduces the time needed to re-equilibrate the column between gradient runs, thereby reducing the total time for each analysis. The total analysis time for each gradient elution run is only 2.8 minutes, including 0.3 minutes for column reequilibration between analyses. Retention times standard calibration solutes are reproducible to better than 0.002 minutes in consecutive runs. A corrected retention index was adopted to account for day-to-day and column-to-column variations in retention time. The discriminating power and mean list length were calculated for a library of 47 intoxicants and compared with previous work from other laboratories to evaluate fast gradient elution HPLC as a screening tool.

  1. Understanding ForteBio's Sensors for High-Throughput Kinetic and Epitope Screening for Purified Antibodies and Yeast Culture Supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao; Mitchell, Scott; Lynaugh, Heather; Brown, Michael; Nobrega, R Paul; Zhi, Xiaoyong; Sun, Tingwan; Caffry, Isabelle; Cao, Yuan; Yang, Rong; Burnina, Irina; Xu, Yingda; Estep, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Real-time and label-free antibody screening systems are becoming more popular because of the increasing output of purified antibodies and antibody supernatant from many antibody discovery platforms. However, the properties of the biosensor can greatly affect the kinetic and epitope binning results generated by these label-free screening systems. ForteBio human-specific ProA, anti-human IgG quantitation (AHQ), anti-human Fc capture (AHC) sensors, and custom biotinylated-anti-human Fc capture (b-AHFc) sensors were evaluated in terms of loading ability, regeneration, kinetic characterization, and epitope binning with both purified IgG and IgG supernatant. AHC sensors proved unreliable for kinetic or binning assays at times, whereas AHQ sensors showed poor loading and regeneration abilities. ProA sensors worked well with both purified IgG and IgG supernatant. However, the interaction between ProA sensors and the Fab region of the IgG with VH3 germline limited the application of ProA sensors, especially in the epitope binning experiment. In an attempt to generate a biosensor type that would be compatible with a variety of germlines and sample types, we found that the custom b-AHFc sensors appeared to be robust working with both purified IgG and IgG supernatant, with little evidence of sensor-related artifacts. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  2. Establishment and Application of a High Throughput Screening System Targeting the Interaction between HCV Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Human Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuying Zhu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are intracellular obligate parasites and the host cellular machinery is usually recruited for their replication. Human eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3 could be directly recruited by the hepatitis C virus (HCV internal ribosome entry site (IRES to promote the translation of viral proteins. In this study, we establish a fluorescence polarization (FP based high throughput screening (HTS system targeting the interaction between HCV IRES and eIF3. By screening a total of 894 compounds with this HTS system, two compounds (Mucl39526 and NP39 are found to disturb the interaction between HCV IRES and eIF3. And these two compounds are further demonstrated to inhibit the HCV IRES-dependent translation in vitro. Thus, this HTS system is functional to screen the potential HCV replication inhibitors targeting human eIF3, which is helpful to overcome the problem of viral resistance. Surprisingly, one compound HP-3, a kind of oxytocin antagonist, is discovered to significantly enhance the interaction between HCV IRES and eIF3 by this HTS system. HP-3 is demonstrated to directly interact with HCV IRES and promote the HCV IRES-dependent translation both in vitro and in vivo, which strongly suggests that HP-3 has potentials to promote HCV replication. Therefore, this HTS system is also useful to screen the potential HCV replication enhancers, which is meaningful for understanding the viral replication and screening novel antiviral drugs. To our knowledge, this is the first HTS system targeting the interaction between eIF3 and HCV IRES, which could be applied to screen both potential HCV replication inhibitors and enhancers.

  3. High-throughput, label-free, single-cell, microalgal lipid screening by machine-learning-equipped optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Ito, Takuro; Yalikun, Yaxiaer; Jiang, Yiyue; Tanaka, Yo; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-05-01

