WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-temperature gas sensing

  1. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented.

  2. Bimodular high temperature planar oxygen gas sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangcheng eSun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A bimodular planar O2 sensor was fabricated using NiO nanoparticles (NPs thin film coated yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ substrate. The thin film was prepared by radio frequency (r.f. magnetron sputtering of NiO on YSZ substrate, followed by high temperature sintering. The surface morphology of NiO nanoparticles film was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns of NiO NPs thin film before and after high temperature O2 sensing demonstrated that the sensing material possesses a good chemical and structure stability. The oxygen detection experiments were performed at 500 °C, 600 °C and 800 °C using the as-prepared bimodular O2 sensor under both potentiometric and resistance modules. For the potentiometric module, a linear relationship between electromotive force (EMF output of the sensor and the logarithm of O2 concentration was observed at each operating temperature, following the Nernst law. For the resistance module, the logarithm of electrical conductivity was proportional to the logarithm of oxygen concentration at each operating temperature, in good agreement with literature report. In addition, this bimodular sensor shows sensitive, reproducible and reversible response to oxygen under both sensing modules. Integration of two sensing modules into one sensor could greatly enrich the information output and would open a new venue in the development of high temperature gas sensors.

  3. High temperature humidity sensing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, P.P.; Tanase, S.; Greenblatt, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on new proton conducting materials prepared and characterized for potential applications in humidity sensing at temperatures higher than 100 degrees C by complex impedance or galvanic cell type techniques. Calcium metaphosphate, β-Ca(PO 3 ) 2 as a galvanic cell type sensor material yields reproducible signals in the range from 5 to 200 mm Hg water vapor pressure at 578 degrees C, with short response time (∼ 30 sec). Polycrystalline samples of α-Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 and KMo 3 P 5.8 Si 2 O 25 , and the gel converted ceramic, 0.10Li 2 O-0.25P 2 O 5 -0.65SiO 2 as impedance sensor materials show decreases in impedance with increasing humidity in the range from 9 mm Hg to 1 atm water vapor pressure at 179 degrees C

  4. Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor with Sol-Gel Derived Refractive Material as Transducer for High Temperature Gas Sensing in Clean Coal Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiquan Tao

    2006-12-31

    The chemistry of sol-gel derived silica and refractive metal oxide has been systematically studied. Sol-gel processes have been developed for preparing porous silica and semiconductor metal oxide materials. Micelle/reversed micelle techniques have been developed for preparing nanometer sized semiconductor metal oxides and noble metal particles. Techniques for doping metal ions, metal oxides and nanosized metal particles into porous sol-gel material have also been developed. Optical properties of sol-gel derived materials in ambient and high temperature gases have been studied by using fiber optic spectroscopic techniques, such as fiber optic ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrometry, fiber optic near infrared absorption spectrometry and fiber optic fluorescence spectrometry. Fiber optic spectrometric techniques have been developed for investigating the optical properties of these sol-gel derived materials prepared as porous optical fibers or as coatings on the surface of silica optical fibers. Optical and electron microscopic techniques have been used to observe the microstructure, such as pore size, pore shape, sensing agent distribution, of sol-gel derived material, as well as the size and morphology of nanometer metal particle doped in sol-gel derived porous silica, the nature of coating of sol-gel derived materials on silica optical fiber surface. In addition, the chemical reactions of metal ion, nanostructured semiconductor metal oxides and nanometer sized metal particles with gas components at room temperature and high temperatures have also been investigated with fiber optic spectrometric methods. Three classes of fiber optic sensors have been developed based on the thorough investigation of sol-gel chemistry and sol-gel derived materials. The first group of fiber optic sensors uses porous silica optical fibers doped with metal ions or metal oxide as transducers for sensing trace NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S in high temperature gas samples. The second group of

  5. High temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosegood, S.B.; Lockett, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    For high-temperature gas cooled reactors it is considered advantageous to design the core so that the moderator blocks can be removed and replaced by some means of standpipes normally situated in the top of the reactor vessel. An arrangement is here described to facilitate these operations. The blocks have end faces shaped as irregular hexagons with three long sides of equal length and three short sides also of equal length, one short side being located between each pair of adjacent long sides, and the long sides being inclined towards one another at 60 0 . The block defines a number of coolant channels located parallel to its sides. Application of the arrangement to a high temperature gas-cooled reactor with refuelling standpipes is described. The standpipes are located in the top of the reactor vessel above the tops of the columns and are disposed coaxially above the hexagonal channels, with diameters that allow the passage of the blocks. (U.K.)

  6. IAEA high temperature gas cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    IAEA activities on high temperature gas cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of Member States, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products, and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (author)

  7. High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Sajad

    2011-05-01

    General Atomics (GA) has over 35 years experience in prismatic block High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technology design. During this period, the design has recently involved into a modular have been performed to demonstrate its versatility. This versatility is directly related to refractory TRISO coated - particle fuel that can contain any type of fuel. This paper summarized GA's fuel cycle studies individually and compares each based upon its cycle sustainability, proliferation-resistance capabilities, and other performance data against pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel cycle data. Fuel cycle studies LEU-NV;commercial HEU-Th;commercial LEU-Th;weapons-grade plutonium consumption; and burning of LWR waste including plutonium and minor actinides in the MHR. results show that all commercial MHR options, with the exception of HEU-TH, are more sustainable than a PWR fuel cycle. With LEU-NV being the most sustainable commercial options. In addition, all commercial MHR options out perform the PWR with regards to its proliferation-resistance, with thorium fuel cycle having the best proliferation-resistance characteristics.

  8. Novel High Temperature Materials for In-Situ Sensing Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florian Solzbacher; Anil Virkar; Loren Rieth; Srinivasan Kannan; Xiaoxin Chen; Hannwelm Steinebach

    2009-12-31

    The overriding goal of this project was to develop gas sensor materials and systems compatible with operation at temperatures from 500 to 700 C. Gas sensors operating at these temperatures would be compatible with placement in fossil-energy exhaust streams close to the combustion chamber, and therefore have advantages for process regulation, and feedback for emissions controls. The three thrusts of our work included investigating thin film gas sensor materials based on metal oxide materials and electroceramic materials, and also development of microhotplate devices to support the gas sensing films. The metal oxide materials NiO, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated for their sensitivity to H{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and CO{sub 2}, respectively, at high temperatures (T > 500 C), where the sensing properties of these materials have received little attention. New ground was broken in achieving excellent gas sensor responses (>10) for temperatures up to 600 C for NiO and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials. The gas sensitivity of these materials was decreasing as temperatures increased above 500 C, which indicates that achieving strong sensitivities with these materials at very high temperatures (T {ge} 650 C) will be a further challenge. The sensitivity, selectivity, stability, and reliability of these materials were investigated across a wide range of deposition conditions, temperatures, film thickness, as using surface active promoter materials. We also proposed to study the electroceramic materials BaZr{sub (1-x)}Y{sub x}O{sub (3-x/2)} and BaCe{sub (2-x)}Ca{sub x}S{sub (4-x/2)} for their ability to detect H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S, respectively. This report focuses on the properties and gas sensing characteristics of BaZr{sub (1-x)}Y{sub x}O{sub (3-x/2)} (Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}), as significant difficulties were encounter in generating BaCe{sub (2-x)}Ca{sub x}S{sub (4-x/2)} sensors. Significant new results were achieved for Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}, including

  9. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  10. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  11. The modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, D.E.; Lipps, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Due to relatively high operating temperatures, the gas-cooled reactor has the potential to serve a wide variety of energy applications. This paper discusses the energy applications which can be served by the modular HTGR, the magnitude of the potential markets, and the HTGR product cost incentives relative to fossil fuel competition. Advantages of the HTGR modular systems are presented along with a description of the design features and performance characteristics of the current reference HTGR modular systems

  12. Sapphire-fiber-based distributed high-temperature sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Hill, Cary; Cheng, Yujie; Homa, Daniel; Pickrell, Gary; Wang, Anbo

    2016-09-15

    We present, for the first time to our knowledge, a sapphire-fiber-based distributed high-temperature sensing system based on a Raman distributed sensing technique. High peak power laser pulses at 532 nm were coupled into the sapphire fiber to generate the Raman signal. The returned Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes signals were measured in the time domain to determine the temperature distribution along the fiber. The sensor was demonstrated from room temperature up to 1200°C in which the average standard deviation is about 3.7°C and a spatial resolution of about 14 cm was achieved.

  13. Fuel arrangement for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel arrangement for a high temperature gas cooled reactor including fuel assemblies with separate directly cooled fissile and fertile fuel elements removably inserted in an elongated moderator block also having a passageway for control elements

  14. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  15. Development history of the gas turbine modular high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brey, H.L.

    2001-01-01

    The development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) as an environmentally agreeable and efficient power source to support the generation of electricity and achieve a broad range of high temperature industrial applications has been an evolutionary process spanning over four decades. This process has included ongoing major development in both the HTGR as a nuclear energy source and associated power conversion systems from the steam cycle to the gas turbine. This paper follows the development process progressively through individual plant designs from early research of the 1950s to the present focus on the gas turbine modular HTGR. (author)

  16. High temperature gas dynamics an introduction for physicists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Tarit K

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Dynamics is a primer for scientists, engineers, and students who would like to have a basic understanding of the physics and the behavior of high-temperature gases. It is a valuable tool for astrophysicists as well. The first chapters treat the basic principles of quantum and statistical mechanics and how to derive thermophysical properties from them. Special topics are included that are rarely found in other textbooks, such as the thermophysical and transport properties of multi-temperature gases and a novel method to compute radiative transfer. Furthermore, collision processes between different particles are discussed. Separate chapters deal with the production of high-temperature gases and with electrical emission in plasmas, as well as related diagnostic techniques.This new edition adds over 100 pages and includes the following updates: several sections on radiative properties of high temperature gases and various radiation models, a section on shocks in magneto-gas-dynamics, a sectio...

  17. Contribution to high-temperature chromatography and high-temperature-gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry of lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aichholz, R.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes the use of high temperature gas chromatography for the investigation of unusual triacylglycerols, cyanolipids and bees waxes. The used glass capillary columns were pretreated and coated with tailor made synthesized high temperature stable polysiloxane phases. The selective separation properties of the individual columns were tested with a synthetic lipid mixture. Suitable derivatization procedures for the gaschromatographic analyses of neutral lipids, containing multiple bonds as well as hydroxy-, epoxy-, and carboxyl groups, were developed and optimized. Therefore conjugated olefinic-, conjugated olefinic-acetylenic-, hydroxy-, epoxy-, and conjugated olefinic keto triacylglycerols in miscellaneous plant seed oils as well as hydroxy monoesters, diesters and hydroxy diesters in bees waxes could be analysed directly with high temperature gas chromatography for the first time. In order to elucidate the structures of separated lipid compounds, high temperature gas chromatography was coupled to mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Comparable analytical systems are hitherto not commercial available. Therefore instrumental prerequisites for a comprehensive and detailed analysis of seed oils and bees waxes were established. In GC/MS commonly two ionization methods are used, electron impact ionization and chemical ionization. For the analysis of lipids the first is of limited use only. Due to intensive fragmentation only weak molecular ions are observed. In contrast, the chemical ionization yields in better results. Dominant quasi molecular ions enable an unambiguous determination of the molecular weight. Moreover, characteristic fragment ions provide important indications of certain structural features of the examined compounds. Nevertheless, in some cases the chromatographic resolution was insufficient in order to separate all compounds present in natural lipid mixtures. Owing to the selected detection with mass spectrometry

  18. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Yan, Xing; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2003-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been designing a Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled reactor) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a high efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) and fossil gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original features of this system are core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 Yen/kWh. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design except PCU design. Also, R and D for developing the power conversion unit is briefly described. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  19. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in the cooling gas of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1989-01-01

    The reactive impurities in the primary cooling helium of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) can cause oxidation, carburization or decarburization of the heat exchanging metallic components. By studies of the fundamental aspects of the corrosion mechanisms it became possible to define operating conditions under which the metallic construction materials show, from the viewpoint of technical application, acceptable corrosion behaviour. By extensive test programmes with exposure times of up to 30,000 hours, a data base has been obtained which allows a reliable extrapolation of the corrosion effects up to the envisaged service lives of the heat exchanging components. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs

  20. Structural instabilities of high temperature alloys and their use in advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.; Nickel, H.; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A.

    1989-01-01

    High-temperature, iron-nickel and nickel based alloys are the candidate heat exchanger materials for advanced high temperature gas-cooled reactors supplying process heat for coal gasification, where operation temperatures can reach 850-950 deg. C and service lives of more than 100,000 h are necessary. In the present paper, typical examples of structural changes which occur in two representative alloys (Alloy 800 H, Fe-32Ni-20Cr and Alloy 617, Ni-22Cr-12Co-9Mo-1Al) during high temperature exposure will be given and the effects on the creep rupture properties discussed. At service temperatures, precipitation of carbides occurs which has a significant effect on the creep behaviour, especially in the early stages of creep when the precipitate particles are very fine. During coarsening of the carbides, carbides at grain boundaries restrict grain boundary sliding which retards the development of creep damage. In the service environments, enhanced carbide precipitation may occur due to the ingress of carbon from the environment (carburization). Although the creep rate is not adversely affected, the ductility of the carburized material at low and intermediate temperatures is very low. During simulated service exposures, the formation of surface corrosion scales, the precipitation of carbides and the formation of internal oxides below the surface leads to depletion of the matrix in the alloying elements involved in the corrosion processes. In thin-walled tubes the depletion of Cr due to Cr 2 O 3 formation on the surface can lead to a loss of creep strength. An additional depletion effect resulting from environmental-metal reactions is the loss of carbon (decarburization) which may occur in specific environments. The compositions of the cooling gases which decarburize the material have been determined; they are to be avoided during reactor operation

  1. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  2. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gas cooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language

  3. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  4. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The high financial risk involved in building large nuclear power reactors has been a major factor in halting investment in new plant and in bringing further technical development to a standstill. Increased public concern about the safety of nuclear plant, particularly after Chernobyl, has contributed to this stagnation. Financial and technical risk could be reduced considerably by going to small modular units, which would make it possible to build up power station capacity in small steps. Such modular plant, based on the helium-cooled high temperature reactor (HTR), offers remarkable advantages in terms of inherent safety characteristics, partly because of the relatively small size of the individual modules but more on account of the enormous thermal capacity and high temperature margins of the graphitic reactor assemblies. Assessments indicate that, in the USA, the cost of power from the modular systems would be less than that from conventional single reactor plant, up to about 600 MW(e), and only marginally greater above that level, a margin that should be offset by the shorter time required in bringing the modular units on line to earn revenue. The modular HTR would be particularly appropriate in the UK, because of the considerable British industrial background in gas-cooled reactors, and could be a suitable replacement for Magnox. The modular reactor would be particularly suited to combined heat and power schemes and would offer great potential for the eventual development of gas turbine power conversion and the production of high-temperature process heat. (author)

  5. Properties of super alloys for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izaki, Takashi; Nakai, Yasuo; Shimizu, Shigeki; Murakami, Takashi

    1975-01-01

    The existing data on the properties at high temperature in helium gas of iron base super alloys. Incoloy-800, -802 and -807, nickel base super alloys, Hastelloy-X, Inconel-600, -617 and -625, and a casting alloy HK-40 were collectively evaluated from the viewpoint of the selection of material for HTGRs. These properties include corrosion resistance, strength and toughness, weldability, tube making, formability, radioactivation, etc. Creep strength was specially studied, taking into consideration the data on the creep characteristics in the actual helium gas atmosphere. The necessity of further long run creep data is suggested. Hastelloy-X has completely stable corrosion resistance at high temperature in helium gas. Incoloy 800 and 807 and Inconel 617 are not preferable in view of corrosion resistance. The creep strength of Inconel 617 extraporated to 1,000 deg C for 100,000 hours in air was the greatest rupture strength of 0.6 kg/mm 2 in all above alloys. However, its strength in helium gas began to fall during a relatively short time, so that its creep strength must be re-evaluated in the use for long time. The radioactivation and separation of oxide film in primary construction materials came into question, Inconel 617 and Incoloy 807 showed high induced radioactivity intensity. Generally speaking, in case of nickel base alloys such as Hastelloy-X, oxide film is difficult to break away. (Iwakiri, K.)

  6. Development of high temperature gas cooled reactor in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wentao [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Dept. of Nuclear Energy and Safety; Schorer, Michael [Swiss Nuclear Forum, Olten (Switzerland)

    2018-02-15

    High temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is one of the six Generation IV reactor types put forward by Generation IV International Forum (GIF) in 2002. This type of reactor has high outlet temperature. It uses Helium as coolant and graphite as moderator. Pebble fuel and ceramic reactor core are adopted. Inherit safety, good economy, high generating efficiency are the advantages of HTGR. According to the comprehensive evaluation from the international nuclear community, HTGR has already been given the priority to the research and development for commercial use. A demonstration project of the High Temperature Reactor-Pebble-�bed Modules (HTR-PM) in Shidao Bay nuclear power plant in China is under construction. In this paper, the development history of HTGR in China and the current situation of HTR-PM will be introduced. The experiences from China may be taken as a reference by the international nuclear community.

  7. Safety philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji Katanishi; Kazuhiko Kunitomi; Shusaku Shiozawa

    2002-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has undertaken the study of an original design concept of gas turbine high temperature reactor, the GTHTR300. The general concept of this study is development of a greatly simplified design that leads to substantially reduced technical and cost requirements. Newly proposed design features enable the GTHTR300 to be an efficient and economically competitive reactor in 2010's. Also, the GTHTR300 fully takes advantage of its inherent safety characteristics. The safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is developed based on the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) of JAERI which is the first HTGR in Japan. Major features of the newly proposed safety philosophy for the GTHTR300 are described in this article. (authors)

  8. IAEA high temperature gas-cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA activities on high temperature gas-cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of the Member states, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWG-GCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas-cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (authors)

  9. High temperature gas cleaning for pressurized gasification. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alden, H.; Hagstroem, P.; Hallgren, A.; Waldheim, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the project was to build an apparatus to study pressurized, high temperature gas cleaning of raw gasification gas generated from biomass. A flexible and easy to operate pressurized apparatus was designed and installed for the investigations in high temperature gas cleaning by means of thermal, catalytic or chemical procedures. A semi continuos fuel feeding concept, at a maximum rate of 700 g/h, allowed a very constant formation of a gas product at 700 deg C. The gas product was subsequently introduced into a fixed bed secondary reactor where the actual gas cleanup or reformation was fulfilled. The installation work was divided into four work periods and apart from a few delays the work was carried out according to the time plan. During the first work period (January - June 1994) the technical design, drawings etc. of the reactor and additional parts were completed. All material for the construction was ordered and the installation work was started. The second work period (July - December 1994) was dedicated to the construction and the installation of the different components. Initial tests with the electrical heating elements, control system and gas supply were assigned to the third work period (January - June 1995). After the commissioning and the resulting modifications, initial pyrolysis and tar decomposition experiments were performed. During the fourth and final work period, (June - December 1995) encouraging results from first tests allowed the experimental part of the project work to commence, however in a slightly reduced program. The experimental part of the project work comparatively studied tar decomposition as a function of the process conditions as well as of the choice of catalyst. Two different catalysts, dolomite and a commercial Ni-based catalyst, were evaluated in the unit. Their tar cracking ability in the pressure interval 1 - 20 bar and at cracker bed temperatures between 800 - 900 deg C was compared. Long term tests to study

  10. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors and process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with ceramic-coated microspheres of uranium and thorium oxides/carbides embedded in graphite blocks which are cooled with helium. Promising areas of HTGR application are in cogeneration, energy transport using Heat Transfer Salt, recovery of oils from oil shale, steam reforming of methane for chemical production, coal gasification, and in energy transfer using chemical heat jpipes in the long term. Further, HTGRs could be used as the energy source for hydrogen production through thermochemical water splitting in the long term. The potential market for Process Heat HTGRs is 100-200 large units by about the year 2020

  11. Analysis of artificial fireplace logs by high temperature gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Raymond J

    2002-11-01

    High temperature gas chromatography is used to analyze the wax of artificial fireplace logs (firelogs). Firelogs from several different manufacturers are studied and compared. This study shows that the wax within a single firelog is homogeneous and that the wax is also uniform throughout a multi-firelog package. Different brands are shown to have different wax compositions. Firelogs of the same brand, but purchased in different locations, also have different wax compositions. With this information it may be possible to associate an unknown firelog sample to a known sample, but a definitive statement of the origin cannot be made.

  12. New deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Tsuchie, Yasuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Konuki, Kaoru; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hayakawa, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is now under a condition difficult to know it well, because of considering not only power generation, but also diverse applications of its nuclear heat, of having extremely different safe principle from that of conventional reactors, of having two types of pebble-bed and block which are extremely different types, of promoting its construction plan in South Africa, of including its application to disposition of Russian surplus weapons plutonium of less reporting HTTR in Japan in spite of its full operation, and so on. However, HTGR is expected for an extremely important nuclear reactor aiming at the next coming one of LWR. HTGR which is late started and developed under complete private leading, is strongly conscious at environmental problem since its beginning. Before 30 years when large scale HTGR was expected to operate, it advertised a merit to reduce wasted heat because of its high temperature. As ratio occupied by electricity expands among application of energies, ratio occupied by the other energies are larger. When considering applications except electric power, high temperature thermal energy from HTGR can be thought wider applications than that from LWR and so on. (G.K.)

  13. Startup analysis for a high temperature gas loaded heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockol, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the rapid startup of a high-temperature gas-loaded heat pipe is presented. A two-dimensional diffusion analysis is used to determine the rate of energy transport by the vapor between the hot and cold zones of the pipe. The vapor transport rate is then incorporated in a simple thermal model of the startup of a radiation-cooled heat pipe. Numerical results for an argon-lithium system show that radial diffusion to the cold wall can produce large vapor flow rates during a rapid startup. The results also show that startup is not initiated until the vapor pressure p sub v in the hot zone reaches a precise value proportional to the initial gas pressure p sub i. Through proper choice of p sub i, startup can be delayed until p sub v is large enough to support a heat-transfer rate sufficient to overcome a thermal load on the heat pipe.

  14. The Influence of Mixing in High Temperature Gas Phase Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østberg, Martin

    1996-01-01

    by injection of NH3 with carrier gas into the flue gas. NH3 can react with NO and form N2, but a competing reaction path is the oxidation of NH3 to NO.The SNR process is briefly described and it is shown by chemical kinetic modelling that OH radicals under the present conditions will initiate the reaction......The objective of this thesis is to describe the mixing in high temperature gas phase reactions.The Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction of NOx (referred as the SNR process) using NH3 as reductant was chosen as reaction system. This in-furnace denitrification process is made at around 1200 - 1300 K...... diffusion. The SNR process is simulated using the mixing model and an empirical kinetic model based on laboratory experiments.A bench scale reactor set-up has been built using a natural gas burner to provide the main reaction gas. The set-up has been used to perform an experimental investigation...

  15. High-temperature gas effects on aerodynamic characteristics of waverider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the analysis of high-temperature effect on a conical waverider and it is a typical configuration of near space vehicles. Two different gas models are used in the numerical simulations, namely the thermochemical non-equilibrium and perfect gas models. The non-equilibrium flow simulations are conducted with the usage of the parallel non-equilibrium program developed by the authors while the perfect gas flow simulations are carried out with the commercial software Fluent. The non-equilibrium code is validated with experimental results and grid sensitivity analysis is performed as well. Then, numerical simulations of the flow around the conical waverider with the two gas models are conducted. In the results, differences in the flow structures as well as aerodynamic performances of the conical waverider are compared. It is found that the thermochemical non-equilibrium effect is significant mainly near the windward boundary layer at the tail of the waverider, and the non-equilibrium influence makes the pressure center move forward to about 0.57% of the whole craft’s length at the altitude of 60 km.

  16. Very-high-temperature gas reactor environmental impacts assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, C.D.; Barton, C.J.; Compere, E.L.; Row, T.H.

