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Sample records for high-throughput genotoxicity assays

  1. High throughput comet assay to study genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naouale El Yamani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The unique physicochemical properties of engineered nanomaterials (NMs have accelerated their use in diverse industrial and domestic products. Although their presence in consumer products represents a major concern for public health safety, their potential impact on human health is poorly understood. There is therefore an urgent need to clarify the toxic effects of NMs and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. In view of the large number of NMs currently being used, high throughput (HTP screening technologies are clearly needed for efficient assessment of toxicity. The comet assay is the most used method in nanogenotoxicity studies and has great potential for increasing throughput as it is fast, versatile and robust; simple technical modifications of the assay make it possible to test many compounds (NMs in a single experiment. The standard gel of 70-100 μL contains thousands of cells, of which only a tiny fraction are actually scored. Reducing the gel to a volume of 5 μL, with just a few hundred cells, allows twelve gels to be set on a standard slide, or 96 as a standard 8x12 array. For the 12 gel format, standard slides precoated with agarose are placed on a metal template and gels are set on the positions marked on the template. The HTP comet assay, incorporating digestion of DNA with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG to detect oxidised purines, has recently been applied to study the potential induction of genotoxicity by NMs via reactive oxygen. In the NanoTEST project we investigated the genotoxic potential of several well-characterized metal and polymeric nanoparticles with the comet assay. All in vitro studies were harmonized; i.e. NMs were from the same batch, and identical dispersion protocols, exposure time, concentration range, culture conditions, and time-courses were used. As a kidney model, Cos-1 fibroblast-like kidney cells were treated with different concentrations of iron oxide NMs, and cells embedded in minigels (12

  2. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human ATAD5 is an excellent biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATADS protein levels increase post-transcriptionally following exposure to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Here we report a novel quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-Iuciferase assay that can moni...

  3. Do Multiwell Plate High Throughput Assays Measure Loss of Cell Viability Following Exposure to Genotoxic Agents?

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    Razmik Mirzayans

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based assays in multiwell plates are widely used for radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity assessment with different mammalian cell types. Despite their relative ease of performance, such assays lack specificity as they do not distinguish between the cytostatic (reversible/sustained growth arrest and cytotoxic (loss of viability effects of genotoxic agents. We recently reported studies with solid tumor-derived cell lines demonstrating that radiosensitivity as measured by multiwell plate colorimetric (e.g., XTT and fluorimetric (e.g., CellTiter-Blue assays reflects growth arrest but not loss of viability. Herein we report similar observations with cancer cell lines expressing wild-type p53 (A549 lung carcinoma or mutant p53 (MDA–MB-231 breast carcinoma after treatment with the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Importantly, we show that treatment of cancer cells with concentrations of cisplatin that result in 50% effect (i.e., IC50 in multiwell plate assays trigger the emergence of growth arrested cells that exhibit highly enlarged morphology, remain viable and adherent to the culture dish, and metabolize the tetrazolium salt 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT to its formazan derivative. The emergence of markedly enlarged viable cells complicates the interpretation of chemosensitivity data obtained with multiwell plate high throughput assays. Relying solely on IC50 values could be misleading.

  4. Development of a panel of high-throughput reporter-gene assays to detect genotoxicity and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Sander C; von Bergh, Anne R M; van Vught-Lussenburg, Barbara M A; Jonker, Lydia R A; Teunis, Marc; Krul, Cyrille A M; van der Burg, Bart

    2014-01-15

    The lack of toxicological information on many of the compounds that humans use or are exposed to, intentionally or unintentionally, poses a big problem in risk assessment. To fill this data gap, more emphasis is given to fast in vitro screening tools that can add toxicologically relevant information regarding the mode(s) of action via which compounds can elicit adverse effects, including genotoxic effects. By use of bioassays that can monitor the activation of specific cellular signalling pathways, many compounds can be screened in a high-throughput manner. We have developed two new specific reporter-gene assays that can monitor the effects of compounds on two pathways of interest: the p53 pathway (p53 CALUX) for genotoxicity and the Nrf2 pathway (Nrf2 CALUX) for oxidative stress. To exclude non-specific effects by compounds influencing the luciferase reporter-gene expression non-specifically, a third assay was developed to monitor changes in luciferase expression by compounds in general (Cytotox CALUX). To facilitate interpretation of the data and to avoid artefacts, all three reporter-gene assays used simple and defined reporter genes and a similar cellular basis, the human U2OS cell line. The three cell lines were validated with a range of reference compounds including genotoxic and non-genotoxic agents. The sensitivity (95%) and specificity (85%) of the p53 CALUX was high, showing that the assay is able to identify various types of genotoxic compound, while avoiding the detection of false positives. The Nrf2 CALUX showed specific responses to oxidants only, enabling the identification of compounds that elicit part of their genotoxicity via oxidative stress. All reporter-gene assays can be used in a high-throughput screening format and can be supplemented with other U2OS-based reporter-gene assays that can profile nuclear receptor activity, and several other signalling pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed.

  6. Fully Bayesian Analysis of High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput metabolomic assays that allow simultaneous targeted screening of hundreds of metabolites have recently become available in kit form. Such assays provide a window into understanding changes to biochemical pathways due to chemical exposure or disease, and are usefu...

  7. Towards a high throughput droplet-based agglutination assay

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-10-22

    This work demonstrates the detection method for a high throughput droplet based agglutination assay system. Using simple hydrodynamic forces to mix and aggregate functionalized microbeads we avoid the need to use magnetic assistance or mixing structures. The concentration of our target molecules was estimated by agglutination strength, obtained through optical image analysis. Agglutination in droplets was performed with flow rates of 150 µl/min and occurred in under a minute, with potential to perform high-throughput measurements. The lowest target concentration detected in droplet microfluidics was 0.17 nM, which is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than a conventional card based agglutination assay.

  8. Spectrophotometric Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

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    Jean-Louis Reymond

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews high-throughput screening enzyme assays developed in our laboratory over the last ten years. These enzyme assays were initially developed for the purpose of discovering catalytic antibodies by screening cell culture supernatants, but have proved generally useful for testing enzyme activities. Examples include TLC-based screening using acridone-labeled substrates, fluorogenic assays based on the β-elimination of umbelliferone or nitrophenol, and indirect assays such as the back-titration method with adrenaline and the copper-calcein fluorescence assay for aminoacids.

  9. A Fully Automated High-Throughput Zebrafish Behavioral Ototoxicity Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Douglas W; Philip, Rohit C; Niihori, Maki; Ringle, Ryan A; Coyle, Kelsey R; Zehri, Sobia F; Zabala, Leanne; Mudery, Jordan A; Francis, Ross H; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J; Jacob, Abraham

    2017-08-01

    Zebrafish animal models lend themselves to behavioral assays that can facilitate rapid screening of ototoxic, otoprotective, and otoregenerative drugs. Structurally similar to human inner ear hair cells, the mechanosensory hair cells on their lateral line allow the zebrafish to sense water flow and orient head-to-current in a behavior called rheotaxis. This rheotaxis behavior deteriorates in a dose-dependent manner with increased exposure to the ototoxin cisplatin, thereby establishing itself as an excellent biomarker for anatomic damage to lateral line hair cells. Building on work by our group and others, we have built a new, fully automated high-throughput behavioral assay system that uses automated image analysis techniques to quantify rheotaxis behavior. This novel system consists of a custom-designed swimming apparatus and imaging system consisting of network-controlled Raspberry Pi microcomputers capturing infrared video. Automated analysis techniques detect individual zebrafish, compute their orientation, and quantify the rheotaxis behavior of a zebrafish test population, producing a powerful, high-throughput behavioral assay. Using our fully automated biological assay to test a standardized ototoxic dose of cisplatin against varying doses of compounds that protect or regenerate hair cells may facilitate rapid translation of candidate drugs into preclinical mammalian models of hearing loss.

  10. State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet (Presented by Dr. Marilyn J. Aardema, Chief Scientific Advisor, Toxicology, Dr. Leon Stankowski, et. al. (6/28/2012)

  11. A high-throughput biliverdin assay using infrared fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlec, Aleš; Štrukelj, Borut

    2014-07-01

    Biliverdin is an intermediate of heme degradation with an established role in veterinary clinical diagnostics of liver-related diseases. The need for chromatographic assays has so far prevented its wider use in diagnostic laboratories. The current report describes a simple, fast, high-throughput, and inexpensive assay, based on the interaction of biliverdin with infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP) that yields functional protein exhibiting infrared fluorescence. The assay is linear in the range of 0-10 µmol/l of biliverdin, has a limit of detection of 0.02 μmol/l, and has a limit of quantification of 0.03 µmol/l. The assay is accurate with relative error less than 0.15, and precise, with coefficient of variation less than 5% in the concentration range of 2-9 µmol/l of biliverdin. More than 95% of biliverdin was recovered from biological samples by simple dimethyl sulfoxide extraction. There was almost no interference by hemin, although bilirubin caused an increase in the biliverdin concentration, probably due to spontaneous oxidation of bilirubin to biliverdin. The newly developed biliverdin assay is appropriate for reliable quantification of large numbers of samples in veterinary medicine.

  12. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  13. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2015-12-14

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  14. High throughput RNAi assay optimization using adherent cell cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan Leena

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background siRNA technology is a promising tool for gene therapy of vascular disease. Due to the multitude of reagents and cell types, RNAi experiment optimization can be time-consuming. In this study adherent cell cytometry was used to rapidly optimize siRNA transfection in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (AoSMC. Methods AoSMC were seeded at a density of 3000-8000 cells/well of a 96well plate. 24 hours later AoSMC were transfected with either non-targeting unlabeled siRNA (50 nM, or non-targeting labeled siRNA, siGLO Red (5 or 50 nM using no transfection reagent, HiPerfect or Lipofectamine RNAiMax. For counting cells, Hoechst nuclei stain or Cell Tracker green were used. For data analysis an adherent cell cytometer, Celigo® was used. Data was normalized to the transfection reagent alone group and expressed as red pixel count/cell. Results After 24 hours, none of the transfection conditions led to cell loss. Red fluorescence counts were normalized to the AoSMC count. RNAiMax was more potent compared to HiPerfect or no transfection reagent at 5 nM siGLO Red (4.12 +/-1.04 vs. 0.70 +/-0.26 vs. 0.15 +/-0.13 red pixel/cell and 50 nM siGLO Red (6.49 +/-1.81 vs. 2.52 +/-0.67 vs. 0.34 +/-0.19. Fluorescence expression results supported gene knockdown achieved by using MARCKS targeting siRNA in AoSMCs. Conclusion This study underscores that RNAi delivery depends heavily on the choice of delivery method. Adherent cell cytometry can be used as a high throughput-screening tool for the optimization of RNAi assays. This technology can accelerate in vitro cell assays and thus save costs.

  15. Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays DE DeGroot, RS Thomas, and SO SimmonsNational Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC USAThe EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput s...

  16. High throughput image cytometry micronucleus assay to investigate the presence or absence of mutagenic effects of cold physical plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeschus, Sander; Schmidt, Anke; Kramer, Axel; Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Adler, Frank; von Woedtke, Thomas; Niessner, Felix; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Wende, Kristian

    2018-02-08

    Promising cold physical plasma sources have been developed in the field of plasma medicine. An important prerequisite to their clinical use is lack of genotoxic effects in cells. During optimization of one or even different plasma sources for a specific application, large numbers of samples need to be analyzed. There are soft and easy-to-assess markers for genotoxic stress such as phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) but only few tests are accredited by the OECD with regard to mutagenicity detection. The micronucleus (MN) assay is among them but often requires manual counting of many thousands of cells per sample under the microscope. A high-throughput MN assay is presented using image flow cytometry and image analysis software. A human lymphocyte cell line was treated with plasma generated with ten different feed gas conditions corresponding to distinct reactive species patterns that were investigated for their genotoxic potential. Several millions of cells were automatically analyzed by a MN quantification strategy outlined in detail in this work. Our data demonstrates the absence of newly formed MN in any feed gas condition using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet kINPen. As positive control, ionizing radiation gave a significant 5-fold increase in micronucleus frequency. Thus, this assay is suitable to assess the genotoxic potential in large sample sets of cells exposed chemical or physical agents including plasmas in an efficient, reliable, and semiautomated manner. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. An image analysis toolbox for high-throughput C. elegans assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wählby, Carolina; Kamentsky, Lee; Liu, Zihan H; Riklin-Raviv, Tammy; Conery, Annie L; O'Rourke, Eyleen J; Sokolnicki, Katherine L; Visvikis, Orane; Ljosa, Vebjorn; Irazoqui, Javier E; Golland, Polina; Ruvkun, Gary; Ausubel, Frederick M; Carpenter, Anne E

    2012-04-22

    We present a toolbox for high-throughput screening of image-based Caenorhabditis elegans phenotypes. The image analysis algorithms measure morphological phenotypes in individual worms and are effective for a variety of assays and imaging systems. This WormToolbox is available through the open-source CellProfiler project and enables objective scoring of whole-worm high-throughput image-based assays of C. elegans for the study of diverse biological pathways that are relevant to human disease.

  18. A High-Throughput MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay of Chitinase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    A high-throughput MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric assay is described for assay of chitolytic enzyme activity. The assay uses unmodified chitin oligosaccharide substrates, and is readily achievable on a microliter scale (2 µL total volume, containing 2 µg of substrate and 1 ng of protein). The speed a...

  19. A High-Throughput Screening Assay to Detect ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In support of the Endocrine Disruption Screening Program (EDSP21), the US EPA ToxCast program is developing assays to enable screening for chemicals that may disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is critical for TH synthesis and is a known target of thyroid-disrupting chemicals that adversely impact neurodevelopment. The AUR-TPO assay was recently developed to screen >1,900 ToxCast chemicals for potential TPO inhibition activity. Parallel assays were used to determine which AUR-TPO actives were more selective for TPO inhibition. Additionally, the TPO inhibition activities of 150 chemicals were compared between the AUR-TPO assay and an orthogonal peroxidase oxidation assay using guaiacol as substrate to confirm putative TPO inhibition profiles. Bioactivity results from the AUR-TPO assay were used to identify chemical substructures associated with in vitro TPO inhibition. Substructure profiles were generated for each chemical in the ToxCast test set using the publicly-available ToxPrint 2.0 chemotypes. Chemotypes enriched among the putative TPO inhibitors were identified using a cumulative hypergeometric probability (p assay:

  20. Functional characterisation of human glycine receptors in a fluorescence-based high throughput screening assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.

    2005-01-01

    receptors in this assay were found to be in good agreement with those from electrophysiology studies of the receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes or mammalian cell lines. Hence, this high throughput screening assay will be of great use in future pharmacological studies of glycine receptors, particular...

  1. 20170913 - Retrofit Strategies for Incorporating Xenobiotic Metabolism into High Throughput Screening Assays (EMGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA’s ToxCast program is designed to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints using a variety of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. However, existing HTS assays have limited or no xenobiotic metabolism which could lead to a mischaracteri...

  2. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluores...

  3. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal.

  4. Rapid 2,2'-bicinchoninic-based xylanase assay compatible with high throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Kenealy; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    High-throughput screening requires simple assays that give reliable quantitative results. A microplate assay was developed for reducing sugar analysis that uses a 2,2'-bicinchoninic-based protein reagent. Endo-1,4-â-D-xylanase activity against oat spelt xylan was detected at activities of 0.002 to 0.011 IU ml−1. The assay is linear for sugar...

  5. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  6. DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    OpenAIRE

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) techniq...

  7. A cell-based high-throughput screening assay for radiation susceptibility using automated cell counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodzic, Jasmina; Dingjan, Ilse; Maas, Mariëlle Jp; van der Meulen-Muileman, Ida H; de Menezes, Renee X; Heukelom, Stan; Verheij, Marcel; Gerritsen, Winald R; Geldof, Albert A; van Triest, Baukelien; van Beusechem, Victor W

    2015-02-27

    Radiotherapy is one of the mainstays in the treatment for cancer, but its success can be limited due to inherent or acquired resistance. Mechanisms underlying radioresistance in various cancers are poorly understood and available radiosensitizers have shown only modest clinical benefit. There is thus a need to identify new targets and drugs for more effective sensitization of cancer cells to irradiation. Compound and RNA interference high-throughput screening technologies allow comprehensive enterprises to identify new agents and targets for radiosensitization. However, the gold standard assay to investigate radiosensitivity of cancer cells in vitro, the colony formation assay (CFA), is unsuitable for high-throughput screening. We developed a new high-throughput screening method for determining radiation susceptibility. Fast and uniform irradiation of batches up to 30 microplates was achieved using a Perspex container and a clinically employed linear accelerator. The readout was done by automated counting of fluorescently stained nuclei using the Acumen eX3 laser scanning cytometer. Assay performance was compared to that of the CFA and the CellTiter-Blue homogeneous uniform-well cell viability assay. The assay was validated in a whole-genome siRNA library screening setting using PC-3 prostate cancer cells. On 4 different cancer cell lines, the automated cell counting assay produced radiation dose response curves that followed a linear-quadratic equation and that exhibited a better correlation to the results of the CFA than did the cell viability assay. Moreover, the cell counting assay could be used to detect radiosensitization by silencing DNA-PKcs or by adding caffeine. In a high-throughput screening setting, using 4 Gy irradiated and control PC-3 cells, the effects of DNA-PKcs siRNA and non-targeting control siRNA could be clearly discriminated. We developed a simple assay for radiation susceptibility that can be used for high-throughput screening. This will

  8. Neuraminidase activity provides a practical read-out for a high throughput influenza antiviral screening assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of influenza strains that are resistant to commonly used antivirals has highlighted the need to develop new compounds that target viral gene products or host mechanisms that are essential for effective virus replication. Existing assays to identify potential antiviral compounds often use high throughput screening assays that target specific viral replication steps. To broaden the search for antivirals, cell-based replication assays can be performed, but these are often labor intensive and have limited throughput. Results We have adapted a traditional virus neutralization assay to develop a practical, cell-based, high throughput screening assay. This assay uses viral neuraminidase (NA as a read-out to quantify influenza replication, thereby offering an assay that is both rapid and sensitive. In addition to identification of inhibitors that target either viral or host factors, the assay allows simultaneous evaluation of drug toxicity. Antiviral activity was demonstrated for a number of known influenza inhibitors including amantadine that targets the M2 ion channel, zanamivir that targets NA, ribavirin that targets IMP dehydrogenase, and bis-indolyl maleimide that targets protein kinase A/C. Amantadine-resistant strains were identified by comparing IC50 with that of the wild-type virus. Conclusion Antivirals with specificity for a broad range of targets are easily identified in an accelerated viral inhibition assay that uses NA as a read-out of replication. This assay is suitable for high throughput screening to identify potential antivirals or can be used to identify drug-resistant influenza strains.

  9. Patterning cell using Si-stencil for high-throughput assay

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2011-01-01

    In this communication, we report a newly developed cell pattering methodology by a silicon-based stencil, which exhibited advantages such as easy handling, reusability, hydrophilic surface and mature fabrication technologies. Cell arrays obtained by this method were used to investigate cell growth under a temperature gradient, which demonstrated the possibility of studying cell behavior in a high-throughput assay. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  10. Development of High-Throughput Quantitative Assays for Glucose Uptake in Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Mohamed; Weidow, Brandy; Koehler, Elizabeth; Bakane, Naimish; Garbett, Shawn; Shyr, Yu; Quaranta, Vito

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metabolism, and especially glucose uptake, is a key quantitative cell trait that is closely linked to cancer initiation and progression. Therefore, developing high-throughput assays for measuring glucose uptake in cancer cells would be enviable for simultaneous comparisons of multiple cell lines and microenvironmental conditions. This study was designed with two specific aims in mind: the first was to develop and validate a high-throughput screening method for quantitative assessment of glucose uptake in “normal” and tumor cells using the fluorescent 2-deoxyglucose analog 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG), and the second was to develop an image-based, quantitative, single-cell assay for measuring glucose uptake using the same probe to dissect the full spectrum of metabolic variability within populations of tumor cells in vitro in higher resolution. Procedure The kinetics of population-based glucose uptake was evaluated for MCF10A mammary epithelial and CA1d breast cancer cell lines, using 2-NBDG and a fluorometric microplate reader. Glucose uptake for the same cell lines was also examined at the single-cell level using high-content automated microscopy coupled with semi-automated cell-cytometric image analysis approaches. Statistical treatments were also implemented to analyze intra-population variability. Results Our results demonstrate that the high-throughput fluorometric assay using 2-NBDG is a reliable method to assess population-level kinetics of glucose uptake in cell lines in vitro. Similarly, single-cell image-based assays and analyses of 2-NBDG fluorescence proved an effective and accurate means for assessing glucose uptake, which revealed that breast tumor cell lines display intra-population variability that is modulated by growth conditions. Conclusions These studies indicate that 2-NBDG can be used to aid in the high-throughput analysis of the influence of chemotherapeutics on glucose uptake in cancer

  11. Novel method for the high-throughput processing of slides for the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbaschi, Mahsa; Cooke, Marcus S

    2014-11-26

    Single cell gel electrophoresis (the comet assay), continues to gain popularity as a means of assessing DNA damage. However, the assay's low sample throughput and laborious sample workup procedure are limiting factors to its application. "Scoring", or individually determining DNA damage levels in 50 cells per treatment, is time-consuming, but with the advent of high-throughput scoring, the limitation is now the ability to process significant numbers of comet slides. We have developed a novel method by which multiple slides may be manipulated, and undergo electrophoresis, in batches of 25 rather than individually and, importantly, retains the use of standard microscope comet slides, which are the assay convention. This decreases assay time by 60%, and benefits from an electrophoresis tank with a substantially smaller footprint, and more uniform orientation of gels during electrophoresis. Our high-throughput variant of the comet assay greatly increases the number of samples analysed, decreases assay time, number of individual slide manipulations, reagent requirements and risk of damage to slides. The compact nature of the electrophoresis tank is of particular benefit to laboratories where bench space is at a premium. This novel approach is a significant advance on the current comet assay procedure.

  12. A high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay for inhibitors of gyrase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Bryan T; Malerich, Jeremiah P; Duellman, Sarah J; Fong, Julie; Hutson, Christopher; Fine, Richard M; Keblansky, Boris; Tang, Mary J; Madrid, Peter B

    2011-02-01

    DNA gyrase, a type II topoisomerase that introduces negative supercoils into DNA, is a validated antibacterial drug target. The holoenzyme is composed of 2 subunits, gyrase A (GyrA) and gyrase B (GyrB), which form a functional A(2)B(2) heterotetramer required for bacterial viability. A novel fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has been developed and optimized to detect inhibitors that bind to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding domain of GyrB. Guided by the crystal structure of the natural product novobiocin bound to GyrB, a novel novobiocin-Texas Red probe (Novo-TRX) was designed and synthesized for use in a high-throughput FP assay. The binding kinetics of the interaction of Novo-TRX with GyrB from Francisella tularensis has been characterized, as well as the effect of common buffer additives on the interaction. The assay was developed into a 21-µL, 384-well assay format and has been validated for use in high-throughput screening against a collection of Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds. The assay performed with an average Z' factor of 0.80 and was able to identify GyrB inhibitors from a screening library.

  13. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay for High-Throughput Screening of ADAMTS1 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I motifs-1 (ADAMTS1 plays a crucial role in inflammatory joint diseases and its inhibitors are potential candidates for anti-arthritis drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, we reported the development and validation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of the ADAMTS1 inhibitors. A FRET substrate was designed for a quantitative assay of ADAMTS1 activity and enzyme kinetics studies. The assay was developed into a 50-µL, 384-well assay format for high throughput screening of ADAMTS1 inhibitors with an overall Z’ factor of 0.89. ADAMTS1 inhibitors were screened against a diverse library of 40,960 total compounds with the established HTS system. Four structurally related hits, naturally occurring compounds, kuwanon P, kuwanon X, albafuran C and mulberrofuran J, extracted from the Chinese herb Morus alba L., were identified for further investigation. The results suggest that this FRET assay is an excellent tool, not only for measurement of ADAMTS1 activity but also for discovery of novel ADAMTS1 inhibitors with HTS.

  14. High-throughput receptor-based assay for the detection of spirolides by chemiluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Laura P; Vilariño, Natalia; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo; Botana, Luis M

    2013-12-01

    The spirolides are marine toxins that belong to a new class of macrocyclic imines produced by dinoflagellates. In this study a previously described solid-phase receptor-based assay for the detection of spirolides was optimized for high-throughput screening and prevalidated. This method is based on the competition between 13-desmethyl spirolide C and biotin-α-bungarotoxin immobilized on a streptavidin-coated surface, for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In this inhibition assay the amount of nAChR bound to the well surface is quantified using a specific antibody, followed by a second anti-mouse IgG antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The assay protocol was optimized for 384-well microplates, which allowed a reduction of the amount of reagents per sample and an increase of the number of samples per plate versus previously published receptor-based assays. The sensitivity of the assay for 13-desmethyl spirolide C ranged from 5 to 150 ng mL(-1). The performance of the assay in scallop extracts was adequate, with an estimated detection limit for 13-desmethyl spirolide C of 50 μg kg(-1) of shellfish meat. The recovery rate of 13-desmethyl spirolide C for spiked samples with this assay was 80% and the inter-assay coefficient of variation was 8%. This 384-well microplate, chemiluminescence method can be used as a high-throughput screening assay to detect 13-desmethyl spirolide C in shellfish meat in order to reduce the number of samples to be processed through bioassays or analytical methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Methodological considerations for using umu assay to assess photo-genotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Baun, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the feasibility of high-throughput (96-well plate) umu assay to test the genotoxic effect of TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) under UV light (full spectrum) and visible light (455nm). Exposure of TiO2 ENPs to up to 60min of UV light induced a photocatalytic...... production of ROS. However, UV light itself caused cytotoxic damage to Salmonella typhimurium at exposures >15min and a genotoxic effect at exposures >0.5min; and use of UV filters did not lower this effect. No genotoxicity of TiO2 ENPs was observed under visible light conditions at concentrations up to 100...

  16. Miniaturization of High-Throughput Epigenetic Methyltransferase Assays with Acoustic Liquid Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bonnie; Lesnick, John; Wang, Jing; Tang, Nga; Peters, Carl

    2016-02-01

    Epigenetics continues to emerge as an important target class for drug discovery and cancer research. As programs scale to evaluate many new targets related to epigenetic expression, new tools and techniques are required to enable efficient and reproducible high-throughput epigenetic screening. Assay miniaturization increases screening throughput and reduces operating costs. Echo liquid handlers can transfer compounds, samples, reagents, and beads in submicroliter volumes to high-density assay formats using only acoustic energy-no contact or tips required. This eliminates tip costs and reduces the risk of reagent carryover. In this study, we demonstrate the miniaturization of a methyltransferase assay using Echo liquid handlers and two different assay technologies: AlphaLISA from PerkinElmer and EPIgeneous HTRF from Cisbio. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  17. A high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism multiplex assay for parentage assignment in New Zealand sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M Clarke

    Full Text Available Accurate pedigree information is critical to animal breeding systems to ensure the highest rate of genetic gain and management of inbreeding. The abundance of available genomic data, together with development of high throughput genotyping platforms, means that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are now the DNA marker of choice for genomic selection studies. Furthermore the superior qualities of SNPs compared to microsatellite markers allows for standardization between laboratories; a property that is crucial for developing an international set of markers for traceability studies. The objective of this study was to develop a high throughput SNP assay for use in the New Zealand sheep industry that gives accurate pedigree assignment and will allow a reduction in breeder input over lambing. This required two phases of development--firstly, a method of extracting quality DNA from ear-punch tissue performed in a high throughput cost efficient manner and secondly a SNP assay that has the ability to assign paternity to progeny resulting from mob mating. A likelihood based approach to infer paternity was used where sires with the highest LOD score (log of the ratio of the likelihood given parentage to likelihood given non-parentage are assigned. An 84 "parentage SNP panel" was developed that assigned, on average, 99% of progeny to a sire in a problem where there were 3,000 progeny from 120 mob mated sires that included numerous half sib sires. In only 6% of those cases was there another sire with at least a 0.02 probability of paternity. Furthermore dam information (either recorded, or by genotyping possible dams was absent, highlighting the SNP test's suitability for paternity testing. Utilization of this parentage SNP assay will allow implementation of progeny testing into large commercial farms where the improved accuracy of sire assignment and genetic evaluations will increase genetic gain in the sheep industry.

  18. A high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism multiplex assay for parentage assignment in New Zealand sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Shannon M; Henry, Hannah M; Dodds, Ken G; Jowett, Timothy W D; Manley, Tim R; Anderson, Rayna M; McEwan, John C

    2014-01-01

    Accurate pedigree information is critical to animal breeding systems to ensure the highest rate of genetic gain and management of inbreeding. The abundance of available genomic data, together with development of high throughput genotyping platforms, means that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are now the DNA marker of choice for genomic selection studies. Furthermore the superior qualities of SNPs compared to microsatellite markers allows for standardization between laboratories; a property that is crucial for developing an international set of markers for traceability studies. The objective of this study was to develop a high throughput SNP assay for use in the New Zealand sheep industry that gives accurate pedigree assignment and will allow a reduction in breeder input over lambing. This required two phases of development--firstly, a method of extracting quality DNA from ear-punch tissue performed in a high throughput cost efficient manner and secondly a SNP assay that has the ability to assign paternity to progeny resulting from mob mating. A likelihood based approach to infer paternity was used where sires with the highest LOD score (log of the ratio of the likelihood given parentage to likelihood given non-parentage) are assigned. An 84 "parentage SNP panel" was developed that assigned, on average, 99% of progeny to a sire in a problem where there were 3,000 progeny from 120 mob mated sires that included numerous half sib sires. In only 6% of those cases was there another sire with at least a 0.02 probability of paternity. Furthermore dam information (either recorded, or by genotyping possible dams) was absent, highlighting the SNP test's suitability for paternity testing. Utilization of this parentage SNP assay will allow implementation of progeny testing into large commercial farms where the improved accuracy of sire assignment and genetic evaluations will increase genetic gain in the sheep industry.

  19. Towards sensitive, high-throughput, biomolecular assays based on fluorescence lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanna Skilitsi, Anastasia; Turko, Timothé; Cianfarani, Damien; Barre, Sophie; Uhring, Wilfried; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Léonard, Jérémie

    2017-09-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence detection for robust sensing of biomolecular interactions is developed by implementing time-correlated single photon counting in high-throughput conditions. Droplet microfluidics is used as a promising platform for the very fast handling of low-volume samples. We illustrate the potential of this very sensitive and cost-effective technology in the context of an enzymatic activity assay based on fluorescently-labeled biomolecules. Fluorescence lifetime detection by time-correlated single photon counting is shown to enable reliable discrimination between positive and negative control samples at a throughput as high as several hundred samples per second.

  20. Multiplexed homogeneous proximity ligation assays for high throughput protein biomarker research in serological material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Martin; Thorsen, Stine Buch; Assarsson, Erika

    2011-01-01

    specificity, even in multiplex, by its dual recognition feature, its proximity requirement, and most importantly by using unique sequence specific reporter fragments on both antibody-based probes. To illustrate the potential of this protein detection technology, a pilot biomarker research project......A high throughput protein biomarker discovery tool has been developed based on multiplexed proximity ligation assays (PLA) in a homogeneous format in the sense of no washing steps. The platform consists of four 24-plex panels profiling 74 putative biomarkers with sub pM sensitivity each consuming...

  1. High-throughput cell mechanical phenotyping for label-free titration assays of cytoskeletal modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfier, Stefan; Rosendahl, Philipp; Mietke, Alexander; Herbig, Maik; Guck, Jochen; Otto, Oliver

    2017-08-01

    The mechanical fingerprint of cells is inherently linked to the structure of the cytoskeleton and can serve as a label-free marker for cell homeostasis or pathologic states. How cytoskeletal composition affects the physical response of cells to external loads has been intensively studied with a spectrum of techniques, yet quantitative and statistically powerful investigations in the form of titration assays are hampered by the low throughput of most available methods. In this study, we employ real-time deformability cytometry (RT-DC), a novel microfluidic tool to examine the effects of biochemically modified F-actin and microtubule stability and nuclear chromatin structure on cell deformation in a human leukemia cell line (HL60). The high throughput of our method facilitates extensive titration assays that allow for significance assessment of the observed effects and extraction of half-maximal concentrations for most of the applied reagents. We quantitatively show that integrity of the F-actin cortex and microtubule network dominate cell deformation on millisecond timescales probed with RT-DC. Drug-induced alterations in the nuclear chromatin structure were not found to consistently affect cell deformation. The sensitivity of the high-throughput cell mechanical measurements to the cytoskeletal modifications we present in this study opens up new possibilities for label-free dose-response assays of cytoskeletal modifications. © 2017 The Authors Cytoskeleton Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. High-throughput kinase assays with protein substrates using fluorescent polymer superquenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weatherford Wendy

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput screening is used by the pharmaceutical industry for identifying lead compounds that interact with targets of pharmacological interest. Because of the key role that aberrant regulation of protein phosphorylation plays in diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hypertension, kinases have become one of the main drug targets. With the exception of antibody-based assays, methods to screen for specific kinase activity are generally restricted to the use of small synthetic peptides as substrates. However, the use of natural protein substrates has the advantage that potential inhibitors can be detected that affect enzyme activity by binding to a site other than the catalytic site. We have previously reported a non-radioactive and non-antibody-based fluorescence quench assay for detection of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation using synthetic peptide substrates. The aim of this work is to develop an assay for detection of phosphorylation of chemically unmodified proteins based on this polymer superquenching platform. Results Using a modified QTL Lightspeed™ assay, phosphorylation of native protein was quantified by the interaction of the phosphorylated proteins with metal-ion coordinating groups co-located with fluorescent polymer deposited onto microspheres. The binding of phospho-protein inhibits a dye-labeled "tracer" peptide from associating to the phosphate-binding sites present on the fluorescent microspheres. The resulting inhibition of quench generates a "turn on" assay, in which the signal correlates with the phosphorylation of the substrate. The assay was tested on three different proteins: Myelin Basic Protein (MBP, Histone H1 and Phosphorylated heat- and acid-stable protein (PHAS-1. Phosphorylation of the proteins was detected by Protein Kinase Cα (PKCα and by the Interleukin -1 Receptor-associated Kinase 4 (IRAK4. Enzyme inhibition yielded IC50 values that were comparable to those obtained using

  3. A high-throughput colorimetric assay for screening halohydrin dehalogenase saturation mutagenesis libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lixia; Li, Yang; Wang, Xiong

    2010-06-01

    Here we have reported a high throughput pH indicator-based assay to measure the activity of halohydrin dehalogenases (HheC). The assay relies upon the absorbance change at 560nm and the visual color change of phenol red in a weakly buffered system, due to the release of protons from the enzyme-catalyzed ring-closure reactions. The assay can be performed in a microplate format using whole cells, making the assay simple and robust. Thus, it is suitable for library screening. The assay has been further validated using two previously studied HheC variants, D80N and W249F, which exhibit 200-fold lower and 2-fold higher k(cat) values, respectively, toward 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol than the wild-type HheC. In addition, a saturation mutagenesis library of HheC was screened using the developed assay for its ability to efficiently catalyze the conversion of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol. After screening of 500 colonies, one mutant W139C was identified and was further purified and characterized. Kinetic analysis indicates that the resulting mutant shows 2- and 5-fold improvement in k(cat) value toward 1,3-DCP and (R,S)-p-nitro-2-bromo-1-phenylethanol, respectively, although it exhibits higher K(m) values than the wild-type enzyme. The method described herein represents a useful tool given the need for the high throughput screening of halohydrin dehalogenase mutants. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High Throughput Assay for Bacterial Adhesion on Acellular Dermal Matrices and Synthetic Surgical Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyame, Theodore T.; Lemon, Katherine P.; Kolter, Roberto; Liao, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been increasing use of various synthetic and biologically derived materials in surgery. Biologic surgical materials are used in many plastic surgery procedures, ranging from breast reconstruction to hernia repairs. In particular, acellular dermal matrix (ADM) material has gained popularity in these applications. There is a paucity of data on how ADM compares to other surgical materials as a substrate for bacterial adhesion, the first step in formation biofilm, which occurs in prosthetic wound infections. We have designed a high throughput assay to evaluate Staphylococcus aureus adherence on various synthetic and biologically derived materials. Methods Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (strains SC-1 and UAMS-1) were cultured with different materials and bacterial adherence was measured using a resazurin cell vitality reporter microtiter assay. Four materials that are commonly utilized in reconstructive procedures were evaluated: prolene mesh, vicryl mesh, and two different ADM preparations (AlloDerm®, FlexHD®). We were able to develop a high throughput and reliable assay for quantifying bacterial adhesion on synthetic and biologically derived materials. Results The resazurin vitality assay can be reliably used to quantify bacterial adherence to acellular dermal matrix material, as well as synthetic material. S. aureus strains SC-1 and UAMS-1 both adhered better to ADM materials (AlloDerm® vs. FlexHD®) than to the synthetic material prolene. S. aureus also adhered better to vicryl than to prolene. Strain UAMS-1 adhered better to vicryl and ADM materials than did strain SC-1. Conclusion Our results suggest that S. aureus adheres more readily to ADM material than to synthetic material. We have developed an assay to rapidly test bacterial formation on surgical materials, using two S. aureus bacterial strains. This provides a standard method to evaluate existing and new materials with regard to bacterial adherence and potential

  5. Identification of adiponectin receptor agonist utilizing a fluorescence polarization based high throughput assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyi Sun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (--arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases.

  6. Identification of Adiponectin Receptor Agonist Utilizing a Fluorescence Polarization Based High Throughput Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiyi; Zang, Zhihe; Zhong, Ling; Wu, Min; Su, Qing; Gao, Xiurong; Zan, Wang; Lin, Dong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (-)-arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases. PMID:23691032

  7. High-throughput assay for bacterial adhesion on acellular dermal matrices and synthetic surgical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyame, Theodore T; Lemon, Katherine P; Kolter, Roberto; Liao, Eric C

    2011-11-01

    There has been increasing use of synthetic and acellular dermal matrix materials in surgery, ranging from breast reconstruction to hernia repairs. There is a paucity of data on how acellular dermal matrix compares with other surgical materials as a substrate for bacterial adhesion, the first step in formation biofilm, which occurs in prosthetic wound infections. The authors have designed a high-throughput assay to evaluate Staphylococcus aureus adherence on various synthetic and biologically derived materials. Clinical isolates of S. aureus (strains SC-1 and UAMS-1) were cultured with different materials, and bacterial adherence was measured using a resazurin cell vitality assay. Four materials that are commonly used in surgery were evaluated: Prolene mesh, Vicryl mesh, and two different acellular dermal matrix preparations (AlloDerm and FlexHD). The authors were able to develop a high-throughput and reliable assay for quantifying bacterial adhesion on synthetic and biologically derived materials. The resazurin vitality assay can be reliably used to quantify bacterial adherence to acellular dermal matrix material and synthetic material. S. aureus strains SC-1 and UAMS-1 both adhered better to acellular dermal matrix materials (AlloDerm versus FlexHD) than to the synthetic material Prolene. S. aureus also adhered better to Vicryl than to Prolene. Strain UAMS-1 adhered better to Vicryl and acellular dermal matrix materials than did strain SC-1. The results show that S. aureus adheres more readily to acellular dermal matrix material than to synthetic material. The resazurin assay provides a standard method for evaluating surgical materials with regard to bacterial adherence and potential propensity for biofilm development.

  8. [Pain of high-throughput screening--pan assay interference compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tao; Du, Guan-hua

    2015-08-01

    High-throughput screening is a regular approach available for identitying new lead compounds for the growing validated drug targets in drug screening. However, it has also introduced a large number of peculiar molecules which interfere drug screening. Pan assay interference compounds (PAINS) interfere with the progress of drug screening in various ways, such as interfering with a biochemical assay, modifying the protein, aggregate-based inhibitors and so on. So it is of vital significance to remove them. This paper has consulted the concept, category of PAINS and reviewed the way of PAINS interfering and the countermeasures to cope with them to direct the approach of high through screening and improve the hits percent.

  9. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay for Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Iván; Lafuente, María José; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a mitochondrial membrane-associated flavoenzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. DHODH is a validated target for malaria, and DSM265, a potent inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate using flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor in the first half of the reaction. Reoxidation of FMN to regenerate the active enzyme is mediated by ubiquinone (CoQD), which is the physiological final electron acceptor and second substrate of the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence-based high-throughput enzymatic assay to find DHODH inhibitors. In this assay, the CoQD has been replaced by a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye, resazurin, which changes to a fluorescent state on reduction to resorufin. Remarkably, the assay sensitivity to find competitive inhibitors of the second substrate is higher than that reported for the standard colorimetric assay. It is amenable to 1536-well plates with Z' values close to 0.8. The fact that the human enzyme can also be assayed in the same format opens additional applications of this assay to the discovery of inhibitors to treat cancer, transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases, and other diseases mediated by rapid cellular growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Repeated Assessment by High-Throughput Assay Demonstrates that Sperm DNA Methylation Levels Are Highly Reproducible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortessis, Victoria K.; Siegmund, Kimberly; Houshdaran, Sahar; Laird, Peter W.; Sokol, Rebecca Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess reliability of high-throughput assay of sperm DNA methylation. Design Observational study comparing DNA methylation of sperm isolated from three divided and twelve longitudinally collected semen samples. Setting Academic Medical Center Patients One man undergoing screening semen analysis during evaluation of the infertile couple and two healthy fertile male volunteers. Interventions Spermatozoa were separated from seminal plasma and somatic cells using gradient separation. DNA was extracted from spermatozoa, and DNA methylation was assessed at 1,505 DNA-sequence specific sites. Main Outcome Measures Repeatability of sperm DNA methylation measures, estimated by correlation coefficients. Results DNA methylation levels were highly correlated within matched sets of divided samples (all r≥0.97) and longitudinal samples (average r=0.97). Conclusions The described methodology reliably assesses methylation of sperm DNA at large numbers of sites. Methylation profiles were consistent over time. High-throughput assessment of sperm DNA methylation is a promising tool for studying the role of epigenetic state in male fertility. PMID:22035967

  11. MICROSPHERE-BASED FLOW CYTOMETRY PROTEASE ASSAYS FOR USE IN PROTEASE ACTIVITY DETECTION AND HIGH-THROUGHPUT SCREENING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Zhu, Jingshu; Sklar, Larry A.; Graves, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes microsphere-based protease assays for use in flow cytometry and high-throughput screening. This platform measures a loss of fluorescence from the surface of a microsphere due to the cleavage of an attached fluorescent protease substrate by a suitable protease enzyme. The assay format can be adapted to any site or protein specific protease of interest and results can be measured in both real time and as end point fluorescence assays on a flow cytometer. End point assays are easily adapted to microplate format for flow cytometry high-throughput analysis and inhibitor screening. PMID:20938917

  12. A novel high-throughput assay for islet respiration reveals uncoupling of rodent and human islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob D Wikstrom

    Full Text Available The pancreatic beta cell is unique in its response to nutrient by increased fuel oxidation. Recent studies have demonstrated that oxygen consumption rate (OCR may be a valuable predictor of islet quality and long term nutrient responsiveness. To date, high-throughput and user-friendly assays for islet respiration are lacking. The aim of this study was to develop such an assay and to examine bioenergetic efficiency of rodent and human islets.The XF24 respirometer platform was adapted to islets by the development of a 24-well plate specifically designed to confine islets. The islet plate generated data with low inter-well variability and enabled stable measurement of oxygen consumption for hours. The F1F0 ATP synthase blocker oligomycin was used to assess uncoupling while rotenone together with myxothiazol/antimycin was used to measure the level of non-mitochondrial respiration. The use of oligomycin in islets was validated by reversing its effect in the presence of the uncoupler FCCP. Respiratory leak averaged to 59% and 49% of basal OCR in islets from C57Bl6/J and FVB/N mice, respectively. In comparison, respiratory leak of INS-1 cells and C2C12 myotubes was measured to 38% and 23% respectively. Islets from a cohort of human donors showed a respiratory leak of 38%, significantly lower than mouse islets.The assay for islet respiration presented here provides a novel tool that can be used to study islet mitochondrial function in a relatively high-throughput manner. The data obtained in this study shows that rodent islets are less bioenergetically efficient than human islets as well as INS1 cells.

  13. Multiplex mRNA assay using electrophoretic tags for high-throughput gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huan; Cao, Liching; Tan, Yuping; Williams, Stephen; Chen, Lili; Matray, Tracy; Chenna, Ahmed; Moore, Sean; Hernandez, Vincent; Xiao, Vivian; Tang, Mengxiang; Singh, Sharat

    2004-09-08

    We describe a novel multiplexing technology using a library of small fluorescent molecules, termed eTag molecules, to code and quantify mRNA targets. eTag molecules, which have the same fluorometric property, but distinct charge-to-mass ratios possess pre-defined electrophoretic characteristics and can be resolved using capillary electrophoresis. Coupled with primary Invader mRNA assay, eTag molecules were applied to simultaneously quantify up to 44 mRNA targets. This multiplexing approach was validated by examining a panel of inflammation responsive genes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1beta. The laser-induced fluorescence detection and electrokinetic sample injection process in capillary electrophoresis allows sensitive quantification of thousands of copies of mRNA molecules in a reaction. The assay is precise, as evaluated by measuring qualified Z' factor, a dimensionless and simple characteristic for applications in high-throughput screening using mRNA assays. Our data demonstrate the synergy between the multiplexing capability of eTag molecules by sensitive capillary electrophoresis detection and the isothermal linear amplification characteristics of the Invader assay. eTag multiplex mRNA assay presents a unique platform for sensitive, high sample throughput and multiplex gene expression analysis.

  14. A novel high-throughput assay for the quantitative assessment of receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsey, Natasha L; Narayan, Pritika J; Dragunow, Mike; Glass, Michelle

    2008-11-01

    1. Receptor transport between intracellular compartments has important consequences for receptor function and is an exciting area of current study. Existing methods for studying receptor trafficking often require labour-intensive techniques or are difficult to quantify reliably. We report a novel high-throughput method that uses automated imaging and analysis tools to accurately quantify cannabinoid CB1 receptor trafficking. 2. Haemagglutinin (HA)-tagged CB1 was stably expressed in HEK-293 cells and cell surface or total receptors were detected immunocytochemically. Images of receptor and nuclear staining were acquired with an automated fluorescent microscope (Discovery-1; Molecular Devices, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) and quantified at high throughput with MetaMorph (Molecular Devices) software. The 'Granularity' assay measured internalization by counting receptor clusters that appear during receptor endocytosis, a well-established approach. Our assay, referred to as 'Total Grey Value per Cell' (TGVC), measures the total fluorescence above background, normalized to cell count. 3. Incubation with the cannabinoid agonist HU-210 (100 nmol/L) resulted in rapid CB1 internalization, reaching a maximum within 20 min. Whether quantified by Granularity or TGVC, the time-course of endocytosis could be modelled with exponentially derived curves and with similar half-lives. We demonstrate the sensitivity of our TGVC method by measuring the concentration dependence of CB1 internalization and its versatility by measuring downregulation following chronic agonist exposure, whereby total CB1 was reduced to approximately 55% of basal after 3 h. 4. The TGVC quantification method described is efficient, accurate and versatile and is likely to provide a valuable tool in receptor trafficking studies.

  15. High-throughput assay for measuring monoclonal antibody self-association and aggregation in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoning; Geng, Steven B; Chiu, Mark L; Saro, Dorina; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-03-18

    Subcutaneous delivery is one of the preferred administration routes for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). High antibody dosing requirements and small injection volumes necessitate formulation and delivery of highly concentrated mAb solutions. Such elevated antibody concentrations can lead to undesirable solution behaviors such as mAb self-association and aggregation, which are relatively straightforward to detect using various biophysical methods because of the high purity and concentration of antibody formulations. However, the biophysical properties of mAbs in serum can also impact antibody activity, but these properties are less well understood because of the difficulty characterizing mAbs in such a complex environment. Here we report a high-throughput assay for directly evaluating mAb self-association and aggregation in serum. Our approach involves immobilizing polyclonal antibodies specific for human mAbs on gold nanoparticles, and then using these conjugates to capture human antibodies at a range of subsaturating to saturating mAb concentrations in serum. Antibody aggregation is detected at subsaturating mAb concentrations via blue-shifted plasmon wavelengths due to the reduced efficiency of capturing mAb aggregates relative to monomers, which reduces affinity cross-capture of mAbs by multiple conjugates. In contrast, antibody self-association is detected at saturating mAb concentrations via red-shifted plasmon wavelengths due to attractive interparticle interactions between immobilized mAbs. The high-throughput nature of this assay along with its compatibility with unusually dilute mAb solutions (0.1-10 μg per mL) should make it useful for identifying antibody candidates with high serum stability during early antibody discovery.

  16. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of Titration-Based Screening for the Rapid Pilot Testing of High-Throughput Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Hu; Kang, Zhao B; Ardayfio, Ophelia; Ho, Pei-i; Smith, Thomas; Wallace, Iain; Bowes, Scott; Hill, W Adam; Auld, Douglas S

    2014-06-01

    Pilot testing of an assay intended for high-throughput screening (HTS) with small compound sets is a necessary but often time-consuming step in the validation of an assay protocol. When the initial testing concentration is less than optimal, this can involve iterative testing at different concentrations to further evaluate the pilot outcome, which can be even more time-consuming. Quantitative HTS (qHTS) enables flexible and rapid collection of assay performance statistics, hits at different concentrations, and concentration-response curves in a single experiment. Here we describe the qHTS process for pilot testing in which eight-point concentration-response curves are produced using an interplate asymmetric dilution protocol in which the first four concentrations are used to represent the range of typical HTS screening concentrations and the last four concentrations are added for robust curve fitting to determine potency/efficacy values. We also describe how these data can be analyzed to predict the frequency of false-positives, false-negatives, hit rates, and confirmation rates for the HTS process as a function of screening concentration. By taking into account the compound pharmacology, this pilot-testing paradigm enables rapid assessment of the assay performance and choosing the optimal concentration for the large-scale HTS in one experiment. © 2013 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  18. A homogeneous, high-throughput fluorescence anisotropy-based DNA supercoiling assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam; Jahic, Haris; Prasad, Swati; Ehmann, David; Thresher, Jason; Gao, Ning; Hajec, Laurel

    2010-10-01

    The degree of supercoiling of DNA is vital for cellular processes, such as replication and transcription. DNA topology is controlled by the action of DNA topoisomerase enzymes. Topoisomerases, because of their importance in cellular replication, are the targets of several anticancer and antibacterial drugs. In the search for new drugs targeting topoisomerases, a biochemical assay compatible with automated high-throughput screening (HTS) would be valuable. Gel electrophoresis is the standard method for measuring changes in the extent of supercoiling of plasmid DNA when acted upon by topoisomerases, but this is a low-throughput and laborious method. A medium-throughput method was described previously that quantitatively distinguishes relaxed and supercoiled plasmids by the difference in their abilities to form triplex structures with an immobilized oligonucleotide. In this article, the authors describe a homogeneous supercoiling assay based on triplex formation in which the oligonucleotide strand is labeled with a fluorescent dye and the readout is fluorescence anisotropy. The new assay requires no immobilization, filtration, or plate washing steps and is therefore well suited to HTS for inhibitors of topoisomerases. The utility of this assay is demonstrated with relaxation of supercoiled plasmid by Escherichia coli topoisomerase I, supercoiling of relaxed plasmid by E. coli DNA gyrase, and inhibition of gyrase by fluoroquinolones and nalidixic acid.

  19. A recombinant fusion protein-based, fluorescent protease assay for high throughput-compatible substrate screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozóki, Beáta; Gazda, Lívia; Tóth, Ferenc; Miczi, Márió; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2018-01-01

    In connection with the intensive investigation of proteases, several methods have been developed for analysis of the substrate specificity. Due to the great number of proteases and the expected target molecules to be analyzed, time- and cost-efficient high-throughput screening (HTS) methods are preferred. Here we describe the development and application of a separation-based HTS-compatible fluorescent protease assay, which is based on the use of recombinant fusion proteins as substrates of proteases. The protein substrates used in this assay consists of N-terminal (hexahistidine and maltose binding protein) fusion tags, cleavage sequences of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) and HIV-1 proteases, and a C-terminal fluorescent protein (mApple or mTurquoise2). The assay is based on the fluorimetric detection of the fluorescent proteins, which are released from the magnetic bead-attached substrates by the proteolytic cleavage. The protease assay has been applied for activity measurements of TEV and HIV-1 proteases to test the suitability of the system for enzyme kinetic measurements, inhibition studies, and determination of pH optimum. We also found that denatured fluorescent proteins can be renatured after SDS-PAGE of denaturing conditions, but showed differences in their renaturation abilities. After in-gel renaturation both substrates and cleavage products can be identified by in-gel UV detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High-throughput colorimetric assays for nucleotide sugar formation and glycosyl transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Richard W; Thorson, Jon S

    2012-01-01

    Glycosyltransferases are ubiquitous in nature, catalyzing glycosidic bond formation in the context of an enormous range of substrates, which include all major classes of biological molecules. Because this wide range of substrates lacks a shared, distinguishable feature that can be altered by glycosyl transfer, general assays for detection of glycosyltransferase activity have long been largely limited to low-throughput methods. Of those high-throughput assays reported in the literature, many are confined to specific glycosyl transfer reactions with modified aglycon acceptors selected for their unique analytical properties. Herein are described a series of protocols centered on the use of 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl glycoside donors and the reversibility of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions to enable a colorimetric assay for the formation of sugar nucleotides, coupled reaction systems for the glycodiversification of small molecules, and a general colorimetric assay for glycosyltransfer, applicable to drug discovery, protein engineering, and other fundamental sugar nucleotide-dependent investigations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. PMID:25155200

  2. Assay development and high-throughput screening of caspases in microfluidic format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ge; Irvine, Jennifer; Luft, Chris; Pressley, David; Hodge, C Nicholas; Janzen, Bill

    2003-06-01

    Caspase proteases are familiar targets in drug discovery. A common format for screening to identify caspase inhibitors employs fluorogenic or colorimetric tetra-peptide substrates in 96, 384, or 1536 -well microtiter plates. The primary motivation for increasing the number of wells per plate is to reduce the reagent cost per test and increase the throughput of HTS operations. There are significant challenges, however, to moving into or beyond the 1536-well format, such as submicroliter liquid handling, liquid evaporation, increased surface area-to-volume ratios, and the potential for artifacts and interference from small air-borne particles such as lint. Therefore, HTS scientists remain keenly interested in technologies that offer alternatives to the ever-shrinking microtiter plate well. Microfluidic assay technology represents an attractive option that, in theory, consumes only subnanoliter volumes of reagents per test. We have successfully employed a microfluidic assay technology in fluorogenic screening assays for several caspase isoforms utilizing the Caliper Technologies Labchip platform. Caspase-3 is used as a representative case to describe microfluidic assay development and initial high-throughput screening results. In addition, microfluidic screening and plate-based screening are compared in terms of reagent consumption, data quality, and ease of operation.

  3. Applications of high-throughput clonogenic survival assays in high-LET particle microbeams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios eGeorgantzoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Charged particle therapy is increasingly becoming a valuable tool in cancer treatment, mainly due to the favorable interaction of particle radiation with matter. Its application is still limited due, in part, to lack of data regarding the radiosensitivity of certain cell lines to this radiation type, especially to high-LET particles. From the earliest days of radiation biology, the clonogenic survival assay has been used to provide radiation response data. This method produces reliable data but it is not optimized for high-throughput microbeam studies with high-LET radiation where high levels of cell killing lead to a very low probability of maintaining cells’ clonogenic potential. A new method, therefore, is proposed in this paper, which could potentially allow these experiments to be conducted in a high-throughput fashion. Cells are seeded in special polypropylene dishes and bright-field illumination provides cell visualization. Digital images are obtained and cell detection is applied based on corner detection, generating individual cell targets as x-y points. These points in the dish are then irradiated individually by a micron field size high-LET microbeam. Post-irradiation, time-lapse imaging follows cells’ response. All irradiated cells are tracked by linking trajectories in all time-frames, based on finding their nearest position. Cell divisions are detected based on cell appearance and individual cell temporary corner density. The number of divisions anticipated is low due to the high probability of cell killing from high-LET irradiation. Survival curves are produced based on cell’s capacity to divide at least 4-5 times. The process is repeated for a range of doses of radiation. Validation shows the efficiency of the proposed cell detection and tracking method in finding cell divisions.

  4. Applications of High-Throughput Clonogenic Survival Assays in High-LET Particle Microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantzoglou, Antonios; Merchant, Michael J; Jeynes, Jonathan C G; Mayhead, Natalie; Punia, Natasha; Butler, Rachel E; Jena, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Charged particle therapy is increasingly becoming a valuable tool in cancer treatment, mainly due to the favorable interaction of particle radiation with matter. Its application is still limited due, in part, to lack of data regarding the radiosensitivity of certain cell lines to this radiation type, especially to high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles. From the earliest days of radiation biology, the clonogenic survival assay has been used to provide radiation response data. This method produces reliable data but it is not optimized for high-throughput microbeam studies with high-LET radiation where high levels of cell killing lead to a very low probability of maintaining cells' clonogenic potential. A new method, therefore, is proposed in this paper, which could potentially allow these experiments to be conducted in a high-throughput fashion. Cells are seeded in special polypropylene dishes and bright-field illumination provides cell visualization. Digital images are obtained and cell detection is applied based on corner detection, generating individual cell targets as x-y points. These points in the dish are then irradiated individually by a micron field size high-LET microbeam. Post-irradiation, time-lapse imaging follows cells' response. All irradiated cells are tracked by linking trajectories in all time-frames, based on finding their nearest position. Cell divisions are detected based on cell appearance and individual cell temporary corner density. The number of divisions anticipated is low due to the high probability of cell killing from high-LET irradiation. Survival curves are produced based on cell's capacity to divide at least four to five times. The process is repeated for a range of doses of radiation. Validation shows the efficiency of the proposed cell detection and tracking method in finding cell divisions.

  5. DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2016-11-10

    Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Results Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemann–Pick type C disease. Conclusion We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between existing

  6. DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2016-01-01

    Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemann-Pick type C disease. We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between existing experimental confirmatory HTS

  7. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-02-27

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay.

  8. Two Variants of a High-Throughput Fluorescent Microplate Assay of Polysaccharide Endotransglycosylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováčová, Kristína; Farkaš, Vladimír

    2016-04-01

    Polysaccharide endotransglycosylases (PETs) are the cell wall-modifying enzymes of fungi and plants. They catalyze random endo-splitting of the polysaccharide donor molecule and transfer of the newly formed reducing sugar residue to the nonreducing end of an acceptor molecule which can be a polysaccharide or an oligosaccharide. Owing to their important role in the cell wall formation, the inhibition of PETs represents an attractive strategy in the fight against fungal infections. We have elaborated two variants of a versatile high-throughput microplate fluorimetric assay that could be used for effective identification of PETs and screening of their inhibitors. Both assays use the respective polysaccharides as the donors and sulforhodamine-labeled oligosaccharides as the acceptors but differ from each other by mode of how the labeled polysaccharide products of transglycosylation are separated from the unreacted oligosaccharide acceptors. In the first variant, the reactions take place in a layer of agar gel laid on the bottoms of the wells of a microtitration plate. After the reaction, the high-Mr transglycosylation products are precipitated with 66 % ethanol and retained within the gel while the low-Mr products and the unreacted acceptors are washed out. In the second variant, the donor polysaccharides are adsorbed to the surface of a microplate well and remain adsorbed there also after becoming labeled in the course of the transglycosylation reaction whereas the unused low-Mr acceptors are washed out. As a proof of versatility, assays of heterologously expressed transglycosylases ScGas1, ScCrh1, and ScCrh2 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, CaPhr1 and CaPhr2 from Candida albicans, and of a plant xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) are demonstrated.

  9. Unlocking the Potential of High-Throughput Drug Combination Assays Using Acoustic Dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Grace Ka Yan; Wilson, Stacy; Schmidt, Stephen; Moffat, John G

    2016-02-01

    Assessment of synergistic effects of drug combinations in vitro is a critical part of anticancer drug research. However, the complexities of dosing and analyzing two drugs over the appropriate range of doses have generally led to compromises in experimental design that restrict the quality and robustness of the data. In particular, the use of a single dose response of combined drugs, rather than a full two-way matrix of varying doses, has predominated in higher-throughput studies. Acoustic dispensing unlocks the potential of high-throughput dose matrix analysis. We have developed acoustic dispensing protocols that enable compound synergy assays in a 384-well format. This experimental design is considerably more efficient and flexible with respect to time, reagent usage, and labware than is achievable using traditional serial-dilution approaches. Data analysis tools integrated in Genedata Screener were used to efficiently deconvolute the combination compound mapping scheme and calculate compound potency and synergy metrics. We have applied this workflow to evaluate interactions among drugs targeting different nodes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in a panel of cancer cell lines. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  10. Sensitivity of neuroprogenitor cells to chemical-induced apoptosis using a multiplexed assay suitable for high-throughput screening*

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractHigh-throughput methods are useful for rapidly screening large numbers of chemicals for biological activity, including the perturbation of pathways that may lead to adverse cellular effects. In vitro assays for the key events of neurodevelopment, including apoptosis, may ...