    The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels to petroleum is required to tackle the global energy crisis. One such alternative is microalgal biofuel, which is expected to play a key role in reducing the detrimental effects of global warming as microalgae absorb atmospheric CO 2 via photosynthesis. Unfortunately, conventional analytical methods only provide population-averaged lipid amounts and fail to characterize a diverse population of microalgal cells with single-cell resolution in a non-invasive and interference-free manner. Here high-throughput label-free single-cell screening of lipid-producing microalgal cells with optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy was demonstrated. In particular, Euglena gracilis, an attractive microalgal species that produces wax esters (suitable for biodiesel and aviation fuel after refinement), within lipid droplets was investigated. The optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscope is based on an integration of a hydrodynamic-focusing microfluidic chip, an optical time-stretch quantitative phase microscope, and a digital image processor equipped with machine learning. As a result, it provides both the opacity and phase maps of every single cell at a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s, enabling accurate cell classification without the need for fluorescent staining. Specifically, the dataset was used to characterize heterogeneous populations of E. gracilis cells under two different culture conditions (nitrogen-sufficient and nitrogen-deficient) and achieve the cell classification with an error rate of only 2.15%. The method holds promise as an effective analytical tool for microalgae-based biofuel production. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. High-throughput bacterial SNP typing identifies distinct clusters of Salmonella Typhi causing typhoid in Nepalese children

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Holt, Kathryn E

    2010-05-31

    Abstract Background Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, which remains an important public health issue in many developing countries. Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal, is an area of high incidence and the pediatric population appears to be at high risk of exposure and infection. Methods We recently defined the population structure of S. Typhi, using new sequencing technologies to identify nearly 2,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can be used as unequivocal phylogenetic markers. Here we have used the GoldenGate (Illumina) platform to simultaneously type 1,500 of these SNPs in 62 S. Typhi isolates causing severe typhoid in children admitted to Patan Hospital in Kathmandu. Results Eight distinct S. Typhi haplotypes were identified during the 20-month study period, with 68% of isolates belonging to a subclone of the previously defined H58 S. Typhi. This subclone was closely associated with resistance to nalidixic acid, with all isolates from this group demonstrating a resistant phenotype and harbouring the same resistance-associated SNP in GyrA (Phe83). A secondary clone, comprising 19% of isolates, was observed only during the second half of the study. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the utility of SNP typing for monitoring bacterial populations over a defined period in a single endemic setting. We provide evidence for genotype introduction and define a nalidixic acid resistant subclone of S. Typhi, which appears to be the dominant cause of severe pediatric typhoid in Kathmandu during the study period.

  5. High throughput screening (HTS) for phototoxicity hazard using the in vitro 3T3 neutral red uptake assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P A; King, A V

    2003-01-01

    Testing for phototoxic hazard is usually carried out for product ingredients intended for use on skin, which may be exposed to sunlight. Unilever currently uses the validated in vitro 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake phototoxicity test (NRU PT). This protocol involves 2-3 experiments, each taking 3 days to perform. One person can test up to seven test materials plus positive control at any one time, requiring approximately 0.5 g test material. Higher throughput is required where libraries of potential actives are being generated and screening for potential phototoxicants is required. A proposed HTS protocol would use the NRU PT, but only one concentration (10 microg/ml) in a single experiment. The validity of the HTS protocol was investigated by a retrospective examination of data from 86 materials previously tested. Phototoxic hazard predictions made using the conventional NRU PT were compared with those obtained if only data at 10 microg/ml were considered. A majority of 73 materials (84.9%) gave agreement in predictions between the two protocols; for 13 materials (15.1%) the assessments did not agree. There were no false positives; however, there were some false negatives, i.e., predicted as phototoxic from the conventional assay, but non-phototoxic at 10 microg/ml. As this protocol is intended for screening purposes only it is considered that this would be acceptable at this stage in material selection. One person could screen 128 test materials in 3 days, requiring selected for further development and inclusion in a formulation may require further confirmatory testing, e.g. using a human skin model assay for phototoxicity.

  6. The Phospholipid Vesicle-Based Drug Permeability Assay: 5. Development Toward an Automated Procedure for High-Throughput Permeability Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Flaten, Gøril Eide; Awoyemi, Opeyemi Linda Ronke; Luthman, Kristina; Brandl, Martin; Massing, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript version. Published version available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jala.2008.04.002 In-vitro screening for oral absorption has become an essential part of drug discovery and development. Recently, a new phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay was developed which has shown to satisfyingly predict passive absorption of drugs in humans. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether the assay may be further developed into a high-th...