    1977-08-01

    The operation of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a slightly modified General Atomic type High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) with 1600 F primary coolant, as a source of process heat for the 1400 0 F steam-methanation reformer step in a hydrogen producing plant (via hydrogasification of coal liquids) was examined. It was found that: (a) from the viewpoint of product contamination by fission and activation products, an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) is probably not necessary; and (b) long term steam corrosion of the core support posts may require increasing their diameter (a relatively minor design adjustment). However, the hydrogen contaminant in the primary coolant which permeates the reformer may reduce steam corrosion but may produce other problems which have not as yet been resolved. An IHX in parallel with both the reformer and steam generator would solve these problems, but probably at greater cost than that of increasing the size of the core support posts. It is recommended that this corrosion problem be examined in more detail, especially by investigating the performance of current fossil fuel heated reformers in industry. Detailed safety analysis of the VHTR would be required to establish definitely whether the IHX can be eliminated. Water and hydrogen ingress into the reactor system are potential problems which can be alleviated by an IHX. These problems will require analysis, research and development within the program required for development of the VHTR

  17. Medium-size high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peinado, C.O.; Koutz, S.L.

    1980-08-01

    This report summarizes high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) experience for the 40-MW(e) Peach Bottom Nuclear Generating Station of Philadelphia Electric Company and the 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station of the Public Service Company of Colorado. Both reactors are graphite moderated and helium cooled, operating at approx. 760 0 C (1400 0 F) and using the uranium/thorium fuel cycle. The plants have demonstrated the inherent safety characteristics, the low activation of components, and the high efficiency associated with the HTGR concept. This experience has been translated into the conceptual design of a medium-sized 1170-MW(t) HTGR for generation of 450 MW of electric power. The concept incorporates inherent HTGR safety characteristics [a multiply redundant prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), a graphite core, and an inert single-phase coolant] and engineered safety features

  18. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  19. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  20. Safety analysis of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Akira; Morimoto, Toshio

    1975-01-01

    In recent years, in order to satisfy the social requirements of environment and safety and also to cope with the current energy stringency, the installation of safe nuclear power plants is indispensable. Herein, safety analysis and evaluation to confirm quantitatively the safety design of a nuclear power plant become more and more important. The safety analysis and its methods for a high temperature gas-cooled reactor are described, with emphasis placed on the practices by Fuji Electric Manufacturing Co. Fundamental rule of securing plant safety ; safety analysis in normal operation regarding plant dynamic characteristics and radioactivity evaluation ; and safety analysis at the time of accidents regarding plant response to the accidents and radioactivity evaluation are explained. (Mori, K.)

  1. Titanium dioxide thin films for high temperature gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, Zachary Mark; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita, E-mail: sbose@wsu.ed

    2010-10-29

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin film gas sensors were fabricated via the sol-gel method from a starting solution of titanium isopropoxide dissolved in methoxyethanol. Spin coating was used to deposit the sol on electroded aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates forming a film 1 {mu}m thick. The influence of crystallization temperature and operating temperature on crystalline phase, grain size, electronic conduction activation energy, and gas sensing response toward carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH{sub 4}) was studied. Pure anatase phase was found with crystallization temperatures up to 800 {sup o}C, however, rutile began to form by 900 {sup o}C. Grain size increased with increasing calcination temperature. Activation energy was dependent on crystallite size and phase. Sensing response toward CO and CH{sub 4} was dependent on both calcination and operating temperatures. Films crystallized at 650 {sup o}C and operated at 450 {sup o}C showed the best selectivity toward CO.

  2. Use of thorium for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimarães, Cláudio Q., E-mail: claudio_guimaraes@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Stefani, Giovanni L. de, E-mail: giovanni.stefani@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Thiago A. dos, E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The HTGR ( High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) is a 4{sup th} generation nuclear reactor and is fuelled by a mixture of graphite and fuel-bearing microspheres. There are two competitive designs of this reactor type: The German “pebble bed” mode, which is a system that uses spherical fuel elements, containing a graphite-and-fuel mixture coated in a graphite shell; and the American version, whose fuel is loaded into precisely located graphite hexagonal prisms that interlock to create the core of the vessel. In both variants, the coolant consists of helium pressurised. The HTGR system operates most efficiently with the thorium fuel cycle, however, so relatively little development has been carried out in this country on that cycle for HTGRs. In the Nuclear Engineering Centre of IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares), a study group is being formed linked to thorium reactors, whose proposal is to investigate reactors using thorium for {sup 233}U production and rejects burning. The present work intends to show the use of thorium in HTGRs, their advantages and disadvantages and its feasibility. (author)

  3. Inherently safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masao; Hayakawa, Hitoshi

    1987-01-01

    It is recognized in general that High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors have remarkable characteristics in inherent safety and it is well known that credits of the time margin have been admitted for accident evaluation in the licensing of the currently operating prototype HTGRs (300 MWe class). Recently, more inherently safe HTGRs are being developed in various countries and drawing attention on their possibility for urban siting. The inherent safety characteristics of these HTRs differ each other depending on their design philosophy and on the features of the components/structures which constitute the plant. At first, the specific features/characteristics of the elemental components/structures of the HTRs are explained one by one and then the overall safety features/characteristics of these HTR plants are explained in connection with their design philosophy and combination of the elemental features. Taking the KWU/Interatom Modular Reactor System as an example, the particular design philosophy and safety characteristics of the inherently safe HTR are explained with a result of preliminary evaluation on the possibility of siting close to densely populated area. (author)

  4. Metaphysics methods development for high temperature gas cooled reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, V.; Downar, T. J.

    2007-01-01

    Gas cooled reactors have been characterized as one of the most promising nuclear reactor concepts in the Generation-IV technology road map. Considerable research has been performed on the design and safety analysis of these reactors. However, the calculational tools being used to perform these analyses are not state-of-the-art and are not capable of performing detailed three-dimensional analyses. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop an improved thermal-hydraulic solver for the pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled reactors. The solution method is based on the porous medium approach and the momentum equation including the modified Ergun's resistance model for pebble bed is solved in three-dimensional geometry. The heat transfer in the pebble bed is modeled considering the local thermal non-equilibrium between the solid and gas, which results in two separate energy equations for each medium. The effective thermal conductivity of the pebble-bed can be calculated both from Zehner-Schluender and Robold correlations. Both the fluid flow and the heat transfer are modeled in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates and can be solved in steady-state and time dependent. The spatial discretization is performed using the finite volume method and the theta-method is used in the temporal discretization. A preliminary verification was performed by comparing the results with the experiments conducted at the SANA test facility. This facility is located at the Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology (ISR), Julich, Germany. Various experimental cases are modeled and good agreement in the gas and solid temperatures is observed. An on-going effort is to model the control rod ejection scenarios as described in the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR-400 benchmark problem. In order to perform these analyses PARCS reactor simulator code will be coupled with the new thermal-hydraulic solver. Furthermore, some of the other anticipated accident scenarios in the benchmark

  5. High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 617 in Helium Environment of Very High Temperature Gas Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Jung, Sujin; Kim, Daejong; Jeong, Yong-Whan; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 617 is a Ni-base superalloy and a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) of a very high temperature gas reactor (VHTR) which is one of the next generation nuclear reactors under development. The high operating temperature of VHTR enables various applications such as mass production of hydrogen with high energy efficiency. Alloy 617 has good creep resistance and phase stability at high temperatures in an air environment. However, it was reported that the mechanical properties decreased at a high temperature in an impure helium environment. In this study, high-temperature corrosion tests were carried out at 850°C-950°C in a helium environment containing the impurity gases H_2, CO, and CH_4, in order to examine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 617. Until 250 h, Alloy 617 specimens showed a parabolic oxidation behavior at all temperatures. The activation energy for oxidation in helium environment was 154 kJ/mol. The SEM and EDS results elucidated a Cr-rich surface oxide layer, Al-rich internal oxides and depletion of grain boundary carbides. The thickness and depths of degraded layers also showed a parabolic relationship with time. A normal grain growth was observed in the Cr-rich surface oxide layer. When corrosion tests were conducted in a pure helium environment, the oxidation was suppressed drastically. It was elucidated that minor impurity gases in the helium would have detrimental effects on the high temperature corrosion behavior of Alloy 617 for the VHTR application.

  6. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  7. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A.; Puente E, F.

    2014-10-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  8. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuels and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    At the third annual meeting of the technical working group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options and Spent Fuel Management (TWG-NFCO), held in Vienna, in 2004, it was suggested 'to develop manuals/handbooks and best practice documents for use in training and education in coated particle fuel technology' in the IAEA's Programme for the year 2006-2007. In the context of supporting interested Member States, the activity to develop a handbook for use in the 'education and training' of a new generation of scientists and engineers on coated particle fuel technology was undertaken. To make aware of the role of nuclear science education and training in all Member States to enhance their capacity to develop innovative technologies for sustainable nuclear energy is of paramount importance to the IAEA Significant efforts are underway in several Member States to develop high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) based on either pebble bed or prismatic designs. All these reactors are primarily fuelled by TRISO (tri iso-structural) coated particles. The aim however is to build future nuclear fuel cycles in concert with the aim of the Generation IV International Forum and includes nuclear reactor applications for process heat, hydrogen production and electricity generation. Moreover, developmental work is ongoing and focuses on the burning of weapon-grade plutonium including civil plutonium and other transuranic elements using the 'deep-burn concept' or 'inert matrix fuels', especially in HTGR systems in the form of coated particle fuels. The document will serve as the primary resource materials for 'education and training' in the area of advanced fuels forming the building blocks for future development in the interested Member States. This document broadly covers several aspects of coated particle fuel technology, namely: manufacture of coated particles, compacts and elements; design-basis; quality assurance/quality control and characterization techniques; fuel irradiations; fuel

  9. Failure mechanisms in high temperature gas cooled reactor fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.; Uneberg, G.; Sabatini, R.L.; Schweitzer, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    BISO coated UO 2 and ThO 2 particles were heated to high temperatures to determine failure mechanisms during hypothetical loss of coolant scenarios. Rapid failure begins when the oxides are reduced to liquid carbides. Several failure mechanisms are applicable, ranging from hole and crack formation in the coatings to catastrophic particle disintegration

  10. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in the primary circuit helium of high temperature gas cooled reactors. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The reactive impurities H 2 O, CO, H 2 and CH 4 which are present in the primary coolant helium of high temperature gas-cooled reactors can cause scale formation, internal oxidation and carburization or decarburization of the high temperature structural alloys. In Part 1 of this contribution a theoretical model was presented, which allows the explanation and prediction of the observed corrosion effects. The model is based on a classical stability diagram for chromium, modified to account for deviations from equilibrium conditions caused by kinetic factors. In this paper it is shown how a stability diagram for a commercial alloy can be constructed and how this can be used to correlate the corrosion results with the main experimental parameters, temperature, gas and alloy composition. Using the theoretical model and the presented experimental results, conditions are derived under which a protective chromia based surface scale will be formed which prevents a rapid transfer of carbon between alloy and gas atmosphere. It is shown that this protective surface oxide can only be formed if the carbon monoxide pressure in the gas exceeds a critical value. Psub(CO), which depends on temperature and alloy composition. Additions of methane only have a limited effect provided that the methane/water ratio is not near to, or greater than, a critical value of around 100/1. The influence of minor alloying additions of strong oxide forming elements, commonly present in high temperature alloys, on the protective properties of the chromia surface scales and the kinetics of carbon transfer is illustrated. (orig.) [de

  11. The real gas behaviour of helium as a cooling medium for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewing, G.

    1977-01-01

    The article describes the influence of the real gas behaviour on the variables of state for the helium gas and the effects on the design of high-temperature reactor plants. After explaining the basic equations for describing variables and changes of state of the real gas, the real and ideal gas behaviour is analysed. Finally, the influence of the real gas behaviour on the design of high-temperature reactors in one- and two-cycle plants is investigated. (orig.) [de

  12. A Silicon Carbide Wireless Temperature Sensing System for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an extreme environment-capable temperature sensing system based on state-of-art silicon carbide (SiC) wireless electronics is presented. In conjunction with a Pt-Pb thermocouple, the SiC wireless sensor suite is operable at 450 °C while under centrifugal load greater than 1,000 g. This SiC wireless temperature sensing system is designed to be non-intrusively embedded inside the gas turbine generators, acquiring the temperature information of critical components such as turbine blades, and wirelessly transmitting the information to the receiver located outside the turbine engine. A prototype system was developed and verified up to 450 °C through high temperature lab testing. The combination of the extreme temperature SiC wireless telemetry technology and integrated harsh environment sensors will allow for condition-based in-situ maintenance of power generators and aircraft turbines in field operation, and can be applied in many other industries requiring extreme environment monitoring and maintenance. PMID:23377189

  13. Stainless steel component with compressed fiber Bragg grating for high temperature sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinesh, Mathew; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2016-05-01

    A smart metal component having the potential for high temperature strain sensing capability is reported. The stainless steel (SS316) structure is made by selective laser melting (SLM). A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is embedded in to a 3D printed U-groove by high temperature brazing using a silver based alloy, achieving an axial FBG compression of 13 millistrain at room temperature. Initial results shows that the test component can be used for up to 700°C for sensing applications.

  14. Novel silica membranes for high temperature gas separations

    KAUST Repository

    Bighane, Neha

    2011-04-01

    This article describes fabrication of novel silica membranes derived via controlled oxidative thermolysis of polydimethylsiloxane and their gas separation performance. The optimized protocol for fabrication of the silica membranes is described and pure gas separation performance in the temperature range 35-80°C is presented. It is observed that the membranes exhibit activated transport for small gas penetrants such as He, H 2 and CO 2. The membranes can withstand temperatures up to 350°C in air and may ultimately find use in H 2/CO 2 separations to improve efficiency in the water-gas shift reactor process. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  15. A review of helium gas turbine technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Hee Cheon; Kim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Hyeun Min

    2007-01-01

    Current High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are based on a closed brayton cycle with helium gas as the working fluid. Thermodynamic performance of the axial-flow helium gas turbines is of critical concern as it considerably affects the overall cycle efficiency. Helium gas turbines pose some design challenges compared to steam or air turbomachinery because of the physical properties of helium and the uniqueness of the operating conditions at high pressure with low pressure ratio. This report present a review of the helium Brayton cycle experiences in Germany and in Japan. The design and availability of helium gas turbines for HTGR are also presented in this study. We have developed a new throughflow calculation code to calculate the design-point performance of helium gas turbines. Use of the method has been illustrated by applying it to the GTHTR300 reference

  16. Gas cooled thermal reactors with high temperatures (VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Vasile, A.

    2014-01-01

    VHTR is one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors, it is an upgraded version of the HTR-type reactor (High Temperature Reactors). 5 HTR reactors were operated in the world in the eighties, now 2 experimental HTR are working in China and Japan and 2 HTR with an output power of 100 MWe are being built in China. The purpose of the VHTR is to provide an helium at very high temperatures around 1000 Celsius degrees that could be used directly in a thermochemical way to produce hydrogen for instance. HTR reactors are interesting in terms of safety but it does not optimise the consumption of uranium and the production of wastes. This article presents a brief historical account of HTR-type reactors and their main design and safety features. The possibility of using HTR to burn plutonium is also presented as well as the possibility of closing the fuel cycle and of using thorium-uranium fuel. (A.C.)

  17. Novel silica membranes for high temperature gas separations

    KAUST Repository

    Bighane, Neha; Koros, William J.

    2011-01-01

    and pure gas separation performance in the temperature range 35-80°C is presented. It is observed that the membranes exhibit activated transport for small gas penetrants such as He, H 2 and CO 2. The membranes can withstand temperatures up to 350°C in air

  18. High temperature metallic materials for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The Specialists' Meeting was organized in conjunction with an earlier meeting on this topic held in Vienna, Austria, 1981, which provided for a comprehensive review of the status of materials development and testing at that time and for a description of test facilities. This meeting provided an opportunity (1) to review and discuss the progress made since 1981 in the development, testing and qualification of high temperature metallic materials, (2) to critically assess results achieved, and (3) to give directions for future research and development programmes. In particular, the meeting provided a form for a close interaction between component designers and materials specialists. The meeting was attended by 48 participants from France, People's Republic of China, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Poland, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USSR and USA presenting 22 papers. The technical part of the meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Components Design and Testing - Implications for Materials (4 papers); Microstructure and Environmental Compatibility (4 papers); Mechanical Properties (9 papers); New Alloys and Developments (6 papers). At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was organized in order to summarize the meeting and to make recommendations for future activities. This volume contains all papers presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. High Temperature Metallic Seal Development For Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Greg; Datta, Amit

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on metallic high temperature static seal development at NASA for gas turbine applications is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature Static Seal Development; 2) Program Review; 3) Phase IV Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 4) Spring Design; 5) Phase IV: Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 6) PHase IV: Testing Results; 7) Seal Seating Load; 8) Spring Seal Manufacturing; and 9) Other Applications for HIgh Temperature Spring Design

  20. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Scoping Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2010-08-01

    The NGNP Project has the objective of developing the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology to supply high temperature process heat to industrial processes as a substitute for burning of fossil fuels, such as natural gas. Applications of the HTGR technology that have been evaluated by the NGNP Project for supply of process heat include supply of electricity, steam and high-temperature gas to a wide range of industrial processes, and production of hydrogen and oxygen for use in petrochemical, refining, coal to liquid fuels, chemical, and fertilizer plants.

  1. High temperature friction and seizure in gas cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousseran, P.; Febvre, A.; Martin, R.; Roche, R.

    1978-01-01

    One of the most delicate problems encountered in the gas cooled nuclear reactors is the friction without lubrication in a dry and hot (800 0 C /1472 0 F) helium atmosphere even at very small velocity. The research and development programs are described together with special tribometers that operate at mode than 1000 0 C (1832 0 F) in dry helium. The most interesting test conditions and results are given for gas nitrited steels and for strongly alloyed Ni-Cr steels coated with chromium carbide by plasma sprayed. The effects of parameters live velocity, travelled distance, contact pressure, roughness, temperature and prolonged stops under charge are described together with the effects of negative phenomena like attachment and chattering [fr

  2. Model simulation for high-temperature gas desulphurization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonini; Zaccagnini; Berg; Vitolo; Tartarelli; Zeppi (Struttura Informatica, Florence (Italy))

    1993-01-01

    Metal oxides such as zinc ferrite, zinc titanate and tin oxide have been identified as promising adsorbent materials in the removal of sulphur compounds from hot coal gas in power generation operations. A mathematical model for the sulfidation phase in fixed, moving and fluidised bed reactors has been developed. This paper presents kinetic models of spherical sorbent particles applicable to all reactor configurations and a mathematical model limited to the moving bed reactor. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Research and development for high temperature gas cooled reactor in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taketani, K.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the current status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor research and development work in Japan, with emphasis on the Experimental Very High Temperature Reactor (Exp. VHTR) to be built by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) before the end of 1985. The necessity of construction of Exp. VHTR was explained from the points of Japanese energy problems and resources

  4. A study of silver behavior in Gas-turbine High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    A Gas-turbine High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (GT-HTGR) is one of the promising reactor systems of future HTGRs. In the design of GT-HTGR, behavior of fission products, especially of silver, is considered to be important from the view point of maintenance of gas-turbine. A study of silver behavior in the GT-HTGR was carried out based on current knowledge. The purposes of this study were to determine an importance of the silver problem quantitatively, countermeasures to the problem and items of future research and development which will be needed. In this study, inventory, fractional release from fuel, plateout in the primary circuit and radiation dose were evaluated, respectively. Based on this study, it is predicted that gamma-ray from plateout silver in gas-turbine system contributes about a half of total radiation dose after reactor shutdown. In future, more detail data for silver release from fuel, plateout behavior, etc. using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), for example, will be needed to carry out reasonable design. (author)

  5. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchoel Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5 layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  6. Utilization of multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawada, Osamu; Onuki, Yoshiaki; Wasaoka, Takeshi.

    1974-01-01

    Concerning the utilization of multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the electric power generation with gas turbines is described: features of HTR-He gas turbine power plants; the state of development of He gas turbines; and combined cycle with gas turbines and steam turbines. The features of gas turbines concern heat dissipation into the environment and the mode of load operation. Outstanding work in the development of He gas turbines is that in Hochtemperatur Helium-Turbine Project in West Germany. The power generation with combined gas turbines and steam turbines appears to be superior to that with gas turbines alone. (Mori, K.)

  7. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz [Research Center Julich (FZJ), Julich (Germany); Kendall, James M. [Global Virtual L1c, Prescott (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Roy Huddle, having invented the coated particle in Harwell 1957, stated in the early 1970s that we know now everything about particles and coatings and should be going over to deal with other problems. This was on the occasion of the Dragon fuel performance information meeting London 1973: How wrong a genius be{exclamation_point} It took until 1978 that really good particles were made in Germany, then during the Japanese HTTR production in the 1990s and finally the Chinese 2000-2001 campaign for HTR-10. Here, we present a review of history and present status. Today, good fuel is measured by different standards from the seventies: where 9 x 10{sup -4} initial free heavy metal fraction was typical for early AVR carbide fuel and 3 x 10{sup -4} initial free heavy metal fraction was acceptable for oxide fuel in THTR, we insist on values more than an order of magnitude below this value today. Half a percent of particle failure at the end-of-irradiation, another ancient standard, is not even acceptable today, even for the most severe accidents. While legislation and licensing has not changed, one of the reasons we insist on these improvements is the preference for passive systems rather than active controls of earlier times. After renewed HTGR interest, we are reporting about the start of new or reactivated coated particle work in several parts of the world, considering the aspects of designs/traditional and new materials, manufacturing technologies/ quality control/ quality assurance, irradiation and accident performance, modeling and performance predictions, and fuel cycle aspects and spent fuel treatment. In very general terms, the coated particle should be strong, reliable, retentive, and affordable. These properties have to be quantified and will be eventually optimized for a specific application system. Results obtained so far indicate that the same particle can be used for steam cycle applications with 700-750 .deg. C helium coolant gas exit, for gas turbine

  8. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz; Kendall, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Roy Huddle, having invented the coated particle in Harwell 1957, stated in the early 1970s that we know now everything about particles and coatings and should be going over to deal with other problems. This was on the occasion of the Dragon fuel performance information meeting London 1973: How wrong a genius be! It took until 1978 that really good particles were made in Germany, then during the Japanese HTTR production in the 1990s and finally the Chinese 2000-2001 campaign for HTR-10. Here, we present a review of history and present status. Today, good fuel is measured by different standards from the seventies: where 9 x 10 -4 initial free heavy metal fraction was typical for early AVR carbide fuel and 3 x 10 -4 initial free heavy metal fraction was acceptable for oxide fuel in THTR, we insist on values more than an order of magnitude below this value today. Half a percent of particle failure at the end-of-irradiation, another ancient standard, is not even acceptable today, even for the most severe accidents. While legislation and licensing has not changed, one of the reasons we insist on these improvements is the preference for passive systems rather than active controls of earlier times. After renewed HTGR interest, we are reporting about the start of new or reactivated coated particle work in several parts of the world, considering the aspects of designs/traditional and new materials, manufacturing technologies/ quality control/ quality assurance, irradiation and accident performance, modeling and performance predictions, and fuel cycle aspects and spent fuel treatment. In very general terms, the coated particle should be strong, reliable, retentive, and affordable. These properties have to be quantified and will be eventually optimized for a specific application system. Results obtained so far indicate that the same particle can be used for steam cycle applications with 700-750 .deg. C helium coolant gas exit, for gas turbine applications at 850-900 .deg. C

  9. Recent developments in high temperature coatings for gas turbine airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goward, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of coatings for hot section airfoils has increased with the drive for more cost-effective use of fuel in a wide variety of gas turbine engines. Minor additions of silicon have been found to appreciably increase the oxidation resistance of plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY coatings on a single crystal nickel-base superalloy. Increasing the chromium content of MCrAlY coatings substantially increases the resistance to acidic (Na2SO4-SO3) hot corrosion at temperatures of about 1300 F (704 C) but gives no significant improvement beyond contemporary coatings in the range of 1600 F (871 C). Surface enrichment of MCrAlY coatings with silicon also gives large increases in resistance to acidic hot corrosion in the 1300 F region. The resistance to the thermal stress-induced spalling of zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings has been improved by lowering coating stresses with segmented structures and by controlling the substrate temperature during coating fabrication.

  10. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines. PMID:23447006

  11. Improved spacers for high temperature gas-cooled heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordstroem, L A [Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research, Wuerenlingen (Switzerland)

    1984-07-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations in the field of heat exchanger thermohydraulics have been performed at EIR for many years, Basic studies have been carried out on heat transfer and pressure loss for tube bundles of different geometries and tube surfaces. As a part of this overall R+D programme for heat exchangers, investigations have been carried out on spacer pressure loss in bundles with longitudinal flow. An analytical spacer pressure loss model was developed which could handle different types of subchannel within the bundle. The model has been evaluated against experiments, using about 25 spacers of widely differing geometries. In a gas-cooled reactor it is important to keep the pressure loss over the primary circuit heat exchangers to a minimum. In exchangers with grid spacers these contribute a significant proportion of the overall bundle losses. For example, in the HHT Recuperator, with a shell-side pressure loss of 3.5 % of the inlet pressure, the spacers cause about one half of this loss. Reducing the loss to, say, 2.5 % results in an overall increase in plant efficiency by more than 1 % - a significant improvement Preliminary analysis identified 5 geometries in particular which were chosen for experimental evaluation as part of a joint project with the SULZER Company, to develop a low pressure-loss spacer for HHT heat exchangers (longitudinal counter-flow He/He and He/H{sub 2}O designs). The aim of the tests was to verify the low pressure-loss characteristics of these spacer grid types, as well as the quality of the results calculated by the computer code analytical model. The experimental and analytical results are compared in this report.