  11. High-throughput micro-plate HCI-vanillin assay for screening tannin content in sorghum grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herald, Thomas J; Gadgil, Priyadarshini; Perumal, Ramasamy; Bean, Scott R; Wilson, Jeff D

    2014-08-01

    The HCI-vanillin assay is a well-accepted method for determining tannin content in sorghum but is limited to small sample sets due to the time-consuming nature of the method. The objective was to develop an accurate and repeatable high-throughput 96-well plate assay for breeders to screen large sample sets of sorghum for tannin content. Validation of the high-throughput assay was tested on 25 sorghums suspected to contain tannin. Approximately 30 measurements per day were completed using the conventional assay compared to 224 measurements using the 96-well platform. The correlation between the two tannin assays was 0.98. The coefficient of variation (CV) was 3.54% and 3.21% for the 96-well and conventional method, respectively. The 96-well assay exhibited good repeatability, with the inter-plate CV between 2.77% and 4.85%. The high-throughput 96-well HCI-vanillin assay exhibited an eightfold increase in the number of measurements completed and was as accurate as the conventional HCI-vanillin assay. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  13. One-Step Seeding of Neural Stem Cells with Vitronectin-Supplemented Medium for High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Li, Rong; Long, Yan; Titus, Steve; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Human neuronal cells differentiated from induced pluripotent cells have emerged as a new model system for the study of disease pathophysiology and evaluation of drug efficacy. Differentiated neuronal cells are more similar in genetics and biological content to human brain cells than other animal disease models. However, culture of neuronal cells in assay plates requires a labor-intensive procedure of plate precoating, hampering its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS). We developed a simplified method with one-step seeding of neural stem cells in assay plates by supplementing the medium with a recombinant human vitronectin (VTN), thus avoiding plate precoating. Robust results were obtained from cell viability, calcium response, and neurite outgrowth assays using this new method. Our data demonstrate that this approach greatly simplifies high-throughput assays using neuronal cells differentiated from human stem cells for translational research.

  14. A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi Willcoxon, Michi; Dennis, Jaclyn R; Lau, Sabina I; Xie, Weiping; You, You; Leng, Song; Fong, Ryan C; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-01-10

    A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins designated as Cry was developed and evaluated for screening a large number of Cry protein variants produced by DNA shuffling. This automation-amenable assay exploits an insect cell line expressing a single receptor of Bt Cry proteins. The Cry toxin used to develop this assay is a variant of the Cry1Ab protein called IP1-88, which was produced previously by DNA shuffling. Cell mortality caused by the activated Bt Cry toxin was determined by chemical cell viability assay in 96/384-well microtiter plates utilizing CellTiter 96(®) obtained from Promega. A widely-accepted mode-of-action theory of certain Bt Cry proteins suggests that the activated toxin binds to one or more receptors and forms a pore through the insect gut epithelial cell apical membrane. A number of insect proteins such as cadherin-like protein (Cad), aminopeptidase-N (APN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and ABC transporter (ABCC) have been identified as the receptors of Bt Cry toxins. In this study, Bt Cry toxin receptors Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer) cadherin-like protein (On-Cad) and aminopeptidase-N 1 and 3 (On-APN1, On-APN3) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) cadherin-like protein (Sf-Cad) were cloned in an insect cell line, Sf21, and a mammalian cell line, Expi293F. It was observed by ligand blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy that trypsin-activated IP1-88 bound to On-Cad and On-APN1, but not Sf-Cad or On-APN3. In contrast, IP1-88 bound only to APN1 in BBMV (Brush Border Membrane Vesicles) prepared from the third and fourth-instar O. nubilalis larval midgut. The sensitivity of the recombinant cells to the toxin was then tested. IP1-88 showed no toxicity to non-recombinant Sf21 and Expi293F. Toxicity was observed only when the On-Cad gene was cloned and expressed. Sf-Cad and On-APN1 were not able to make those cells sensitive to the toxin. Since the expression of On-Cad alone was

  15. Automation of a Nile red staining assay enables high throughput quantification of microalgal lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morschett, Holger; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco

    2016-02-09

    Within the context of microalgal lipid production for biofuels and bulk chemical applications, specialized higher throughput devices for small scale parallelized cultivation are expected to boost the time efficiency of phototrophic bioprocess development. However, the increasing number of possible experiments is directly coupled to the demand for lipid quantification protocols that enable reliably measuring large sets of samples within short time and that can deal with the reduced sample volume typically generated at screening scale. To meet these demands, a dye based assay was established using a liquid handling robot to provide reproducible high throughput quantification of lipids with minimized hands-on-time. Lipid production was monitored using the fluorescent dye Nile red with dimethyl sulfoxide as solvent facilitating dye permeation. The staining kinetics of cells at different concentrations and physiological states were investigated to successfully down-scale the assay to 96 well microtiter plates. Gravimetric calibration against a well-established extractive protocol enabled absolute quantification of intracellular lipids improving precision from ±8 to ±2 % on average. Implementation into an automated liquid handling platform allows for measuring up to 48 samples within 6.5 h, reducing hands-on-time to a third compared to manual operation. Moreover, it was shown that automation enhances accuracy and precision compared to manual preparation. It was revealed that established protocols relying on optical density or cell number for biomass adjustion prior to staining may suffer from errors due to significant changes of the cells' optical and physiological properties during cultivation. Alternatively, the biovolume was used as a measure for biomass concentration so that errors from morphological changes can be excluded. The newly established assay proved to be applicable for absolute quantification of algal lipids avoiding limitations of currently established

  16. Mass Spectrometry-based Assay for High Throughput and High Sensitivity Biomarker Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xuejiang; Tang, Keqi

    2017-06-14

    Searching for disease specific biomarkers has become a major undertaking in the biomedical research field as the effective diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many complex human diseases are largely determined by the availability and the quality of the biomarkers. A successful biomarker as an indicator to a specific biological or pathological process is usually selected from a large group of candidates by a strict verification and validation process. To be clinically useful, the validated biomarkers must be detectable and quantifiable by the selected testing techniques in their related tissues or body fluids. Due to its easy accessibility, protein biomarkers would ideally be identified in blood plasma or serum. However, most disease related protein biomarkers in blood exist at very low concentrations (<1ng/mL) and are “masked” by many none significant species at orders of magnitude higher concentrations. The extreme requirements of measurement sensitivity, dynamic range and specificity make the method development extremely challenging. The current clinical protein biomarker measurement primarily relies on antibody based immunoassays, such as ELISA. Although the technique is sensitive and highly specific, the development of high quality protein antibody is both expensive and time consuming. The limited capability of assay multiplexing also makes the measurement an extremely low throughput one rendering it impractical when hundreds to thousands potential biomarkers need to be quantitatively measured across multiple samples. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays have recently shown to be a viable alternative for high throughput and quantitative candidate protein biomarker verification. Among them, the triple quadrupole MS based assay is the most promising one. When it is coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) separation and electrospray ionization (ESI) source, a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in a special selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode

  17. Alternative to the soft-agar assay that permits high-throughput drug and genetic screens for cellular transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Asaf; Janzer, Andreas; Izar, Benjamin; Ji, Zhe; Doench, John G.; Garraway, Levi A.; Struhl, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation in soft agar is the gold-standard assay for cellular transformation in vitro, but it is unsuited for high-throughput screening. Here, we describe an assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the soft-agar assay. Using GILA, we describe high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. Such molecules are unlikely to be found through conventional drug screening, and they include kinase inhibitors and drugs for noncancer diseases. In addition to known oncogenes, the genetic screen identifies genes that contribute to cellular transformation. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of Food and Drug Administration-approved noncancer drugs to selectively kill ovarian cancer cells derived from patients with chemotherapy-resistant disease, suggesting this approach may provide useful information for personalized cancer treatment. PMID:25902495

  18. Quantitative digital image analysis of chromogenic assays for high throughput screening of alpha-amylase mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Manoharan; Priyadharshini, Ramachandran; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis-based method for high throughput screening of an alpha-amylase mutant library using chromogenic assays was developed. Assays were performed in microplates and high resolution images of the assay plates were read using the Virtual Microplate Reader (VMR) script to quantify the concentration of the chromogen. This method is fast and sensitive in quantifying 0.025-0.3 mg starch/ml as well as 0.05-0.75 mg glucose/ml. It was also an effective screening method for improved alpha-amylase activity with a coefficient of variance of 18%.

  19. Development and implementation of a high-throughput compound screening assay for targeting disrupted ER calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Honarnejad

    Full Text Available Disrupted intracellular calcium homeostasis is believed to occur early in the cascade of events leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Particularly familial AD mutations linked to Presenilins result in exaggerated agonist-evoked calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Here we report the development of a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay utilizing a genetically-encoded FRET-based calcium indicator at single cell resolution for compound screening. The established high-throughput screening assay offers several advantages over conventional high-throughput calcium imaging technologies. We employed this assay for drug discovery in AD by screening compound libraries consisting of over 20,000 small molecules followed by structure-activity-relationship analysis. This led to the identification of Bepridil, a calcium channel antagonist drug in addition to four further lead structures capable of normalizing the potentiated FAD-PS1-induced calcium release from ER. Interestingly, it has recently been reported that Bepridil can reduce Aβ production by lowering BACE1 activity. Indeed, we also detected lowered Aβ, increased sAPPα and decreased sAPPβ fragment levels upon Bepridil treatment. The latter findings suggest that Bepridil may provide a multifactorial therapeutic modality for AD by simultaneously addressing multiple aspects of the disease.

  20. High-throughput clone screening followed by protein expression cross-check: A visual assay platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Partha Pratim; Kumar, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    In high-throughput biotechnology and structural biology, molecular cloning is an essential prerequisite for attaining high yields of recombinant protein. However, a rapid, cost-effective, easy clone screening protocol is still required to identify colonies with desired insert along with a cross check method to certify the expression of the desired protein as the end product. We report an easy, fast, sensitive and cheap visual clone screening and protein expression cross check protocol employing gold nanoparticle based plasmonic detection phenomenon. This is a non-gel, non-PCR based visual detection technique, which can be used as simultaneous high throughput clone screening followed by the determination of expression of desired protein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A high throughput solubility assay for drug discovery using microscale shake-flask and rapid UHPLC-UV-CLND quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Baiwei; Pease, Joseph H

    2016-04-15

    The rapid determination of key physical properties of lead compounds is essential to the drug discovery process. Solubility is one of the most important properties since good solubility is needed not only for obtaining reliable in vitro and in vivo assay results in early discovery but also to ensure sufficient concentration of the drug being in circulation to get the desired therapeutic exposure at the target of interest. In order for medicinal chemists to tune solubility of lead compounds, a rapid assay is needed to provide solubility data that is accurate and predictive so that it can be reliably used for designing the next generation of compounds with improved properties. To ensure speed and data quality, we developed a high throughput solubility assay that utilizes a single calibration UHPLC-UV-CLND method and a 24h shake-flask format for rapid quantification. A set of 46 model compounds was used to demonstrate that the method is accurate, reproducible and predictive. Here we present development of the assay, including evaluation of quantification method, filtration membranes, equilibrium times, DMSO concentrations, and buffer conditions. A comparison of thermodynamic solubility results to our high throughput 24h shake-flask solubility assay results is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Luo, Kathy Qian, E-mail: kluo@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  3. High-Throughput Yeast-Based Reporter Assay to Identify Compounds with Anti-inflammatory Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G; Santos, C Nunes do; Menezes, R

    2016-01-01

    The association between altered proteostasis and inflammatory responses has been increasingly recognized, therefore the identification and characterization of novel compounds with anti-inflammatory potential will certainly have a great impact in the therapeutics of protein-misfolding diseases such as degenerative disorders. Although cell-based screens are powerful approaches to identify potential therapeutic compounds, establishing robust inflammation models amenable to high-throughput screening remains a challenge. To bridge this gap, we have exploited the use of yeasts as a platform to identify lead compounds with anti-inflammatory properties. The yeast cell model described here relies on the high-degree homology between mammalian and yeast Ca(2+)/calcineurin pathways converging into the activation of NFAT and Crz1 orthologous proteins, respectively. It consists of a recombinant yeast strain encoding the lacZ gene under the control of Crz1-recongition elements to facilitate the identification of compounds interfering with Crz1 activation through the easy monitoring of β-galactosidase activity. Here, we describe in detail a protocol optimized for high-throughput screening of compounds with potential anti-inflammatory activity as well as a protocol to validate the positive hits using an alternative β-galactosidase substrate.

  4. Validation of a high-throughput real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of capripoxviral DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Samuel; Oura, Chris A L; Henstock, Mark; Bowden, Timothy R; King, Donald P; Tuppurainen, Eeva S M

    2012-02-01

    Capripoxviruses, which are endemic in much of Africa and Asia, are the aetiological agents of economically devastating poxviral diseases in cattle, sheep and goats. The aim of this study was to validate a high-throughput real-time PCR assay for routine diagnostic use in a capripoxvirus reference laboratory. The performance of two previously published real-time PCR methods were compared using commercially available reagents including the amplification kits recommended in the original publication. Furthermore, both manual and robotic extraction methods used to prepare template nucleic acid were evaluated using samples collected from experimentally infected animals. The optimised assay had an analytical sensitivity of at least 63 target DNA copies per reaction, displayed a greater diagnostic sensitivity compared to conventional gel-based PCR, detected capripoxviruses isolated from outbreaks around the world and did not amplify DNA from related viruses in the genera Orthopoxvirus or Parapoxvirus. The high-throughput robotic DNA extraction procedure did not adversely affect the sensitivity of the assay compared to manual preparation of PCR templates. This laboratory-based assay provides a rapid and robust method to detect capripoxviruses following suspicion of disease in endemic or disease-free countries. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of antifungal compounds active against Candida albicans using an improved high-throughput Caenorhabditis elegans assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikechukwu Okoli

    Full Text Available Candida albicans, the most common human pathogenic fungus, can establish a persistent lethal infection in the intestine of the microscopic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The C. elegans-C. albicans infection model was previously adapted to screen for antifungal compounds. Modifications to this screen have been made to facilitate a high-throughput assay including co-inoculation of nematodes with C. albicans and instrumentation allowing precise dispensing of worms into assay wells, eliminating two labor-intensive steps. This high-throughput method was utilized to screen a library of 3,228 compounds represented by 1,948 bioactive compounds and 1,280 small molecules derived via diversity-oriented synthesis. Nineteen compounds were identified that conferred an increase in C. elegans survival, including most known antifungal compounds within the chemical library. In addition to seven clinically used antifungal compounds, twelve compounds were identified which are not primarily used as antifungal agents, including three immunosuppressive drugs. This assay also allowed the assessment of the relative minimal inhibitory concentration, the effective concentration in vivo, and the toxicity of the compound in a single assay.

  6. Development and validation of a high-throughput calcium mobilization assay for the orphan receptor GPR88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ann M; Gay, Elaine A; Mathews, Kelly M; Rosa, Taylor C; Langston, Tiffany L; Maitra, Rangan; Jin, Chunyang

    2017-03-27

    GPR88 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in the striatum and is implicated in basal ganglia-associated disorders. However, the receptor functions of GPR88 are still largely unknown due to the lack of potent and selective ligands appropriate for central nervous system investigation. Development of a high-throughput screening assay for GPR88 should facilitate the discovery of novel ligands to probe GPR88 functions. In this paper, we describe the development of a CHO-Gα qi5 -GPR88 cell-based calcium mobilization assay. The assay takes advantage of functional coupling of GPR88 with the promiscuous Gα qi5 protein and consequent mobilization of intracellular calcium, which can be measured in a 384-well format with a Fluorescent Imaging Plate Reader. The CHO-Gα qi5 -GPR88 cell-based calcium mobilization assay was validated by the structure-activity relationship study of known GPR88 agonist (1R,2R)-2-PCCA analogues. The assay was automated and miniaturized to a 384-well format, and was deemed robust and reproducible with a Z'-factor of 0.72 and tolerated dimethyl sulfoxide to a final concentration of 2%. Screening a pilot neurotransmitter library consisting of 228 compounds yielded 10 hits, but none of the hits were confirmed as GPR88 agonists in follow-up assays. We have developed a high-throughput calcium mobilization assay for the orphan receptor GPR88. This calcium mobilization assay can be used to identify several different types of GPR88 ligands including agonists, competitive and noncompetitive antagonists, inverse agonists, and allosteric modulators. These ligands will serve as valuable tools to probe signaling mechanisms and in vivo functions of GPR88, and could expedite development of novel therapies for diseases potentially mediated by GPR88.

  7. Testing candidate genes for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in fruit flies using a high throughput assay for complex behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Madsen, Lisbeth Strøm; Arvidson, Sandra Marie Neumann

    2016-01-01

    Fruit flies are important model organisms for functional testing of candidate genes in multiple disciplines, including the study of human diseases. Here we use a high-throughput locomotor activity assay to test the response on activity behavior of gene disruption in Drosophila melanogaster. The aim...... was to investigate the impact of disruption of 14 candidate genes for human attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on fly behavior. By obtaining a range of correlated measures describing the space of variables for behavioral activity we show, that some mutants display similar phenotypic responses...... in fruit flies. Results provide additional support for the investigated genes being risk candidate genes for ADHD in humans....

  8. A universal indicator dye pH assay for crystallization solutions and other high-throughput applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Janet; Sayle, Roger A; Fazio, Vincent J

    2012-08-01

    In protein crystallization, as well as in many other fields, it is known that the pH at which experiments are performed is often the key factor in the success or failure of the trials. With the trend towards plate-based high-throughput experimental techniques, measuring the pH values of solutions one by one becomes prohibitively time- and reagent-expensive. As part of an HT crystallization facility, a colour-based pH assay that is rapid, uses very little reagent and is suitable for 96-well or higher density plates has been developed.

  9. Improved high-throughput quantification of luminescent microplate assays using a common Western-blot imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Liam J; Storey, Kenneth B

    2017-01-01

    Common Western-blot imaging systems have previously been adapted to measure signals from luminescent microplate assays. This can be a cost saving measure as Western-blot imaging systems are common laboratory equipment and could substitute a dedicated luminometer if one is not otherwise available. One previously unrecognized limitation is that the signals captured by the cameras in these systems are not equal for all wells. Signals are dependent on the angle of incidence to the camera, and thus the location of the well on the microplate. Here we show that: •The position of a well on a microplate significantly affects the signal captured by a common Western-blot imaging system from a luminescent assay.•The effect of well position can easily be corrected for.•This method can be applied to commercially available luminescent assays, allowing for high-throughput quantification of a wide range of biological processes and biochemical reactions.

  10. A novel high-throughput vaccinia virus neutralization assay and preexisting immunity in populations from different geographic regions in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV neutralization assay that used the attenuated replication-competent VTT carrying the firefly luciferase gene of Photinus pyralis (rTV-Fluc was established and standardized for critical parameters that included the choice of cell line, viral infection dose, and the infection time. The current study evaluated the maintenance of virus-specific immunity after smallpox vaccination by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis of antiviral antibody-mediated immune responses in volunteers examined 30-55 years after vaccination. The rTV-Fluc neutralization assay was able to detect neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against Vaccinia virus without the ability to differentiate strains of Vaccinia virus. We showed that the neutralizing titers measured by our assay were similar to those obtained by the traditional plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT. Using this assay, we found a low prevalence of NAb to VTT (7.6% in individuals born before 1980 from Beijing and Anhui provinces in China, and when present, anti-VTT NAb titers were low. No NAbs were detected in all 222 samples from individuals born after 1980. There was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender, age range and geographic origin. CONCLUSION: A simplified, sensitive, standardized, reproducible, and high-throughput assay was developed for the quantitation of NAbs against different Vaccinia strains. The current study provides useful insights for the future development of VTT-based vaccination in

  11. A low cost and high throughput magnetic bead-based immuno-agglutination assay in confined droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teste, Bruno; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Viovy, Jean Louis; Malaquin, Laurent

    2013-06-21

    Although passive immuno-agglutination assays consist of one step and simple procedures, they are usually not adapted for high throughput analyses and they require expensive and bulky equipment for quantitation steps. Here we demonstrate a low cost, multimodal and high throughput immuno-agglutination assay that relies on a combination of magnetic beads (MBs), droplets microfluidics and magnetic tweezers. Antibody coated MBs were used as a capture support in the homogeneous phase. Following the immune interaction, water in oil droplets containing MBs and analytes were generated and transported in Teflon tubing. When passing in between magnetic tweezers, the MBs contained in the droplets were magnetically confined in order to enhance the agglutination rate and kinetics. When releasing the magnetic field, the internal recirculation flows in the droplet induce shear forces that favor MBs redispersion. In the presence of the analyte, the system preserves specific interactions and MBs stay in the aggregated state while in the case of a non-specific analyte, redispersion of particles occurs. The analyte quantitation procedure relies on the MBs redispersion rate within the droplet. The influence of different parameters such as magnetic field intensity, flow rate and MBs concentration on the agglutination performances have been investigated and optimized. Although the immuno-agglutination assay described in this work may not compete with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in terms of sensitivity, it offers major advantages regarding the reagents consumption (analysis is performed in sub microliter droplet) and the platform cost that yields to very cheap analyses. Moreover the fully automated analysis procedure provides reproducible analyses with throughput well above those of existing technologies. We demonstrated the detection of biotinylated phosphatase alkaline in 100 nL sample volumes with an analysis rate of 300 assays per hour and a limit of detection of 100 pM.

  12. Implementation of a high-throughput ion chromatographic assay to assess glass degradation in drug product formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumangalathu, Renuka; Wong, Kwun Ngok; Coultas, James; Hair, Alison; Piedmonte, Deirdre Murphy

    2015-01-01

    The primary container for parenterals is usually composed of glass. Given the recent industry-wide spike in glass-related problems, assays capable of detecting glass degradation before glass-related particles are visible in solution have practical significance. A rapid, high-throughput ion chromatography method coupled with molybdate reaction is described here for detection and quantitation of silicic acid (soluble form of silica) in complex samples. The method involves ion exchange separation of the silicate anion at high pH followed by a post-column derivatization step with sodium molybdate reagent. The resulting molybdo-silicate complex is detected with high sensitivity in the visible wavelength range at 410 nm and correlates to the level of soluble silica in solution. This assay is high-throughput and amenable for implementation during the early phase of product development. The assay provides a direct measurement to assess potential incompatibility between the formulation and its glass container. The Si levels measured by this method showed a direct correlation to the vial surface morphology changes as monitored by differential interference contrast microscopy. Recently, the pharmaceutical industry has been faced with glass quality challenges that have resulted in many products being recalled from the market. Monitoring levels of soluble silica in solution is critical because silica is the primary component of glass containers used in the pharmaceutical industry. Given this recent industry-wide increase in glass-related problems, assays capable of detecting glass degradation before glass-related particles are visible in solution have practical significance. A rapid assay to detect the soluble form of silica is presented here. The method presented will enable earlier detection of a formulation and container incompatibility instead of waiting until glass-related particles are visible in solution. © PDA, Inc. 2015.

  13. A high-throughput colorimetric screening assay for terpene synthase activity based on substrate consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Furubayashi

    Full Text Available Terpene synthases catalyze the formation of a variety of terpene chemical structures. Systematic mutagenesis studies have been effective in providing insights into the characteristic and complex mechanisms of C-C bond formations and in exploring the enzymatic potential for inventing new chemical structures. In addition, there is growing demand to increase terpene synthase activity in heterologous hosts, given the maturation of metabolic engineering and host breeding for terpenoid synthesis. We have developed a simple screening method for the cellular activities of terpene synthases by scoring their substrate consumption based on the color loss of the cell harboring carotenoid pathways. We demonstrate that this method can be used to detect activities of various terpene synthase or prenyltransferase genes in a high-throughput manner, irrespective of the product type, enabling the mutation analysis and directed evolution of terpene synthases. We also report the possibility for substrate-specific screening system of terpene synthases by taking advantage of the substrate-size specificity of C30 and C40 carotenoid pathways.

  14. A Fluorescence-Based High-Throughput Coupled Enzymatic Assay for Quantitation of Isoaspartate in Proteins and Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Aastha; Quan, Yong; Narang, Ajit S; Adams, Monica; Gandhi, Rajesh; Nashine, Vishal C

    2017-04-01

    Formation of isoaspartate (IsoAsp) from spontaneous asparagine (Asn) deamidation or aspartate (Asp) isomerization is one of the most common non-enzymatic pathways of chemical degradation of protein and peptide pharmaceuticals. Rapid quantitation of IsoAsp formation can enable rank-ordering of potential drug candidates, mutants, and formulations as well as support shelf life prediction and stability requirements. A coupled enzymatic fluorescence-based IsoAsp assay (CEFIA) was developed as a high-throughput method for quantitation of IsoAsp in peptides and proteins. In this note, application of this method to two therapeutic candidate proteins with distinct structural scaffolds is described. In addition, the results obtained with this method are compared to those from conventional assays.

  15. Peptide Binding to HLA Class I Molecules: Homogenous, High-Throughput Screening, and Affinity Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    present a homogenous, proximity-based assay for detection of peptide binding to HLA class I molecules. It uses a conformation-dependent anti-HLA class I antibody, W6/32, as one tag and a biotinylated recombinant HLA class I molecule as the other tag, and a proximity-based signal is generated through...... the luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassay technology (abbreviated LOCI and commercialized as AlphaScreen (TM)). Compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based peptide-HLA class I binding assay, the LOCI assay yields virtually identical affinity measurements, although having a broader dynamic range...

  16. Ribonuclease activity of vaccinia DNA topoisomerase IB: kinetic and high-throughput inhibition studies using a robust continuous fluorescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Keehwan; Nagarajan, Rajesh; Stivers, James T

    2004-11-30

    Vaccinia type I DNA topoisomerase exhibits a strong site-specific ribonuclease activity when provided a DNA substrate that contains a single uridine ribonucleotide within a duplex DNA containing the sequence 5' CCCTU 3'. The reaction involves two steps: attack of the active site tyrosine nucleophile of topo I at the 3' phosphodiester of the uridine nucleotide to generate a covalent enzyme-DNA adduct, followed by nucleophilic attack of the uridine 2'-hydroxyl to release the covalently tethered enzyme. Here we report the first continuous spectroscopic assay for topoisomerase that allows monitoring of the ribonuclease reaction under multiple-turnover conditions. The assay is especially robust for high-throughput screening applications because sensitive molecular beacon technology is utilized, and the topoisomerase is released during the reaction to allow turnover of multiple substrate molecules by a single molecule of enzyme. Direct computer simulation of the fluorescence time courses was used to obtain the rate constants for substrate binding and release, covalent complex formation, and formation of the 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiester product of the ribonuclease reaction. The assay allowed rapid screening of a 500 member chemical library from which several new inhibitors of topo I were identified with IC(50) values in the range of 2-100 microM. Three of the most potent hits from the high-throughput screening were also found to inhibit plasmid supercoil relaxation by the enzyme, establishing the utility of the assay in identifying inhibitors of the biologically relevant DNA relaxation reaction. One of the most potent inhibitors of the vaccinia enzyme, 3-benzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl-2-oxoproprionic acid, did not inhibit the closely related human enzyme. The inhibitory mechanism of this compound is unique and involves a step required for recycling the enzyme for steady-state turnover.

  17. A high throughput in vivo assay for taste quality and palatability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kyle Palmer

    Full Text Available Taste quality and palatability are two of the most important properties measured in the evaluation of taste stimuli. Human panels can report both aspects, but are of limited experimental flexibility and throughput capacity. Relatively efficient animal models for taste evaluation have been developed, but each of them is designed to measure either taste quality or palatability as independent experimental endpoints. We present here a new apparatus and method for high throughput quantification of both taste quality and palatability using rats in an operant taste discrimination paradigm. Cohorts of four rats were trained in a modified operant chamber to sample taste stimuli by licking solutions from a 96-well plate that moved in a randomized pattern beneath the chamber floor. As a rat's tongue entered the well it disrupted a laser beam projecting across the top of the 96-well plate, consequently producing two retractable levers that operated a pellet dispenser. The taste of sucrose was associated with food reinforcement by presses on a sucrose-designated lever, whereas the taste of water and other basic tastes were associated with the alternative lever. Each disruption of the laser was counted as a lick. Using this procedure, rats were trained to discriminate 100 mM sucrose from water, quinine, citric acid, and NaCl with 90-100% accuracy. Palatability was determined by the number of licks per trial and, due to intermediate rates of licking for water, was quantifiable along the entire spectrum of appetitiveness to aversiveness. All 96 samples were evaluated within 90 minute test sessions with no evidence of desensitization or fatigue. The technology is capable of generating multiple concentration-response functions within a single session, is suitable for in vivo primary screening of tastant libraries, and potentially can be used to evaluate stimuli for any taste system.

  18. High-throughput assay for the identification of compounds regulating osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Alves

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stromal cells are regarded as the golden standard for cell-based therapies. They present multilineage differentiation potential and trophic and immunosuppressive abilities, making them the best candidate for clinical applications. Several molecules have been described to increase bone formation and were mainly discovered by candidate approaches towards known signaling pathways controlling osteogenesis. However, their bone forming potential is still limited, making the search for novel molecules a necessity. High-throughput screening (HTS not only allows the screening of a large number of diverse chemical compounds, but also allows the discovery of unexpected signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms for a certain application, even without the prior knowledge of the full molecular pathway. Typically HTS is performed in cell lines, however, in this manuscript we have performed a phenotypical screen on more clinically relevant human mesenchymal stromal cells, as a proof of principle that HTS can be performed in those cells and can be used to find small molecules that impact stem cell fate. From a library of pharmacologically active small molecules, we were able to identify novel compounds with increased osteogenic activity. These compounds allowed achieving levels of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase higher than any other combination previously known. By combining biochemical techniques, we were able to demonstrate that a medium to high-throughput phenotypic assay can be performed in academic research laboratories allowing the discovery of novel molecules able to enhance stem cell differentiation.

  19. Is the Comet Assay a Sensitive Procedure for Detecting Genotoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satomi; Nakamura, Takanori; Yamamoto, Ayumi; Honda, Gisho; Sasaki, Yu F.

    2010-01-01

    Although the Comet assay, a procedure for quantitating DNA damage in mammalian cells, is considered sensitive, it has never been ascertained that its sensitivity is higher than the sensitivity of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells. To determine whether the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to those of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells, we compared the results of Comet assay with those of micronucleus test (MN test). WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells were exposed to methyl nitrosourea (MNU), ethyl nitrosourea (ENU), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), bleomycin (BLM), or UVC. In Comet assay, cells were exposed to each mutagen with (Comet assay/araC) and without (Comet assay) DNA repair inhibitors (araC and hydroxyurea). Furthermore, acellular Comet assay (acellular assay) was performed to determine how single-strand breaks (SSBs) as the initial damage contributes to DNA migration and/or to micronucleus formation. The lowest genotoxic dose (LGD), which is defined as the lowest dose at which each mutagen causes a positive response on each genotoxicity assay, was used to compare the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential and that of MN test; that is, a low LGD indicates a high power. Results are summarized as follows: (1) for all mutagens studied, LGDs were MN test ≦ Comet assay; (2) except for BLM, LGDs were Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test; (3) except for UVC and MNU, LGDs were acellular assay ≦ Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test ≦ Comet assay. The following is suggested by the present findings: (1) LGD in the Comet assay is higher than that in MN test, which suggests that the power of the MN test to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to that of the Comet assay; (2) for the studied mutagens, all assays were able to detect all mutagens correctly, which suggests that the sensitivity of the Comet assay and that of the MN test were

  20. Comparative analysis and validation of the malachite green assay for the high throughput biochemical characterization of terpene synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardakou, Maria; Salmon, Melissa; Faraldos, Juan A; O'Maille, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    Terpenes are the largest group of natural products with important and diverse biological roles, while of tremendous economic value as fragrances, flavours and pharmaceutical agents. Class-I terpene synthases (TPSs), the dominant type of TPS enzymes, catalyze the conversion of prenyl diphosphates to often structurally diverse bioactive terpene hydrocarbons, and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). To measure their kinetic properties, current bio-analytical methods typically rely on the direct detection of hydrocarbon products by radioactivity measurements or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In this study we employed an established, rapid colorimetric assay, the pyrophosphate/malachite green assay (MG), as an alternative means for the biochemical characterization of class I TPSs activity.•We describe the adaptation of the MG assay for turnover and catalytic efficiency measurements of TPSs.•We validate the method by direct comparison with established assays. The agreement of k cat/K M among methods makes this adaptation optimal for rapid evaluation of TPSs.•We demonstrate the application of the MG assay for the high-throughput screening of TPS gene libraries.

  1. Micropatterned comet assay enables high throughput and sensitive DNA damage quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Chow, Danielle N; Fessler, Jessica L; Weingeist, David M; Wood, David K; Engelward, Bevin P

    2015-01-01

    The single cell gel electrophoresis assay, also known as the comet assay, is a versatile method for measuring many classes of DNA damage, including base damage, abasic sites, single strand breaks and double strand breaks. However, limited throughput and difficulties with reproducibility have limited its utility, particularly for clinical and epidemiological studies. To address these limitations, we created a microarray comet assay. The use of a micrometer scale array of cells increases the number of analysable comets per square centimetre and enables automated imaging and analysis. In addition, the platform is compatible with standard 24- and 96-well plate formats. Here, we have assessed the consistency and sensitivity of the microarray comet assay. We showed that the linear detection range for H2O2-induced DNA damage in human lymphoblastoid cells is between 30 and 100 μM, and that within this range, inter-sample coefficient of variance was between 5 and 10%. Importantly, only 20 comets were required to detect a statistically significant induction of DNA damage for doses within the linear range. We also evaluated sample-to-sample and experiment-to-experiment variation and found that for both conditions, the coefficient of variation was lower than what has been reported for the traditional comet assay. Finally, we also show that the assay can be performed using a 4× objective (rather than the standard 10× objective for the traditional assay). This adjustment combined with the microarray format makes it possible to capture more than 50 analysable comets in a single image, which can then be automatically analysed using in-house software. Overall, throughput is increased more than 100-fold compared to the traditional assay. Together, the results presented here demonstrate key advances in comet assay technology that improve the throughput, sensitivity, and robustness, thus enabling larger scale clinical and epidemiological studies. © The Author 2014. Published by

  2. Design of a high-throughput assay for alternative splicing using polymerase colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, J D; Souvenir, R M; Zhang, W; Mitra, R D

    2004-01-01

    We propose an assay to detect and quantify alternative splicing simultaneously for numerous genes in a pool of cellular mRNA. The assay exploits polymerase colonies, a recently developed method for sampling and amplifying large numbers of individual transcript molecules into discrete spots on a gel. The proposed assay combines the advantages of microarrays for transcript quantitation with the sensitivity and precision of methods based on counting single transcript molecules. Given a collection of spots s(i), each containing an unknown splice variant of some known gene G(i), we design a series of hybridizations to short oligonucleotide probes to determine in parallel which exons of G(i) are present in every spot s(i). We give algorithms to minimize the cost of such designs.

  3. An improved high-throughput screening assay for tunicamycin sensitivity in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie E McCormack

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tunicamycin sensitivity assays are a useful method for studies of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response in eukaryotic cells. While tunicamycin sensitivity and tunicamycin recovery assays have been previously described, these existing methods are time-consuming, labor intensive and subjected to mechanical wounding. This study shows an improved method of testing tunicamycin sensitivity in Arabidopsis using liquid Murashige and Skoog medium versus the traditional solid agar plates. Liquid medium bypasses the physical manipulation of seedlings, thereby eliminating the risk of potential mechanical damage and additional unwanted stress to seedlings. Seedlings were subjected to comparative treatments with various concentrations of tunicamycin on both solid and liquid media and allowed to recover. Determination of fresh weight, chlorophyll contents analysis and qRT-PCR results confirm the efficacy of using liquid medium to perform quantitative tunicamycin stress assays.

  4. Development of a high-throughput colorimetric Zika virus infection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Janis A; Harms, Mirja; Schubert, Axel; Mayer, Benjamin; Jansen, Stephanie; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe; Michel, Detlef; Mertens, Thomas; Vapalahti, Olli; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Münch, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen that causes congenital infections which may result in birth defects, such as microcephaly. Currently, no approved treatment or vaccination is available. ZIKV can be readily detected in cell culture where virally infected cells are normally stained by specific antibodies. As ZIKV regularly causes a cytopathic effect, we were wondering whether this viral property can be used to quantitatively determine viral infectivity. We here describe the use of an 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide-(MTT)-based cell viability assay that allows to determine ZIKV-induced cell death. We show that this colorimetric assay quantifies ZIKV infection over a broad range of viral dilutions in both monkey and human cells. It allows to determine inhibitory activities of antivirals that block ZIKV or to define the neutralizing antibody titers of ZIKV antisera. This MTT-based ZIKV detection assay can be evaluated by naked eye or computational tools, has a broad linear range, does not require large equipment or costly reagents, and thus represents a promising alternative to antibody-based assays, in particular in resource-poor settings. We propose to use this simple, fast, and cheap method for quantification of ZIKV neutralizing antibodies and testing of antiviral compounds.

  5. A functional analysis of the CREB signaling pathway using HaloCHIP-chip and high throughput reporter assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldred Shelley F

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression is essential for normal development and cellular growth. Transcriptional events are tightly controlled both spatially and temporally by specific DNA-protein interactions. In this study we finely map the genome-wide targets of the CREB protein across all known and predicted human promoters, and characterize the functional consequences of a subset of these binding events using high-throughput reporter assays. To measure CREB binding, we used HaloCHIP, an antibody-free alternative to the ChIP method that utilizes the HaloTag fusion protein, and also high-throughput promoter-luciferase reporter assays, which provide rapid and quantitative screening of promoters for transcriptional activation or repression in living cells. Results In analysis of CREB genome-wide binding events using a comprehensive DNA microarray of human promoters, we observe for the first time that CREB has a strong preference for binding at bidirectional promoters and unlike unidirectional promoters, these binding events often occur downstream of transcription start sites. Comparison between HaloCHIP-chip and ChIP-chip data reveal this to be true for both methodologies, indicating it is not a bias of the technology chosen. Transcriptional data obtained from promoter-luciferase reporter arrays also show an unprecedented, high level of activation of CREB-bound promoters in the presence of the co-activator protein TORC1. Conclusion These data suggest for the first time that TORC1 provides directional information when CREB is bound at bidirectional promoters and possible pausing of the CREB protein after initial transcriptional activation. Also, this combined approach demonstrates the ability to more broadly characterize CREB protein-DNA interactions wherein not only DNA binding sites are discovered, but also the potential of the promoter sequence to respond to CREB is evaluated.

  6. Development of a fluorescent microsphere-based multiplexed high-throughput assay system for profiling of transcription factor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Takuro; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs), which play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in the human genome, are highly regulated by a variety of mechanisms. A single extracellular stimulus can trigger multiple signaling pathways, and these in turn can activate multiple TFs to mediate the inducible expression of target genes. Alterations in the activities of TFs are often associated with human diseases, such as altered activating factor 1, estrogen receptor, and p53 function in cancer, nuclear factor kappaB in inflammatory diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in obesity. A systematic assay for profiling the activation of TFs will aid in elucidating the mechanisms of TF activation, reveal altered TFs associated with human diseases, and aid in developing assays for drug discovery. Here, we developed a 24-plex fluorescent microsphere-based TF activation assay system with a 96-well plate format. The assay system enabled high-throughput profiling of the DNA binding activity of TFs in multiple samples with high sensitivity.

  7. A high-throughput, homogeneous microplate assay for agents that kill mammalian tissue culture cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Michael; Wang, Chunwei; Rebentisch, Matt; Endo, Mark; Stump, Mark; Kamb, Alexander

    2003-06-01

    Screens for cytostasis/cytoxicity have considerable value for the discovery of therapeutic agents and the investigation of the biology of apoptosis. For instance, genetic screens for proteins, protein fragments, peptides, RNAs, or chemicals that kill tissue culture cells may aid in identifying new cancer therapeutic targets. A microplate assay for cell death is needed to achieve throughputs sufficient to sift through thousands of agents from expression or chemical libraries. The authors describe a homogeneous assay for cell death in tissue culture cells compatible with 96- or 384-well plates. In combination with a previously described system for retroviral packaging and transduction, nearly 6000 expression library clones could be screened per week in a 96-well plate format. The screening system may also prove useful for chemical screens.

  8. A high-throughput, modified ALS activity assay for Cyperus difformis and Schoenoplectus mucronatus seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Rafael M; Al-Khatib, Kassim; Hanson, Bradley D; Fischer, Albert J

    2017-01-01

    Cyperus difformis L. (CYPDI) and Schoenoplectus mucronatus (L.) Palla (SCHMU) are major weeds of California (CA) rice, where resistance to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibitors was identified in several CYPDI and SCHMU populations that have also evolved resistance to photosystem II (PSII)-inhibiting herbicides. The mechanism of ALS resistance in these populations remains to be clarified but this information is crucial in a weed management program, especially in a scenario where resistance to multiple herbicides has been identified. ALS activity assays are commonly used to diagnose resistance to ALS-inhibitors, but protocols currently available are burdensome for the study of CYPDI and SCHMU, as they require large amounts of plant material from young seedlings and have low yields. Our objective was to investigate the ALS resistance mechanism in suspected ALS-resistant (R) CYPDI and SCHMU biotypes using a modified ALS activity assay that requires less plant material. ALS enzymes from suspected R biotypes were at least 10,000-fold less sensitive to bensulfuron-methyl than susceptible (S) cohorts, indicating ALS resistance that is likely due to an altered target-site. Protein concentration (mgg(-1) tissue) did not differ between R and S biotypes within each species, suggesting that R biotypes do not over produce ALS enzymes. CYPDI biotypes had up to 4-fold more protein per mg of tissue than SCHMU biotypes, but up to 7-fold more acetoin per mg(-1) protein was quantified in SCHMU, suggesting greater ALS catalytic ability in SCHMU biotypes, regardless of their herbicide resistance status. Our optimized protocol to measure ALS activity allowed for up to a 3-fold increase in the number of assays performed per g of leaf tissue. The modified assay may be useful for measuring ALS activity in other weed species that also produce small amount of foliage in early growth stages when protein in tissue is most abundant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a novel 96-microwell assay with high throughput for determination of olmesartan medoxomil in its tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwish Ibrahim A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel 96-microwell-based spectrophotometric assay has been developed and validated for determination of olmesartan medoxomil (OLM in tablets. The formation of a colored charge-transfer (CT complex between OLM as a n-electron donor and 2, 5-dichloro-3, 6-dihydroxy-1, 4-benzoquinone (p-chloranilic acid, pCA as a π-electron acceptor was investigated, for the first time, and employed as a basis in the development of the proposed assay. The proposed assay was carried out in 96-microwell plates. The absorbance of the colored-CT complex was measured at 490 nm by microwell-plate absorbance reader. The optimum conditions of the reaction and the analytical procedures of the assay were established. Under the optimum conditions, linear relationship with good correlation coefficient was found between the absorbance and the concentration of OLM in the range of 1-200 μg ml-1. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.3 and 1 μg ml-1, respectively. No interference was observed from the additives that are present in the pharmaceutical formulation or from hydrochlorothiazide and amlodipine that are co-formulated with OLM in some formulations. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of OLM in tablets with good accuracy and precision. The assay described herein has great practical value in the routine analysis of OLM in quality control laboratories, as it has high throughput property, consumes minimum volume of organic solvent thus it offers the reduction in the exposures of the analysts to the toxic effects of organic solvents, and reduction in the analysis cost by 50-fold. Although the proposed assay was validated for OLM, however, the same methodology could be used for any electron-donating analyte for which a CT reaction can be performed.

  10. Multiplex mRNA assay using electrophoretic tags for high-throughput gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Huan; Cao, Liching; Tan, Yuping; Williams, Stephen; Chen, Lili; Matray, Tracy; Chenna, Ahmed; Moore, Sean; Hernandez, Vincent; Xiao, Vivian; Tang, Mengxiang; Singh, Sharat

    2004-01-01

    We describe a novel multiplexing technology using a library of small fluorescent molecules, termed eTag molecules, to code and quantify mRNA targets. eTag molecules, which have the same fluorometric property, but distinct charge-to-mass ratios possess pre-defined electrophoretic characteristics and can be resolved using capillary electrophoresis. Coupled with primary Invader® mRNA assay, eTag molecules were applied to simultaneously quantify up to 44 mRNA targets. This multiplexing approach w...

  11. Colorimetric determination of fructose for the high-throughput microtiter plate assay of glucose isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Hajime; Takakuwa, Masahiro; Itoh, Takafumi; Hibi, Takao

    2015-01-01

    A colorimetric method for the reducing monosaccharide determination is optimized for the assay of glucose isomerase, which converts glucose (Glc) to fructose (Fru). Test solution was mixed with 20-fold volume of the 50 mM Na2SiO3, 600 mM Na2MoO4, and 0.95 M HCl aqueous solution (pH 4.5), in which a yellow molybdosilicate species was formed. The mixture was kept at 70 °C for 30 min. Test solution containing 10 mM level Fru gave a remarkable blue reaction mixture, in which the Mo(VI) species was reduced by Fru to form a blue molybdosilicate species. The blueness increased with the Fru concentration. Glc cannot render the reaction mixture blue as strong as Fru. Thus, the colorimetric method can be used advantageously for the determination of 10 mM level Fru in the Glc isomerase reaction mixture, even in the presence of 100 mM level Glc, and has been applied successfully to the microtiter plate assay of the enzyme.

  12. Src homology 2 domain-based high throughput assays for profiling downstream molecules in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Takuro; Chamnongpol, Sangpen; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-05-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are evolutionary conserved small protein modules that bind specifically to tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. More than 100 SH2 domains have been identified in proteins encoded by the human genome. The binding specificity of these domains plays a critical role in signaling within the cell, mediating the relocalization and interaction of proteins in response to changes in tyrosine phosphorylation states. Here we developed an SH2 domain profiling method based on a multiplexed fluorescent microsphere assay in which various SH2 domains are used to probe the global state of tyrosine phosphorylation within a cell and to screen synthetic peptides that specifically bind to each SH2 domain. The multiplexed, fluorescent microsphere-based assay is a recently developed technology that can potentially detect a wide variety of interactions between biological molecules. We constructed 25-plex SH2 domain-GST fusion protein-conjugated fluorescent microsphere sets to investigate phosphorylation-mediated cell signaling through the specific binding of SH2 domains to activated target proteins. The response of HeLa, COS-1, A431, and 293 cells and four breast cancer cell lines to epidermal growth factor and insulin were quantitatively profiled using this novel microsphere-based, multiplexed, high throughput assay system.

  13. Automated reporter quantification in vivo: high-throughput screening method for reporter-based assays in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven L; Ariga, Junko; Mathias, Jonathan R; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Xie, Xiayang; Distel, Martin; Köster, Reinhard W; Parsons, Michael J; Bhalla, Kapil N; Saxena, Meera T; Mumm, Jeff S

    2012-01-01

    Reporter-based assays underlie many high-throughput screening (HTS) platforms, but most are limited to in vitro applications. Here, we report a simple whole-organism HTS method for quantifying changes in reporter intensity in individual zebrafish over time termed, Automated Reporter Quantification in vivo (ARQiv). ARQiv differs from current "high-content" (e.g., confocal imaging-based) whole-organism screening technologies by providing a purely quantitative data acquisition approach that affords marked improvements in throughput. ARQiv uses a fluorescence microplate reader with specific detection functionalities necessary for robust quantification of reporter signals in vivo. This approach is: 1) Rapid; achieving true HTS capacities (i.e., >50,000 units per day), 2) Reproducible; attaining HTS-compatible assay quality (i.e., Z'-factors of ≥0.5), and 3) Flexible; amenable to nearly any reporter-based assay in zebrafish embryos, larvae, or juveniles. ARQiv is used here to quantify changes in: 1) Cell number; loss and regeneration of two different fluorescently tagged cell types (pancreatic beta cells and rod photoreceptors), 2) Cell signaling; relative activity of a transgenic Notch-signaling reporter, and 3) Cell metabolism; accumulation of reactive oxygen species. In summary, ARQiv is a versatile and readily accessible approach facilitating evaluation of genetic and/or chemical manipulations in living zebrafish that complements current "high-content" whole-organism screening methods by providing a first-tier in vivo HTS drug discovery platform.

  14. PubChem BioAssay: A Decade's Development toward Open High-Throughput Screening Data Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Cheng, Tiejun; Bryant, Stephen H

    2017-07-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is now routinely conducted for drug discovery by both pharmaceutical companies and screening centers at academic institutions and universities. Rapid advance in assay development, robot automation, and computer technology has led to the generation of terabytes of data in screening laboratories. Despite the technology development toward HTS productivity, fewer efforts were devoted to HTS data integration and sharing. As a result, the huge amount of HTS data was rarely made available to the public. To fill this gap, the PubChem BioAssay database ( https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pcassay/ ) was set up in 2004 to provide open access to the screening results tested on chemicals and RNAi reagents. With more than 10 years' development and contributions from the community, PubChem has now become the largest public repository for chemical structures and biological data, which provides an information platform to worldwide researchers supporting drug development, medicinal chemistry study, and chemical biology research. This work presents a review of the HTS data content in the PubChem BioAssay database and the progress of data deposition to stimulate knowledge discovery and data sharing. It also provides a description of the database's data standard and basic utilities facilitating information access and use for new users.

  15. A high throughput Cre–lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Anthony M. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Cheung, Pamela [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Swartz, Talia H.; Li, Hongru [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Tsibane, Tshidi [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Durham, Natasha D. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Basler, Christopher F. [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Felsenfeld, Dan P. [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Benjamin K., E-mail: benjamin.chen@mssm.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes. - Highlights: • Cre recombinase viral fusion assay screens cell-free or cell–cell entry inhibitors. • This Gag-iCre based assay is specific for the entry step of HIV replication. • Screened a library of known pharmacologic compounds for HIV fusion antagonists. • Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but here are classified as entry antagonists. Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but not as entry antagonists. • The assay is compatible with pseudotyping with HIV and heterologous viruses.

  16. High throughput microwell spectrophotometric assay for olmesartan medoxomil in tablets based on its charge-transfer reaction with DDQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwish Ibrahim A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the development and validation of a new microwell-based spectrophotometric assay for determination of olmesartan medoxomil (OLM in tablets. The formation of a colored charge-transfer (CT complex between OLM as an n-electron donor and 2,3-dichloro- -5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ as a p-electron acceptor was investigated, and employed as the basis for the development of the new assay. The proposed assay was conducted in 96-microwell plates. The absorbance of the colored-CT complex was measured at 460 nm with a microplate reader. Optimum conditions of the reaction and the analytical procedures of the assay were established. Under the optimum conditions, a linear relationship with a good correlation coefficient was found between the absorbance and the concentration of OLM in the range of 2-200 μg per well. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.53 and 1.61 μg per well, respectively. No interference was observed from the excipients present in OLM tablets or from hydrochlorothiazide and amlodipine besylate that were co-formulated with OLM in some of its formulations. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of OLM in tablets with good accuracy and precision. The assay described herein has a great practical value in the routine analysis of OLM in quality control laboratories, since it has a high throughput property and consumes low volumes of organic solvent. It thus offers a reduction in the exposure of analysts to the toxic effects of organic solvents, as well as a reduction in the cost of analysis.

  17. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    alpha and beta MHC-II chain constructs, where the membrane-spanning regions were replaced by dimerization motifs, and the C-terminal of the beta chains was fused to a biotinylation signal peptide (BSP) allowing for in vivo biotinylation. These chains were produced separately as inclusion bodies in E......-II molecules and accompanying HTS peptide-binding assay were successfully developed for nine different MHC-II molecules including the DPA1*0103/DPB1*0401 (DP401) and DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201, where both alpha and beta chains are polymorphic, illustrating the advantages of producing the two chains separately....... coli , extracted into urea, and purified under denaturing and non-reducing conditions using conventional column chromatography. Subsequently, diluting the two chains into a folding reaction with appropriate peptide resulted in efficient peptide-MHC-II complex formation. Several different formats...

  18. High-throughput, dual probe biological assays based on single molecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollars, Christopher W [Brentwood, CA; Huser, Thomas R [Livermore, CA; Lane, Stephen M [Oakland, CA; Balhorn, Rodney L [Livermore, CA; Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Darrow, Christopher [Pleasanton, CA; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2006-07-11

    A method and apparatus with the sensitivity to detect and identify single target molecules through the localization of dual, fluorescently labeled probe molecules. This can be accomplished through specific attachment of the taget to a surface or in a two-dimensional (2D) flowing fluid sheet having approximate dimensions of 0.5 .mu.m.times.100 .mu.m.times.100 .mu.m. A device using these methods would have 10.sup.3 10.sup.4 greater throughput than previous one-dimensional (1D) micro-stream devices having 1 .mu.m.sup.3 interrogation volumes and would for the first time allow immuno- and DNA assays at ultra-low (femtomolar) concentrations to be performed in short time periods (.about.10 minutes). The use of novel labels (such as metal or semiconductor nanoparticles) may be incorporated to further extend the sensitivity possibly into the attomolar range.

  19. A novel high throughput assay for anthelmintic drug screening and resistance diagnosis by real-time monitoring of parasite motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Smout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helminth parasites cause untold morbidity and mortality to billions of people and livestock. Anthelmintic drugs are available but resistance is a problem in livestock parasites, and is a looming threat for human helminths. Testing the efficacy of available anthelmintic drugs and development of new drugs is hindered by the lack of objective high-throughput screening methods. Currently, drug effect is assessed by observing motility or development of parasites using laborious, subjective, low-throughput methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a novel application for a real-time cell monitoring device (xCELLigence that can simply and objectively assess anthelmintic effects by measuring parasite motility in real time in a fully automated high-throughput fashion. We quantitatively assessed motility and determined real time IC(50 values of different anthelmintic drugs against several developmental stages of major helminth pathogens of humans and livestock, including larval Haemonchus contortus and Strongyloides ratti, and adult hookworms and blood flukes. The assay enabled quantification of the onset of egg hatching in real time, and the impact of drugs on hatch rate, as well as discriminating between the effects of drugs on motility of drug-susceptible and -resistant isolates of H. contortus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that this technique will be suitable for discovery and development of new anthelmintic drugs as well as for detection of phenotypic resistance to existing drugs for the majority of helminths and other pathogens where motility is a measure of pathogen viability. The method is also amenable to use for other purposes where motility is assessed, such as gene silencing or antibody-mediated killing.

  20. Utilizing high throughput screening data for predictive toxicology models: protocols and application to MLSCN assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Rajarshi; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2008-06-01

    Computational toxicology is emerging as an encouraging alternative to experimental testing. The Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network (MLSCN) as part of the NIH Molecular Libraries Roadmap has recently started generating large and diverse screening datasets, which are publicly available in PubChem. In this report, we investigate various aspects of developing computational models to predict cell toxicity based on cell proliferation screening data generated in the MLSCN. By capturing feature-based information in those datasets, such predictive models would be useful in evaluating cell-based screening results in general (for example from reporter assays) and could be used as an aid to identify and eliminate potentially undesired compounds. Specifically we present the results of random forest ensemble models developed using different cell proliferation datasets and highlight protocols to take into account their extremely imbalanced nature. Depending on the nature of the datasets and the descriptors employed we were able to achieve percentage correct classification rates between 70% and 85% on the prediction set, though the accuracy rate dropped significantly when the models were applied to in vivo data. In this context we also compare the MLSCN cell proliferation results with animal acute toxicity data to investigate to what extent animal toxicity can be correlated and potentially predicted by proliferation results. Finally, we present a visualization technique that allows one to compare a new dataset to the training set of the models to decide whether the new dataset may be reliably predicted.

  1. A high-throughput method for membrane protein solubility screening: the ultracentrifugation dispersity sedimentation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Daniel A P; Mizohata, Eiichi; Newstead, Simon; Ferrandon, Sebastian; Postis, Vincent; Xia, Xiaobing; Henderson, Peter J F; van Veen, Hendrik W; Byrne, Bernadette

    2007-07-01

    One key to successful crystallization of membrane proteins is the identification of detergents that maintain the protein in a soluble, monodispersed state. Because of their hydrophobic nature, membrane proteins are particularly prone to forming insoluble aggregates over time. This nonspecific aggregation of the molecules reduces the likelihood of the regular association of the protein molecules essential for crystal lattice formation. Critical buffer components affecting the aggregation of membrane proteins include detergent choice, salt concentration, and presence of glycerol. The optimization of these parameters is often a time- and protein-consuming process. Here we describe a novel ultracentrifugation dispersity sedimentation (UDS) assay in which ultracentrifugation of very small (5 microL) volumes of purified, soluble membrane protein is combined with SDS-PAGE analysis to rapidly assess the degree of protein aggregation. The results from the UDS method correlate very well with established methods like size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), while consuming considerably less protein. In addition, the UDS method allows rapid screening of detergents for membrane protein crystallization in a fraction of the time required by SEC. Here we use the UDS method in the identification of suitable detergents and buffer compositions for the crystallization of three recombinant prokaryotic membrane proteins. The implications of our results for membrane protein crystallization prescreening are discussed.

  2. High-throughput real-time assay based on molecular beacons for HIV-1 integrase 3'-processing reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-qiu HE; Xiao-hui MA; Bin LIU; Xiao-yi ZHANG; Wei-zu CHEN; Cun-xin WANG; Shao-hui CHENG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To develop a high-throughput real-time assay based on molecular beacons to monitor the integrase 3'-processing reaction in vitro and apply it to inhibitor screening.Methods: The recombinant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN) is incubated with a 38 mer oligonucleotide substrate, a sequence identical to the U5 end of HIV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR). Based on the fluores-cence properties of molecular beacons, the substrate is designed to form a stem-loop structure labeled with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3'end.IN cleaves the terminal 3'-dinucleotide containing the quencher, resulting in an increase in fluorescence which can be monitored on a spectrofluorometer. To optimize this assay, tests were performed to investigate the effects of substrates, enzyme and the metal ion concentrations on the IN activity and optimal param-eters were obtained. Moreover, 2 IN inhibitors were employed to test the perfor-mance of this assay in antiviral compound screening.Results: The fluorescent intensity of the reaction mixture varies linearly with time and is proportional to the velocity of the 3'-processing reaction. Tests were performed and the results showed that the optimal rate was obtained for a reaction mixture containing 50 mg/L recom-binant HIV-1 IN, 400 nmol/L substrate, and 10 mmol/L Mn2+. The IN 3'-processing reaction under the optimal conditions showed a more than 18-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity compared to the enzyme-free control. The IC50 values of the IN inhibitors obtained in our assay were similar to the values obtained from a radiolabeled substrate assay.Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that this is a fast, reliable, and sensitive method to monitor HIV IN 3'-processing reaction and that it can be used for inhibitor screening.

  3. High-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay for analysis of natural and vaccine-induced antibodies against human papillomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sehr

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, automated, purely add-on, high-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (HT-PBNA with excellent repeatability and run-to-run reproducibility was developed for human papillomavirus types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 45, 52, 58 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. Preparation of 384 well assay plates with serially diluted sera and the actual cell-based assay are separated in time, therefore batches of up to one hundred assay plates can be processed sequentially. A mean coefficient of variation (CV of 13% was obtained for anti-HPV 16 and HPV 18 titers for a standard serum tested in a total of 58 repeats on individual plates in seven independent runs. Natural antibody response was analyzed in 35 sera from patients with HPV 16 DNA positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ lesions. The new HT-PBNA is based on Gaussia luciferase with increased sensitivity compared to the previously described manual PBNA (manPBNA based on secreted alkaline phosphatase as reporter. Titers obtained with HT-PBNA were generally higher than titers obtained with the manPBNA. A good linear correlation (R(2 = 0.7 was found between HT-PBNA titers and anti-HPV 16 L1 antibody-levels determined by a Luminex bead-based GST-capture assay for these 35 sera and a Kappa-value of 0.72, with only 3 discordant sera in the low titer range. In addition to natural low titer antibody responses the high sensitivity of the HT-PBNA also allows detection of cross-neutralizing antibodies induced by commercial HPV L1-vaccines and experimental L2-vaccines. When analyzing the WHO international standards for HPV 16 and 18 we determined an analytical sensitivity of 0.864 and 1.105 mIU, respectively.

  4. Inhibitors of the influenza A virus M2 proton channel discovered using a high-throughput yeast growth restoration assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna D Balgi

    Full Text Available The M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus is the target of the anti-influenza drugs amantadine and rimantadine. The effectiveness of these drugs has been dramatically limited by the rapid spread of drug resistant mutations, mainly at sites S31N, V27A and L26F in the pore of the channel. Despite progress in designing inhibitors of V27A and L26F M2, there are currently no drugs targeting these mutated channels in clinical trials. Progress in developing new drugs has been hampered by the lack of a robust assay with sufficient throughput for discovery of new active chemotypes among chemical libraries and sufficient sensitivity to provide the SAR data essential for their improvement and development as drugs. In this study we adapted a yeast growth restoration assay, in which expression of the M2 channel inhibits yeast growth and exposure to an M2 channel inhibitor restores growth, into a robust and sensitive high-throughput screen for M2 channel inhibitors. A screen of over 250,000 pure chemicals and semi-purified fractions from natural extracts identified 21 active compounds comprising amantadine, rimantadine, 13 related adamantanes and 6 non-adamantanes. Of the non-adamantanes, hexamethylene amiloride and a triazine derivative represented new M2 inhibitory chemotypes that also showed antiviral activity in a plaque reduction assay. Of particular interest is the fact that the triazine derivative was not sufficiently potent for detection as an inhibitor in the traditional two electrode voltage clamp assay for M2 channel activity, but its discovery in the yeast assay led to testing of analogues of which one was as potent as amantadine.

  5. Supplementary Material for: DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Results Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemannâ Pick type C disease. Conclusion We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between

  6. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay system for appetite-regulating gene and drug screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Shimada

    Full Text Available The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish. This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf, knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1, and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers.

  7. Evaluation of a High-Throughput Peptide Reactivity Format Assay for Assessment of the Skin Sensitization Potential of Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chin Lin; Lam, Ai-Leen; Smith, Maree T; Ghassabian, Sussan

    2016-01-01

    the difficulty in adapting in vitro methods to high-throughput format for screening the skin sensitization potential of large numbers of chemicals whilst ensuring that the data produced are both accurate and reproducible.