  7. High throughput sequencing and proteomics to identify immunogenic proteins of a new pathogen: the dirty genome approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Greub

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the availability of new generation sequencing technologies, bacterial genome projects have undergone a major boost. Still, chromosome completion needs a costly and time-consuming gap closure, especially when containing highly repetitive elements. However, incomplete genome data may be sufficiently informative to derive the pursued information. For emerging pathogens, i.e. newly identified pathogens, lack of release of genome data during gap closure stage is clearly medically counterproductive. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We thus investigated the feasibility of a dirty genome approach, i.e. the release of unfinished genome sequences to develop serological diagnostic tools. We showed that almost the whole genome sequence of the emerging pathogen Parachlamydia acanthamoebae was retrieved even with relatively short reads from Genome Sequencer 20 and Solexa. The bacterial proteome was analyzed to select immunogenic proteins, which were then expressed and used to elaborate the first steps of an ELISA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work constitutes the proof of principle for a dirty genome approach, i.e. the use of unfinished genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria, coupled with proteomics to rapidly identify new immunogenic proteins useful to develop in the future specific diagnostic tests such as ELISA, immunohistochemistry and direct antigen detection. Although applied here to an emerging pathogen, this combined dirty genome sequencing/proteomic approach may be used for any pathogen for which better diagnostics are needed. These genome sequences may also be very useful to develop DNA based diagnostic tests. All these diagnostic tools will allow further evaluations of the pathogenic potential of this obligate intracellular bacterium.

  8. State-of-the-art automated patch clamp: heat activation, action potentials, and high throughput in ion channel screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoelzle-Feix, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    A successful robotic approach of the patch clamp technique is based on planar patch clamp chips where a glass pipette, as used in conventional patch clamping, is replaced by a thin planar glass sheet with a small hole in the middle. Automated patch clamp (APC) systems utilizing this chip design offer higher throughput capabilities and ease of use and thus have become common in basic research, drug development, and safety screening. Further development of existing devices and introduction of new systems widen the range of possible experiments and increase throughput. Here, two features with different areas of applications that meet the needs of drug discovery researchers and basic researchers alike are described. The utilized system is a medium throughput APC device capable of recording up to eight cells simultaneously. The temperature control capability and the possibility to perform recordings not only in the voltage clamp but also in the current clamp mode are described in detail. Since eight recordings can be generated in parallel without compromising data quality, reliable and cost-effective and time-effective screening of compounds against ion channels using voltage clamp and current clamp electrophysiology can be performed.

  9. Virtual and experimental high-throughput screening (HTS) in search of novel inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase II (IMPDH II) inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkern, Torsten; Prabhu, Arati; Kharkar, Prashant S.; Goebel, Heike; Rolser, Edith; Burckhard-Boer, Waltraud; Arumugam, Premkumar; Makhija, Mahindra T.

    2012-11-01

    IMPDH (Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase) catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. IMPDH inhibition in sensitive cell types (e.g., lymphocytes) blocks proliferation (by blocking RNA and DNA synthesis as a result of decreased cellular levels of guanine nucleotides). This makes it an interesting target for cancer and autoimmune disorders. Currently available IMPDH inhibitors such as mycophenolic acid (MPA, uncompetitive inhibitor) and nucleoside analogs (e.g., ribavirin, competitive inhibitor after intracellular activation by phosphorylation) have unfavorable tolerability profiles which limit their use. Hence, the quest for novel IMPDH inhibitors continues. In the present study, a ligand-based virtual screening using IMPDH inhibitor pharmacophore models was performed on in-house compound collection. A total of 50,000 virtual hits were selected for primary screen using in vitro IMPDH II inhibition up to 10 μM. The list of 2,500 hits (with >70 % inhibition) was further subjected to hit confirmation for the determination of IC50 values. The hits obtained were further clustered using maximum common substructure based formalism resulting in 90 classes and 7 singletons. A thorough inspection of these yielded 7 interesting classes in terms of mini-SAR with IC50 values ranging from 0.163 μM to little over 25 μM. The average ligand efficiency was found to be 0.3 for the best class. The classes thus discovered represent structurally novel chemotypes which can be taken up for further development.

  10. Ultra-high frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy and high throughput cardiovascular phenotyping in a large scale mouse mutagenesis screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Francis, Richard; Tobita, Kimimasa; Kim, Andy; Leatherbury, Linda; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) is ideally suited for phenotyping fetal mice for congenital heart disease (CHD), as imaging can be carried out noninvasively to provide both hemodynamic and structural information essential for CHD diagnosis. Using the UBM (Vevo 2100; 40Hz) in conjunction with the clinical ultrasound system (Acuson Sequioa C512; 15Hz), we developed a two-step screening protocol to scan thousands fetuses derived from ENU mutagenized pedigrees. A wide spectrum of CHD was detected by the UBM, which were subsequently confirmed with follow-up necropsy and histopathology examination with episcopic fluorescence image capture. CHD observed included outflow anomalies, left/right heart obstructive lesions, septal/valvular defects and cardiac situs anomalies. Meanwhile, various extracardiac defects were found, such as polydactyly, craniofacial defects, exencephaly, omphalocele-cleft palate, most of which were associated with cardiac defects. Our analyses showed the UBM was better at assessing cardiac structure and blood flow profiles, while conventional ultrasound allowed higher throughput low-resolution screening. Our study showed the integration of conventional clinical ultrasound imaging with the UBM for fetal mouse cardiovascular phenotyping can maximize the detection and recovery of CHD mutants.