  12. Polymer-derived microporous ceramics for membranes and sensors for high temperature hydrogen purification and sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Ravi Mohan

    2012-06-11

    The growing interest in the use of hydrogen as main fuel has increased the need for pure hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production and purification. There are several by-products (CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}) associated with the production of hydrogen which might damage the production rate. Therefore, separation of hydrogen from other gases is an important step in the hydrogen production process. If H{sub 2} can be selectively removed from the product side during hydrogen production in membrane reactors, then it would be possible to achieve complete CO conversion in a single-step under high temperature conditions. The main goal of the present work is the high temperature H{sub 2} purification and sensing by applying polymer-derived ceramics. To prove the concept, the microporous SiBCN, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiCN ceramic membranes have been synthesized by the polymer-pyrolysis route and their performance for the hydrogen separation have been evaluated in tubular membranes as well as in planar chemiresistors. The synthesis of amorphous SiBCN ceramics has been realized through pyrolysis of poly(organoborosilazanes) in argon. Multilayered amorphous SiBCN/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes with gradient porosity have been realized and assessed with respect to the thermal stability, pore-size distribution and H{sub 2}/CO permeance. N{sub 2}-adsorption measurement indicates micropores in the range of 0.68-0.73 nm for three-fold SiBCN/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane. SEM characterization of three-fold SiBCN/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane shows the thickness of SiBCN membrane layer is 2.8 {mu}m; gas permeance measurements of the membrane shows H{sub 2}/CO selectivity of about 10.5 and the H{sub 2} permeance of about 1.05 x 10{sup -8} mol m{sup -2}s{sup -1}Pa{sup -1}. The observed gas permeation properties point out that the transportation of gas molecules through the membrane is governed by both

  13. Assessment and status report High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor gas-turbine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Purpose of this report is to present a brief summary assessment of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor - Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) technology. The focal point for the study was a potential 2000 MW(t)/800 MW(e) HTGR-GT commercial plant. Principal findings of the study were that: the HTGR-GT is feasible, but with significantly greater development risk than the HTGR-SC (Steam Cycle). At the level of performance corresponding to the reference design, no incremental economic incentive can be identified for the HTGR-GT to offset the increased development costs and risk relative to the HTGR-SC. The relative economics of the HTGR-GT and HTGR-SC are not significantly impacted by dry cooling considerations. While reduced cycel complexity may ultimately result in a reliability advantage for the HTGR-GT, the value of that potential advantage was not quantified

  14. The early history of high-temperature helium gas-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnad, M.T.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA

    1991-01-01

    The original concepts in the proposals for high-temperature helium gas-cooled power reactors by Farrington Daniels, during the decade 1944-1955, are summarized. The early research on the development of the helium gas-cooled power reactors is reviewed, and the operational experiences with the first generation of HTGRs are discussed. (author)

  15. Parametric studies on different gas turbine cycles for a high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Gu Yihua

    2005-01-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidates for future nuclear power plants. In this paper, the various types of HTGR gas turbine cycles are concluded as three typical cycles of direct cycle, closed indirect cycle and open indirect cycle. Furthermore they are theoretically converted to three Brayton cycles of helium, nitrogen and air. Those three types of Brayton cycles are thermodynamically analyzed and optimized. The results show that the variety of gas affects the cycle pressure ratio more significantly than other cycle parameters, however, the optimized cycle efficiencies of the three Brayton cycles are almost the same. In addition, the turbomachines which are required for the three optimized Brayton cycles are aerodynamically analyzed and compared and their fundamental characteristics are obtained. Helium turbocompressor has lower stage pressure ratio and more stage number than those for nitrogen and air machines, while helium and nitrogen turbocompressors have shorter blade length than that for air machine

  16. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  17. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  18. Characterization of thick and thin film SiCN for pressure sensing at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Alfin; Andronenko, Sergey; Stiharu, Ion; Bhat, Rama B

    2010-01-01

    Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA), thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40-60 μm) and thick (about 2-3 mm) films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated.

  19. Characterization of Thick and Thin Film SiCN for Pressure Sensing at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama B. Bhat

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA, thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40–60 µm and thick (about 2–3 mm films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated.

  20. Simulation of the fuzzy-smith control system for the high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Deheng; Xu Xiaolin; Zheng Jie; Guo Renjun; Zhang Guifen

    1997-01-01

    The Fuzzy-Smith pre-estimate controller to solve the control of the big delay system is developed, accompanied with the development of the mathematical model of the 10 MW high temperature gas cooled test reactor (HTR-10) and the design of its control system. The simulation results show the Fuzzy-Smith pre-estimate controller has the advantages of both fuzzy control and Smith pre-estimate controller; it has better compensation to the delay and better adaptability to the parameter change of the control object. So it is applicable to the design of the control system for the high temperature gas cooled reactor

  1. High Temperature Gas-to-Gas Heat Exchanger Based on a Solid Intermediate Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Amirante

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the design of an innovative high temperature gas-to-gas heat exchanger based on solid particles as intermediate medium, with application in medium and large scale externally fired combined power plants fed by alternative and dirty fuels, such as biomass and coal. An optimization procedure, performed by means of a genetic algorithm combined with computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis, is employed for the design of the heat exchanger: the goal is the minimization of its size for an assigned heat exchanger efficiency. Two cases, corresponding to efficiencies equal to 80% and 90%, are considered. The scientific and technical difficulties for the realization of the heat exchanger are also faced up; in particular, this work focuses on the development both of a pressurization device, which is needed to move the solid particles within the heat exchanger, and of a pneumatic conveyor, which is required to deliver back the particles from the bottom to the top of the plant in order to realize a continuous operation mode. An analytical approach and a thorough experimental campaign are proposed to analyze the proposed systems and to evaluate the associated energy losses.

  2. Mechanical Property and Its Comparison of Superalloys for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, D. W.; Ryu, W. S.; Han, C. H.; Yoon, J. H.; Chang, J.

    2005-01-01

    Since structural materials for high temperature gas cooled reactor are used during long period in nuclear environment up to 1000 .deg. C, it is important to have good properties at elevated temperature such as mechanical properties (tensile, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue), microstructural stability, interaction between metal and gas, friction and wear, hydrogen and tritium permeation, irradiation behavior, corrosion by impurity in He. Thus, in order to select excellent materials for the high temperature gas cooled reactor, it is necessary to understand the material properties and to gather the data for them. In this report, the items related to material properties which are needed for designing the high temperature gas cooled reactor were presented. Mechanical properties; tensile, creep, and fatigue etc. were investigated for Haynes 230, Hastelloy-X, In 617 and Alloy 800H, which can be used as the major structural components, such as intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), hot duct and piping and internals. Effect of He and irradiation on these structural materials was investigated. Also, mechanical properties; physical properties, tensile properties, creep and creep crack growth rate were compared for them, respectively. These results of this report can be used as important data to select superior materials for high temperature gas reactor

  3. High-Temperature Structural Analysis Model of the Process Heat Exchanger for Helium Gas Loop (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Lee, Heong Yeon; Kim, Chan Soo; Hong, Seong Duk; Park, Hong Yoon

    2010-01-01

    PHE (Process Heat Exchanger) is a key component required to transfer heat energy of 950 .deg. C generated in a VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) to the chemical reaction that yields a large quantity of hydrogen. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute established the helium gas loop for the performance test of components, which are used in the VHTR, and they manufactured a PHE prototype to be tested in the loop. In this study, as part of the high temperature structural-integrity evaluation of the PHE prototype, which is scheduled to be tested in the helium gas loop, we carried out high-temperature structural-analysis modeling, thermal analysis, and thermal expansion analysis of the PHE prototype. The results obtained in this study will be used to design the performance test setup for the PHE prototype

  4. High temperature, high pressure gas loop - the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.; Sanders, J.P.; Young, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    The high-pressure, high-temperature, gas-circulating Component Flow Test Loop located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was designed and constructed utilizing Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The quality assurance program for operating and testing is also based on applicable ASME standards. Power to a total of 5 MW is available to the test section, and an air-cooled heat exchanger rated at 4.4 MW serves as heat sink. The three gas-bearing, completely enclosed gas circulators provide a maximum flow of 0.47 m 3 /s at pressures to 10.7 MPa. The control system allows for fast transients in pressure, power, temperature, and flow; it also supports prolonged unattended steady-state operation. The data acquisition system can access and process 10,000 data points per second. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor components are being tested

  5. The world trends of high temperature gas-cooled reactors and the mode of utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Jun-ichi

    1974-01-01

    After a long period of research and development, high temperature gas-cooled reactors are going to enter the practical stage. The combination of a HTGR with a closed cycle helium gas turbine is advantageous in thermal efficiency, reduction of environmental impact and economy. In recent years, the direct utilization of nuclear heat energy in industries has been attracting interest. The multi-purpose utilization of high temperature gas-cooled reactors is thus now the world trend. Reviewing the world developments in this field, the following matters are described: (1) development of HTGRs in the U.K., West Germany, France and the United States; (2) development of He gas turbine, etc. in West Germany; and (3) multi-purpose utilization of HTGRs in West Germany and Japan. (Mori, K.)

  6. Design activity of IHI on the experimental multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    With conspicuous interest and attention paid by iron and steel manufacturing industries, the development of the multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor, namely the process heat reactor has been energetically discussed in Japan. The experimental multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor, planned by JAERI (the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), is now at the end of the adjustment design stage and about to enter the system synthesizing design stage. The design of the JAERI reactor as a pilot plant for process heat reactors that make possible the direct use of the heat, produced in the reactor, for other industrial uses was started in 1969, and has undergone several revisions up to now. The criticality of the JAERI reactor is expected to be realized before 1985 according to the presently published program. IHI has engaged in the developing work of HTGR (high temperature gas-cooled reactor) including VHTR (very high temperature gas-cooled reactor) for over seven years, producing several achievements. IHI has also participated in the JAERI project since 1973 with some other companies concerned in this field. The design activity of IHI in the development of the JAERI reactor is briefly presented in this paper. (auth.)

  7. Sodium and cover gas chemistry in the high temperature sodium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.; Duncan, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    The equipment and procedures used in following sodium and cover gas chemistry changes in the High Temperature Sodium Facility are presented. The methods of analysis and results obtained are given. Impurity trends which have been measured during the facility operations are discussed

  8. Technology development for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Turner, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    In the USA the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor is in an advanced stage of design. The related HTGR program areas, the approaches to these programs along with sample results and a description of how these data are used are highlighted in the paper. (author). Figs and tabs

  9. Design of project management system for 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yan; Xu Yuanhui

    1998-01-01

    A framework of project management information system (MIS) for 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor is introduced. Based on it, the design of nuclear project management information system and project monitoring system (PMS) are given. Additionally, a new method of developing MIS and Decision Support System (DSS) has been tried

  10. Summary of ORNL high-temperature gas-cooled reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) efforts on the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Program have been on HTGR fuel development, fission product and coolant chemistry, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) studies, materials studies, graphite development, reactor physics and shielding studies, application assessments and evaluations and selected component testing

  11. High temperature gasification and gas cleaning – phase II of the HotVegas project

    OpenAIRE

    Meysel, P.; Halama, S.; Botteghi, F.; Steibel, M.; Nakonz, M.; Rück, R.; Kurowski, P.; Buttler, A.; Spliethoff, H.

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of the research project HotVeGas is to lay the necessary foundations for the long-term development of future, highly efficient high-temperature gasification processes. This includes integrated hot gas cleaning and optional CO2 capture and storage for next generation IGCC power plants and processes for the development of synthetic fuels. The joint research project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology and five industry partners. It is coordi...

  12. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300 (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Yan, Xing; Kosugiyama, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) started design and development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor with a gas turbine electric generation system, GTHTR300, in April 2001. Design originalities of the GTHTR300 are a horizontally mounted highly efficient gas turbine system and an ultimately simplified safety system such as no containment building and no active emergency core cooling. These design originalities are proposed based on design and operational experiences in conventional gas turbine systems and Japan's first high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTTR: High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) so that many R and Ds are not required for the development. Except these original design features, devised core design, fuel design and plant design are adopted to meet design requirements and attain a target cost. This paper describes the unique design features focusing on the safety design, reactor core design and gas turbine system design together with a preliminary result of the safety evaluation carried out for a typical severe event. This study is entrusted from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  13. High temperature resistant materials and structural ceramics for use in high temperature gas cooled reactors and fusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1992-01-01

    Irrespective of the systems and the status of the nuclear reactor development lines, the availability, qualification and development of materials are crucial. This paper concentrates on the requirements and the status of development of high temperature metallic and ceramic materials for core and heat transferring components in advanced HTR supplying process heat and for plasma exposed, high heat flux components in Tokamak fusion reactor types. (J.P.N.)

  14. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1-200 bar and temperature range 300-1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients...... of a CO2-N2 mixture at 100 bar and 1000 K are revealed for the first time, exceeding the high temperature and pressure combinations previously reported. This paper discusses the design considerations involved in the construction of the cell and presents validation measurements compared against simulated...

  15. Method and alloys for fabricating wrought components for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.D.; Johnson, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Wrought, nickel-based alloys, suitable for components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor exhibit strength and excellent resistance to carburization at elevated temperatures and include aluminum and titanium in amounts and ratios to promote the growth of carburization resistant films while preserving the wrought character of the alloys. These alloys also include substantial amounts of molybdenum and/or tungsten as solid-solution strengtheners. Chromium may be included in concentrations less than 10% to assist in fabrication. Minor amounts of carbon and one or more carbide-forming metals also contribute to high-temperature strength. The range of compositions of these alloys is given. (author)

  16. Nuclear power for coexistence with nature, high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1996-01-01

    Until this century, it is sufficient to aim at the winner of competition in human society to obtain resources, and to entrust waste to natural cleaning action. However, the expansion of social activities has been too fast, and the scale has become too large, consequently, in the next century, the expansion of social activities will be caught by the structure of trilemma that is subjected to the strong restraint and selection from the problems of finite energy and resources and environment preservation. In 21st century, the problems change to those between mankind and nature. Energy supply and population increase, envrionment preservation and human activities, and the matters that human wisdom should bear regarding energy technology are discussed. In Japan, the construction of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is in progress. The design of high temperature gas-cooled reactors and their features on the safety are explained. The capability of reducing CO 2 release of high temperature gas-cooled reactors is reported. In future, it is expected that the time of introducing high temperature gas-cooled reactors will come. (K.I.)

  17. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1–200 bar and temperature range 300–1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients of a CO_2–N_2 mixture at 100 bar and 1000 K are revealed for the first time, exceeding the high temperature and pressure combinations previously reported. This paper discusses the design considerations involved in the construction of the cell and presents validation measurements compared against simulated spectra, as well as published experimental data. - Highlights: • A ceramic gas cell designed for gas measurements up to 1300 K and 200 bar. • The first recorded absorption spectrum of CO_2 at 1000 K and 101 bar is presented. • Voigt profiles might suffice in the modeling of radiation from CO_2 in combustion.

  18. High-temperature CO / HC gas sensors to optimize firewood combustion in low-power fireplaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ojha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to optimize firewood combustion in low-power firewood-fuelled fireplaces, a novel combustion airstream control concept based on the signals of in situ sensors for combustion temperature, residual oxygen concentration and residual un-combusted or partly combusted pyrolysis gas components (CO and HC has been introduced. A comparison of firing experiments with hand-driven and automated airstream-controlled furnaces of the same type showed that the average CO emissions in the high-temperature phase of the batch combustion can be reduced by about 80 % with the new control concept. Further, the performance of different types of high-temperature CO / HC sensors (mixed-potential and metal oxide types, with reference to simultaneous exhaust gas analysis by a high-temperature FTIR analysis system, was investigated over 20 batch firing experiments (∼ 80 h. The distinctive sensing behaviour with respect to the characteristically varying flue gas composition over a batch firing process is discussed. The calculation of the Pearson correlation coefficients reveals that mixed-potential sensor signals correlate more with CO and CH4; however, different metal oxide sensitive layers correlate with different gas species: 1 % Pt / SnO2 designates the presence of CO and 2 % ZnO / SnO2 designates the presence of hydrocarbons. In the case of a TGS823 sensor element, there was no specific correlation with one of the flue gas components observed. The stability of the sensor signals was evaluated through repeated exposure to mixtures of CO, N2 and synthetic air after certain numbers of firing experiments and exhibited diverse long-term signal instabilities.

  19. Experiment Plan of High Temperature Steam and Carbon dioxide Co-electrolysis for Synthetic Gas Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Ko, Jae-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Currently, Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) come into the spotlight in the middle of the energy technologies of the future for highly effective conversion of fossil fuels into electricity without carbon dioxide emission. The SOFC is a reversible cell. By applying electrical power to the cell, which is solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), it is possible to produce synthetic gas (syngas) from high temperature steam and carbon dioxide. The produced syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) can be used for synthetic fuels. This SOEC technology can use high temperature from VHTRs for high efficiency. This paper describes KEPRI's experiment plan of high temperature steam and carbon co-electrolysis for syngas production using SOEC technology

  20. Gas phase analysis of CO interactions with solid surfaces at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghel, Clara; Hoernlund, Erik; Hultquist, Gunnar; Limbaeck, Magnus

    2004-01-01

    An in situ method including mass spectrometry and labeled gases is presented and used to gain information on adsorption of molecules at high temperatures (>300 deg. C). Isotopic exchange rate in H 2 upon exposure to an oxidized zicaloy-2 sample and exchange rate in CO upon exposure to various materials have been measured. From these measurements, molecular dissociation rates in respective system have been calculated. The influence of CO and N 2 on the uptake rate of H 2 in zirconium and oxidized zicaloy-2 is discussed in terms of tendency for adsorption at high temperatures. In the case of oxidized Cr exposed to CO gas with 12 C, 13 C, 16 O and 18 O, the influence of H 2 O is investigated with respect to dissociation of CO molecules. The presented data supports a view of different tendencies for molecular adsorption of H 2 O, CO, N 2 , and H 2 molecules on surfaces at high temperatures

  1. Preliminary study on helium turbomachine for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yihua; Wang Jie; Zhang Zuoyi

    2003-01-01

    In the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), gas turbine cycle is a new concept in the field of nuclear power. It combines two technologies of HTGR and gas turbine cycle, which represent the state-of-the-art technologies of nuclear power and fossil fuel generation respectively. This approach is expected to improve safety and economy of nuclear power plant significantly. So it is a potential scheme with competitiveness. The heat-recuperated cycle is the main stream of gas turbine cycle. In this cycle, the work medium is helium, which is very different from the air, so that the design features of the helium turbomachine and combustion gas turbomachine are different. The paper shows the basic design consideration for the heat-recuperated cycle as well as helium turbomachine and highlights its main design features compared with combustion gas turbomachine

  2. Flow distribution of pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactors using large eddy simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokhan Yesilyurt; Hassan, Y.A.

    2003-01-01

    A High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the renewed reactor designs to play a role in nuclear power generation. This reactor design concepts is currently under consideration and development worldwide. Since the HTGR concept offers inherent safety, has a very flexible fuel cycle with capability to achieve high burnup levels, and provides good thermal efficiency of power plant, it can be considered for further development and improvement as a reactor concept of generation IV. The combination of coated particle fuel, inert helium gas as coolant and graphite moderated reactor makes it possible to operate at high temperature yielding a high efficiency. In this study the simulation of turbulent transport for the gas through the gaps of the spherical fuel elements (fuel pebbles) will be performed. This will help in understanding the highly three-dimensional, complex flow phenomena in pebble bed caused by flow curvature. Under these conditions, heat transfer in both laminar and turbulent flows varies noticeably around curved surfaces. Curved flows would be present in the presence of contiguous curved surfaces. In the case of a laminar flow and of an appreciable effect of thermogravitional forces, the Nusselt (Nu) number depends significantly on the curvature shape of the surface. It changes with order of 10 times. The flow passages through the gap between the fuel balls have concave and convex configurations. Here the action of the centrifugal forces manifests itself differently on convex and concave parts of the flow path (suppression or stimulation of turbulence). The flow of this type has distinctive features. In such flow there is a pressure gradient, which strongly affects the boundary layer behavior. The transition from a laminar to turbulent flow around this curved flow occurs at deferent Reynolds (Re) numbers. Consequently, noncircular curved flows as in the pebble-bed situation, in detailed local sense, is interesting to be investigated. To the

  3. Present state and future prospect of development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanokawa, Konomo

    1994-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors can supply the heat of about 1000degC, and the high efficiency and the high rate of heat utilization can be attained. Also they have the features of excellent inherent safety, the easiness of operation, the high burnup of fuel and so on. The heat utilization of atomic energy in addition to electric power generation is very important in view of the protection of global environment and the diversification of energy supply. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the construction of the high temperature engineering test and research reactor (HTTR) of 30 MW thermal output, aiming at attaining the criticality in 1998. The progress of the development of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor is described. For 18 years, the design study of the reactor was advanced together with the research and development of the reactor physics, fuel and materials, high temperature machinery and equipment and others, and the decision of the design standard and the development of computation codes. The main specification and the construction schedule are shown. The reactor building was almost completed, and the reactor containment vessel was installed. The plan of the research and development by using the HTTR is investigated. (K.I.)

  4. Interdigitated Pt-GaN Schottky interfaces for high-temperature soot-particulate sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hongyun; Hou, Minmin; Jain, Sambhav R.; Lim, Jongwoo; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2016-04-01

    A microscale soot-particulate sensor using interdigitated platinum-gallium nitride (Pt-GaN) Schottky interfaces was developed to monitor fine soot particles within high-temperature environments (e.g., combustion exhausts and flues). Upon exposure to soot particles (30 to 50 nm in diameter) from an experimental chimney, an increased current (∼43.6%) is observed through the back-to-back Schottky contact to n-type GaN. This is attributed to a reduction in the effective Schottky barrier height (SBH) of ∼10 meV due to the electric field from the charged soot particles in the depletion region and exposed GaN surface. Furthermore, the microfabricated sensor was shown to recover sensitivity and regenerate the sensing response (∼11 meV SBH reduction) after exposure to temperature as high as 550 °C. This study supports the feasibility of a simple and reliable soot sensor to meet the increasing market demand for particulate matter sensing in harsh environments.

  5. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, g.; Anghaie, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper proposes a computational model for analysis of flow and heat transfer in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The formulation of the problem is based on using the axisymmetric, thin layer Navier-Stokes equations. A hybrid implicit-explicit method based on finite volume approach is used to numerically solve the governing equations. A fast converging scheme is developed to accelerate the Gauss-Siedel iterative method for problems involving the wall heat flux boundary condition. Several cases are simulated and results of temperature and pressure distribution in the core are presented. Results of a parametric analysis for the assessment of the impact of power density on the convective heat transfer rate and wall temperature are discussed. A comparative analysis is conducted to identify the Nusselt number correlation that best fits the physical conditions of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors.

  6. Economical evaluation on gas turbine high temperature reactor 300 (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takei, Masanobu; Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Mouri, Tomoaki; Katanishi, Shoji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing a graphite moderate and helium cooled High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) with gas turbine, the GTHTR300 based on experience gained in development and operations of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in JAERI. The GTHTR300 is a simplified and economical power plant with a high level of safety characteristics and a high plant efficiency of approximately 46%. Cost evaluation for plant construction and power generation is studied in order to clarify the economical feasibility of the GTHTR300. The construction cost is estimated to be about 200 thousands Yen/kWe. The power generation cost is estimated to be about 3.8 Yen/kWh by the conditions of 90% load factor and 3% discount rate. The economical feasibility of the GTHTR300 is certified. The present study is entrusted from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  7. The Integration Of Process Heat Applications To High Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKellar, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    A high temperature gas reactor, HTGR, can produce industrial process steam, high-temperature heat-transfer gases, and/or electricity. In conventional industrial processes, these products are generated by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas, resulting in significant emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Heat or electricity produced in an HTGR could be used to supply process heat or electricity to conventional processes without generating any greenhouse gases. Process heat from a reactor needs to be transported by a gas to the industrial process. Two such gases were considered in this study: helium and steam. For this analysis, it was assumed that steam was delivered at 17 MPa and 540 C and helium was delivered at 7 MPa and at a variety of temperatures. The temperature of the gas returning from the industrial process and going to the HTGR must be within certain temperature ranges to maintain the correct reactor inlet temperature for a particular reactor outlet temperature. The returning gas may be below the reactor inlet temperature, ROT, but not above. The optimal return temperature produces the maximum process heat gas flow rate. For steam, the delivered pressure sets an optimal reactor outlet temperature based on the condensation temperature of the steam. ROTs greater than 769.7 C produce no additional advantage for the production of steam.