  8. Development of a high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay for the discovery of EZH2-EED interaction inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mao-Rong; Du, Dao-Hai; Hu, Jun-Chi; Li, Lian-Chun; Liu, Jing-Qiu; Ding, Hong; Kong, Xiang-Qian; Jiang, Hua-Liang; Chen, Kai-Xian; Luo, Cheng

    2017-08-31

    Aberrant activity of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is associated with a wide range of human cancers. The interaction of EZH2 with embryonic ectoderm development (EED) is required for EZH2's catalytic activity. Inhibition of the EZH2-EED complex thus represents a novel strategy for interfering with the oncogenic potentials of EZH2 by targeting both its catalytic and non-catalytic functions. To date, there have been no reported high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for inhibitors acting at the EZH2-EED interface. In this study, we developed a fluorescence polarization (FP)-based HTS system for the discovery of EZH2-EED interaction inhibitors. The tracer peptide sequences, positions of fluorescein labeling, and a variety of physicochemical conditions were optimized. The high Z' factors (>0.9) at a variety of DMSO concentrations suggested that this system is robust and suitable for HTS. The minimal sequence requirement for the EZH2-EED interaction was determined by using this system. A pilot screening of an in-house compound library containing 1600 FDA-approved drugs identified four compounds (apomorphine hydrochloride, oxyphenbutazone, nifedipine and ergonovine maleate) as potential EZH2-EED interaction inhibitors.

  9. Ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assay for therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in pediatric HIV-1 infection applying dried blood spots.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, R.J.; Kampen, J.J. van; Reedijk, M.L.; Scheuer, R.D.; Dekker, L.J.; Burger, D.M.; Hartwig, N.G.; Osterhaus, A.D.; Luider, T.M.; Gruters, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Kaletra (Abott Laboratories) is a co-formulated medication used in the treatment of HIV-1-infected children, and it contains the two antiretroviral protease inhibitor drugs lopinavir and ritonavir. We validated two new ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assays to be used for

  10. Ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assay for therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in pediatric HIV-1 infection applying dried blood spots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.W. Meesters (Roland); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); M.L. Reedijk (Mariska); R.D. Scheuer (Rachel); L.J.M. Dekker (Lennard); D.M. Burger (David); N.G. Hartwig (Nico); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T.M. Luider (Theo); R.A. Gruters (Rob)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractKaletra® (Abott Laboratories) is a co-formulated medication used in the treatment of HIV-1-infected children, and it contains the two antiretroviral protease inhibitor drugs lopinavir and ritonavir. We validated two new ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assays to be used

  11. Evaluation of a high-throughput peptide reactivity format assay for assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Lin eWong

    2016-03-01

    highlight the difficulty in adapting in vitro methods to high-throughput format for screening the skin sensitization potential of large numbers of chemicals whilst ensuring that the data produced are both accurate and reproducible.

  12. A high-throughput assay for evaluating state dependence and subtype selectivity of Cav2 calcium channel inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ge; Haedo, Rodolfo J; Warren, Vivien A; Ratliff, Kevin S; Bugianesi, Randal M; Rush, Alison; Williams, Mark E; Herrington, James; Smith, McHardy M; McManus, Owen B; Swensen, Andrew M

    2008-04-01

    Cav2.2 channels play a critical role in pain signaling by controlling synaptic transmission between dorsal root ganglion neurons and dorsal horn neurons. The Cav2.2-selective peptide blocker ziconotide (Prialt, Elan Pharmaceuticals, Dublin, Ireland) has proven efficacious in pain relief, but has a poor therapeutic index and requires intrathecal administration. This has provided impetus for finding an orally active, state-dependent Cav2.2 inhibitor with an improved safety profile. Members of the Cav2 subfamily of calcium channels are the main contributors to central and peripheral synaptic transmission, but the pharmacological effects of blocking each subtype is not yet defined. Here we describe a high-throughput fluorescent assay using a fluorometric imaging plate reader (FLIPR [Molecular Devices, Sunnyvale, CA]) designed to quickly evaluate the state dependence and selectivity of inhibitors across the Cav2 subfamily. Stable cell lines expressing functional Cav2 channels (Ca(V)alpha, beta(3), and alpha(2)delta subunits) were co-transfected with an inward rectifier (Kir2.3) so that membrane potential, and therefore channel state, could be controlled by external potassium concentration. Following cell incubation in drug with varying concentrations of potassium, a high potassium trigger was added to elicit calcium influx through available, unblocked channels. State-dependent inhibitors that preferentially bind to channels in the open or inactivated state can be identified by their increased potency at higher potassium concentrations, where cells are depolarized and channels are biased towards these states. Although the Cav2 channel subtypes differ in their voltage dependence of inactivation, by adjusting pre-trigger potassium concentrations, the degree of steady-state inactivation can be more closely matched across Cav2 subtypes to assess molecular selectivity.

  13. Development of a high-throughput cell-based reporter assay for screening of JAK3 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chang-Hong; Bach, Erika A; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2011-04-01

    JAK3 is an ideal target for the treatment of immune-related diseases and the prevention of organ allograft rejection. Several JAK3 inhibitors have been identified by biochemical enzymatic assays, but the majority display significant off-target effects on JAK2. Therefore, there is a need to develop new experimental approaches to identify compounds that specifically inhibit JAK3. Here, we show that in 32D/IL-2Rβ cells, STAT5 becomes phosphorylated by an IL-3/JAK2- or IL-2/JAK3-dependent pathway. Importantly, the selective JAK3 inhibitor CP-690,550 blocked the phosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of STAT5 following treatment of cells with IL-2 but not with IL-3. In an attempt to use the cells for large-scale chemical screens to identify JAK3 inhibitors, we established a cell line, 32D/IL-2Rβ/6xSTAT5, stably expressing a STAT5 reporter gene. Treatment of this cell line with IL-2 or IL-3 dramatically increased the reporter activity in a high-throughput format. As expected, CP-690,550 selectively inhibited the activity of the 6xSTAT5 reporter following treatment with IL-2. By contrast, the pan-JAK inhibitor curcumin inhibited the activity of this reporter following treatment with either IL-2 or IL-3. Thus, this study indicates that the STAT5 reporter cell line can be used as an efficacious cellular model for chemical screens to identify selective JAK3 inhibitors.

  14. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  15. High-Throughput Direct Fecal PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Sheep and Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Anna M.; Galea, Francesca; Whittington, Ann-Michele; Saunders, Vanessa F.; Begg, Douglas J.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that affects ruminants. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route. A commonly used antemortem diagnostic test for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces is liquid culture; however, a major constraint is the 2- to 3-month incubation period needed for this method. Rapid methods for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis based on PCR have been reported, but comprehensive validation data are lacking. We describe here a new test, the high-throughput-Johnes (HT-J), to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of liquid radiometric (Bactec) fecal culture using samples from cattle (1,330 samples from 23 herds) and sheep (596 samples from 16 flocks). The multistage protocol involves the recovery of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from a fecal suspension, cell rupture by bead beating, extraction of DNA using magnetic beads, and IS900 quantitative PCR. The limit of detection of the assay was 0.0005 pg, and the limit of quantification was 0.005 pg M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA. Only M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from a panel of 51 mycobacterial isolates, including 10 with IS900-like sequences. Of the 549 culture-negative fecal samples from unexposed herds and flocks, 99% were negative in the HT-J test, while 60% of the bovine- and 84% of the ovine-culture-positive samples were positive in the HT-J test. As similar total numbers of samples from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed animals were positive in culture and HT-J tests in both species, and as the results of a McNemar's test were not significant, these methods probably have similar sensitivities, but the true diagnostic sensitivities of these tests are unknown. These validation data meet the consensus-based reporting standards for diagnostic test accuracy studies for paratuberculosis and

  16. High-throughput SNP genotyping in the highly heterozygous genome of Eucalyptus: assay success, polymorphism and transferability across species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lima Bruno

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput SNP genotyping has become an essential requirement for molecular breeding and population genomics studies in plant species. Large scale SNP developments have been reported for several mainstream crops. A growing interest now exists to expand the speed and resolution of genetic analysis to outbred species with highly heterozygous genomes. When nucleotide diversity is high, a refined diagnosis of the target SNP sequence context is needed to convert queried SNPs into high-quality genotypes using the Golden Gate Genotyping Technology (GGGT. This issue becomes exacerbated when attempting to transfer SNPs across species, a scarcely explored topic in plants, and likely to become significant for population genomics and inter specific breeding applications in less domesticated and less funded plant genera. Results We have successfully developed the first set of 768 SNPs assayed by the GGGT for the highly heterozygous genome of Eucalyptus from a mixed Sanger/454 database with 1,164,695 ESTs and the preliminary 4.5X draft genome sequence for E. grandis. A systematic assessment of in silico SNP filtering requirements showed that stringent constraints on the SNP surrounding sequences have a significant impact on SNP genotyping performance and polymorphism. SNP assay success was high for the 288 SNPs selected with more rigorous in silico constraints; 93% of them provided high quality genotype calls and 71% of them were polymorphic in a diverse panel of 96 individuals of five different species. SNP reliability was high across nine Eucalyptus species belonging to three sections within subgenus Symphomyrtus and still satisfactory across species of two additional subgenera, although polymorphism declined as phylogenetic distance increased. Conclusions This study indicates that the GGGT performs well both within and across species of Eucalyptus notwithstanding its nucleotide diversity ≥2%. The development of a much larger

  17. A Fluorescence-Based High-Throughput Assay for the Identification of Anticancer Reagents Targeting Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Jeong; Devkota, Ashwini K; Stancu, Gabriel; Edupunganti, Ramakrishna; Powis, Garth; Dalby, Kevin N

    2017-08-01

    A high rate of glycolysis, which supplies energy and materials for anabolism, is observed in a wide range of tumor cells, making it a potential pathway to control cancer growth. ALDOA is a multifunctional enzyme in the glycolytic pathway and also promotes HIF-1α, which is of importance in hypoxic solid tumors. The current method for assaying ALDOA activity involves monitoring the consumption of NADH in vitro using absorbance or intrinsic fluorescence via a coupled enzymatic reaction. Here, we report the development of a homogeneous biochemical assay that can overcome limitations of current methods, in particular for the application of high-throughput drug screening. The assay utilizes the commercially available Elite NADH Assay Kit, which incorporates an enzymatic reaction to measure the level of NADH using a fluorescent probe. Assay optimization and validation are discussed. Its feasibility for high-throughput screening (HTS) was demonstrated by screening 65,000 compounds for the identification of small molecules that inhibit ALDOA. Through a validation screen and dose-response evaluation, four inhibitors with IC50 below 10 µM were identified. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a traditional ALDOA assay can be transformed readily into a fluorescence-based assay utilizing a commercial NADH detection kit that is rapid, sensitive, inexpensive, and HTS friendly.

  18. The comet assay in testing the potential genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Azqueta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades the production and use of nanomaterials (NMs has impressively increased. Their small size, given a mass equal to that of the corresponding bulk material, implies an increase in the surface area and consequently in the number of atoms that can be reactive. They possess different physical, chemical and biological properties compared to bulk materials of the same composition, which makes them very interesting and valuable for many different applications in technology, energy, construction, electronics, agriculture, optics, paints, textiles, food, cosmetics, medicine... Toxicological assessment of NMs is crucial; the same properties that make them interesting also make them potentially harmful for health and the environment. However, the term NM covers many different kinds of particle , and so there is no simple, standard approach to assessing their toxicity. NMs can enter the cell, interact with cell components and even penetrate the nucleus and interfere with the genetic material. Among the different branches of toxicology, genotoxicity is a main area of concern since it is closely related with the carcinogenic potential of compounds. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD has published internationally agreed in vitro and in vivo validated test methods to evaluate different genotoxic endpoints of chemicals, including chromosome and gene mutations, and DNA breaks. However not all the assays are suitable to study the genotoxic potential of NMs as has been shown by the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN. Moreover, alterations to DNA bases, which are precursors to mutations and of great importance in elucidating the mechanism of action of NMs, are not covered by the OECD guidelines. The in vivo standard comet assay (which measures DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites was included in the OECD assays battery in September 2014 while the in vitro standard comet assay is currently under

  19. Development and validation of a chemiluminescent immunodetection assay amenable to high throughput screening of antiviral drugs for Nipah and Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljofan, Mohamad; Porotto, Matteo; Moscona, Anne; Mungall, Bruce A

    2008-04-01

    There are currently no antiviral drugs approved for the highly lethal Biosafety Level 4 pathogens Nipah and Hendra virus. A number of researchers are developing surrogate assays amenable to Biosafety Level 2 biocontainment but ultimately, the development of a high throughput screening method for directly quantifying these viruses in a Biosafety Level 4 environment will be critical for final evaluation of antiviral drugs identified in surrogate assays, in addition to reducing the time required for effective antiviral drug development. By adapting an existing immunoplaque assay and using enzyme linked immunodetection in a microtitre plate format, the current experiments describe a simple two step assay protocol involving an overnight virus inoculation of Vero cell monolayers (with or without antiviral drug treatment) at Biosafety Level 4, followed by cell fixation and virus inactivation enabling removal of plates from the Biosafety Level 4 laboratory and a subsequent immunodetection assay using a chemiluminescent horse radish peroxidase substrate to be performed at Biosafety Level 2. The analytical sensitivity (limit of detection) of this assay is 100 tissue culture infectious dose50/ml of either Nipah or Hendra virus. In addition this assay enables linear quantitation of virus over three orders of magnitude and is unaffected by dimethyl sulfoxide concentrations of 1% or less. Intra-assay coefficients of variation are acceptable (less than 20%) when detecting a minimum of 1000 tissue culture infectious dose50/ml of either virus although inter-assay variation is considerably greater. By an assessment of efficacies of the broad spectrum antiviral Ribavirin and an experimental fusion inhibitory peptide, this assay reveals a good correlation with previously published fluorescent immunodetection assays. The current experiments describe for the first time, a high throughput screening method amenable for direct assessment of live henipavirus antiviral drug activity.

  20. Emerging metrology for high-throughput nanomaterial genotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bryant C; Wright, Christa W; Ibuki, Yuko; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Karlsson, Hanna L; Hendriks, Giel; Sims, Christopher M; Singh, Neenu; Doak, Shareen H

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of the engineered nanomaterial (ENM) manufacturing industry has accelerated the incorporation of ENMs into a wide variety of consumer products across the globe. Unintentionally or not, some of these ENMs may be introduced into the environment or come into contact with humans or other organisms resulting in unexpected biological effects. It is thus prudent to have rapid and robust analytical metrology in place that can be used to critically assess and/or predict the cytotoxicity, as well as the potential genotoxicity of these ENMs. Many of the traditional genotoxicity test methods [e.g. unscheduled DNA synthesis assay, bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test, etc.,] for determining the DNA damaging potential of chemical and biological compounds are not suitable for the evaluation of ENMs, due to a variety of methodological issues ranging from potential assay interferences to problems centered on low sample throughput. Recently, a number of sensitive, high-throughput genotoxicity assays/platforms (CometChip assay, flow cytometry/micronucleus assay, flow cytometry/γ-H2AX assay, automated 'Fluorimetric Detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding' (FADU) assay, ToxTracker reporter assay) have been developed, based on substantial modifications and enhancements of traditional genotoxicity assays. These new assays have been used for the rapid measurement of DNA damage (strand breaks), chromosomal damage (micronuclei) and for detecting upregulated DNA damage signalling pathways resulting from ENM exposures. In this critical review, we describe and discuss the fundamental measurement principles and measurement endpoints of these new assays, as well as the modes of operation, analytical metrics and potential interferences, as applicable to ENM exposures. An unbiased discussion of the major technical advantages and limitations of each assay for evaluating and predicting the genotoxic potential of ENMs is also provided. Published by Oxford University Press on

  1. Assay development and high-throughput screening for small molecule inhibitors of a Vibrio cholerae stress response pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanbery L

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laura Stanbery, Jyl S Matson Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine and Life Sciences, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: Antibiotics are important adjuncts to oral rehydration therapy in cholera disease management. However, due to the rapid emergence of resistance to the antibiotics used to treat cholera, therapeutic options are becoming limited. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop additional therapeutics to aid in the treatment of cholera. Previous studies showed that the extracytoplasmic stress response (σE pathway of Vibrio cholerae is required for full virulence of the organism. The pathway is also required for bacterial growth in the presence of ethanol. Therefore, we exploited this ethanol sensitivity phenotype in order to develop a screen for inhibitors of the pathway, with the aim of also inhibiting virulence of the pathogen. Here we describe the optimization and implementation of our high-throughput screening strategy. From a primary screen of over 100,000 compounds, we have identified seven compounds that validated the growth phenotypes from the primary and counterscreens. These compounds have the potential to be developed into therapeutic agents for cholera and will also be valuable probes for uncovering basic molecular mechanisms of an important cause of diarrheal disease. Keywords: Vibrio cholerae, stress response, σE, high-throughput screening

  2. Genotoxicity evaluation of water soil leachates by Ames test, comet assay, and preliminary Tradescantia micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lah, B; Vidic, T; Glasencnik, E; Cepeljnik, T; Gorjanc, G; Marinsek-Logar, Romana

    2008-04-01

    Combining genotoxicity/mutagenicity tests and physico-chemical methodologies can be useful for determining the potential genotoxic contaminants in soil samples. The aim of our study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of soil by applying an integrated physico-chemical-biological approach. Soil samples were collected at six sampling points in a Slovenian industrial and agricultural region where contamination by heavy metals and sulphur dioxide (SO(2)) are primarily caused by a nearby power plant. The in vitro alkaline version of the comet assay on water soil leachates was performed with Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. A parallel genotoxicity evaluation of the samples was performed by Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium and the Tradescantia micronucleus test. Pedological analyses, heavy metal content determination, and different physico-chemical analyses, were also performed utilizing standard methodology. Water leachates of soil samples were prepared according to standard methods. Since only a battery of biotests with prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms or cells can accurately estimate the effects of (geno)toxicants in soil samples and water soil leachates, a combination of three bioassays, with cells or organisms belonging to different trophic levels, was used. Genotoxicity of all six water soil leachates was proven by the comet assay on both human cell lines, however no positive results were detected by bacterial assay, Ames test. The Tradescantia micronucleus assay showed increase in micronuclei formation for three samples. According to these results we can assume that the comet assay was the most sensitive assay, followed by the micronucleus test. The Ames test does not appear to be sensitive enough for water soil leachates genotoxicity evaluations where heavy metal contamination is anticipated.

  3. Quantitative RT-PCR assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of drugs against the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haili eZhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Our laboratory has previously developed a qRT-PCR assay to assess drug efficacy on the growth of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro by detecting the levels of parasite 18S rRNA. This approach displayed up to four orders of magnitude of linear dynamic range and was much less labor-intensive than the traditional microscopic methods. However, conventional qRT-PCR protocol is not very amendable to high-throughput analysis when total RNA needs to be purified by lengthy, multi-step procedures. Recently, several commercial reagents are available for preparing cell lysates that could be directly used in downstream qRT-PCR analysis (e.g., Ambion Cell-to-cDNA kit and Bio-Rad iScript sample preparation reagent. Using these reagents, we are able to adapt the qRT-PCR assay into high-throughput screening of drugs in vitro (i.e., 96-well and 384-well formats for the cultivation of parasites and qRT-PCR detection, respectively. This qRT-PCR protocol is able to give a >150-fold linear dynamic range using samples isolated from cells infected with various numbers of parasites. The new assay is also validated by the NIH-recommended intra-plate, inter-plate and inter-day uniformity tests. The robustness and effectiveness of the assay are also confirmed by evaluating the anti-cryptosporidial efficacy of paromomycin and by a small scale screening of compounds.

  4. Development of an efficient transformation method by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and high throughput spray assay to identify transgenic plants for woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) using NPTII selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, Christopher J; Fisk, Sarah; Mills, Kerri; Flinn, Barry S; Shulaev, Vladimir; Veilleux, Richard E; Dan, Yinghui

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We developed an efficient Agrobacterium -mediated transformation method using an Ac/Ds transposon tagging construct for F. vesca and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to identify its transformants for strawberry functional genomics. Genomic resources for Rosaceae species are now readily available, including the Fragaria vesca genome, EST sequences, markers, linkage maps, and physical maps. The Rosaceae Genomic Executive Committee has promoted strawberry as a translational genomics model due to its unique biological features and transformability for fruit trait improvement. Our overall research goal is to use functional genomic and metabolic approaches to pursue high throughput gene discovery in the diploid woodland strawberry. F. vesca offers several advantages of a fleshy fruit typical of most fruit crops, short life cycle (seed to seed in 12-16 weeks), small genome size (206 Mbb/C), small plant size, self-compatibility, and many seeds per plant. We have developed an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated strawberry transformation method using kanamycin selection, and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to efficiently identify transgenic strawberry plants. Using our kanamycin transformation method, we were able to produce up to 98 independent kanamycin resistant insertional mutant lines using a T-DNA construct carrying an Ac/Ds transposon Launchpad system from a single transformation experiment involving inoculation of 22 leaf explants of F. vesca accession 551572 within approx. 11 weeks (from inoculation to soil). Transgenic plants with 1-2 copies of a transgene were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Using our paromomycin spray assay, transgenic F. vesca plants were rapidly identified within 10 days after spraying.

  5. Identification of several high-risk HPV inhibitors and drug targets with a novel high-throughput screening assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Männik, Andres; Mumm, Karl; Tämm, Kaido; Tamm, Tarmo; Ustav, Mart

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are oncogenic viruses that cause numerous different cancers as well as benign lesions in the epithelia. To date, there is no effective cure for an ongoing HPV infection. Here, we describe the generation process of a platform for the development of anti-HPV drugs. This system consists of engineered full-length HPV genomes that express reporter genes for evaluation of the viral copy number in all three HPV replication stages. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system by conducting high-throughput screens to identify novel high-risk HPV-specific inhibitors. At least five of the inhibitors block the function of Tdp1 and PARP1, which have been identified as essential cellular proteins for HPV replication and promising candidates for the development of antivirals against HPV and possibly against HPV-related cancers. PMID:28182794

  6. Development of novel, 384-well high-throughput assay panels for human drug transporters: drug interaction and safety assessment in support of discovery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huaping; Shen, Ding Ren; Han, Yong-Hae; Kong, Yan; Balimane, Praveen; Marino, Anthony; Gao, Mian; Wu, Sophie; Xie, Dianlin; Soars, Matthew G; O'Connell, Jonathan C; Rodrigues, A David; Zhang, Litao; Cvijic, Mary Ellen

    2013-10-01

    Transporter proteins are known to play a critical role in affecting the overall absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion characteristics of drug candidates. In addition to efflux transporters (P-gp, BCRP, MRP2, etc.) that limit absorption, there has been a renewed interest in influx transporters at the renal (OATs, OCTs) and hepatic (OATPs, BSEP, NTCP, etc.) organ level that can cause significant clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Several of these transporters are also critical for hepatobiliary disposition of bilirubin and bile acid/salts, and their inhibition is directly implicated in hepatic toxicities. Regulatory agencies took action to address transporter-mediated DDI with the goal of ensuring drug safety in the clinic and on the market. To meet regulatory requirements, advanced bioassay technology and automation solutions were implemented for high-throughput transporter screening to provide structure-activity relationship within lead optimization. To enhance capacity, several functional assay formats were miniaturized to 384-well throughput including novel fluorescence-based uptake and efflux inhibition assays using high-content image analysis as well as cell-based radioactive uptake and vesicle-based efflux inhibition assays. This high-throughput capability enabled a paradigm shift from studying transporter-related issues in the development space to identifying and dialing out these concerns early on in discovery for enhanced mechanism-based efficacy while circumventing DDIs and transporter toxicities.

  7. Development of a Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) Based, High Throughput Screening Feasible Method for the Identification of PDE12 Activity Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Samuel; Bucher, Hannes; Nickolaus, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology has been widely used to establish high throughput screens (HTS) for a range of targets in the pharmaceutical industry. PDE12 (aka. 2'- phosphodiesterase) has been published to participate in the degradation of oligoadenylates that are involved in the establishment of an antiviral state via the activation of ribonuclease L (RNAse-L). Degradation of oligoadenylates by PDE12 terminates these antiviral activities, leading to decreased resistance of cells for a variety of viral pathogens. Therefore inhibitors of PDE12 are discussed as antiviral therapy. Here we describe the use of the yttrium silicate SPA bead technology to assess inhibitory activity of compounds against PDE12 in a homogeneous, robust HTS feasible assay using tritiated adenosine-P-adenylate ([3H]ApA) as substrate. We found that the used [3H]ApA educt, was not able to bind to SPA beads, whereas the product [3H]AMP, as known before, was able to bind to SPA beads. This enables the measurement of PDE12 activity on [3H]ApA as a substrate using a wallac microbeta counter. This method describes a robust and high throughput capable format in terms of specificity, commonly used compound solvents, ease of detection and assay matrices. The method could facilitate the search for PDE12 inhibitors as antiviral compounds.

  8. Development of a high-throughput screening for nerve agent detoxifying materials using a fully-automated robot-assisted biological assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, T; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2010-04-01

    Developing improved medical countermeasures against chemical warfare agents (nerve agents) is urgently needed but time-consuming and costly. Here we introduce a robot-assisted liquid handling system with warming, cooling and incubating facilities to screen the detoxifying properties of biological and chemical materials against nerve agents. Two biological tests were established and plasma from various species, DFPase and three cyclodextrins were used as test materials. In test 1, plasma was mixed with sarin or VX and the inhibitory potency of the incubate was determined with human acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at 0, 30 and 60 min. In test 2, test materials and nerve agents were mixed and incubated. Between 0 and 40 min samples were taken and incubated for 3 min with AChE and the residual AChE inhibition was determined to enable the semi-quantitative evaluation of the detoxification kinetics. The automated assays proved to be highly reproducible. It was possible to pre-select detoxifying reagents with test 1 and to determine more detailed detoxifying kinetics with test 2. In conclusion, the automated assay may be considered as a versatile tool for the high-throughput screening of potential detoxifying materials against different nerve agents. With this two-step assay it is possible to screen effectively for detoxifying materials in a high-throughput system. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyan P Ivanov

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  10. Multiplexing Spheroid Volume, Resazurin and Acid Phosphatase Viability Assays for High-Throughput Screening of Tumour Spheroids and Stem Cell Neurospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P.; Parker, Terry L.; Walker, David A.; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B.; Gellert, Paul R.; Garnett, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  11. A High Throughput Screening Assay for Anti-Mycobacterial Small Molecules Based on Adenylate Kinase Release as a Reporter of Cell Lysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Forbes

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is well-established to be one of the most important bacterial pathogens for which new antimicrobial therapies are needed. Herein, we describe the development of a high throughput screening assay for the identification of molecules that are bactericidal against Mycobacteria. The assay utilizes the release of the intracellular enzyme adenylate kinase into the culture medium as a reporter of mycobacterial cell death. We demonstrate that the assay is selective for mycobactericidal molecules and detects anti-mycobacterial activity at concentrations below the minimum inhibitory concentration of many molecules. Thus, the AK assay is more sensitive than traditional growth assays. We have validated the AK assay in the HTS setting using the Mtb surrogate organism M. smegmatis and libraries of FDA approved drugs as well as a commercially available Diversity set. The screen of the FDA-approved library demonstrated that the AK assay is able to identify the vast majority of drugs with known mycobactericidal activity. Importantly, our screen of the Diversity set revealed that the increased sensitivity of the AK assay increases the ability of M. smegmatis-based screens to detect molecules with relatively poor activity against M. smegmatis but good to excellent activity against Mtb.

  12. High-throughput immunoturbidimetric assays for in-process determination of polyclonal antibody concentration and functionality in crude samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Hanne; Kyhse-Andersen, J.; Thomas, O.R.T.

    2007-01-01

    We present fast, simple immunoturbidimetric assays suitable for direct determination of antibody 'concentration' and 'functionality' in crude samples, such as in-process samples taken at various stages during antibody purification. Both assays display excellent linearity and analytical recovery...

  13. Identification of the phosphorylation targets of symbiotic receptor-like kinases using a high-throughput multiplexed assay for kinase specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Richards, Alicia L; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2017-06-01

    Detecting the phosphorylation substrates of multiple kinases in a single experiment is a challenge, and new techniques are being developed to overcome this challenge. Here, we used a multiplexed assay for kinase specificity (MAKS) to identify the substrates directly and to map the phosphorylation site(s) of plant symbiotic receptor-like kinases. The symbiotic receptor-like kinases nodulation receptor-like kinase (NORK) and lysin motif domain-containing receptor-like kinase 3 (LYK3) are indispensable for the establishment of root nodule symbiosis. Although some interacting proteins have been identified for these symbiotic receptor-like kinases, very little is known about their phosphorylation substrates. Using this high-throughput approach, we identified several other potential phosphorylation targets for both these symbiotic receptor-like kinases. In particular, we also discovered the phosphorylation of LYK3 by NORK itself, which was also confirmed by pairwise kinase assays. Motif analysis of potential targets for these kinases revealed that the acidic motif xxxsDxxx was common to both of them. In summary, this high-throughput technique catalogs the potential phosphorylation substrates of multiple kinases in a single efficient experiment, the biological characterization of which should provide a better understanding of phosphorylation signaling cascade in symbiosis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Genotoxic effects of bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles by comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reecep Liman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth oxide is one of the important transition metal oxides and it has been intensively studied due to their peculiar characteristics (semiconductor band gap, high refractive index, high dielectric permittivity, high oxygen conductivity, resistivity, photoconductivity and photoluminescence etc.. Therefore, it is used such as microelectronics, sensor technology, optical coatings, transparent ceramic glass manufacturing, nanoenergetic gas generator, biosensor for DNA hybridization, potential immobilizing platforms for glucose oxidase and polyphenol oxidase, fuel cells, a additive in paints, an astringent in a variety of medical creams and topical ointments, and for the determination of heavy metal ions in drinking water, mineral water and urine. In addition this, Bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles (BONPs are favorable for the biomolecules adsorption than regular sized particles because of their greater advantages and novel characteristics (much higher specific surface, greater surface free energy, and good electrochemical stability etc.. Genotoxic effects of BONPs were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm for 4 h. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5 ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan’s multiple range test was performed. These result indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  15. A cAMP Biosensor-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Identification of Gs-Coupled GPCR Ligands and Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is an important second messenger, and quantification of intracellular cAMP levels is essential in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The intracellular cAMP levels are regulated by the adenylate cyclase (AC) upon activation of either Gs- or Gi......-coupled GPCRs, which leads to increased or decreased cAMP levels, respectively. Here we describe a real-time Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for identification and characterization of Gs-coupled GPCR ligands and phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors...... also observed for the other representative Gs-coupled GPCRs tested, GLP-1R and GlucagonR. The FRET-based cAMP biosensor assay is robust, reproducible, and inexpensive with good Z factors and is highly applicable for HTS....

  16. High-throughput screening assay used in pharmacognosy: Selection, optimization and validation of methods of enzymatic inhibition by UV-visible spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Granados-Guzmán

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In research laboratories of both organic synthesis and extraction of natural products, every day a lot of products that can potentially introduce some biological activity are obtained. Therefore it is necessary to have in vitro assays, which provide reliable information for further evaluation in in vivo systems. From this point of view, in recent years has intensified the use of high-throughput screening assays. Such trials should be optimized and validated for accurate and precise results, i.e. reliable. The present review addresses the steps needed to develop and validate bioanalytical methods, emphasizing UV-Visible spectrophotometry as detection system. Particularly focuses on the selection of the method, the optimization to determine the best experimental conditions, validation, implementation of optimized and validated method to real samples, and finally maintenance and possible transfer it to a new laboratory.

  17. A high-throughput-compatible fluorescence anisotropy-based assay for competitive inhibitors of Escherichia coli UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase (LpxA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Ross, Philip L; Gao, Ning; Livchak, Stephania; Kern, Gunther; Yang, Wei; Andrews, Beth; Thresher, Jason

    2013-03-01

    LpxA, the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway for the Lipid A component of the outer membrane lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria, is a potential target for novel antibacterial drug discovery. A fluorescence polarization assay was developed to facilitate high-throughput screening for competitive inhibitors of LpxA. The assay detects displacement of a fluorescently labeled peptide inhibitor, based on the previously reported inhibitor peptide 920, by active site ligands. The affinity of the fluorescent ligand was increased ~10-fold by acyl carrier protein (ACP). Competition with peptide binding was observed with UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (IC(50) ~6 mM), UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl)-N-acetylglucosamine (IC(50) ~200 nM), and DL-3-hydroxymyristic acid (IC(50) ~50 µM) and peptide 920 (IC(50) ~600 nM). The IC(50)s were not significantly affected by the presence of ACP.

  18. Comet Assay on Daphnia magna in eco-genotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegri, Valerio; Gorbi, Gessica; Buschini, Annamaria

    2014-10-01

    Detection of potentially hazardous compounds in water bodies is a priority in environmental risk assessment. For the evaluation and monitoring of water quality, a series of methodologies may be applied. Among them, the worldwide used toxicity tests with organisms of the genus Daphnia is one of the most powerful. In recent years, some attempts were made to utilize Daphnia magna in genotoxicity testing as many of the new environmental contaminants are described as DNA-damaging agents in aquatic organisms. The aim of this research was to develop a highly standardized protocol of the Comet Assay adapted for D. magna, especially regarding the isolation of cells derived from the same tissue (haemolymph) from newborn organisms exposed in vivo. Several methods for haemolymph extraction and different Comet Assay parameters were compared. Electrophoretic conditions were adapted in order to obtain minimum DNA migration in cells derived from untreated organisms and, at the same time, maximum sensitivity in specimens treated with known genotoxicants (CdCl2 and H2O2). Additional tests were performed to investigate if life-history traits of the cladoceran (such as the age of adult organisms that provide newborns, the clutch size of origin, the number of generations reared in standard conditions) and the water composition as well, might influence the response of the assay. This study confirms the potential application of the Comet Assay in D. magna for assessing genotoxic loads in aqueous solution. The newly developed protocol could integrate the acute toxicity bioassay, thus expanding the possibility of using this model species in freshwater monitoring (waters, sediment and soil elutriates) and is in line with the spirit of the EU Water Framework Directive in reducing the number of bioassays that involve medium-sized species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A homogeneous, high-throughput-compatible, fluorescence intensity-based assay for UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductase (MurB) with nanomolar product detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Livchak, Stephania; Gao, Ning; Whiteaker, James; Thresher, Jason; Jahić, Haris; Huang, Jian; Gu, Rong-Fang

    2012-03-01

    A novel assay for the NADPH-dependent bacterial enzyme UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductase (MurB) is described that has nanomolar sensitivity for product formation and is suitable for high-throughput applications. MurB catalyzes an essential cytoplasmic step in the synthesis of peptidoglycan for the bacterial cell wall, reduction of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine to UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UNAM). Interruption of this biosynthetic pathway leads to cell death, making MurB an attractive target for antibacterial drug discovery. In the new assay, the UNAM product of the MurB reaction is ligated to L-alanine by the next enzyme in the peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway, MurC, resulting in hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP). The ADP is detected with nanomolar sensitivity by converting it to oligomeric RNA with polynucleotide phosphorylase and detecting the oligomeric RNA with a fluorescent dye. The product sensitivity of the new assay is 1000-fold greater than that of the standard assay that follows the absorbance decrease resulting from the conversion of NADPH to NADP(+). This sensitivity allows inhibitor screening to be performed at the low substrate concentrations needed to make the assay sensitive to competitive inhibition of MurB.

  20. Cytotoxicity Test Based on Human Cells Labeled with Fluorescent Proteins: Fluorimetry, Photography, and Scanning for High-Throughput Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, Marina A; Skvortsov, Dmitry A; Rubtsova, Maria P; Komarova, Ekaterina S; Dontsova, Olga A

    2017-12-21

    High- and medium-throughput assays are now routine methods for drug screening and toxicology investigations on mammalian cells. However, a simple and cost-effective analysis of cytotoxicity that can be carried out with commonly used laboratory equipment is still required. The developed cytotoxicity assays are based on human cell lines stably expressing eGFP, tdTomato, mCherry, or Katushka2S fluorescent proteins. Red fluorescent proteins exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio, due to less interference by medium autofluorescence, in comparison to green fluorescent protein. Measurements have been performed on a fluorescence scanner, a plate fluorimeter, and a camera photodocumentation system. For a 96-well plate assay, the sensitivity per well and the measurement duration were 250 cells and 15 min for the scanner, 500 cells and 2 min for the plate fluorimeter, and 1000 cells and less than 1 min for the camera detection. These sensitivities are similar to commonly used MTT (tetrazolium dye) assays. The used scanner and the camera had not been previously applied for cytotoxicity evaluation. An image processing scheme for the high-resolution scanner is proposed that significantly diminishes the number of control wells, even for a library containing fluorescent substances. The suggested cytotoxicity assay has been verified by measurements of the cytotoxicity of several well-known cytotoxic drugs and further applied to test a set of novel bacteriotoxic compounds in a medium-throughput format. The fluorescent signal of living cells is detected without disturbing them and adding any reagents, thus allowing to investigate time-dependent cytotoxicity effects on the same sample of cells. A fast, simple and cost-effective assay is suggested for cytotoxicity evaluation based on mammalian cells expressing fluorescent proteins and commonly used laboratory equipment.

  1. The Phospholipid Vesicle-Based Drug Permeability Assay: 5. Development Toward an Automated Procedure for High-Throughput Permeability Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Flaten, Gøril Eide; Awoyemi, Opeyemi Linda Ronke; Luthman, Kristina; Brandl, Martin; Massing, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript version. Published version available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jala.2008.04.002 In-vitro screening for oral absorption has become an essential part of drug discovery and development. Recently, a new phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay was developed which has shown to satisfyingly predict passive absorption of drugs in humans. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether the assay may be further developed into a high-th...

  2. Development of sensitive, high-throughput one-tube RT-PCR-enzyme hybridisation assay to detect selected bacterial fish pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T; Carson, J

    2003-03-31

    Bacterial monitoring and surveillance is critical for the early detection of pathogens to avoid the spread of disease. To facilitate this, an efficient, high-performance and high-throughput method to detect the presence of femotgram amounts of ribosomal RNA from 4 bacterial fish pathogens: Aeromonas salmonicida; Tenacibaculum maritimum (formerly Flexibacter maritimus); Lactococcus garvieae; and Yersinia ruckeri was developed. The system uses NucleoLink strips for liquid- and solid-phase PCR in 1 tube, to perform RT-PCR-enzyme hybridisation assays (RT-PCR-EHA) detecting 4 fg or less of rRNA from pure cultures and between 1 and 9 CFU per 200 microl sample volume from selective-enrichment culture media. The liquid-phase amplicons were visualised by gel electrophoresis and the solid-phase amplicons detected using internal probes and visualised using colorimetric detection and p-nitrophenylphosphate.

  3. Development of a Facile and High-Throughput Bioluminescence Assay Using Vibrio fischeri to Determine the Chronic Toxicity of Contaminated Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuhoglu, Deniz; Westlund, Paul; Isazadeh, Siavash; Neamatallah, Sarah; Yargeau, Viviane

    2017-02-01

    Chronic toxicity testing using the luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, has recently been demonstrated to be a suitable bioassay for water quality monitoring. The toxicity evaluation is typically based on determining the EC50 at specific time points which may lead to overlooking the dynamic nature of luminescence response and limits information regarding the possible mechanisms of action of target compounds. This study investigated various approaches (standard, integral, and luminescence rate inhibition) to evaluate the chronic toxicity of three target compounds (atrazine, trimethoprim, and acetamiprid) using a 96-well plate based method. The chronic toxicity assay and the methods used for EC50 calculation provided in this work resulted in a high-throughput method of chronic toxicity testing and indicated lower EC50 than the values provided by the standard short term methods, indicating higher toxicity. This study emphasizes the need for additional chronic toxicity testing to further evaluate the toxicity of compounds or unknown samples.

  4. High-throughput screening of cellulase F mutants from multiplexed plasmid sets using an automated plate assay on a functional proteomic robotic workcell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nasib

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The field of plasmid-based functional proteomics requires the rapid assay of proteins expressed from plasmid libraries. Automation is essential since large sets of mutant open reading frames are being cloned for evaluation. To date no integrated automated platform is available to carry out the entire process including production of plasmid libraries, expression of cloned genes, and functional testing of expressed proteins. Results We used a functional proteomic assay in a multiplexed setting on an integrated plasmid-based robotic workcell for high-throughput screening of mutants of cellulase F, an endoglucanase from the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces PC-2. This allowed us to identify plasmids containing optimized clones expressing mutants with improved activity at lower pH. A plasmid library of mutagenized clones of the celF gene with targeted variations in the last four codons was constructed by site-directed PCR mutagenesis and transformed into Escherichia coli. A robotic picker integrated into the workcell was used to inoculate medium in a 96-well deep well plate, combining the transformants into a multiplexed set in each well, and the plate was incubated on the workcell. Plasmids were prepared from the multiplexed culture on the liquid handler component of the workcell and used for in vitro transcription/translation. The multiplexed expressed recombinant proteins were screened for improved activity and stability in an azo-carboxymethylcellulose plate assay. The multiplexed wells containing mutants with improved activity were identified and linked back to the corresponding multiplexed cultures stored in glycerol. Spread plates were prepared from the glycerol stocks and the workcell was used to pick single colonies from the spread plates, prepare plasmid, produce recombinant protein, and assay for activity. The screening assay and subsequent deconvolution of the multiplexed wells resulted in identification of improved Cel

  5. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  6. A high-throughput cellular assay to quantify the p53-degradation activity of E6 from different human papillomavirus types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, David; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    A subset of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), known as the high-risk types, are the causative agents of cervical cancer and other malignancies of the anogenital region and oral mucosa. The capacity of these viruses to induce cancer and to immortalize cells in culture relies in part on a critical function of their E6 oncoprotein, that of promoting the poly-ubiquitination of the cellular tumor suppressor protein p53 and its subsequent degradation by the proteasome. Here, we describe a cellular assay to measure the p53-degradation activity of E6 from different HPV types. This assay is based on a translational fusion of p53 to Renilla luciferase (Rluc-p53) that remains sensitive to degradation by high-risk E6 and whose steady-state levels can be accurately measured in standard luciferase assays. The p53-degradation activity of any E6 protein can be tested and quantified in transiently transfected cells by determining the amount of E6-expression vector required to reduce by half the levels of RLuc-p53 luciferase activity (50 % effective concentration [EC50]). The high-throughput and quantitative nature of this assay makes it particularly useful to compare the p53-degradation activities of E6 from several HPV types in parallel.

  7. A high-throughput absorbance-based assay for methionine produced by methionine aminopeptidase using S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Gao, Ning; Thresher, Jason; Walkup, Grant K; Whiteaker, James

    2011-06-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase (MAP) (E.C. 3.4.11.18) is a metallopeptidase that cleaves the N-terminal methionine (Met) residue from some proteins. MAP is essential for growth of several bacterial pathogens, making it a target for antibacterial drug discovery. MAP enzymes are also present in eukaryotic cells, and one is a target for antiangiogenic cancer therapy. To screen large compound libraries for MAP inhibitors as the starting point for drug discovery, a high-throughput-compatible assay is valuable. Here the authors describe a novel assay, which detects the Met product of MAP-catalyzed peptide cleavage by coupling it to adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent production of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) and inorganic phosphate (P(i)) by SAM synthetase (MetK) combined with inorganic pyrophosphatase. The three P(i) ions produced for each Met consumed are detected using Malachite Green/molybdate reagent. This assay can use any unmodified peptide MAP substrate with an N-terminal Met. The assay was used to measure kinetic constants for Escherichia coli MAP using Mn(2+) as the activator and the peptide Met-Gly-Met-Met as the substrate, as well as to measure the potency of a MAP inhibitor. A Mn(2+) buffer is described that can be used to prevent free Mn(2+) depletion by chelating compounds from interfering in screens for MAP inhibitors.

  8. Microscopy-based Assays for High-throughput Screening of Host Factors Involved in Brucella Infection of Hela Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Alain; Low, Shyan H; Emmenlauer, Mario; Conde-Alvarez, Raquel; Salcedo, Suzana P; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Dehio, Christoph

    2016-08-05

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular pathogens that infect animals as their natural hosts. Transmission to humans is most commonly caused by direct contact with infected animals or by ingestion of contaminated food and can lead to severe chronic infections. Brucella can invade professional and non-professional phagocytic cells and replicates within endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vacuoles. The host factors required for Brucella entry into host cells, avoidance of lysosomal degradation, and replication in the ER-like compartment remain largely unknown. Here we describe two assays to identify host factors involved in Brucella entry and replication in HeLa cells. The protocols describe the use of RNA interference, while alternative screening methods could be applied. The assays are based on the detection of fluorescently labeled bacteria in fluorescently labeled host cells using automated wide-field microscopy. The fluorescent images are analyzed using a standardized image analysis pipeline in CellProfiler which allows single cell-based infection scoring. In the endpoint assay, intracellular replication is measured two days after infection. This allows bacteria to traffic to their replicative niche where proliferation is initiated around 12 hr after bacterial entry. Brucella which have successfully established an intracellular niche will thus have strongly proliferated inside host cells. Since intracellular bacteria will greatly outnumber individual extracellular or intracellular non-replicative bacteria, a strain constitutively expressing GFP can be used. The strong GFP signal is then used to identify infected cells. In contrast, for the entry assay it is essential to differentiate between intracellular and extracellular bacteria. Here, a strain encoding for a tetracycline-inducible GFP is used. Induction of GFP with simultaneous inactivation of extracellular bacteria by gentamicin enables the differentiation between intracellular and extracellular

  9. Optimized automated data analysis for the cytokinesis‐block micronucleus assay using imaging flow cytometry for high throughput radiation biodosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. A.; Probst, C. E.; Beaton‐Green, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cytokinesis‐block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a well‐established technique that can be employed in triage radiation biodosimetry to estimate whole body doses of radiation to potentially exposed individuals through quantitation of the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in binucleated lymphocyte cells (BNCs). The assay has been partially automated using traditional microscope‐based methods and most recently has been modified for application on the ImageStreamX (ISX) imaging flow cytometer. This modification has allowed for a similar number of BNCs to be automatically scored as compared to traditional microscopy in a much shorter time period. However, the MN frequency measured was much lower than both manual and automated slide‐based methods of performing the assay. This work describes the optimized analysis template which implements newly developed functions in the IDEAS® data analysis software for the ISX that enhances specificity for BNCs and increases the frequency of scored MN. A new dose response calibration curve is presented in which the average rate of MN per BNC is of similar magnitude to those presented in the literature using automated CBMN slide scoring methods. In addition, dose estimates were generated for nine irradiated, blinded samples and were found to be within ±0.5 Gy of the delivered dose. Results demonstrate that the improved identification accuracy for MN and BNCs in the ISX‐based version of the CBMN assay will translate to increased accuracy when estimating unknown radiation doses received by exposed individuals following large‐scale radiological or nuclear emergencies. © 2016 The Authors. Cytometry Part A published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of ISAC PMID:27272602

  10. A High-Throughput Solid-Phase Microplate Protein-Binding Assay to Investigate Interactions between Myofilament Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Biesiadecki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the structure-function relationship of muscle-regulatory-protein isoforms, mutations, and posttranslational modifications, it is necessary to probe functional effects at the level of the protein-protein interaction. Traditional methodologies assessing such protein-protein interactions are laborious and require significant amounts of purified protein, while many current methodologies require costly and specialized equipment or modification of the proteins, which may affect their interaction. To address these issues, we developed a novel method of microplate-based solid-phase protein-binding assay over the recent years. This method assesses specific protein-protein interactions at physiological conditions, utilizes relatively small amounts of protein, is free of protein modification, and does not require specialized instrumentation. Here we present detailed methodology for the solid-phase protein-binding assay with examples that we have successfully applied to quantify interactions of myofilament-regulatory proteins. We further provide considerations for optimization of the assay conditions and its broader application in studies of other protein-protein interactions.

  11. Prevalence of H63D, S65C and C282Y hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations in Slovenian population by an improved high-throughput genotyping assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupreht Ruth

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is a common genetic disease characterized by excessive iron overload that leads to multi-organ failure. Although the most prevalent genotype in HH is homozygosity for C282Y mutation of the HFE gene, two additional mutations, H63D and S65C, appear to be associated with a milder form of HH. The aim of this study was to develop a high-throughput assay for HFE mutations screening based on TaqMan technology and to determine the frequencies of HFE mutations in the Slovenian population. Methods Altogether, 1282 randomly selected blood donors from different Slovenian regions and 21 HH patients were analyzed for the presence of HFE mutations by an in-house developed real-time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology using shorter non-interfering fluorescent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-specific MGB probes. The assay was validated by RFLP analysis and DNA sequencing. Results The genotyping assay of the H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations in the HFE gene, based on TaqMan technology proved to be fast, reliable, with a high-throughput capability and 100% concordant with genotypes obtained by RFLP and DNA sequencing. The observed frequency of C282Y homozygotes in the group of HH patients was only 48%, others were of the heterogeneous HFE genotype. Among 1282 blood donors tested, the observed H63D, S65C and C282Y allele frequency were 12.8% (95% confidence interval (CI 11.5 – 14.2%, 1.8% (95% CI 1.4 – 2.5% and 3.6% (95% CI 3.0 – 4.5%, respectively. Approximately 33% of the tested subjects had at least one of the three HH mutations, and 1% of them were C282Y homozygotes or compound heterozygotes C282Y/H63D or C282Y/S65C, presenting an increased risk for iron overload disease. A significant variation in H63D allele frequency was observed for one of the Slovenian regions. Conclusion The improved real-time PCR assay for H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations detection is accurate, fast, cost-efficient and ready for

  12. Prevalence of H63D, S65C and C282Y hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations in Slovenian population by an improved high-throughput genotyping assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukjati, Marko; Vaupotic, Tomaz; Rupreht, Ruth; Curin-Serbec, Vladka

    2007-11-23

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a common genetic disease characterized by excessive iron overload that leads to multi-organ failure. Although the most prevalent genotype in HH is homozygosity for C282Y mutation of the HFE gene, two additional mutations, H63D and S65C, appear to be associated with a milder form of HH. The aim of this study was to develop a high-throughput assay for HFE mutations screening based on TaqMan technology and to determine the frequencies of HFE mutations in the Slovenian population. Altogether, 1282 randomly selected blood donors from different Slovenian regions and 21 HH patients were analyzed for the presence of HFE mutations by an in-house developed real-time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology using shorter non-interfering fluorescent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific MGB probes. The assay was validated by RFLP analysis and DNA sequencing. The genotyping assay of the H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations in the HFE gene, based on TaqMan technology proved to be fast, reliable, with a high-throughput capability and 100% concordant with genotypes obtained by RFLP and DNA sequencing. The observed frequency of C282Y homozygotes in the group of HH patients was only 48%, others were of the heterogeneous HFE genotype. Among 1282 blood donors tested, the observed H63D, S65C and C282Y allele frequency were 12.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 11.5-14.2%), 1.8% (95% CI 1.4-2.5%) and 3.6% (95% CI 3.0-4.5%), respectively. Approximately 33% of the tested subjects had at least one of the three HH mutations, and 1% of them were C282Y homozygotes or compound heterozygotes C282Y/H63D or C282Y/S65C, presenting an increased risk for iron overload disease. A significant variation in H63D allele frequency was observed for one of the Slovenian regions. The improved real-time PCR assay for H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations detection is accurate, fast, cost-efficient and ready for routine screening and diagnostic procedures. The genotype frequencies in

  13. Risk-based high-throughput chemical screening and prioritization using exposure models and in vitro bioactivity assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Ernstoff, Alexi; Arnot, Jon

    2015-01-01

    relevant use scenarios (e.g., dermal application, indoor emissions). For each chemical and use scenario, exposure models are then used to calculate a chemical intake fraction, or a product intake fraction, accounting for chemical properties and the exposed population. We then combine these intake fractions...... with use scenario-specific estimates of chemical quantity to calculate daily intake rates (iR; mg/kg/day). These intake rates are compared to oral equivalent doses (OED; mg/kg/day), calculated from a suite of ToxCast in vitro bioactivity assays using in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation and reverse dosimetry...

  14. Tackling heterogeneity: a leaf disc-based assay for the high-throughput screening of transient gene expression in tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Piotrzkowski

    Full Text Available Transient Agrobacterium-mediated gene expression assays for Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum are frequently used because they facilitate the comparison of multiple expression constructs regarding their capacity for maximum recombinant protein production. However, for three model proteins, we found that recombinant protein accumulation (rpa was significantly influenced by leaf age and leaf position effects. The ratio between the highest and lowest amount of protein accumulation (max/min ratio was found to be as high as 11. Therefore, construct-based impacts on the rpa level that are less than 11-fold will be masked by background noise. To address this problem, we developed a leaf disc-based screening assay and infiltration device that allows the rpa level in a whole tobacco plant to be reliably and reproducibly determined. The prototype of the leaf disc infiltration device allows 14 Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration events to be conducted in parallel. As shown for three model proteins, the average max/min rpa ratio was reduced to 1.4 using this method, which allows for a sensitive comparison of different genetic elements affecting recombinant protein expression.

  15. High-throughput Characterization of HIV-1 Reservoir Reactivation Using a Single-Cell-in-Droplet PCR Assay

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    Robert W. Yucha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of latent viral reservoirs is on the forefront of HIV-1 eradication research. However, it is unknown if latency reversing agents (LRAs increase the level of viral transcription from cells producing HIV RNA or harboring transcriptionally-inactive (latent infection. We therefore developed a microfluidic single-cell-in-droplet (scdPCR assay to directly measure the number of CD4+ T cells that produce unspliced (usRNA and multiply spliced (msRNA following ex vivo latency reversal with either an histone deacetylase inhibitor (romidepsin or T cell receptor (TCR stimulation. Detection of HIV-1 transcriptional activity can also be performed on hundreds of thousands of CD4+ T-cells in a single experiment. The scdPCR method was then applied to CD4+ T cells obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Overall, our results suggest that effects of LRAs on HIV-1 reactivation may be heterogeneous—increasing transcription from active cells in some cases and increasing the number of transcriptionally active cells in others. Genomic DNA and human mRNA isolated from HIV-1 reactivated cells could also be detected and quantified from individual cells. As a result, our assay has the potential to provide needed insight into various reservoir eradication strategies.

  16. A High-Throughput Flow Cytometry Assay for Identification of Inhibitors of 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Dominique; Simons, Peter C; Smagley, Yelena; Sklar, Larry A; Chigaev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell transporters have long been used to develop potential therapies for reversing drug resistance in cancer cells. In flow cytometry, these approaches rely on the use of fluorescent substrates of transporters. Compounds which prevent the loss of cell fluorescence have typically been pursued as inhibitors of specific transporters, but further drug development has been largely unsuccessful. One possible reason for this low success rate could be a substantial overlap in substrate specificities and functions between transporters of different families. Additionally, the fluorescent substrates are often synthetic dyes that exhibit promiscuity among transporters as well. Here, we describe an assay in which a fluorescent analog of a natural metabolite, 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (F-cAMP), is actively effluxed by malignant leukemia cells. The F-cAMP is loaded into the cell cytoplasm using a procedure based on the osmotic lysis of pinocytic vesicles. The flow cytometric analysis of the fluorescence retained in F-cAMP-loaded cells incubated with various compounds can subsequently identify inhibitors of cyclic AMP efflux (ICE).

  17. High-throughput and cost-effective global DNA methylation assay by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingnan; Franke, Adrian A.

    2015-01-01

    An affordable and fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the accurate and precise determination of global DNA methylation levels in peripheral blood. Global DNA methylation extent was expressed as the ratio of methylated 2′-deoxycytidine (5MedC) to 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG), which were obtained after DNA extraction and hydrolysis and determined by positive electrospray LC–ESI-MS/MS. The cost-effective internal standards 15N3-dC and 15N5-dG were incorporated for the accurate quantification of 5MedC and dG, respectively. The desired nucleoside analytes were separated and eluted by LC within 2.5 min on a reverse phase column with a limit of detection of 1.4 femtomole on column for 5MedC. Sample preparation in 96-well format has significantly increased the assay throughput and filtration was found to be a necessary step to assure precision. Precision was performed with repeated analysis of four DNA QC sample over 12 days, with mean intra- and inter-day CVs of 6% and 11%, respectively. Accuracy was evaluated by comparison with a previously reported method showing a mean CV of 4% for 5 subjects analyzed. Furthermore, application of the assay using a benchtop orbitrap LCMS in exact mass full scan mode showed comparable sensitivity to tandem LCMS using multiple reaction monitoring. PMID:21843675

  18. Design of a high-throughput human neural crest cell migration assay to indicate potential developmental toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Johanna; Karreman, Christiaan; Leisner, Heidrun; Kim, Yong Jun; Lee, Gabsang; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Migration of neural crest cells (NCCs) is one of the pivotal processes of human fetal development. Malformations arise if NCC migration and differentiation are impaired genetically or by toxicants. In the currently available test systems for migration inhibition of NCC (MINC), the manual generation of a cell-free space results in extreme operator dependencies, and limits throughput. Here a new test format was established. The assay avoids scratching by plating cells around a commercially available circular stopper. Removal of the stopper barrier after cell attachment initiates migration. This microwell-based circular migration zone NCC function assay (cMINC) was further optimized for toxicological testing of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived NCCs. The challenge of obtaining data on viability and migration by automated image processing was addressed by developing a freeware. Data on cell proliferation were obtained by labelling replicating cells, and by careful assessment of cell viability for each experimental sample. The role of cell proliferation as an experimental confounder was tested experimentally by performing the cMINC in the presence of the proliferation-inhibiting drug cytosine arabinoside (AraC), and by a careful evaluation of mitotic events over time. Data from these studies led to an adaptation of the test protocol, so that toxicant exposure was limited to 24 h. Under these conditions, a prediction model was developed that allows classification of toxicants as either inactive, leading to unspecific cytotoxicity, or specifically inhibiting NC migration at non-cytotoxic concentrations.

  19. Tackling heterogeneity: a leaf disc-based assay for the high-throughput screening of transient gene expression in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrzkowski, Natalia; Schillberg, Stefan; Rasche, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Transient Agrobacterium-mediated gene expression assays for Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) are frequently used because they facilitate the comparison of multiple expression constructs regarding their capacity for maximum recombinant protein production. However, for three model proteins, we found that recombinant protein accumulation (rpa) was significantly influenced by leaf age and leaf position effects. The ratio between the highest and lowest amount of protein accumulation (max/min ratio) was found to be as high as 11. Therefore, construct-based impacts on the rpa level that are less than 11-fold will be masked by background noise. To address this problem, we developed a leaf disc-based screening assay and infiltration device that allows the rpa level in a whole tobacco plant to be reliably and reproducibly determined. The prototype of the leaf disc infiltration device allows 14 Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration events to be conducted in parallel. As shown for three model proteins, the average max/min rpa ratio was reduced to 1.4 using this method, which allows for a sensitive comparison of different genetic elements affecting recombinant protein expression.

  20. Comparison of two high-throughput assays for quantification of adenovirus type 5 neutralizing antibodies in a population of donors in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The presence of various levels of Adenovirus serotype 5 neutralizing antibodies (Ad5NAb is thought to contribute to the inconsistent clinical results obtained from vaccination and gene therapy studies. Currently, two platforms based on high-throughput technology are available for Ad5NAb quantification, chemiluminescence- and fluorescence-based assays. The aim of this study was to compare the results of two assays in the seroepidemiology of Ad5NAb in a local population of donors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The fluorescence-based neutralizing antibody detection test (FRNT using recombinant Ad5-EGFP virus and the chemiluminescence-based neutralizing antibody test (CLNT using Ad5-Fluc were developed and standardized for detecting the presence of Ad5NAb in serum samples from the population of donors in Beijing and Anhui provinces, China. First, the overall percentage of people positive for Ad5NAb performed by CLNT was higher than that obtained by FRNT (85.4 vs 69.9%, p<0.001. There was an 84.5% concordance between the two assays for the 206 samples tested (144 positive in both assays and 30 negative in both assays. All 32 discordant sera were CLNT-positive/FRNT-negative and were confirmed positive by western blot. Secondly, for all 144 sera positive by both assays, the two assays showed high correlation (r = 0.94, p<0.001 and close agreement (mean difference: 0.395 log(10, 95% CI: -0.054 log(10 to 0.845 log(10. Finally, it was found by both assays that there was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender (p = 0.503 vs 0.818, for two assays; however, age range (p = 0.049 vs 0.010 and geographic origin (p = 0.007 vs 0.011 were correlated with Ad5NAb prevalence in northern regions of China. CONCLUSION: The CLNT assay was relatively more simple and had higher sensitivity than the FRNT assay for determining Ad5NAb titers. It is strongly suggested that the CLNT assay be used for future

  1. Miniaturizing 3D assay for high-throughput drug and genetic screens for small patient-derived tumor samples (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Asaf; Garraway, Levi; Su, Mei-Ju; Basu, Anindita; Regev, Aviv; Struhl, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional growth conditions reflect the natural environment of cancer cells and are crucial to be performed at drug screens. We developed a 3D assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the 50-year old benchmark assay-soft agar. Using GILA, we performed high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. This phenotypic approach is complementary to our genetic approach that utilizes single-cell RNA-sequencing of a patient sample to identify putative oncogenes that confer sensitivity to drugs designed to specifically inhibit the identified oncoprotein. Currently, we are dealing with a big challenge in our field- the limited number of cells that might be extracted from a biopsy. Small patient-derived samples are hard to test in the traditional multiwell plate and it will be helpful to minimize the culture area and the experimental system. We managed to design a suitable microfluidic device for limited number of cells and perform the assay using image analysis. We aim to test drugs on tumor cells, outside of the patient body- and recommend on the ideal treatment that is tailored to the individual. This device will help to minimize biopsy-sampling volumes and minimize interventions in the patient's tumor.