  11. A screening cascade to identify ERβ ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Carly S; Benod, Cindy; Lou, Xiaohua; Gunamalai, Prem S; Villagomez, Rosa A; Strom, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Berkenstam, Anders L; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of effective high throughput screening cascades to identify nuclear receptor (NR) ligands that will trigger defined, therapeutically useful sets of NR activities is of considerable importance. Repositioning of existing approved drugs with known side effect profiles can provide advantages because de novo drug design suffers from high developmental failure rates and undesirable side effects which have dramatically increased costs. Ligands that target estrogen receptor β (ERβ) could be useful in a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to neurological to cardiovascular disorders. In this context, it is important to minimize cross-reactivity with ERα, which has been shown to trigger increased rates of several types of cancer. Because of high sequence similarities between the ligand binding domains of ERα and ERβ, preferentially targeting one subtype can prove challenging. Here, we describe a sequential ligand screening approach comprised of complementary in-house assays to identify small molecules that are selective for ERβ. Methods include differential scanning fluorimetry, fluorescence polarization and a GAL4 transactivation assay. We used this strategy to screen several commercially-available chemical libraries, identifying thirty ERβ binders that were examined for their selectivity for ERβ versus ERα, and tested the effects of selected ligands in a prostate cancer cell proliferation assay. We suggest that this approach could be used to rapidly identify candidates for drug repurposing.

  12. Cell-Based High-Throughput Luciferase Reporter Gene Assays for Identifying and Profiling Chemical Modulators of Endoplasmic Reticulum Signaling Protein, IRE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Juan; Pass, Ian; Diaz, Paul W; Ngo, Tram A; Sauer, Michelle; Magnuson, Gavin; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Hassig, Christian A; Jackson, Michael R; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2015-12-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates three distinct signal transducers on the ER membrane. Inositol-requiring protein 1 (IRE1), the most conserved signal transducer, plays a key role in ER stress-mediated signaling. During ER stress, IRE1 initiates two discrete signaling cascades: the "adaptive" signaling cascade mediated by the XBP1 pathway and the "alarm" signaling cascade mediated by stress-activated protein kinase pathways. Fine-tuning of the balance between the adaptive and alarm signals contributes significantly to cellular fate under ER stress. Thus, we propose that the design of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to selectively monitor IRE1 mediated-signaling would be desirable for drug discovery. To this end, we report the generation of stable human neural cell lines and development of cell-based HTS luciferase (Luc) reporter gene assays for the identification of pathway-specific chemical modulators of IRE1. We implemented a cell-based Luc assay using a chimeric CHOP-Gal4 transcription factor in 384-well format for monitoring IRE1 kinase-mediated p38MAPK activation and an unfolded response pathway element (URPE)-Luc cell-based assay in 1536-well format for monitoring IRE1's RNase-mediated activation of XBP1. Chemical library screening was successfully conducted with both the CHOP/Gal4-Luc cells and UPRE-Luc engineered cells. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of using these HTS assays for discovery of pathway-selective modulators of IRE1. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  13. Rapid and accurate detection of Escherichia coli growth by fluorescent pH-sensitive organic nanoparticles for high-throughput screening applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yang; Grazon, Chloé; Clavier, Gilles; Rieger, Jutta; Audibert, Jean-Frédéric; Sclavi, Bianca; Méallet-Renault, Rachel

    2016-01-15

    Rapid detection of bacterial growth is an important issue in the food industry and for medical research. Here we present a novel kind of pH-sensitive fluorescent nanoparticles (FANPs) that can be used for the rapid and accurate real-time detection of Escherichia coli growth. These organic particles are designed to be non-toxic and highly water-soluble. Here we show that the coupling of pH sensitive fluoresceinamine to the nanoparticles results in an increased sensitivity to changes in pH within a physiologically relevant range that can be used to monitor the presence of live bacteria. In addition, these FANPs do not influence bacterial growth and are stable over several hours in a complex medium and in the presence of bacteria. The use of these FANPs allows for continuous monitoring of bacterial growth via real-time detection over long time scales in small volumes and can thus be used for the screening of a large number of samples for high-throughput applications such as screening for the presence of antibiotic resistant strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Semirational Approach for Ultrahigh Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) Accumulation in Escherichia coli by Combining One-Step Library Construction and High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Teng; Ye, Jianwen; Shen, Rui; Zong, Yeqing; Zhao, Xuejin; Lou, Chunbo; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2016-11-18