  8. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor: A cost/risk competitive nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotschall, H.L.

    1994-01-01

    The business risks of nuclear plant ownership are identified as a constraint on the expanded use of nuclear power. Such risks stem from the exacting demands placed on owner/operator organizations of current plants to demonstrate ongoing compliance with safety regulations and the resulting high costs for operation and maintenance. This paper describes the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) design, competitive economics, and approach to reducing the business risks of nuclear plant ownership

  9. Reference modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Plant: Concept description report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a summary description of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concept and interim results of assessments of costs, safety, constructibility, operability, maintainability, and availability. Conceptual design of this concept was initiated in October 1985 and is scheduled for completion in 1987. Participating industrial contractors are Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC), GA Technologies, Inc. (GA), General Electric Co. (GE), and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E).

  10. Reference modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Plant: Concept description report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a summary description of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concept and interim results of assessments of costs, safety, constructibility, operability, maintainability, and availability. Conceptual design of this concept was initiated in October 1985 and is scheduled for completion in 1987. Participating industrial contractors are Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC), GA Technologies, Inc. (GA), General Electric Co. (GE), and Combustion Engineering, Inc

  11. Probabilistic safety assessment framework of pebble-bed modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tao; Tong Jiejuan; Zhao Jun; Cao Jianzhu; Zhang Liguo

    2009-01-01

    After an investigation of similar reactor type probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) framework, Pebble-bed Modular High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTR-PM) PSA framework was presented in correlate with its own design characteristics. That is an integral framework which spreads through event sequence structure with initiating events at the beginning and source term categories in the end. The analysis shows that it is HTR-PM design feature that determines its PSA framework. (authors)

  12. HTGR [High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] ingress analysis using MINET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Yang, J.W.; Kroeger, P.G.; Mallen, A.N.; Aronson, A.L.

    1989-04-01

    Modeling of water/steam ingress into the primary (helium) cooling circuit of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is described. This modeling was implemented in the MINET Code, which is a program for analyzing transients in intricate fluid flow and heat transfer networks. Results from the simulation of a water ingress event postulated for the Modular HTGR are discussed. 27 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  13. Thermal-hydraulic code selection for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E M.J.; Bogaard, J.P.A. van den

    1995-06-01

    In order to study the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the thermal-hydraulic computer codes RELAP5, MELCOR, THATCH, MORECA, and VSOP are considered at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN. This report presents the selection of the most appropriate codes. To cover the range of relevant accidents, a suite of three codes is recommended for analyses of HTR-M and MHTGR reactors. (orig.).

  14. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.M.; Collins, J.W.; Garcia, C.B.; Pincock, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) have been designed and operated throughout the world over the past five decades. These seven HTGRs are varied in size, outlet temperature, primary fluid, and purpose. However, there is much the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has learned and can learn from these experiences. This report captures these various experiences and documents the lessons learned according to the physical NGNP hardware (i.e., systems, subsystems, and components) affected thereby.

  15. Characterization of effluents from a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel refabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, M.S.; Bradley, R.A.; Olsen, A.R.

    1975-12-01

    The types and quantities of chemical and radioactive effluents that would be released from a reference fuel refabrication facility for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) have been determined. This information will be used to predict the impact of such a facility on the environment, to identify areas where additional development work needs to be done to further identify and quantify effluent streams, and to limit effluent release to the environment

  16. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  17. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  18. Economic analysis of multiple-module high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTR) nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yu; Dong Yujie

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, as the increasing demand of energy all over the world, and the pressure on greenhouse emissions, there's a new opportunity for the development of nuclear energy. Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTR) received recognition for its inherent safety feature and high outlet temperature. Whether the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor would be accepted extensively, its economy is a key point. In this paper, the methods of qualitative analysis and the method of quantitative analysis, the economic models designed by Economic Modeling Working Group (EMWG) of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), as well as the HTR-PM's main technical features, are used to analyze the economy of the MHTR. A prediction is made on the basis of summarizing High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor module characteristics, construction cost, total capital cost, fuel cost and operation and maintenance (O and M) cost and so on. In the following part, comparative analysis is taken measures to the economy and cost ratio of different designs, to explore the impacts of modularization and standardization on the construction of multiple-module reactor nuclear power plant. Meanwhile, the analysis is also adopted in the research of key factors such as the learning effect and yield to find out their impacts on the large scale development of MHTR. Furthermore, some reference would be provided to its wide application based on these analysis. (author)

  19. Utility industry evaluation of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstein, S.; Bitel, J.S.; Tramm, T.R.; High, M.D.; Neils, G.H.; Tomonto, J.R.; Weinberg, C.J.

    1990-02-01

    A team of utility industry representatives evaluated the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor plant design, a current design created by an industrial team led by General Atomics under Department of Energy sponsorship and with support provided by utilities through Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates. The utility industry team concluded that the plant design should be considered a viable application of an advanced nuclear concept and deserves continuing development. Specific comments and recommendations are provided as a contribution toward improving a very promising plant design. 2 refs

  20. Study on fundamental features of helium turbomachine for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Gu Yihua

    2004-01-01

    The High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with helium turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidates for future nuclear power plants. The HTGR helium turbine cycle was analyzed and optimized. Then the focal point of investigation was concentrated on the fundamental thermodynamic and aerodynamic features of helium turbomachine. As a result, a helium turbomachine is different from a general combustion gas turbine in two main design features, that is a helium turbomachine has more blade stages and shorter blade length, which are caused by the helium property and the high pressure of a closed cycle, respectively. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of proposed German safety criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsell, A.W.

    1980-05-01

    This work reviews proposed safety criteria prepared by the German Bundesministerium des Innern (BMI) for future licensing of gas-cooled high-temperature reactor (HTR) concepts in the Federal Republic of Germany. Comparison is made with US General Design Criteria (GDCs) in 10CFR50 Appendix A and with German light water reactor (LWR) criteria. Implications for the HTR design relative to the US design and safety approach are indicated. Both inherent characteristics and design features of the steam cycle, gas turbine, and process heat concepts are taken into account as well as generic design options such as a pebble bed or prismatic core

  2. Conceptual Design for a High-Temperature Gas Loop Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James B. Kesseli

    2006-08-01

    This report documents an early-stage conceptual design for a high-temperature gas test loop. The objectives accomplished by the study include, (1) investigation of existing gas test loops to determine ther capabilities and how the proposed system might best complement them, (2) development of a preliminary test plan to help identify the performance characteristics required of the test unit, (3) development of test loop requirements, (4) development of a conceptual design including process flow sheet, mechanical layout, and equipment specifications and costs, and (5) development of a preliminary test loop safety plan.

  3. A design method to isothermalize the core of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, M.; Sawa, K.

    1987-01-01

    A practical design method is developed to isothermalize the core of block-type high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Isothermalization plays an important role in increasing the design margin on fuel temperature. In this method, the fuel enrichment and the size and boron content of the burnable poison rod are determined over the core blockwise so that the axially exponential and radially flat power distribution are kept from the beginning to the end of core life. The method enables conventional HTGRs to raise the outlet gas temperature without increasing the maximum fuel temperature

  4. Experimental studies on particle deposition by thermophoresis and inertial impaction from particulate high temperature gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Kim, Y.J.

    1987-01-01

    In view of fouling and erosion of gas turbine blade, heat exchanger and pipelines, increasing attention has been paid to particle deposition (transport) in high temperature flow systems. This is also necessary to develop a cleaning or filtration devices. Using 'real time' laser-light reflectivity and scanning electron microscope technique, we quantitatively treat particle size effect and the interaction between Brownian diffusion, thermoporesis (particle drift down a temperature gradient), and inertial impaction of particles (0.2 to 30 μm in diameter) in laminar hot combustion gas-particles flow (ca. 1565 K)

  5. Gas reactor and associated nuclear experience in the UK relevant to high temperature reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beech, D.J.; May, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the UK, the NNC played a leading role in the design and build of all of the UK's commercial magnox reactors and advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs). It was also involved in the DRAGON project and was responsible for producing designs for large scale HTRs and other gas reactor designs employing helium and carbon dioxide coolants. This paper addresses the gas reactor experience and its relevance to the current HTR designs under development which use helium as the coolant, through the consideration of a representative sample of the issues addressed in the UK by the NNC in support of the AGR and other reactor programmes. Modern HTR designs provide unique engineering challenges. The success of the AGR design, reflected in the extended lifetimes agreed upon by the licensing authorities at many stations, indicates that these challenges can be successfully overcome. The UK experience is unique and provides substantial support to future gas reactor and high temperature engineering studies. (authors)

  6. Some problems on materials tests in high temperature hydrogen base gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Tanabe, Tatsuhiko; Fujitsuka, Masakazu; Yoshida, Heitaro; Watanabe, Ryoji

    1980-01-01

    Some problems have been examined on materials tests (creep rupture tests and corrosion tests) in high temperature mixture gas of hydrogen (80%H 2 + 15%CO + 5%CO 2 ) simulating the reducing gas for direct steel making. H 2 , CO, CO 2 and CH 4 in the reducing gas interact with each other at elevated temperature and produce water vapor (H 2 O) and carbon (soot). Carbon deposited on the walls of retorts and the water condensed at pipings of the lower temperature gas outlet causes blocking of gas flow. The gas reactions have been found to be catalyzed by the retort walls, and appropriate selection of the materials for retorts has been found to mitigate the problems caused by water condensation and carbon deposition. Quartz has been recognized to be one of the most promising materials for minimizing the gas reactions. And ceramic coating, namely, BN (born nitride) on the heat resistant superalloy, MO-RE II, has reduced the amounts of water vapor and deposited carbon (sooting) produced by gas reactions and has kept dew points of outlet gas below room temperature. The well known emf (thermo-electromotive force) deterioration of Alumel-Chromel thermocouples in the reducing gases at elevated temperatures has been also found to be prevented by the ceramic (BN) coating. (author)

  7. Hydrogen production from biomass pyrolysis gas via high temperature steam reforming process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongchang, Thawatchai; Patumsawad, Suthum

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this work has been undertaken as part of the design of continuous hydrogen production using the high temperature steam reforming process. The steady-state test condition was carried out using syngas from biomass pyrolysis, whilst operating at high temperatures between 600 and 1200 degree Celsius. The main reformer operating parameters (e.g. temperature, resident time and steam to biomass ratio (S/B)) have been examined in order to optimize the performance of the reformer. The operating temperature is a key factor in determining the extent to which hydrogen production is increased at higher temperatures (900 -1200 degree Celsius) whilst maintaining the same as resident time and S/B ratio. The effects of exhaust gas composition on heating value were also investigated. The steam reforming process produced methane (CH 4 ) and ethylene (C 2 H 4 ) between 600 to 800 degree Celsius and enhanced production ethane (C 2 H 6 ) at 700 degree Celsius. However carbon monoxide (CO) emission was slightly increased for higher temperatures all conditions. The results show that the use of biomass pyrolysis gas can produce higher hydrogen production from high temperature steam reforming. In addition the increasing reformer efficiency needs to be optimized for different operating conditions. (author)

  8. Concept of an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masuro

    2012-01-01

    As the challenge to ensure no harmful release of radioactive materials at the accidents by deterministic approach instead to satisfy acceptance criteria or safety goal for risk by probabilistic approach, new concept of advanced reactor, an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor, is proposed based on the experience of the operation of the actual High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan, High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), and the design of the commercial plant (GTHTR300), utilizing the inherent safety features of the HTGR (i.e., safety features based on physical phenomena). The safety design philosophy of the inherently-safe HTGR for the safety analysis of the radiological consequences is determined as the confinement of radioactive materials is assured by only inherent safety features without engineered safety features, AC power or prompt actions by plant personnel if the design extension conditions occur. Inherent safety features to prevent the loss or degradation of the confinement function are identified. It is proposed not to apply the probabilistic approach for the evaluation of the radiological consequences of the accidents in the safety analysis because no inherent safety features fail for the mitigation of the consequences of the accidents. Consequently, there are no event sequences to harmful release of radioactive materials if the design extension conditions occur in the inherently-safe HTGR concept. The concept and future R and D items for the inherently-safe HTGR are described in this paper.

  9. Draft of standard for graphite core components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Eto, Motokuni; Kunimoto, Eiji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Oku, Tatsuo; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    For the design of the graphite components in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the graphite structural design code for the HTTR etc. were applied. However, general standard systems for the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) have not been established yet. The authors had studied on the technical issues which is necessary for the establishment of a general standard system for the graphite components in the HTGR. The results of the study were documented and discussed at a 'Special committee on research on preparation for codes for graphite components in HTGR' at Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). As a result, 'Draft of Standard for Graphite Core Components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor.' was established. In the draft standard, the graphite components are classified three categories (A, B and C) in the standpoints of safety functions and possibility of replacement. For the components in the each class, design standard, material and product standards, and in-service inspection and maintenance standard are determined. As an appendix of the design standard, the graphical expressions of material property data of 1G-110 graphite as a function of fast neutron fluence are expressed. The graphical expressions were determined through the interpolation and extrapolation of the irradiated data. (author)

  10. Comparison of high temperature gas particulate collectors for low level radwaste incinerator volume reduction systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscardini, R.L.; Johnston, J.R.; Waters, R.M.; Zievers, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Incinerator system off-gases must be treated to prevent the release of particulates, noxious gases and radioactive elements to the environment. Fabric filters, venturi scrubbers, cyclone separators, an ceramic or metal filter candles have been used for particulate removal. Dry high temperature particulate collectors have the advantage of not creating additional liquid wastes. This paper presents a graphical comparison of different methods for filtering particles from high temperature incineration system off-gases. Eight methods of off-gas handling are compared. A much larger group may be present, but some judicious selection of different, but related systems was done for this paper based on experience with the Combustion Engineering Waste Incineration System (CE/WIS) Prototype. The eight types are: Inertial Devices, Electrostatic Precipitators (ESP), Standard Fabric Bags, Woven Ceramic Bags, Granular Beds, Sintered Metal Tubes, Felted Ceramic Bags and Ceramic Filter Candles. For high temperature LLRW particulate collection in incinerator off-gas systems, ceramic filter candles are the best overall choice

  11. Analysis of Precooling Injection Transient of Steam Generator for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a postulated design basis accident leads high temperature gas cooled reactor to emergency shutdown, steam generator still remains with high temperature level and needs to be cooled down by a precooling before reactor restarts with clearing of fault. For the large difference of coolant temperature between inlet and outlet of steam generator in normal operation, the temperature distribution on the components of steam generator is very complicated. Therefore, the temperature descending rate of the components in steam generator needs to be limited to avoid the potential damage during the precooling stage. In this paper, a pebble-bed high temperature gas cooled reactor is modeled by thermal-hydraulic system analysis code and several postulated precooling injection transients are simulated and compared to evaluate their effects, which will provide support for the precooling design. The analysis results show that enough precooling injection is necessary to satisfy the precooling requirements, and larger mass flow rate of precooling water injection will accelerate the precooling process. The temperature decrease of steam generator is related to the precooling injection scenarios, and the maximal mass flow rate of the precooling injection should be limited to avoid the excessively quick temperature change of the structures in steam generator.

  12. Safety design philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katanishi, Shoji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing design studies of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The original safety design philosophy has also been discussed and fixed for the GTHTR300 based on the experience of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of JAERI which is the first High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan. One of the unique feature of the safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is that a depressurization accident induced by a large pipe break is postulated as a design basis accident in order to show the high level of safety characteristics, though its probability of occurrence is lower than the probability range of design basis accident. Another feature of safety design is to adopt a double confinement that is one of the original concepts for the GTHTR300. By using a double confinement, a feasibility of safety design without containment vessel was clarified even in case of the depressurization accident. The safety design philosophies for passive cooling system, reactor shutdown system, and so on were determined. The methodology for the safety evaluation, such as safety criteria and selection of events to be evaluated by using estimation of probability of occurrence, were also discussed and determined. This article describes the safety design philosophy and some results of preliminary evaluations which were conducted in order to clarify the feasibility of original safety design of the GTHTR300. The present study is entrusted from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  13. Analysis of pressure drop accidents in high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameoka, Toshiyuki

    1980-01-01

    Research and development are carried out on various problems in order to realize a multi-purpose, high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and others. In the experimental reactor in consideration at present, it is planned to flow helium at 1000 deg C and 40 atm. For the purpose, high temperature heat insulation structures are designed and developed, which insulate heat on the internal surfaces of pressure vessels and pipings. Consideration must be given to these internal heat insulation structures about the various characteristics in the working environmental temperature and pressure conditions, the measures for preventing the by-pass flow due to the formation of gaps and the abnormal leak of heat through the natural convection in the heat insulators and others. In this paper, the experimental results on the rapid pressure reduction characteristics of ceramic fiber heat insulation structures are reported. The ceramic fiber heat insulation structures have the features such as the application to uneven surfaces and penetration parts, the prevention of by-pass flow, and very low permeability. The problem is the restoring force after the high temperature compression. The experiment on rapid pressure reduction due to the accidental release of gas and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Basic design and economical evaluation of Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazuhiko, Kunitomi; Shusaku, Shiozawa; Xing, Yan

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) combined with a direct cycle gas turbine offers one of the most promising nuclear electricity generation options after 2010. Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been engaging in the basic design and development of Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300) since 2003. Costs of capital, fuel, and operation and maintenance have been estimated. The capital cost of the GTHTR300 is lower than that of the existing light water reactor (LWR) because the generation efficiency is considerably higher whereas the construction cost is lower owing to the design simplicity of the gas turbine power conversion unit and the reactor safety system. The fuel cost is shown to equal that of LWR. The operation and maintenance cost has a slight advantage due to the use of chemically inert helium coolant. In sum, the cost of electricity for the GTHTR300 is estimated to be below US 3.3 cents/kWh (4 yen/kWh), which is about two-third of that of current LWRs in Japan. The results confirm that the net power generation cost of the GTHTR300 is much lower than that of the LWR, indicating that the GTHTR300 plant consisting of small-scale reactor units can be economically competitive to the latest large-scale LWR. (authors)

  15. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Preliminary Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2011-08-01

    This paper summarizes the potential market for process heat produced by a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the environmental benefits reduced CO2 emissions will have on these markets, and the typical economics of projects using these applications. It gives examples of HTGR technological applications to industrial processes in the typical co-generation supply of process heat and electricity, the conversion of coal to transportation fuels and chemical process feedstock, and the production of ammonia as a feedstock for the production of ammonia derivatives, including fertilizer. It also demonstrates how uncertainties in capital costs and financial factors affect the economics of HTGR technology by analyzing the use of HTGR technology in the application of HTGR and high temperature steam electrolysis processes to produce hydrogen.

  16. Preliminary analysis of combined cycle of modular high-temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baogang, Z.; Xiaoyong, Y.; Jie, W.; Gang, Z.; Qian, S.

    2015-01-01

    Modular high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is known as one of the most advanced nuclear reactors because of its inherent safety and high efficiency. The power conversion system of HTGR can be steam turbine based on Rankine cycle or gas turbine based on Brayton cycle respectively. The steam turbine system is mature and the gas turbine system has high efficiency but under development. The Brayton-Rankine combined cycle is an effective way to further promote the efficiency. This paper investigated the performance of combined cycle from the viewpoint of thermodynamics. The effect of non-dimensional parameters on combined cycle’s efficiency, such as temperature ratio, compression ratio, efficiency of compressor, efficiency of turbine, was analyzed. Furthermore, the optimal parameters to achieve highest efficiency was also given by this analysis under engineering constraints. The conclusions could be helpful to the design and development of combined cycle of HTGR. (author)

  17. Heat exchanger for transfering heat produced in a high temperature reactor to an intermediate circuit gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barchewitz, E.; Baumgaertner, H.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is concerned with improving the arrangement of a heat exchanger designed to transfer heat from the coolant gas circuit of a high temperature reactor to a gas which is to be used for a process heat plant. In the plant the material stresses are to be kept low at high differential pressures and temperatures. According to the invention the tube bundles designed as boxes are fixed within the heat exchanger closure by means of supply pipes having got loops. For conducting the hot gas the heat exchanger has got a central pipe leading out of the reactor vessel through the pod closure and having got only one point of fixation, lying in this closure. Additional advantageous designs are mentioned. (orig./PW)

  18. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Graf, D.F.; Millunzi, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    GA Technologies Inc. and other U.S. corporations, in a cooperative program with the U.S. Department of Energy, is developing a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that will provide highly reliable, economic, nuclear power. The MHTGR system assures maximum safety to the public, the owner/operator, and the environment. The MHTGR is being designed to meet and exceed rigorous requirements established by the user industry for availability, operation and maintenance, plant investment protection, safety and licensing, siting flexibility and economics. The plant will be equally attractive for deployment and operation in the U.S., other major industrialized nations including Korea, Japan, and the Republic of China, as well as the developing nations. The High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is an advanced, third generation nuclear power system which incorporates distinctive technical features, including the use of pressurized helium as a coolant, graphite as the moderator and core structural material, and fuel in the form of ceramic coated uranium particles. The modular HTGR builds upon generic gas-cooled reactor experience and specific HTGR programs and projects. The MHTGR offers unique technological features and the opportunity for the cooperative international development of an advanced energy system that will help assure adaquate world energy resources for the future. Such international joint venturing of energy development can offer significant benefits to participating industries and governments and also provides a long term solution to the complex problems of the international balance of payments

  19. Basic study on high temperature gas cooled reactor technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jong Hwa; Lee, W. J.; Lee, H. M.

    2003-01-01

    The annual production of hydrogen in the world is about 500 billion m 3 . Currently hydrogen is consumed mainly in chemical industries. However hydrogen has huge potential to be consumed in transportation sector in coming decades. Assuming that 10% of fossil energy in transportation sector is substituted by hydrogen in 2020, the hydrogen in the sector will exceed current hydrogen consumption by more than 2.5 times. Currently hydrogen is mainly produced by steam reforming of natural gas. Steam reforming process is chiefest way to produce hydrogen for mass production. In the future, hydrogen has to be produced in a way to minimize CO2 emission during its production process as well as to satisfy economic competition. One of the alternatives to produce hydrogen under such criteria is using heat source of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor represents one type of the next generation of nuclear reactors for safe and reliable operation as well as for efficient and economic generation of energy

  20. Facilitated transport ceramic membranes for high-temperature gas cleanup. Final report, February 1990--April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, R.; Minford, E.; Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.; Hart, B.A.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing high temperature, high pressure, facilitated transport ceramic membranes to control gaseous contaminants in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. Meeting this objective requires that the contaminant gas H{sub 2}S be removed from an IGCC gas mixture without a substantial loss of the other gaseous components, specifically H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. As described above this requires consideration of other, nonconventional types of membranes. The solution evaluated in this program involved the use of facilitated transport membranes consisting of molten mixtures of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salts immobilized in a microporous ceramic support. To accomplish this objective, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Golden Technologies Company Inc., and Research Triangle Institute worked together to develop and test high temperature facilitated membranes for the removal of H{sub 2}S from IGCC gas mixtures. Three basic experimental activities were pursued: (1) evaluation of the H{sub 2}S chemistry of a variety of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salt mixtures; (2) development of microporous ceramic materials which were chemically and physically compatible with molten carbonate salt mixtures under IGCC conditions and which could function as a host to support a molten carbonate mixture and; (3) fabrication of molten carbonate/ceramic immobilized liquid membranes and evaluation of these membranes under conditions approximating those found in the intended application. Results of these activities are presented.

  1. The Preliminary Study of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Izhar Abu Hussin; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib

    2015-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) have attracted worldwide interest because of their high outlet temperatures, which allow them to be used for applications beyond electricity generation. HTGRs have been built and operated since as far back as the 1970s. Experimental and demonstration reactors of this type have operated in China, Great Britain, Germany, Japan, and the United States of America. This paper is written to share the valuable knowledge and information of HTGRs technology as a mean to enrich peoples understanding of the technology. This paper will present the technological features of HTGRs that allow for a modular design with inherently safe characteristics. (author)

  2. Conceptual design study of high temperature gas-cooled reactor for plutonium incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    JAEA has started a conceptual design study of a Pu burner HTGR, which is called CBHTR (Clean Burn High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor). CBHTR’s fuel is TRISO-coated fuel particle with PuO 2 -YSZ (Yttria- Stabilized Zirconia) kernel, which increase proliferation resistance, safety of geological disposal, and Pu incineration. CBHTR can decrease Puf ratio from 60% to 20% with 520 GWd/t. In the future, 15% of electricity capacity is employed by 7 of CBHTRs and 59 of U-HTRs. JAEA has a R and D plan of manufacturing technology of TRISO-coated fuel with PuO 2 -YSZ kernel

  3. Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs

  4. Hypothetical air ingress scenarios in advanced modular high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Considering an extremely hypothetical scenario of complete cross duct failure and unlimited air supply into the reactor vessel of a modular high temperature gas cooled ractor, it is found that the potential air inflow remains limited due to the high friction pressure drop through the active core. All incoming air will be oxidized to CO and some local external burning would be temporarily possible in such a scenario. The accident would have to continue with unlimited air supply for hundreds of hours before the core structural integrity would be jeopardized

  5. The passive safety characteristics of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodin, D.T.; Kania, M.J.; Nabielek, H.; Schenk, W.; Verfondern, K.