  2. Brush and Spray: A High-Throughput Systemic Acquired Resistance Assay Suitable for Large-Scale Genetic Screening1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Beibei; Xu, Shaohua; Xu, Mo; Li, Yan; Li, Shuxin; Ding, Jinmei; Zhang, Yuelin

    2011-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a defense mechanism induced in the distal parts of plants after primary infection. It confers long-lasting protection against a broad spectrum of microbial pathogens. Lack of high-throughput assays has hampered the forward genetic analysis of SAR. Here, we report the development of an easy and efficient assay for SAR and its application in a forward genetic screen for SAR-deficient mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using the new assay for SAR, we identified six flavin-dependent monooxygenase1, four AGD2-like defense response protein1, three salicylic acid induction-deficient2, one phytoalexin deficient4, and one avrPphB-susceptible3 alleles as well as a gain-of-function mutant of CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR3 designated camta3-3D. Like transgenic plants overexpressing CAMTA3, camta3-3D mutant plants exhibit compromised SAR and enhanced susceptibility to virulent pathogens, suggesting that CAMTA3 is a critical regulator of both basal resistance and SAR. PMID:21900483

  3. A Rapid and High-Throughput Screening Approach for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Based on the Combination of Two Different Real-Time PCR Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maarseveen, Noortje M.; van Hannen, Erik J.; van Zwet, Anton A.; Mascini, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen that has been responsible for major nosocomial epidemics worldwide. For infection control programs, rapid and adequate detection of MRSA is of great importance. We developed a rapid and high-throughput molecular screening approach that consists of an overnight selective broth enrichment, followed by mecA, mecC, and S. aureus-specific (SA442 gene) real-time PCR assays, with subsequent confirmation using a staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec)-orfX-based real-time PCR assay (GeneOhm MRSA assay) and culture. Here, the results of the screening approach over a 2-year period are presented. During this period, a total of 13,387 samples were analyzed for the presence of MRSA, 2.6% of which were reported as MRSA positive. No MRSA isolates carrying the mecC gene were detected during this study. Based on the results of the real-time PCR assays only, 95.2% of the samples could be reported as negative within 24 h. Furthermore, the performance of these real-time PCR assays was evaluated using a set of 104 assorted MRSA isolates, which demonstrated high sensitivity for both the combination of mecA and mecC with SA442 and the BD GeneOhm MRSA assay (98.1% and 97.1%, respectively). This molecular screening approach proved to be an accurate method for obtaining reliable negative results within 24 h after arrival at the laboratory and contributes to improvement of infection control programs, especially in areas with a low MRSA prevalence. PMID:24871220

  4. High-Throughput Assay Development for Cystine-Glutamate Antiporter (xc- Highlights Faster Cystine Uptake than Glutamate Release in Glioma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit G Thomas

    Full Text Available The cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc- is a Na+-independent amino acid transporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. It is thought to play a critical role in cellular redox processes through regulation of intracellular glutathione synthesis via cystine uptake. In gliomas, system xc- expression is universally up-regulated while that of glutamate transporters down-regulated, leading to a progressive accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding non-tumorous tissue. Additionally, up-regulation of system xc- in activated microglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders mediated by excess glutamate. Consequently, system xc- is a new drug target for brain cancer and neuroinflammatory diseases associated with excess extracellular glutamate. Unfortunately no potent and selective small molecule system xc- inhibitors exist and to our knowledge, no high throughput screening (HTS assay has been developed to identify new scaffolds for inhibitor design. To develop such an assay, various neuronal and non-neuronal human cells were evaluated as sources of system xc-. Human glioma cells were chosen based on their high system xc- activity. Using these cells, [14C]-cystine uptake and cystine-induced glutamate release assays were characterized and optimized with respect to cystine and protein concentrations and time of incubation. A pilot screen of the LOPAC/NINDS libraries using glutamate release demonstrated that the logistics of the assay were in place but unfortunately, did not yield meaningful pharmacophores. A larger, HTS campaign using the 384-well cystine-induced glutamate release as primary assay and the 96-well 14C-cystine uptake as confirmatory assay is currently underway. Unexpectedly, we observed that the rate of cystine uptake was significantly faster than the rate of glutamate release in human glioma cells. This was in contrast to the

  5. Quantitative genotoxicity assays for analysis of medicinal plants: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponchiado, Graziela; Adam, Mônica Lucia; Silva, Caroline Dadalt; Soley, Bruna Silva; de Mello-Sampayo, Cristina; Cabrini, Daniela Almeida; Correr, Cassyano Januário; Otuki, Michel Fleith

    2016-02-03

    Medicinal plants are known to contain numerous biologically active compounds, and although they have proven pharmacological properties, they can cause harm, including DNA damage. Review the literature to evaluate the genotoxicity risk of medicinal plants, explore the genotoxicity assays most used and compare these to the current legal requirements. A quantitative systematic review of the literature, using the keywords "medicinal plants", "genotoxicity" and "mutagenicity", was undertakenQ to identify the types of assays most used to assess genotoxicity, and to evaluate the genotoxicity potential of medicinal plant extracts. The database searches retrieved 2289 records, 458 of which met the inclusion criteria. Evaluation of the selected articles showed a total of 24 different assays used for an assessment of medicinal plant extract genotoxicity. More than a quarter of those studies (28.4%) reported positive results for genotoxicity. This review demonstrates that a range of genotoxicity assay methods are used to evaluate the genotoxicity potential of medicinal plant extracts. The most used methods are those recommended by regulatory agencies. However, based on the current findings, in order to conduct a thorough study concerning the possible genotoxic effects of a medicinal plant, we indicate that it is important always to include bacterial and mammalian tests, with at least one in vivo assay. Also, these tests should be capable of detecting outcomes that include mutation induction, clastogenic and aneugenic effects, and structural chromosome abnormalities. In addition, the considerable rate of positive results detected in this analysis further supports the relevance of assessing the genotoxicity potential of medicinal plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Quantification of rapid Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation using high-throughput in-cell Western assays: comparison to Western immunoblots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector N Aguilar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of phospho-proteins (PPs is crucial when studying cellular signaling pathways. Western immunoblotting (WB is commonly used for the measurement of relative levels of signaling intermediates in experimental samples. However, WB is in general a labour-intensive and low-throughput technique. Because of variability in protein yield and phospho-signal preservation during protein harvesting, and potential loss of antigen during protein transfer, WB provides only semi-quantitative data. By comparison, the "in-cell western" (ICW technique has high-throughput capacity and requires less extensive sample preparation. Thus, we compared the ICW technique to WB for measuring phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain (PMLC(20 in primary cultures of uterine myocytes to assess their relative specificity, sensitivity, precision, and quantification of biologically relevant responses.ICWs are cell-based microplate assays for quantification of protein targets in their cellular context. ICWs utilize a two-channel infrared (IR scanner (Odyssey(R to quantify signals arising from near-infrared (NIR fluorophores conjugated to secondary antibodies. One channel is dedicated to measuring the protein of interest and the second is used for data normalization of the signal in each well of the microplate. Using uterine myocytes, we assessed oxytocin (OT-stimulated MLC(20 phosphorylation measured by ICW and WB, both using NIR fluorescence. ICW and WB data were comparable regarding signal linearity, signal specificity, and time course of phosphorylation response to OT.ICW and WB yield comparable biological data. The advantages of ICW over WB are its high-throughput capacity, improved precision, and reduced sample preparation requirements. ICW might provide better sensitivity and precision with low-quantity samples or for protocols requiring large numbers of samples. These features make the ICW technique an excellent tool for the study of phosphorylation endpoints

  7. Evaluation of the Effects of Mitragyna speciosa Alkaloid Extract on Cytochrome P450 Enzymes Using a High Throughput Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Elina Raja Aziddin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The extract from Mitragyna speciosa has been widely used as an opium substitute, mainly due to its morphine-like pharmacological effects. This study investigated the effects of M. speciosa alkaloid extract (MSE on human recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP enzyme activities using a modified Crespi method. As compared with the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method, this method has shown to be a fast and cost-effective way to perform CYP inhibition studies. The results indicated that MSE has the most potent inhibitory effect on CYP3A4 and CYP2D6, with apparent half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 0.78 µg/mL and 0.636 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, moderate inhibition was observed for CYP1A2, with an IC50 of 39 µg/mL, and weak inhibition was detected for CYP2C19. The IC50 of CYP2C19 could not be determined, however, because inhibition was < 50%. Competitive inhibition was found for the MSE-treated CYP2D6 inhibition assay, whereas non-competitive inhibition was shown in inhibition assays using CYP3A4, CYP1A2 and CYP2C19. Quinidine (CYP2D6, ketoconazole (CYP3A4, tranylcypromine (CYP2C19 and furafylline (CYP1A2 were used as positive controls throughout the experiments. This study shows that MSE may contribute to an herb-drug interaction if administered concomitantly with drugs that are substrates for CYP3A4, CYP2D6 and CYP1A2.

  8. High throughput screening (HTS) for phototoxicity hazard using the in vitro 3T3 neutral red uptake assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P A; King, A V

    2003-01-01

    Testing for phototoxic hazard is usually carried out for product ingredients intended for use on skin, which may be exposed to sunlight. Unilever currently uses the validated in vitro 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake phototoxicity test (NRU PT). This protocol involves 2-3 experiments, each taking 3 days to perform. One person can test up to seven test materials plus positive control at any one time, requiring approximately 0.5 g test material. Higher throughput is required where libraries of potential actives are being generated and screening for potential phototoxicants is required. A proposed HTS protocol would use the NRU PT, but only one concentration (10 microg/ml) in a single experiment. The validity of the HTS protocol was investigated by a retrospective examination of data from 86 materials previously tested. Phototoxic hazard predictions made using the conventional NRU PT were compared with those obtained if only data at 10 microg/ml were considered. A majority of 73 materials (84.9%) gave agreement in predictions between the two protocols; for 13 materials (15.1%) the assessments did not agree. There were no false positives; however, there were some false negatives, i.e., predicted as phototoxic from the conventional assay, but non-phototoxic at 10 microg/ml. As this protocol is intended for screening purposes only it is considered that this would be acceptable at this stage in material selection. One person could screen 128 test materials in 3 days, requiring selected for further development and inclusion in a formulation may require further confirmatory testing, e.g. using a human skin model assay for phototoxicity.

  9. Developing high throughput quantitative PCR assays for diagnosing Ikeda and other Theileria orientalis types common to New Zealand in bovine blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulford, D J; Gias, E; Bueno, I M; McFadden, Amj

    2016-01-01

    µL of blood. All qPCR assays had improved specificity and sensitivity over existing conventional PCR assays for diagnosis of T. orientalis Ikeda. The burden of Ikeda DNA in blood was demonstrated using an Ikeda-specific qPCR assay with titrated synthetic gene target. Adoption of high-throughput DNA extraction and qPCR reduced T. orientalis and Ikeda diagnosis times. The Ikeda-specific qPCR assay provides a specific diagnosis for Ikeda in animals with signs of infection with T. orientalis and can be used to monitor the parasite load of Ikeda in blood.

  10. Cell-Based High-Throughput Luciferase Reporter Gene Assays for Identifying and Profiling Chemical Modulators of Endoplasmic Reticulum Signaling Protein, IRE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Juan; Pass, Ian; Diaz, Paul W; Ngo, Tram A; Sauer, Michelle; Magnuson, Gavin; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Hassig, Christian A; Jackson, Michael R; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2015-12-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates three distinct signal transducers on the ER membrane. Inositol-requiring protein 1 (IRE1), the most conserved signal transducer, plays a key role in ER stress-mediated signaling. During ER stress, IRE1 initiates two discrete signaling cascades: the "adaptive" signaling cascade mediated by the XBP1 pathway and the "alarm" signaling cascade mediated by stress-activated protein kinase pathways. Fine-tuning of the balance between the adaptive and alarm signals contributes significantly to cellular fate under ER stress. Thus, we propose that the design of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to selectively monitor IRE1 mediated-signaling would be desirable for drug discovery. To this end, we report the generation of stable human neural cell lines and development of cell-based HTS luciferase (Luc) reporter gene assays for the identification of pathway-specific chemical modulators of IRE1. We implemented a cell-based Luc assay using a chimeric CHOP-Gal4 transcription factor in 384-well format for monitoring IRE1 kinase-mediated p38MAPK activation and an unfolded response pathway element (URPE)-Luc cell-based assay in 1536-well format for monitoring IRE1's RNase-mediated activation of XBP1. Chemical library screening was successfully conducted with both the CHOP/Gal4-Luc cells and UPRE-Luc engineered cells. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of using these HTS assays for discovery of pathway-selective modulators of IRE1. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. The development and validation of EpiComet-Chip, a modified high-throughput comet assay for the assessment of DNA methylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Todd A; Parrish, Marcus C; Engelward, Bevin P; Manjanatha, Mugimane G

    2017-08-01

    DNA damage and alterations in global DNA methylation status are associated with multiple human diseases and are frequently correlated with clinically relevant information. Therefore, assessing DNA damage and epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, is critical for predicting human exposure risk of pharmacological and biological agents. We previously developed a higher-throughput platform for the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay, CometChip, to assess DNA damage and genotoxic potential. Here, we utilized the methylation-dependent endonuclease, McrBC, to develop a modified alkaline comet assay, "EpiComet," which allows single platform evaluation of genotoxicity and global DNA methylation [5-methylcytosine (5-mC)] status of single-cell populations under user-defined conditions. Further, we leveraged the CometChip platform to create an EpiComet-Chip system capable of performing quantification across simultaneous exposure protocols to enable unprecedented speed and simplicity. This system detected global methylation alterations in response to exposures which included chemotherapeutic and environmental agents. Using EpiComet-Chip on 63 matched samples, we correctly identified single-sample hypermethylation (≥1.5-fold) at 87% (20/23), hypomethylation (≥1.25-fold) at 100% (9/9), with a 4% (2/54) false-negative rate (FNR), and 10% (4/40) false-positive rate (FPR). Using a more stringent threshold to define hypermethylation (≥1.75-fold) allowed us to correctly identify 94% of hypermethylation (17/18), but increased our FPR to 16% (7/45). The successful application of this novel technology will aid hazard identification and risk characterization of FDA-regulated products, while providing utility for investigating epigenetic modes of action of agents in target organs, as the assay is amenable to cultured cells or nucleated cells from any tissue. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:508-521, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Detection of knockdown resistance (kdr mutations in Anopheles gambiae: a comparison of two new high-throughput assays with existing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball Amanda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knockdown resistance (kdr is a well-characterized mechanism of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in many insect species and is caused by point mutations of the pyrethroid target site the para-type sodium channel. The presence of kdr mutations in Anopheles gambiae, the most important malaria vector in Africa, has been monitored using a variety of molecular techniques. However, there are few reports comparing the performance of these different assays. In this study, two new high-throughput assays were developed and compared with four established techniques. Methods Fluorescence-based assays based on 1 TaqMan probes and 2 high resolution melt (HRM analysis were developed to detect kdr alleles in An. gambiae. Four previously reported techniques for kdr detection, Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (AS-PCR, Heated Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay (HOLA, Sequence Specific Oligonucleotide Probe – Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (SSOP-ELISA and PCR-Dot Blot were also optimized. The sensitivity and specificity of all six assays was then compared in a blind genotyping trial of 96 single insect samples that included a variety of kdr genotypes and African Anopheline species. The relative merits of each assay was assessed based on the performance in the genotyping trial, the length/difficulty of each protocol, cost (both capital outlay and consumable cost, and safety (requirement for hazardous chemicals. Results The real-time TaqMan assay was both the most sensitive (with the lowest number of failed reactions and the most specific (with the lowest number of incorrect scores. Adapting the TaqMan assay to use a PCR machine and endpoint measurement with a fluorimeter showed a slight reduction in sensitivity and specificity. HRM initially gave promising results but was more sensitive to both DNA quality and quantity and consequently showed a higher rate of failure and incorrect scores. The sensitivity and specificity of AS

  13. AlphaScreen-based homogeneous assay using a pair of 25-residue artificial proteins for high-throughput analysis of non-native IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senga, Yukako; Imamura, Hiroshi; Miyafusa, Takamitsu; Watanabe, Hideki; Honda, Shinya

    2017-09-29

    Therapeutic IgG becomes unstable under various stresses in the manufacturing process. The resulting non-native IgG molecules tend to associate with each other and form aggregates. Because such aggregates not only decrease the pharmacological effect but also become a potential risk factor for immunogenicity, rapid analysis of aggregation is required for quality control of therapeutic IgG. In this study, we developed a homogeneous assay using AlphaScreen and AF.2A1. AF.2A1 is a 25-residue artificial protein that binds specifically to non-native IgG generated under chemical and physical stresses. This assay is performed in a short period of time. Our results show that AF.2A1-AlphaScreen may be used to evaluate the various types of IgG, as AF.2A1 recognizes the non-native structure in the constant region (Fc region) of IgG. The assay was effective for detection of non-native IgG, with particle size up to ca. 500 nm, generated under acid, heat, and stirring conditions. In addition, this technique is suitable for analyzing non-native IgG in CHO cell culture supernatant and mixed with large amounts of native IgG. These results indicate the potential of AF.2A1-AlphaScreen to be used as a high-throughput evaluation method for process monitoring as well as quality testing in the manufacturing of therapeutic IgG.

  14. Analysis of Epitopes on Dengue Virus Envelope Protein Recognized by Monoclonal Antibodies and Polyclonal Human Sera by a High Throughput Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-En; Tsai, Wen-Yang; Liu, I-Ju; Li, Pi-Chun; Liao, Mei-Ying; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Lai, Chih-Yun; Lu, Chih-Hsuan; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung; Chang, Gwong-Jen; Wu, Han-Chung; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2012-01-01

    Background The envelope (E) protein of dengue virus (DENV) is the major target of neutralizing antibodies and vaccine development. While previous studies on domain III or domain I/II alone have reported several epitopes of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against DENV E protein, the possibility of interdomain epitopes and the relationship between epitopes and neutralizing potency remain largely unexplored. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a dot blot assay by using 67 alanine mutants of predicted surface-exposed E residues as a systematic approach to identify epitopes recognized by mAbs and polyclonal sera, and confirmed our findings using a capture-ELISA assay. Of the 12 mouse mAbs tested, three recognized a novel epitope involving residues (Q211, D215, P217) at the central interface of domain II, and three recognized residues at both domain III and the lateral ridge of domain II, suggesting a more frequent presence of interdomain epitopes than previously appreciated. Compared with mAbs generated by traditional protocols, the potent neutralizing mAbs generated by a new protocol recognized multiple residues in A strand or residues in C strand/CC′ loop of DENV2 and DENV1, and multiple residues in BC loop and residues in DE loop, EF loop/F strand or G strand of DENV1. The predominant epitopes of anti-E antibodies in polyclonal sera were found to include both fusion loop and non-fusion residues in the same or adjacent monomer. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses have implications for epitope-specific diagnostics and epitope-based dengue vaccines. This high throughput method has tremendous application for mapping both intra and interdomain epitopes recognized by human mAbs and polyclonal sera, which would further our understanding of humoral immune responses to DENV at the epitope level. PMID:22235356

  15. Comparative investigations of genotoxic activity of five nitriles in the comet assay and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jong-C; Hseu, You C; Chen, Chin-H; Wang, Shu-H; Chen, Ssu C

    2009-09-30

    Two short-term assays, the modified Ames test and the comet assay, were carried out to evaluate the genotoxicity of five nitriles (acetonitrile, propionitrile, methacrylonitrile, butyronitrile, and benzonitrile). With the comet assay, all the nitriles studied were found to induce the genotoxicity in human lymphocytes and Hep G2 cells. Except for butyronitrile, the genotoxic potency in lymphocytes was more pronounced than that in Hep G2 cells, and the rank order of genotoxicity induced by these five nitriles in lymphocytes was different from that in Hep G2 cells, indicating that the pathways leading to genotoxicity in both types of cells were different. In the modified Ames test, no tested nitriles showed mutagenic activity on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 98 and TA 100 with and without metabolic activation. Comparing the results obtained from both tests in this study, the comet assay seems to be more sensitive than the modified Ames test. Thus, the comet assay can be used to detect the genotoxicity of all nitriles.

  16. Genotype MTBDRsl line probe assay shortens time to diagnosis of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in a high-throughput diagnostic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Marinus; Warren, Rob; Gey Van Pittius, Nico; van Helden, Paul; Bosman, Marlein; Streicher, Elizabeth; Coetzee, Gerrit; O'Brien, Richard

    2012-12-15

    Conventional culture-based drug susceptibility testing (DST) for the second-line antituberculosis drugs is slow, leading to diagnostic delay with associated exacerbation of transmission, amplification of resistance, and increased mortality. To assess the diagnostic performance of the GenoType MTBDRsl line probe assay (LPA) for the rapid detection of mutations conferring resistance to ofloxacin (OFX), amikacin (AMK), and ethambutol and to determine the impact of implementation on the turnaround time in a high-throughput diagnostic laboratory. Six hundred and fifty-seven direct patient acid-fast bacilli smear-positive specimens resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, or both according to the GenoType MTBDRplus assay were consecutively tested, using the GenoType MTBDRsl LPA. The diagnostic performance was assessed relative to the "gold standard" culture-based method, and the laboratory turnaround times for both methods were determined. A total of 516 of 657 patient specimens had valid results for both tests. The sensitivity for detecting OFX, AMK, and extensive drug resistance, using the GenoType MTBDRsl LPA, was 90.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80.1-96.0%), 100% (95% CI, 91.8-100%), and 92.3% (95% CI, 75.9-97.9%), respectively, and the specificity for detection was 98.1% (95% CI, 96.3-99.0%), 99.4% (95% CI, 98.2-99.8%), and 99.6% (95% CI, 98.5-99.9%), respectively. Implementation of this test significantly reduced the turnaround time by 93.3% (P < 0.001), calculated from the date that the specimen was received at the laboratory to reporting second-line results. In addition, a significant increase in diagnostic yield of 20.1% and 19.3% (P < 0.001) for OFX and AMK resistance, respectively, was obtained for isolates that were either contaminated or had lost viability. The GenoType MTBDRsl LPA is a rapid and reliable DST that can be easily incorporated into the diagnostic algorithm. This assay significantly improved diagnostic yield (P < 0.001) while simultaneously

  17. Assessment of genotoxic effects of flumorph by the comet assay in mice organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Zhao, Q; Zhang, Y; Ning, J

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the genotoxic effects of flumorph in various organs (brain, liver, spleen, kidney and sperm) of mice. The DNA damage, measured as comet tail length (µm), was determined using the alkaline comet assay. The comet assay is a sensitive assay for the detection of genotoxicity caused by flumorph using mice as a model. Statistically significant increases in comet assay for both dose-dependent and duration-dependent DNA damage were observed in all the organs assessed. The organs exhibited the maximum DNA damage in 96 h at 54 mg/kg body weight. Brain showed maximum DNA damage followed by spleen > kidney > liver > sperm. Our data demonstrated that flumorph had induced systemic genotoxicity in mammals as it caused DNA damage in all tested vital organs, especially in brain and spleen.

  18. Assessment of Genotoxicity of Ionizing radiation using Tradescantia-Comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min; Ryu, Tae Ho; Hyun, Kyung Man; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Wilhelmova, Nad [Institute of Experimental Botany, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-05-15

    Over the last two decades, several new methodologies for the detection of DNA damage have been developed. The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, also called the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was first introduced by Ostling and Johanson as a microelectrophoretic technique for the direct visualization of DNA damage in individual cells. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Although the genotoxic effects detected by Tradescantia tests cannot be associated with mutagenesis or even carcinogenesis in humans, these bioassays are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay

  19. Genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles evaluated using the Ames test and in vitro micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, David H; Yan, Jian; Chen, Ying; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Zhang, Yongbin; Biris, Alexandru S; Heflich, Robert H; Chen, Tao

    2012-06-14

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have antimicrobial properties, which have contributed to their widespread use in consumer products. A current issue regarding nanomaterials is the extent to which existing genotoxicity assays are useful for evaluating the risks associated with their use. In this study, the genotoxicity of 5 nm AgNPs was assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the in vitro micronucleus assay. Using the preincubation version of the Ames assay, Salmonella strains TA102, TA100, TA1537, TA98, and TA1535 were treated with 0.15-76.8 μg/plate of the AgNPs. Toxicity limited the doses that could be assayed to 2.4-38.4 μg/plate; no increases in mutant frequency over the vehicle control were found for the concentrations that could be assayed. Human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were treated with 10-30 μg/ml AgNPs, and additional cells were treated with water and 0.73 gy X-rays as vehicle and positive controls. Micronucleus frequency was increased by the AgNP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 30 μg/ml (with 45.4% relative population doubling), AgNPs induced a significant, 3.17-fold increase with a net increase of 1.60% in micronucleus frequency over the vehicle control, a weak positive response by our criteria. These results demonstrate that the 5 nm AgNP are genotoxic in TK6 cells. Also, the data suggest that the in vitro micronucleus assay may be more appropriate than the Ames test for evaluating the genotoxicity of the AgNPs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. GENOTOXICITY OF TEN CIGARETTE SMOKE CONDENSATES IN FOUR TEST SYSTEMS: COMPARISONS BETWEEN ASSAYS AND CONDENSATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is the study? This the first assessment of a set of cigarette smoke condensates from a range of cigarette types in a variety (4) of short-term genotoxicity assays. Why was it done? No such comparative study of cigarette smoke condensates has been reported. H...

  1. Optimisation and validation of a high throughput screening compatible assay to identify inhibitors of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase pump--a novel therapeutic target for contraception and malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tamer M A; Zakeri, Simon A; Baudoin, Florence; Wolf, Markus; Oceandy, Delvac; Cartwright, Elizabeth J; Gul, Sheraz; Neyses, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    ATPases, which constitute a major category of ion transporters in the human body, have a variety of significant biological and pathological roles. However, the lack of high throughput assays for ATPases has significantly limited drug discovery in this area. We have recently found that the genetic deletion of the ATP dependent calcium pump PMCA4 (plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin dependent ATPase, isoform 4) results in infertility in male mice due to a selective defect in sperm motility. In addition, recent discoveries in humans have indicated that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the PMCA4 gene determines the susceptibility towards malaria plasmodium infection. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop specific PMCA4 inhibitors. In the current study, we aim to optimise and validate a high throughput screening compatible assay using recombinantly expressed PMCA4 and the HTRF® Transcreener® ADP (TR-FRET) assay to screen a drug library. PMCA4 membrane microsomes were prepared from HEK293 cells overexpressing PMCA4. Western blot quantification revealed nearly nine-fold increased expression of PMCA4 compared to LacZ (control virus)-infected cells. Maximal PMCA4 microsomal activity was achieved in the TR-FRET assay with 15ng/μl microsomal concentration, 30-minute pre-incubation with compounds at 37°C, and calcium buffering with 1mM EGTA providing 1μM free-calcium. Finally a dose-response curve for carboxyeosin (a non-specific PMCA inhibitor) under optimised conditions showed significant PMCA4 inhibition. Upon confirmation that the assay was suitable for high-throughput screening, we have screened the ChemBioNet small molecule library (~21,000 compounds) against the PMCA4 assay to identify those that are its apparent inhibitors. This screening yielded 1,494 primary hits. We have optimised the HTRF® Transcreener® ADP assay for high-throughput screening to identify PMCA4 inhibitors. The output of the screening campaign has provided preliminary chemical

  2. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Aquatic Genotoxicity Using the Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Comet assay is a novel biological analysis, which is a sensitive, flexible, simple, rapid, and inexpensive method to assess aquatic genotoxicant. Since Singh and co-workers developed the method in 1988, its use has increased exponentially in various fields. This review discourses on the application of this assay in aquatic ecosystems. Various types of cells from various aquatic organisms have been tested by various genotoxicant both direct- and indirect-acting using the comet assay. The applications of this assay suggest that it is a useful assay to assess aquatic genotoxicants. However, there are some factors, which should be taken into account when using this assay as aquatic ecotoxicological assessment device such as inter-animal and cell variability.

  3. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Aquatic Genotoxicity Using the Comet Assay

    OpenAIRE

    YAQIN, KHUSNUL

    2006-01-01

    Comet assay is a novel biological analysis, which is a sensitive, flexible, simple, rapid, and inexpensive method to assess aquatic genotoxicant. Since Singh and co-workers developed the method in 1988, its use has increased exponentially in various fields. This review discourses on the application of this assay in aquatic ecosystems. Various types of cells from various aquatic organisms have been tested by various genotoxicant both direct- and indirect-acting using the comet assay. The appli...

  4. Recent advances in in vivo genotoxicity testing: prediction of carcinogenic potential using comet and micronucleus assay in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung Hun; Kwon, Jee Young; Lee, Jong Kwon; Seo, Young Rok

    2013-12-01

    Genotoxic events have been known as crucial step in the initiation of cancer. To assess the risk of cancer, genotoxicity assays, including comet, micronucleus (MN), chromosomal aberration, bacterial reverse, and sister chromatid exchange assay, can be performed. Compared with in vitro genotoxicity assay, in vivo genotoxicity assay has been used to verify in vitro assay result and definitely provide biological significance for certain organs or cell types. The comet assay can detect DNA strand breaks as markers of genotoxicity. Methods of the in vivo comet assay have been established by Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) validation studies depending on tissue and sample types. The MN can be initiated by segregation error and lagging acentric chromosome fragment. Methods of the in vivo MN assay have been established by Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guidelines and many studies. Combining the in vivo comet and MN assay has been regarded as useful methodology for evaluating genetic damage, and it has been used in the assessment of potential carcinogenicity by complementarily presenting two distinct endpoints of the in vivo genotoxicity individual test. Few studies have investigated the quantitative relation between in vivo genotoxicity results and carcinogenicity. Extensive studies emphasizes that positive correlation is detectable. This review summarizes the results of the in vivo comet and MN assays that have investigated the genotoxicity of carcinogens as classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) carcinogenicity database. As a result, these genotoxicity data may provide meaningful information for the assessment of potential carcinogenicity and for implementation in the prevention of cancer.

  5. A High-Throughput (HTS) Assay for Enzyme Reaction Phenotyping in Human Recombinant P450 Enzymes Using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Suhar, Tom; Glass, Lateca; Rajaraman, Ganesh

    2014-03-03

    Enzyme reaction phenotyping is employed extensively during the early stages of drug discovery to identify the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of new chemical entities (NCEs). Early identification of metabolic pathways facilitates prediction of potential drug-drug interactions associated with enzyme polymorphism, induction, or inhibition, and aids in the design of clinical trials. Incubation of NCEs with human recombinant enzymes is a popular method for such work because of the specificity, simplicity, and high-throughput nature of this approach for phenotyping studies. The availability of a relative abundance factor and calculated intersystem extrapolation factor for the expressed recombinant enzymes facilitates easy scaling of in vitro data, enabling in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. Described in this unit is a high-throughput screen for identifying enzymes involved in the metabolism of NCEs. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the human recombinant enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4, including the calculation of the intrinsic clearance for each. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The comet assay as an indicator test for germ cell genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Vasquez, Marie; Hartmann, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The in vivo comet assay is a well-established genotoxicity test. It is currently mainly performed with somatic cells from different organs to detect a genotoxic activity of potential carcinogens. It is regarded as a useful test for follow-up testing of positive or equivocal in vitro test results and for the evaluation of local genotoxicity. However, the comet assay also has the potential to detect germ cell genotoxicity and may be used for demonstrating the ability of a substance or its metabolite(s) to directly interact with the genetic material of gonadal and/or germ cells. Such results are important for the classification of germ cell mutagens, e.g. in the context of the "Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals" (GHS). This review summarizes and discusses available information on the use of the comet assay with germ cells and cells from the gonads in genetic toxicology. The literature contains results from in vitro studies, ex vivo studies and in vivo studies. With regard to the assessment of germ cell genotoxicity, only in vivo studies are relevant but the other kind of studies provided important information on various aspects of the methodology. Many comet assay studies with human sperm have been performed in the context of male infertility and assisted fertilization. The results of these studies are not reviewed in detail here but various aspects of the assay modifications used are discussed. Measuring DNA effects by the comet assay in sperm requires additional steps for chromatin decondensation. Many different modifications of the alkaline and the neutral comet assay are in use but a standard protocol has not been established yet. High and variable background levels of DNA effects were reported and there is still need for standardization and validation of the comet assay with sperm. Some human biomonitoring studies with human sperm were published, but it seems to be premature to use these data for hazard identification and

  7. The potential of a multiplex high-throughput molecular assay for early detection of first and second line tuberculosis drug resistance mutations to improve infection control and reduce costs: a decision analytical modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van't Hoog, A H; Bergval, I; Tukvadze, N; Sengstake, S; Aspindzelashvili, R; Anthony, R M; Cobelens, F

    2015-10-26

    Molecular resistance detection (MRD) of resistance to second-line anti-tuberculous drugs provides faster results than phenotypic tests, may shorten treatment and allow earlier separation among patients with and without second-line drug resistance. In a decision-analytical model we simulated a cohort of patients diagnosed with TB in a setting where drug resistant TB is highly prevalent and requires initial hospitalization, to explore the potential benefits of a high-throughput MRD-assay for reducing potential nosocomial transmission of highly resistant strains, and total costs for diagnosis of drug resistance, treatment and hospitalization. In the base case scenario first-line drug resistance was diagnosed with WHO-endorsed molecular tests, and second-line drug resistance with culture and phenotypic methods. Three alternative scenarios were explored, each deploying high-throughput MRD allowing either detection of second-line mutations in cultured isolates, directly on sputum, or MRD with optimized markers. Compared to a base case scenario, deployment of high-throughput MRD reduced total costs by 17-21 %. The period during which nosocomial transmission may take place increased by 15 % compared to the base case if MRD had currently reported suboptimal sensitivity and required cultured isolates; increased by 7 % if direct sputum analysis were possible including in patients with smear-negative TB, and reduced by 24 % if the assay had improved markers, but was still performed on cultured isolates. Improved clinical sensitivity of the assay (additional markers) by more than 35 % would be needed to avoid compromising infection control. Further development of rapid second-line resistance testing should prioritize investment in optimizing markers above investments in a platform for direct analysis of sputum.

  8. Silver (nano)materials cause genotoxicity in Enchytraeus crypticus, as determined by the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Vera L; Ribeiro, Maria João; Guilherme, Sofia; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2017-08-10

    Enchytraeids have been used in standard ecotoxicity testing for approximately 20 yr. Since adopting the standard test for survival and reproduction, a number of additional tools have been developed, including transcriptomics and enzymatic biomarkers. So far, a genotoxicity tool and endpoint have not been used; hence, the goals of the present study included optimization of the in vivo alkaline comet assay in Enchytraeus crypticus. Further, the effect of silver nanomaterial (Ag NM300K, dispersed, 15 nm) was tested and compared with silver nitrate. Hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control. The various steps were optimized. The fully detailed standard operating procedure is presented. Silver materials caused genotoxicity, this being differentiated for the nano and non-nano forms. Silver nitrate caused genotoxicity after 3 d of exposure in a dose-related manner, although after 7 d the effects were either reduced or repaired. Ag NM300K caused higher genotoxicity after 7 d for the lowest concentration, highlighting a potential nonmonotonic dose-response effect. Overall, the comet assay showed the power to discriminate effects between materials and also toxicity at low relevant doses. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-8. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  9. Genotoxic evaluation of Halfenprox using the human peripheral lymphocyte micronucleus assay and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyıl, Dilek; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Dere, Hatice; Serteser, Ahmet

    2017-04-01

    The genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Halfenprox, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide and acaricide, was assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays of the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay in human peripheral lymphocytes. In the Ames test, Salmonella strains TA98 and TA100 were treated with or without S9 fraction. The doses of Halfenprox were 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 μg/plate and test materials were dissolved in DMSO. The concentrations of Halfenprox did not show mutagenic activity on both strains with and without S9 fraction. The MN assay was used to investigate the genotoxic effects of Halfenprox in human peripheral lymphocytes treated with 250, 500, 750, and 1000 μg/ml concentrations of Halfenprox for 24 and 48 h, and at 1000 μg/ml the concentration was significantly increased and the MN formation was compared with the negative control for both treatment periods. In addition, a significant decrease of the nuclear devision index (NDI) values at the higher concentrations of Halfenprox and at both treatment periods was observed.

  10. Comet assay evaluation of six chemicals of known genotoxic potential in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Cheryl A; Recio, Leslie; Streicker, Michael; Boyle, Molly H; Tanaka, Jin; Shiga, Atsushi; Witt, Kristine L

    2015-07-01

    As a part of an international validation of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay) initiated by the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) we examined six chemicals for potential to induce DNA damage: 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN), o-anisidine, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (1,2-DMH), sodium chloride, and sodium arsenite. DNA damage was evaluated in the liver and stomach of 7- to 9-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats. Of the five genotoxic carcinogens tested in our laboratory, DMN and 1,2-DMH were positive in the liver and negative in the stomach, 2-AAF and o-anisidine produced an equivocal result in liver and negative results in stomach, and sodium arsenite was negative in both liver and stomach. 1,2-DMH and DMN induced dose-related increases in hedgehogs in the same tissue (liver) that exhibited increased DNA migration. However, no cytotoxicity was indicated by the neutral diffusion assay (assessment of highly fragmented DNA) or histopathology in response to treatment with any of the tested chemicals. Therefore, the increased DNA damage resulting from exposure to DMN and 1,2-DMH was considered to represent a genotoxic response. Sodium chloride, a non-genotoxic non-carcinogen, was negative in both tissues as would be predicted. Although only two (1,2-DMH and DMN) out of five genotoxic carcinogens produced clearly positive results in the comet assay, the results obtained for o-anisidine and sodium arsenite in liver and stomach cells are consistent with the known mode of genotoxicity and tissue specificity exhibited by these carcinogens. In contrast, given the known genotoxic mode-of-action and target organ carcinogenicity of 2-AAF, it is unclear why this chemical failed to convincingly increase DNA migration in the liver. Thus, the results of the comet assay validation studies conducted in our laboratory were considered appropriate for five out of the six test chemicals. Copyright © 2015

  11. Genotoxicity Evaluation of an Urban River on Freshwater Planarian by RAPD Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He-Cai; Liu, Tong-Yi; Shi, Chang-Ying; Chen, Guang-Wen; Liu, De-Zeng

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of an urban river - the Wei River in Xinxiang, China using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay in planarians. The results showed that the total number of polymorphic bands and varied bands in RAPD patterns of treated planarians decreased with the water sample site far away from the sewage outlet of a factory. In addition, the genome template stability of treated groups decreased and the degree of the decline was negatively related to the distance between the sample site and the sewage outlet, suggesting that the Wei River water had genotoxicity effects on planarians and strengthening the management of the Wei River was necessary. Furthermore, this work also indicated that RAPD assay in planarians was a very promising test for environmental monitoring studies.

  12. Comet Assay: A Method to Evaluate Genotoxicity of Nano-Drug Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Eskandani; Somayeh Vandghanooni

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Drug delivery systems could induce cellular toxicity as side effect of nanomaterials. The mechanism of toxicity usually involves DNA damage. The comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) is a sensitive method for detecting strand damages in the DNA of a cell with applications in genotoxicity testing and molecular epidemiology as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. Methods: In the current study, we reviewed recent drug delivery researches related to...

  13. Lanthanum nitrate genotoxicity evaluation: Ames test, mouse micronucleus assay, and chromosome aberration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Haibo; Cui, Wenming; Zhang, Qiannan; Li, Yongning; Yu, Zhou; Jia, Xudong

    2016-11-01

    The increasing use of rare-earth elements (REE) and their compounds has led to their accumulation in the environment and has raised concern about their safety. The toxic effects of REE such as lanthanum are largely unknown; genotoxicity studies have been limited and results are controversial. We evaluated the genotoxicity of lanthanum nitrate (La(NO3)3) in several in vitro and in vivo tests, including bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay, and chromosome aberration assay. La(NO3)3 was not mutagenic in the Ames test. La(NO3)3 did not increase the frequencies of bone marrow micronuclei or chromosome aberration in the mouse after repeated treatments at oral doses up to 735 (females) and 855mg/kg (males). The compound did not increase the frequency of chromosome aberrations in CHO cells in vitro. These results indicate that lanthanum is not a genotoxic hazard. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity assessment of shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler using the Comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Miyaji

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler is been widely consumed in many countries, including Brazil, because of its pleasant flavor and reports of its therapeutic properties, although there is little available information on the genotoxicity and/or antigenotoxicity of this mushroom. We used the Comet assay and HEp-2 cells to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of aqueous extracts of shiitake prepared in three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL and three different temperatures (4, 22 and 60 °C, using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. Two concentrations (1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL of extract prepared at 4 °C and all of the concentrations prepared at 22 ± 2 and 60 °C showed moderate genotoxic activity. To test the protective effect of the three concentrations of the extracts against the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate, three protocols were used: pre-treatment, simultaneous-treatment and post-treatment. Treatments were repeated for all combinations of preparation temperature and concentration. Two extracts (22 ± 2 °C 1.0 mg/mL (simultaneous-treatment and 4 °C 0.5 mg/mL (post-treatment showed antigenotoxic activity.

  15. Evaluating the potential genotoxicity of phthalates esters (PAEs) in perfumes using in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Al-Rajudi, Tahreer; Al-Qudaihi, Ghofran; Manogaran, Pulicat

    2017-10-01

    We previously reported high levels of phthalate esters (PAEs) added as solvents or fixatives in 47 brands of perfumes. Diethyl phthalate was the most abundant compound (0.232-23,649 ppm), and 83.3% of the perfumes had levels >1 ppm, the threshold limit cited by a Greenpeace investigation. All samples had dimethyl phthalate levels higher than its threshold limit of 0.1 ppm, and 88, 38, and 7% of the perfumes had benzyl butyl phthalate, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and dibutyl phthalate levels, respectively, above their threshold limits. The role of PAEs as endocrine disruptors has been well documented, but their effect on genotoxic behavior has received little attention. We used in vitro single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) and micronucleus (MN) assays with human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells to evaluate the genotoxic potency of 42 of the same perfumes and to determine its association with PAEs. All perfumes induced more DNA damage than a negative control (NEG), ≥ 90% of the samples caused more damage than cells treated with the vehicles possibly used in perfume's preparations such as methanol (ME) and ethanol (ET), and 11.6% of the perfumes caused more DNA damage than a positive control (hydrogen peroxide). Chromosome breakage expressed as MN frequency was higher in cells treated with 71.4, 64.3, 57.1, and 4.8% of the perfumes than in NEG, cells treated with ME or ET, and another positive control (x-rays), respectively. The genotoxic responses in the comet and MN assays were not correlated. The comet assay indicated that the damage in TK6 cells treated with five PAEs at concentrations of 0.05 and 0.2 ppm either individually or as a mixture did not differ significantly from the damage in cells treated with the perfumes. Unlike the comet assay, the sensitivity of the MN assay to PAEs was weak at both low and high concentrations, and MN frequencies were generally low. This study demonstrates for the first time the possible contribution of PAEs in perfumes to DNA

  16. Development and qualification of a high sensitivity, high throughput Q-PCR assay for quantitation of residual host cell DNA in purification process intermediate and drug substance samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Meng; Menesale, Emily; Lu, Tongjun; Magliola, Aeona; Bergelson, Svetlana

    2014-11-01

    Methods of high sensitivity, accuracy and throughput are needed for quantitation of low level residual host cell DNA in purification process intermediates and drug substances of therapeutic proteins. In this study, we designed primer/probe sets targeting repetitive Alu repeats or Alu-equivalent sequences in the human, Chinese hamster and murine genomes. When used in quantitative polymerase chain reactions (Q-PCRs), these primer/probe sets showed high species specificity and gave significantly higher sensitivity compared to those targeting the low copy number GAPDH gene. This allowed for detection of residual host cell DNA of much lower concentrations and, for some samples, eliminated the need for DNA extraction. By combining the high sensitivity Alu Q-PCR with high throughput automated DNA extraction using an automated MagMAX magnetic particle processor, we successfully developed and qualified a highly accurate, specific, sensitive and efficient method for the quantitation of residual host cell DNA in process intermediates and drug substances of multiple therapeutic proteins purified from cells of multiple species. Compared to the previous method using manual DNA extraction and primer/probe sets targeting the GAPDH gene, this new method increased our DNA extraction throughput by over sevenfold, and lowered the lower limit of quantitation by up to eightfold. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Using the comet and micronucleus assays for genotoxicity studies: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araldi, Rodrigo Pinheiro; de Melo, Thatiana Corrêa; Mendes, Thais Biude; de Sá Júnior, Paulo Luiz; Nozima, Bruno Heidi Nakano; Ito, Eliana Tiemi; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Franco; de Souza, Edislane Barreiros; de Cassia Stocco, Rita

    2015-05-01

    Physical, chemical and biological agents can act in the DNA, resulting in mutation involved in cancer. Thus, genotoxic tests are required by regulatory agencies in order to evaluate potential risk of cancer. Among these tests, the comet assay (CA) and micronucleus assay (MNA) are the most commonly used. However, there are different protocols and recommendations already published. This is the first review, after the inclusion of CA in S2R1 guidance and OECD 489, which summarizes the main technical recommendations of both CA and MNA. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Genotoxicity of cadmium chloride in the marine gastropod Nerita chamaeleon using comet assay and alkaline unwinding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Anupam; Bhagat, Jacky; Ingole, Baban S; Rao, Durga P; Markad, Vijaykumar L

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the genotoxic effects of cadmium chloride (CdCl2 ) on marine gastropod, Nerita chamaeleon following the technique of comet assay and the DNA alkaline unwinding assay (DAUA). In this study, the extent of DNA damage in gill cells of N. chamaeleon was measured after in vivo exposure to four different concentrations (10, 25, 50, and 75 µg/L) of CdCl2 . In vitro exposure of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ; 1, 10, 25, and 50 µM) of the gill cells showed a significant increase in the percentage tail DNA, Olive tail moment, and tail length (TL). Significant changes in percentage tail DNA by CdCl2 exposure were observed in all exposed groups of snails with respect to those in control. Exposure to 75 µg/L of CdCl2 produced significant decrease in DNA integrity as measured by DAUA at all duration with respect to control. In vivo exposure to different concentrations of CdCl2 (10, 25, 50, and 75 µg/L) to N. chamaeleon showed considerable increase in DNA damage as observed by both alkaline comet assay and the DAUA. The extent of DNA damage in marine gastropods determined by the application of alkaline comet assay and DAUA clearly indicated the genotoxic responses of marine gastropod, N. chamaeleon to a wide range of cadmium concentration in the marine environment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of Sinos River water genotoxicity using the comet assay in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalon, M C S; Rechenmacher, C; Siebel, A M; Kayser, M L; Rodrigues, M T; Maluf, S W; Rodrigues, M A S; Silva, L B

    2010-12-01

    The Sinos River, in southern Brazil, is polluted by industrial discharges and untreated urban wastes. Fish genotoxicity biomarkers are valuable parameters for environmental risk assessment. In this study, we used the comet assay to detect genotoxicity due to multiple sources of pollution in the peripheral blood of a native fish species (Hyphessobrycon luetkenii). In addition, we analysed possible DNA damage from aluminum, lead, chromium, copper, nickel, iron and zinc contamination. Water samples were collected seasonally from three sampling sites and the fish were assessed under laboratory conditions. Water chemical analysis showed an increased level of aluminum and iron in most of the samples at sites 2 and 3, located in the middle and lower river course, respectively. The index of DNA damage assessed by the comet assay demonstrated no significant differences in different seasons or at the different sampling sites, while the frequency of cells with DNA damage was higher in water samples collected at sites 1 and 2 during the spring season. None of the metals studied seems to be associated with the increase in the frequency of cells with DNA damage observed during the spring season. The results of this study indicate that the Sinos River is contaminated with substances that are genotoxic to fish, including the waters near the river spring.

  20. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Torres-Bugarín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies.

  1. Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu

    2007-10-15

    Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals. Recently, the importance of ionizing radiation and chemicals has been recognized since radio- and chemical therapy is directly related to the control of various diseases such as cancer. Radiation and the chemicals can cause biological damages while they have great applicability. It is of necessity to analyze rapidly, easily and accurately the biological effects, especially DNA damage due to those factors. Recently SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis assay, alias comet assay) has been developed for the efficient evaluation of DNA damage. In this report, the comprehensive review will be given on the rationale, the technical applications and the advantages and shortcomings of SCGE assay. This method can be directly applied to study on toxicity, cancer, and aging in terms of the evaluation of DNA damages due to radiation and chemicals on human cellular level. It is also suggested that comet assay be used for testing genotoxicity of suspected substances, detecting irradiated foods, screening radioprotective candidates, and studying DNA repair process in various biological systems.

  2. Analysis of 75 marketed pharmaceuticals using the GADD45a-GFP 'GreenScreen HC' genotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastwell, Paul W; Webster, Thomas W; Tate, Matthew; Billinton, Nicholas; Lynch, Anthony M; Harvey, James S; Rees, Robert W; Walmsley, Richard M

    2009-09-01

    The GADD45a-GFP (GreenScreen HC) reporter assay detects genotoxic damage in the human lymphoblastoid TK6 cell line and gives positive results for all classes of genotoxin, including mutagens, aneugens and clastogens. In this study, a collection of 75 marketed pharmaceuticals were tested in the assay. Compounds in the collection represent a broad range of chemical structures, pharmacologies and therapeutic indications, including neoplasia and viral infection where positive genotoxicity results are often associated with the pharmacological activity. Based on the results of this study, two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the GreenScreen HC is more predictive of in vivo genotoxicity (88%) and genotoxic carcinogenicity (93%) data than the any of the other regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assay and (ii) no compounds were uniquely positive in the GADD45a-GFP assay. This analysis therefore provides additional evidence to support the use of the GADD45a-GFP assay as an effective tool either in early genotoxic liability identification or non-clinical safety assessment of candidate pharmaceuticals during development.

  3. Reliability of plant root comet assay in comparison with human leukocyte comet assay for assessment environmental genotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Gabriela Barreto Dos; Andrade-Vieira, Larissa Fonseca; Moraes, Isabella de Campos; César, Pedro Henrique Souza; Marcussi, Silvana; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2017-08-01

    Comet assay is an efficient test to detect genotoxic compounds based on observation of DNA damage. The aim of this work was to compare the results obtained from the comet assay in two different type of cells extracted from the root tips from Lactuca sativa L. and human blood. For this, Spent Pot Liner (SPL), and its components (aluminum and fluoride) were applied as toxic agents. SPL is a solid waste generated in industry from the aluminum mining and processing with known toxicity. Three concentrations of all tested solutions were applied and the damages observed were compared to negative and positive controls. It was observed an increase in the frequency of DNA damage for human leukocytes and plant cells, in all treatments. On human leukocytes, SPL induced the highest percentage of damage, with an average of 87.68%. For root tips cells of L. sativa the highest percentage of damage was detected for aluminum (93.89%). Considering the arbitrary units (AU), the average of nuclei with high levels of DNA fragmentation was significant for both cells type evaluated. The tested cells demonstrated equal effectiveness for detection of the genotoxicity induced by the SPL and its chemical components, aluminum and fluoride. Further, using a unique method, the comet assay, we proved that cells from root tips of Lactuca sativa represent a reliable model to detect DNA damage induced by genotoxic pollutants is in agreement of those observed in human leukocytes as model. So far, plant cells may be suggested as important system to assess the toxicological risk of environmental agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genotoxicity testing: Comparison of the γH2AX focus assay with the alkaline and neutral comet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Teodora; Marini, Federico; Kaina, Bernd

    2017-10-01

    Genotoxicity testing relies on the quantitative measurement of adverse effects, such as chromosome aberrations, micronuclei, and mutations, resulting from primary DNA damage. Ideally, assays will detect DNA damage and cellular responses with high sensitivity, reliability, and throughput. Several novel genotoxicity assays may fulfill these requirements, including the comet assay and the more recently developed γH2AX assay. Although they are thought to be specific for genotoxicants, a systematic comparison of the assays has not yet been undertaken. In the present study, we compare the γH2AX focus assay with the alkaline and neutral versions of the comet assay, as to their sensitivities and limitations for detection of genetic damage. We investigated the dose-response relationships of γH2AX foci and comet tail intensities at various times following treatment with four prototypical genotoxicants, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), mitomycin C, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and we tested whether there is a correlation between the endpoints, i.e., alkali-labile sites and DNA strand breaks on the one hand and the cell's response to DNA double-strand breaks and blocked replication forks on the other. Induction of γH2AX foci gave a linear dose response and all agents tested were positive in the assay. The increase in comet tail intensity was also a function of dose; however, mitomycin C was almost completely ineffective in the comet assay, and the doses needed to achieve a significant effect were somewhat higher for some treatments in the comet assay than in the γH2AX foci assay, which was confirmed by threshold analysis. There was high correlation between tail intensity and γH2AX foci for MMS and H2O2, less for MNNG, and none for mitomycin C. From this we infer that the γH2AX foci assay is more reliable, sensitive, and robust than the comet assay for detecting genotoxicant-induced DNA damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  5. Can the comet assay be used reliably to detect nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna L; Di Bucchianico, Sebastiano; Collins, Andrew R; Dusinska, Maria

    2015-03-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive method to detect DNA strand breaks as well as oxidatively damaged DNA at the level of single cells. Today the assay is commonly used in nano-genotoxicology. In this review we critically discuss possible interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and the comet assay. Concerns for such interactions have arisen from the occasional observation of NPs in the "comet head", which implies that NPs may be present while the assay is being performed. This could give rise to false positive or false negative results, depending on the type of comet assay endpoint and NP. For most NPs, an interaction that substantially impacts the comet assay results is unlikely. For photocatalytically active NPs such as TiO2 , on the other hand, exposure to light containing UV can lead to increased DNA damage. Samples should therefore not be exposed to such light. By comparing studies in which both the comet assay and the micronucleus assay have been used, a good consistency between the assays was found in general (69%); consistency was even higher when excluding studies on TiO2 NPs (81%). The strong consistency between the comet and micronucleus assays for a range of different NPs-even though the two tests measure different endpoints-implies that both can be trusted in assessing the genotoxicity of NPs, and that both could be useful in a standard battery of test methods. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Modeling Steroidogenesis Disruption Using High-Throughput ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental chemicals can elicit endocrine disruption by altering steroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism (steroidogenesis) causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. Historically, a lack of assays resulted in few chemicals having been evaluated for effects on steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic pathway is a series of hydroxylation and dehydrogenation steps carried out by CYP450 and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, yet the only enzyme in the pathway for which a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed is aromatase (CYP19A1), responsible for the aromatization of androgens to estrogens. Recently, the ToxCast HTS program adapted the OECD validated H295R steroidogenesis assay using human adrenocortical carcinoma cells into a high-throughput model to quantitatively assess the concentration-dependent (0.003-100 µM) effects of chemicals on 10 steroid hormones including progestagens, androgens, estrogens and glucocorticoids. These results, in combination with two CYP19A1 inhibition assays, comprise a large dataset amenable to clustering approaches supporting the identification and characterization of putative mechanisms of action (pMOA) for steroidogenesis disruption. In total, 514 chemicals were tested in all CYP19A1 and steroidogenesis assays. 216 chemicals were identified as CYP19A1 inhibitors in at least one CYP19A1 assay. 208 of these chemicals also altered hormone levels in the H295R assay, suggesting 96% sensitivity in the

  7. Functional characterisation of homomeric ionotropic glutamate receptors GluR1-GluR6 in a fluorescence-based high throughput screening assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strange, Mette; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Jensen, Anders A.

    2006-01-01

    studies. Finally, the effects of various concentrations of Ca2+ in the assay buffer and of the allosteric modulators cyclothiazide and concanavalin A on GluR signalling were examined. This study represents the most elaborate functional characterisation of multiple AMPA and KA receptor subtypes in the same...

  8. Inflammatory breast cancer tumor emboli express high levels of anti-apoptotic proteins: use of a quantitative high content and high-throughput 3D IBC spheroid assay to identify targeting strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpley, Michael; Vermeulen, Peter; Rypens, Charlotte; Van Laere, Steven; Williams, Kevin P.; Devi, Gayathri R.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is one of the most lethal breast cancer variants; with existing therapy, 5-yr survival rate is only 35%. Current barriers to successful treatment of IBC include frequent infiltration and the presence of tumor cell clusters, termed tumor emboli, within the breast parenchyma and lymphatics. Prior studies have identified the role of anti-apoptotic signaling, in particular hyperactivation of NFκB and its target genes, in IBC pathobiology and therapeutic resistance. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine if IBC tumor emboli express anti-apoptotic proteins and (2) develop a high content, multiparametric assay to assess the morphology of the IBC 3D spheroids and to optimize a high throughput format to screen for compounds that can inhibit the formation of the IBC tumor clusters/embolic structures. Immunohistochemical analysis of IBC patient tumor samples with documented tumor emboli revealed high NFκB (p65) staining along with expression of XIAP, a potent anti-apoptotic protein known to interact with NFκB signaling in enhancing survival of malignant cells. Subsequently, the high content assay developed allowed for simultaneous imaging and morphometric analysis, including count and viability of spheroids derived from SUM149, rSUM149 and SUM190 cells and its application to evaluate XIAP and NFκB inhibitory agents. We demonstrate the efficacy of the off-patent drug disulfiram when chelated with copper, which we had previously reported to inhibit NFκB signaling, was highly effective in disrupting both IBC spheroids and emboli grown in vitro. Taken together, these results identify a high-throughput approach to target tumor spheroid formation for drug discovery. Finally, disulfiram is a safe and approved drug for management of alcohol abuse, warranting its evaluation for repurposing in IBC therapy. PMID:28460441

  9. Genotoxicity of nano/microparticles in in vitro micronuclei, in vivo comet and mutation assay systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukumori Nobutaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, manufactured nano/microparticles such as fullerenes (C60, carbon black (CB and ceramic fiber are being widely used because of their desirable properties in industrial, medical and cosmetic fields. However, there are few data on these particles in mammalian mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. To examine genotoxic effects by C60, CB and kaolin, an in vitro micronuclei (MN test was conducted with human lung cancer cell line, A549 cells. In addition, DNA damage and mutations were analyzed by in vivo assay systems using male C57BL/6J or gpt delta transgenic mice which were intratracheally instilled with single or multiple doses of 0.2 mg per animal of particles. Results In in vitro genotoxic analysis, increased MN frequencies were observed in A549 cells treated with C60, CB and kaolin in a dose-dependent manner. These three nano/microparticles also induced DNA damage in the lungs of C57BL/6J mice measured by comet assay. Moreover, single or multiple instillations of C60 and kaolin, increased either or both of gpt and Spi- mutant frequencies in the lungs of gpt delta transgenic mice. Mutation spectra analysis showed transversions were predominant, and more than 60% of the base substitutions occurred at G:C base pairs in the gpt genes. The G:C to C:G transversion was commonly increased by these particle instillations. Conclusion Manufactured nano/microparticles, CB, C60 and kaolin, were shown to be genotoxic in in vitro and in vivo assay systems.

  10. Comet Assay: A Method to Evaluate Genotoxicity of Nano-Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Eskandani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Drug delivery systems could induce cellular toxicity as side effect of nanomaterials. The mechanism of toxicity usually involves DNA damage. The comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE is a sensitive method for detecting strand damages in the DNA of a cell with applications in genotoxicity testing and molecular epidemiology as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. Methods: In the current study, we reviewed recent drug delivery researches related to SCGE. Results: We found that one preference for choosing the assay is that comet images may result from apoptosis-mediated nuclear fragmentation. This method has been widely used over the last decade in several different areas. Overall cells, such as cultured cells are embedded in agarose on a microscope slide, lysed with detergent, and treated with high salt. Nucleoids are supercoiled DNA form. When the slide is faced to alkaline electrophoresis any breakages present in the DNA cause the supercoiling to relax locally and loops of DNA extend toward the anode as a ‘‘comet tail’’. Conclusion: This article provides a relatively comprehensive review upon potentiality of the comet assay for assessment of DNA damage and accordingly it can be used as an informative platform in genotoxicity studies of drug delivery systems.

  11. Comet assay: a method to evaluate genotoxicity of nano-drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandghanooni, Somayeh; Eskandani, Morteza

    2011-01-01

    Drug delivery systems could induce cellular toxicity as side effect of nanomaterials. The mechanism of toxicity usually involves DNA damage. The comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) is a sensitive method for detecting strand damages in the DNA of a cell with applications in genotoxicity testing and molecular epidemiology as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. In the current study, we reviewed recent drug delivery researches related to SCGE. We found that one preference for choosing the assay is that comet images may result from apoptosis-mediated nuclear fragmentation. This method has been widely used over the last decade in several different areas. Overall cells, such as cultured cells are embedded in agarose on a microscope slide, lysed with detergent, and treated with high salt. Nucleoids are supercoiled DNA form. When the slide is faced to alkaline electrophoresis any breakages present in the DNA cause the supercoiling to relax locally and loops of DNA extend toward the anode as a ''comet tail''. This article provides a relatively comprehensive review upon potentiality of the comet assay for assessment of DNA damage and accordingly it can be used as an informative platform in genotoxicity studies of drug delivery systems.