    As a product of a multistep enzymatic reaction, accumulation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) can be achieved by overexpression of the PHB synthesis pathway from a native producer involving three genes phbC, phbA, and phbB. Pathway optimization by adjusting expression levels of the three genes can influence properties of the final product. Here, we reported a semirational approach for highly efficient PHB pathway optimization in E. coli based on a phbCAB operon cloned from the native producer Ralstonia entropha (R. entropha). Rationally designed ribosomal binding site (RBS) libraries with defined strengths for each of the three genes were constructed based on high or low copy number plasmids in a one-pot reaction by an oligo-linker mediated assembly (OLMA) method. Strains with desired properties were evaluated and selected by three different methodologies, including visual selection, high-throughput screening, and detailed in-depth analysis. Applying this approach, strains accumulating 0%-92% PHB contents in cell dry weight (CDW) were achieved. PHB with various weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of 2.7-6.8 × 10(6) were also efficiently produced in relatively high contents. These results suggest that the semirational approach combining library design, construction, and proper screening is an efficient way to optimize PHB and other multienzyme pathways.

  15. High-Throughput and Rapid Screening of Novel ACE Inhibitory Peptides from Sericin Source and Inhibition Mechanism by Using in Silico and in Vitro Prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huaju; Chang, Qing; Liu, Long; Chai, Kungang; Lin, Guangyan; Huo, Qingling; Zhao, Zhenxia; Zhao, Zhongxing

    2017-11-22

    Several novel peptides with high ACE-I inhibitory activity were successfully screened from sericin hydrolysate (SH) by coupling in silico and in vitro approaches for the first time. Most screening processes for ACE-I inhibitory peptides were achieved through high-throughput in silico simulation followed by in vitro verification. QSAR model based predicted results indicated that the ACE-I inhibitory activity of these SH peptides and six chosen peptides exhibited moderate high ACE-I inhibitory activities (log IC50 values: 1.63-2.34). Moreover, two tripeptides among the chosen six peptides were selected for ACE-I inhibition mechanism analysis which based on Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated that they behave as competitive ACE-I inhibitors. The C-terminal residues of short-chain peptides that contain more H-bond acceptor groups could easily form hydrogen bonds with ACE-I and have higher ACE-I inhibitory activity. Overall, sericin protein as a strong ACE-I inhibition source could be deemed a promising agent for antihypertension applications.

  16. Optimizing ultrafast wide field-of-view illumination for high-throughput multi-photon imaging and screening of mutant fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb; Mikhailov, Alexandr; Rebane, Aleksander

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence induced by 1wo-photon absorption (2PA) and three-photon absorption (3PA) is becoming an increasingly important tool for deep-tissue microscopy, especially in conjunction with genetically-encoded functional probes such as fluorescent proteins (FPs). Unfortunately, the efficacy of the multi-photon excitation of FPs is notoriously low, and because relations between a biological fluorophore's nonlinear-optical properties and its molecular structure are inherently complex, there are no practical avenues available that would allow boosting the performance of current FPs. Here we describe a novel method, where we apply directed evolution to optimize the 2PA properties of EGFP. Key to the success of this approach consists in high-throughput screening of mutants that would allow selection of variants with promising 2PA and 3PA properties in a broad near-IR excitation range of wavelength. For this purpose, we construct and test a wide field-of-view (FOV), femtosecond imaging system that we then use to quantify the multi-photon excited fluorescence in the 550- 1600 nm range of tens of thousands of E. coli colonies expressing randomly mutated FPs in a standard 10 cm diameter Petri dish configuration. We present a quantitative analysis of different factors that are currently limiting the maximum throughput of the femtosecond multi-photon screening techniques and also report on quantitative measurement of absolute 2PA and 3PA cross sections spectra.