    1988-01-01

    High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) in both the US and West Germany use an all-ceramic, coated fuel particle to retain fission products. Data from irradiation, postirradiation examinations and postirradiation heating experiments are used to study the performance capabilities of the fuel particles. The experimental results from fission product release tests with HTGR fuel are discussed. These data are used for development of predictive fuel performance models for purposes of design, licensing, and risk analyses. During off normal events, where temperatures may reach up to 1600/degree/C, the data show that no significant radionuclide releases from the fuel will occur

  6. Aseismic study of high temperature gas-cooled reactor core with block-type fuel, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    A two-dimensional horizontal seismic experiment with single axis and simultaneous two-axes excitations was performed to obtain the core seismic design data on the block-type high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Effects of excitation directions and core side support stiffness on characteristics of core displacements and reaction forces of support were revealed. The values of the side reaction forces are the largest in the excitation of flat-to-flat of hexagonal block. Preload from the core periphery to the core center are effective to decrease core displacements and side reaction forces. (author)

  7. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed

  8. Perspectives on deployment of modular high temperature gas-cooled power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northup, T.E.; Penfield, S.

    1988-01-01

    Energy needs and energy options are undergoing re-evaluation by almost every country of the world. Energy issues such as safety, public perceptions, load growth, air pollution, acid rain, construction schedules, waste management, capital financing, project cancellations, and energy mix are but a few of those problems that are plaguing planners. This paper examines some of the key elements of the energy re-evaluation and transition that are in progress and the potential for the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (Modular HTGR) to have a major impact on energy planning and its favorable prospects for deployment. (orig.)

  9. Safety analysis of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitake, Susumu; Ezaki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Katsuo; Takaya, Junichi; Shimazu, Akira

    1976-02-01

    Safety features of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor being developed in JAERI were studied or the basis of its preliminary conceptual design of the reactor plant. Covered are control of the plant in transients, plant behaviour in accidents, and functions of engineered safeguards, and also dynamics of the uprant and frequencies of the accidents. These studies have shown, (i) the reactor plant can be operated both in plant slave to reactor and reactor slave to plant control, (ii) stable control of

  10. Resource utilization of symbiotic high-temperature gas-cooled reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; Brogli, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    The cumulative uranium requirements of different symbiotic combinations of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) prebreeders have been calculated assuming an open-end nuclear economy. The results obtained indicate that the combination of prebreeders and near-breeders does not save resources over a self-generated recycle case of comparable conversion ratio, and that it may take between 40 and 50 yr before the symbiotic system containing breeders starts saving resources over an HTGR with self-generated recycle and a conversion ratio of 0.83

  11. MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] technology development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Neylan, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the approach used to define the technology program needed to support design and licensing of a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR design depends heavily on data and information developed during the past 25 years to support large HTGR (LHTGR) designs. The technology program focuses on MHTGR-specific operating and accident conditions, and on validation of models and assumptions developed using LHTGR data. The technology program is briefly outlined, and a schedule is presented for completion of technology work which is consistent with completion of a Final Safety Summary Analysis Report (FSSAR) by 1992

  12. A study on different thermodynamic cycle schemes coupled with a high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Xinhe; Yang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The features of three different power generation schemes, including closed Brayton cycle, non-reheating combined cycle and reheating combined cycle, coupled with high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) were investigated and compared. • The effects and mechanism of reactor core outlet temperature, compression ratio and other key parameters over cycle characteristics were analyzed by the thermodynamic models.. • It is found that reheated combined cycle has the highest efficiency. Reactor outlet temperature and main steam parameters are key factors to improve the cycle’s performance. - Abstract: With gradual increase in reactor outlet temperature, the efficient power conversion technology has become one of developing trends of (very) high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). In this paper, different cycle power generation schemes for HTGRs were systematically studied. Physical and mathematical models were established for these three cycle schemes: closed Brayton cycle, simple combined cycle, and reheated combined cycle. The effects and mechanism of key parameters such as reactor core outlet temperature, reactor core inlet temperature and compression ratio on the features of these cycles were analyzed. Then, optimization results were given with engineering restrictive conditions, including pinch point temperature differences. Results revealed that within the temperature range of HTGRs (700–900 °C), the reheated combined cycle had the highest efficiency, while the simple combined cycle had the lowest efficiency (900 °C). The efficiencies of the closed Brayton cycle, simple combined cycle and reheated combined cycle are 49.5%, 46.6% and 50.1%, respectively. These results provide insights on the different schemes of these cycles, and reveal the effects of key parameters on performance of these cycles. It could be helpful to understand and develop a combined cycle coupled with a high temperature reactor in the future.

  13. Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim

  14. Seismic response of high temperature gas-cooled reactor core with block-type fuel, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1980-01-01

    For the aseismic design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) with block-type fuel, it is necessary to predict the motion and force of core columns and blocks. To reveal column vibration characteristics in three-dimensional space and impact response, column vibration tests were carried out with a scale model of a one-region section (seven columns) of the HTGR core. The results are as follows: (1) the column has a soft spring characteristic based on stacked blocks connected with loose pins, (2) the column has whirling phenomena, (3) the compression spring force simulating the gas pressure has the effect of raising the column resonance frequency, and (4) the vibration behavior of the stacked block column and impact response of the surrounding columns show agreement between experiment and analysis. (author)

  15. Microstructure and Hardness of High Temperature Gas Nitrided AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nor Nurulhuda Md.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the microstructure and hardness of as-received and nitrided AISI 420 martensitic stainless steels. High temperature gas nitriding was employed to treat the steels at 1200°C for one hour and four hours using nitrogen gas, followed by furnace cooled. Chromium nitride and iron nitride were formed and concentrated at the outmost surface area of the steels since this region contained the highest concentration of nitrogen. The grain size enlarged at the interior region of the nitrided steels due to nitriding at temperature above the recrystallization temperature of the steel and followed by slow cooling. The nitrided steels produced higher surface hardness compared to as-received steel due to the presence of nitrogen and the precipitation of nitrides. Harder steel was produced when nitriding at four hours compared to one hour since more nitrogen permeated into the steel.

  16. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor heat source for coal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, R.W. Jr.; Lewis, A.C.

    1992-09-01

    In the industrial nations, transportable fuels in the form of natural gas and petroleum derivatives constitute a primary energy source nearly equivalent to that consumed for generating electric power. Nations with large coal deposits have the option of coal conversion to meet their transportable fuel demands. But these processes themselves consume huge amounts of energy and produce undesirable combustion by-products. Therefore, this represents a major opportunity to apply nuclear energy for both the environmental and energy conservation reasons. Because the most desirable coal conversion processes take place at 800 degree C or higher, only the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) have the potential to be adapted to coal conversion processes. This report provides a discussion of this utilization of HTGR reactors

  17. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  18. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  19. State of development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Yukio

    1990-01-01

    Emphasis has been placed in the development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors on high thermal efficiency as power reactors and the reactor from which nuclear heat can be utilized. In U.K., as the international project 'Dragon Project', the experimental Dragon reactor for research use with 20 MWt output and exit coolant temperature 750 deg C was constructed, and operated till 1976. Coated fuel particles were developed. In West Germany, the experimental power reactor AVR with 46 MWt and 15 MWe output was operated till 1988. The prototype power reactor THTR-300 with 300 MWe output and 750 deg C exit temperature is in commercial operation. In USA, the experimental power reactor Peach Bottom reactor with 40 MWe output and 728 deg C exit temperature was operated till 1974. The prototype Fort Saint Vrain power reactor with 330 MWe output and 782 deg C exit temperature was operated till 1989. In USSR, the modular VGM with 200 MWh output is at the planning stage. Also in China, high temperature gas-cooled reactors are at the design stage. Switzerland has taken part in various international projects. (K.I.)

  20. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzki, Marcin; Darnowski, Piotr; Niewiński, Grzegorz

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an `early design' variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit). A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  1. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Marcin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an ‘early design’ variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit. A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  2. AREVA Modular Steam Cycle – High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Development Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lommers, L.; Shahrokhi, F.; Southworth, F.; Mayer, J. III

    2014-01-01

    The AREVA Steam Cycle – High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (SCHTGR) is a modular graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactor currently being developed to support a wide variety of applications including industrial process heat, high efficiency electricity generation, and cogeneration. It produces high temperature superheated steam which makes it a good match for many markets currently dependent on fossil fuels for process heat. Moreover, the intrinsic safety characteristics of the SC-HTGR make it uniquely qualified for collocation with large industrial process heat users which is necessary for serving these markets. The NGNP Industry Alliance has selected the AREVA SC-HTGR as the basis for future development work to support commercial HTGR deployment. This paper provides a concise description of the SC-HTGR concept, followed by a summary of recent development activities. Since this concept was introduced, ongoing design activities have focused primarily on confirming key system capabilities and the suitability for potential future markets. These evaluations continue to confirm the suitability of the SC-HTGR for a variety of potential applications that are currently dependent on fossil fuels. (author)

  3. Evaluation of high temperature gas reactor for demanding cogeneration load follow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xing L.; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Hino, Ryutaro

    2012-01-01

    Modular nuclear reactor systems are being developed around the world for new missions among which is cogeneration for industries and remote areas. Like existing fossil energy counterpart in these markets, a nuclear plant would need to demonstrate the feasibility of load follow including (1) the reliability to generate power and heat simultaneously and alone and (2) the flexibility to vary cogeneration rates concurrent to demand changes. This article reports the results of JAEA's evaluation on the high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) to perform these duties. The evaluation results in a plant design based on the materials and design codes developed with JAEA's operating test reactor and from additional equipment validation programs. The 600 MWt-HTGR plant generates electricity efficiently by gas turbine and 900degC heat by a topping heater. The heater couples via a heat transport loop to industrial facility that consumes the high temperature heat to yield heat product such as hydrogen fuel, steel, or chemical. Original control methods are proposed to automate transition between the load duties. Equipment challenges are addressed for severe operation conditions. Performance limits of cogeneration load following are quantified from the plant system simulation to a range of bounding events including a loss of either load and a rapid peaking of electricity. (author)

  4. Development of the design of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockett, G.E.; Huddle, R.A.U.

    1960-01-01

    Early in 1956 a small team was formed at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, to investigate the possibilities of the High Temperature Gas Cooled (H.T.G.C.) Reactor System. Although the primary objective of this team was to carry out a feasibility study of the system as a whole, it soon became apparent that, in addition to design studies and economic surveys of power producing reactors, the most appropriate approach to such a novel system was to carry out a design study of a relatively small (10 to 20 M.W.) Reactor Experiment, together with the necessary research and development work associated with such a reactor. This work proceeded within the U.K.A.E.A. during the three following years, and it was felt that realistic design proposals could be put forward with sufficient confidence to justify the detailed design and construction of a 20 M.W. Reactor Experiment. In April 1959 responsibility for this Reactor Experiment was taken over by the O.E.E.C. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Project, the DRAGON Project, at the Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorset. In this Paper the research, development, and design work is reviewed, and the proposals for the Reactor Experiment are summarised. (author)

  5. Discussion on Design Transients of Pebble-bed High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Li Fu; Zheng Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    In order to assure high quality for the components and their supports in the reactor coolant system, etc., some thermal-hydraulic transient conditions will be selected and researched for equipment design evaluation to satisfy the requirements ASME code, which are based on the conservative estimates of the magnitude and frequency of the temperature and pressure transients resulting from various operating conditions in the plant. In the mature design on pressurized water reactor, five conditions are considered. For the developing advanced pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor(HTGR), its design and operation has much difference with other reactors, so the transients of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor have distinctive characteristics. In this paper, the possible design transients of the pebble-bed HTGR will be discussed, and the frequency of design transients for equipment fatigue analysis and stress analysis due to cyclic stresses is also studied. The results will provide support for the design and construct of the pebble-bed HTGR. (author)

  6. Investigation of the Optical and Sensing Characteristics of Nanoparticle Arrays for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmalingam, Gnanaprakash

    The monitoring of polluting gases such as CO and NOx emitted from gas turbines in power plants and aircraft is important in order to both reduce the effects of such gases on the environment as well as to optimize the performance of the respective power system. The need for emissions monitoring systems is further realized from increased regulatory requirements that are being instituted as a result of the environmental impact from increased air travel. Specifically, it is estimated that the contributions from aircraft emissions to total NOx emissions will increase from 4% to 17% between 2008 and 2020. Extensive fuel cost savings as well as a reduced environmental impact would therefore be realized if this increased air traffic utilized next generation jet turbines which used a emission/performance control sensing system. These future emissions monitoring systems must be sensitive and selective to the emission gases, reliable and stable under harsh environmental conditions where the operation temperatures are in excess of 500 °C within a highly reactive environment. Plasmonics based chemical sensors which use nanocomposites comprised of a combination of gold nano particles and Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) has enabled the sensitive (PPM) and stable detection (100s of hrs) of H2, NO2 and CO at temperatures of 500 °C. The detection method involves measuring the change in the localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) characteristics of the Au- YSZ nano composite and in particular, the plasmon peak position. Selectivity remains a challenging parameter to optimize and a layer by layer sputter deposition approach has been recently demonstrated to modify the resulting sensing properties through a change in the morphology of the deposited films. The material properties of the films have produced a unique sensing behavior in terms of a preferential response to H2 compared to CO. Although this is a very good benefit, it is expected that further enhancements would be

  7. Transient fission gas release from UO2 fuel for high temperature and high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper it is assumed that the fission gas release kinetics from an irradiated UO 2 fuel for high temperature is determined by the kinetics of grain growth. A well founded assumption that Vitanza curve describes the change of uranium dioxide re-crystallization temperature and the experimental results referring to the limiting grain size presented in the literature are used to modify the grain growth model. Algorithms of fission gas release due to re-crystallization of uranium dioxide grains are worked out. The defect trap model of fission gas behaviour described in the earlier papers is supplemented with the algorithms. Calculations of fission gas release in function of time, temperature, burn-up and initial grain sizes are obtained. Computation of transient fission gas release in the paper is limited to the case where steady state of irradiation to accumulate a desired burn-up is performed below the temperature of re-crystallization then the subsequent step temperature increase follows. There are considered two kinds of step temperature increase for different burn-up: the final temperature of the step increase is below and above the re-crystallization temperature. Calculations show that bursts of fission gas are predicted in both kinds. The release rate of gas liberated for the final temperature above the re-crystallization temperature is much higher than for final temperature below the re-crystallization temperature. The time required for the burst to subside is longer due to grain growth than due to diffusion of bubbles and knock-out release. The theoretical results explain qualitatively the experimental data but some of them need to be verified since this sort of experimental data are not found in the available literature. (author)

  8. Parametric Investigation of Brayton Cycle for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. In this project, we are investigating helium Brayton cycles for the secondary side of an indirect energy conversion system. Ultimately we will investigate the improvement of the Brayton cycle using other fluids, such as supercritical carbon dioxide. Prior to the cycle improvement study, we established a number of baseline cases for the helium indirect Brayton cycle. These cases look at both single-shaft and multiple-shaft turbomachinery. The baseline cases are based on a 250 MW thermal pebble bed HTGR. The results from this study are applicable to other reactor concepts such as a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), fast gas-cooled reactor (FGR), supercritical water reactor (SWR), and others. In this study, we are using the HYSYS computer code for optimization of the helium Brayton cycle. Besides the HYSYS process optimization, we performed parametric study to see the effect of important parameters on the cycle efficiency. For these parametric calculations, we use a cycle efficiency model that was developed based on the Visual Basic computer language. As a part of this study we are currently investigated single-shaft vs. multiple shaft arrangement for cycle efficiency and comparison, which will be published in the next paper. The ultimate goal of this study is to use supercritical carbon dioxide for the HTGR power conversion loop in order to improve the cycle efficiency to values great than that of the helium Brayton cycle. This paper includes preliminary calculations of the steady state overall Brayton cycle efficiency based on the pebble bed reactor reference design (helium used as the working fluid) and compares those results with an initial calculation of a CO2 Brayton cycle

  9. Numerical evaluation of flow through a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros Filho, Jose A.; Santos, Andre A.C.; Navarro, Moyses A.; Ribeiro, Felipe Lopes

    2011-01-01

    The High-temperature Gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is a Next Generation Nuclear System that has a good chance to be used as energy generation source in the near future owing to its potential capacity to supply hydrogen without greenhouse gas emission for the future humanity. Recently, improvements in the HTGR design led to the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept in which the outlet temperature of the coolant gas reaches to 1000 deg C increasing the efficiency of the hydrogen and electricity generation. Among the core concepts emerging in the VHTR development stands out the prismatic block which uses coated fuel microspheres named TRISO pressed into cylinders and assembled in hexagonal graphite blocks staked to form columns. The graphite blocks contain flow channels around the fuel cylinders for the helium coolant. In this study an analysis is performed using the CFD code CFX 13.0 on a prismatic fuel assembly in order to investigate its thermo-fluid dynamic performance. The simulations were made in a 1/12 fuel element model of the GT-MHR design which was developed by General Atomics. A numerical mesh verification process based on the Grid Convergence Index (GCI) was performed using five progressively refined meshes to assess the numerical uncertainty of the simulation and determine adequate mesh parameters. An analysis was also performed to evaluate different methods to define the inlet and outlet boundary conditions. In this study simulations of models with and without inlet and outlet plena were compared, showing that the presence of the plena offers a more realistic flow distribution. (author)

  10. Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornard, Trond; Hockert, John

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC and A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC and A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC and A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR (Pty) and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC and A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR and D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present

  11. Fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Junichi; Yasuno, Takehiko; Yasukawa, Shigeru; Mitake, Susumu; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1975-06-01

    The fundamental conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (experimental VHTR of thermal output 50 MW with reactor outlet-gas temperature 1,000 0 C) has been carried out to provide the operation modes of the system consisting of the reactor and the heat-utilization system, including characteristics and performance of the components and safety of the plant system. For the heat-utilization system of the plant, heat distribution, temperature condition, cooling system constitution, and the containment facility are specified. For the operation of plant, testing capability of the reactor and controlability of the system are taken into consideration. Detail design is made of the fuel element, reactor core, reactivity control and pressure vessel, and also the heat exchanger, steam reformer, steam generator, helium circulator, helium-gas turbine, and helium-gas purification, fuel handling, and engineered safety systems. Emphasis is placed on providing the increase of the reactor outlet-gas temperature. Fuel element design is directed to the prismatic graphite blocks of hexagonal cross-section accommodating the hollow or tubular fuel pins sheathed in graphite sleeve. The reactor core is composed of 73 fuel columns in 7 stages, concerning the reference design MK-II. Orificing is made in the upper portion of core; one orifice for every 7 fuel columns. Average core power density is 2.5 watts/cm 3 . Fuel temperature is kept below 1,300 0 C in rated power. The main components, i.e. pressure vessel, reformer, gas turbine and intermediate heat exchanger are designed in detail; the IHX is of a double-shell and helically-wound tube coils, the reformer is of a byonet tube type, and the turbine-compressor unit is of an axial flow type (turbine in 6 stages and compressor in 16 stages). (auth.)

  12. Features, present condition of development and future scope on the high temperature gas reactor as an innovative one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Shusaku

    2001-01-01

    The high temperature gas reactor has some features without previous reactors such as high temperature capable of taking-out, high specific safety, feasibility adaptable to versatile fuel cycle, and so on. Then, it is expected to be an innovative reactor to contribute to diversification of energy supply and expansion of energy application field. In Japan, under the HTTR (high temperature engineering test reactor) plan, construction of HTTR, which is the first high temperature gas reactor in Japan, was finished and its output upgrading test has been promoted. And, on the HTTR plan, together with promotion of full power operation, reactor performance tests, safety proof test, and so on, it is planned to carry out study on application of the high temperature heat such as hydrogen production and so on to aim to practise establishment and upgrading of technologies on high temperature gas reactor in Japan. Here were introduced features and present condition of development of the high temperature gas reactor as an innovative type reactor and described role and future scope in Japan. (G.K.)

  13. Research and development program of hydrogen production system with high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Y.; Shiozawa, S.; Ogawa, M.; Inagaki, Y.; Nishihara, T.; Shimizu, S.

    2000-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing a hydrogen production system with a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). While the HTGR hydrogen production system has the following advantages compared with a fossil-fired hydrogen production system; low operation cost (economical fuel cost), low CO 2 emission and saving of fossil fuel by use of nuclear heat, it requires some items to be solved as follows; cost reduction of facility such as a reactor, coolant circulation system and so on, development of control and safety technologies. As for the control and safety technologies, JAERI plans demonstration test with hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane coupling to 30 Wt HTGR, named high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). Prior to the demonstration test, a 1/30-scale out-of-pile test facility is in construction for safety review and detailed design of the HTTR hydrogen production system. Also, design study will start for reduction of facility cost. Moreover, basic study on hydrogen production process without CO 2 emission is in progress by thermochemical water splitting. (orig.)

  14. Behavior of radioactive organic iodide in an atmosphere of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Masakatsu; Nakashima, Mikio; Sagawa, Chiaki; Masaki, Nobuyuki; Hirabayashi, Takakuni; Aratono, Yasuyuki

    1990-06-01

    Formation and decomposition behavior of radioactive organic iodide have been studied in an atmosphere of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, HTTR). Na 125 I was chosen for radioactive iodine source instead of CsI diffusing from coated fuel particles. Na 125 I adsorbed on graphite was heated in pure He and He containing O 2 or H 2 O atmosphere. The results obtained are as follows. It was proved that organic iodide was formed with organic radicals released from graphite even in He atmosphere. Thus, the interchange rate of inorganic iodide with organic iodide was remarkably decreased with prolonged preheat-treatment period at 1000degC. Organic iodide formed was easily decomposed by its recirculation into hot reaction tube kept at 900degC. When organic iodide was passed through powdered graphite bed, more than 70% was decomposed at 90degC. Oxygen and water vapour intermixed in He suppressed the interchange rate of inorganic iodide with organic iodide. These results suggest that organic iodide rarely exists in the pressure vessel under normal operating condition of HTTR, and, under hypothetical accident condition of HTTR, organic iodide fraction never exceeds the value used for a safety assessment of light water reactor. (author)

  15. Red soil as a regenerable sorbent for high temperature removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, T.-H.; Chu Hsin; Lin, H.-P.; Peng, C.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) was removed from coal gas by red soil under high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor. Red soil powders were collected from the northern, center and southern of Taiwan. They were characterized by XRPD, porosity analysis and DCB chemical analysis. Results show that the greater sulfur content of LP red soils is attributed to the higher free iron oxides and suitable sulfidation temperature is around 773 K. High temperature has a negative effect for use red soil as a desulfurization sorbent due to thermodynamic limitation in a reduction atmosphere. During 10 cycles of regeneration, after the first cycle the red soil remained stable with a breakthrough time between 31 and 36 min. Hydrogen adversely affects sulfidation reaction, whereas CO exhibits a positive effect due to a water-shift reaction. COS was formed during the sulfidation stage and this was attributed to the reaction of H 2 S and CO. Results of XRPD indicated that, hematite is the dominant active species in fresh red soil and iron sulfide (FeS) is a product of the reaction between hematite and hydrogen sulfide in red soils. The spinel phase FeAl 2 O 4 was found during regeneration, moreover, the amount of free iron oxides decreased after regeneration indicating the some of the free iron oxide formed a spinel phase, further reducting the overall desulfurization efficiency

  16. Sustainability and Efficiency Improvements of Gas-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmier, Alain

    2012-01-01

    high temperature irradiation to high burn-ups with fission gas release measurements. To this end, the HFR-EU1 fuel irradiation in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten (2006-2010) explored the potential for high performance and high burn-up of existing German fuel (3 pebbles produced for the AVR reactor at the German research centre Juelich) and newly produced Chinese fuel (2 pebbles produced by INET for use in the HTR-10 test reactor in China). These five pebbles were irradiated for 445 days in separately controlled capsules, while the fission gas release was monitored by gamma spectrometry thus enabling evaluation of the characteristic release over birth fraction, indicative for the health of the fuel. In none of the pebbles, abnormally increased fission gas release was observed indicating that all of the approx. 45,000 coated particles in the pebbles had remained intact. The results presented in this thesis cover the first 332 days of irradiation. While HFR-EU1 was dedicated to a particularly high burn-up, HFR-EU1bis, performed between 2004 and 2005, investigated extremely high temperature for steady-state conditions. The comparison of both experiments confirms that temperature plays a decisive part in fuel performance and integrity. The peak fuel temperature in pebbles can be lowered with the so-called w allpaper fuel , in which the coated fuel particles are arranged in a spherical shell within a pebble. This wallpaper concept also enhances neutronic performance through improved neutron economy, resulting in reduced fissile material and/or enrichment needs or providing the potential to achieve higher burn-up. To quantify these improvements, calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo neutron transport and depletion codes MCNP/MCB (to assess conversion ratio, temperature coefficient of reactivity and neutron multiplication) and PANTHERMIX (for fuel cycle in steady state conditions and loss of coolant accident calculations). Based on PANTHERMIX steady

  17. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  18. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  19. Novel polymer derived ceramic-high temperature heat flux sensor for gas turbine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaiah, N R; Kapat, J S; An, L; Chow, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper attempts to prove the feasibility of a novel High Temperature Heat Flux (HTHF) sensor for gas turbine environment. Based on the latest improvement in a new type of Polymer-Derived Ceramic (PDC) material, the authors present the design and development of a HTHF sensor based on PDC material, and show that such a sensor is indeed feasible. The PDC-HTHF sensor is fabricated using newly developed polymer derived SiCN, whose conductivity is controlled by proper composition and treatment condition. Direct measurements and characterization of the relevant material properties are presented. Electrical conductivity can be varied from 0 (insulator) to 100 (ohm.cm) -1 ; in addition a value of 4000 ppm/ 0 C (at 600 K) is obtained for temperature coefficient of resistance. This novel sensor is found to perform quite satisfactorily at about 1400 0 C for long term as compared to conventional heat flux sensors available commercially. This type of PDC-HTHF sensor can be used in harsh environments due to its high temperature resistance and resistance to oxidation. This paper also discusses lithography as a microfabrication technique to manufacture the proposed PDC-HTHF sensor. In our current design, the sensor dimensions are 2.5mm in diameter and 250 μm thickness

  20. Nuclear design for high temperature gas cooled reactor (GTHTR300C) using MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouri, Tomoaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    A design study of the hydrogen cogeneration high temperature gas cooled reactor (GTHTR300C) that can produce both electricity and hydrogen has been carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The GTHTR300C is the system with thermal power of 600MW and reactor outlet temperature of 950degC, which is expected to supply the hydrogen to fuel cell vehicles after 2020s. In future, the full deployment of fast reactor cycle without natural uranium will demand the use of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuels in the GTHTR300C. Therefore, a nuclear design was performed to confirm the feasibility of the reactor core using MOX fuels. The designed reactor core has high performance and meets safety requirements. In this paper, the outline of the GTHTR300C and the nuclear design of the reactor core using MOX fuels are described. (author)

  1. Appraisal of possible combustion hazards associated with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, H.B.; Sibulkin, M.; Strehlow, R.A.; Yang, C.H.