  12. Comet Assay: A Method to Evaluate Genotoxicity of Nano-Drug Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandghanooni, Somayeh; Eskandani, Morteza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Drug delivery systems could induce cellular toxicity as side effect of nanomaterials. The mechanism of toxicity usually involves DNA damage. The comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) is a sensitive method for detecting strand damages in the DNA of a cell with applications in genotoxicity testing and molecular epidemiology as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. Methods In the current study, we reviewed recent drug delivery researches related to SCGE. Results We found that one preference for choosing the assay is that comet images may result from apoptosis-mediated nuclear fragmentation. This method has been widely used over the last decade in several different areas. Overall cells, such as cultured cells are embedded in agarose on a microscope slide, lysed with detergent, and treated with high salt. Nucleoids are supercoiled DNA form. When the slide is faced to alkaline electrophoresis any breakages present in the DNA cause the supercoiling to relax locally and loops of DNA extend toward the anode as a ‘‘comet tail’’. Conclusion This article provides a relatively comprehensive review upon potentiality of the comet assay for assessment of DNA damage and accordingly it can be used as an informative platform in genotoxicity studies of drug delivery systems. PMID:23678412

  13. Effects of photopolymerisation on genotoxicity of composite adhesives in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dačić Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain in vivo studies have shown that the application of adhesives directly onto the open pulp or on a thin layer of dentin causes inflammation and pulpal abscesses. This reaction is related to toxic effects of monomers from adhesives. It has been confirmed that after proper illumination the adhesives become less toxic. The aim of the study was to examine genotoxicity of non-polymerised, partly polymerised and polymerised adhesives on isolated human lymphocytes using the alkaline Comet assay. Adper Single bond2 and Adper Easy One/3M ESPE adhesive photopolymerisation was performed by Elipar Highlight 3M ESPE halogen lamp for 0, 10 and 40 sec, at final concentrations of 100, 200, 500 and 1000 μg/mL. With both adhesives, photopolymerisation at 0 and 10 seconds showed statistically significant increase in DNA damage in comparision to the negative control (solvent. On the other hand, after 40 seconds of photopolymerisation of both adhesives in all tested concentrations, the degree of DNA damage in Comet assay had no significant difference (P>0.05, χ2 test compared to the negative control. Therefore, only the 40 seconds of photopolymerisation prevented genotoxic effects of both adhesives in the Comet assay. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46002 i br. OI173012

  14. Comparative potency approach based on H2AX assay for estimating the genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audebert, M., E-mail: marc.audebert@toulouse.inra.fr [INRA UMR1331, TOXALIM (Research Center in Food Toxicology), 180 chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, INP, ENVT, EIP, UPS, UMR1331, Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Zeman, F.; Beaudoin, R.; Péry, A. [Unité “Modèles pour l' écotoxicologie et la toxicologie” (METO), INERIS, BP2, F-60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Cravedi, J.-P. [INRA UMR1331, TOXALIM (Research Center in Food Toxicology), 180 chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, INP, ENVT, EIP, UPS, UMR1331, Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France)

    2012-04-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) constitute a family of over one hundred compounds and can generally be found in complex mixtures. PAHs metabolites cause DNA damage which can lead to the development of carcinogenesis. Toxicity assessment of PAH complex mixtures is currently expressed in terms of toxic equivalents, based on Toxicity Equivalent Factors (TEFs). However, the definition of new TEFs for a large number of PAH could overcome some limitations of the current method and improve cancer risk assessment. The current investigation aimed at deriving the relative potency factors of PAHs, based on their genotoxic effect measured in vitro and analyzed with mathematical models. For this purpose, we used a new genotoxic assay (γH2AX) with two human cell lines (HepG2 and LS-174T) to analyze the genotoxic properties of 13 selected PAHs at low doses after 24 h treatment. The dose–response for genotoxic effects was modeled with a Hill model; equivalency between PAHs at low dose was assessed by applying constraints to the model parameters. In the two cell lines tested, we observed a clear dose–response for genotoxic effects for 11 tested compounds. LS-174T was on average ten times more sensitive than HepG2 towards PAHs regarding genotoxicity. We developed new TEFs, which we named Genotoxic Equivalent Factor (GEF). Calculated GEF for the tested PAHs were generally higher than the TEF usually used. Our study proposed a new in vitro based method for the establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment. -- Highlights: ► Examination of the genotoxic properties of 13 PAHs on two human cell lines. ► Modelization with a Hill model of the genotoxic dose–response. ► First investigation of the genotoxicity of benzo[c]fluorene on human cell lines. ► Establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment.

  15. Measurement of the distribution of non-structural carbohydrate composition in onion populations by a high-throughput microplate enzymatic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revanna, Roopashree; Turnbull, Matthew H; Shaw, Martin L; Wright, Kathryn M; Butler, Ruth C; Jameson, Paula E; McCallum, John A

    2013-08-15

    Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC; glucose, fructose, sucrose and fructan) composition of onions (Allium cepa L.) varies widely and is a key determinant of market usage. To analyse the physiology and genetics of onion carbohydrate metabolism and to enable selective breeding, an inexpensive, reliable and practicable sugar assay is required to phenotype large numbers of samples. A rapid, reliable and cost-effective microplate-based assay was developed for NSC analysis in onions and used to characterise variation in tissue hexose, sucrose and fructan content in open-pollinated breeding populations and in mapping populations developed from a wide onion cross. Sucrose measured in microplates employing maltase as a hydrolytic enzyme was in agreement with HPLC-PAD results. The method revealed significant variation in bulb fructan content within open-pollinated 'Pukekohe Longkeeper' breeding populations over a threefold range. Very wide segregation from 80 to 600 g kg(-1) in fructan content was observed in bulbs of F2 genetic mapping populations from the wide onion cross 'Nasik Red × CUDH2150'. The microplate enzymatic assay is a reliable and practicable method for onion sugar analysis for genetics, breeding and food technology. Open-pollinated onion populations may harbour extensive within-population variability in carbohydrate content, which may be quantified and exploited using this method. The phenotypic data obtained from genetic mapping populations show that the method is well suited to detailed genetic and physiological analysis. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Genotoxicity evaluation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using the Ames test and Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Robert S; Li, Yan; Yan, Jian; Bishop, Michelle; Jones, M Yvonne; Watanabe, Fumiya; Biris, Alexandru S; Rice, Penelope; Zhou, Tong; Chen, Tao

    2012-11-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are being used increasingly for various industrial and consumer products, including cosmetics and sunscreens because of their photoactive properties. Therefore, the toxicity of TiO2-NPs needs to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of 10nm uncoated sphere TiO2-NPs with an anatase crystalline structure, which has been well characterized in a previous study, was assessed using the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. For the Ames test, Salmonella strains TA102, TA100, TA1537, TA98 and TA1535 were preincubated with eight different concentrations of the TiO2-NPs for 4 h at 37 °C, ranging from 0 to 4915.2 µg per plate. No mutation induction was found. Analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the TiO2-NPs were not able to enter the bacterial cell. For the Comet assay, TK6 cells were treated with 0-200 µg ml(-1) TiO2-NPs for 24 h at 37 °C to detect DNA damage. Although the TK6 cells did take up TiO2-NPs, no significant induction of DNA breakage or oxidative DNA damage was observed in the treated cells using the standard alkaline Comet assay and the endonuclease III (EndoIII) and human 8-hydroxyguanine DNA-glycosylase (hOGG1)-modified Comet assay, respectively. These results suggest that TiO2-NPs are not genotoxic under the conditions of the Ames test and Comet assay. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Yeast-based assays for the high-throughput screening of inhibitors of coronavirus RNA cap guanine-N7-methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Wang, Zidao; Tao, Jiali; Wang, Yi; Wu, Andong; Yang, Ziwen; Wang, Kaimei; Shi, Liqiao; Chen, Yu; Guo, Deyin

    2014-04-01

    The 5'-cap structure is a distinct feature of eukaryotic mRNAs and is important for RNA stability and protein translation by providing a molecular signature for the distinction of self or non-self mRNA. Eukaryotic viruses generally modify the 5'-end of their RNAs to mimic the cellular mRNA structure, thereby facilitating viral replication in host cells. However, the molecular organization and biochemical mechanisms of the viral capping apparatus typically differ from its cellular counterpart, which makes viral capping enzymes attractive targets for drug discovery. Our previous work showed that SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) non-structural protein 14 represents a structurally novel and unique guanine-N7-methyltransferase (N7-MTase) that is able to functionally complement yeast cellular N7-MTase. In the present study, we developed a yeast-based system for identifying and screening inhibitors against coronavirus N7-MTase using both 96-well and 384-well microtiter plates. The MTase inhibitors previously identified by in vitro biochemical assays were tested, and some, such as sinefungin, effectively suppressed N7-MTase in the yeast system. However, other compounds, such as ATA and AdoHcy, did not exert an inhibitory effect within a cellular context. These results validated the yeast assay system for inhibitor screening yet also demonstrated the difference between cell-based and in vitro biochemical assays. The yeast system was applied to the screening of 3000 natural product extracts, and three were observed to more potently inhibit the activity of coronavirus than human N7-MTase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A versatile, stability-indicating and high-throughput ultra-fast liquid chromatography method for the determination of isoflavone aglycones in soybeans, topical formulations, and permeation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, Marina C; Yatsu, Francini K J; Bidone, Juliana; Koester, Letícia S; Bassani, Valquiria L; Garcia, Cássia V; Mendez, Andreas S L; von Poser, Gilsane L; Teixeira, Helder F

    2015-03-01

    There is a growing interest in the pharmaceutical field concerning isoflavones topical delivery systems, especially with regard to their skin care properties and antiherpetic activity. In this context, the present work describes an ultra-fast liquid chromatography method (UFLC) for determining daidzein, glycitein, and genistein in different matrices during the development of topical systems containing isoflavone aglycones (IA) obtained from soybeans. The method showed to be specific, precise, accurate, and linear (0.1 to 5 µg mL(-1)) for IA determination in soybean acid extract, IA-rich fraction obtained after the purification process, IA loaded-nanoemulsions, and topical hydrogel, as well as for permeation/retention assays in porcine skin and porcine esophageal mucosa. The matrix effect was determined for all complex matrices, demonstrating low effect during the analysis. The stability indicating UFLC method was verified by submitting IA to acidic, alkaline, oxidative, and thermal stress conditions, and no interference of degradation products was detected during analysis. Mass spectrometry was performed to show the main compounds produced after acid hydrolysis of soybeans, as well as suggest the main degradation products formed after stress conditions. Besides the IA, hydroxymethylfurfural and ethoxymethylfurfural were produced and identified after acid hydrolysis of the soybean extract and well separated by the UFLC method. The method's robustness was confirmed using the Plackett-Burman experimental design. Therefore, the new method affords fast IA analysis during routine processes, extract purification, products development, and bioanalytical assays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing the genotoxicities of sparteine and compounds isolated from Lupinus mexicanus and L. montanus seeds by using comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M R; Alvarez, C M; García, P M; Ruiz, M A

    2014-12-12

    The genus Lupinus is widely distributed. Its seeds are used for animal and human food, and Lupinus possesses pharmacological potential because of its high content of quinolizidine alkaloids and flavonoids; however, there is little available information about its genotoxicity. We used the comet assay and staminal nuclei of Tradescantia (clone 4430) to evaluate the in vitro genotoxicity of 4 concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mM) of alkaloid extracts of Lupinus mexicanus and Lupinus montanus, flavonoids of L. mexicanus, and commercial sparteine; nitrosodiethylamine was used as a positive control and untreated nuclei were used as a negative control. All concentrations of L. mexicanus and L. montanus showed significant genotoxic activity (P ≤ 0.05). A similar behavior was observed for flavonoid extracts of L. montanus except the 1.0 mM concentration. Sparteine showed genotoxic activity only at 0.5 mM. The order of genotoxicity of the compounds studied was as follows: L. mexicanus > L. montanus > flavonoids of L. montanus > sparteine. There is evident genotoxic activity in the compounds that were studied, particularly at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.1 mM). Given the limited information about the genotoxicity of the compounds of L. mexicanus and L. montanus, further studies are necessary.

  20. Development of an assay to assess genotoxicity by particulate matter extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priftis, Alexandros; Papikinos, Konstantinos; Koukoulanaki, Marina; Kerasioti, Efthalia; Stagos, Dimitrios; Konstantinopoulos, Konstantinos; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Karakitsios, Spyros; Sarigiannis, Dimosthenis; Tsatsakis, Aristides M; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2017-04-01

    The current study describes a method for assessing the oxidative potential of common environmental stressors (ambient air particulate matter), using a plasmid relaxation assay where the extract caused single-strand breaks, easily visualised through electrophoresis. This assay utilises a miniscule amount (11 µg) of particulate matter (PM) extract compared to other, cell‑based methods (~3,000 µg). The negative impact of air pollution on human health has been extensively recognised. Among the air pollutants, PM plays an eminent role, as reflected in the broad scientific interest. PM toxicity highly depends on its composition (metals and organic compounds), which in turn has been linked to multiple health effects (such as cardiorespiratory diseases and cancer) through multiple toxicity mechanisms; the induction of oxidative stress is considered a major mechanism among these. In this study, the PM levels, oxidative potential, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of PM in the region of Larissa, Greece were examined using the plasmid relaxation assay. Finally, coffee extracts from different varieties, derived from both green and roasted seeds, were examined for their ability to inhibit PM-induced DNA damage. These extracts also exerted an inhibitory effect on xanthine oxidase and catalase, but had no effect against superoxide dismutase. Overall, this study highlights the importance of assays for assessing the oxidative potential of widespread environmental stressors (PM), as well as the antioxidant capacity of beverages and food items, with the highlight being the development of a plasmid relaxation assay to assess the genotoxicity caused by PM using only a miniscule amount.

  1. Identification of a broad-spectrum antiviral small molecule against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses by using a novel high-throughput screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshabrawy, Hatem A; Fan, Jilao; Haddad, Christine S; Ratia, Kiira; Broder, Christopher C; Caffrey, Michael; Prabhakar, Bellur S

    2014-04-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses are members of different viral families and are known causative agents of fatal viral diseases. These viruses depend on cathepsin L for entry into their target cells. The viral glycoproteins need to be primed by protease cleavage, rendering them active for fusion with the host cell membrane. In this study, we developed a novel high-throughput screening assay based on peptides, derived from the glycoproteins of the aforementioned viruses, which contain the cathepsin L cleavage site. We screened a library of 5,000 small molecules and discovered a small molecule that can inhibit the cathepsin L cleavage of all viral peptides with minimal inhibition of cleavage of a host protein-derived peptide (pro-neuropeptide Y). The small molecule inhibited the entry of all pseudotyped viruses in vitro and the cleavage of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein in an in vitro cleavage assay. In addition, the Hendra and Nipah virus fusion glycoproteins were not cleaved in the presence of the small molecule in a cell-based cleavage assay. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the small molecule is a mixed inhibitor of cathepsin L. Our broad-spectrum antiviral small molecule appears to be an ideal candidate for future optimization and development into a potent antiviral against SARS-CoV and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses. We developed a novel high-throughput screening assay to identify small molecules that can prevent cathepsin L cleavage of viral glycoproteins derived from SARS-CoV and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses that are required for their entry into the host cell. We identified a novel broad-spectrum small molecule that could block cathepsin L-mediated cleavage and thus inhibit the entry of pseudotypes bearing the glycoprotein derived from SARS-CoV or Ebola, Hendra, or Nipah virus. The small molecule can be further optimized and developed into a potent broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  2. In vivo genotoxicity study of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using comet assay following intratracheal instillation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naya, Masato; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Ema, Makoto; Kasamoto, Sawako; Fukumuro, Masahito; Takami, Shigeaki; Nakajima, Madoka; Hayashi, Makoto; Nakanishi, Junko

    2012-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) is widely used as a white pigment in paints, plastics, inks, paper, creams, cosmetics, drugs and foods. In the present study, the genotoxicity of anatase TiO₂ nanoparticles was evaluated in vivo using the comet assay after a single or repeated intratracheal instillation in rats. The nanoparticles were instilled intratracheally at a dosage of 1.0 or 5.0 mg/kg body weight (single instillation group) and 0.2 or 1.0 mg/kg body weight once a week for 5 weeks (repeated instillation group) into male Sprague-Dawley rats. A positive control, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) at 500 mg/kg, was administered orally 3 h prior to dissection. Histopathologically, macrophages and neutrophils were detected in the alveolus of the lung in the 1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg TiO₂ groups. In the comet assay, there was no increase in % tail DNA in any of the TiO₂ groups. In the EMS group, there was a significant increase in % tail DNA compared with the negative control group. TiO₂ nanoparticles in the anatase crystal phase are not genotoxic following intratracheal instillation in rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Size- and coating-dependent cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles evaluated using in vitro standard assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Li, Yan; Yan, Jian; Ingle, Taylor; Jones, Margie Yvonne; Mei, Nan; Boudreau, Mary D; Cunningham, Candice K; Abbas, Mazhar; Paredes, Angel M; Zhou, Tong; Moore, Martha M; Howard, Paul C; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) may greatly alter their toxicological potential. To explore the effects of size and coating on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of AgNPs, six different types of AgNPs, having three different sizes and two different coatings, were investigated using the Ames test, mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. The genotoxicities of silver acetate and silver nitrate were evaluated to compare the genotoxicity of nanosilver to that of ionic silver. The Ames test produced inconclusive results for all types of the silver materials due to the high toxicity of silver to the test bacteria and the lack of entry of the nanoparticles into the cells. Treatment of L5718Y cells with AgNPs and ionic silver resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity, mutagenicity in the Tk gene and the induction of micronuclei from exposure to nearly every type of the silver materials. Treatment of TK6 cells with these silver materials also resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and significantly increased micronucleus frequency. With both the MLA and micronucleus assays, the smaller the AgNPs, the greater the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. The coatings had less effect on the relative genotoxicity of AgNPs than the particle size. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of the induced Tk mutants indicated that the types of mutations induced by AgNPs were different from those of ionic silver. These results suggest that AgNPs induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a size- and coating-dependent manner. Furthermore, while the MLA and in vitro micronucleus assay (in both types of cells) are useful to quantitatively measure the genotoxic potencies of AgNPs, the Ames test cannot.

  4. High Throughput Transcriptomics @ USEPA (Toxicology ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ideal chemical testing approach will provide complete coverage of all relevant toxicological responses. It should be sensitive and specific It should identify the mechanism/mode-of-action (with dose-dependence). It should identify responses relevant to the species of interest. Responses should ideally be translated into tissue-, organ-, and organism-level effects. It must be economical and scalable. Using a High Throughput Transcriptomics platform within US EPA provides broader coverage of biological activity space and toxicological MOAs and helps fill the toxicological data gap. Slide presentation at the 2016 ToxForum on using High Throughput Transcriptomics at US EPA for broader coverage biological activity space and toxicological MOAs.

  5. A rapid, high-throughput viability assay for Blastocystis spp. reveals metronidazole resistance and extensive subtype-dependent variations in drug susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Haris; Teo, Joshua D W; Upcroft, Jacqui; Tan, Kevin S W

    2011-02-01

    Blastocystis is an emerging protistan parasite of controversial pathogenesis. Although metronidazole (Mz) is standard therapy for Blastocystis infections, there have been accumulating reports of treatment failure, suggesting the existence of drug-resistant isolates. Furthermore, very little is known about Blastocystis susceptibility to standard antimicrobials. In the present study, we established resazurin and XTT viability microassays for Blastocystis spp. belonging to subtypes 4 and 7, both of which have been suggested to represent pathogenic zoonotic subtypes. The optimized resazurin assay was used to screen a total of 19 compounds against both subtypes. Interestingly, subtype 7 parasites were resistant to Mz, a 1-position-substituted 5-nitroimidazole (5-NI), while subtype 4 parasites were sensitive. Some cross-resistance was observed to tinidazole, another 1-position 5-NI. Conversely, subtype 4 parasites were resistant to emetine, while subtype 7 parasites were sensitive. Position 2 5-NIs were effective against both subtypes, as were ornidazole, nitazoxanide, furazolidone, mefloquine, quinicrine, quinine, cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), and iodoacetamide. Both subtypes were resistant to chloroquine, doxycycline, paromomycin, ampicillin, and pyrimethamine. This is the first study to report extensive variations in drug sensitivities among two clinically important subtypes. Our study highlights the need to reevaluate established treatment regimens for Blastocystis infections and offers clear new treatment options for Mz treatment failures.

  6. Development of a high-throughput screening-compatible assay to identify inhibitors of the CK2alpha/CK2beta interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochscherf, Jennifer; Lindenblatt, Dirk; Steinkrueger, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Increased activity of protein kinase CK2 is associated with various types of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and chronic inflammation. In the search for CK2 inhibitors, attention has expanded toward compounds disturbing the interaction between CK2alpha and CK2beta in addition to established...... active site-directed approaches. The current article describes the development of a fluorescence anisotropy-based assay that mimics the principle of CK2 subunit interaction by using CK2alpha1-335 and the fluorescent probe CF-Ahx-Pc as a CK2beta analog. In addition, we identified new inhibitors able...... to displace the fluorescent probe from the subunit interface on CK2alpha1-335. Both CF-Ahx-Pc and the inhibitors I-Pc and Cl-Pc were derived from the cyclic peptide Pc, a mimetic of the C-terminal CK2alpha-binding motif of CK2beta. The design of the two inhibitors was based on docking studies using the known...

  7. Clinical Evaluation of the New High-Throughput Luminex NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel Assay for Multiplex Respiratory Pathogen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H K; Lam, Ho-Yin; Yip, Cyril C Y; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Ma, Edmond S K; Cheng, Vincent C C; Tang, Bone S F; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-07-01

    A broad range of viral and bacterial pathogens can cause acute respiratory tract infection. For rapid detection of a broad respiratory pathogen spectrum, multiplex real-time PCR is ideal. This study evaluated the performance of the new Luminex NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel (NxTAG-RPP) in comparison with the BioFire FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FA-RP) or singleplex real-time PCR as reference. A total of 284 clinical respiratory specimens and 3 influenza A/H7N9 viral culture samples were tested. All clinical specimens were processed and analyzed in parallel using NxTAG-RPP and the reference standard method. The H7N9 viral culture samples were tested using NxTAG-RPP only. Overall, the NxTAG-RPP demonstrated ≥93% sensitivity and specificity for all respiratory targets except human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) and HCoV-HKU1. The H7N9 virus was detected by the influenza A virus matrix gene target, while other influenza A virus subtyping gene targets in the panel remained negative. Complete concordance between NxTAG-RPP and FA-RP was observed in 98.8% (318/322) of positive results (kappa = 0.92). Substantial agreement was found for most respiratory targets, but significant differences were observed in human metapneumovirus (P = 0.001) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (P = 0.031). NxTAG-RPP has a higher sample throughput than FA-RP (96 samples versus 1 sample per run) while the turnaround times for NxTAG-RPP and FA-RP were 5 h (up to 96 samples) and 1 h (for one sample), respectively. Overall, NxTAG-RPP demonstrated good diagnostic performance for most respiratory pathogens. The high sample throughput with reasonable turnaround time of this new assay makes it a suitable multiplex platform for routine screening of respiratory specimens in hospital-based laboratories. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. P56-M High-Throughput Genotyping of International HapMap Project Populations with Applied Biosystems TaqMan Drug Metabolism Genotyping Assays: An Automated Laboratory and Analysis Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, K. A.; Wronka, L. M.; Dagnall, C. L.; Stefan, C. M.; Beerman, M. B.; Hicks, B. D.; Welch, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    Although high-density whole-genome SNP scans are available for association studies, the tagging SNP approach used to design many of these panels from International HapMap Project data may miss a substantial number of coding functional variations of drug metabolism enzymes (DME). In fact, more than 40 DME genes are not covered by the HapMap Project, probably due to the difficulties in assay design for these highly homologous gene families. Additionally, many of these technologies do not provide detection in a high number of known DME genes, leading to further gaps in whole-genome scans. Of the polymorphic putative functional DME variants not typed in Hap-Map, a large proportion is untagged by any combination of HapMap SNPs. Therefore, to correlate phenotypes to putative functional DME variations in pharmacogenomic studies, direct genotyping of these functional SNPs will be necessary. Applied Biosystems has developed a panel of N = 2394 TaqMan Drug Metabolism Genotyping Assays to interrogate putative functional variations in N = 220 DME genes. At the National Cancer Institute’s Core Genotyping Facility, an automated, high-throughput pipeline has been created to genotype these assays on the International HapMap Project population. DNA sample preparation and handling, assay set-up, genotype analysis, and data publishing at SNP500 Cancer Database (http://snp500cancer.nci.nih.gov), have all been automated. Using a series of custom-designed methods on five Beckman Coulter Biomek FXs, a Laboratory Information Management System, and analysis software, >650,000 genotypes have been obtained and analyzed by a single person in about 8 weeks. Using this pipeline, a completion rate of >99% and no Mendelian inheritance errors were observed. Furthermore, the CGF has implemented quality-controlled, automated pipelines for sample receiving, quantification, numerous DNA handling procedures, genotyping, and analysis for all samples and studies processed.

  9. Development of a high-throughput real-time PCR assay for the detection of the R81T mutation in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of neonicotinoid-resistant Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puinean, Alin M; Elias, Jan; Slater, Russell; Warren, Anne; Field, Linda M; Williamson, Martin S; Bass, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Myzus persicae is a globally important aphid pest that is mainly controlled through the application of chemical insecticides. Recently, a clone of M. persicae exhibiting control-compromising levels of resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides was described. The resistance of this clone was associated with reduced affinity of imidacloprid for the target site (the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor) as a result of mutation of a key amino acid residue (R81T) in the loop D region of a nAChR β1 subunit. The potent levels of resistance conferred by this mechanism are cause for considerable concern, and the frequency and distribution of the mutation in worldwide populations of M. persicae require careful monitoring. In this study, a high-throughput assay has been developed that allows detection of the mutation in individual aphids. A real-time TaqMan assay to detect the R81T substitution was developed that proved to be sensitive and specific in tests of analytical sensitivity and in a blind genotyping trial of DNA extracted from individual aphids comprising the three possible genotypes. The assay was then used to examine the frequency of the R81T mutation in aphids collected and stored in ethanol from peach orchards in southern France. The R81T frequency varied from 33 to 100% in seven populations from the department of Gard, France. This study describes a rapid and sensitive assay that very effectively detects the R81T mutation in individual aphids. The results also have practical significance for the control of M. persicae in southern France and provide contemporary data to inform current resistance management strategies. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Genotoxic effects of synthetic amorphous silica nanoparticles in the mouse lymphoma assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eşref Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic amorphous silica nanoparticles (SAS NPs have been used in various industries, such as plastics, glass, paints, electronics, synthetic rubber, in pharmaceutical drug tablets, and a as food additive in many processed foods. There are few studies in the literature on NPs using gene mutation approaches in mammalian cells, which represents an important gap for genotoxic risk estimations. To fill this gap, the mouse lymphoma L5178Y/Tk+/− assay (MLA was used to evaluate the mutagenic effect for five different concentrations (from 0.01 to 150 μg/mL of two different sizes of SAS NPs (7.172 and 7.652 nm and a fine collodial form of silicon dioxide (SiO2. This assay detects a broad spectrum of mutational events, from point mutations to chromosome alterations. The results obtained indicate that the two selected SAS NPs are mutagenic in the MLA assay, showing a concentration-dependent effect. The relative mutagenic potencies according to the induced mutant frequency (IMF are as follows: SAS NPs (7.172 nm (IMF = 705.5 × 10−6, SAS NPs (7.652 nm (IMF = 575.5 × 10−6, and SiO2 (IMF = 57.5 × 10−6. These in vitro results, obtained from mouse lymphoma cells, support the genotoxic potential of NPs as well as focus the discussion of the benefits/risks associated with their use in different areas.

  11. The comet assay in Folsomia candida: A suitable approach to assess genotoxicity in collembolans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Diogo N; Silva, Ana Rita R; Cruz, Andreia; Lourenço, Joana; Neves, Joana; Malheiro, Catarina; Mendo, Sónia; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2017-09-01

    The present study shows the comet assay technique being successfully applied for the first time to one of the most widely used soil organisms in standardized ecotoxicological tests, Folsomia candida, providing a step forward in assessing the genotoxicity induced by xenobiotics. Because collembolans have a high content of chitin, a new methodology was developed in which the heads of the collembolans were separated from the rest of the body, allowing the hemolymph to leak out. This procedure allows the cells to be released, and after lysis the genetic material is available for the comet assay. Among other key procedures, the use of 30 organisms (20- to 22-d-old adults) per replicate and the correct amount of cells with genetic material (translated as 10 μL of suspension) applied on the agarose gel were determinants for the success of the results obtained. The methodology was validated by exposing F. candida to a representative metallic element (cadmium) and a representative of organophosphates, the insecticide dimethoate, for a shorter time period of 10 d, compared with the 28 d for the International Organization for Standardization 11267 method. Within this method, the relatively low percentage of DNA damage (30%) observed in controls and the significant increase in terms of percentage of DNA damage for almost all the concentrations of dimethoate and Cd (reaching 52% and 56% of damage in the highest concentrations, respectively) confirmed the genotoxic effect of both compounds and validated this technique. The comet assay proved to be a sensitive technique to detect DNA strand breaks in collembolans' cells. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2514-2520. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  12. Chronic toxicity, genotoxic assay, and phytochemical analysis of four traditional medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda Sortibrán, América; Téllez, María Guadalupe Ordaz; Ocotero, Verónica Muñoz; Carballo-Ontiveros, Marco Antonio; García, Angélica Méndez; Valdés, Rocio Jimena Jiménez; Gutiérrez, Elizabeth Romero; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2011-09-01

    Four medicinal plants--Tecoma stans, Ligusticum porteri, Monarda austromontana, and Poliomintha longiflora, which are distributed in tropical and subtropical countries of the American continent--are widely used in folk medicine to treat diseases such as diarrhea and dysentery. In addition, T. stans and P. longiflora are extensively used as hypoglycemic agents, and M. austromontana and P. longiflora are used as condiments. The plants were collected, identified, dried, and pulverized. Solvent extraction was prepared by maceration of the plant samples, and the phytochemical composition of the extracts was determined by using standard analysis procedures. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of triterpenoids/steroids, flavonoids, and phenols/tannins and, in L. porteri, traces of alkaloids. After the elimination of solvents in vacuo, the extracts were administrated to Drosophila larvae to test their toxicity and genotoxicity. Third instar larvae were chronically fed with the phytoextracts. The extract from L. porteri was toxic, whereas those from T. stans, P. longiflora, and M. austromontana were not. Genotoxic activities of the 4 plants were investigated by using the wing-spot assay of D. melanogaster. Mitomycin C was used as a positive control. No statistically significant increase was observed between treated sample series and a concurrent negative (water) or solvent control sample series.

  13. Comet assay comparison of different Corbicula fluminea (Mollusca tissues for the detection of genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Rigonato

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay was used to study the sensitivity of the widely distributed freshwater bivalve mollusk Corbicula fluminea to the DNA-damaging alkylating-agent methylmethane sulfonate (MMS. This study was undertaken to ascertain if C. fluminea is a good bioindicator of pollutants in aquatic environments and identify which C. fluminea tissue is most effective and practical for genotoxicity studies. The mollusks were exposed to 0.6, 1.2 or 2.4 X 10-4 M MMS for 40 min and their hemolymph, gill tissue and digestive gland tissue assessed for the level of DNA damage and the time needed for the tissues to recovery. Regression analysis showed a direct linear dose-response relationship between MMS concentration and the number of damaged cells for hemolymph and digestive gland tissue but a quadratic relationship for gill tissue, which made the interpretation the gill tissue results difficult. The basal level of DNA damage to gill tissue was very high, possibly because gill is the organs most directly exposed to environmental toxins and mutagenic agents. Although all three types of tissue produced useful results, hemolymph and digestive gland tissue produced more reproducible and reliable results. Hemolymph was the best sample type in that it was easy to obtain and handle, while gill tissue required more manipulation to obtain cell suspensions. Our results indicate that C. fluminea is an optimal bioindicator for the determination genotoxic contaminants in aquatic environments.

  14. An evaluation of a genotoxicity assay with liver s9 for activation and luminescent bacteria for detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. Thomas

    1992-01-01

    A new short-term in vitro genotoxicity assay with marine bioluminescent bacteria was evaluated for sensitivity and cost. Known under the trade name of Mutatox™, this assay is a simple and rapid screening tool that detects DNA-damaging substances (genotoxins) by measuring light output from an isolated dark mutant strain of the luminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum. A positive response indicates the ability of the test chemical to restore the luminescent state in the dark mutant strain; the degree of light increase indicates the relative genotoxicity of the sample. In this study, the Mutatox assay with rat hepatic fractions (S9) as an exogenous metabolic activation system detected genotoxic activity with known progenotoxins: 2-acetamidofluorene, aflatoxin B1, 2-aminoanthracene, 2-aminofluorene, 2-aminonaphthalene, benzo[a]pyrene, 3-methyl-cholanthrene, and pyrene. Each chemical clearly demonstrated a dose response between 5.0 and 0.6 μg per tube. Known nongenotoxic controls carbofuran, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, malathion, simazine, and permethrin showed no genotoxic responses. The optimum assay conditions were determined to be rat S9 concentration of 0.4 mg/ml, preincubation at 37°C for 30 min, and 18 h incubation at 23°C. Genotoxicity data were obtained in <24 h. The Mutatox assay compared favorably in sensitivity with the Ames test; it was easier and more rapid to perform and, as a result, cost less. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value suggested that the Mutatox assay could be a valuable screening tool to monitor complex environmental samples for genotoxins.

  15. High throughput calorimetry for evaluating enzymatic reactions generating phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoflack, Lieve; De Groeve, Manu; Desmet, Tom; Van Gerwen, Peter; Soetaert, Wim

    2010-05-01

    A calorimetric assay is described for the high-throughput screening of enzymes that produce inorganic phosphate. In the current example, cellobiose phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.20) is tested for its ability to synthesise rare disaccharides. The generated phosphate is measured in a high-throughput calorimeter by coupling the reaction to pyruvate oxidase and catalase. This procedure allows for the simultaneous analysis of 48 reactions in microtiter plate format and has been validated by comparison with a colorimetric phosphate assay. The proposed assay has a coefficient of variation of 3.14% and is useful for screening enzyme libraries for enhanced activity and substrate libraries for enzyme promiscuity.

  16. Genotoxic evaluation of aspirin eugenol ester using the Ames test and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyong; Kong, Xiaojun; Li, Xiwang; Yang, Yajun; Zhang, Jiyu

    2013-12-01

    Aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) is a promising drug candidate for treatment of inflammation, pain and fever and prevention of cardiovascular diseases with less side effects and it is important to characterize its genotoxicity. In this study, the genotoxicity of AEE was assessed with two standard genotoxicity assays of the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, Salmonella strains TA97, TA98, TA100, TA102 and TA1535 were treated with or without the metabolic activation with a S9 fraction from Acroclor-induced rat liver. The doses of AEE were 5 mg/plate, 2.5 mg/plate, 1.25 mg/plate, 0.625 mg/plate and 0.3125 mg/plate, respectively. In the above tested strains, mutagenicity with or without the S-9 mixture was not detected. In the mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus assay, fifty mice were divided into five groups evenly and the AEE dose at 5000 mg/kg, 2500 mg/kg and 1250 mg/kg and the cyclophosphamide dose at 40 mg/kg as a positive control, the 0.5% of CMC-Na as negative control were administered. The results showed that AEE did not induce any significant increase in micronucleated erythrocytes after 24 h (p<0.01). Our results suggested that AEE was non-genotoxic in vivo or in vitro. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Direct influence of S9 liver homogenate on fluorescence signals: impact on practical applications in a bacterial genotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, Jürg; Breitmaier, Eva B; Gocke, Elmar; Apfel, Christian M; Page, Malcolm G P

    2002-01-15

    Assays based on the bacterial SOS-response offer the possibility of automatization of genotoxicity testing for screening of large compound libraries. While existing assays use colorimetric detection or luminescence read-out, we describe here the use of a fluorescence-based system to achieve high sensitivity of detection required for assay miniaturization. Three commonly used fluorophores--fluorescein, DDAO and resorufin--are evaluated. Experimental evidence is given that S9 liver homogenate contains a heat-labile, reversible fluorophore-binding activity and therefore, significantly reduces fluorescence intensities. We have worked out simple solutions to overcome the S9 related interference in order to be able to establish a robust bacterial genotoxicity assay.

  18. Evaluation of the genotoxic potential of the Casearia sylvestris extract on HTC and V79 cells by the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maistro, E L; Carvalho, J C T; Mantovani, M S

    2004-06-01

    Casearia sylvestris is common in tropical America growing wild in Brazil in the states of Amazonas and São Paulo. Its leaves are used in Brazilian folk medicine for several diseases. The present investigation was carried out to examine the genotoxic effects of a C. sylvestris crude ethanolic extract on Hepatoma Tissue Culture (HTC cells) of Rattus norvegicus and Chinese hamster V79 cells in culture, using the comet assay. For the genotoxic evaluation the cells were treated with three different concentrations (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/ml) of extract prepared from a 25 mg/ml aqueous solution. The positive control was cyclophosphamide for HTC cells and methyl methanesulfonate for V79 cells. The duration of the treatment was 2 h. The results showed that the extract of C. sylvestris presented no genotoxic effects and not modified effect inducing DNA damage by alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and methyl methanesulfonate in HTC and V 79 cells respectively.

  19. Genotoxicity of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles to human keratinocytes assessed by the comet assay and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, V; Duarte, I F; Santos, C; Oliveira, H

    2017-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in industrial, cosmetic, and biomedical products, and humans are frequently exposed to these products through the skin. It is widely recognized that the characteristics of AgNPs (e.g., size, coating) may influence their cytotoxic effects, but their correlation with DNA damage and mitotic disorders remains poorly explored. In this study, human keratinocytes (HaCaT cell line) were exposed to well-characterized 30 nm AgNPs coated with citrate, and their effects on viability, DNA fragmentation (assessed by the comet assay), and micronuclei (MNi) induction (assessed by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assays, CBMN) were investigated. The results showed that 10 and 40 μg/mL AgNPs decreased cell proliferation and viability, and induced a significant genetic damage. This was observed by an increase of DNA amount in comet tail, which linearly correlated with dose and time of exposure. Also, cytostaticity (increase of mononucleated cells) and MNi rates increased in treated cells. In contrast, no significant changes were observed in nucleoplasmatic bridges (NPBs) or nuclear buds (NBUDs), although NBUDs tended to increase in all conditions and periods. The cytostatic effects on HaCaT cells were also shown by the decrease of their nuclear division index. Thus, both comet and CBMN assays supported the observation that citrate-AgNPs induced genotoxic effects on HaCaT cells. Considering that AgNPs are present in a vast number of consumer products and also in multiple nanomedicine skin applications and formulations, more research is needed to determine the properties that confer less toxicity of AgNPs to different cell lines.

  20. A simple dilute and shoot approach incorporated with pentafluorophenyl (PFP) column based LC-MS/MS assay for the simultaneous determination of trimethylamine N-oxide and trimethylamine in spot urine samples with high throughput.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang Sunny; Li, Shu; Kellermann, Gottfried

    2017-11-01

    Determination of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and trimethylamine (TMA) in biological and environmental samples has drawn great attention recently due to their increasing association with human health and disease. It remains a challenge to simultaneously quantify TMAO and TMA in a simple, fast and cost-effective manner due to pre-analytical and analytical constraints. For the first time, we describe a dilute and shoot approach combined with LC-MS/MS detection for the simultaneous measurement of the analytes in spot urine samples with high throughput. Compared to the existing methods, the merits of the proposed assay include the use of a simple dilute and shoot approach (100-fold), small sample volume (10μL), short LC run on a PFP column (4.0min) and multi-analyte MS detection without sample cleanup, derivatization, evaporation and a HILIC column. Dilution, LC and MS parameters were optimized in detail. Method validation yielded a wide linearity for TMAO (1.0-400μg/mL) and TMA (0.025-10μg/mL) with a respective limit of quantitation of 1.0 and 0.025μg/mL. The quantitation was not affected by 41 major urinary components, structurally-related drugs and metabolites. The intra- and inter-day assay precisions were ≤3.6% and recoveries were 93.3%-103.3% for spiked quality control samples. The clinical utility of the alternative spot urine sampling approach compared to conventional 24h urine collection was supported by a significant correlation between the two sampling strategies (n=20, p<0.0001, r=0.757-0.862; slope=0.687-1.170) and no statistical difference in day-to-day biological variability (n=20). The applicability and reliability of the assay was verified by the assessment of reference intervals in a cohort of 118 healthy people. The proposed assay would be beneficial for the rapid and accurate determination of the increasingly important TMAO and TMA demanded in clinical, environmental, pharmaceutical and nutritional fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  1. High throughput protein production screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Peter T [Walnut Creek, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Segelke, Brent W [San Ramon, CA

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  2. Comet assay as a procedure for detecting possible genotoxicity induced by non-ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Nemeth

    2015-05-01

    In our laboratory we use comet assay for testing genotoxicity of non-ionizing radiation for more than ten years. In the experiments we use whole blood samples (human or dog, cell lines (e.g. H295R cell line or 3 dimensional in vitro skin tissue (epidermis models. In our protocol a slightly modified alkaline Comet assay method of Singh et al. (1988 is used. On our poster there will be presented a brief summary of our experiments with exposure to different types of radiation (ELF, RF, and intermediate frequency. In our protocols the non-ionizing radiation was often combined with ionizing radiation to see whether the non-ionizing radiation can influence the repair of the DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. For the evaluation of the slides mainly Komet 4.0 image analysis system software (Kinetic Imaging, Liverpool, UK was used, but as we got familiarized with other methods for slide evaluation like grading the comets by visual scoring into 5 categories or the CaspLab software, the comparison of these three methods will be also presented.

  3. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Agaricus blazei methanolic extract fractions assessed using gene and chromosomal mutation assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilanda Ferreira Bellini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional food investigations have demonstrated the presence of substances that could be beneficial to human health when consumed. However, the toxic effects of some substances contained in foods have been determined. Reported medicinal and nutritive properties have led to the extensive commercialization of the basidiomycete fungi Agaricus blazei Murrill (sensu Heinemann, also known as Agaricus brasiliensis Wasser et al., Agaricus subrufescens Peck or the Brazilian medical mushroom (BMM. Different methanolic extract fractions (ME of this mushroom were submitted to the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN clastogenic assay and the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus (HGPRT assay for gene mutation, both using Chinese hamster ovary cells clone K1 (CHO-K1. The results suggest that all the fractions tested possess cytotoxic and mutagenic potential but no clastogenic effects. Further information is needed on the biochemical components of the A. blazei methanol fractions to identify any substances with cytotoxic and/or mutagenicity potential. These findings indicate that A. blazei methanolic extract should not be used due to their genotoxicity and care should be taken in the use of A. blazei by the general population until further biochemical characterization of this fungi is completed.

  4. Dose-Response Assessment of Four Genotoxic Chemicals in a Combined Mouse and Rat Micronucleus and Comet Assay Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio, Leslie; Hobbs, Cheryl; Caspary, William; Witt, Kristine L.

    2012-01-01

    The in vivo micronucleus (MN) assay has proven to be an effective measure of genotoxicity potential. However, sampling a single tissue (bone marrow) for a single indicator of genetic damage using the MN assay provides a limited genotoxicity profile. The in vivo alkaline (pH>13) Comet assay, which detects a broad spectrum of DNA damage, can be applied to a variety of rodent tissues following administration of test agents. To determine if the Comet assay is a useful supplement to the in vivo MN assay, a combined test protocol (MN/Comet assay) was conducted in male B6C3F1 mice and F344/N rats using four model genotoxicants: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), acrylamide (ACM), cyclophosphamide (CP), and vincristine sulfate (VS). Test compounds were administered on 4 consecutive days at 24-hour intervals (VS was administered to rats for 3 days); animals were euthanized 4 hours after the last administration. All compounds induced significant increases in micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RET) in the peripheral blood of mice, and all but ACM induced MN-RET in rats. EMS and ACM induced significant increases in DNA damage, measured by the Comet assay, in multiple tissues of mice and rats. CP-induced DNA damage was detected in leukocytes and duodenum cells. VS, a spindle fiber disrupting agent, was negative in the Comet assay. Based on these results, the MN/Comet assay holds promise for providing more comprehensive assessments of potential genotoxicants, and the National Toxicology Program is presently using this combined protocol in its overall evaluation of the genotoxicity of substances of public health concern. PMID:20371966

  5. GENOTOXICITY OF TEN CIGARETTE SMOKE CONDENSATES IN FOUR TEST SYSTEMS: COMPARISONS AMONG ASSAYS AND CONDENSATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The particulate fraction of cigarette smoke, cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), is genotoxic in many short-term in vitro tests and carcinogenic in rodents. However, no study has evaluatedd a set of CSCs prepared from a diverse set of cigarettes in a variety of short-term genotoxic...

  6. Determination of genotoxic effects of methidathion alkaline hydrolysis in human lymphocytes using the micronucleus assay and square-wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivaktakis, Polychronis D; Giannakopoulos, Evangelos; Vlastos, Dimitris; Matthopoulos, Demetrios P

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of pesticides with environmental factors, such as pH, may result in alterations of their physicochemical properties and should be taken into consideration in regard to their classification. This study investigates the genotoxicity of methidathion and its alkaline hydrolysis by-products in cultured human lymphocytes, using the square-wave voltammetry (square wave-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (SW-AdCSV) technique) and the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN assay). According to the SW-AdCSV data the alkaline hydrolysis of methidathion results in two new molecules, one non-electro-active and a second electro-active which is more genotoxic than methidathion itself in cultured human lymphocytes, inducing higher micronuclei frequencies. The present study confirms the SW-AdCSV technique as a voltammetric method which can successfully simulates the electrodynamics of the cellular membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Can the use of medical muds cause genotoxicity in eukaryotic cells? A trial using comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerencsér, Gellért; Szendi, Katalin; Berényi, Károly; Varga, Csaba

    2015-02-01

    Despite the lack of knowledge of their exact effects, peloids (natural muds) are widely applied in clinical treatment and prevention of different diseases, especially in rheumatic and gynecological disorders or skin diseases. Primarily we have information on their inorganic components, but only limited data are available on the organic components and nothing on their mechanism of chemical action. The objective of the present study was to detect the DNA-damaging effects (possible genotoxic effect) of peloid samples using the single-cell comet assay on Long Evans rat lymphocytes, human lymphocytes, and Eisenia fetida coelomocytes. Rat and human lymphocytes were exposed to the in toto peloid samples, in vitro. The Eisenia cells were extracted from the coelom of animals kept in the intact peloid sample. An indicator derived from the DNA fluorescence intensity was used in the statistical evaluation. The predominantly organic (Hévíz) sample showed a significant alteration from the negative control in several cases, while the inorganic (Kolop) applied did not. A higher quantity of organic compounds may have an important role in the emergence of DNA damage. The results revealed that medical muds have not only positive health effects but can also contain substances with potential human toxicity risk. Our research provides essential steps towards the creation of a toxicity profile and the possible safe use of peloids as medicinal therapy.

  8. Determination of mutagenicity and genotoxicity of indium tin oxide nanoparticles using the Ames test and micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyıl, Dilek; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Tepekozcan, Aykut; Sağlam, Esra

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the mutagenicity and genotoxicity of indium tin oxide (ITO) nanomaterial were assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay. Seven different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, and 150 µg/plate) of this nanomaterial were tested using the Ames test on the TA98 and TA100 strains in the presence and absence of the S9 mixture. At all the concentrations tested, this substance did not significantly increase the number of revertant colonies compared with the control with or without S9 mixture. The genotoxic effects of ITO were investigated in human peripheral lymphocytes treated with 125, 250, 500, and 750 µg/ml concentrations of this substance for 24- and 48-h treatment periods using an MN test. Nuclear division index (NDI) was also calculated in order to determine the cytotoxicity of ITO. It was determined that ITO increased MN frequency in the 750 µg/ml concentration in 24- and 48-h treatments. In addition, ITO dose dependently decreased the NDI significantly for two treatment periods. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. A high-throughput multiplex method adapted for GMO detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Maher; Chupeau, Gaëlle; Berard, Aurélie; McKhann, Heather; Romaniuk, Marcel; Giancola, Sandra; Laval, Valérie; Bertheau, Yves; Brunel, Dominique

    2008-12-24

    A high-throughput multiplex assay for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) was developed on the basis of the existing SNPlex method designed for SNP genotyping. This SNPlex assay allows the simultaneous detection of up to 48 short DNA sequences (approximately 70 bp; "signature sequences") from taxa endogenous reference genes, from GMO constructions, screening targets, construct-specific, and event-specific targets, and finally from donor organisms. This assay avoids certain shortcomings of multiplex PCR-based methods already in widespread use for GMO detection. The assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity. The results suggest that this assay is reliable, flexible, and cost- and time-effective for high-throughput GMO detection.

  10. Testing the genotoxicity of some perfumes with high diethylphthalate (DEP levels using comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Al-Saleh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence of phthalates in perfumes has gained recently some attention since these chemicals are added sometimes intentionally as a fixative. Our previous study tested 47 branded perfumes sold in Saudi market and found 68% of tested samples had diethylphthalate (DEP, above reported threshold limit of 1 ppm. Of these phthalates, DEP was found to have the highest mean value (1621.63 ppm. These results enticed us to test the potential genotoxicity of 7 brands in which their DEP contents were in the range of 1.06 ppm to 23649.3 ppm in human TK-6 cells using single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay. Cells were exposed to 400 µl perfume for 2 hrs, at room temperature. Tail moment was (TM used as a metric measure for DNA damage and 25 cells per sample were determined by image analysis software. Four perfumes with DEP above 40 ppm produced significant DNA damage in TK-6 cells with TM of 54.27 ± 1.04, n=500 compare to the other 3 perfumes with DEP < 2 ppm (21.94 ± 1.09, n=300, untreated cells (2.99 ± 0.17, n=250 and cells induced with ethanol (33.76 ± 1.4, n=75 or methanol (23.82 ± 1.84, n=100 which are the vehicles used in perfume's preparations. The results suggest that DEP in perfumes might be one of the ingredients that provoked DNA damage; however, further investigation is required confirming our observation.

  11. Biomonitoring of genotoxicity of industrial fertilizer pollutants in Aiolopus thalassinus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) using alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Eman A; Augustyniak, Maria; Yousef, Hesham A

    2017-09-01

    Phosphate fertilizer industry is considered as one of the main sources of environmental pollutants. Besides solid waste products, e.g. phosphates, sulphates, and heavy metals, also atmospheric pollutants, such as hydrofluoric acid fumes (HF), sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NO2), and particulate matter with diameter up to 10 μm (PM10) can be dangerous. Genotoxic effect of these pollutants was monitored by assessing the DNA damage using alkaline comet assay on cells from brain, thoracic muscles and gut of Aiolopus thalassinus collected at three sites (A-C) located at 1, 3, and 6 km away from Abu-Zaabal Company for Fertilizers and Chemical Industries. Control site was established 32 km from the source of pollution, at the Cairo University Campus. The level of the DNA damage was significantly higher in insects from polluted sites comparing to that from the control site. A strong negative correlation between percentage of cells with visible DNA damage (% of severed cells) and the distance of the sites from Abu-Zaabal Company was found. The best parameter for monitoring of fertilizer pollutants is % of severed cells. Possible impact of Abu-Zaabal Company (extremely high concentration of phosphates and sulphates in all the polluted sites) on DNA integrity in A. thalassinus tissues was discussed. The potential use of the comet assay as a biomonitoring method of the environmental pollution caused by fertilizer industry was proposed. Specific pollution resulting from the activity of the fertilizer industry can cause comparable adverse effects in the organisms inhabiting areas up to 6 km from the source of contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-throughput epitope binning assays on label-free array-based biosensors can yield exquisite epitope discrimination that facilitates the selection of monoclonal antibodies with functional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmina Noubia Abdiche

    Full Text Available Here, we demonstrate how array-based label-free biosensors can be applied to the multiplexed interaction analysis of large panels of analyte/ligand pairs, such as the epitope binning of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. In this application, the larger the number of mAbs that are analyzed for cross-blocking in a pairwise and combinatorial manner against their specific antigen, the higher the probability of discriminating their epitopes. Since cross-blocking of two mAbs is necessary but not sufficient for them to bind an identical epitope, high-resolution epitope binning analysis determined by high-throughput experiments can enable the identification of mAbs with similar but unique epitopes. We demonstrate that a mAb's epitope and functional activity are correlated, thereby strengthening the relevance of epitope binning data to the discovery of therapeutic mAbs. We evaluated two state-of-the-art label-free biosensors that enable the parallel analysis of 96 unique analyte/ligand interactions and nearly ten thousand total interactions per unattended run. The IBIS-MX96 is a microarray-based surface plasmon resonance imager (SPRi integrated with continuous flow microspotting technology whereas the Octet-HTX is equipped with disposable fiber optic sensors that use biolayer interferometry (BLI detection. We compared their throughput, versatility, ease of sample preparation, and sample consumption in the context of epitope binning assays. We conclude that the main advantages of the SPRi technology are its exceptionally low sample consumption, facile sample preparation, and unparalleled unattended throughput. In contrast, the BLI technology is highly flexible because it allows for the simultaneous interaction analysis of 96 independent analyte/ligand pairs, ad hoc sensor replacement and on-line reloading of an analyte- or ligand-array. Thus, the complementary use of these two platforms can expedite applications that are relevant to the discovery of therapeutic

  13. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Guoxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  14. Genotoxicity and ELF-magnetic fields: a review through the micronucleus assay; Genotoxicidad y campos magneticos-ELF: una revision a traves del ensayo de micronucleos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, M.; Andreu-Galvez, M.; Sanchez-Villalobos, J. M.; Achel, D. G.; Olmos, E.; Martinez-Hernandez, C. M.

    2012-07-01

    Thirty for (34) published studies, conducted from 1994 to the present to evaluate the genotoxic effect of magnetic fields using ELF-EMF and diagnostic resonance on humans by the micronucleus assay have been reviewed. some characteristics of the assay methods, their significance to genotoxicity and basic interpretations of the results of these assays are discussed. of the studies analysed 70.5% implicated genotoxic effects induced by these magnetic fields: 52.9% were due to exposure to magnetic fields only and 17,6% by exposure to magnetic fields in combination with some treatment types, resulting in additive or synergistic effect. Evidence exist to support the notion that exposure of humans to magnetic fields stimulates genotoxic effects, although the actual mechanisms of action or even the true human health consequences resulting from these exposure still remain unclear. (Author) 80 refs.

  15. High Throughput Plasma Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujovic, Selman; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    The troublesome emergence of new classes of micro-pollutants, such as pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors, poses challenges for conventional water treatment systems. In an effort to address these contaminants and to support water reuse in drought stricken regions, new technologies must be introduced. The interaction of water with plasma rapidly mineralizes organics by inducing advanced oxidation in addition to other chemical, physical and radiative processes. The primary barrier to the implementation of plasma-based water treatment is process volume scale up. In this work, we investigate a potentially scalable, high throughput plasma water reactor that utilizes a packed bed dielectric barrier-like geometry to maximize the plasma-water interface. Here, the water serves as the dielectric medium. High-speed imaging and emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the reactor discharges. Changes in methylene blue concentration and basic water parameters are mapped as a function of plasma treatment time. Experimental results are compared to electrostatic and plasma chemistry computations, which will provide insight into the reactor's operation so that efficiency can be assessed. Supported by NSF (CBET 1336375).

  16. The Utilization of Formalin Fixed-Paraffin-Embedded Specimens in High Throughput Genomic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High throughput genomic assays empower us to study the entire human genome in short time with reasonable cost. Formalin fixed-paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue processing remains the most economical approach for longitudinal tissue specimen storage. Therefore, the ability to apply high throughput genomic applications to FFPE specimens can expand clinical assays and discovery. Many studies have measured the accuracy and repeatability of data generated from FFPE specimens using high throughput genomic assays. Together, these studies demonstrate feasibility and provide crucial guidance for future studies using FFPE specimens. Here, we summarize the findings of these studies and discuss the limitations of high throughput data generated from FFPE specimens across several platforms that include microarray, high throughput sequencing, and NanoString.

  17. Compounds used to produce cloned animals are genotoxic and mutagenic in mammalian assays in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.J. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto de Biociências de Rio Claro, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde em Desenvolvimento na Região Centro-Oeste, Faculdade de Medicina “Dr. Hélio Mandetta”, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Mestrado em Farmácia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Mantovani, M.S.; Silva, A.F. da [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pesarini, J.R. [Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde em Desenvolvimento na Região Centro-Oeste, Faculdade de Medicina “Dr. Hélio Mandetta”, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Mauro, M.O. [Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Doutorado em Biotecnologia e Biodiversidade - Rede Pró Centro-Oeste, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Ribeiro, L.R. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto de Biociências de Rio Claro, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-28

    The compounds 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide promote the successful production of cloned mammals and have been used in the development of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This study investigated the effects of 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide in vitro, using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay to assess cytotoxicity, the trypan blue exclusion assay to assess cell viability, the comet assay to assess genotoxicity, and the micronucleus test with cytokinesis block to test mutagenicity. In addition, the comet assay and the micronucleus test were also performed on peripheral blood cells of 54 male Swiss mice, 35 g each, to assess the effects of the compounds in vivo. The results indicated that both 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide, at the concentrations and doses tested, were cytotoxic in vitro and genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro and in vivo, altered the nuclear division index in vitro, but did not diminish cell viability in vitro. Considering that alterations in DNA play important roles in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and morphofunctional teratogenesis and reduce embryonic viability, this study indicated that 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide utilized in the process of mammalian cloning may be responsible for the low embryo viability commonly seen in nuclear transfer after implantation in utero.

  18. Development of cultures of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve for genotoxicity assessment using the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpiri, Rachael U; Konya, Roseline S; Hodges, Nikolas J

    2017-12-01

    Sponges are a potential alternative model species to bivalves in pollution biomonitoring and environmental risk assessment in the aquatic ecosystem. In the present study, a novel in vivo exposure sponge culture model was developed from field-collected and cryopreserved sponge (Hymeniacidon perleve) cells to investigate the genotoxic effects of environmentally relevant metals in the laboratory. Sponge cell aggregates were cultured and exposed to noncytotoxic concentrations (0-0.4 mg/L) of cadmium chloride, nickel chloride, and sodium dichromate as quantified by the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and DNA-strand breaks assessed by the comet assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was quantified by oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate in sponge cell aggregates exposed to the same concentrations of Cd, Cr, and Ni. There was a statistically significant (p comet assay to detect DNA-strand breaks in marine sponge cells and demonstrated that exposure to noncytotoxic concentrations of Cd, Cr, and Ni for 12 h results in a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage and levels of ROS production. In conclusion, we have developed a novel in vivo model based on culture of cryopreserved sponge cells that is compatible with the alkaline comet assay. Genotoxicity in marine sponges measured by the comet assay technique may be a useful tool for biomonitoring research and risk assessment in aquatic ecosystems. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3314-3323. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  19. Hemocytes of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha are relevant cells for the monitoring of environmental genotoxicity by the comet assay.

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    Marc Bonnard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The measure of DNA integrity by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or comet assay is especially recommended for its sensitivity and its capacity for detecting different types of damages. Therefore, it has been applied in environmental genotoxicity in a variety of organisms. It appears today necessary to define both reference and threshold levels of DNA damage, for their application in in situ biomonitoring. However, little is known about the influence of both biological (sex, reproduction status or external (temperature… confounding factors on the measure of DNA damage by the comet assay. These variables need to be taken into account if the robustness of the assay is to be established (Jha, 2008. In the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha (recommended as a sentinel species in the evaluation of freshwater quality the measure of DNA damage by the comet assay is mainly performed on hemocytes, which are circulating cells involved in key physiological functions such as immunity, homeostasis, detoxication…. This communication will present and discuss results from an innovative study about the variability of the baseline level of DNA damage in hemocytes of mussels encaged for one year in the canal de l’Aisne à la Marne (Reims, according to their sex and their reproductive status. The sensitivity and the suitability of hemocytes in the evaluation of environmental genotoxicity will also be discussed, referring to observations during a 6 month-exposure of mussels in mesocosms to environmentally realistic concentrations of carbamazepine.

  20. Evaluation of genotoxicity of the acute gamma radiation on earthworm Eisenia fetida using single cell gel electrophoresis technique (Comet assay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowmithra, K; Shetty, N J; Jha, S K; Chaubey, R C

    2015-12-01

    Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) most suitable biological indicators of radioactive pollution. Radiation-induced lesions in DNA can be considered to be molecular markers for early effects of ionizing radiation. Gamma radiation produces a wide spectrum of DNA. Some of these lesions, i.e., DNA strand breaks and alkali labile sites can be detected by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay by measuring the migration of DNA from immobilized nuclear DNA. E. fetida were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation, i.e., 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50Gy, and comet assay was performed for all the doses along with control at 1, 3 and 5h post irradiation to evaluate the genotoxicity of gamma radiation in this organism. The DNA damage was measured as percentage of comet tail DNA. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in samples exposed to 5Gy and above, and the increase in DNA damage was dose dependent i.e., DNA damage was increased with increased doses of radiation. The highest DNA damage was noticed at 1h post irradiation and gradually decreased with time, i.e., at 3 and 5h post irradiation. The present study reveals that gamma radiation induces DNA damage in E. fetida and the comet assay is a sensitive and rapid method for its detection to detect genotoxicity of gamma radiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Fucus vesiculosus extract on cultured human lymphocytes using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays

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    Cleide Leite-Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fucales, Fucaceae was screened for its protective activity using doxorubicin-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. In this study, we assessed the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of three different concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 of F. vesiculosus aqueous extract using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays. Treatment of human lymphocyte cultures with 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 F. vesiculosus aqueous extract had no effect on the chromosome aberration frequency or on the extent of DNA damage detected by the Comet assay. The antigenotoxic effects of the extract were tested in human lymphocyte cultures treated with 15 µg mL-1 of doxorubicin, either alone or combined with the different concentrations of the extract, which was added to the cultures before, simultaneously with or after the doxorubicin. Only when lymphocytes were pre-treated with extract there was a reduction in doxorubicin-induced chromosome aberrations and DNA damage as detected by the Comet assay. These results demonstrate that F. vesiculosus aqueous extract is not genotoxic in cultured human lymphocytes and indicate that when added to lymphocyte cultures before doxorubicin it has antigenotoxic activity against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage.