  17. Tackling heterogeneity: a leaf disc-based assay for the high-throughput screening of transient gene expression in tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Piotrzkowski

    Full Text Available Transient Agrobacterium-mediated gene expression assays for Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum are frequently used because they facilitate the comparison of multiple expression constructs regarding their capacity for maximum recombinant protein production. However, for three model proteins, we found that recombinant protein accumulation (rpa was significantly influenced by leaf age and leaf position effects. The ratio between the highest and lowest amount of protein accumulation (max/min ratio was found to be as high as 11. Therefore, construct-based impacts on the rpa level that are less than 11-fold will be masked by background noise. To address this problem, we developed a leaf disc-based screening assay and infiltration device that allows the rpa level in a whole tobacco plant to be reliably and reproducibly determined. The prototype of the leaf disc infiltration device allows 14 Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration events to be conducted in parallel. As shown for three model proteins, the average max/min rpa ratio was reduced to 1.4 using this method, which allows for a sensitive comparison of different genetic elements affecting recombinant protein expression.

  18. High-throughput de novo screening of receptor agonists with an automated single-cell analysis and isolation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Tatematsu, Kenji; Iijima, Masumi; Niimi, Tomoaki; Maturana, Andrés D; Fujii, Ikuo; Kondo, Akihiko; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2014-02-28

    Reconstitution of signaling pathways involving single mammalian transmembrane receptors has not been accomplished in yeast cells. In this study, intact EGF receptor (EGFR) and a cell wall-anchored form of EGF were co-expressed on the yeast cell surface, which led to autophosphorylation of the EGFR in an EGF-dependent autocrine manner. After changing from EGF to a conformationally constrained peptide library, cells were fluorescently labeled with an anti-phospho-EGFR antibody. Each cell was subjected to an automated single-cell analysis and isolation system that analyzed the fluorescent intensity of each cell and automatically retrieved each cell with the highest fluorescence. In ~3.2 × 10(6) peptide library, we isolated six novel peptides with agonistic activity of the EGFR in human squamous carcinoma A431 cells. The combination of yeast cells expressing mammalian receptors, a cell wall-anchored peptide library, and an automated single-cell analysis and isolation system might facilitate a rational approach for de novo drug screening.

  19. Enzyme engineering: A synthetic biology approach for more effective library generation and automated high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Quaglia

    Full Text Available The Golden Gate strategy entails the use of type IIS restriction enzymes, which cut outside of their recognition sequence. It enables unrestricted design of unique DNA fragments that can be readily and seamlessly recombined. Successfully employed in other synthetic biology applications, we demonstrate its advantageous use to engineer a biocatalyst. Hot-spots for mutations were individuated in three distinct regions of Candida antarctica lipase A (Cal-A, the biocatalyst chosen as a target to demonstrate the versatility of this recombination method. The three corresponding gene segments were subjected to the most appropriate method of mutagenesis (targeted or random. Their straightforward reassembly allowed combining products of different mutagenesis methods in a single round for rapid production of a series of diverse libraries, thus facilitating directed evolution. Screening to improve discrimination of short-chain versus long-chain fatty acid substrates was aided by development of a general, automated method for visual discrimination of the hydrolysis of varied substrates by whole cells.

  20. Tackling heterogeneity: a leaf disc-based assay for the high-throughput screening of transient gene expression in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrzkowski, Natalia; Schillberg, Stefan; Rasche, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Transient Agrobacterium-mediated gene expression assays for Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) are frequently used because they facilitate the comparison of multiple expression constructs regarding their capacity for maximum recombinant protein production. However, for three model proteins, we found that recombinant protein accumulation (rpa) was significantly influenced by leaf age and leaf position effects. The ratio between the highest and lowest amount of protein accumulation (max/min ratio) was found to be as high as 11. Therefore, construct-based impacts on the rpa level that are less than 11-fold will be masked by background noise. To address this problem, we developed a leaf disc-based screening assay and infiltration device that allows the rpa level in a whole tobacco plant to be reliably and reproducibly determined. The prototype of the leaf disc infiltration device allows 14 Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration events to be conducted in parallel. As shown for three model proteins, the average max/min rpa ratio was reduced to 1.4 using this method, which allows for a sensitive comparison of different genetic elements affecting recombinant protein expression.

  1. High-throughput sequencing of fecal DNA to identify insects consumed by wild Weddell's saddleback tamarins (Saguinus weddelli, Cebidae, Primates) in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallott, E K; Malhi, R S; Garber, P A

    2015-03-01

    The genus Saguinus represents a successful radiation of over 20 species of small-bodied New World monkeys. Studies of the tamarin diet indicate that insects and small vertebrates account for ∼16-45% of total feeding and foraging time, and represent an important source of lipids, protein, and metabolizable e