    1978-03-01

    The report presents a study of combustion hazards that may be associated with the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) in the event of a primary coolant circuit depressurization followed by water or air ingress into the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Reactions between graphite and steam or air produce the combustible gases H 2 and/or CO. When these gases are mixed with air in the containment vessel (CV), flammable mixtures may be formed. Various modes of combustion including diffusion or premixed flames and possibly detonation may be exhibited by these mixtures. These combustion processes may create high over-pressure, pressure waves, and very hot gases within the CV and hence may threaten the structural integrity of the CV or damage the instrumentation and control system installations within it. Possible circumstances leading to these hazards and the physical characteristics related to them are delineated and studied in the report

  2. Perspectives on understanding and verifying the safety terrain of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Donald E., E-mail: donald@carlsonperin.net [11221 Empire Lane, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Ball, Sydney J., E-mail: beckysyd@comcast.net [100 Greywood Place, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The passive safety characteristics of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are conceptually well known and are largely supported by insights from past and ongoing research. This paper offers perspectives on selected issues in areas where further analysis and testing achievable within existing research and demonstration programs could help address residual uncertainties and better support the analysis of safety performance and the regulatory assessment of defense in depth. Areas considered include the evaluation of normal and anomalous core operating conditions and the analysis of accidents involving loss of forced cooling, coolant depressurization, air ingress, moisture ingress, and reactivity events. In addition to discussing associated uncertainties and potential measures to address them, this paper also proposes supplemental “safety terrain” studies that would use realistic assessments of postulated extreme event sequences to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the inherent behaviors and ultimate safety capabilities of modular HTGRs.

  3. Consideration of emergency source terms for pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Liu; Jun, Zhao; Jiejuan, Tong; Jianzhu, Cao

    2009-01-01

    Being the last barrier in the nuclear power plant defense-in-depth strategy, emergency planning (EP) is an integrated project. One of the key elements in this process is emergency source terms selection. Emergency Source terms for light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant (NPP) have been introduced in many technical documents, and advanced NPP emergency planning is attracting attention recently. Commercial practices of advanced NPP are undergoing in the world, pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) power plant is under construction in China which is considered as a representative of advanced NPP. The paper tries to find some pieces of suggestion from our investigation. The discussion of advanced NPP EP will be summarized first, and then the characteristics of pebble-bed HTGR relating to EP will be described. Finally, PSA insights on emergency source terms selection and current pebble-bed HTGR emergency source terms suggestions are proposed

  4. Status of international HTGR [high-temperature gas-cooled reactor] development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Simon, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    Programs for the development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology over the past 30 years in eight countries are briefly described. These programs have included both government sector and industrial participation. The programs have produced four electricity-producing prototype/demonstration reaactors, two in the United States, and two in the Federal Republic of Germany. Key design parameters for these reactors are compared with the design parameters planned for follow-on commercial-scale HTGRs. The development of HTGR technology has been enhanced by numerous cooperative agreements over the years, involving both government-sponsored national laboratories and industrial participants. Current bilateral cooperative agreements are described. A relatively new component in the HTGR international cooperation is that of multinational industrial alliances focused on supplying commercial-scale HTGR power plants. Current industrial cooperative agreements are briefly discussed

  5. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  6. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor safety-reliability program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a safety plan as part of an overall program plan for the design and development of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). This plan is intended to establish a logical framework for identifying the technology necessary to demonstrate that the requisite degree of public risk safety can be achieved economically. This plan provides a coherent system safety approach together with goals and success criterion as part of a unifying strategy for licensing a lead reactor plant in the near term. It is intended to provide guidance to program participants involved in producing a technology base for the HTGR that is fully responsive to safety consideration in the design, evaluation, licensing, public acceptance, and economic optimization of reactor systems.

  7. Safety aspects of forced flow cooldown transients in modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    During some of the design basis accidents in Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (MHTGRs) the main Heat Transport System (HTS) and the Shutdown Cooling System (SCS), are assumed to have failed. Decay heat is then removed by the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) only. If either forced flow cooling system becomes available during such a transient, its restart could significantly reduce the down-time. This paper uses the THATCH code to examine whether such restart, during a period of elevated core temperatures, can be accomplished within safe limits for fuel and metal component temperatures. If the reactor is scrammed, either system can apparently be restarted at any time, without exceeding any safe limits. However, under unscrammed conditions a restart of forced cooling can lead to recriticality, with fuel and metal temperatures significantly exceeding the safety limits

  8. Crossflow characteristics of flange type fuel element for very high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Takakazu; Kaburaki, Hideo; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Nakamura, Masahide.

    1987-01-01

    Fuel element design incorporating mating flanges at block end faces has the potential to improve thermal hydraulic performance of a VHTR (very high temperature gas-cooled reactor) core. As part of research and development efforts to establish flange type fuel element design, experiments and analyses were carried out on crossflow through interface gap between elements. Air at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature was used as a fluid. Crossflow loss coefficient factors were obtained with three test models, having different flange mating clearances, for various interface gap configurations, gap widths and block misalignments. It was found that crossflow loss coefficient factors for flange type fuel element were much larger than those for conventional flat-faced element. Numerical analyses were also made using a simple model devised to represent the crossflow path at the fuel element interface. The close agreement between numerical results and experimental data indicated that this model could predict well the crossflow characteristics of the flange type fuel element. (author)

  9. Safety and licensing of MHTGR [Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Millunzi, A.C.; Kelley, A.P. Jr.; Cunliffe, J.

    1987-07-01

    The Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) design meets stringent top-level regulatory and user safety requirements that require that the normal and off-normal operation of the plant not disturb the public's day-to-day activities. Quantitative, top-level regulatory criteria have been specified from US NRC and EPA sources to guide the design. The user/utility group has further specified that these criteria be met at the plant boundary. The focus of the safety approach has then been centered on retaining the radionuclide inventory within the fuel by removing core heat, controlling chemical attack, and by controlling heat generation. The MHTGR is shown to passively meet the stringent requirements with margin. No operator action is required and the plant is insensitive to operator error

  10. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor steam cycle/cogeneration application study update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Since publication of a report on the application of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (HTGR-SC/C) plant in December of 1980, progress has continued on application related activities. In particular, a reference plant and an application identification effort has been performed, a variable cogeneration cycle balance-of-plant design was developed and an updated economic analysis was prepared. A reference HTGR-SC/C plant size of 2240 MW(t) was selected, primarily on the basis of 2240 MW(t) being in the mid-range of anticipated application needs and the availability of the design data from the 2240 MW(t) Steam Cycle/Electric generation plant design. A variable cogeneration cycle plant design was developed having the capability of operating at a range of process steam loads between the reference design load (full cogeneration) and the no process steam load condition

  11. RCCS Experiments and Validation for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Goon C. Park

    2007-01-01

    A reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS), an air-cooled helical coil RCCS unit immersed in the water pool, was proposed to overcome the disadvantages of the weak cooling ability of air-cooled RCCS and the complex structure of water-cooled RCCS for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). An experimental apparatus was constructed to investigate the various heat transfer phenomena in the water pool type RCCS, such as the natural convection of air inside the cavity, radiation in the cavity, the natural convection of water in the water pool and the forced convection of air in the cooling pipe. The RCCS experimental results were compared with published correlations. The CFX code was validated using data from the air-cooled portion of the RCCS. The RELAP5 code was validated using measured temperatures from the reactor vessel and cavity walls

  12. Benchmark Analysis Of The High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Using Monte Carlo Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Kien Cuong; Huda, M.Q.

    2008-01-01

    Information about several past and present experimental and prototypical facilities based on High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have been examined to assess the potential of these facilities for use in this benchmarking effort. Both reactors and critical facilities applicable to pebble-bed type cores have been considered. Two facilities - HTR-PROTEUS of Switzerland and HTR-10 of China and one conceptual design from Germany - HTR-PAP20 - appear to have the greatest potential for use in benchmarking the codes. This study presents the benchmark analysis of these reactors technologies by using MCNP4C2 and MVP/GMVP Codes to support the evaluation and future development of HTGRs. The ultimate objective of this work is to identify and develop new capabilities needed to support Generation IV initiative. (author)

  13. Selection of design basis event for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2016-06-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been investigating safety requirements and basic approach of safety guidelines for modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) aiming to increase internarial contribution for nuclear safety by developing an international HTGR safety standard under International Atomic Energy Agency. In this study, we investigate a deterministic approach to select design basis events utilizing information obtained from probabilistic approach. In addition, selections of design basis events are conducted for commercial HTGR designed by JAEA. As a result, an approach for selecting design basis event considering multiple failures of safety systems is established which has not been considered as design basis in the safety guideline for existing nuclear facility. Furthermore, selection of design basis events for commercial HTGR has completed. This report provides an approach and procedure for selecting design basis events of modular HTGR as well as selected events for the commercial HTGR, GTHTR300. (author)

  14. Digital Information Platform Design of Fuel Element Engineering For High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yuwei

    2014-01-01

    This product line provide fuel element for high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear power plant which is being constructed in Shidao bay in Shandong province. Its annual productive capacity is thirty ten thousands fuel elements whose shape is spherical . Compared with pressurized water fuel , this line has the feature of high radiation .In order to reduce harm to operators, the comprehensive information platform is designed , which can realize integration of automation and management for plant. This platform include two nets, automation net using field bus technique and information net using Ethernet technique ,which realize collection ,control, storage and publish of information.By means of construction, automatization and informatization of product line can reach high level. (author)

  15. Digital simulation of a commercial scale high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, A.; Bowman, H.F.

    1978-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model of a commercial scale high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam power plant was derived in state-space form from fundamental principles. The plant model is 40th order, time-invariant, deterministic and continuous-time. Numerical results were obtained by digital simulation. Steady-state performance of the nonlinear model was verified with plant heat balance data at 100, 75 and 50 percent load levels. Local stability, controllability and observability were examined in this range using standard linear algorithms. Transfer function matrices for the linearized models were also obtained. Transient response characteristics of 6 system variables for independent step distrubances in 2 different input variables are presented as typical results

  16. Perspectives on Understanding and Verifying the Safety Terrain of Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent safety characteristics of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are conceptually well known and are largely supported by insights from past and ongoing research. This paper offers perspectives on selected issues in areas where further analysis and testing achievable within existing research and demonstration programs could help address residual uncertainties and better support the analysis of safety performance and the regulatory assessment of defense in depth. Areas considered include the evaluation of normal and anomalous core operating conditions and the analysis of accidents involving coolant depressurization, air ingress, moisture ingress, and reactivity insertion. In addition to discussing associated uncertainties and potential measures to address them, the paper also proposes supplemental “safety terrain” studies that would use realistic assessments of postulated extreme event sequences to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the inherent behaviors and ultimate safety capabilities of modular HTGRs. (author)

  17. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor simulation using parallel processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.; Conklin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The MHPP (Modular HTGR Parallel Processor) code has been developed to simulate modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) transients and accidents. MHPP incorporates a very detailed model for predicting the dynamics of the reactor core, vessel, and cooling systems over a wide variety of scenarios ranging from expected transients to very-low-probability severe accidents. The simulations routines, which had originally been developed entirely as serial code, were readily adapted to parallel processing Fortran. The resulting parallelized simulation speed was enhanced significantly. Workstation interfaces are being developed to provide for user (operator) interaction. In this paper the benefits realized by adapting previous MHTGR codes to run on a parallel processor are discussed, along with results of typical accident analyses

  18. Using Wireless Sensor Networks to Achieve Intelligent Monitoring for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghai Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR can incorporate wireless sensor network (WSN technology to improve safety and economic competitiveness. WSN has great potential in monitoring the equipment and processes within nuclear power plants (NPPs. This technology not only reduces the cost of regular monitoring but also enables intelligent monitoring. In intelligent monitoring, large sets of heterogeneous data collected by the WSN can be used to optimize the operation and maintenance of the HTGR. In this paper, WSN-based intelligent monitoring schemes that are specific for applications of HTGR are proposed. Three major concerns regarding wireless technology in HTGR are addressed: wireless devices interference, cybersecurity of wireless networks, and wireless standards selected for wireless platform. To process nonlinear and non-Gaussian data obtained by WSN for fault diagnosis, novel algorithms combining Kernel Entropy Component Analysis (KECA and support vector machine (SVM are developed.

  19. Critical evaluation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors applicable to coal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; DeStefano, J.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1975-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the technology and costs of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTRs) applicable to nuclear coal conversion. Coal conversion processes suitable for coupling to reactors are described. Vendor concepts of the VHTR are summarized. The materials requirements as a function of process temperature in the range 1400 to 2000 0 F are analyzed. Components, environmental and safety factors, economics and nuclear fuel cycles are reviewed. It is concluded that process heat supply in the range 1400 to 1500 0 F could be developed with a high degree of assurance. Process heat at 1600 0 F would require considerably more materials development. While temperatures up to 2000 0 F appear to be attainable, considerably more research and risk were involved. A demonstration plant would be required as a step in the commercialization of the VHTR

  20. Summary of the experimental multi-purpose very high temperature gas cooled reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The report presents the design of Multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (the Experimental VHTR) based on the second stage of detailed design which was completed on March 1984, in the from of ''An application of reactor construction permit Appendix 8''. The Experimental VHTR is designed to satisfy with the design specification for the reactor thermal output 50 MW and reactor outlet temperature 950 0 C. The adequacy of the design is also checked by the safety analysis. The planning of plant system and safety is summarized such as safety design requirements and conformance with them, seismic design and plant arrangement. Concerning with the system of the Experimental VHTR the design basis, design data and components are described in the order. (author)

  1. Safety design philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katanishi, Shoji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing design studies of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The original safety design philosophy has also been discussed and fixed for the GTHTR300. One of the unique feature of the safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is that a depressurization accident is postulated as a design basis accident in order to show the high level of safety characteristics, though its probability of occurrence is much lower than the probability range of design basis accident. Another feature of safety design is to adopt a double confinement that is one of the original concepts for the GTHTR300. By using a double confinement, a feasibility of safety design without containment vessel was clarified even in case of a depressurization accident. This article describes the safety design philosophy and some results of preliminary evaluations which were conducted in order to clarify the feasibility of original safety design of the GTHTR300. (author)

  2. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, R.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. Pre and post test metallurgical analyses were conducted on the Hastelloy-X structures and reference specimens. The results gave evidence of aging in the form of noticeable changes in room temperature tensile and reduction in area parameters. The Hastelloy-X welds exhibited greater changes in properties due to thermal aging. The antifriction coating (Cr 3 C 2 ) performed well without spallation or excessive wear. (orig.)

  3. Modification of Low-Alloy Steel Surface by High-Temperature Gas Nitriding Plus Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Dongling; Li, Minsong; Ding, Hongzhen; Qiu, Wanqi; Luo, Chengping

    2018-02-01

    The low-alloy steel was nitrided in a pure NH3 gas atmosphere at 640 660 °C for 2 h, i.e., high-temperature gas nitriding (HTGN), followed by tempering at 225 °C, which can produce a high property surface coating without brittle compound (white) layer. The steel was also plasma nitriding for comparison. The composition, microstructure and microhardness of the nitrided and tempered specimens were examined, and their tribological behavior investigated. The results showed that the as-gas-nitrided layer consisted of a white layer composed of FeN0.095 phase (nitrided austenite) and a diffusional zone underneath the white layer. After tempering, the white layer was decomposed to a nano-sized (α-Fe + γ'-Fe4N + retained austenite) bainitic microstructure with a high hardness of 1150HV/25 g. Wear test results showed that the wear resistance and wear coefficient yielded by the complex HTGN plus tempering were considerably higher and lower, respectively, than those produced by the conventional plasma nitriding.

  4. Plant accident dynamics of high-temperature reactors with direct gas turbine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waloch, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    In the paper submitted, a one-dimensional accident simulation model for high-temperature reactors with direct-cycle gas turbine (single-cycle facilities) is described. The paper assesses the sudden failure of a gas duct caused by the double-ended break of one out of several parallel pipes before and behind the reactor for a non-integrated plant, leading to major loads in the reactor region, as well as the complete loss of vanes of the compressor for an integrated plant. The results of the calculations show especially high loads for the break of a hot-gas pipe immediately behind the flow restrictors of the reactor outlet, because of prolonged effects of pressure gradients in the reactor region and the maximum core differential pressure. A plant accident dynamics calculation therefore allows to find a compromise between the requirements of stable compressor operation, on the one hand, and small loads in the reactor in the course of an accident, on the other, by establishing in a co-ordinated manner the narrowing ratio of the flow restrictors. (GL) [de

  5. Temperature profile and producer gas composition of high temperature air gasification of oil palm fronds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guangul, F M; Sulaiman, S A; Ramli, A

    2013-01-01

    Environmental pollution and scarcity of reliable energy source are the current pressing global problems which need a sustainable solution. Conversion of biomass to a producer gas through gasification process is one option to alleviate the aforementioned problems. In the current research the temperature profile and composition of the producer gas obtained from the gasification of oil palm fronds by using high temperature air were investigated and compared with unheated air. By preheating the gasifying air at 500°C the process temperature were improved and as a result the concentration of combustible gases and performance of the process were improved. The volumetric percentage of CO, CH4 and H2 were improved from 22.49, 1.98, and 9.67% to 24.98, to 2.48% and 13.58%, respectively. In addition, HHV, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency were improver from 4.88 MJ/Nm3, 83.8% and 56.1% to 5.90 MJ/Nm3, 87.3% and 62.4%, respectively.

  6. Bombardment of gas molecules on single graphene layer at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesan, Ramki [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyun [Department of Aerospace and System Engineering and Research Center for Aircraft Parts Technology, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Dong Sung [Future Propulsion Center, Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-09

    Graphite is widely used as a material for rocket-nozzle inserts due to its excellent thermo-physical properties as well as low density. During the operation of rockets, the surface of the graphite nozzle is subjected to very high heat fluxes and the undesirable erosion of the surface occurs due to the bombardment of gas molecules with high kinetic energy, which causes a significant reduction of nozzle performance. However, the understanding and quantification of such bombardment is not satisfactory due to its complexity: The bond breaking-forming happens simultaneously for the carbon atoms of graphene, some gas molecules penetrate through the surface, some of them are reflected from the surface, etc. In the present study, we perform extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the bombardment phenomena in high temperature environment (several thousand Kelvin). Advanced from the previous studies that have focused on the bombardment by light molecules (e.g., H{sub 2}), we will concentrate on the impact by realistic molecules (e.g., CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O). LAMMPS is employed for the MD simulations with NVE ensemble and AIREBO potential for graphene. The molecular understanding of the interaction between graphene and highly energetic gas molecules will enable us to design an efficient thermo-mechanical protection system.

  7. Heat insulating structure for use in transporting and handling gas of high temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathusima, T.; Sato, T.; Uenishi, A.