  2. Genotoxicity evaluation of locally produced dental porcelain--an in vitro study using the Ames and Comet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noushad, Mohammed; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Husein, Adam; Abdullah, Haswati; Ismail, Abdul Rashid

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the genotoxicity of a locally produced dental porcelain (Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia) using the Ames and Comet assays. In the Ames assay, four genotypic variants of the Salmonella strains (TA98, TA100, TA1537 and TA1535) carrying mutations in several genes were used. The dental porcelain was incubated with these four strains in five different doses both in the presence and absence of metabolic activation (S9) and the result was assessed based on the number of revertant colonies. Concurrently, appropriate positive controls were used so as to validate the test. The average number of revertant colonies per plate treated with locally produced dental porcelain was less than double as compared to that of negative control. In the Comet assay, L929 (CCL-1 ATCC, USA) mouse fibroblast cells were treated with the dental porcelain in three different concentrations along with concurrent negative and positive controls. The tail moment which was used as a measurement of DNA damage was almost equal to that of the negative control, suggesting that the locally produced dental porcelain did not induce any DNA damage. The results indicated that the locally produced dental porcelain is non-genotoxic under the present test conditions.

  3. Sensitive detection of chemical-induced genotoxicity by the Cypridina secretory luciferase reporter assay, using DNA repair-deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Yukari; Sugawara, Harumi; Iwami, Mio; Tanaka, Megumi; Eki, Toshihiko

    2011-04-01

    Yeast-based reporter assays are useful for detecting various genotoxic chemicals. We established a genotoxicity assay using recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, each containing a reporter plasmid with the secretory luciferase gene from Cypridina noctiluca, driven by a DNA damage-responsive promoter of the yeast RNR3 gene. This system detected the genotoxicity of methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) as sensitively as conventional yeast-based reporter assays, using the β-galactosidase gene in a concentration-dependent manner; it also detects four other genotoxic chemicals, allowing us to monitor DNA damage easily by skipping the cell extraction process for the assay. We examined Cypridina luciferase levels induced by MMS and three antitumour agents using a set of BY4741-derived deletion mutants, each defective in a DNA repair pathway or DNA damage checkpoint. Luciferase activities were particularly enhanced in mutant strains with mms2 Δ and mag1 Δ by exposure to MMS, rad59 Δ and mlh1 Δ to camptothecin and mms2 Δ and mlh1 Δ to mitomycin C, respectively, compared with their parent strains. Enhanced reporter activities were also found in some DNA repair mutants with cisplatin. These observations suggest that this Cypridina secretory luciferase reporter assay using yeast DNA repair mutants offers convenient and sensitive detection of the potential genotoxicity of numerous compounds, including antitumour drugs and studying the mechanisms of DNA damage response in yeast. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. A Comparison of the Human Buccal Cell Assay and the Pollen Abortion Assay in Assessing Genotoxicity in an Urban-Rural Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan da Silveira Fleck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is exacerbated near heavy traffic roads in cities. Air pollution concentration and composition vary by region and depend on urban-rural gradients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of air pollution in areas of varying population densities and to compare plant biomonitoring with an established biomarker of human exposure to traffic-related air pollution in children. The areas of study were selected near a major street in 3 different regions. Areas A, B and C represent high, intermediate and low population densities, respectively. Micronucleus assay, an established biomarker of human exposure, was performed in children from these areas. For a plant biomonitoring assay, the pollen abortion assay was performed on Bauhinia variegata in these areas. NO2 and O3 concentrations were determined by passive sampling. We report here that the pollen abortion frequency in Bauhinia variegata is correlated with NO2 concentration (P = 0.004 and is strongly associated with vehicular flow and population density in the studied areas. Micronuclei frequency in buccal cells of children was higher in the regions with more degree of urbanization (P < 0.001 following the same pattern of O3 concentrations (P = 0.030. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that high concentrations of air pollutants in Porto Alegre are related to both human and plant genotoxicity. Areas with different concentration of pollutants demonstrated to have an urbanization gradient dependent pattern which also reflected on genotoxic damage among these areas.

  5. Genotoxicity testing of PLGA-PEO nanoparticles in TK6 cells by the comet assay and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimirova, Alena; Magdolenova, Zuzana; Barancokova, Magdalena; Staruchova, Marta; Volkovova, Katarina; Dusinska, Maria

    2012-10-09

    The in vitro genotoxicity of PLGA-PEO (poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid-polyethylene oxide copolymer) nanoparticles was assessed in TK6 cells using the comet assay as well as cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. The cells were exposed to 0.12-75μg/cm² of PLGA-PEO nanoparticles during 2 and 24h for analysis in the comet assay, and to 3-75μg/cm² of these nanoparticles during 4, 24, 48 and 72h, respectively, for analysis in the CBMN assay. Two different protocols for treatment with cytochalasin B were used. We found that PLGA-PEO was neither cytotoxic (measured by relative cell growth activity and cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI)), nor did it induce DNA strand-breaks (detected by the comet assay) or oxidative DNA lesions (measured by the comet assay modified with lesion-specific enzyme formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase). There were no statistically significant differences in the frequencies of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBNCs) between untreated and treated cells in either of the conditions used. This suggests that PLGA-PEO did not have potential genotoxicity. However, using two experimental protocols of the micronucleus assay, PLGA-PEO nanoparticles showed a weak but significant increase in the level of MN in mononucleated cells, in cells treated for 48h with PLGA-PEO nanoparticles when cytochalasin B was added for the last 24h (1st protocol), and in cells treated for 24h with PLGA-PEO nanoparticles followed by washing of NPs and addition of cytochalasin B for another 24h (2nd protocol). It remains unclear whether the increase of MNMNC after treatment with PLGA-PEO nanoparticles is the effect of a possible, weak aneugenic potential or early effect of these particles, or due to another reason. These results suggest that aneugenicity in addition to clastogenicity may be considered as an important biomarker when assessing the genotoxic potential of polymeric nanoparticles. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of dental materials in human lymphocytes as assessed by the single cell microgel electrophoresis (comet) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, Norbert H; Wallner, Barbara C; Harréus, Ulrich A; Kleinjung, Tobias; Folwaczny, Matthias; Hickel, Reinhard; Kehe, Kai; Reichl, Franz-Xaver

    2004-03-01

    Resin monomers may be released from restorative dental materials and can diffuse into the tooth pulp or the gingiva, and can reach the saliva and the circulating blood. Whereas the cytotoxic potential of some components has been clearly documented, possible genotoxicity in human target cells demands further investigation. The Comet assay was used to quantify DNA single strand breaks, alkali labile and incomplete excision repair sites in lymphocytes of 10 volunteers. The xenobiotics investigated were 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and dimethyl sulfoxide as controls. DNA migration was quantified using the tail moment according to Olive (OTM) and DNA migration was considered to be elevated at OTM levels above 2. Cytotoxicity was monitored using trypan blue. In the negative controls, OTM ranged between 1.0 and 1.2. With HEMA concentrations above 10(-6)M, TEGDMA 10(-3)M, Bis-GMA 10(-4)M, and UDMA above 10(-6)M relevant enhancements of DNA migration (OTM>2) were achieved. At higher concentrations of up to 2.5x10(-2) induced DNA migration was expressed by OTM of 3.3 for HEMA, 4.5 for TEGDMA, 7.4 for Bis-GMA, and 2.8 for UDMA. Relevant cytotoxic effects were also seen but vitality levels were at a critical range of 71% for Bis-GMA and 73% for TEGDMA, only. In higher concentration levels, all tested substances induced significant but minor enhancement of DNA migration in the Comet assay as a possible sign for limited genotoxic effects. However, with the highest levels of DNA migration being combined with elevated cytotoxic effects, a low in vivo genotoxic strain appears to be posed by the resin components.

  7. Genotoxicity assessment of biphasic calcium phosphate of modified porosity on human dental pulp cells using Ames and Comet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Nur Fathin Alia Che; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Mahmood, Zuliani; Rahman, Ismail Ab; Ismail, Hanafi

    2017-12-13

    Biphasic Calcium Phosphate (BCP) with a ratio of 20/80 Hydroxyapatite (HA)/Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) promotes the differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). In the current study, the genotoxicity of locally produced BCP of modified porosity (65%) with a mean pore size of 300micrometer (μm) was assessed using Comet and Ames assays. HDPCs were treated with BCP extract at three different inhibitory concentrations which were obtained based on cytotoxicity test conducted with concurrent negative and positive controls. The tail moment of HDPCs treated with BCP extract at all three concentrations showed no significant difference compared to negative control (p>0.05), indicating that BCP did not induce DNA damage to HDPCs. The BCP was evaluated using five tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium TA98, TA100, TA102, TA1537 and TA1538. Each strain was incubated with BCP extract with five different concentrations in the presence and absence of metabolic activation system (S9) mix. Concurrently, negative and positive controls were included. The average number of revertant colonies per plate treated with the BCP extract was less than double as compared to the number of revertant colonies in negative control plate and no dose-related increase was observed. Results from both assays suggested that the BCP of modified porosity did not exhibit any genotoxic effect under the present test conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genotoxicity Assessment of Volatile Organic Compounds in Landfill Gas Emission Using Comet Assay in Higher Terrestrial Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na Roi-Et, Veerapas; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Chiemchaisri, Chart

    2017-02-01

    Genotoxicity model is developed to assess the individual subacute toxicity of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) at very low levels as in a landfill gas. Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum), a higher plant, was tested under variation of benzene 54-5656 ng/L, toluene 10-4362 ng/L, ethylbenzene 28-4997 ng/L, xylene 53-4845 ng/L, for 96 h. DNA fragmentation in plant leaves were investigated via comet assay. The results show that DNA migration ratio increased with the BTEX concentrations, but at different rates. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of DNA fragmentation from the dose-response relationships indicated toluene has the highest EC50 value and followed by benzene, xylene and ethylbenzene. Alternatively, ethylbenzene has the highest toxicity unit and followed by xylene, benzene and toluene as described by toxicity unit (TU). In conclusion, comet assay of Pothos can be used in differentiating DNA fragmentation against very low levels of BTEX in the atmosphere. Pothos is recommended for genotoxicity assessment of a low BTEX contaminated atmosphere.

  9. Genotoxic effects of the fungicide thiophanate-methyl on Podarcis sicula assessed by micronucleus test, comet assay and chromosome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriglione, T; De Iorio, S; Gay, F; Capaldo, A; Vaccaro, M C; Morescalchi, M A; Laforgia, V

    2011-06-01

    The increasing use of pesticides in modern agriculture has raised the need to evaluate their potential threat to animal and human health. In the present study, the genotoxic effects of environmentally relevant exposure to the fungicide thiophanate-methyl (TM) were assessed in the lizard Podarcis sicula (Reptilia, Lacertidae) using micronucleus test, chromosome aberration analysis and single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. The number of micronuclei increased significantly with exposure time in lizard specimens exposed to 1.5% TM for 30-40 days. In situ hybridization with the specific HindIII centromeric satellite was positive in 18.7% of the micronuclei observed, suggesting an aneugenic effect of TM during mitosis. DNA damage, evaluated by the comet assay, documented a significant gain in comet length in relation to exposure time that was paralleled by a reduction in head size. Finally, cytogenetic analysis showed a significant increase in chromosome aberrations in exposed animals compared with controls. Our data suggest that long-term TM exposure induces a genomic damage that is positively correlated to exposure time. If such genotoxic effects arise so clearly in an ectothermal vertebrate, such as P. sicula, prolonged exposure TM must be considered as a cytogenetic hazard.

  10. Critical issues with the in vivo comet assay: A report of the comet assay working group in the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Kojima, Hajime; Burlinson, Brian; Collins, Andrew R; Kasper, Peter; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Uno, Yoshifumi; Vasquez, Marie; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Escobar, Patricia A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Pant, Kamala; Pfuhler, Stefan; Tanaka, Jin; Levy, Dan D

    2015-05-01

    As a part of the 6th IWGT, an expert working group on the comet assay evaluated critical topics related to the use of the in vivo comet assay in regulatory genotoxicity testing. The areas covered were: identification of the domain of applicability and regulatory acceptance, identification of critical parameters of the protocol and attempts to standardize the assay, experience with combination and integration with other in vivo studies, demonstration of laboratory proficiency, sensitivity and power of the protocol used, use of different tissues, freezing of samples, and choice of appropriate measures of cytotoxicity. The standard protocol detects various types of DNA lesions but it does not detect all types of DNA damage. Modifications of the standard protocol may be used to detect additional types of specific DNA damage (e.g., cross-links, bulky adducts, oxidized bases). In addition, the working group identified critical parameters that should be carefully controlled and described in detail in every published study protocol. In vivo comet assay results are more reliable if they were obtained in laboratories that have demonstrated proficiency. This includes demonstration of adequate response to vehicle controls and an adequate response to a positive control for each tissue being examined. There was a general agreement that freezing of samples is an option but more data are needed in order to establish generally accepted protocols. With regard to tissue toxicity, the working group concluded that cytotoxicity could be a confounder of comet results. It is recommended to look at multiple parameters such as histopathological observations, organ-specific clinical chemistry as well as indicators of tissue inflammation to decide whether compound-specific toxicity might influence the result. The expert working group concluded that the alkaline in vivo comet assay is a mature test for the evaluation of genotoxicity and can be recommended to regulatory agencies for use

  11. Ultraspecific probes for high throughput HLA typing

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    Eggers Rick

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The variations within an individual's HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen genes have been linked to many immunological events, e.g. susceptibility to disease, response to vaccines, and the success of blood, tissue, and organ transplants. Although the microarray format has the potential to achieve high-resolution typing, this has yet to be attained due to inefficiencies of current probe design strategies. Results We present a novel three-step approach for the design of high-throughput microarray assays for HLA typing. This approach first selects sequences containing the SNPs present in all alleles of the locus of interest and next calculates the number of base changes necessary to convert a candidate probe sequences to the closest subsequence within the set of sequences that are likely to be present in the sample including the remainder of the human genome in order to identify those candidate probes which are "ultraspecific" for the allele of interest. Due to the high specificity of these sequences, it is possible that preliminary steps such as PCR amplification are no longer necessary. Lastly, the minimum number of these ultraspecific probes is selected such that the highest resolution typing can be achieved for the minimal cost of production. As an example, an array was designed and in silico results were obtained for typing of the HLA-B locus. Conclusion The assay presented here provides a higher resolution than has previously been developed and includes more alleles than previously considered. Based upon the in silico and preliminary experimental results, we believe that the proposed approach can be readily applied to any highly polymorphic gene system.

  12. Evaluation of genotoxicity in patients subjected to panoramic radiography by micronucleus assay on epithelial cells of the oral mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallak Arora

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiography is one of the most valuable diagnostic tools used in comprehensive dental care. Although there is no safe level of radiation exposure, the possible risk associated with exposure to radiation, must be elucidated. To date, a variety of assays have been proposed to assess the mutagenic potential of genotoxicants; however, these methods are typically laborious and time consuming. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of routinely used panoramic radiation exposure in exfoliated epithelial cells as measured by the formation of micronuclei and to compare the genotoxicity of X-rays on keratinized epithelial gingival cells and the nonkeratinized buccal epithelial cells.The study included 53 healthy individuals with a mean age of 25.21 ±12.67 years. Specimens of exfoliated epithelial cells were collected from patients subjected to panoramic radiography before and 10 days after radiation exposure. The cells were stained with Giemsa and evaluated for micronuclei by scoring 1000 cells per slide.In our study, the genotoxic effect of radiation exposure from panoramic radiography showed a statistically significant increase in the MN frequency in buccal epithelial cells. A significant correlation was observed between the age of the subjects and micronuclei, although no such correlation was found between gender and micronuclei count.MN test serves as a simple biomarker indicating the direct exposure to DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation, emphasizing great sensitivity even for exposure to low doses during radiation screening. Thus, panoramic dental radiography should be cautiously used only when necessary.

  13. Soil genotoxicity assessment--results of an interlaboratory study on the Vicia micronucleus assay in the context of ISO standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotelle, Sylvie; Dhyèvre, Adrien; Muller, Serge; Chenon, Pascale; Manier, Nicolas; Pandard, Pascal; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Silvestre, Jérôme; Guiresse, Maritxu; Pinelli, Eric; Giorgetti, Lucia; Barbafieri, Meri; Silva, Valéria C; Engel, Fernanda; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2015-01-01

    The Vicia micronucleus assay was standardized in an international protocol, ISO 29200, "Assessment of genotoxic effects on higher plants-Vicia faba micronucleus test," for soil or soil materials (e.g., compost, sludge, sediment, waste, and fertilizing materials). The aim of this interlaboratory study on the Vicia micronucleus assay was to investigate the robustness of this in vivo assay in terms of its applicability in different countries where each participant were asked to use their own seeds and reference soil, in agreement with the ISO 29200 standard. The ISO 29200 standard protocol was adopted for this study, and seven laboratories from three countries (France, Italy, and Brazil) participated in the study. Negative and positive controls were correctly evaluated by 100 % of the participants. In the solid-phase test, the micronucleus frequency (number of micronuclei/1,000 cells) varied from 0.0 to 1.8 for the negative control (i.e., Hoagland's solution) and from 5.8 to 85.7 for the positive control (i.e., maleic hydrazide), while these values varied from 0.0 to 1.7 for the negative control and from 14.3 to 97.7 for the positive control in the case of liquid-phase test. The variability in the data obtained does not adversely affect the robustness of the protocol assessed, on the condition that the methodology described in the standard ISO 29200 is strictly respected. Thus, the Vicia micronucleus test (ISO 29200) is appropriate for complementing prokaryotic or in vitro tests cited in legislation related to risk assessment of genotoxicity potential.

  14. Analysis of the Genotoxic Effects of Mobile Phone Radiation using Buccal Micronucleus Assay: A Comparative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sumita; Singh, Narendra Nath; Sreedhar, Gadiputi; Mukherjee, Saikat

    2016-03-01

    Micronucleus (MN) is considered to be a reliable marker for genotoxic damage and it determines the presence and the extent of the chromosomal damage. The MN is formed due to DNA damage or chromosomal disarrangements. The MN has a close association with cancer incidences. In the new era, mobile phones are constantly gaining popularity specifically in the young generation, but this device uses radiofrequency radiation that may have a possible carcinogenic effect. The available reports related to the carcinogenic effect of mobile radiation on oral mucosa are contradictory. To explore the effects of mobile phone radiation on the MN frequency in oral mucosal cells. The subjects were divided into two major groups: low mobile phone users and high mobile phone users. Subjects who used their mobile phone since less than five years and less than three hours a week comprised of the first group and those who used their mobile since more than five years and more than 10 hours a week comprised of the second group. Net surfing and text messaging was not considered in this study. Exfoliated buccal mucosal cells were collected from both the groups and the cells were stained with DNA-specific stain acridine orange. Thousand exfoliated buccal mucosal cells were screened and the cells which were positive for micronuclei were counted. The micronucleus frequency was represented as mean±SD, and unpaired Student t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. The number of micronucleated cells/ 1000 exfoliated buccal mucosal cells was found to be significantly increased in high mobile phone users group than the low mobile phone users group. The use of mobile phone with the associated complaint of warmth around the ear showed a maximum increase in the number of micronucleated cells /1000 exfoliated buccal mucosal cells. Mobile phone radiation even in the permissible range when used for longer duration causes significant genotoxicity. The genotoxicity can be avoided to some extent by the

  15. Sensitive DsRed fluorescence-based reporter cell systems for genotoxicity and oxidative stress assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Giel; Atallah, Mirna; Raamsman, Martine; Morolli, Bruno; van der Putten, Haidy; Jaadar, Haziz; Tijdens, Ine; Esveldt-van Lange, Rebecca; Mullenders, Leon; van de Water, Bob; Vrieling, Harry

    2011-05-10

    Various in vitro test systems have been developed for genotoxic risk assessment in early drug development. However, these genotoxicity tests often show limited specificity, and provide limited insights into the mode of toxicity of the tested compounds. To identify genes that could serve as specific biomarkers for genotoxicity or oxidative stress, we exposed mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to various genotoxic and oxidative stress-inducing compounds and performed genome-wide expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes were classified based on the fold-change of expression and their specificity for either genotoxic or oxidative stress. Promoter regions of four selected genes (Ephx1, Btg2, Cbr3 and Perp) were fused to a DsRed fluorescent reporter gene and stably integrated in mouse ES cells. Established stable reporter cell lines displayed significant induction of DsRed expression upon exposure to different classes of genotoxic and oxidative stress-inducing compounds. In contrast, exposure to non-genotoxic carcinogenic compounds did not induce DsRed expression even at cytotoxic doses. Expression of the Cbr3-DsRed reporter was more responsive to compounds that induce oxidative stress while the other three DsRed reporters reacted more specific to direct-acting genotoxic agents. Therefore, the differential response of the Btg2- and Cbr3-DsRed reporters can serve as indicator for the main action mechanism of genotoxic and oxidative stress-inducing compounds. In addition, we provide evidence that inhibition of DNA replication results in preferential activation of the Btg2-DsRed genotoxicity reporter. In conclusion, we have generated sensitive mouse ES cell reporter systems that allow detection of genotoxic and oxidative stress-inducing properties of chemical compounds and can be used in high-throughput assays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modified in vivo comet assay detects the genotoxic potential of 14-hydroxycodeinone, an α,β-unsaturated ketone in oxycodone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Kamala; Roden, Nicholas; Zhang, Charles; Bruce, Shannon; Wood, Craig; Pendino, Kimberly

    2015-12-01

    14-Hydroxycodeinone (14-HC) is an α,β-unsaturated ketone impurity found in oxycodone drug substance and has a structural alert for genotoxicity. 14-HC was tested in a combined Modified and Standard Comet Assay to determine if the slight decrease in % Tail DNA noted in a previously conducted Standard Comet Assay with 14-HC could be magnified to clarify if the response was due to cross-linking activity. One limitation of the Standard Comet Assay is that DNA cross-links cannot be reliably detected. However, under certain modified testing conditions, DNA cross-links and chemical moieties that elicit such cross-links can be elucidated. One such modification involves the induction of additional breakages of DNA strands by gamma or X-ray irradiation. To determine if 14-HC is a DNA crosslinker in vivo, a Modified Comet Assay was conducted using X-ray irradiation as the modification to visualize crosslinking activity. In this assay, 14-HC was administered orally to mice up to 320 mg/kg/day. Results showed a statistically significant reduction in percent tail DNA in duodenal cells at 320 mg/kg/day, with a nonstatistically significant but dose-related reduction in percent tail DNA also observed at the mid dose of 160 mg/kg/day. Similar decreases were not observed in cells from the liver or stomach, and no increases in percent tail DNA were noted for any tissue in the concomitantly conducted Standard Comet Assay. Taken together, 14-HC was identified as a cross-linking agent in the duodenum in the Modified Comet Assay. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Assessment of genotoxicity and depuration of anthracene in the juvenile coastal fish Trachinotus carolinus using the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Matsu Hasue

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the environment, anthracene is characterized as being persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic to aquatic organisms. Biotransformation of xenobiotic substances, such as anthracene, produces reactive oxygen species that may induce DNA strand breaks. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the DNA damage in juvenile T. carolinus exposed to different concentrations (8, 16 and 32 µg.L-1 of anthracene for 24 h in the dark then subsequently allowed to depurate in clean water for different periods of time (48, 96 or 144 h using the comet assay. Our results show that anthracene is genotoxic to T. carolinus and that DNA damage was dose- and depuration/time- dependent. Anthracenegenotoxicity was observed in all experimental concentrations. Depuration seemed to be more efficient in fish exposed to thelowest anthracene concentration and maintained in clean water for 96 h.

  18. Development and evaluation of yeast-based GFP and luciferase reporter assays for chemical-induced genotoxicity and oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hajime; Sakabe, Takahiro; Hirose, Yuu; Eki, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to develop the bioassays for genotixicity and/or oxidative damage using the recombinant yeast. A genotoxicity assay was developed using recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4741 with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter plasmid, driven by the DNA damage-responsive RNR3 promoter. Enhanced fluorescence induction was observed in DNA repair-deficient strains treated with methyl methanesulfonate, but not with hydrogen peroxide. A GFP reporter yeast strain driven by the oxidative stress-responsive TRX2 promoter was newly developed to assess oxidative damage, but fluorescence was poorly induced by oxidants. In place of GFP, yeast strains with luciferase gene reporter plasmids (luc2 and luc2CP, encoding stable and unstable luciferase, respectively) were prepared. Transient induction of luciferase activity was clearly detected only in a TRX2 promoter-driven luc2CP reporter strain within 90 min of oxidant exposure. However, luciferase was strongly induced by hydroxyurea in the RNR3 promoter-driven luc2 and GFP reporter strains over 8 h after the exposure, suggesting that the RNR3 promoter is continuously upregulated by DNA damage, whereas the TRX2 promoter is transiently activated by oxidative agents. Luciferase activity levels were also increased in a TRX2-promoter-driven luc2CP reporter strain treated with tert-butyl hydroperoxide and menadione and weakly induced with diamide and diethyl maleate. Weakly enhanced luciferase activity induction was detected in the sod1Δ, sod2Δ, and rad27Δ strains treated with hydrogen peroxide compared with that in the wild-type strain. In conclusion, tests using GFP and stable luciferase reporters are useful for genotoxicity, and oxidative damage can be clearly detected by assay with an unstable luciferase reporter.

  19. The alkaline comet assay used in evaluation of genotoxic damage of drinking water disinfection by-products (bromoform and chloroform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messaouda Khallef

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The alkaline comet assay (pH 12.3 is a useful method for monitoring genotoxic effects of environmental pollutants in the root nuclei of Allium cepa and various plants; it allows the detection of single- and double-strand breaks, incomplete excision-repair sites and cross-links. It has been introduced to detect even small changes in DNA structure. It is a technically simple, highly sensitive, fast and economic test which detects in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity (DNA integrity and packing mode in any cell types examined, and requires just a few cells for its execution (Liman et al., 2011; Yıldız et al., 2009. Chloroform and bromoform are the most important trihalomethanes found in drinking water. Different concentrations of bromoform (25, 50, 75and 100µg/ml and chloroform (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water was used as a negative control and methyl methansulfonate (MMS-10 µg/ml as positive control. All obtained data were subjected to statistical analyses by using SPSS 15.0 for Windows software. For comparison purposes, Duncan multiple range tests using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA were employed and p<0.05 was accepted as the test of significance. Comet assay results showed that DNA damage was significant at p <0.05 for the different concentrations of chloroform and bromoform compared to the negative control which has a damage rate equal to 3.5 ± 0.7 and the positive control which has damage rate equal to 13.5 ± 2.12. The exposure of root tip cells to these disinfection by-products increases DNA damage. All concentrations examined in this study of bromoform and chloroform cause significant harm, which could be due to DNA damage induced by oxidative stress. The measurement of DNA damage in the nuclei of higher plant tissues is a new area of study with SCGE. This assay could be incorporated into in situ monitoring of atmosphere, water and soil: the comet assay allows a fast detection without

  20. Evaluation of genotoxicity of coal fly ash in Allium cepa root cells by combining comet assay with the Allium test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rajarshi; Mukherjee, Ashit Kumar; Mukherjee, Anita

    2009-06-01

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. Its utilization and disposal is of utmost importance. Using onion (Allium cepa) root tip system, the present study was carried out to evaluate the potential toxic and genotoxic effects of fly ash, collected from a thermal power plant in West Bengal, India. Prior to testing, the collected fly ash sample was mixed with sand in different proportions. Allium bulbs were allowed to germinate directly in fly ash and after five days the germinating roots were processed for the Allium test. Additionally, the Allium test was adapted for detecting DNA damage through comet assay. The results from the Allium test indicate that fly ash at 100% concentration inhibits root growth and mitotic indices; induces binucleated cells as a function of the proportion, but is not toxic at very low concentration. In the comet assay, a statistical increase for DNA strand breaks was found only at higher concentrations. The sample was analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometer for Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, Cd and As, whose presence could partly be responsible for the toxicity of fly ash. The study concludes that the classical Allium test can give a more comprehensive data when done in combination with the comet assay, which is faster, simpler and independent of mitosis. Also when fly ash is used for other purposes in combination with soils, it should be judiciously used at very low concentrations in order to protect the ecosystem health from any potential adverse effects.

  1. High-throughput scoring of seed germination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, Wilco; Hilhorst, Henk W.M.

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput analysis of seed germination for phenotyping large genetic populations or mutant collections is very labor intensive and would highly benefit from an automated setup. Although very often used, the total germination percentage after a nominated period of time is not very

  2. Evaluation of genotoxicity using the micronucleus assay and nuclear abnormalities in the tropical sea fish Bathygobius soporator (Valenciennes, 1837 (Teleostei, Gobiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni P. Galindo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities assays have been used increasingly to evaluate genotoxicity of many compounds in polluted aquatic ecossystems. The aim of this study is to verify the efficiency of the micronucleus assay and nuclear abnormality assay in field and laboratory work, when using erythrocytes of the tropical marine fish Bathygobius soporator as genotoxicity biomarkers. Gill peripheral blood samples were obtained from specimens of Bathygobius soporator. In order to investigate the frequencies of micronuclei and to assess the sensitivity of species, the results were compared with samples taken at the reference site and maintained in the laboratory, and fish treated with cyclophosphamide. The micronucleus assay was efficient in demonstrating field pollution and reproducing results in the labotatory. There were significant higher frequencies of micronuclei in two sites subject to discharge of urban and industrial effluents. The nuclear abnormality assay did not appear to be an efficient tool for genotoxicity evaluation when compared with field samples taken at a reference site in laboratory, with a positive control.

  3. Genotoxicity evaluation of ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide in freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica using RAPD assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He-Cai; Shi, Chang-Ying; Yang, Hui-Hui; Chen, Guang-Wen; Liu, De-Zeng

    2016-12-01

    The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay has been used to detect DNA alternation and mutation recently. However, the effectiveness of this method in detecting DNA damage in planarians, a model organism for assessing the toxicity of environmental pollutants is unknown. In the present study, RAPD assay was used to detect the DNA damage in planarians treated by the ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C8mim]Br) for the first time. Among the 20 test RAPD primers, 13 primers with 60-70% GC content produced unique polymorphic band profiles. A total of 60 bands were observed in the untreated control planarians. In comparison with the control group, the [C8mim]Br-treated groups displayed differences in RAPD patterns in the band intensity, disappearance of normal bands and appearance of new bands. The variation of RAPD profiles showed both concentration- and time-effect relationships. Meanwhile, the genomic template stability (GTS) of treated planarians decreased and exhibited negative correlation to the exposure concentration and time of [C8mim]Br. Our results suggested that [C8mim]Br had genotoxic effects on planarians, and this DNA damage analysis would lay the foundation for further elucidating the toxicity mechanisms of ionic liquids on planarians. Furthermore, RAPD analysis was proved to be a highly sensitive method for the detection of DNA damage induced by environmental pollutants like toxic chemicals on planarians. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Monochromosomal hybrid cell assay for evaluating the genotoxicity of environmental chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.; Gudi, R.D.; Athwal, R.S.

    1988-12-01

    The development and utilization of a monochromosomal hybrid cell assay for detecting aneuploidy and chromosomal aberrations are described. The monochromosomal hybrid cell lines were produced by a two-step process involving transfer of a marker bacterial gene to a human chromosome and then by integration of that human chromosome into a mouse complement of chromosomes through microcell fusion. For chemically induced aneuploidy, the segregation of a single human chromosome among mouse chromosomes is used as a cytogenetic marker. The genetic assay for aneuploidy is based on the ability of the cells to grow in a medium that selects for the loss of the human chromosome. The assay for clastogenicity is based on survival of the cells after treatment with the chemicals in medium that selects for retention of the human chromosome but loss of its segment containing diphtheria toxin locus. The assays greatly simplify the detection of chromosomal aberrations induced by environmental factors at low-dose levels.

  5. Genotoxicity of cadmium in marine diatom Chaetoceros tenuissimus using the alkaline Comet assay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, S.R.; Verlecar, X.N.; Nagarajappa; Goswami

    of Cd increased growth of the diatom decreased. Alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) method, which is highly sensitive in detection of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells, was used to observe genomic changes in marine diatom cells. DNA...

  6. Assessment of the DNA damaging potential of environmental chemicals using a quantitative high-throughput screening approach to measure p53 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Kristine L; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Smith-Roe, Stephanie L; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Zhao, Jinghua; Auerbach, Scott S; Hur, Junguk; Tice, Raymond R

    2017-08-01

    Genotoxicity potential is a critical component of any comprehensive toxicological profile. Compounds that induce DNA or chromosomal damage often activate p53, a transcription factor essential to cell cycle regulation. Thus, within the US Tox21 Program, we screened a library of ∼10,000 (∼8,300 unique) environmental compounds and drugs for activation of the p53-signaling pathway using a quantitative high-throughput screening assay employing HCT-116 cells (p53(+/+) ) containing a stably integrated β-lactamase reporter gene under control of the p53 response element (p53RE). Cells were exposed (-S9) for 16 hr at 15 concentrations (generally 1.2 nM to 92 μM) three times, independently. Excluding compounds that failed analytical chemistry analysis or were suspected of inducing assay interference, 365 (4.7%) of 7,849 unique compounds were concluded to activate p53. As part of an in-depth characterization of our results, we first compared them with results from traditional in vitro genotoxicity assays (bacterial mutation, chromosomal aberration); ∼15% of known, direct-acting genotoxicants in our library activated the p53RE. Mining the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database revealed that these p53 actives were significantly associated with increased expression of p53 downstream genes involved in DNA damage responses. Furthermore, 53 chemical substructures associated with genotoxicity were enriched in certain classes of p53 actives, for example, anthracyclines (antineoplastics) and vinca alkaloids (tubulin disruptors). Interestingly, the tubulin disruptors manifested unusual nonmonotonic concentration response curves suggesting activity through a unique p53 regulatory mechanism. Through the analysis of our results, we aim to define a role for this assay as one component of a comprehensive toxicological characterization of large compound libraries. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:494-507, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A high throughput spectral image microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesley, M.; Puri, R.

    2018-01-01

    A high throughput spectral image microscopy system is configured for rapid detection of rare cells in large populations. To overcome flow cytometry rates and use of fluorophore tags, a system architecture integrates sample mechanical handling, signal processors, and optics in a non-confocal version of light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy. Spectral images with native contrast do not require the use of exogeneous stain to render cells with submicron resolution. Structure may be characterized without restriction to cell clusters of differentiation.

  8. The Comet assay for the evaluation of genotoxic impact in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzilli, G; Nigro, M; Lyons, B P

    2009-01-01

    This review considers the potential of the Comet assay (or Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis, SCGE) to evaluate the environmental impact of genotoxins in aquatic environments. It focuses on in vivo and in situ studies that have been carried out in various marine and freshwater sentinel species, published in the last 5 years. A large number of the studies reviewed report that the Comet assay is more sensitive when compared with other biomarkers commonly used in genetic ecotoxicology, such as sister chromatid exchanges or micronucleus test. Due to its high sensitivity, the Comet assay is widely influenced by laboratory procedures suggesting that standard protocols are required for both fish and mussel cells. However, there are still a wide variety of personalised Comet procedures evident in the literature reviewed, making comparison between published results often very difficult. Standardization and inter-laboratory calibration of the Comet assay as applied to aquatic species will be required if the Comet assay is to be used routinely by national bodies charged with monitoring water quality.

  9. High Throughput Neuro-Imaging Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Miller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes neuroinformatics technologies at 1 mm anatomical scale based on high throughput 3D functional and structural imaging technologies of the human brain. The core is an abstract pipeline for converting functional and structural imagery into their high dimensional neuroinformatic representations index containing O(E3-E4 discriminating dimensions. The pipeline is based on advanced image analysis coupled to digital knowledge representations in the form of dense atlases of the human brain at gross anatomical scale. We demonstrate the integration of these high-dimensional representations with machine learning methods, which have become the mainstay of other fields of science including genomics as well as social networks. Such high throughput facilities have the potential to alter the way medical images are stored and utilized in radiological workflows. The neuroinformatics pipeline is used to examine cross-sectional and personalized analyses of neuropsychiatric illnesses in clinical applications as well as longitudinal studies. We demonstrate the use of high throughput machine learning methods for supporting (i cross-sectional image analysis to evaluate the health status of individual subjects with respect to the population data, (ii integration of image and non-image information for diagnosis and prognosis.

  10. Genotoxicity assessment of NIM-76 and its formulation (pessary) in an in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay and in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vinod; Meshram, Ghansham P

    2013-10-01

    The possible genotoxic potential of NIM-76, a volatile fraction obtained from neem oil, having promising contraceptive activity, as well as its formulation product, called pessary (7.5% NIM-76 in polyethylene glycol), were evaluated in the Ames assay and mouse bone marrow micronucleus (MN) assay. Genotoxicity of NIM-76 (0.1-1000 µg/plate) and pessary (0.1-10,000 µg/plate) were studied using the liquid preincubation protocol of the Ames assay both in the presence and absence of S9. Likewise, the ability of NIM-76 [1-1000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)] and its formulation product (18.75-300 mg/kg b.w.) to induce clastogenic effects were studied in the female mouse bone marrow MN test by using a two-dose intraperitoneal treatment protocol. There was no increase in the number of revertant colonies resulting from NIM-76 or pessary at any of their doses over the respective negative control plates, either in the presence or absence of S9. Similarly, in the MN assay, neither of them showed any clastogenic activity because there was no significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes, over the negative control group of animals. The use of this compound in humans is therefore not likely to have mutagenic effects and may be considered as safe with regard to genotoxic potential.

  11. High-throughput assessment of context-dependent effects of chromatin proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brueckner, L. (Laura); Van Arensbergen, J. (Joris); Akhtar, W. (Waseem); L. Pagie (Ludo); B. van Steensel (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chromatin proteins control gene activity in a concerted manner. We developed a high-throughput assay to study the effects of the local chromatin environment on the regulatory activity of a protein of interest. The assay combines a previously reported multiplexing strategy

  12. Genotoxic Potential of Two Herbicides and their Active Ingredients Assessed with Comet Assay on a Fish Cell Line, Epithelioma Papillosum Cyprini (EPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Rank, Jette; Jensen, Klara

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the epithelioma papillosum cyprini (EPC) cell line handling procedure for the comet assay to investigate the genotoxic potential of widely used pesticides. The effects of various media and handling of the EPC cell line were examined. Results indicated that av......-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid) individually and in a ternary mixture were examined with the comet assay. Data showed that among the active ingredients only 2,4-D andMCPA induced DNA damage, while both herbicides were genotoxic at high concentrations....... that avoiding trypsin to detach cells led to lower level of DNA damage in the negative control. Further, two commonly used herbicides (Dezormon and Optica trio) and their four active ingredients (4-chloro-o-tolyloxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propionic acid, 2...

  13. Nongenotoxic effects and a reduction of the DXR-induced genotoxic effects of Helianthus annuus Linné (sunflower) seeds revealed by micronucleus assays in mouse bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriollo, Marcelo Fabiano Gomes; Souza, Luiz Silva; Resende, Marielly Reis; Silva, Thaísla Andrielle da; Oliveira, Nelma de Mello Silva; Resck, Maria Cristina Costa; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos; Fiorini, João Evangelista

    2014-04-02

    This research evaluated the genotoxicity of oil and tincture of H. annuus L. seeds using the micronucleus assay in bone marrow of mice. The interaction between these preparations and the genotoxic effects of doxorubicin (DXR) was also analysed (antigenotoxicity test). Experimental groups were evaluated at 24-48 h post treatment with N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea (positive control - NEU), DXR (chemotherapeutic), NaCl (negative control), a sunflower tincture (THALS) and two sources of sunflower oils (POHALS and FOHALS). Antigenotoxic assays were carried out using the sunflower tincture and oils separately and in combination with NUE or DXR. For THALS, analysis of the MNPCEs showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250-2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. A significant reduction in MNPCE was observed when THALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) was administered in combination with DXR (5 mg.Kg-1). For POHALS or FOHALS, analysis of the MNPCEs also showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250-2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. However, the combination DXR + POHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) or DXR + FOHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) not contributed to the MNPCEs reduction. This research suggests absence of genotoxicity of THALS, dose-, time- and sex-independent, and its combination with DXR can reduce the genotoxic effects of DXR. POHALS and FOHALS also showed absence of genotoxicity, but their association with DXR showed no antigenotoxic effects.

  14. Detection Of Genotoxicity Induced By Heavy Metal Ions And Gamma Radiation Using Micronucleus Assay In Mice: Pathological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kültiğin Çavuşoğlu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Micronuclei (MN test is used as markers of radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity. In present study, it was investigated the frequency of MN in erythrocytes and body weight gain in 80 Mus musculus var. albinos exposed to 10 Gy gamma (;#947; radiation and heavy metal ions. For this aim, it was used MN assay as an indicator of genotoxicity induced by ;#947;–radiation and heavy metal toxication. The animals were divided into four groups: control, radiation, Hg and Pb treatment groups. They were treated with three dose levels (10, 15 and 20 µg/mL of Hg and Pb metal ions and 10 Gy ;#947;–radiaton was applied twice during 14 days. The initial and final weights of all mice were determined by sensitive balance in order to investigate the effect of heavy metal ions and radiation on the weight gain of mice. As a result, the frequency of MN was higher in the Hg, Pb and ;#947;–radiation treated animals than animals in control group. Besides, MN frequency was higher in mice exposed to ;#947;–radiation than in Hg and Pb treated mice, and differences was statistically significant (p

  15. Comparative study of genotoxicity and antimutagenicity of methanolic extracts from Teucrium chamaedrys and Teucrium montanum in human lymphocytes using micronucleus assay

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević-Djordjević, Olivera; Stošić, Ivana; Stanković, Milan; Grujičić, Darko

    2013-01-01

    Since Teucrium chamaedrys and Teucrium montanum are the most popular plants used in the treatment of many diseases, we evaluated genotoxic potential of their methanolic extracts on cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) using cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) assay. Cultures were treated with four concentrations of both plants (125, 250, 500 and 1,000 μg/ml), both separately and in combination with mitomycin C (MMC). The results revealed that extract of T. chamaedrys administere...

  16. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Guo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation, but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner.

  17. Assessment of the in vivo genotoxicity of cadmium chloride, chloroform, and D,L-menthol as coded test chemicals using the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kunio; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Nakashima, Nobuaki; Matsumoto, Kyomu

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) international validation study of in vivo rat alkaline comet assays, we examined cadmium chloride, chloroform, and D,L-menthol under blind conditions as coded chemicals in the liver and stomach of Sprague-Dawley rats after 3 days of administration. Cadmium chloride showed equivocal responses in the liver and stomach, supporting previous reports of its poor mutagenic potential and non-carcinogenic effects in these organs. Treatment with chloroform, which is a non-genotoxic carcinogen, did not induce DNA damage in the liver or stomach. Some histopathological changes, such as necrosis and degeneration, were observed in the liver; however, they did not affect the comet assay results. D,L-Menthol, a non-genotoxic non-carcinogen, did not induce liver or stomach DNA damage. These results indicate that the comet assay can reflect genotoxic properties under blind conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Lack of genotoxic effect of food dyes amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine and their metabolites in the gut micronucleus assay in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poul, Martine; Jarry, Gérard; Elhkim, Mostafa Ould; Poul, Jean-Michel

    2009-02-01

    The food dyes amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine were administered twice, at 24h intervals, by oral gavage to mice and assessed in the in vivo gut micronucleus test for genotoxic effects (frequency of micronucleated cells) and toxicity (apoptotic and mitotic cells). The concentrations of each compound and their main metabolites (sulfanilic acid and naphthionic acid) were measured in faeces during a 24-h period after single oral administrations of the food dyes to mice. Parent dye compounds and their main aromatic amine metabolites were detected in significant amounts in the environment of colonic cells. Acute oral exposure to food dye additives amaranth, sunset yellow and tartrazine did not induce genotoxic effect in the micronucleus gut assay in mice at doses up to 2000 mg/kg b.w. Food dyes administration increased the mitotic cells at all dose levels when compared to controls. These results suggest that the transient DNA damages previously observed in the colon of mice treated by amaranth and tartrazine by the in vivo comet assay [Sasaki, Y.F., Kawaguchi, S., Kamaya, A., Ohshita, M., Kabasawa, K., Iwama, K., Taniguchi, K., Tsuda, S., 2002. The comet assay with 8 mouse organs: results with 39 currently used food additives. Mutat. Res. 519, 103-119] are unable to be fixed in stable genotoxic lesions and might be partly explained by local cytotoxicity of the dyes.

  19. The effect of gamma radiation on the Common carp (Cyprinus carpio): In vivo genotoxicity assessment with the micronucleus and comet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M K, Praveen Kumar; Soorambail K, Shyama; Bhagatsingh Harisingh, Sonaye; D'costa, Avelyno; Ramesh Chandra, Chaubey

    2015-10-01

    Radioactive wastes may be leached into freshwater, either accidentally or in industrial effluents. We have studied gamma radiation-induced DNA damage in the freshwater fish Cyprinus carpio. Fish were irradiated with 2-10Gy gamma radiation and genotoxic effects in blood cells were studied with the micronucleus (MN) and comet assays. Micronuclei and a dose-dependent increase in comet-tail DNA were seen in dose- and time-dependent studies. The highest % tail DNA was observed at 24h, declining until 72h, which may indicate the repair of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks after gamma radiation. However, double-stranded DNA damage may not have been repaired, as indicated by increased micronuclei at later periods. A positive correlation was observed between the comet and micronucleus assay results. This study confirms the mutagenic/genotoxic potential of gamma radiation in the Common carp, as well as the possible combined use of the micronucleus and comet assays for in vivo laboratory studies with fresh-water fish for screening the genotoxic potential of radioactive pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High-throughput screening: update on practices and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Sandra; Farr-Jones, Shauna; Sopchak, Lynne; Boggs, Amy; Nicely, Helen Wang; Khoury, Richard; Biros, Michael

    2006-10-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an important part of drug discovery at most pharmaceutical and many biotechnology companies worldwide, and use of HTS technologies is expanding into new areas. Target validation, assay development, secondary screening, ADME/Tox, and lead optimization are among the areas in which there is an increasing use of HTS technologies. It is becoming fully integrated within drug discovery, both upstream and downstream, which includes increasing use of cell-based assays and high-content screening (HCS) technologies to achieve more physiologically relevant results and to find higher quality leads. In addition, HTS laboratories are continually evaluating new technologies as they struggle to increase their success rate for finding drug candidates. The material in this article is based on a 900-page HTS industry report involving 54 HTS directors representing 58 HTS laboratories and 34 suppliers.

  1. High Throughput PBTK: Open-Source Data and Tools for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation on High Throughput PBTK at the PBK Modelling in Risk Assessment meeting in Ispra, Italy Presentation on High Throughput PBTK at the PBK Modelling in Risk Assessment meeting in Ispra, Italy

  2. Genotoxicity of waterpipe smoke in buccal cells and peripheral blood leukocytes as determined by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amrah, Hadba Jar-Allah; Aboznada, Osama Abdullah; Alam, Mohammad Zubair; ElAssouli, M-Zaki Mustafa; Mujallid, Mohammad Ibrahim; ElAssouli, Sufian Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Waterpipe smoke causes DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes and in buccal cells of smokers. To determine the exposure effect of waterpipe smoke on buccal cells and peripheral blood leukocytes in regard to DNA damage using comet assay. The waterpipe smoke condensates were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study was performed on 20 waterpipe smokers. To perform comet assay on bucaal cells of smokers, 10 µl of cell suspension was mixed with 85 µl of pre-warmed 1% low melting agarose, applied to comet slide and electrophoresed. To analyze the effect of smoke condensate in vitro, 1 ml of peripheral blood was mixed with 10 µl of smoke condensate and subjected for comet assay. The GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 2,3-dihydro-3,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4on, nicotine, hydroxymethyl furancarboxaldehyde and 3-ethoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde in the smoke condensates. Waterpipe smoking caused DNA damage in vivo in buccal cells of smokers. The tail moment and tail length in buccal cells of smokers were 186 ± 26 and 456 ± 71, respectively, which are higher than control. The jurak and moassel smoke condensates were found to cause DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes. The moassel smoke condensate was more damaging. There is wide misconception that waterpipe smoking is not as harmful as cigarette smoking. This study demonstrated that waterpipe smoke induced DNA damage in exposed cells. Waterpipe smokes cause DNA damage in buccal cells. The smoke condensate of both jurak and moassel caused comet formation suggesting DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes.

  3. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Safety Evaluation of Papain (Carica papaya L. Using In Vitro Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R. da Silva

    2010-01-01

    This work evaluated the toxic and mutagenic potential of papain and its potential antioxidant activity against induced-H2O2 oxidative stress in Escherichia coli strains. Cytotoxicity assay, Growth inhibition test, WP2-Mutoxitest and Plasmid-DNA treatment, and agarose gel electrophoresis were used to investigate if papain would present any toxic or mutagenic potential as well as if papain would display antioxidant properties. Papain exhibited negative results for all tests. This agent presented an activity protecting cells against H2O2-induced mutagenesis.

  4. Detection of synergistic combinations of Baccharis extracts with terbinafine against Trichophyton rubrum with high throughput screening synergy assay (HTSS) followed by 3D graphs. Behavior of some of their components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, María Victoria; Sortino, Maximiliano A; Ivancovich, Juan J; Pellegrino, José M; Favier, Laura S; Raimondi, Marcela P; Gattuso, Martha A; Zacchino, Susana A

    2013-10-15

    Forty four extracts from nine Baccharis spp. from the Caulopterae section were tested in combination with terbinafine against Trichophyton rubrum with the HTSS assay at six different ratios with the aim of detecting those mixtures that produced a ≥50% statistically significant enhancement of growth inhibition. Since an enhanced effect of a combination respective of its components, does not necessarily indicate synergism, three-dimensional (3D) dose-response surfaces were constructed for each selected pair of extract/antifungal drug with the aid of CombiTool software. Ten extracts showed synergistic or additive combinations which constitutes a 22% hit rate of the extracts submitted to evaluation. Four flavonoids and three ent-clerodanes were detected in the active Baccharis extracts with HPLC/UV/ESI-MS methodology, all of which were tested in combination with terbinafine. Results showed that ent-clerodanes but not flavonoids showed synergistic or additive effects. Among them, bacchotricuneatin A followed by bacrispine showed synergistic effects while hawtriwaic acid showed additive effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of High Throughput Screening Data in IARC Monograph ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in IARC monograph evaluations, and can lead to “upgrade” or “downgrade” of the carcinogenicity conclusions based on human and animal evidence alone. Three recent IARC monograph Working Groups (110, 112, and 113) pioneered analysis of high throughput in vitro screening data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program in evaluations of carcinogenic mechanisms. Methods: For monograph 110, ToxCast assay data across multiple nuclear receptors were used to test the hypothesis that PFOA acts exclusively through the PPAR family of receptors, with activity profiles compared to several prototypical nuclear receptor-activating compounds. For monographs 112 and 113, ToxCast assays were systematically evaluated and used as an additional data stream in the overall evaluation of the mechanistic evidence. Specifically, ToxCast assays were mapped to 10 “key characteristics of carcinogens” recently identified by an IARC expert group, and chemicals’ bioactivity profiles were evaluated both in absolute terms (number of relevant assays positive for bioactivity) and relative terms (ranking with respect to other compounds evaluated by IARC, using the ToxPi methodology). Results: PFOA activates multiple nuclear receptors in addition to the PPAR family in the ToxCast assays. ToxCast assays offered substantial coverage for 5 of the 10 “key characteristics,” with the greates

  6. Efficient Management of High-Throughput Screening Libraries with SAVANAH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; Schmidt, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis for such scr......High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis...... for such screens are molecular libraries, that is, microtiter plates with solubilized reagents such as siRNAs, shRNAs, miRNA inhibitors or mimics, and sgRNAs, or small compounds, that is, drugs. These reagents are typically condensed to provide enough material for covering several screens. Library plates thus need...... to be serially diluted before they can be used as assay plates. This process, however, leads to an explosion in the number of plates and samples to be tracked. Here, we present SAVANAH, the first tool to effectively manage molecular screening libraries across dilution series. It conveniently links (connects...

  7. Evaluation of a High Throughput Starch Analysis Optimised for Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Fini, Alessio; Ferrini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Starch is the most important long-term reserve in trees, and the analysis of starch is therefore useful source of physiological information. Currently published protocols for wood starch analysis impose several limitations, such as long procedures and a neutralization step. The high-throughput standard protocols for starch analysis in food and feed represent a valuable alternative. However, they have not been optimised or tested with woody samples. These have particular chemical and structural characteristics, including the presence of interfering secondary metabolites, low reactivity of starch, and low starch content. In this study, a standard method for starch analysis used for food and feed (AOAC standard method 996.11) was optimised to improve precision and accuracy for the analysis of starch in wood. Key modifications were introduced in the digestion conditions and in the glucose assay. The optimised protocol was then evaluated through 430 starch analyses of standards at known starch content, matrix polysaccharides, and wood collected from three organs (roots, twigs, mature wood) of four species (coniferous and flowering plants). The optimised protocol proved to be remarkably precise and accurate (3%), suitable for a high throughput routine analysis (35 samples a day) of specimens with a starch content between 40 mg and 21 µg. Samples may include lignified organs of coniferous and flowering plants and non-lignified organs, such as leaves, fruits and rhizomes. PMID:24523863

  8. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  9. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  10. Genotoxicity effects of nano bioactive glass and Novabone bioglass on gingival fibroblasts using single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay): An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad; Bateni, Ensiyeh; Rismanchian, Mansour; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Doostmohammadi, Ali; Rabiei, Azim; Sadeghi, Hojat; Etebari, Mahmood; Mirian, Mina

    2012-05-01

    The greater surface of bioactive glass nanoparticles presents an incomparable and promising feature similar to the biological apatite. Nanoparticles improve cellular adhesion, enhance osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, and increase biomineralization for periodontal regeneration and dental implants. Considering the fact that interaction between periodontal cells and bone graft materials are important for periodontal lesion regeneration, the present study was undertaken to investigate the genotoxicity of a novel synthesized nanoscale bioactive glass and compared it with Novabone bioglass in periodontal fibroblasts cells, in order to approve the biocompatibility of nano bioactive glass. In this in vitro experimental study, periodontal C165 fibroblasts cells were cultured in their logarithmic phase and the genotoxicity of novel synthesized bioactive glass nanoparticles and Novabone bioglass was studied in different concentrations and a control group using Comet assay test. By using Autocomet software, three parameters (Tail length, %DNA in tail, Tail moment) were analyzed; the genotoxicity of mentioned biomaterials and control group. Obtained data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5 software, Kruskal Wallis H and Mann Whitney tests (P = 0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed between the concentrations of Novabone bioglass (P value = 0.085) with control group and novel nano bioactive glass (P value = 0.437) with control group in the evaluation of %DNA in tail parameter. There was significant difference between genotoxicity of novel nano bioactive glass and control, and between Novabone bioglass and control group in concentrations of 4 and 5 mg/ml. According to significance of the mean difference, novel nano bioactive glass showed higher genotoxicity compared to Novabone bioglass in the concentration of 5 mg/ml (P ≤ 0.05). The findings of this study have demonstrated that novel nano bioactive glass had no genotoxicity in concentrations lower than

  11. Linking genotoxic responses in Gammarus fossarum germ cells with reproduction impairment, using the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Emilie; Geffard, Olivier; Goyet, Delphine; Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain

    2011-07-01

    Germ cells perform a unique and critical biological function: they pass down DNA that will be used for the development of the next generation. Thus there is an increasing need to understand how the adult exposure to genotoxicants could show negative impact on the offspring of aquatic organisms. Hence this work addresses the question of the consequences of germ cell DNA damage resulting from parental exposure on reproduction quality in the freshwater crustacean Gammarus fossarum, a high ecologically relevant species. Initially, the sensitivity response of mature oocytes and spermatozoa to two model genotoxicants, MMS and K(2)Cr(2)O(7) was compared by implementing the Comet assay after the exposure of these gammarids in the laboratory and after the exposure of caged organisms in the field. Spermatozoa appeared significantly more susceptible than the oocytes to genotoxicants whatever were the exposure conditions. Secondly, a significant correlation between the level of damage to the sperm DNA of exposed parents and the abnormality rate in embryos that had developed in non-contaminated water were demonstrated. Interestingly, this relationship bridges the biomarker response measured in germ cells at molecular level and its consequences at individual level for the subsequent generation. Moreover, reproduction defects were observed for a level of DNA damage exceeding a minimal threshold, which could have significant consequences for the population dynamics of this high ecologically relevant species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Micronucleus Assay for Evaluation of Genotoxicity in Potentially Malignant and Malignant Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathi Devi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is a common malignancy, ranking first among all cancers in Western and Asian countries. It is preceded by some benign lesions or conditions, which are termed precancerous. Only one-third of people at the precancerous stage of disease succumb to cancer, it would be of practical importance to identify individuals at risk among them. Biomarkers, instruments of individual tumor prevention, help to detect high-risk patents. The induction of micronucleus is considered to bean effective biomarker of diseases- In the recent past, a great deal of enthusiasm was raised by application of the micronucleus test to assess DNA damage in human population. The present study is aimed at the evaluation of frequency of micronuclei in smears of oral exfoliated cells. A total of 33 patients with potentially malignant (leukoplakia, OSMF, lichen planus and malignant oral epithelial diseases from the department of oral medicine and radiology were considered as study group and compared with 33 age and sex matched healthy controls. Micronucleus frequencies were found higher in diseased patients than in control subjects- Hence, concluded that the micronucleus assay can be used as a prognostic indicator in potentially malignant and malignant disorders.

  13. Genotoxicity of heterocyclic PAHs in the micronucleus assay with the fish liver cell line RTL-W1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Brinkmann

    Full Text Available Heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are, together with their un-substituted analogues, widely distributed throughout all environmental compartments. While fate and effects of homocyclic PAHs are well-understood, there are still data gaps concerning the ecotoxicology of heterocyclic PAHs: Only few publications are available investigating these substances using in vitro bioassays. Here, we present a study focusing on the identification and quantification of clastogenic and aneugenic effects in the micronucleus assay with the fish liver cell line RTL-W1 that was originally derived from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss. Real concentrations of the test items after incubation without cells were determined to assess chemical losses due to, e.g., sorption or volatilization, by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We were able to show genotoxic effects for six compounds that have not been reported in vertebrate systems before. Out of the tested substances, 2,3-dimethylbenzofuran, benzothiophene, quinoline and 6-methylquinoline did not cause substantial induction of micronuclei in the cell line. Acridine caused the highest absolute induction. Carbazole, acridine and dibenzothiophene were the most potent substances compared with 4-nitroquinoline oxide, a well characterized genotoxicant with high potency used as standard. Dibenzofuran was positive in our investigation and tested negative before in a mammalian system. Chemical losses during incubation ranged from 29.3% (acridine to 91.7% (benzofuran and may be a confounding factor in studies without chemical analyses, leading to an underestimation of the real potency. The relative potency of the investigated substances was high compared with their un-substituted PAH analogues, only the latter being typically monitored as priority or indicator pollutants. Hetero-PAHs are widely distributed in the environment and even more mobile, e.g. in ground water, than homocyclic PAHs due to the higher water

  14. Biosensing approaches for rapid genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assays upon nanomaterial exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuena; Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu, Wenjun; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2013-05-27

    The increased utilization of nanomaterials could affect human health and the environment due to increased exposure. Several mechanisms regarding the negative effects of nanomaterials have been proposed, one of the most discussed being oxidative stress. Many studies have shown that some metal oxide nanoparticles can enhance reactive oxygen species generation, inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage, and unregulated cell signaling, and eventually leading to changes in cell motility, apoptosis, and even carcinogenesis. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the predominant forms of oxidative DNA damage, and has therefore been widely used as a biomarker for oxidative stress and carcinogenesis. Ther are two major objectives to this study. Firstly, the development of a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) is presented to measure the concentration of 8-OHdG in cells and thus reveal the nanotoxicity on the genomic level. The feasibility of this new method is validated by comparison with two other established methods: Alamar Blue assay and a recently developed electrical impedance sensing (EIS) system on the level of cell proliferation/viability. Secondly, the toxicological effects of three metallic nanoparticles (CuO, CdO, and TiO2 ) are investigated and compared using these three methods with completely different mechanisms. The results show that there is a high variation among different nanoparticles concerning their ability to cause toxic effects. CuO nanoparticles are the most potent regarding cytotoxicity and DNA damage. CdO shows a fallen cell viability as well as DNA damage, however, to a lesser extent than CuO nanoparticles. TiO2 particles only cause very limited cytotoxicity, and there is no obvious increase in 8-OHdG levels. In conclusion, LFIA as well as the EIS system are useful methods for quantitative or qualitative nanotoxicity assessments with high sensitivity, specificity, speed of performance, and simplicity. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag Gmb

  15. High-throughput hyperdimensional vertebrate phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Martin, Carlos; Allalou, Amin; Medina, Jaime; Eimon, Peter M; Wählby, Carolina; Fatih Yanik, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Most gene mutations and biologically active molecules cause complex responses in animals that cannot be predicted by cell culture models. Yet animal studies remain too slow and their analyses are often limited to only a few readouts. Here we demonstrate high-throughput optical projection tomography with micrometre resolution and hyperdimensional screening of entire vertebrates in tens of seconds using a simple fluidic system. Hundreds of independent morphological features and complex phenotypes are automatically captured in three dimensions with unprecedented speed and detail in semitransparent zebrafish larvae. By clustering quantitative phenotypic signatures, we can detect and classify even subtle alterations in many biological processes simultaneously. We term our approach hyperdimensional in vivo phenotyping. To illustrate the power of hyperdimensional in vivo phenotyping, we have analysed the effects of several classes of teratogens on cartilage formation using 200 independent morphological measurements, and identified similarities and differences that correlate well with their known mechanisms of actions in mammals.