    1980-01-01

    A heat insulating structure is described that has a heat-resistant tube disposed in a tubular cylindrical body and defining a passage for a high temperature gas, a heat insulating material disposed between the tube and the tubular cylindrical body and adapted to prevent the heat possessed by the gas from being transmitted to the tubular cylindrical body, and a spring adapted to bias the heat insulating material toward the inner surface of the tubular cylindrical body, so as to prevent the formation of a bypass passage for the gas including the gap between the tubular cylindrical body and the heat insulating material. The heat insulating material consists of a plurality of fibrous heat insulating materials mainly consisting of bulky fibrous materials and a plurality of shaped fibrous heat insulating materials. These fibrous heat insulating materials and the shaped fibrous heat insulating materials are arranged alternatingly and independently in the axial direction. In each of the bulky fibrous heat insulating material, disposed is a spring for biasing the shaped fibrous heat insulating material in the axial direction

  8. Applications of Nd:YAG laser micromanufacturing in high temperature gas reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Smal, C.A.; Steyn, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two innovative applications of Nd:YAG laser micromachining techniques demonstrated. ► Firstly an alumina jig to contain multiple 500 μm diameter ZrO 2 spheres. ► Secondly the manufacture of a sealing system using laser micromachining. ► ZrO 2 micro plugs isolate the openings of micro-machined cavities to produce a gas-tight seal. ► Manufacturing processes for both the tapered seating cavity and the plug are demonstrated. - Abstract: Two innovative applications of Nd:YAG laser micromachining techniques are demonstrated in this publication. Research projects to determine the fission product transport mechanisms in TRISO coated particles necessitate heat treatment studies as well as the manufacturing of a unique sealed system for experimentation at very high temperatures. This article describes firstly the design and creation of an alumina jig designed to contain 500 μm diameter ZrO 2 spheres intended for annealing experiments at temperatures up to 1600 °C. Functional requirements of this jig are the precision positioning of spheres for laser ablation, welding and post weld heat treatment in order to ensure process repeatability and accurate indexing of individual spheres. The design challenges and the performance of the holding device are reported. Secondly the manufacture of a sealing system using laser micromachining is reported. ZrO 2 micro plugs isolate the openings of micro-machined cavities to produce a gas-tight seal fit for application in a high temperature environment. The technique is described along with a discussion of the problems experienced during the sealing process. Typical problems experienced were seating dimensions and the relative small size (∼200 μm) of these plugs that posed handling challenges. Manufacturing processes for both the tapered seating cavity and the plug are demonstrated. In conclusion, this article demonstrates the application of Nd-YAG micromachining in an innovative way to solve practical research

  9. Safety aspects of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Millunzi, A.C.

    1989-08-01

    The Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept under development through a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry and the utilities. The design utilizes the basic high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The qualitative top-level safety requirement is that the plant's operation not disturb the normal day-to-day activities of the public. The MHTGR safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles has been evaluated. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal have been examined which include a loss of helium pressure and a simultaneous loss of forced cooling of the core. The challenges to control of heat generation have considered not only the failure to insert the reactivity control systems, but the withdrawal of control rods. Finally, challenges to control chemical attack of the ceramic coated fuel have been considered, including catastrophic failure of the steam generator allowing water ingress or of the pressure vessels allowing air ingress. The plant's response to these extreme challenges is not dependent on operator action and the events considered encompass conceivable operator errors. In the same vein, reliance on radionuclide retention within the full particle and on passive features to perform a few key functions to maintain the fuel within acceptable conditions also reduced susceptibility to external events, site-specific events, and to acts of sabotage and terrorism. 4 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  10. Development of a neutronic model for the fuel of a high temperature gas reactor type PBMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oropeza C, I.; Carmona H, R.; Francois L, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    In this work was developed the neutronic model of a fuel sphere of a nuclear reactor of gas of high temperature to modulate of bed of spheres (PBMR), using the Monte Carlo method with the MCNPx code. In order to be able to verify the fuel model constructed in this investigation, it is used a case of reference, based on an international exercise b enchmark . The benchmark report contains the results sent by different international participants for five phases with respect to the high temperature gas reactor (HTR), fed with uranium, plutonium and thorium. In particular, in first stage of benchmark an infinite adjustment of uranium compound fuel spheres is considered unique, with which our results were compared. This first stage considers two cases: cell calculations with spherical external frontier and cell calculations with cubic external frontier. The objective is to identify any increase in the uncertainty, related to the uranium fuel, that is associated with the plutonium and thorium fuels. In order to validate our results, the values of the neutron multiplication factor were taken in account, in cold and in the heat of the moment from the participants who sent their results obtained with Monte Carlo and deterministic calculations. The model of the fuel sphere developed in this work considers a regular distribution of 15000 Triso particles, in a cubic mesh centered within the sphere. For it was necessary to define the step firstly or p itch o f the cubic mesh. Generally, the results obtained by the participants of benchmark and those of this investigation present good agreement, nevertheless, appear some discrepancies, attributed to factors like different libraries of cross sections used, the nature of the solution: Monte Carlo or deterministic, and the difficulty of some participants to model the external frontier condition of reflection. (Author)

  11. Study on the fuel cycle cost of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300). Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takei, Masanobu; Katanishi, Shoji; Nakata, Tetsuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Oda, Takefumi; Izumiya, Toru [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    In the basic design of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300), reduction of the fuel cycle cost has a large benefit of improving overall plant economy. Then, fuel cycle cost was evaluated for GTHTR300. First, of fuel fabrication for high-temperature gas cooled reactor, since there was no actual experience with a commercial scale, a preliminary design for a fuel fabrication plant with annual processing of 7.7 ton-U sufficient four GTHTR300 was performed, and fuel fabrication cost was evaluated. Second, fuel cycle cost was evaluated based on the equilibrium cycle of GTHTR300. The factors which were considered in this cost evaluation include uranium price, conversion, enrichment, fabrication, storage of spent fuel, reprocessing, and waste disposal. The fuel cycle cost of GTHTR300 was estimated at about 1.07 yen/kWh. If the back-end cost of reprocessing and waste disposal is included and assumed to be nearly equivalent to LWR, the fuel cycle cost of GTHTR300 was estimated to be about 1.31 yen/kWh. Furthermore, the effects on fuel fabrication cost by such of fuel specification parameters as enrichment, the number of fuel types, and the layer thickness were considered. Even if the enrichment varies from 10 to 20%, the number of fuel types change from 1 to 4, the 1st layer thickness of fuel changes by 30 {mu}m, or the 2nd layer to the 4th layer thickness of fuel changes by 10 {mu}m, the impact on fuel fabrication cost was evaluated to be negligible. (author)

  12. The analysis for inventory of experimental reactor high temperature gas reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Kuntjoro; Pande Made Udiyani

    2016-01-01

    Relating to the plan of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) to operate an experimental reactor of High Temperature Gas Reactors type (RGTT), it is necessary to reactor safety analysis, especially with regard to environmental issues. Analysis of the distribution of radionuclides from the reactor into the environment in normal or abnormal operating conditions starting with the estimated reactor inventory based on the type, power, and operation of the reactor. The purpose of research is to analyze inventory terrace for Experimental Power Reactor design (RDE) high temperature gas reactor type power 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt. Analyses were performed using ORIGEN2 computer code with high temperatures cross-section library. Calculation begins with making modifications to some parameter of cross-section library based on the core average temperature of 570 °C and continued with calculations of reactor inventory due to RDE 10 MWt reactor power. The main parameters of the reactor 10 MWt RDE used in the calculation of the main parameters of the reactor similar to the HTR-10 reactor. After the reactor inventory 10 MWt RDE obtained, a comparison with the results of previous researchers. Based upon the suitability of the results, it make the design for the reactor RDE 20MWEt and 30 MWt to obtain the main parameters of the reactor in the form of the amount of fuel in the pebble bed reactor core, height and diameter of the terrace. Based on the main parameter or reactor obtained perform of calculation to get reactor inventory for RDE 20 MWT and 30 MWT with the same methods as the method of the RDE 10 MWt calculation. The results obtained are the largest inventory of reactor RDE 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt sequentially are to Kr group are about 1,00E+15 Bq, 1,20E+16 Bq, 1,70E+16 Bq, for group I are 6,50E+16 Bq, 1,20E+17 Bq, 1,60E+17 Bq and for groups Cs are 2,20E+16 Bq, 2,40E+16 Bq, 2,60E+16 Bq. Reactor inventory will then be used to calculate the reactor source term and it

  13. Program for aerodynamic performance tests of helium gas compressor model of the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunimoto, Kazuhiko; Yan, Xing; Itaka, Hidehiko; Mori, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Research and development program for helium gas compressor aerodynamics was planned for the power conversion system of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The axial compressor with polytropic efficiency of 90% and surge margin more than 30% was designed with 3-dimensional aerodynamic design. Performance and surge margin of the helium gas compressor tends to be lower due to the higher boss ratio which makes the tip clearance wide relative to the blade height, as well as due to a larger number of stages. The compressor was designed on the basis of methods and data for the aerodynamic design of industrial open-cycle gas-turbine. To validate the design of the helium gas compressor of the GTHTR300, aerodynamic performance tests were planned, and a 1/3-scale, 4-stage compressor model was designed. In the tests, the performance data of the helium gas compressor model will be acquired by using helium gas as a working fluid. The maximum design pressure at the model inlet is 0.88 MPa, which allows the Reynolds number to be sufficiently high. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  14. Design study on evaluation for power conversion system concepts in high temperature gas cooled reactor with gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minatsuki, Isao; Mizokami, Yorikata

    2007-01-01

    The design studies on High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor with Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) have been performed, which were mainly promoted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and supported by fabricators in Japan. HTGR-GT plant feature is almost determined by selection of power conversion system concepts. Therefore, plant design philosophy is observed characteristically in selection of them. This paper describes the evaluation and analysis of the essential concepts of the HTGR-GT power conversion system through the investigations based on our experiences and engineering knowledge as a fabricator. As a result, the following concepts were evaluated that have advantages against other competitive one, such as the horizontal turbo machine rotor, the turbo machine in an individual vessel, the turbo machine with single shaft, the generator inside the power conversion vessel, and the power conversion system cycle with an intercooler. The results of the study can contribute as reference data when the concepts will be selected. Furthermore, we addressed reasonableness about the concept selection of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor GTHTR300 power conversion system, which has been promoted by JAEA. As a conclusion, we recognized the GTHTR300 would be one of the most promising concepts for commercialization in near future. (author)

  15. Thermodynamic data for selected gas impurities in the primary coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feber, R.C.

    1976-12-01

    The literature of thermodynamic data for selected fission-product species is reviewed and supplemented in support of complex chemical equilibrium calculations applied to fission-product distributions in the primary coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Thermodynamic functions and heats and free energies of formation are calculated and tabulated to 3000 0 K for CsI (s,l,g), Cs 2 I 2 (g), CH 3 I(g), COI 2 (g), and CsH(g). 79 references

  16. High-Temperature Desulfurization of Heavy Fuel-Derived Reformate Gas Streams for SOFC Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2007-01-01

    Desulfurization of the hot reformate gas produced by catalytic partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of heavy fuels, such as JP-8 and jet fuels, is required prior to using the gas in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Development of suitable sorbent materials involves the identification of sorbents with favorable sulfidation equilibria, good kinetics, and high structural stability and regenerability at the SOFC operating temperatures (650 to 800 C). Over the last two decades, a major barrier to the development of regenerable desulfurization sorbents has been the gradual loss of sorbent performance in cyclic sulfidation and regeneration at such high temperatures. Mixed oxide compositions based on ceria were examined in this work as regenerable sorbents in simulated reformate gas mixtures and temperatures greater than 650 C. Regeneration was carried out with dilute oxygen streams. We have shown that under oxidative regeneration conditions, high regeneration space velocities (greater than 80,000 h(sup -1)) can be used to suppress sulfate formation and shorten the total time required for sorbent regeneration. A major finding of this work is that the surface of ceria and lanthanan sorbents can be sulfided and regenerated completely, independent of the underlying bulk sorbent. This is due to reversible adsorption of H2S on the surface of these sorbents even at temperatures as high as 800 C. La-rich cerium oxide formulations are excellent for application to regenerative H2S removal from reformate gas streams at 650 to 800 C. These results create new opportunities for compact sorber/regenerator reactor designs to meet the requirements of solid oxide fuel cell systems at any scale.

  17. On residual gas analysis during high temperature baking of graphite tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, A A; Chaudhuri, P; Khirwadkar, S; Reddy, D Chenna; Saxena, Y C; Chauhan, N; Raole, P M

    2008-01-01

    Steady-state Super-conducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. It is designed for plasma discharge duration of 1000 seconds to obtain fully steady-state plasma operation. Plasma Facing Components (PFC), consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and poloidal limiters are also designed to be UHV compatible for steady state operation. All PFC are made up of graphite tiles mechanically attached to the copper alloy substrate. Graphite is one of the preferred first wall armour material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number of carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. High temperature vacuum baking of graphite tiles is the standard process to remove the impurities. Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used for qualitative and quantitative measurements of released gases from graphite tiles during baking. Surface Analysis of graphite tiles has also been done before and after baking. This paper describes the residual gas analysis during baking and surface analysis of graphite tiles

  18. Dynamics and inherent safety features of small modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to characterize the dynamics and inherent safety features of various modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs. This work was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's HTGR Safety Research program. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) have sponsored studies of several modular HTGR concepts, each having it own unique advantageous economic and inherent safety features. The DOE design team has recently choses a 350-MW(t) annular core with prismatic, graphite matrix fuel for its reference plant. The various safety features of this plant and of the pebble-bed core designs similar to those currently being developed and operated in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) are described. A varity of postulated accident sequences involving combinations of loss of forced circulation of the helium primary coolant, loss of primary coolant pressurization, and loss of normal and backup heat sinks were studied and are discussed. Results demonstrate that each concept can withstand an uncontrolled heatup accident without reaching excessive peak fuel temperatures. Comparisons of calculated and measured response for a loss of forced circulation test on the FRG reactor, AVR, are also presented. 10 refs

  19. Material development for gas-cooled high temperature reactors for the production of nuclear process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1977-04-01

    In the framework of the material development for gas-cooled high temperature reactors, considerable investigations of the materials for the reactor core and the primary cicuit are being conducted. Concerning the core components, the current state-of-the-art and the objectives of the development work on the spherical fuel elements, coated particles and structural graphite are discussed. As an example of the structural graphite, the non-replaceable reflector of the process heat reactor is discussed. The primary circuit will be constructed mainly from metallic materials, although some ceramics are also being considered. Components of interest are hot gas ducts, liners, methane reformer tubes and helium-helium intermediate heat exchangers. The gaseous impurities present in the helium coolant may cause oxidation and carburization of the nickel-base and iron-base alloys envisaged for use in these components, with a possible associated adverse effect on the mechanical properties such as creep and fatigue. Test capacity has therefore been installed to investigate materials behaviour in simulated reactor helium under both constant and alternating stress conditions. The first results on the creep behaviour of several alloys in impure helium are presented and discussed. (orig./GSC) [de

  20. On residual gas analysis during high temperature baking of graphite tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, A A; Chaudhuri, P; Khirwadkar, S; Reddy, D Chenna; Saxena, Y C [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar - 382 428 (India); Chauhan, N; Raole, P M [Facilitation Center for Industrial Plasma Technologies, IPR, Gandhinagar (India)], E-mail: arun@ipr.res.in

    2008-05-01

    Steady-state Super-conducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. It is designed for plasma discharge duration of 1000 seconds to obtain fully steady-state plasma operation. Plasma Facing Components (PFC), consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and poloidal limiters are also designed to be UHV compatible for steady state operation. All PFC are made up of graphite tiles mechanically attached to the copper alloy substrate. Graphite is one of the preferred first wall armour material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number of carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. High temperature vacuum baking of graphite tiles is the standard process to remove the impurities. Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used for qualitative and quantitative measurements of released gases from graphite tiles during baking. Surface Analysis of graphite tiles has also been done before and after baking. This paper describes the residual gas analysis during baking and surface analysis of graphite tiles.

  1. High-temperature behavior of a deformed Fermi gas obeying interpolating statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algin, Abdullah; Senay, Mustafa

    2012-04-01

    An outstanding idea originally introduced by Greenberg is to investigate whether there is equivalence between intermediate statistics, which may be different from anyonic statistics, and q-deformed particle algebra. Also, a model to be studied for addressing such an idea could possibly provide us some new consequences about the interactions of particles as well as their internal structures. Motivated mainly by this idea, in this work, we consider a q-deformed Fermi gas model whose statistical properties enable us to effectively study interpolating statistics. Starting with a generalized Fermi-Dirac distribution function, we derive several thermostatistical functions of a gas of these deformed fermions in the thermodynamical limit. We study the high-temperature behavior of the system by analyzing the effects of q deformation on the most important thermostatistical characteristics of the system such as the entropy, specific heat, and equation of state. It is shown that such a deformed fermion model in two and three spatial dimensions exhibits the interpolating statistics in a specific interval of the model deformation parameter 0 < q < 1. In particular, for two and three spatial dimensions, it is found from the behavior of the third virial coefficient of the model that the deformation parameter q interpolates completely between attractive and repulsive systems, including the free boson and fermion cases. From the results obtained in this work, we conclude that such a model could provide much physical insight into some interacting theories of fermions, and could be useful to further study the particle systems with intermediate statistics.

  2. Techno-economic analysis of seawater desalination using high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Linchun; Qin Zhenya

    2001-01-01

    Our world, including China (especially in big cities and foreland), is facing the increased global shortage of potable water and pollution of water. It is ideal to promote seawater desalination to satisfy the potable water demand in these areas. Among the various processes, MED, RO and VC have proven well developed and promising. Due to the inherent safety and its vapor produced with high parameters and features of small size and modular design, HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) of 2x200MW is chosen as the energy source for the desalination in dual production of clean water and power. This paper discusses the techno-economic feasibility of different seawater desalting systems using 2x200MW HTGR in the areas mentioned above, that is, ST-MED (Steam Turbine Cycle), RO, MED/TVC, RO/MED and GT-MED (Gas Turbine Cycle). The exergy concept is used in calculating availability to get cost of energy in desalination, and power credit method is used in economic assessment of different systems to get reasonable evaluating, while economic-life levelized cost method is adopted for calculating electricity cost of referred HTGR plant. In addition, sensitivity analysis on ST-MED economy is also presented. (author)

  3. Recovery of perchloroethylene scrubbing medium generated in the refabrication of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, M.S.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.; Rainey, W.T. Jr.

    1976-11-01

    During the refabrication of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel, perchloroethylene (C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/) is used as the nonmoderating scrubbing medium to remove condensable hydrocarbons, carbon soot, and uranium-bearing particulates from the off-gas streams. The process by which the contaminated perchloroethylene is recycled is discussed.

  4. Recovery of perchloroethylene scrubbing medium generated in the refabrication of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, M.S.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.; Rainey, W.T. Jr.

    1976-11-01

    During the refabrication of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel, perchloroethylene (C 2 Cl 4 ) is used as the nonmoderating scrubbing medium to remove condensable hydrocarbons, carbon soot, and uranium-bearing particulates from the off-gas streams. The process by which the contaminated perchloroethylene is recycled is discussed

  5. Determination of an instability temperature for alloys in the cooling gas of a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmer, H.; Grman, D.; Krompholz, K.; Zimmermann, U.; Ullrich, G.

    1985-05-01

    High temperature alloys designed to be used for components in the primary circuit of a helium cooled high temperature nuclear reactor show massive CO production above a certain temperature, called the instability temperature T/sub i/, which increases with increasing partial pressure of CO in the cooling gas. At p/sub CO/ = 15 microbar, T/sub i/ lies between 900 and 950 degrees C for the four alloys under investigation: T/sub i/ is lowest for the iron base alloy Incoloy 800 H and increases for the nickel base alloys in the order Inconel 617, HDA 230 and Nimonic 86. Measurements of T/sub i/ made at 3 different laboratories were compared and shown to agree for p/sub CO/ 25 microbar, compatible with CO production by a reaction of Cr2O3 with carbides. Some measurements of T/sub i/ on HDA 230 and Nimonic 86 were performed in the course of simulated reactor disturbances. They showed that the oxide layer looses its protective properties above T/sub i/. A highlight of the examinations was the detection of eta-carbides (M6C) with unusual properties. M6C is the only type of carbide occuring in HDA 230. An eta-carbide with a lattice constant of 1088.8 pm had developed at the surface of Nimonic 86 during pre-oxidation before the disturbance simulation. Its composition is estimated at Ni3SiMo2C. Eta-carbides containing Si and especially eta-carbides with lattice constants as low as 1088.8 pm have been described only rarely until now. (author)

  6. Management of graphite material: a key issue for High Temperature Gas Reactor system (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdeloie, C.; Marimbeau, P.; Robin, J.C.; Cellier, F.

    2005-01-01

    Graphite material is used in nuclear High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR, Fig.1) as moderator, thermal absorber and also as structural components of the core (Fig.2). This type of reactor was selected by the Generation IV forum as a potential high temperature provider for supplying hydrogen production plants and is under development in France in the frame of the AREVA ANTARES program. In order to select graphite grades to be used in these future reactors, the requirements for mechanical, thermal, physical-chemical properties must match the internal environment of the nuclear core, especially with regard to irradiation effect. Another important aspect that must be addressed early in design is the waste issue. Indeed, it is necessary to reduce the amount of nuclear waste produced by operation of the reactor during its lifetime. Preliminary assessment of the nuclear waste output for an ANTARES type 280 MWe HTGR over 60 year-lifetime gives an estimated 6000 m 3 of activated graphite waste. Thus, reducing the graphite waste production is an important issue for any HTGR system. First, this paper presents a preliminary inventory of graphite waste fluxes coming from a HTGR, in mass and volume, with magnitudes of radiological activities based on activation calculations of graphite during its stay in the core of the reactor. Normalized data corresponding to an output of 1 GWe.year electricity allows comparison of the waste production with other nuclear reactor systems. Second, possible routes to manage irradiated graphite waste are addressed in both the context of French nuclear waste management rules and by comparison to other national regulations. Routes for graphite waste disposal studied in different countries (concerning existing irradiated graphite waste) will be discussed with regard to new issues of large graphite waste from HTGR. Alternative or complementary solutions aiming at lowering volume of graphite waste to be managed will be presented. For example

  7. Pressure pressure-balanced pH sensing system for high temperature and high pressure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Koji

    1995-01-01

    As for the pH measurement system for high temperature, high pressure water, there have been the circumstances that first the reference electrodes for monitoring corrosion potential were developed, and subsequently, it was developed for the purpose of maintaining the soundness of metallic materials in high temperature, high pressure water in nuclear power generation. In the process of developing the reference electrodes for high temperature water, it was clarified that the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs is closely related to the corrosion potential determined by dissolved oxygen concentration. As the types of pH electrodes, there are metal-hydrogen electrodes, glass electrodes, ZrO 2 diaphragm electrodes and TiO 2 semiconductor electrodes. The principle of pH measurement using ZrO 2 diaphragms is explained. The pH measuring system is composed of YSZ element, pressure-balanced type external reference electrode, pressure balancer and compressed air vessel. The stability and pH response of YSZ elements are reported. (K.I.)

  8. Numerical simulation and geometry optimization of hot-gas mixing in lower plenum of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hang; Wang Jie; Laurien, E.

    2010-01-01

    The lower plenum in high temperature gas-cooled reactor was designed to mix the gas of different temperatures from the reactor core. Previous researches suggest the current geometry of the lower plenum to be improved for better mixing capability and lower pressure drop. In the presented work, a series of varied geometries were investigated with numerical simulation way. The choice of appropriate mesh type and size used in the geometry variation was discussed with the reference of experimental data. The original thin ribs in the current design were merged into thicker ones, and a junction located at the starting end of the outlet pipe was introduced. After comparing several potential optimization methods, an improved geometry was selected with the merged ribs increasing the pre-defined mixing coefficient and the junction reducing the pressure drop. Future work was discussed based on the simulation of real reactor case. The work shows a direction for design improvements of the lower plenum geometry. (authors)

  9. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, D.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. The insulation retained an acceptable degree of resiliency. However, some fiber damage was observed within both the high and low temperature insulation blankets. A thermal analysis was conducted to correlate the hot duct heat transfer results with those obtained from the analytical techniques used for the HTGR design using a computer thermal model representative of the duct and test setup. The thermal performance of the insulation, the temperature gradient through the structural components, the heating load to the cooling system and the permeation flow effect on heat transfer were verified. Exellent correlation between the experimental data and the analytical techniques were obtained

  10. High temperature gas cooled reactor technology development. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The successful introduction of an advanced nuclear power plant programme depends on many key elements. It must be economically competitive with alternative sources of energy, its technical development must assure operational dependability, the support of society requires that it be safe and environmentally acceptable, and it must meet the regulatory standards developed for its use and application. These factors interrelate with each other, and the ability to satisfy the established goals and criteria of all of these requirements is mandatory if a country or a specific industry is to proceed with a new, advanced nuclear power system. It was with the focus on commercializing the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) that the IAEA's International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors recommended this Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on HTGR Technology Development. Over the past few years, many Member States have instituted a re-examination of their nuclear power policies and programmes. It has become evident that the only realistic way to introduce an advanced nuclear power programme in today's world is through international co-operation between countries. The sharing of expertise and technical facilities for the common development of the HTGR is the goal of the Member States comprising the IAEA's International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This meeting brought together key representatives and experts on the HTGR from the national organizations and industries of ten countries and the European Commission. The state electric utility of South Africa, Eskom, hosted this TCM in Johannesburg, from 13 to 15 November 1996. This TCM provided the opportunity to review the status of HTGR design and development activities, and especially to identify international co-operation which could be utilized to bring about the commercialization of the HTGR

  11. Stability of test environments for performance evaluation of materials for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgemon, G.L.; Wilson, D.F.; Bell, G.E.C.

    1993-01-01

    Stability of the primary helium-based coolant test gas for use in performance ests of materials for the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) was determined. Results of tests of the initial gas chemistry from General Atomics (GA) at elevated temperatures, and the associated results predicted by the SOLGASMIX trademark modelling package are presented. Results indicated that for this gas composition and at flow rates obtainable in the test loop, 466 ± 24C is the highest temperature that can be maintained without significantly altering the specified gas chemistry. Four additional gas chemistries were modelled using SOLGASMIX trademark

  12. Study on thermodynamic cycle of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Xinhe; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie

    2017-01-01

    The development trend of the (very) High temperature gas-cooled reactor is to gradually increase the reactor outlet temperature. The different power conversion units are required at the different reactor outlet temperature. In this paper, for the helium turbine direct cycle and the combined cycle of the power conversion unit of the High temperature gas-cooled reactor, the mathematic models are established, and three cycle plans are designed. The helium turbine direct cycle is a Brayton cycle with recuperator, precooler and intercooler. In the combined cycle plan 1, the topping cycle is a simple Brayton cycle without recuperator, precooler and intercooler, and the bottoming cycle is based on the steam parameters (540deg, 6 MPa) recommended by Siemens. In the combined cycle plan 2, the topping cycle also is a simple Brayton cycle, and the bottoming cycle which is a Rankine cycle with reheating cycle is based on the steam parameters of conventional subcritical thermal power generation (540degC, 18 MPa). The optimization results showed that the cycle efficiency of the combined cycle plan 2 is the highest, the second is the helium turbine direct cycle, and the combined cycle plan 2 is the lowest. When the reactor outlet temperature is 900degC and the pressure ratio is 2.02, the cycle efficiency of the combined cycle plan 2 can reach 49.7%. The helium turbine direct cycle has a reactor inlet temperature above 500degC due to the regenerating cycle, so it requires a cooling circuit for the internal wall of the reactor pressure vessel. When the reactor outlet temperature increases, the increase of the pressure ratio required by the helium turbine direct cycle increases may bring some difficulties to the design and manufacture of the magnetic bearings. For the combined cycle, the reactor inlet temperature can be controlled below than 370degC, so the reactor pressure vessel can use SA533 steel without cooling the internal wall of the reactor pressure vessel. The pressure

  13. Periodical rocking long period gratings in PANDA fibers for high temperature and refractive index sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wa; Bi, Wei-hong; Fu, Xing-hu; Fu, Guang-wei

    2017-09-01

    We report periodical rocking long period gratings (PR-LPGs) in PANDA fibers fabricated with CO2 laser. The PR-LPGs achieve very high coupling efficiency of 19 dB with 12 periods and a 3.5° twist angle in just one scanning cycle, which is much more effective than the conventional CO2 laser fabrication technique. This type of LPGs exhibits polarization-selective resonance dips which demonstrate different sensitivities to environmental parameters. The high temperature and external refractive index sensitivities are measured simultaneously, so it can be used as a wavelength-selective polarization filter and sensor.