  16. High-Throughput Process Development for Biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Abhinav A; Rameez, Shahid; Wolfe, Leslie S; Oien, Nathan

    2017-11-14

    The ability to conduct multiple experiments in parallel significantly reduces the time that it takes to develop a manufacturing process for a biopharmaceutical. This is particularly significant before clinical entry, because process development and manufacturing are on the "critical path" for a drug candidate to enter clinical development. High-throughput process development (HTPD) methodologies can be similarly impactful during late-stage development, both for developing the final commercial process as well as for process characterization and scale-down validation activities that form a key component of the licensure filing package. This review examines the current state of the art for HTPD methodologies as they apply to cell culture, downstream purification, and analytical techniques. In addition, we provide a vision of how HTPD activities across all of these spaces can integrate to create a rapid process development engine that can accelerate biopharmaceutical drug development. Graphical Abstract.

  17. Applications of High Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, Johannes Eichler

    The recent advent of high throughput sequencing of nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) has vastly expanded research into the functional and structural biology of the genome of all living organisms (and even a few dead ones). With this enormous and exponential growth in biological data generation come...... equally large demands in data handling, analysis and interpretation, perhaps defining the modern challenge of the computational biologist of the post-genomic era. The first part of this thesis consists of a general introduction to the history, common terms and challenges of next generation sequencing......, focusing on oft encountered problems in data processing, such as quality assurance, mapping, normalization, visualization, and interpretation. Presented in the second part are scientific endeavors representing solutions to problems of two sub-genres of next generation sequencing. For the first flavor, RNA-sequencing...

  18. Applications of High Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, Johannes Eichler

    The recent advent of high throughput sequencing of nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) has vastly expanded research into the functional and structural biology of the genome of all living organisms (and even a few dead ones). With this enormous and exponential growth in biological data generation come...... equally large demands in data handling, analysis and interpretation, perhaps defining the modern challenge of the computational biologist of the post-genomic era. The first part of this thesis consists of a general introduction to the history, common terms and challenges of next generation sequencing......). For the second flavor, DNA-seq, a study presenting genome wide profiling of transcription factor CEBP/A in liver cells undergoing regeneration after partial hepatectomy (article IV) is included....

  19. Enzyme assays: high-throughput screening, genetic selection, and fingerprinting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    ... (Testing Many Substrates Toward Hydrolase) Comparison with Other Methods 26 Estimating and Measuring Selectivity 27 Estimating Selectivity without a Reference Compound 28 Quantitative Measure of Se...

  20. Genotoxicity of carbon tetrachloride and the protective role of essential oil of Salvia officinalis L. in mice using chromosomal aberration, micronuclei formation, and comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Kawthar Ae; Fahmy, Maha A; Hassan, Zeinab M; Hassan, Emad M; Salama, Adel B; Omara, Enayat A

    2018-01-01

    The present work was conducted to evaluate the genotoxic effect of carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) in mouse bone marrow and male germ cells. The safety and the modulating activity of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) essential oil (SEO) against the possible genotoxic effect of CCl 4 were also evaluated. A combination of in vivo mutagenic endpoints was included: micronucleus (MN), apoptosis using dual acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining, comet assay, chromosomal aberrations (CAs), and sperm abnormalities. Histological examination of testis tissues was also studied. The extracted SEO was subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for identifying its chemical constituents. Safety/genotoxicity of SEO was determined after two consecutive weeks (5 days/week) from oral treatment with different concentrations (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mL/kg). For assessing genotoxicity of CCl 4 , both acute (once) and subacute i.p. treatment for 2 weeks (3 days/week) with the concentrations 1.2 mL/kg (for acute) and 0.8 mL/kg (for subacute) were performed. For evaluating the protective role of SEO, simultaneous treatment with SEO plus CCl 4 was examined. In sperm abnormalities, mice were treated with the subject materials for five successive days and the samples were collected after 35 days from the beginning of treatment. Based on GC-MS findings, 22 components were identified in the chromatogram of SEO. The results demonstrated that the three concentrations of SEO were safe and non-genotoxic in all the tested endpoints. Negative results were also observed in bone marrow after acute and subacute treatment with CCl 4. In contrast, CCl 4 induced testicular DNA damage as evidenced by a significant increase of CAs in primary spermatocytes, sperm abnormalities, and histological distortion of testis. A remarkable reduction in these cells was observed in groups treated with SEO plus CCl 4 especially with the two higher concentrations of SEO. In conclusion, SEO is safe and

  1. A cell-free fluorometric high-throughput screen for inhibitors of Rtt109-catalyzed histone acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme L Dahlin

    Full Text Available The lysine acetyltransferase (KAT Rtt109 forms a complex with Vps75 and catalyzes the acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56ac in the Asf1-H3-H4 complex. Rtt109 and H3K56ac are vital for replication-coupled nucleosome assembly and genotoxic resistance in yeast and pathogenic fungal species such as Candida albicans. Remarkably, sequence homologs of Rtt109 are absent in humans. Therefore, inhibitors of Rtt109 are hypothesized as potential and minimally toxic antifungal agents. Herein, we report the development and optimization of a cell-free fluorometric high-throughput screen (HTS for small-molecule inhibitors of Rtt109-catalyzed histone acetylation. The KAT component of the assay consists of the yeast Rtt109-Vps75 complex, while the histone substrate complex consists of full-length Drosophila histone H3-H4 bound to yeast Asf1. Duplicated assay runs of the LOPAC demonstrated day-to-day and plate-to-plate reproducibility. Approximately 225,000 compounds were assayed in a 384-well plate format with an average Z' factor of 0.71. Based on a 3σ cut-off criterion, 1,587 actives (0.7% were identified in the primary screen. The assay method is capable of identifying previously reported KAT inhibitors such as garcinol. We also observed several prominent active classes of pan-assay interference compounds such as Mannich bases, catechols and p-hydroxyarylsulfonamides. The majority of the primary active compounds showed assay signal interference, though most assay artifacts can be efficiently removed by a series of straightforward counter-screens and orthogonal assays. Post-HTS triage demonstrated a comparatively small number of confirmed actives with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. This assay, which utilizes five label-free proteins involved in H3K56 acetylation in vivo, can in principle identify compounds that inhibit Rtt109-catalyzed H3K56 acetylation via different mechanisms. Compounds discovered via this assay or adaptations thereof could

  2. Genotoxicity of doxorubicin in F344 rats by combining the comet assay, flow-cytometric peripheral blood micronucleus test, and pathway-focused gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Bishop, Michelle E; Pearce, Mason G; Kulkarni, Rohan; Lyn-Cook, Lascelles E; Ding, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an antineoplastic drug effective against many human malignancies. DOX's clinical efficacy is greatly limited because of severe cardiotoxicity. To evaluate if DOX is genotoxic in the heart, ~7-week-old, male F344 rats were administered intravenously 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg bw DOX at 0, 24, 48, and 69 hr and the Comet assays in heart, liver, kidney, and testis and micronucleus (MN) assay in the peripheral blood (PB) erythrocytes using flow cytometry were conducted. Rats were euthanized at 72 hr and PB was removed for the MN assay and single cells were isolated from multiple tissues for the Comet assays. None of the doses of DOX induced a significant DNA damage in any of the tissues examined by the alkaline Comet assay. Contrastingly, the glycosylase enzymes-modified Comet assay showed a significant dose dependent increase in the oxidative DNA damage in the cardiac tissue (P ≤ 0.05). In the liver, only the top dose induced significant increase in the oxidative DNA damage (P ≤ 0.05). The histopathology showed no severe cardiotoxicity but non-neoplastic lesions were present in both untreated and treated samples. A severe toxicity likely occurred in the bone marrow because no viable reticulocytes could be screened for the MN assay. Gene expression profiling of the heart tissues showed a significant alteration in the expression of 11 DNA damage and repair genes. These results suggest that DOX is genotoxic in the heart and the DNA damage may be induced primarily via the production of reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The comet assay in Environmental Risk Assessment of marine pollutants: applications, assets and handicaps of surveying genotoxicity in non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marta; Costa, Pedro M

    2015-01-01

    Determining the genotoxic effects of pollutants has long been a priority in Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) for coastal ecosystems, especially of complex areas such as estuaries and other confined waterbodies. The acknowledged link between DNA damage, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity to the exposure to certain toxicants has been responsible to the growing interest in determining the genotoxic effects of xenobiotics to wildlife as a measure of environmental risk. The comet assay, although widely employed in in vivo and in vitro toxicology, still holds many constraints in ERA, in large part owing to difficulties in obtaining conclusive cause-effect relationships from complex environments. Nevertheless, these challenges do not hinder the attempts to apply the alkaline comet assay on sentinel organisms, wild or subjected to bioassays in or ex situ (from fish to molluscs) as well to standardise protocols and establish general guidelines to the interpretation of findings. Fish have been regarded as an appealing subject due to the ease of performing the comet assay in whole blood. However, the application of the comet assay is becoming increasingly common in invertebrates (e.g. in molluscan haemocytes and solid tissues such as gills). Virtually all sorts of results have been obtained from the application of the comet assay in ERA (null, positive and inconclusive). However, it has become clear that interpreting DNA damage data from wild organisms is particularly challenging due to their ability to adapt to continuous environmental stressors, including toxicants. Also, the comet assay in non-model organisms for the purpose of ERA implies different constraints, assumptions and interpretation of findings, compared with the in vitro procedures from which most guidelines have been derived. This paper critically reviews the application of the comet assay in ERA, focusing on target organisms and tissues; protocol developments, case studies plus data handling and

  4. In vivo genotoxicity testing of the amnesic shellfish poison (domoic acid) in piscine erythrocytes using the micronucleus test and the comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavas, Tolga [Mersin University, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Department of Biology, 33343 Mersin (Turkey)], E-mail: tcavas@mersin.edu.tr; Koenen, Serpil [Mersin University, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Department of Biology, 33343 Mersin (Turkey)

    2008-11-11

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxic amino acid naturally produced in the marine environment by some diatom species belonging to the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Although the neurotoxic properties of DA have been demonstrated, very little is known about in vivo genotoxicity of DA on aquatic organisms. In the present paper, an in vivo study on the genotoxic effects of domoic acid was carried out on a fish, Oreochromis niloticus, using the micronucleus test and the comet assay. The fish were exposed to three doses of domoic acid (1, 5 and 10 {mu}g/g body weight) by intracoelomic injections. Ethyl methane sulphonate at a single dose of 5 mg/l was used as positive control. Analysis of micronuclei, nuclear abnormalities and DNA damage were carried out on peripheral erythrocytes sampled 24, 48 and 72 h post-treatment. Our results revealed significant increases in the frequencies of micronuclei, nuclear abnormalities as well as DNA strand breaks and thus demonstrated the genotoxic potential of DA on fish.

  5. Use of a standardized JaCVAM in vivo rat comet assay protocol to assess the genotoxicity of three coded test compounds; ampicillin trihydrate, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride, and N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), our laboratory examined ampicillin trihydrate (AMP), 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDA) using a standard comet assay validation protocol (v14.2) developed by the JaCVAM validation management team (VMT). Coded samples were received by our laboratory along with basic MSDS information. Solubility analysis and range-finding experiments of the coded test compounds were conducted for dose selection. Animal dosing schedules, the comet assay processing and analysis, and statistical analysis were conducted in accordance with the standard protocol. Based upon our blinded evaluation, AMP was not found to exhibit evidence of genotoxicity in either the rat liver or stomach. However, both NDA and DMH were observed to cause a significant increase in % tail DNA in the rat liver at all dose levels tested. While acute hepatoxicity was observed for these compounds in the high dose group, in the investigators opinion there were a sufficient number of consistently damaged/measurable cells at the medium and low dose groups to judge these compounds as genotoxic. There was no evidence of genotoxicity from either NDA or DMH in the rat stomach. In conclusion, our laboratory observed increased DNA damage from two blinded test compounds in rat liver (later identified as genotoxic carcinogens), while no evidence of genotoxicity was observed for the third blinded test compound (later identified as a non-genotoxic, non-carcinogen). This data supports the use of a standardized protocol of the in vivo comet assay as a cost-effective alternative genotoxicity assay for regulatory testing purposes. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High-throughput microcavitation bubble induced cellular mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jonathan Lee

    inhibitor to IP 3 induced Ca2+ release. This capability opens the development of a high-throughput screening platform for molecules that modulate cellular mechanotransduction. We have applied this approach to screen the effects of a small set of small molecules, in a 96-well plate in less than an hour. These detailed studies offer a basis for the design, development, and implementation of a novel high-throughput mechanotransduction assay to rapidly screen the effect of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction at high throughput.

  7. High Throughput Spectroscopic Catalyst Screening via Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 26-June-2014 to 25-March-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Throughput Catalyst Screening via Surface...TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Throughput Catalyst Screening via Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4064 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...AOARD Grant 144064 FA2386-14-1-4064 “High Throughput Spectroscopic Catalyst Screening by Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy” Date July 15, 2015

  8. Silver (nano)materials cause genotoxicity in Enchytraeus crypticus, as determined by the comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maria, Vera L; Ribeiro, Maria João; Guilherme, Sofia

    2018-01-01

    Enchytraeids have been used in standard ecotoxicity testing for about 20 years now. Since adopting the standard test for survival and reproduction, a number of additional tools have been developed, including transcriptomics and enzymatic biomarkers. So far, a genotoxicity tool and endpoint have n...

  9. GENOTOXICITY STUDIES OF THREE TRIAZINE HERBICIDES III. IN VIVO STUDIES USING THE ALKALINE SINGLE CELL GEL (SCG) ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractTriazine herbicides are prevalent contaminants of groundwater in the agricultural regions of the United States. The literature on the genotoxicity of triazines is rife with conflicting data, though the general tendency is for most studies to report negative resul...

  10. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009). The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity...... of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided...... with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014). An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster...

  11. High-throughput crystallography for structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2009-10-01

    Protein X-ray crystallography recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. The structures of myoglobin and hemoglobin determined by Kendrew and Perutz provided the first glimpses into the complex protein architecture and chemistry. Since then, the field of structural molecular biology has experienced extraordinary progress and now more than 55000 protein structures have been deposited into the Protein Data Bank. In the past decade many advances in macromolecular crystallography have been driven by world-wide structural genomics efforts. This was made possible because of third-generation synchrotron sources, structure phasing approaches using anomalous signal, and cryo-crystallography. Complementary progress in molecular biology, proteomics, hardware and software for crystallographic data collection, structure determination and refinement, computer science, databases, robotics and automation improved and accelerated many processes. These advancements provide the robust foundation for structural molecular biology and assure strong contribution to science in the future. In this report we focus mainly on reviewing structural genomics high-throughput X-ray crystallography technologies and their impact.

  12. High-throughput Crystallography for Structural Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Protein X-ray crystallography recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. The structures of myoglobin and hemoglobin determined by Kendrew and Perutz provided the first glimpses into the complex protein architecture and chemistry. Since then, the field of structural molecular biology has experienced extraordinary progress and now over 53,000 proteins structures have been deposited into the Protein Data Bank. In the past decade many advances in macromolecular crystallography have been driven by world-wide structural genomics efforts. This was made possible because of third-generation synchrotron sources, structure phasing approaches using anomalous signal and cryo-crystallography. Complementary progress in molecular biology, proteomics, hardware and software for crystallographic data collection, structure determination and refinement, computer science, databases, robotics and automation improved and accelerated many processes. These advancements provide the robust foundation for structural molecular biology and assure strong contribution to science in the future. In this report we focus mainly on reviewing structural genomics high-throughput X-ray crystallography technologies and their impact. PMID:19765976

  13. A robust robotic high-throughput antibody purification platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter M; Abdo, Michael; Butcher, Rebecca E; Yap, Min-Yin; Scotney, Pierre D; Ramunno, Melanie L; Martin-Roussety, Genevieve; Owczarek, Catherine; Hardy, Matthew P; Chen, Chao-Guang; Fabri, Louis J

    2016-07-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become the fastest growing segment in the drug market with annual sales of more than 40 billion US$ in 2013. The selection of lead candidate molecules involves the generation of large repertoires of antibodies from which to choose a final therapeutic candidate. Improvements in the ability to rapidly produce and purify many antibodies in sufficient quantities reduces the lead time for selection which ultimately impacts on the speed with which an antibody may transition through the research stage and into product development. Miniaturization and automation of chromatography using micro columns (RoboColumns(®) from Atoll GmbH) coupled to an automated liquid handling instrument (ALH; Freedom EVO(®) from Tecan) has been a successful approach to establish high throughput process development platforms. Recent advances in transient gene expression (TGE) using the high-titre Expi293F™ system have enabled recombinant mAb titres of greater than 500mg/L. These relatively high protein titres reduce the volume required to generate several milligrams of individual antibodies for initial biochemical and biological downstream assays, making TGE in the Expi293F™ system ideally suited to high throughput chromatography on an ALH. The present publication describes a novel platform for purifying Expi293F™-expressed recombinant mAbs directly from cell-free culture supernatant on a Perkin Elmer JANUS-VariSpan ALH equipped with a plate shuttle device. The purification platform allows automated 2-step purification (Protein A-desalting/size exclusion chromatography) of several hundred mAbs per week. The new robotic method can purify mAbs with high recovery (>90%) at sub-milligram level with yields of up to 2mg from 4mL of cell-free culture supernatant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A High-Throughput Antibody-Based Microarray Typing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Gehring; Charles, Barnett; Chu, Ted; DebRoy, Chitrita; D'Souza, Doris; Eaker, Shannon; Fratamico, Pina; Gillespie, Barbara; Hegde, Narasimha; Jones, Kevin; Lin, Jun; Oliver, Stephen; Paoli, George; Perera, Ashan; Uknalis, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Many rapid methods have been developed for screening foods for the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Rapid methods that have the additional ability to identify microorganisms via multiplexed immunological recognition have the potential for classification or typing of microbial contaminants thus facilitating epidemiological investigations that aim to identify outbreaks and trace back the contamination to its source. This manuscript introduces a novel, high throughput typing platform that employs microarrayed multiwell plate substrates and laser-induced fluorescence of the nucleic acid intercalating dye/stain SYBR Gold for detection of antibody-captured bacteria. The aim of this study was to use this platform for comparison of different sets of antibodies raised against the same pathogens as well as demonstrate its potential effectiveness for serotyping. To that end, two sets of antibodies raised against each of the “Big Six” non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) as well as E. coli O157:H7 were array-printed into microtiter plates, and serial dilutions of the bacteria were added and subsequently detected. Though antibody specificity was not sufficient for the development of an STEC serotyping method, the STEC antibody sets performed reasonably well exhibiting that specificity increased at lower capture antibody concentrations or, conversely, at lower bacterial target concentrations. The favorable results indicated that with sufficiently selective and ideally concentrated sets of biorecognition elements (e.g., antibodies or aptamers), this high-throughput platform can be used to rapidly type microbial isolates derived from food samples within ca. 80 min of total assay time. It can also potentially be used to detect the pathogens from food enrichments and at least serve as a platform for testing antibodies. PMID:23645110

  15. Acanthamoeba castellanii: a new high-throughput method for drug screening in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega-Rivas, Antonio; Padrón, José M; Valladares, Basilio; Elsheikha, Hany M

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant public health impact, there is no specific antiprotozoal therapy for prevention and treatment of Acanthamoeba castellanii infection. There is a need for new and efficient anti-Acanthamoeba drugs that are less toxic and can reduce treatment duration and frequency of administration. In this context a new, rapid and sensitive assay is required for high-throughput activity testing and screening of new therapeutic compounds. A colorimetric assay based on sulforhodamine B (SRB) ...

  16. In Vitro genotoxic and antigenotoxic studies of Thai Noni fruit juice by chromosomal aberration and sister chromatid exchange assays in human lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treetip Ratanavalachai

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Noni fruit juice produced in Thailand have been studied in human lymphocytes for chromosome aberration assay and sister chromatid exchange (SCE assay in vitro. Treatment of Noni fruit juice(3.1-50 mg/ml alone for 3 h did not significantly induce chromosomal aberration or SCE (p<0.05. Noni fruit juice at 6.2 mg/ml is the optimum dose for cell survival and cell replication as demonstrated by the highest value of mitotic index and proliferation index (P.I.. Interestingly, pretreatment of Noni fruit juice at the same concentration of 6.2 mg/ml for 2 hfollowed by mitomycin C treatment at 3 μg/ml for 2 h significantly reduced SCE level induced by mitomycin C (p<0.05. However, these treatments did not show significant decrease in chromatid-type aberrations. Our data indicate that Thai Noni fruit juice is not genotoxic against human lymphocytes in vitro. In addition, pretreatment of Noni fruit juice at 6.2 mg/ml demonstrated no anticlastogenic effect while had some antigenotoxic effects as demonstrated by significant decrease in the SCE level induced by mitomycin C (p<0.05. Therefore, the optimum dose of Noni fruit juice used as a traditional medicine is required and needs to be studied further for the benefit of human health.

  17. Efficient Management of High-Throughput Screening Libraries with SAVANAH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Markus; Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; Schmidt, Steffen; Christiansen, Helle; Tan, Qihua; Mollenhauer, Jan; Baumbach, Jan

    2017-02-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis for such screens are molecular libraries, that is, microtiter plates with solubilized reagents such as siRNAs, shRNAs, miRNA inhibitors or mimics, and sgRNAs, or small compounds, that is, drugs. These reagents are typically condensed to provide enough material for covering several screens. Library plates thus need to be serially diluted before they can be used as assay plates. This process, however, leads to an explosion in the number of plates and samples to be tracked. Here, we present SAVANAH, the first tool to effectively manage molecular screening libraries across dilution series. It conveniently links (connects) sample information from the library to experimental results from the assay plates. All results can be exported to the R statistical environment or piped into HiTSeekR ( http://hitseekr.compbio.sdu.dk ) for comprehensive follow-up analyses. In summary, SAVANAH supports the HTS community in managing and analyzing HTS experiments with an emphasis on serially diluted molecular libraries.

  18. Nanoliter high-throughput PCR for DNA and RNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenan, Colin J H; Roberts, Douglas; Hurley, James

    2009-01-01

    The increasing emphasis in life science research on utilization of genetic and genomic information underlies the need for high-throughput technologies capable of analyzing the expression of multiple genes or the presence of informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in large-scale, population-based applications. Human disease research, disease diagnosis, personalized therapeutics, environmental monitoring, blood testing, and identification of genetic traits impacting agricultural practices, both in terms of food quality and production efficiency, are a few areas where such systems are in demand. This has stimulated the need for PCR technologies that preserves the intrinsic analytical benefits of PCR yet enables higher throughputs without increasing the time to answer, labor and reagent expenses and workflow complexity. An example of such a system based on a high-density array of nanoliter PCR assays is described here. Functionally equivalent to a microtiter plate, the nanoplate system makes possible up to 3,072 simultaneous end-point or real-time PCR measurements in a device, the size of a standard microscope slide. Methods for SNP genotyping with end-point TaqMan PCR assays and quantitative measurement of gene expression with SYBR Green I real-time PCR are outlined and illustrative data showing system performance is provided.

  19. High Throughput Determinations of Critical Dosing Parameters (IVIVE workshop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    High throughput toxicokinetics (HTTK) is an approach that allows for rapid estimations of TK for hundreds of environmental chemicals. HTTK-based reverse dosimetry (i.e, reverse toxicokinetics or RTK) is used in order to convert high throughput in vitro toxicity screening (HTS) da...

  20. Uncertainty Quantification in High Throughput Screening: Applications to Models of Endocrine Disruption, Cytotoxicity, and Zebrafish Development (GRC Drug Safety)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using uncertainty quantification, we aim to improve the quality of modeling data from high throughput screening assays for use in risk assessment. ToxCast is a large-scale screening program that analyzes thousands of chemicals using over 800 assays representing hundreds of bioche...

  1. Indoor and outdoor genotoxic load detected by the Comet assay in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum cultivars Bel B and Bel W3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restivo, Francesco Maria; Laccone, Maria Concetta; Buschini, Annamaria; Rossi, Carlo; Poli, Paola

    2002-03-01

    Environmental pollution assessment and control are priority issues for both developed and developing countries of the world. The use of plant material for a more complete picture of environmental health appears to be particularly appealing. Here we validate a previous plant-adapted Comet assay on leaf tissues of Nicotiana tabacum cultivars Bel B and Bel W3. The effects of H(2)O(2) on DNA damage in Bel B and Bel W3 agree with the hypothesis that some component of the machinery that protects DNA integrity from oxidative stress may be impaired in cv. Bel W3. Exposure in the field on sunny summer days (peak ozone concentration >80 p.p.b.) showed significantly higher DNA damage in cv. Bel W3 if plants were collected and subjected to the Comet assay when the air ozone concentration was reaching its peak value, but not when plants were sampled early in the morning and hence after a period of low ozone concentration. The different results suggest that Bel W3 possesses a less efficient recovery apparatus that requires a longer period of activity to be effective and/or is less protected against reactive oxygen species production during exposure to ozone. However, it cannot be excluded that the increase in mean DNA damage is the result of the presence of a genotoxic agent(s) other than ozone. Interestingly, Bel W3 also appears to be more responsive, compared with Bel B, when exposed to ambient indoor pollutants. The use of cv. Bel W3 increases the sensitivity of the assay under both indoor and field conditions. However, different classes of mutagens should be tested to define the range of profitable utilization of this tobacco cultivar for environmental genotoxicity detection.

  2. SiO2 Nanoparticule-induced size-dependent genotoxicity - an in vitro study using sister chromatid exchange, micronucleus and comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battal, Dilek; Çelik, Ayla; Güler, Gizem; Aktaş, Ayça; Yildirimcan, Saadet; Ocakoglu, Kasim; Çömelekoǧlu, Ülkü

    2015-04-01

    Fine particles with a characteristic size smaller than 100 nm (i.e. nanoparticlesspread out in nowadays life. Silicon or Si, is one of the most abundant chemical elements found on the Earth. Its oxide forms, such as silicate (SiO4) and silicon dioxide, also known as silica (SiO2), are the main constituents of sand and quartz contributing to 90% of the Earth's crust. In this work, three genotoxicity systems "sister chromatid exchange, cytokinesis block micronucleus test and single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay" were employed to provide further insight into the cytotoxic and mutagenic/genotoxic potential of SiO2 nanoparticules (particle size 6 nm, 20 nm, 50 nm) in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes as in vitro. It was observed that there is a significant decrease in Mitotic index (MI), Cytokinesis block proliferation index (CBPI), proliferation index (PRI) values expressed as Cell Kinetic parameters compared with negative control (p nanoparticules is dependent to particule size.

  3. Assessment in vitro of the genotoxicity, antigenotoxicity and antioxidant of Ceratonia siliqua L. extracts in murine leukaemia cells L1210 by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Aïcha; Bouhlel, Ines; Mustapha, Nadia; Mokdad-Bzeouich, Imen; Chaabane, Fadwa; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-06-01

    Genotoxicity of Ceratonia siliqua extracts, was investigated by assessing their capacity to induce nucleus DNA degradation of murine leukaemia cells L1210, using the "Comet assay". The ability of total oligomer flavonoids (TOF) and aqueous extracts to protect cell DNA against oxidative stress induced by H2O2, was performed by pre- co or post-treatment of cells with the before mentioned extracts for different periods preceding exposure to H2O2 stress. No significant genotoxic effect was detected at different exposure times, except at the lowest concentration of TOF extract (16.25 μg/ml). It appears that extracts decreased DNA damage, induced by H2O2. Both of TOF and aqueous extracts exhibited cellular antioxidant capacity, with EC50 values of respectively <16.25 and < 35 μg/ml, as well as, a protective capacity against lipidperoxidation inducing using L1210 cells line as a cellular model. MDA inhibition percentages reached 88.43% and 90.52% with respectively 35.5 μg/ml of TOF extract and 70 μg/ml of aqueous extract. Antioxidant properties of carob leaf extracts revealed by our study make a good antioxidant protection and thus a good candidate as food addition component. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative study of genotoxicity and antimutagenicity of methanolic extracts from Teucrium chamaedrys and Teucrium montanum in human lymphocytes using micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević-Djordjević, Olivera; Stošić, Ivana; Stanković, Milan; Grujičić, Darko

    2013-10-01

    Since Teucrium chamaedrys and Teucrium montanum are the most popular plants used in the treatment of many diseases, we evaluated genotoxic potential of their methanolic extracts on cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) using cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) assay. Cultures were treated with four concentrations of both plants (125, 250, 500 and 1,000 μg/ml), both separately and in combination with mitomycin C (MMC). The results revealed that extract of T. chamaedrys administered at the tested concentrations did not significantly affect the mean MN frequency in comparison to untreated cells. Methanolic extract of T. montanum increased the mean MN frequency in PBL at the tested concentrations, but significantly only at the concentration of 1,000 μg/ml. In all tested concentrations, the extract of T. chamaedrys significantly reduced the MMC-induced MN frequency, in a dose dependent manner (r = - 0.687, p chamaedrys in the concentrations of 500 and 1,000 μg/ml significantly decreased NDI values in comparison to MMC-treated cells alone, while the extract of T. montanum significantly decreased NDI at all tested concentrations. Both extracts nonsignificantly decreased NDI at all tested concentrations in comparison to untreated cells. Our results suggest the important function of T. chamaedrys extract in cancer therapy, this methanolic extract may prevent genotoxic effects of chemotherapy in PBLs.

  5. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of resin monomers in human salivary gland tissue and lymphocytes as assessed by the single cell microgel electrophoresis (Comet) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, Norbert H; Schmid, Katharina; Sassen, Andrea W; Harréus, Ulrich A; Staudenmaier, Rainer; Folwaczny, Matthias; Glas, Jürgen; Reichl, Franz-Xaver

    2006-03-01

    Malignant tumors of the three major pairs and the numerous minor salivary glands in humans are rare, and little is known about their various etiologies. Considering the fact that resin monomers from dental restorative materials are released into the saliva and diffuse into the tooth pulp or gingiva, mucosa, and salivary glands, this may potentially contribute to tumorigenesis. Resin monomers may also be reabsorbed and reach the circulating blood as well. Whereas the cytotoxic potential of some components has been clearly documented, data on genotoxicity in human target cells require further investigation. In the present study, genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of three common methacrylates are investigated in human samples of salivary glands and peripheral lymphocytes. The Comet assay was used to quantify DNA single strand breaks, alkali labile and incomplete excision repair sites in salivary gland probes and lymphocytes of 10 volunteers. The xenobiotics investigated were triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as controls. DNA migration was analyzed using the tail moment according to Olive (OTM). Cytotoxicity was monitored using trypan blue staining. With TEGDMA concentrations at 10(-5)m (10(-3)m), UDMA at 10(-7)m (10(-7)m), and HEMA at 10(-3)m (10(-5)m) significant enhancements of DNA migration were achieved in tissue cells (lymphocytes) as compared to the negative controls. At higher concentrations of up to 2.5x10(-2)m, induced DNA migration was expressed by OTM at 10.7 for TEGDMA in tissue cells (8.7 in lymphocytes), 10.5 for UDMA (6.4), and 9.7 for HEMA (6.1). The viability of the cell systems was not affected as concerns the threshold level for the assay of 75% viable cells except for the highest concentration tested for TEGDMA and UDMA in tissue cells. At higher concentration levels, all tested substances

  6. DNA from buccal swabs suitable for high-throughput SNP multiplex analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Gai L; Gibson, Catherine S; O'Callaghan, Michael E; Goldwater, Paul N; Dekker, Gustaaf A; Haan, Eric A; MacLennan, Alastair H

    2009-12-01

    We sought a convenient and reliable method for collection of genetic material that is inexpensive and noninvasive and suitable for self-collection and mailing and a compatible, commercial DNA extraction protocol to meet quantitative and qualitative requirements for high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) multiplex analysis on an automated platform. Buccal swabs were collected from 34 individuals as part of a pilot study to test commercially available buccal swabs and DNA extraction kits. DNA was quantified on a spectrofluorometer with Picogreen dsDNA prior to testing the DNA integrity with predesigned SNP multiplex assays. Based on the pilot study results, the Catch-All swabs and Isohelix buccal DNA isolation kit were selected for our high-throughput application and extended to a further 1140 samples as part of a large cohort study. The average DNA yield in the pilot study (n=34) was 1.94 microg +/- 0.54 with a 94% genotyping pass rate. For the high-throughput application (n=1140), the average DNA yield was 2.44 microg +/- 1.74 with a >or=93% genotyping pass rate. The Catch-All buccal swabs are a convenient and cost-effective alternative to blood sampling. Combined with the Isohelix buccal DNA isolation kit, they provided DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for high-throughput SNP multiplex analysis.

  7. High throughput system for magnetic manipulation of cells, polymers, and biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spero, Richard Chasen; Vicci, Leandra; Cribb, Jeremy; Bober, David; Swaminathan, Vinay; O’Brien, E. Timothy; Rogers, Stephen L.; Superfine, R.

    2008-01-01

    In the past decade, high throughput screening (HTS) has changed the way biochemical assays are performed, but manipulation and mechanical measurement of micro- and nanoscale systems have not benefited from this trend. Techniques using microbeads (particles ∼0.1–10 μm) show promise for enabling high throughput mechanical measurements of microscopic systems. We demonstrate instrumentation to magnetically drive microbeads in a biocompatible, multiwell magnetic force system. It is based on commercial HTS standards and is scalable to 96 wells. Cells can be cultured in this magnetic high throughput system (MHTS). The MHTS can apply independently controlled forces to 16 specimen wells. Force calibrations demonstrate forces in excess of 1 nN, predicted force saturation as a function of pole material, and powerlaw dependence of F∼r−2.7±0.1. We employ this system to measure the stiffness of SR2+ Drosophila cells. MHTS technology is a key step toward a high throughput screening system for micro- and nanoscale biophysical experiments. PMID:19044357

  8. High Throughput Architecture for High Performance NoC

    OpenAIRE

    Ghany, Mohamed A. Abd El; El-Moursy, Magdy A.; Ismail, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, the high throughput NoC architecture is proposed to increase the throughput of the switch in NoC. The proposed architecture can also improve the latency of the network. The proposed high throughput interconnect architecture is applied on different NoC architectures. The architecture increases the throughput of the network by more than 38% while preserving the average latency. The area of high throughput NoC switch is decreased by 18% as compared to the area of BFT switch. The...

  9. A high-throughput Arabidopsis reverse genetics system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Allen; Burke, Ellen; Presting, Gernot; Aux, George; McElver, John; Patton, David; Dietrich, Bob; Ho, Patrick; Bacwaden, Johana; Ko, Cynthia; Clarke, Joseph D; Cotton, David; Bullis, David; Snell, Jennifer; Miguel, Trini; Hutchison, Don; Kimmerly, Bill; Mitzel, Theresa; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Glazebrook, Jane; Law, Marc; Goff, Stephen A

    2002-12-01

    A collection of Arabidopsis lines with T-DNA insertions in known sites was generated to increase the efficiency of functional genomics. A high-throughput modified thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL)-PCR protocol was developed and used to amplify DNA fragments flanking the T-DNA left borders from approximately 100000 transformed lines. A total of 85108 TAIL-PCR products from 52964 T-DNA lines were sequenced and compared with the Arabidopsis genome to determine the positions of T-DNAs in each line. Predicted T-DNA insertion sites, when mapped, showed a bias against predicted coding sequences. Predicted insertion mutations in genes of interest can be identified using Arabidopsis Gene Index name searches or by BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) search. Insertions can be confirmed by simple PCR assays on individual lines. Predicted insertions were confirmed in 257 of 340 lines tested (76%). This resource has been named SAIL (Syngenta Arabidopsis Insertion Library) and is available to the scientific community at www.tmri.org.

  10. Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Using a Coincidence Reporter Biocircuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Brittany W; MacArthur, Ryan; Inglese, James

    2017-04-10

    Reporter-biased artifacts-i.e., compounds that interact directly with the reporter enzyme used in a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay and not the biological process or pharmacology being interrogated-are now widely recognized to reduce the efficiency and quality of HTS used for chemical probe and therapeutic development. Furthermore, narrow or single-concentration HTS perpetuates false negatives during primary screening campaigns. Titration-based HTS, or quantitative HTS (qHTS), and coincidence reporter technology can be employed to reduce false negatives and false positives, respectively, thereby increasing the quality and efficiency of primary screening efforts, where the number of compounds investigated can range from tens of thousands to millions. The three protocols described here allow for generation of a coincidence reporter (CR) biocircuit to interrogate a biological or pharmacological question of interest, generation of a stable cell line expressing the CR biocircuit, and qHTS using the CR biocircuit to efficiently identify high-quality biologically active small molecules. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. High-throughput membrane surface modification to control NOM fouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingyan; Liu, Hongwei; Kilduff, James E; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Belfort, Georges

    2009-05-15

    A novel method for synthesis and screening of fouling-resistant membrane surfaces was developed by combining a high-throughput platform (HTP) approach together with photoinduced graft polymerization (PGP)forfacile modification of commercial poly(aryl sulfone) membranes. This method is an inexpensive, fast, simple, reproducible, and scalable approach to identify fouling-resistant surfaces appropriate for a specific feed. In this research, natural organic matter (NOM)-resistant surfaces were synthesized and indentified from a library of 66 monomers. Surfaces were prepared via graft polymerization onto poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membranes and were evaluated using an assay involving NOM adsorption, followed by pressure-driven-filtration. In this work new and previously tested low-fouling surfaces for NOM are identified, and their ability to mitigate NOM and protein (bovine serum albumin)fouling is compared. The best-performing monomers were the zwitterion [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl)ammonium hydroxide, and diacetone acrylamide, a neutral monomer containing an amide group. Other excellent surfaces were synthesized from amides, amines, basic monomers, and long-chain poly(ethylene) glycols. Bench-scale studies conducted for selected monomers verified the scalability of HTP-PGP results. The results and the synthesis and screening method presented here offer new opportunities for choosing new membrane chemistries that minimize NOM fouling.

  12. High throughput screening for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alonso-Padilla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti-T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti-T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here.

  13. Validation of high throughput sequencing and microbial forensics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budowle, Bruce; Connell, Nancy D; Bielecka-Oder, Anna; Colwell, Rita R; Corbett, Cindi R; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Forsman, Mats; Kadavy, Dana R; Markotic, Alemka; Morse, Stephen A; Murch, Randall S; Sajantila, Antti; Schmedes, Sarah E; Ternus, Krista L; Turner, Stephen D; Minot, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing (HTS) generates large amounts of high quality sequence data for microbial genomics. The value of HTS for microbial forensics is the speed at which evidence can be collected and the power to characterize microbial-related evidence to solve biocrimes and bioterrorist events. As HTS technologies continue to improve, they provide increasingly powerful sets of tools to support the entire field of microbial forensics. Accurate, credible results allow analysis and interpretation, significantly influencing the course and/or focus of an investigation, and can impact the response of the government to an attack having individual, political, economic or military consequences. Interpretation of the results of microbial forensic analyses relies on understanding the performance and limitations of HTS methods, including analytical processes, assays and data interpretation. The utility of HTS must be defined carefully within established operating conditions and tolerances. Validation is essential in the development and implementation of microbial forensics methods used for formulating investigative leads attribution. HTS strategies vary, requiring guiding principles for HTS system validation. Three initial aspects of HTS, irrespective of chemistry, instrumentation or software are: 1) sample preparation, 2) sequencing, and 3) data analysis. Criteria that should be considered for HTS validation for microbial forensics are presented here. Validation should be defined in terms of specific application and the criteria described here comprise a foundation for investigators to establish, validate and implement HTS as a tool in microbial forensics, enhancing public safety and national security.

  14. Genotoxicity of phthalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkekoglu, Pınar; Kocer-Gumusel, Belma

    2014-12-01

    Many of the environmental, occupational and industrial chemicals are able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. ROS may lead to genotoxicity, which is suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of many human diseases, including inflammatory diseases and cancer. Phthalates are ubiquitous environmental chemicals and are well-known peroxisome proliferators (PPs) and endocrine disruptors. Several in vivo and in vitro studies have been conducted concerning the carcinogenic and mutagenic effects of phthalates. Di(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) and several other phthalates are shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodents. The underlying factor in the hepatocarcinogenesis is suggested to be their ability to generate ROS and cause genotoxicity. Several methods, including chromosomal aberration test, Ames test, micronucleus assay and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutation test and Comet assay, have been used to determine genotoxic properties of phthalates. Comet assay has been an important tool in the measurement of the genotoxic potential of many chemicals, including phthalates. In this review, we will mainly focus on the studies, which were conducted on the DNA damage caused by different phthalate esters and protection studies against the genotoxicity of these chemicals.

  15. In Vitro High Throughput Screening, What Next? Lessons from the Screening for Aurora Kinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-My-Nhung Hoang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on in vitro assays, we performed a High Throughput Screening (HTS to identify kinase inhibitors among 10,000 small chemical compounds. In this didactic paper, we describe step-by-step the approach to validate the hits as well as the major pitfalls encountered in the development of active molecules. We propose a decision tree that could be adapted to most in vitro HTS.

  16. In vitro high throughput screening, what next? Lessons from the screening for aurora kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thi-My-Nhung; Vu, Hong-Lien; Le, Ly-Thuy-Tram; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Molla, Annie

    2014-02-27

    Based on in vitro assays, we performed a High Throughput Screening (HTS) to identify kinase inhibitors among 10,000 small chemical compounds. In this didactic paper, we describe step-by-step the approach to validate the hits as well as the major pitfalls encountered in the development of active molecules. We propose a decision tree that could be adapted to most in vitro HTS.

  17. Peranan Biologi Molekuler Dan Hts (High Throughput Screening) Dalam Pengembangan Obat Sintetik Baru

    OpenAIRE

    Nurrochmad, Arief

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the discovery of new drugs uses the new concept by modern techniques instead ofthe convenstional techniques. In the development of scientific knowledge, the role of molecularbiology and the modern techniques in the investigations and discovery new drug becomes theimportant things. Many methods and modern techniques use in the discovery of new drugs, i.e,genetic enginering, DNA recombinant, radioligand binding assay technique, HTS techniques (HighThroughput Screening), and mass ligan...

  18. Mixture Genotoxicity of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, Acrylamide, and Maleic Hydrazide on Human Caco-2 Cells Assessed with Comet Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Cedergreen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of genotoxic properties of chemicals is mainly conducted only for single chemicals, without taking mixture genotoxic effects into consideration. The current study assessed mixture effects of the three known genotoxic chemicals, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), acrylamide (AA...

  19. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek is developing a high throughput nominal 100-W Hall Effect Thruster. This device is well sized for spacecraft ranging in size from several tens of kilograms to...

  20. AOPs & Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening and Regulatory Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    As high throughput screening (HTS) approaches play a larger role in toxicity testing, computational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models for this purpose are becoming increasingly more sophisticated...

  1. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to develop a high throughput, nominal 100 W Hall Effect Thruster (HET). This HET will be sized for small spacecraft (< 180 kg), including...

  2. High-Throughput Analysis and Automation for Glycomics Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shubhakar, A.; Reiding, K.R.; Gardner, R.A.; Spencer, D.I.R.; Fernandes, D.L.; Wuhrer, M.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers advances in analytical technologies for high-throughput (HTP) glycomics. Our focus is on structural studies of glycoprotein glycosylation to support biopharmaceutical realization and the discovery of glycan biomarkers for human disease. For biopharmaceuticals, there is increasing

  3. Materiomics - High-Throughput Screening of Biomaterial Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    This complete, yet concise, guide introduces you to the rapidly developing field of high throughput screening of biomaterials: materiomics. Bringing together the key concepts and methodologies used to determine biomaterial properties, you will understand the adaptation and application of materomics

  4. MIPHENO: Data normalization for high throughput metabolic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    High throughput methodologies such as microarrays, mass spectrometry and plate-based small molecule screens are increasingly used to facilitate discoveries from gene function to drug candidate identification. These large-scale experiments are typically carried out over the course...

  5. Data from Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — High-throughput screening for potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge...

  6. Genotoxicity and antioxidant activity of five Agrimonia and Filipendula species plant extracts evaluated by comet and micronucleus assays in human lymphocytes and Ames Salmonella/microsome test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukalskienė, Milda; Slapšytė, Gražina; Dedonytė, Veronika; Lazutka, Juozas Rimantas; Mierauskienė, Jūratė; Venskutonis, Petras Rimantas

    2017-12-18

    The species of Agrimonia and Filipendula have been traditionally used in folk medicine as anti-inflammatory herbs. This study extends the knowledge on bioactivities of F. palmata, A. eupatoria, A. procera, F. ulmaria and F. vulgaris by comprehensive characterization of their methanolic extracts. Antioxidant properties of extracts were evaluated by DPPH• (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl), ABTS•+ 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) scavenging and oxygen radical absorbance capacities (ORAC). Genotoxicity of extracts was tested using alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assays in human lymphocytes in vitro and the Ames Salmonella/microsome test. All investigated Agrimonia and Filipendula extracts possessed strong antioxidant activity, which was comparable with that of a standard antioxidant trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid). Thirty five compounds belonging to the classes of phenolic acids, flavonoids, phenylpropanoids and ellagitanins were detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). Agrimonia and Filipendula extracts induced an increase in a DNA damage in the comet assay expressed as mean percentage of DNA in the comet tail. However, these extracts did not produce reverse mutation in bacterial cells in the Ames test and were not genotoxic in the micronucleus test. However, a slight though significant decrease of nuclear division index values was determined. In general, this study proved that Agrimonia and Filipendula species are a good source of bioactive compounds; their extracts may be classified as non-mutagenic and non-clastogenic in vitro under conditions of the current study. Consequently, the plants may be a promising material for nutraceuticals and natural medicines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Compound Cytotoxicity Profiling Using Quantitative High-Throughput Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Witt, Kristine L.; Southall, Noel; Fostel, Jennifer; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Jadhav, Ajit; Smith, Cynthia S.; Inglese, James; Portier, Christopher J.; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    Background The propensity of compounds to produce adverse health effects in humans is generally evaluated using animal-based test methods. Such methods can be relatively expensive, low-throughput, and associated with pain suffered by the treated animals. In addition, differences in species biology may confound extrapolation to human health effects. Objective The National Toxicology Program and the National Institutes of Health Chemical Genomics Center are collaborating to identify a battery of cell-based screens to prioritize compounds for further toxicologic evaluation. Methods A collection of 1,408 compounds previously tested in one or more traditional toxicologic assays were profiled for cytotoxicity using quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) in 13 human and rodent cell types derived from six common targets of xenobiotic toxicity (liver, blood, kidney, nerve, lung, skin). Selected cytotoxicants were further tested to define response kinetics. Results qHTS of these compounds produced robust and reproducible results, which allowed cross-compound, cross-cell type, and cross-species comparisons. Some compounds were cytotoxic to all cell types at similar concentrations, whereas others exhibited species- or cell type–specific cytotoxicity. Closely related cell types and analogous cell types in human and rodent frequently showed different patterns of cytotoxicity. Some compounds inducing similar levels of cytotoxicity showed distinct time dependence in kinetic studies, consistent with known mechanisms of toxicity. Conclusions The generation of high-quality cytotoxicity data on this large library of known compounds using qHTS demonstrates the potential of this methodology to profile a much broader array of assays and compounds, which, in aggregate, may be valuable for prioritizing compounds for further toxicologic evaluation, identifying compounds with particular mechanisms of action, and potentially predicting in vivo biological response. PMID:18335092

  8. Applications of High Throughput Sequencing for Immunology and Clinical Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyunsung John

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing methods have fundamentally shifted the manner in which biological experiments are performed. In this dissertation, conventional and novel high throughput sequencing and bioinformatics methods are applied to immunology and diagnostics. In order to study rare subsets of cells, an RNA sequencing method was first optimized for use with minimal levels of RNA and cellular input. The optimized RNA sequencing method was then applied to study the transcriptional differences ...

  9. First genotoxicity study of Paraná river water from Argentina using cells from the clam Corbicula fluminea (Veneroida Corbiculidae and Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus Rodentia, Cricetidae K1 cells in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline D. Caffetti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High concentrations of xenobiotics from urban and industrial wastes have contributed to the contamination of many aquatic environments. We used the comet assay to evaluate the genotoxic potential of water collected from the River Paraná, which receives a great deal of waste, at three points (Puerto Piray, Eldorado and Montecarlo in the Misiones Province of Argentina. The in vivo comet assay used 40 freshwater clams (Corbicula fluminea while the in vitro comet assay used Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus K1 cell (CHO-K1 cultures with the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS as the positive control and phosphate buffered saline (PBS as the negative control. Both assays showed statistically significant differences between the three sampling sites in relation to the negative control, the results of this preliminary study indicating that at these three sites water from the Paraná River presents genotoxic potential.

  10. Acanthamoeba castellanii: A new high-throughput method for drug screening in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Rivas, Antonio; Padrón, José M; Valladares, Basilio; Elsheikha, Hany M

    2016-12-01

    Despite significant public health impact, there is no specific antiprotozoal therapy for prevention and treatment of Acanthamoeba castellanii infection. There is a need for new and efficient anti-Acanthamoeba drugs that are less toxic and can reduce treatment duration and frequency of administration. In this context a new, rapid and sensitive assay is required for high-throughput activity testing and screening of new therapeutic compounds. A colorimetric assay based on sulforhodamine B (SRB) staining has been developed for anti-Acanthamoeba drug susceptibility testing and adapted to a 96-well microtiter plate format. Under these conditions chlorhexidine was tested to validate the assay using two clinical strains of A. castellanii (Neff strain, T4 genotype [IC50 4.68±0.6μM] and T3 genotype [IC50 5.69±0.9μM]). These results were in good agreement with those obtained by the conventional Alamar Blue assay, OCR cytotoxicity assay and manual cell counting method. Our new assay offers an inexpensive and reliable method, which complements current assays by enhancing high-throughput anti-Acanthamoeba drug screening capabilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of genotoxic potency of sulfate-rich surface waters on medicinal leech and human leukocytes using different versions of the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaljević, Zlatko; Ternjej, Ivančica; Stanković, Igor; Ivković, Marija; Zelježić, Davor; Mladinić, Marin; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how exposure to sulfate-rich surface waters affects the level of primary DNA damage in hemocytes of leech Hirudo medicinalis. Samples of surface water were collected at two sites near a gypsum factory (Knin, Croatia) and two reference sites. In the laboratory, samples were subjected to detailed chemical analysis and used in toxicity testing. For that purpose, previously acclimatized individuals of H. medicinalis were sub-chronically exposed (for 28 days) to tested water samples. Levels of primary DNA damage were evaluated using the alkaline Comet assay in hemocytes collected on days 7, 14, 21 and 28 of exposure and compared with their baseline values. Genotoxic potency of the water sample with the highest sulfate concentration was further evaluated using the alkaline, neutral and hOGG1-modified Comet assay on human peripheral blood leukocytes exposed ex vivo for 30 min. The purpose was to explore which mechanisms are responsible for DNA damage. Chemical analysis revealed that sulfate concentrations in two water samples collected in Mali Kukar Lake (1630 mg/L SO₄) and Kosovčica River (823.3 mg/L SO₄) exceeded the WHO and US EPA defined limits for sulfate in drinking water. Increased levels of metals were found only in the water sample collected in Mali Kukar Lake. However, of the 65 elements analyzed, only nickel and titanium exceed the value legally accepted in Croatia for drinking water. The levels of DNA damage, estimated by the alkaline Comet assay in hemocytes of medicinal leech, increased with the duration of exposure to two sulfate-rich water samples. Since hemocytes responded sensitively to treatment, they could be used for biomonitoring purposes. As observed on treated human peripheral blood leukocytes, all versions of the Comet assay were effective in detecting DNA damage, which was measured in samples with sulfate concentrations equal to or higher than the legally accepted levels for drinking water

  12. High-throughput gene expression profiling of memory differentiation in primary human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Kate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation of naive T and B cells into memory lymphocytes is essential for immunity to pathogens. Therapeutic manipulation of this cellular differentiation program could improve vaccine efficacy and the in vitro expansion of memory cells. However, chemical screens to identify compounds that induce memory differentiation have been limited by 1 the lack of reporter-gene or functional assays that can distinguish naive and memory-phenotype T cells at high throughput and 2 a suitable cell-line representative of naive T cells. Results Here, we describe a method for gene-expression based screening that allows primary naive and memory-phenotype lymphocytes to be discriminated based on complex genes signatures corresponding to these differentiation states. We used ligation-mediated amplification and a fluorescent, bead-based detection system to quantify simultaneously 55 transcripts representing naive and memory-phenotype signatures in purified populations of human T cells. The use of a multi-gene panel allowed better resolution than any constituent single gene. The method was precise, correlated well with Affymetrix microarray data, and could be easily scaled up for high-throughput. Conclusion This method provides a generic solution for high-throughput differentiation screens in primary human T cells where no single-gene or functional assay is available. This screening platform will allow the identification of small molecules, genes or soluble factors that direct memory differentiation in naive human lymphocytes.

  13. High-Throughput Cloning and Expression Library Creation for Functional Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, Fernanda; Steel, Jason; Bian, Xiaofang; Labaer, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    The study of protein function usually requires the use of a cloned version of the gene for protein expression and functional assays. This strategy is particular important when the information available regarding function is limited. The functional characterization of the thousands of newly identified proteins revealed by genomics requires faster methods than traditional single gene experiments, creating the need for fast, flexible and reliable cloning systems. These collections of open reading frame (ORF) clones can be coupled with high-throughput proteomics platforms, such as protein microarrays and cell-based assays, to answer biological questions. In this tutorial we provide the background for DNA cloning, discuss the major high-throughput cloning systems (Gateway® Technology, Flexi® Vector Systems, and Creator™ DNA Cloning System) and compare them side-by-side. We also report an example of high-throughput cloning study and its application in functional proteomics. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP12). Details can be found at http://www.proteomicstutorials.org. PMID:23457047

  14. Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzes, Eric; Medkova, Martina; Savenelli, Neal; Marran, Dave; Twardowski, Mariusz; Hutchison, J Brian; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Link, Darren R; Perrimon, Norbert; Samuels, Michael L

    2009-08-25

    We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high-throughput screening of single mammalian cells. This integrated platform allows for the encapsulation of single cells and reagents in independent aqueous microdroplets (1 pL to 10 nL volumes) dispersed in an immiscible carrier oil and enables the digital manipulation of these reactors at a very high-throughput. Here, we validate a full droplet screening workflow by conducting a droplet-based cytotoxicity screen. To perform this screen, we first developed a droplet viability assay that permits the quantitative scoring of cell viability and growth within intact droplets. Next, we demonstrated the high viability of encapsulated human monocytic U937 cells over a period of 4 days. Finally, we developed an optically-coded droplet library enabling the identification of the droplets composition during the assay read-out. Using the integrated droplet technology, we screened a drug library for its cytotoxic effect against U937 cells. Taken together our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range of potential applications including high-throughput single-cell analyses, combinatorial screening, and facilitating small sample analyses.

  15. High-throughput detection, genotyping and quantification of the human papillomavirus using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micalessi, Isabel M; Boulet, Gaëlle A V; Bogers, Johannes J; Benoy, Ina H; Depuydt, Christophe E

    2011-12-20

    The establishment of the causal relationship between high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and cervical cancer and its precursors has resulted in the development of HPV DNA detection systems. Currently, real-time PCR assays for the detection of HPV, such as the RealTime High Risk (HR) HPV assay (Abbott) and the cobas® 4800 HPV Test (Roche Molecular Diagnostics) are commercially available. However, none of them enables the detection and typing of all HR-HPV types in a clinical high-throughput setting. This paper describes the laboratory workflow and the validation of a type-specific real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for high-throughput HPV detection, genotyping and quantification. This assay is routinely applied in a liquid-based cytology screening setting (700 samples in 24 h) and was used in many epidemiological and clinical studies. The TaqMan-based qPCR assay enables the detection of 17 HPV genotypes and β-globin in seven multiplex reactions. These HPV types include all 12 high-risk types (HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59), three probably high-risk types (HPV53, 66 and 68), one low-risk type (HPV6) and one undetermined risk type (HPV67). An analytical sensitivity of ≤100 copies was obtained for all the HPV types. The analytical specificity of each primer pair was 100% and an intra- and inter-run variability of real-time PCR approach enables detection of 17 HPV types, identification of the HPV type and determination of the viral load in a single sensitive assay suitable for high-throughput screening.

  16. The complete automation of cell culture: improvements for high-throughput and high-content screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shushant; Sondervan, David; Rizzu, Patrizia; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Caminada, Daniel; Heutink, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Genomic approaches provide enormous amounts of raw data with regard to genetic variation, the diversity of RNA species, and protein complement. High-throughput (HT) and high-content (HC) cellular screens are ideally suited to contextualize the information gathered from other "omic" approaches into networks and can be used for the identification of therapeutic targets. Current methods used for HT-HC screens are laborious, time-consuming, and prone to human error. The authors thus developed an automated high-throughput system with an integrated fluorescent imager for HC screens called the AI.CELLHOST. The implementation of user-defined culturing and assay plate setup parameters allows parallel operation of multiple screens in diverse mammalian cell types. The authors demonstrate that such a system is able to successfully maintain different cell lines in culture for extended periods of time as well as significantly increasing throughput, accuracy, and reproducibility of HT and HC screens.

  17. In vitro genotoxicity of neutral red after photo-activation and metabolic activation in the Ames test, the micronucleus test and the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérard, Melanie; Zeller, Andreas; Singer, Thomas; Gocke, Elmar

    2012-07-04

    Neutral red (Nr) is relatively non-toxic and is widely used as indicator dye in many biological test systems. It absorbs visible light and is known to act as a photosensitizer, involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (type-I reaction) and singlet oxygen (type-II reaction). The mutagenicity of Nr was determined in the Ames test (with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1535, TA97, TA98, TA98NR, TA100, and TA102) with and without metabolic activation, and with and without photo-activation on agar plates. Similarly to the situation following metabolic activation, photo-mutagenicity of Nr was seen with all Salmonella strains tested, albeit with different effects between these strains. To our knowledge, Nr is the only photo-mutagen showing such a broad action. Since the effects are also observed in strains not known to be responsive to ROS, this indicates that ROS production is not the sole mode of action that leads to photo-genotoxicity. The reactive species produced by irradiation are short-lived as pre-irradiation of an Nr solution did not produce mutagenic effects when added to the bacteria. In addition, mutagenicity in TA98 following irradiation was stronger than in the nitroreductase-deficient strain TA98NR, indicating that nitro derivatives that are transformed by bacterial nitroreductase to hydroxylamines appear to play a role in the photo-mutagenicity of Nr. Photo-genotoxicity of Nr was further investigated in the comet assay and micronucleus test in L5178Y cells. Concentration-dependent increases in primary DNA damage and in the frequency of micronuclei were observed after irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genotoxicity of chemical compounds identification and assessment by yeast cells transformed with GFP reporter constructs regulated by the PLM2 or DIN7 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Van Ngoc; Nguyen, Thi Thu Huyen; Bettarel, Yvan; Nguyen, Thi Hoai Thu; Pham, Thuy Linh; Hoang, Thi Yen; Nguyen, Vu Thanh Thanh; Nghiem, Ngoc Minh; Wölfl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells transformed with high-copy number plasmids comprising a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-encoding gene optimized for yeast under the control of the new DIN7 or PLM2 and the established RNR2 and RAD54 promoters were used to assess the genotoxic potential of chemical compounds. The activity of potential DNA-damaging agents was investigated by genotoxicity assays and by OxoPlate assay in the presence of various test compounds. The fluorescence signal generated by GFP in response to DNA damage was related to the different concentrations of analytes and the analyte-dependent GFP synthesis. The use of distinct DNA damage-inducible promoters presents alternative genotoxicity testing strategies by selective induction of promoters in response to DNA damage. The new DIN7 and PLM2 systems show higher sensitivity than the RNR2 and RAD54 systems in detecting 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and actinomycin D. Both DIN7 and PLM2 systems are able to detect camptothecin while RNR2 and RAD54 systems are not. Automated laboratory systems with assay performance on 384-well microplates provide for cost-effective high-throughput screening of DNA-damaging agents, reducing compound consumption to about 53% as compared with existing eukaryotic genotoxicity bioassays. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Performance of high-throughput DNA quantification methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanock Stephen J

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy and precision of estimates of DNA concentration are critical factors for efficient use of DNA samples in high-throughput genotype and sequence analyses. We evaluated the performance of spectrophotometric (OD DNA quantification, and compared it to two fluorometric quantification methods, the PicoGreen® assay (PG, and a novel real-time quantitative genomic PCR assay (QG specific to a region at the human BRCA1 locus. Twenty-Two lymphoblastoid cell line DNA samples with an initial concentration of ~350 ng/uL were diluted to 20 ng/uL. DNA concentration was estimated by OD and further diluted to 5 ng/uL. The concentrations of multiple aliquots of the final dilution were measured by the OD, QG and PG methods. The effects of manual and robotic laboratory sample handling procedures on the estimates of DNA concentration were assessed using variance components analyses. Results The OD method was the DNA quantification method most concordant with the reference sample among the three methods evaluated. A large fraction of the total variance for all three methods (36.0–95.7% was explained by sample-to-sample variation, whereas the amount of variance attributable to sample handling was small (0.8–17.5%. Residual error (3.2–59.4%, corresponding to un-modelled factors, contributed a greater extent to the total variation than the sample handling procedures. Conclusion The application of a specific DNA quantification method to a particular molecular genetic laboratory protocol must take into account the accuracy and precision of the specific method, as well as the requirements of the experimental workflow with respect to sample volumes and throughput. While OD was the most concordant and precise DNA quantification method in this study, the information provided by the quantitative PCR assay regarding the suitability of DNA samples for PCR may be an essential factor for some protocols, despite the decreased concordance and

  20. High-throughput flow cytometry data normalization for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finak, Greg; Jiang, Wenxin; Krouse, Kevin; Wei, Chungwen; Sanz, Ignacio; Phippard, Deborah; Asare, Adam; De Rosa, Stephen C; Self, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael

    2014-03-01

    Flow cytometry datasets from clinical trials generate very large datasets and are usually highly standardized, focusing on endpoints that are well defined apriori. Staining variability of individual makers is not uncommon and complicates manual gating, requiring the analyst to adapt gates for each sample, which is unwieldy for large datasets. It can lead to unreliable measurements, especially if a template-gating approach is used without further correction to the gates. In this article, a computational framework is presented for normalizing the fluorescence intensity of multiple markers in specific cell populations across samples that is suitable for high-throughput processing of large clinical trial datasets. Previous approaches to normalization have been global and applied to all cells or data with debris removed. They provided no mechanism to handle specific cell subsets. This approach integrates tightly with the gating process so that normalization is performed during gating and is local to the specific cell subsets exhibiting variability. This improves peak alignment and the performance of the algorithm. The performance of this algorithm is demonstrated on two clinical trial datasets from the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) and the Immune Tolerance Network (ITN). In the ITN data set we show that local normalization combined with template gating can account for sample-to-sample variability as effectively as manual gating. In the HVTN dataset, it is shown that local normalization mitigates false-positive vaccine response calls in an intracellular cytokine staining assay. In both datasets, local normalization performs better than global normalization. The normalization framework allows the use of template gates even in the presence of sample-to-sample staining variability, mitigates the subjectivity and bias of manual gating, and decreases the time necessary to analyze large datasets. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  1. Applications of Biophysics in High-Throughput Screening Hit Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genick, Christine Clougherty; Barlier, Danielle; Monna, Dominique; Brunner, Reto; Bé, Céline; Scheufler, Clemens; Ottl, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    For approximately a decade, biophysical methods have been used to validate positive hits selected from high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns with the goal to verify binding interactions using label-free assays. By applying label-free readouts, screen artifacts created by compound interference and fluorescence are discovered, enabling further characterization of the hits for their target specificity and selectivity. The use of several biophysical methods to extract this type of high-content information is required to prevent the promotion of false positives to the next level of hit validation and to select the best candidates for further chemical optimization. The typical technologies applied in this arena include dynamic light scattering, turbidometry, resonance waveguide, surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning fluorimetry, mass spectrometry, and others. Each technology can provide different types of information to enable the characterization of the binding interaction. Thus, these technologies can be incorporated in a hit-validation strategy not only according to the profile of chemical matter that is desired by the medicinal chemists, but also in a manner that is in agreement with the target protein's amenability to the screening format. Here, we present the results of screening strategies using biophysics with the objective to evaluate the approaches, discuss the advantages and challenges, and summarize the benefits in reference to lead discovery. In summary, the biophysics screens presented here demonstrated various hit rates from a list of ~2000 preselected, IC50-validated hits from HTS (an IC50 is the inhibitor concentration at which 50% inhibition of activity is observed). There are several lessons learned from these biophysical screens, which will be discussed in this article. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  2. Filtration improves the performance of a high-throughput screen for anti-mycobacterial compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Cheng

    Full Text Available The tendency for mycobacteria to aggregate poses a challenge for their use in microplate based assays. Good dispersions have been difficult to achieve in high-throughput screening (HTS assays used in the search for novel antibacterial drugs to treat tuberculosis and other related diseases. Here we describe a method using filtration to overcome the problem of variability resulting from aggregation of mycobacteria. This method consistently yielded higher reproducibility and lower variability than conventional methods, such as settling under gravity and vortexing.

  3. Genotoxicity of 5-aminolevulinic and 4,5-dioxovaleric acids in the salmonella/microsuspension mutagenicity assay and SOS chromotest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuki, Janice; Rech, Célia Maria; Medeiros, Marisa H G; de A Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a heme precursor that accumulates in some porphyric disorders and in lead poisoning which can undergo metal-catalyzed oxidation producing reactive oxygen species and the keto-aldehyde, 4,5-dioxovaleric acid (DOVA). Evidence in vitro of ALA-induced DNA lesions suggests that ALA and DOVA have mutagenic potential that could possibly contribute to an increased frequency of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). In this study, we evaluated the genotoxic potential of ALA and DOVA. In the absence of exogenous metabolic activation, ALA and DOVA were mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium tester strain TA104. ALA was also mutagenic in S. typhimurium TA102, but not in TA98, TA100, or TA1535, indicating an oxidative mechanism. Removal of H(2)O(2) with catalase gave only partial protection, suggesting generation of other mutagenic species. Both ALA and DOVA damaged the DNA of Escherichia coli PQ37, inducing the SOS response detected by an increase in beta-galactosidase activity. These results verified the potential mutagenic activity of ALA and DOVA and reinforce the hypothesis that DNA damage induced by ALA may be associated with the development of HCC in individuals suffering from AIP. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Detection of genotoxicity of water from an urbanized stream, in Corbicula fluminea (Mollusca) (in vivo) and CHO-K1 cells (in vitro) using comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigonato, Janaina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio; Jordão, Berenice Quinzani

    2010-07-01

    The comet assay was utilized to investigate the quality of water from seven locations along the Cambé Stream, in vivo (Corbicula fluminea hemolymph), in vitro (CHO-K1 cells), in situ, and in laboratory studies. The Cambé Stream basin (Londrina, PR, Brazil) is almost completely urbanized and receives different forms of industrial and domestic runoff. The data indicated the occurrence of DNA damage in cells examined in vivo and in vitro, shown by the significant increase in frequencies of cells with DNA damage after exposure to water from all seven locations used in the study. Our results strongly suggest the presence of genotoxic agent(s) in water at all of the sampled locations, demonstrated by elevated numbers of cells with DNA damaged in field and laboratory tests. In all of the places sampled, domestic sewage influence appeared to be one important cause for the introduction of xenobiotics, environmental genotoxins, and pollutants into the water. Thus, the comet assay applied in these cell systems was able to detect adverse environmental conditions, proving to be a very adequate short-term test and should be included in batteries of tests utilized in the monitoring of aquatic environments.

  5. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  6. Comparison of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization for Low and High Throughput HER2 Genetic Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tim S; Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Kofoed, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate and compare 5 different HER2 genetic assays with different characteristics that could affect the performance to analyze the human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) gene copy number under low and high throughput conditions. The study included 108 tissue samples from brea...

  7. A novel high throughput method to investigate polymer dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Mallapragada, Surya K; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2010-02-16

    The dissolution behavior of polystyrene (PS) in biodiesel was studied by developing a novel high throughput approach based on Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy. A multiwell device for high throughput dissolution testing was fabricated using a photolithographic rapid prototyping method. The dissolution of PS films in each well was tracked by following the characteristic IR band of PS and the effect of PS molecular weight and temperature on the dissolution rate was simultaneously investigated. The results were validated with conventional gravimetric methods. The high throughput method can be extended to evaluate the dissolution profiles of a large number of samples, or to simultaneously investigate the effect of variables such as polydispersity, crystallinity, and mixed solvents. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Reed beds receiving industrial sludge containing nitroaromatic compounds. Effects of outgoing water and bed material extracts in the umu-c genotoxicity assay, DR-CALUX assay and on early life stage development in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Lillemor; Hollert, Henner; Jonsson, Sofie; van Bavel, Bert; Engwall, Magnus

    2007-05-01

    Sweden has prohibited the deposition of organic waste since January, 2005. Since 1 million tons of sludge is produced every year in Sweden and the capacity for incineration does not fill the demands, other methods of sludge management have to be introduced to a larger degree. One common method in the USA and parts of Europe is the use of wetlands to treat wastewater and sewage sludge. The capacity of reed beds to affect the toxicity of a complex mixture of nitroaromatics in sludge, however, is not fully elucidated. In this study, an industrial sludge containing explosives and pharmaceutical residues was therefore treated in artificial reed beds and the change in toxicity was studied. Nitroaromatic compounds, which are the main ingredients of many pharmaceuticals and explosives, are well known to cause cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Recently performed studies have also showed that embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) are sensitive to nitroaromatic compounds. Therefore, we tested the sludge passing through constructed wetlands in order to detect any changes in levels of embryotoxicity, genotoxicity and dioxin-like activity (AhR-agonists). We also compared unplanted and planted systems in order to examine the impact of the root system on the fate of the toxicants. An industrial sludge containing a complex mixture of nitroaromatics was added daily to small-scale constructed wetlands (vertical flow), both unplanted and planted with Phragmites australis. Sludge with an average dry weight of 1.25%, was added with an average hydraulic loading rate of 1.2 L/day. Outgoing water was collected daily and stored at -20 degrees C. The artificial wetland sediment was Soxhlet extracted, followed by clean-up with multi-layer silica, or extracted by ultrasonic treatment, yielding one organic extract and one water extract of the same sample. Genotoxicity of the extracts was measured according to the ISO protocol for the umu-C genotoxicity assay (ISO/TC 147/SC 5/ WG9 N8), using

  9. High-throughput metal susceptibility testing of microbial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Raymond J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial biofilms exist all over the natural world, a distribution that is paralleled by metal cations and oxyanions. Despite this reality, very few studies have examined how biofilms withstand exposure to these toxic compounds. This article describes a batch culture technique for biofilm and planktonic cell metal susceptibility testing using the MBEC assay. This device is compatible with standard 96-well microtiter plate technology. As part of this method, a two part, metal specific neutralization protocol is summarized. This procedure minimizes residual biological toxicity arising from the carry-over of metals from challenge to recovery media. Neutralization consists of treating cultures with a chemical compound known to react with or to chelate the metal. Treated cultures are plated onto rich agar to allow metal complexes to diffuse into the recovery medium while bacteria remain on top to recover. Two difficulties associated with metal susceptibility testing were the focus of two applications of this technique. First, assays were calibrated to allow comparisons of the susceptibility of different organisms to metals. Second, the effects of exposure time and growth medium composition on the susceptibility of E. coli JM109 biofilms to metals were investigated. Results This high-throughput method generated 96-statistically equivalent biofilms in a single device and thus allowed for comparative and combinatorial experiments of media, microbial strains, exposure times and metals. By adjusting growth conditions, it was possible to examine biofilms of different microorganisms that had similar cell densities. In one example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was up to 80 times more resistant to heavy metalloid oxyanions than Escherichia coli TG1. Further, biofilms were up to 133 times more tolerant to tellurite (TeO32- than corresponding planktonic cultures. Regardless of the growth medium, the tolerance of biofilm and planktonic

  10. High-throughput metal susceptibility testing of microbial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joe J; Turner, Raymond J; Ceri, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Background Microbial biofilms exist all over the natural world, a distribution that is paralleled by metal cations and oxyanions. Despite this reality, very few studies have examined how biofilms withstand exposure to these toxic compounds. This article describes a batch culture technique for biofilm and planktonic cell metal susceptibility testing using the MBEC assay. This device is compatible with standard 96-well microtiter plate technology. As part of this method, a two part, metal specific neutralization protocol is summarized. This procedure minimizes residual biological toxicity arising from the carry-over of metals from challenge to recovery media. Neutralization consists of treating cultures with a chemical compound known to react with or to chelate the metal. Treated cultures are plated onto rich agar to allow metal complexes to diffuse into the recovery medium while bacteria remain on top to recover. Two difficulties associated with metal susceptibility testing were the focus of two applications of this technique. First, assays were calibrated to allow comparisons of the susceptibility of different organisms to metals. Second, the effects of exposure time and growth medium composition on the susceptibility of E. coli JM109 biofilms to metals were investigated. Results This high-throughput method generated 96-statistically equivalent biofilms in a single device and thus allowed for comparative and combinatorial experiments of media, microbial strains, exposure times and metals. By adjusting growth conditions, it was possible to examine biofilms of different microorganisms that had similar cell densities. In one example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was up to 80 times more resistant to heavy metalloid oxyanions than Escherichia coli TG1. Further, biofilms were up to 133 times more tolerant to tellurite (TeO32-) than corresponding planktonic cultures. Regardless of the growth medium, the tolerance of biofilm and planktonic cell E. coli JM109 to metals

  11. Screening and synthesis: high throughput technologies applied to parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R E; Westwood, N J

    2004-01-01

    High throughput technologies continue to develop in response to the challenges set by the genome projects. This article discusses how the techniques of both high throughput screening (HTS) and synthesis can influence research in parasitology. Examples of the use of targeted and phenotype-based HTS using unbiased compound collections are provided. The important issue of identifying the protein target(s) of bioactive compounds is discussed from the synthetic chemist's perspective. This article concludes by reviewing recent examples of successful target identification studies in parasitology.

  12. High throughput materials research and development for lithium ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of next generation batteries requires a breakthrough in materials. Traditional one-by-one method, which is suitable for synthesizing large number of sing-composition material, is time-consuming and costly. High throughput and combinatorial experimentation, is an effective method to synthesize and characterize huge amount of materials over a broader compositional region in a short time, which enables to greatly speed up the discovery and optimization of materials with lower cost. In this work, high throughput and combinatorial materials synthesis technologies for lithium ion battery research are discussed, and our efforts on developing such instrumentations are introduced.

  13. High-throughput optical coherence tomography at 800 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Keisuke; Fard, Ali; Malik, Omer; Fu, Gilbert; Quach, Alan; Jalali, Bahram

    2012-08-27

    We report high-throughput optical coherence tomography (OCT) that offers 1,000 times higher axial scan rate than conventional OCT in the 800 nm spectral range. This is made possible by employing photonic time-stretch for chirping a pulse train and transforming it into a passive swept source. We demonstrate a record high axial scan rate of 90.9 MHz. To show the utility of our method, we also demonstrate real-time observation of laser ablation dynamics. Our high-throughput OCT is expected to be useful for industrial applications where the speed of conventional OCT falls short.

  14. Use of the fluorescent micronucleus assay to detect the genotoxic effects of radiation and arsenic exposure in exfoliated human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L.E.; Warner, M.L.; Smith, A.H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The exfoliated cell micronucleus (MN) assay using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a centromeric probe is a rapid method for determining the mechanism of MN formation in epithelial tissues exposed to carcinogenic agents. Here, we describe the use of this assay to detect the presence or absence of centromeric DNA in MN induced in vivo by radiation therapy and chronic arsenic (As) ingestion. We examined the buccal cells of an individual receiving 6,500 rads of photon radiation to the head and neck. Exfoliated cells were collected before, during, and after treatment. After radiation exposure a 16.6-fold increase in buccal cell MN frequency was seen. All induced MN were centromere negative (MN-) resulting from chromosome breakage. This finding is consistent with the clastogenic action of radiation and confirmed the reliability of the method. Three weeks post-therapy, MN frequencies returned to baseline. The assay was used on 18 people chronically exposed to high levels of inorganic arsenic (In-As) in drinking water (average level, 1,312 {mu}g As/L) and 18 matched controls (average level, 16 {mu}g As/L). The combined increase in MN frequency was 1.8-fold (P = 0.001, Fisher`s exact test). Frequencies of micronuclei containing acentric fragments (MN-) and those containing whole chromosomes (MN+) both increased, suggesting that arsenic may have both clastogenic and weak aneuploidogenic properties in vivo. After stratification on sex, the effect was stronger in male than in female bladder cells. In males the MN-frequency increased 2.06-fold (P =0.07) while the frequency of MN+ increased 1.86-fold (P = 0.08). In addition, the frequencies of MN and MN+ were positively associated with urinary arsenic and its metabolites. The association was stronger for micronuclei containing acentric fragments. By using FISH with centromeric probes, the mechanism of chemically induced genotoxicity can not be determined in epithelial tissues. 35 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Carbohydrate chips for studying high-throughput carbohydrate-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungjin; Lee, Myung-ryul; Pyo, Soon-Jin; Shin, Injae

    2004-04-21

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions play important biological roles in living organisms. For the most part, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used for studying these biomolecular interactions. Less attention has been given to the development of high-throughput methods to elucidate recognition events between carbohydrates and proteins. In the current effort to develop a novel high-throughput tool for monitoring carbohydrate-protein interactions, we prepared carbohydrate microarrays by immobilizing maleimide-linked carbohydrates on thiol-derivatized glass slides and carried out lectin binding experiments by using these microarrays. The results showed that carbohydrates with different structural features selectively bound to the corresponding lectins with relative binding affinities that correlated with those obtained from solution-based assays. In addition, binding affinities of lectins to carbohydrates were also quantitatively analyzed by determining IC(50) values of soluble carbohydrates with the carbohydrate microarrays. To fabricate carbohydrate chips that contained more diverse carbohydrate probes, solution-phase parallel and enzymatic glycosylations were performed. Three model disaccharides were in parallel synthesized in solution-phase and used as carbohydrate probes for the fabrication of carbohydrate chips. Three enzymatic glycosylations on glass slides were consecutively performed to generate carbohydrate microarrays that contained the complex oligosaccharide, sialyl Le(x). Overall, these works demonstrated that carbohydrate chips could be efficiently prepared by covalent immobilization of maleimide-linked carbohydrates on the thiol-coated glass slides and applied for the high-throughput analyses of carbohydrate-protein interactions.

  16. A high throughput array microscope for the mechanical characterization of biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribb, Jeremy; Osborne, Lukas D.; Hsiao, Joe Ping-Lin; Vicci, Leandra; Meshram, Alok; O'Brien, E. Tim; Spero, Richard Chasen; Taylor, Russell; Superfine, Richard

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade, the emergence of high throughput screening has enabled the development of novel drug therapies and elucidated many complex cellular processes. Concurrently, the mechanobiology community has developed tools and methods to show that the dysregulation of biophysical properties and the biochemical mechanisms controlling those properties contribute significantly to many human diseases. Despite these advances, a complete understanding of the connection between biomechanics and disease will require advances in instrumentation that enable parallelized, high throughput assays capable of probing complex signaling pathways, studying biology in physiologically relevant conditions, and capturing specimen and mechanical heterogeneity. Traditional biophysical instruments are unable to meet this need. To address the challenge of large-scale, parallelized biophysical measurements, we have developed an automated array high-throughput microscope system that utilizes passive microbead diffusion to characterize mechanical properties of biomaterials. The instrument is capable of acquiring data on twelve-channels simultaneously, where each channel in the system can independently drive two-channel fluorescence imaging at up to 50 frames per second. We employ this system to measure the concentration-dependent apparent viscosity of hyaluronan, an essential polymer found in connective tissue and whose expression has been implicated in cancer progression.

  17. A high throughput biochemical fluorometric method for measuring lipid peroxidation in HDL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoros Kelesidis

    Full Text Available Current cell-based assays for determining the functional properties of high-density lipoproteins (HDL have limitations. We report here the development of a new, robust fluorometric cell-free biochemical assay that measures HDL lipid peroxidation (HDLox based on the oxidation of the fluorochrome Amplex Red. HDLox correlated with previously validated cell-based (r = 0.47, p<0.001 and cell-free assays (r = 0.46, p<0.001. HDLox distinguished dysfunctional HDL in established animal models of atherosclerosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV patients. Using an immunoaffinity method for capturing HDL, we demonstrate the utility of this novel assay for measuring HDLox in a high throughput format. Furthermore, HDLox correlated significantly with measures of cardiovascular diseases including carotid intima media thickness (r = 0.35, p<0.01 and subendocardial viability ratio (r = -0.21, p = 0.05 and physiological parameters such as metabolic and anthropometric parameters (p<0.05. In conclusion, we report the development of a new fluorometric method that offers a reproducible and rapid means for determining HDL function/quality that is suitable for high throughput implementation.

  18. High throughput defect detection with multiple parallel electron beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Himbergen, H.M.P. van; Nijkerk, M.D.; Jager, P.W.H. de; Hosman, T.C.; Kruit, P.

    2007-01-01

    A new concept for high throughput defect detection with multiple parallel electron beams is described. As many as 30 000 beams can be placed on a footprint of a in.2, each beam having its own microcolumn and detection system without cross-talk. Based on the International Technology Roadmap for

  19. High-throughput cloning and expression in recalcitrant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsma, Eric R.; Poolman, Bert

    We developed a generic method for high-throughput cloning in bacteria that are less amenable to conventional DNA manipulations. The method involves ligation-independent cloning in an intermediary Escherichia coli vector, which is rapidly converted via vector-backbone exchange (VBEx) into an

  20. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology - Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to chemical profiling to address sensitivity and specificity of molecular targets, biological pathways, cellular and developmental processes. EPA’s ToxCast project is testing 960 uniq...

  1. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to profile thousands of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. EPA’s ToxCast™ project, and the broader Tox21 consortium, in addition to projects worldwide,...

  2. High-throughput sequencing in mitochondrial DNA research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Samuels, David C; Clark, Travis; Guo, Yan

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing, also known as high-throughput sequencing, has greatly enhanced researchers' ability to conduct biomedical research on all levels. Mitochondrial research has also benefitted greatly from high-throughput sequencing; sequencing technology now allows for screening of all 16,569 base pairs of the mitochondrial genome simultaneously for SNPs and low level heteroplasmy and, in some cases, the estimation of mitochondrial DNA copy number. It is important to realize the full potential of high-throughput sequencing for the advancement of mitochondrial research. To this end, we review how high-throughput sequencing has impacted mitochondrial research in the categories of SNPs, low level heteroplasmy, copy number, and structural variants. We also discuss the different types of mitochondrial DNA sequencing and their pros and cons. Based on previous studies conducted by various groups, we provide strategies for processing mitochondrial DNA sequencing data, including assembly, variant calling, and quality control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074334603; Folkers, G.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162277202

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning

  4. Chemometric Optimization Studies in Catalysis Employing High-Throughput Experimentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, S.R.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main topic of this thesis is the investigation of the synergies between High-Throughput Experimentation (HTE) and Chemometric Optimization methodologies in Catalysis research and of the use of such methodologies to maximize the advantages of using HTE methods. Several case studies were analysed

  5. High throughput production of mouse monoclonal antibodies using antigen microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Federico; Chiarella, P.; Wilhelm, H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in proteomics research underscore the increasing need for high-affinity monoclonal antibodies, which are still generated with lengthy, low-throughput antibody production techniques. Here we present a semi-automated, high-throughput method of hybridoma generation and identification...

  6. High throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Larsen, Poul; Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup

    S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing has been developed over the past few years and is now ready to use for more comprehensive studies related to plant operation and optimization thanks to short analysis time, low cost, high throughput, and high taxonomic resolution. In this study we show how 16S r...

  7. Comparative evaluation of genotoxicity by micronucleus assay in the buccal mucosa over comet assay in peripheral blood in oral precancer and cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katarkar, Atul; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Khan, Masood H; Ray, Jay G; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2014-09-01

    Early detection and quantification of DNA damage in oral premalignancy or malignancy may help in management of the disease and improve survival rates. The comet assay has been successfully utilised to detect DNA damage in oral premalignant or malignancy. However, due to the invasive nature of collecting blood, it may be painful for many unwilling patients. This study compares the micronucleus (MN) assay in oral buccal mucosa cells with the comet assay in peripheral blood cells in a subset of oral habit-induced precancer and cancer patients. For this, MN assay of exfoliated epithelial cells was compared with comet assay of peripheral blood leucocytes among 260 participants, including those with oral lichen planus (OLP; n = 52), leukoplakia (LPK; n = 51), oral submucous fibrosis (OSF; n = 51), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC; n = 54) and normal volunteers (n = 52). Among the precancer groups, LPK patients showed significantly higher levels of DNA damage as reflected by both comet tail length (P cancer patients was OLP oral habits, it was multiple habits > cigarette + khaini > cigarette smokers > areca + khaini > areca. There was no significant difference in the comet length and MNi frequency between males and females who had oral chewing habits. An overall significant correlation was observed between MNi frequency and comet tail length with r = 0.844 and P oral exfoliated epithelial cells, and MNi frequency can be used with the same effectiveness and greater efficiency in early detection of oral premalignant conditions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Genotoxic endpoints in the earthworms sub-lethal assay to evaluate natural soils contaminated by metals and radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenco, Joana I., E-mail: joanalourenco@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth O., E-mail: ruthp@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Silva, Ana C., E-mail: ana.cmj@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Morgado, Jose M., E-mail: jmtmorgado@gmail.com [Centro de Histocompatibilidade do Centro, Praceta Prof. Mota Pinto, Edificio S. Jeronimo, 4o piso, Apartado 9041, 3001-301 Coimbra (Portugal); Carvalho, Fernando P., E-mail: fernando.carvalho@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Oliveira, Joao M., E-mail: joaomota@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Malta, Margarida P., E-mail: margm@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Paiva, Artur A., E-mail: apaiva@histocentro.min-saude.pt [Centro de Histocompatibilidade do Centro, Praceta Prof. Mota Pinto, Edificio S. Jeronimo, 4o piso, Apartado 9041, 3001-301 Coimbra (Portugal); Mendo, Sonia A., E-mail: smendo@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Goncalves, Fernando J., E-mail: fjmg@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-02-15

    Eisenia andrei was exposed, for 56 days, to a contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine and to the natural reference soil LUFA 2.2. The organisms were sampled after 0, 1, 2, 7, 14 and 56 days of exposure, to assess metals bioaccumulation, coelomocytes DNA integrity and cytotoxicity. Radionuclides bioaccumulation and growth were also determined at 0 h, 14 and 56 days of exposure. Results have shown the bioaccumulation of metals and radionuclides, as well as, growth reduction, DNA damages and cytotoxicity in earthworms exposed to contaminated soil. The usefulness of the comet assay and flow cytometry, to evaluate the toxicity of contaminants such as metals and radionuclides in earthworms are herein reported. We also demonstrated that DNA strand breakage and immune cells frequency are important endpoints to be employed in the earthworm reproduction assay, for the evaluation of soil geno and cytotoxicity, as part of the risk assessment of contaminated areas. This is the first study that integrates DNA damage and cytotoxicity evaluation, growth and bioaccumulation of metals and radionuclides in a sub lethal assay, for earthworms exposed to soil contaminated with metals and radionuclides.

  9. High-Throughput Screening of Myometrial Calcium-Mobilization to Identify Modulators of Uterine Contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herington, Jennifer L.; Swale, Daniel R.; Brown, Naoko; Shelton, Elaine L.; Choi, Hyehun; Williams, Charles H.; Hong, Charles C.; Paria, Bibhash C.; Denton, Jerod S.; Reese, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The uterine myometrium (UT-myo) is a therapeutic target for preterm labor, labor induction, and postpartum hemorrhage. Stimulation of intracellular Ca2+-release in UT-myo cells by oxytocin is a final pathway controlling myometrial contractions. The goal of this study was to develop a dual-addition assay for high-throughput screening of small molecular compounds, which could regulate Ca2+-mobilization in UT-myo cells, and hence, myometrial contractions. Primary murine UT-myo cells in 384-well plates were loaded with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent probe, and then screened for inducers of Ca2+-mobilization and inhibitors of oxytocin-induced Ca2+-mobilization. The assay exhibited robust screening statistics (Z´ = 0.73), DMSO-tolerance, and was validated for high-throughput screening against 2,727 small molecules from the Spectrum, NIH Clinical I and II collections of well-annotated compounds. The screen revealed a hit-rate of 1.80% for agonist and 1.39% for antagonist compounds. Concentration-dependent responses of hit-compounds demonstrated an EC50 less than 10μM for 21 hit-antagonist compounds, compared to only 7 hit-agonist compounds. Subsequent studies focused on hit-antagonist compounds. Based on the percent inhibition and functional annotation analyses, we selected 4 confirmed hit-antagonist compounds (benzbromarone, dipyridamole, fenoterol hydrobromide and nisoldipine) for further analysis. Using an ex vivo isometric contractility assay, each compound significantly inhibited uterine contractility, at different potencies (IC50). Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that high-throughput small-molecules screening of myometrial Ca2+-mobilization is an ideal primary approach for discovering modulators of uterine contractility. PMID:26600013

  10. A preliminary Ames fluctuation assay assessment of the genotoxicity of drinking water that has been solar disinfected in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; McGuigan, Kevin G

    2010-12-01

    Though microbially safe, concerns have been raised about the genotoxic/mutagenic quality of solar-disinfected drinking water, which might be compromised as a result of photodegradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles used as SODIS reactors. This study assessed genotoxic risk associated with the possible release of genotoxic compounds into water from PET bottles during SODIS, using the Ames fluctuation test. Negative genotoxicity results were obtained for water samples that had been in PET bottles and exposed to normal SODIS conditions (strong natural sunlight) over 6 months. Under SODIS conditions, bottles were exposed to 6 h of sunlight, followed by overnight room temperature storage. They were then emptied and refilled the following day and exposed to sunlight again. Genotoxicity was detected after 2 months in water stored in PET bottles and exposed continuously (without refilling) to sunlight for a period ranging from 1 to 6 months. However, similar genotoxicity results were also observed for the dark control (without refill) samples at the same time-point and in no other samples after that time; therefore it is unlikely that this genotoxicity event is related to solar exposure.

  11. High-throughput screening for novel anti-infectives using a C. elegans pathogenesis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conery, Annie L; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Ausubel, Frederick M; Kirienko, Natalia V

    2014-03-14

    In recent history, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has provided a compelling platform for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. In this protocol, we present an automated, high-throughput C. elegans pathogenesis assay, which can be used to screen for anti-infective compounds that prevent nematodes from dying due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. New antibiotics identified from such screens would be promising candidates for treatment of human infections, and also can be used as probe compounds to identify novel targets in microbial pathogenesis or host immunity. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Noninvasive High-Throughput Single-Cell Analysis of HIV Protease Activity Using Ratiometric Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Rok; Majerle, Andreja; Jerala, Roman; Benčina, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    To effectively fight against the human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic, ongoing development of novel HIV protease inhibitors is required. Inexpensive high-throughput screening assays are needed to quickly scan large sets of chemicals for potential inhibitors. We have developed a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based, HIV protease-sensitive sensor using a combination of a fluorescent protein pair, namely mCerulean and mCitrine. Through extensive in vitro characterization, we show that the FRET-HIV sensor can be used in HIV protease screening assays. Furthermore, we have used the FRET-HIV sensor for intracellular quantitative detection of HIV protease activity in living cells, which more closely resembles an actual viral infection than an in vitro assay. We have developed a high-throughput method that employs a ratiometric flow cytometry for analyzing large populations of cells that express the FRET-HIV sensor. The method enables FRET measurement of single cells with high sensitivity and speed and should be used when subpopulation-specific intracellular activity of HIV protease needs to be estimated. In addition, we have used a confocal microscopy sensitized emission FRET technique to evaluate the usefulness of the FRET-HIV sensor for spatiotemporal detection of intracellular HIV protease activity. PMID:24287545

  13. Combination of physico-chemical analysis, Allium cepa test system and Oreochromis niloticus erythrocyte based comet assay/nuclear abnormalities tests for cyto-genotoxicity assessments of treated effluents discharged from textile industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemachandra, Chamini K; Pathiratne, Asoka

    2016-09-01

    Bioassays for cyto-genotoxicity assessments are generally not required in current textile industry effluent discharge management regulations. The present study applied in vivo plant and fish based toxicity tests viz. Allium cepa test system and Oreochromis niloticus erythrocyte based comet assay and nuclear abnormalities tests in combination with physico-chemical analysis for assessing potential cytotoxic/genotoxic impacts of treated textile industry effluents reaching a major river (Kelani River) in Sri Lanka. Of the treated effluents tested from two textile industries, color in the Textile industry 1 effluents occasionally and color, biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand in the Textile industry 2 effluents frequently exceeded the specified Sri Lankan tolerance limits for discharge of industrial effluents into inland surface waters. Exposure of A. cepa bulbs to 100% and 12.5% treated effluents from both industries resulted in statistically significant root growth retardation, mito-depression, and induction of chromosomal abnormalities in root meristematic cells in comparison to the dilution water in all cases demonstrating cyto-genotoxicity associated with the treated effluents. Exposure of O. niloticus to the 100% and 12.5% effluents, resulted in erythrocytic genetic damage as shown by elevated total comet scores and induction of nuclear abnormalities confirming the genotoxicity of the treated effluents even with 1:8 dilution. The results provide strong scientific evidence for the crucial necessity of incorporating cyto-genotoxicity impact assessment tools in textile industry effluent management regulations considering human health and ecological health of the receiving water course under chronic exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Scanning droplet cell for high throughput electrochemical and photoelectrochemical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, John M.; Xiang, Chengxiang; Liu, Xiaonao; Marcin, Martin; Jin, Jian

    2013-02-01

    High throughput electrochemical techniques are widely applied in material discovery and optimization. For many applications, the most desirable electrochemical characterization requires a three-electrode cell under potentiostat control. In high throughput screening, a material library is explored by either employing an array of such cells, or rastering a single cell over the library. To attain this latter capability with unprecedented throughput, we have developed a highly integrated, compact scanning droplet cell that is optimized for rapid electrochemical and photoeletrochemical measurements. Using this cell, we screened a quaternary oxide library as (photo)electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution (water splitting) reaction. High quality electrochemical measurements were carried out and key electrocatalytic properties were identified for each of 5456 samples with a throughput of 4 s per sample.

  15. High-throughput theoretical design of lithium battery materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi-Gang, Ling; Jian, Gao; Rui-Juan, Xiao; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of high-throughput theoretical design schemes to discover new lithium battery materials is reviewed, including high-capacity cathodes, low-strain cathodes, anodes, solid state electrolytes, and electrolyte additives. With the development of efficient theoretical methods and inexpensive computers, high-throughput theoretical calculations have played an increasingly important role in the discovery of new materials. With the help of automatic simulation flow, many types of materials can be screened, optimized and designed from a structural database according to specific search criteria. In advanced cell technology, new materials for next generation lithium batteries are of great significance to achieve performance, and some representative criteria are: higher energy density, better safety, and faster charge/discharge speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 51172274) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201).

  16. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-07-29

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches.

  17. High-Throughput Thermodynamic Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification for ICME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, Richard A.; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2017-05-01

    One foundational component of the integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) and Materials Genome Initiative is the computational thermodynamics based on the calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) method. The CALPHAD method pioneered by Kaufman has enabled the development of thermodynamic, atomic mobility, and molar volume databases of individual phases in the full space of temperature, composition, and sometimes pressure for technologically important multicomponent engineering materials, along with sophisticated computational tools for using the databases. In this article, our recent efforts will be presented in terms of developing new computational tools for high-throughput modeling and uncertainty quantification based on high-throughput, first-principles calculations and the CALPHAD method along with their potential propagations to downstream ICME modeling and simulations.

  18. Trade-Off Analysis in High-Throughput Materials Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volety, Kalpana K; Huyberechts, Guido P J

    2017-03-13

    This Research Article presents a strategy to identify the optimum compositions in metal alloys with certain desired properties in a high-throughput screening environment, using a multiobjective optimization approach. In addition to the identification of the optimum compositions in a primary screening, the strategy also allows pointing to regions in the compositional space where further exploration in a secondary screening could be carried out. The strategy for the primary screening is a combination of two multiobjective optimization approaches namely Pareto optimality and desirability functions. The experimental data used in the present study have been collected from over 200 different compositions belonging to four different alloy systems. The metal alloys (comprising Fe, Ti, Al, Nb, Hf, Zr) are synthesized and screened using high-throughput technologies. The advantages of such a kind of approach compared to the limitations of the traditional and comparatively simpler approaches like ranking and calculating figures of merit are discussed.

  19. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated...... maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content...... and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers...

  20. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Chan Young; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P; Stamer, W Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2014-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signaling intermediates with poorly defined relationship to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we screened libraries to identify novel drug candidates in the case of human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma, and also in the case of Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery.

  1. Genotoxicity effects of nano bioactive glass and Novabone bioglass on gingival fibroblasts using single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Tavakoli

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The findings of this study have demonstrated that novel nano bioactive glass had no genotoxicity in concentrations lower than 4 mg/ml. Nanoparticles have a higher surface area in comparison to microparticles and thus, the amount and rate of ion release for nanoparticles are extremely higher. This difference is the main reason for the different genotoxicity of nano bioactive glass and micro Novabone bioglass in the concentrations higher than 4 mg/ml.

  2. High-throughput sequence alignment using Graphics Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapnell Cole

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent availability of new, less expensive high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies has yielded a dramatic increase in the volume of sequence data that must be analyzed. These data are being generated for several purposes, including genotyping, genome resequencing, metagenomics, and de novo genome assembly projects. Sequence alignment programs such as MUMmer have proven essential for analysis of these data, but researchers will need ever faster, high-throughput alignment tools running on inexpensive hardware to keep up with new sequence technologies. Results This paper describes MUMmerGPU, an open-source high-throughput parallel pairwise local sequence alignment program that runs on commodity Graphics Processing Units (GPUs in common workstations. MUMmerGPU uses the new Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA from nVidia to align multiple query sequences against a single reference sequence stored as a suffix tree. By processing the queries in parallel on the highly parallel graphics card, MUMmerGPU achieves more than a 10-fold speedup over a serial CPU version of the sequence alignment kernel, and outperforms the exact alignment component of MUMmer on a high end CPU by 3.5-fold in total application time when aligning reads from recent sequencing projects using Solexa/Illumina, 454, and Sanger sequencing technologies. Conclusion MUMmerGPU is a low cost, ultra-fast sequence alignment program designed to handle the increasing volume of data produced by new, high-throughput sequencing technologies. MUMmerGPU demonstrates that even memory-intensive applications can run significantly faster on the relatively low-cost GPU than on the CPU.

  3. High-throughput optical screening of cellular mechanotransduction

    OpenAIRE

    Compton, JL; Luo, JC; Ma, H.; Botvinick, E; Venugopalan, V

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an optical platform for rapid, high-throughput screening of exogenous molecules that affect cellular mechanotransduction. Our method initiates mechanotransduction in adherent cells using single laser-microbeam generated microcavitation bubbles without requiring flow chambers or microfluidics. These microcavitation bubbles expose adherent cells to a microtsunami, a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress, which stimulates cells over areas approaching 1 mm2. We demo...

  4. Intel: High Throughput Computing Collaboration: A CERN openlab / Intel collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The Intel/CERN High Throughput Computing Collaboration studies the application of upcoming Intel technologies to the very challenging environment of the LHC trigger and data-acquisition systems. These systems will need to transport and process many terabits of data every second, in some cases with tight latency constraints. Parallelisation and tight integration of accelerators and classical CPU via Intel's OmniPath fabric are the key elements in this project.

  5. High-throughput sequence alignment using Graphics Processing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Michael C; Trapnell, Cole; Delcher, Arthur L; Varshney, Amitabh

    2007-12-10

    The recent availability of new, less expensive high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies has yielded a dramatic increase in the volume of sequence data that must be analyzed. These data are being generated for several purposes, including genotyping, genome resequencing, metagenomics, and de novo genome assembly projects. Sequence alignment programs such as MUMmer have proven essential for analysis of these data, but researchers will need ever faster, high-throughput alignment tools running on inexpensive hardware to keep up with new sequence technologies. This paper describes MUMmerGPU, an open-source high-throughput parallel pairwise local sequence alignment program that runs on commodity Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) in common workstations. MUMmerGPU uses the new Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) from nVidia to align multiple query sequences against a single reference sequence stored as a suffix tree. By processing the queries in parallel on the highly parallel graphics card, MUMmerGPU achieves more than a 10-fold speedup over a serial CPU version of the sequence alignment kernel, and outperforms the exact alignment component of MUMmer on a high end CPU by 3.5-fold in total application time when aligning reads from recent sequencing projects using Solexa/Illumina, 454, and Sanger sequencing technologies. MUMmerGPU is a low cost, ultra-fast sequence alignment program designed to handle the increasing volume of data produced by new, high-throughput sequencing technologies. MUMmerGPU demonstrates that even memory-intensive applications can run significantly faster on the relatively low-cost GPU than on the CPU.

  6. High-throughput evaluation of synthetic metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesmith, Justin R; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2016-03-01

    A central challenge in the field of metabolic engineering is the efficient identification of a metabolic pathway genotype that maximizes specific productivity over a robust range of process conditions. Here we review current methods for optimizing specific productivity of metabolic pathways in living cells. New tools for library generation, computational analysis of pathway sequence-flux space, and high-throughput screening and selection techniques are discussed.

  7. The high-throughput highway to computational materials design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtarolo, Stefano; Hart, Gus L W; Nardelli, Marco Buongiorno; Mingo, Natalio; Sanvito, Stefano; Levy, Ohad

    2013-03-01

    High-throughput computational materials design is an emerging area of materials science. By combining advanced thermodynamic and electronic-structure methods with intelligent data mining and database construction, and exploiting the power of current supercomputer architectures, scientists generate, manage and analyse enormous data repositories for the discovery of novel materials. In this Review we provide a current snapshot of this rapidly evolving field, and highlight the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

  8. Web-based visual analysis for high-throughput genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goecks, Jeremy; Eberhard, Carl; Too, Tomithy; Nekrutenko, Anton; Taylor, James

    2013-06-13

    Visualization plays an essential role in genomics research by making it possible to observe correlations and trends in large datasets as well as communicate findings to others. Visual analysis, which combines visualization with analysis tools to enable seamless use of both approaches for scientific investigation, offers a powerful method for performing complex genomic analyses. However, there are numerous challenges that arise when creating rich, interactive Web-based visualizations/visual analysis applications for high-throughput genomics. These challenges include managing data flow from Web server to Web browser, integrating analysis tools and visualizations, and sharing visualizations with colleagues. We have created a platform simplifies the creation of Web-based visualization/visual analysis applications for high-throughput genomics. This platform provides components that make it simple to efficiently query very large datasets, draw common representations of genomic data, integrate with analysis tools, and share or publish fully interactive visualizations. Using this platform, we have created a Circos-style genome-wide viewer, a generic scatter plot for correlation analysis, an interactive phylogenetic tree, a scalable genome browser for next-generation sequencing data, and an application for systematically exploring tool parameter spaces to find good parameter values. All visualizations are interactive and fully customizable. The platform is integrated with the Galaxy (http://galaxyproject.org) genomics workbench, making it easy to integrate new visual applications into Galaxy. Visualization and visual analysis play an important role in high-throughput genomics experiments, and approaches are needed to make it easier to create applications for these activities. Our framework provides a foundation for creating Web-based visualizations and integrating them into Galaxy. Finally, the visualizations we have created using the framework are useful tools for high-throughput

  9. Validation of high throughput sequencing and microbial forensics applications

    OpenAIRE

    Budowle, Bruce; Connell, Nancy D.; Bielecka-Oder, Anna; Rita R Colwell; Corbett, Cindi R.; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Forsman, Mats; Kadavy, Dana R; Markotic, Alemka; Morse, Stephen A.; Murch, Randall S; Sajantila, Antti; Schemes, Sarah E; Ternus, Krista L; Turner, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Abstract High throughput sequencing (HTS) generates large amounts of high quality sequence data for microbial genomics. The value of HTS for microbial forensics is the speed at which evidence can be collected and the power to characterize microbial-related evidence to solve biocrimes and bioterrorist events. As HTS technologies continue to improve, they provide increasingly powerful sets of tools to support the entire field of microbial forensics. Accurate, credible results a...

  10. Chlorination-induced genotoxicity in the mussel Perna viridis: assessment by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Pooja; Kumar, Rajesh; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2016-08-01

    Mussels are important fouling organisms in the cooling water systems of coastal power plants. Continuous low-dose chlorination (CLDC) is being practiced as an effective method to control mussel biofouling in power plant cooling water systems. CLDC effectively controls mussel fouling by discouraging larval settlement rather than by killing the larvae or adults. Mussels are an integral part of the natural benthic community in the receiving water body where the coolant water is discharged. Hence, from a toxicological point of view, they can serve as both target and non-target organisms. Previous researchers have indicated that chlorine residual, rather than elevated temperature, can be the major stress factor in the effluents released from coastal power plants. However, very little data are available on the sub-lethal effects of low level chlorination on representative benthic fauna. In this study, we used native and transplanted mussels (Perna viridis) to study lethal and sub-lethal effects of chlorination in the cooling water circuit of an operating power plant. Experiments involving comet assay suggested that CLDC can cause DNA damage in treated mussels. However, activation of DNA repair appeared to get initiated after the accrued damage reached a threshold. The results indicate that, at chlorine residual levels observed at the discharge point, exposure to chlorinated effluents is unlikely to cause significant genetic damage to mussels in the recipient water body. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High-Throughput Toxicity Testing: New Strategies for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, the food industry has made progress in improving safety testing methods focused on microbial contaminants in order to promote food safety. However, food industry toxicologists must also assess the safety of food-relevant chemicals including pesticides, direct additives, and food contact substances. With the rapidly growing use of new food additives, as well as innovation in food contact substance development, an interest in exploring the use of high-throughput chemical safety testing approaches has emerged. Currently, the field of toxicology is undergoing a paradigm shift in how chemical hazards can be evaluated. Since there are tens of thousands of chemicals in use, many of which have little to no hazard information and there are limited resources (namely time and money) for testing these chemicals, it is necessary to prioritize which chemicals require further safety testing to better protect human health. Advances in biochemistry and computational toxicology have paved the way for animal-free (in vitro) high-throughput screening which can characterize chemical interactions with highly specific biological processes. Screening approaches are not novel; in fact, quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) methods that incorporate dose-response evaluation have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. For toxicological evaluation and prioritization, it is the throughput as well as the cost- and time-efficient nature of qHTS that makes it

  12. Graph-based signal integration for high-throughput phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovic, Jorge R; Subramanian, Devika; Cohen, Trevor; Bozzo-Silva, Pamela A; Bearden, Charles F; Bernstam, Elmer V

    2012-01-01

    Electronic Health Records aggregated in Clinical Data Warehouses (CDWs) promise to revolutionize Comparative Effectiveness Research and suggest new avenues of research. However, the effectiveness of CDWs is diminished by the lack of properly labeled data. We present a novel approach that integrates knowledge from the CDW, the biomedical literature, and the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) to perform high-throughput phenotyping. In this paper, we automatically construct a graphical knowledge model and then use it to phenotype breast cancer patients. We compare the performance of this approach to using MetaMap when labeling records. MetaMap's overall accuracy at identifying breast cancer patients was 51.1% (n=428); recall=85.4%, precision=26.2%, and F1=40.1%. Our unsupervised graph-based high-throughput phenotyping had accuracy of 84.1%; recall=46.3%, precision=61.2%, and F1=52.8%. We conclude that our approach is a promising alternative for unsupervised high-throughput phenotyping.

  13. Condor-COPASI: high-throughput computing for biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Edward

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical modelling has become a standard technique to improve our understanding of complex biological systems. As models become larger and more complex, simulations and analyses require increasing amounts of computational power. Clusters of computers in a high-throughput computing environment can help to provide the resources required for computationally expensive model analysis. However, exploiting such a system can be difficult for users without the necessary expertise. Results We present Condor-COPASI, a server-based software tool that integrates COPASI, a biological pathway simulation tool, with Condor, a high-throughput computing environment. Condor-COPASI provides a web-based interface, which makes it extremely easy for a user to run a number of model simulation and analysis tasks in parallel. Tasks are transparently split into smaller parts, and submitted for execution on a Condor pool. Result output is presented to the user in a number of formats, including tables and interactive graphical displays. Conclusions Condor-COPASI can effectively use a Condor high-throughput computing environment to provide significant gains in performance for a number of model simulation and analysis tasks. Condor-COPASI is free, open source software, released under the Artistic License 2.0, and is suitable for use by any institution with access to a Condor pool. Source code is freely available for download at http://code.google.com/p/condor-copasi/, along with full instructions on deployment and usage.

  14. High-throughput computational and experimental techniques in structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Mark R; Fiser, Andras; Sali, Andrej; Pieper, Ursula; Eswar, Narayanan; Xu, Guiping; Fajardo, J Eduardo; Radhakannan, Thirumuruhan; Marinkovic, Nebojsa

    2004-10-01

    Structural genomics has as its goal the provision of structural information for all possible ORF sequences through a combination of experimental and computational approaches. The access to genome sequences and cloning resources from an ever-widening array of organisms is driving high-throughput structural studies by the New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium. In this report, we outline the progress of the Consortium in establishing its pipeline for structural genomics, and some of the experimental and bioinformatics efforts leading to structural annotation of proteins. The Consortium has established a pipeline for structural biology studies, automated modeling of ORF sequences using solved (template) structures, and a novel high-throughput approach (metallomics) to examining the metal binding to purified protein targets. The Consortium has so far produced 493 purified proteins from >1077 expression vectors. A total of 95 have resulted in crystal structures, and 81 are deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Comparative modeling of these structures has generated >40,000 structural models. We also initiated a high-throughput metal analysis of the purified proteins; this has determined that 10%-15% of the targets contain a stoichiometric structural or catalytic transition metal atom. The progress of the structural genomics centers in the U.S. and around the world suggests that the goal of providing useful structural information on most all ORF domains will be realized. This projected resource will provide structural biology information important to understanding the function of most proteins of the cell.

  15. A high-throughput and quantitative method to assess the mutagenic potential of translesion DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, David J.; Camerlengo, Terry L.; Harrison, Jason K.; Sherrer, Shanen M.; Kshetry, Ajay K.; Taylor, John-Stephen; Huang, Kun; Suo, Zucai

    2013-01-01

    Cellular genomes are constantly damaged by endogenous and exogenous agents that covalently and structurally modify DNA to produce DNA lesions. Although most lesions are mended by various DNA repair pathways in vivo, a significant number of damage sites persist during genomic replication. Our understanding of the mutagenic outcomes derived from these unrepaired DNA lesions has been hindered by the low throughput of existing sequencing methods. Therefore, we have developed a cost-effective high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay that uses next-generation DNA sequencing technology for the assessment of the mutagenic profiles of translesion DNA synthesis catalyzed by any error-prone DNA polymerase. The vast amount of sequencing data produced were aligned and quantified by using our novel software. As an example, the high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay was used to analyze the types and frequencies of mutations upstream, downstream and at a site-specifically placed cis–syn thymidine–thymidine dimer generated individually by three lesion-bypass human Y-family DNA polymerases. PMID:23470999

  16. High-throughput screening of PLGA thin films utilizing hydrophobic fluorescent dyes for hydrophobic drug compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Terry W J; Huang, Charlotte L; Kumar, Saranya; Widjaja, Effendi; Chiang Boey, Freddy Yin; Loo, Joachim S C; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2011-10-01

    Hydrophobic, antirestenotic drugs such as paclitaxel (PCTX) and rapamycin are often incorporated into thin film coatings for local delivery using implantable medical devices and polymers such as drug-eluting stents and balloons. Selecting the optimum coating formulation through screening the release profile of these drugs in thin films is time consuming and labor intensive. We describe here a high-throughput assay utilizing three model hydrophobic fluorescent compounds: fluorescein diacetate (FDAc), coumarin-6, and rhodamine 6G that were incorporated into poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and PLGA-polyethylene glycol films. Raman microscopy determined the hydrophobic fluorescent dye distribution within the PLGA thin films in comparison with that of PCTX. Their subsequent release was screened in a high-throughput assay and directly compared with HPLC quantification of PCTX release. It was observed that PCTX controlled-release kinetics could be mimicked by a hydrophobic dye that had similar octanol-water partition coefficient values and homogeneous dissolution in a PLGA matrix as the drug. In particular, FDAc was found to be the optimal hydrophobic dye at modeling the burst release as well as the total amount of PCTX released over a period of 30 days. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. A high-throughput method for GMO multi-detection using a microfluidic dynamic array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brod, Fábio Cristiano Angonesi; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Voorhuijzen, Marleen M; Dinon, Andréia Zilio; Guimarães, Luis Henrique S; Scholtens, Ingrid M J; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave; Kok, Esther J

    2014-02-01

    The ever-increasing production of genetically modified crops generates a demand for high-throughput DNA-based methods for the enforcement of genetically modified organisms (GMO) labelling requirements. The application of standard real-time PCR will become increasingly costly with the growth of the number of GMOs that is potentially present in an individual sample. The present work presents the results of an innovative approach in genetically modified crops analysis by DNA based methods, which is the use of a microfluidic dynamic array as a high throughput multi-detection system. In order to evaluate the system, six test samples with an increasing degree of complexity were prepared, preamplified and subsequently analysed in the Fluidigm system. Twenty-eight assays targeting different DNA elements, GM events and species-specific reference genes were used in the experiment. The large majority of the assays tested presented expected results. The power of low level detection was assessed and elements present at concentrations as low as 0.06 % were successfully detected. The approach proposed in this work presents the Fluidigm system as a suitable and promising platform for GMO multi-detection.

  18. High-Throughput Multiplex Flow Cytometry Screening for Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Light Chain Protease Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Given their medical importance, proteases have been studied by diverse approaches and screened for small molecule protease inhibitors. Here, we present a multiplexed microsphere-based protease assay that uses high-throughput flow cytometry to screen for inhibitors of the light chain protease of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTALC). Our assay uses a full-length substrate and several deletion mutants screened in parallel to identify small molecule inhibitors. The use of multiplex flow cytometry has the advantage of using full-length substrates, which contain already identified distal-binding elements for the BoNTALC, and could lead to a new class of BoNTALC inhibitors. In this study, we have screened 880 off patent drugs and bioavailable compounds to identify ebselen as an in vitro inhibitor of BoNTALC. This discovery demonstrates the validity of our microsphere-based approach and illustrates its potential for high-throughput screening for inhibitors of proteases in general. PMID:20035615

  19. MassCode liquid arrays as a tool for multiplexed high-throughput genetic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S Richmond

    Full Text Available Multiplexed detection assays that analyze a modest number of nucleic acid targets over large sample sets are emerging as the preferred testing approach in such applications as routine pathogen typing, outbreak monitoring, and diagnostics. However, very few DNA testing platforms have proven to offer a solution for mid-plexed analysis that is high-throughput, sensitive, and with a low cost per test. In this work, an enhanced genotyping method based on MassCode technology was devised and integrated as part of a high-throughput mid-plexing analytical system that facilitates robust qualitative differential detection of DNA targets. Samples are first analyzed using MassCode PCR (MC-PCR performed with an array of primer sets encoded with unique mass tags. Lambda exonuclease and an array of MassCode probes are then contacted with MC-PCR products for further interrogation and target sequences are specifically identified. Primer and probe hybridizations occur in homogeneous solution, a clear advantage over micro- or nanoparticle suspension arrays. The two cognate tags coupled to resultant MassCode hybrids are detected in an automated process using a benchtop single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The prospective value of using MassCode probe arrays for multiplexed bioanalysis was demonstrated after developing a 14plex proof of concept assay designed to subtype a select panel of Salmonella enterica serogroups and serovars. This MassCode system is very flexible and test panels can be customized to include more, less, or different markers.

  20. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs, <100 nm are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO2-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO2-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO2-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells.

  1. Results of the International Validation of the in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay for the detection of genotoxic carcinogens: Individual data for 1,2-dibromoethane, p-anisidine, and o-anthranilic acid in the 2nd step of the 4th phase Validation Study under the JaCVAM initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasawa, Hironao; Takashima, Rie; Narumi, Kazunori; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hattori, Akiko; Kawabata, Masayoshi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative International Validation Study of an in vivo rat alkaline comet assay, we examined 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE), p-anisidine (ASD), and o-anthranilic acid (ANT) to investigate the effectiveness of the comet assay in detecting genotoxic carcinogens. Each of the three test chemicals was administered to 5 male Sprague-Dawley rats per group by oral gavage at 48, 24, and 3h before specimen preparation. Single cells were collected from the liver and glandular stomach at 3h after the final dosing, and the specimens prepared from these two organs were subjected to electrophoresis under alkaline conditions (pH>13). The percentage of DNA intensity in the comet tail was then assessed using an image analysis system. A micronucleus (MN) assay was also conducted using these three test chemicals with the bone marrow (BM) cells collected from the same animals simultaneously used in the comet assay, i.e., combination study of the comet assay and BM MN assay. A genotoxic (Ames positive) rodent carcinogen, DBE gave a positive result in the comet assay in the present study, while a genotoxic (Ames positive) non-carcinogen, ASD and a non-genotoxic (Ames negative) non-carcinogen, ANT showed negative results in the comet assay. All three chemicals produced negative results in the BM MN assay. While the comet assay findings in the present study were consistent with those obtained from the rodent carcinogenicity studies for the three test chemicals, we consider the positive result in the comet assay for DBE to be particularly meaningful, given that this chemical produced a negative result in the BM MN assay. Therefore, the combination study of the comet assay and BM MN assay is a useful method to detect genotoxic carcinogens that are undetectable with the BM MN assay alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High-throughput screening with nanoimprinting 3D culture for efficient drug development by mimicking the tumor environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Waki, Atsuo; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masahiro; Itoh, Manabu; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Sogawa, Chizuru; Kiyono, Yasushi; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-05-01

    Anti-cancer drug development typically utilizes high-throughput screening with two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. However, 2D culture induces cellular characteristics different from tumors in vivo, resulting in inefficient drug development. Here, we report an innovative high-throughput screening system using nanoimprinting 3D culture to simulate in vivo conditions, thereby facilitating efficient drug development. We demonstrated that cell line-based nanoimprinting 3D screening can more efficiently select drugs that effectively inhibit cancer growth in vivo as compared to 2D culture. Metabolic responses after treatment were assessed using positron emission tomography (PET) probes, and revealed similar characteristics between the 3D spheroids and in vivo tumors. Further, we developed an advanced method to adopt cancer cells from patient tumor tissues for high-throughput drug screening with nanoimprinting 3D culture, which we termed Cancer tissue-Originated Uniformed Spheroid Assay (COUSA). This system identified drugs that were effective in xenografts of the original patient tumors. Nanoimprinting 3D spheroids showed low permeability and formation of hypoxic regions inside, similar to in vivo tumors. Collectively, the nanoimprinting 3D culture provides easy-handling high-throughput drug screening system, which allows for efficient drug development by mimicking the tumor environment. The COUSA system could be a useful platform for drug development with patient cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of auto-immune and infectious disease specific antibodies using a high throughput multiplexing tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Asati

    Full Text Available Considering importance of ganglioside antibodies as biomarkers in various immune-mediated neuropathies and neurological disorders, we developed a high throughput multiplexing tool for the assessment of gangliosides-specific antibodies based on Biolpex/Luminex platform. In this report, we demonstrate that the ganglioside high throughput multiplexing tool is robust, highly specific and demonstrating ∼100-fold higher concentration sensitivity for IgG detection than ELISA. In addition to the ganglioside-coated array, the high throughput multiplexing tool contains beads coated with influenza hemagglutinins derived from H1N1 A/Brisbane/59/07 and H1N1 A/California/07/09 strains. Influenza beads provided an added advantage of simultaneous detection of ganglioside- and influenza-specific antibodies, a capacity important for the assay of both infectious antigen-specific and autoimmune antibodies following vaccination or disease. Taken together, these results support the potential adoption of the ganglioside high throughput multiplexing tool for measuring ganglioside antibodies in various neuropathic and neurological disorders.

  4. Inhibitors of the salicylate synthase (MbtI) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis discovered by high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Neres, João; Williams, Jessica; Wilson, Daniel J; Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Remmel, Rory P; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2010-12-03

    A simple steady-state kinetic high-throughput assay was developed for the salicylate synthase MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis. The mycobactins are small-molecule iron chelators produced by M. tuberculosis, and their biosynthesis has been identified as a promising target for the development of new antitubercular agents. The assay was miniaturized to a 384-well plate format and high-throughput screening was performed at the National Screening Laboratory for the Regional Centers of Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (NSRB). Three classes of compounds were identified comprising the benzisothiazolones (class I), diarylsulfones (class II), and benzimidazole-2-thiones (class III). Each of these compound series was further pursued to investigate their biochemical mechanism and structure-activity relationships. Benzimidazole-2-thione 4 emerged as the most promising inhibitor owing to its potent reversible inhibition.

  5. Evaluation of the mutagenicity and genotoxic potential of carvacrol and thymol using the Ames Salmonella test and alkaline, Endo III- and FPG-modified comet assays with the human cell line Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LLana-Ruiz-Cabello, Maria; Maisanaba, Sara; Puerto, Maria; Prieto, Ana I; Pichardo, Silvia; Jos, Ángeles; Cameán, Ana M

    2014-10-01

    Currently, direct antimicrobial and antioxidant additives derived from essential oils are used in food packaging and are perceived by consumers as low-health-risk compounds. In this study, we investigated the potential mutagenicity and genotoxicity of carvacrol and thymol, major compounds in several essential oils, using the Ames Salmonella test and the alkaline, Endo III- and formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)-modified comet assays, respectively. Thymol did not show any mutagenic activity at any concentration assayed (0-250 μM), whereas carvacrol exhibited mutagenic potential, displaying greater activity in presence of the metabolic fraction (29-460 μM). The genotoxic effects were evaluated in the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, and the standard comet assay revealed that neither carvacrol (0-460 μM) nor thymol (0-250 μM) had any affects at 24 and 48 h. The FPG-modified comet assay showed that the highest conce