  14. Application of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor to oil shale recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadekamper, D.C.; Arcilla, N.T.; Impellezzeri, J.R.; Taylor, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    Current oil shale recovery processes combust some portion of the products to provide energy for the recovery process. In an attempt to maximize the petroleum products produced during recovery, the potentials for substituting nuclear process heat for energy generated by combustion of petroleum were evaluated. Twelve oil shale recovery processes were reviewed and their potentials for application of nuclear process heat assessed. The High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor-Reformer/Thermochemical Pipeline (HTGR-R/TCP) was selected for interfacing process heat technology with selected oil shale recovery processes. Utilization of these coupling concepts increases the shale oil product output of a conventional recovery facility from 6 to 30 percent with the same raw shale feed rate. An additional benefit of the HTGR-R/TCP system was up to an 80 percent decrease in emission levels. A detailed coupling design for a typical counter gravity feed indirect heated retorting and upgrading process were described. Economic comparisons prepared by Bechtel Group Incorporated for both the conventional and HTGR-R/TCP recovery facility were summarized

  15. Radioactivities evaluation code system for high temperature gas cooled reactors during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Kenji; Morimoto, Toshio; Suzuki, Katsuo.

    1979-01-01

    A radioactivity evaluation code system for high temperature gas-cooled reactors during normal operation was developed to study the behavior of fission products (FP) in the plants. The system consists of a code for the calculation of diffusion of FPs in fuel (FIPERX), a code for the deposition of FPs in primary cooling system (PLATO), a code for the transfer and emission of FPs in nuclear power plants (FIPPI-2), and a code for the exposure dose due to emitted FPs (FEDOSE). The FIPERX code can calculate the changes in the course of time FP of the distribution of FP concentration, the distribution of FP flow, the distribution of FP partial pressure, and the emission rate of FP into coolant. The amount of deposition of FPs and their distribution in primary cooling system can be evaluated by the PLATO code. The FIPPI-2 code can be used for the estimation of the amount of FPs in nuclear power plants and the amount of emitted FPs from the plants. The exposure dose of residents around nuclear power plants in case of the operation of the plants is calculated by the FEDOSE code. This code evaluates the dose due to the external exposure in the normal operation and in the accident, and the internal dose by the inhalation of radioactive plume and foods. Further studies of this code system by the comparison with the experimental data are considered. (Kato, T.)

  16. The design status of the United States Department of Energy modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Raymond R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is being designed using a systems engineering approach referred to as the integrated approach. The top level requirement for the plant is that it provides safe, reliable, economical energy. The safety requirements are established by the U.S. Licensing Authorities, principally the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The reliability and economic requirements associated with the top level functions have been established in close coordination and cooperation with the electrical utilities and other potential users, and the nuclear supply industry. The integrated approach uses functional analysis to define the functions and sub-functions for the plant and to identify quantitatively how the various functions must be fulfilled. The top four functions associated with the MHTGR are: maintain safe plant operation; maintain plant protection; maintain control of radionuclide release; maintain emergency preparedness. In addition to meeting all U.S. Regulatory Requirements this advanced reactor concept is being designed to meet the following requirements: do not require sheltering or evacuating of anyone outside the plant boundary of 425 meters as a result of normal or abnormal plant operation; do not require operator action in order to accomplish the above sheltering and evacuation objectives and the design must be insensitive to operator errors; utilize inherent characteristics of materials to develop passive safety features; provide very long times for corrective actions following the initiation of an abnormal event before plant damage would be incurred

  17. Small high temperature gas-cooled reactors with innovative nuclear burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liem, Peng Hong; Ismail; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Since the innovative concept of CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron Flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) burning strategy was proposed, intensive research works have been continuously conducted to evaluate the feasibility and the performance of the burning strategy on both fast and thermal reactors. We learned that one potential application of the burning strategy for thermal reactors is for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) with prismatic/block-type fuel elements. Several characteristics of CANDLE burning strategy such as constant reactor characteristics during burn-up, no need for burn-up reactivity control mechanism, proportionality of core height with core lifetime, sub-criticality of fresh fuel elements, etc. enable us to design small sized HTGR with a high degree of safety easiness of operation and maintenance, and long core lifetime which are required for introducing the reactors into remote areas or developing countries with limited infrastructures and resources. In the present work, we report our evaluation results on small sized block-type HTGR designs with CANDLE burning strategy and compared with other existing small HTGR designs including the ones with pebble fuel elements, under both uranium and thorium fuel cycles. (author)

  18. CFD Analysis of the Fuel Temperature in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Chun, T. H.; Lee, W. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have received a renewed interest as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. Among the HTGRs, the pebble bed reactor (PBR) and a prismatic modular reactor (PMR) are considered as the nuclear heat source in Korea's nuclear hydrogen development and demonstration project. PBR uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. PMR uses graphite fuel blocks which contain cylindrical fuel compacts consisting of the fuel particles. The fuel blocks also contain coolant passages and locations for absorber and control material. The maximum fuel temperature in the core hot spot is one of the important design parameters for both PBR and PMR. The objective of this study is to predict the fuel temperature distributions in PBR and PMR using a computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-5. The reference reactor designs used in this analysis are PBMR400 and GT-MHR600

  19. Design study of the experimental multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Ryokichi

    1981-01-01

    In this paper, the design study carried out since 1973 is outlined. The basic conceptual design was performed in fiscal 1973. In this design, concept was established on the total system of the experimental high temperature gas-cooled reactor including heat-utilizing system. The first conceptual design was carried out in fiscal 1974. The range of design was limited to the experimental reactor and its direct heat-removing system. The part 2 of the first conceptual design was performed in fiscal 1975, and the system design concerning the plant characteristics was made. The part 1 of the adjustment design was carried out in fiscal 1976, and the subject was the adjustment design of plant systems. The part 2 was performed in fiscal 1977, and the characteristics of plant control system were analyzed. In fiscal 1978, the analysis of flow characteristics in the core was made. The integrated system design was carried out in fiscal 1979, and the design of the total plant system except heat-utilizing system was started again. The part 1 of the detailed design was performed in fiscal 1980, and in addition, the possibility of increasing power output was examined. The construction cost of the experimental reactor plant estimated in 1979 was far higher than that in 1973. (Kako, I.)

  20. Improvements in quality of as-manufactured fuels for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Tobita, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Kousaku; Kaneko, Mitsunobu; Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Yoshimuta, Shigeharu; Tomimoto, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of coating failure of the fuel particles for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors during coating and compaction processes of the fuel fabrication were studied to determine a way to reduce the defective particle fraction of the as-manufactured fuels. Through the observation of the defective particles, it was found that the coating failure during the coating process was mainly caused by the strong mechanical shocks to the particles given by violent particle fluidization in the coater and by unloading and loading of the particles. The coating failure during the compaction process was probably related to the direct contact with neighboring particles in the fuel compacts. The coating process was improved by optimizing the mode of the particle fluidization and by developing the process without unloading and loading of the particles at intermediate coating process. The compaction process was improved by optimizing the combination of the pressing temperature and the pressing speed of the overcoated particles. Through these modifications of the fabrication process, the quality of the as-manufactured fuel compacts was improved outstandingly. (author)

  1. Validation of SCALE for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Sunny, Eva E [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    This report documents verification and validation studies carried out to assess the performance of the SCALE code system methods and nuclear data for modeling and analysis of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) configurations. Validation data were available from the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhE Handbook), prepared by the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project, for two different HTGR designs: prismatic and pebble bed. SCALE models have been developed for HTTR, a prismatic fuel design reactor operated in Japan and HTR-10, a pebble bed reactor operated in China. The models were based on benchmark specifications included in the 2009, 2010, and 2011 releases of the IRPhE Handbook. SCALE models for the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed configuration at the PROTEUS critical facility in Switzerland have also been developed, based on benchmark specifications included in a 2009 IRPhE draft benchmark. The development of the SCALE models has involved a series of investigations to identify particular issues associated with modeling the physics of HTGRs and to understand and quantify the effect of particular modeling assumptions on calculation-to-experiment comparisons.

  2. Real time thermal hydraulic model for high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Zhe; Sun Jun; Ma Yuanle; Zhang Ruipeng

    2013-01-01

    A real-time thermal hydraulic model of the reactor core was described and integrated into the simulation system for the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor nuclear power plant, which was developed in the vPower platform, a new simulation environment for nuclear and fossil power plants. In the thermal hydraulic model, the helium flow paths were established by the flow network tools in order to obtain the flow rates and pressure distributions. Meanwhile, the heat structures, representing all the solid heat transfer elements in the pebble bed, graphite reflectors and carbon bricks, were connected by the heat transfer network in order to solve the temperature distributions in the reactor core. The flow network and heat transfer network were coupled and calculated in real time. Two steady states (100% and 50% full power) and two transients (inlet temperature step and flow step) were tested that the quantitative comparisons of the steady results with design data and qualitative analysis of the transients showed the good applicability of the present thermal hydraulic model. (authors)

  3. High-temperature gas reactor (HTGR) market assessment, synthetic fuels analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This study is an update of assessments made in TRW's October 1979 assessment of overall high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) markets in the future synfuels industry (1985 to 2020). Three additional synfuels processes were assessed. Revised synfuel production forecasts were used. General environmental impacts were assessed. Additional market barriers, such as labor and materials, were researched. Market share estimates were used to consider the percent of markets applicable to the reference HTGR size plant. Eleven HTGR plants under nominal conditions and two under pessimistic assumptions are estimated for selection by 2020. No new HTGR markets were identified in the three additional synfuels processes studied. This reduction in TRW's earlier estimate is a result of later availability of HTGR's (commercial operation in 2008) and delayed build up in the total synfuels estimated markets. Also, a latest date for HTGR capture of a synfuels market could not be established because total markets continue to grow through 2020. If the nominal HTGR synfuels market is realized, just under one million tons of sulfur dioxide effluents and just over one million tons of nitrous oxide effluents will be avoided by 2020. Major barriers to a large synfuels industry discussed in this study include labor, materials, financing, siting, and licensing. Use of the HTGR intensifies these barriers

  4. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - a new production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nulton, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    One of the reactor concepts being considered for application as a new production reactor (NPR) is a 350-MW(thermal) modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The proposed MHTGR-NPR is based on the design of the commercial MHTGR and is being developed by a team that includes General Atomics and Combustion Engineering. The proposed design includes four modules combined into a production block that includes a shared containment, a spent-fuel storage facility, and other support facilities. The MHTGR has a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, graphite-reflected annular core formed from prismatic graphite fuel blocks. The MHTGR fuel consists of highly enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microsphere fuel particles that are coated with successive layers of pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC). Tritium-producing targets consist of enriched 6 Li aluminate microsphere target particles that are coated with successive layers of PyC and SiC similar to the fuel microspheres. Normal reactivity control is implemented by articulated control rods that can be inserted into channels in the inner and outer reflector blocks. Shutdown heat removal is accomplished by a single shutdown heat exchanger and electric motor-driven circulator located in the bottom of the reactor vessel. Current plans are to stack spent fuel elements in dry, helium-filled, water-cooled wells and store them for ∼1 yr before reprocessing. All phases of MHTGR fuel reprocessing have been demonstrated

  5. Economic evaluation of the steam-cycle high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor is unique among current nuclear technologies in its ability to generate energy in temperature regimes previously limited to fossil fuels. As a result, it can offer commercial benefits in the production of electricity, and at the same time, expand the role of nuclear energy to the production of process heat. This report provides an evaluation of the HTGR-Steam Cycle (SC) system for the production of baseloaded electricity, as well as cogenerated electricity and process steam. In each case the HTGR-SC system has been evaluated against appropriate competing technologies. The computer code which was developed for this evaluation can be used to present the analyses on a cost of production or cash flow basis; thereby, presenting consistent results to a utility, interested in production costs, or an industrial steam user or third party investor, interested in returns on equity. Basically, there are two economic evaluation methodologies which can be used in the analysis of a project: (1) minimum revenue requirements, and (2) discounted cash flow

  6. Modeling and Simulation of the Multi-module High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dan; Sun Jun; Sui Zhe; Xu Xiaolin; Ma Yuanle; Sun Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) is characterized with the inherent safety. To enhance its economic benefit, the capital cost of MHTGR can be decreased by combining more reactor modules into one unit and realize the batch constructions in the concept of modularization. In the research and design of the multi-module reactors, one difficulty is to clarify the coupling effects of different modules in operating the reactors due to the shared feed water and main steam systems in the secondary loop. In the advantages of real-time simulation and coupling calculations of different modules and sub-systems, the operation of multi-module reactors can be studied and analyzed to understand the range and extent of the coupling effects. In the current paper; the engineering simulator for the multi-module reactors was realized and able to run in high performance computers, based on the research experience of the HTR-PM engineering simulator. The models were detailed introduced including the primary and secondary loops. The steady state of full power operation was demonstrated to show the good performance of six-module reactors. Typical dynamic processes, such as adjusting feed water flow rates and shutting down one reactor; were also tested to study the coupling effects in multi-module reactors. (author)

  7. Helium circulator design concepts for the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.; Kaufman, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Two helium circulators are featured in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) power plant - (1) the main circulator, which facilitates the transfer of reactor thermal energy to the steam generator, and (2) a small shutdown cooling circulator that enables rapid cooling of the reactor system to be realized. The 3170 kW(e) main circulator has an axial flow compressor, the impeller being very similar to the unit in the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) plant. The 164 kW(e) shutdown cooling circulator, the design of which is controlled by depressurized conditions, has a radial flow compressor. Both machines are vertically oriented, have submerged electric motor drives, and embody rotors that are supported on active magnetic bearings. As outlined in this paper, both machines have been conservatively designed based on established practice. The circulators have features and characteristics that have evolved from actual plant operating experience. With a major goal of high reliability, emphasis has been placed on design simplicity, and both machines are readily accessible for inspection, repair, and replacement, if necessary. In this paper, conceptual design aspects of both machines are discussed, together with the significant technology bases. As appropriate for a plant that will see service well into the 21st century, new and emerging technologies have been factored into the design. Examples of this are the inclusion of active magnetic bearings, and an automated circulator condition monitoring system. (author). 18 refs, 20 figs, 13 tabs

  8. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor critical facility for Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Noriyuki

    1985-01-01

    The outline of the critical facility, its construction, the results of the basic studies and experiments on the graphite material, and the results obtained from the test conducted on the overall functions of the critical facility were reported. With the completion of the critical facility, it has been made possible to demonstrate the establishment of the manufacturing techniques and product-quality guarantee for extremely pure isotropic graphite in addition to the reliability of the structural design and analytical techniques for the main unit of the critical facility. It is expected that the present facility will prove instrumental in the verification of the nuclear safety of the very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor and in the acquisition of experimental data on the reactor physics pertaining to the improvement of the reactor characteristics. The tasks which remain to be accomplished hereafter are the improvements of the performance and quality features with regard to the oxidization of graphite, the heat-resisting structural materials, and the welded structures. (Kubozono, M.)

  9. Fracture Resistance of 14Cr ODS Steel Exposed to a High Temperature Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hojna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the impact fracture behavior of the 14%Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS steel (ODM401 after high temperature exposures in helium and air in comparison to the as-received state. A steel bar was produced by mechanical alloying and hot-extrusion at 1150 °C. Further, it was cut into small specimens, which were consequently exposed to air or 99.9% helium in a furnace at 720 °C for 500 h. Impact energy transition curves are shifted towards higher temperatures after the gas exposures. The transition temperatures of the exposed states significantly increase in comparison to the as-received steel by about 40 °C in He and 60 °C in the air. Differences are discussed in terms of microstructure, surface and subsurface Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM observations. The embrittlement was explained as temperature and environmental effects resulting in a decrease of dislocation level, slight change of the particle composition and interface/grain boundary segregations, which consequently affected the nucleation of voids leading to the ductile fracture.

  10. Depressurization accidents in a medium-sized high-temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ron, S.; Tzoref, J.; Gal, D.

    1992-01-01

    The amount of fission product release during a core heatup accident in a medium-sized high-temperature gas reactor depends on the size of the inadvertent opening in the primary circuit; this dependence is assessed. The opening triggers a depressurization event that is assumed to be coupled with the failure of the forced circulation in both decay-heat removal systems. The scenario investigated is a beyond-design-base accident. The DSNP modular simulation code is used. This paper reports that a two-dimensional model is developed to simulate the HTR-500 design. The study shows that the depressurization process does not contribute significantly to the sweeping out (from the primary circuit) of fission products released from the fuel during the core heatup. There is also no significant variation in the results when the opening size is >33 cm 2 , and only a slight sensitivity is found when the rupture size is between 3.3 and 33 cm 2 . The fission product release decreases considerably in the range from 1 to 3.3 cm 2 . The small-sized rupture is of major significance, as the failure of the relief valves to reclose increases the frequency of the event

  11. A PC-based high temperature gas reactor simulator for Indonesian conceptual HTR reactor basic training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarip; Po, L. C. C.

    2018-05-01

    In planning for nuclear power plant construction in Indonesia, helium cooled high temperature reactor (HTR) is favorable for not relying upon water supply that might be interrupted by earthquake. In order to train its personnel, BATAN has cooperated with Micro-Simulation Technology of USA to develop a 200 MWt PC-based simulation model PCTRAN/HTR. It operates in Win10 environment with graphic user interface (GUI). Normal operation of startup, power maneuvering, shutdown and accidents including pipe breaks and complete loss of AC power have been conducted. A sample case of safety analysis simulation to demonstrate the inherent safety features of HTR was done for helium pipe break malfunction scenario. The analysis was done for the variation of primary coolant pipe break i.e. from 0,1% - 0,5 % and 1% - 10 % helium gas leakages, while the reactor was operated at the maximum constant power of 10 MWt. The result shows that the highest temperature of HTR fuel centerline and coolant were 1150 °C and 1296 °C respectively. With 10 kg/s of helium flow in the reactor core, the thermal power will back to the startup position after 1287 s of helium pipe break malfunction.

  12. Quality control of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Mitsunobu

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of the coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors is characterized by the fact that the size of the target product to be controlled is very small, and the quantity is very large. Accordingly, the sampling plan and the method of evaluating the population through satisfically treating the measured data of the samples are the important subjects to see and evaluate the quality of a batch or a lot. This paper shows the fabrication process and the quality control procedure for the coated fuel particles. The development work of a HTGR was started by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1969, and as for the production technology for coated fuel particles, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. has continued the development work. The pilot plan with the capacity of about 40 kg/year was established in 1972. The fuel product fabricated in this plant was put to the irradiation experiment and out-of-pile evaluation test. In 1983, the production capacity was expanded to 200 kg/year, and the fuel compacts for the VHTRC in JAERI were produced for two years. The basic fuel design, the fabrication process, the quality control, the process control and the quality assurance are reported. For the commercial product, the studies from the viewpoint of production and quality control costs are required. (Kako, I.)

  13. Severe water ingress accident analysis for a Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Scherer, Winfried

    1997-01-01

    This paper analyzes the severe water ingress accidents in the SIEMENS 200MW Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-Module) under the assumption of no active safety protection systems in order to find the safety margin of the current HTR-Module design. A water, steam and helium multi-phase cavity model is originally developed and implemented in the DSNP simulation system. The developed DSNP system is used to simulate the primary circuit of HTR-Module power plant. The comparisons of the models with the TINTE calculations validate the current simulation. After analyzing the effects of blower separation on water droplets, the wall heat storage, etc., it is found that the maximum H 2 O density increase rate in the reactor core is smaller than 0.3 kg/(m 3 s). The liquid water vaporization in the steam generator and H 2 O transport from the steam generator to the reactor core reduces the impulse of the H 2 O in the reactor core. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress leads to a fast power excursion, which, however, is inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. Concerning the integrity of the fuel elements, the safety relevant temperature limit of 1600degC was not reached in any case. (author)

  14. Working Towards Unified Safety Design Criteria for Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, Frederik; Silady, Fred; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Development Section of the IAEA recently received approval for a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to investigate and make proposals on modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Safety design criteria. It is expected that these criteria would consider past experience and existing safety standards in the light of modular HTGR material and design characteristics to propose safety design criteria. It will consider the deterministic and risk-informed safety design standards that apply to the wide spectrum of Off- normal events under development worldwide for existing and planned HTGRs. The CRP would also take into account lessons from the Fukushima Daiichi accident, clarifying the safety approach and safety evaluation criteria for design and beyond design basis events, including those events that can affect multiple reactor modules and/or are dependent on the application proximate to the plant site. (e. g., industrial process steam/heat). The logical flow of criteria is from the fundamental inherent safety characteristics of modular HTGRs and associated expected performance characteristics, to the safety functions required to ensure those characteristics during the wide spectrum of Off-normal events, and finally to specific criteria related to those functions. This is detailed in the paper with specific examples included of how it may be applied. The results of the CRP will be made available to the member states and HTGR community. (author)

  15. Coupling of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with Supercritical Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutang Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigations on the possible combination of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR technology with the supercritical (SC steam turbine technology and the prospective deployments of the MHTGR SC power plant. Energy conversion efficiency of steam turbine cycle can be improved by increasing the main steam pressure and temperature. Investigations on SC water reactor (SCWR reveal that the development of SCWR power plants still needs further research and development. The MHTGR SC plant coupling the existing technologies of current MHTGR module design with operation experiences of SC FPP will achieve high cycle efficiency in addition to its inherent safety. The standard once-reheat SC steam turbine cycle and the once-reheat steam cycle with life-steam have been studied and corresponding parameters were computed. Efficiencies of thermodynamic processes of MHTGR SC plants were analyzed, while comparisons were made between an MHTGR SC plant and a designed advanced passive PWR - AP1000. It was shown that the net plant efficiency of an MHTGR SC plant can reach 45% or above, 30% higher than that of AP1000 (35% net efficiency. Furthermore, an MHTGR SC plant has higher environmental competitiveness without emission of greenhouse gases and other pollutants.

  16. Utility/user requirements for the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, V.S.; Kendall, J.M.; Gotschall, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates (GCRA) in developing Utility/User Requirements for the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). As representatives of the Utility/User industry, it is GCRA's goal that the MHTGR concept be established as an attractive nuclear option offering competitive economics and limited ownership risks. Commercially deployed MHTGR systems should then compete favorably in a mixed-fuel economy with options using fossil, other nuclear and other non-fossil sources. To achieve this goal, the design of the MHTGR plant must address the problems experienced by the U.S. industrial infrastructure during deployment of the first generation of nuclear plants. Indeed, it is GCRA's intent to utilize the characteristics of MHTGR technology for the development of a nuclear alternative that poses regulatory, financial and operational demands on the Owner/Operator that are, in aggregate, comparable to those encountered with non-nuclear options. The dominant risks faced by U.S. Utilities with current nuclear plants derive from their operational complexity and the degree of regulatory involvement in virtually all aspects of utility operations. The MHTGR approach of using ceramic fuel coatings to contain fission products provides the technical basis for simplification of the plant and stabilization of licensing requirements and thus the opportunity for reducing the risks of nuclear plant ownership. The paper describes the rationale for the selection of key requirements for public safety, plant size and performance, operations and maintenance, investment protection, economics and siting in the context of a risk management philosophy. It also describes the ongoing participation of the Utility/User in interpreting requirements, conducting program and design reviews and establishing priorities from the Owner/Operator perspective. (author). 7 refs, 1 fig

  17. On the high-temperature desulfurization of coal gas: The development of a regenerable absorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Yperen, Renee

    1994-05-18

    There is actually no solid absorbent based on bulk metal oxides available that meets the conditions for application in high-temperature desulfurization processes. This research was aimed to develop an absorbent that fulfills all the specifications for employment in hot-gas clean up. Chapter 2 deals with the development of amorphous aluminium phosphate as a support material. The influence of the preparation conditions onto the specific surface area, pore structure, thermal and chemical stability, and acidity of amorphous aluminium phosphate was investigated. The application of iron oxide onto amorphous aluminium phosphate by means of deposition-precipitation from a homogeneous solution is discussed in chapter 3. The influence of amorphous aluminium phosphate onto the stability, activity, and capacity of the iron oxide is described in detail. Chapter 4 surveys the activity and capacity of several active materials in the absorption of hydrogen sulphide. It is shown that the most promising active material is a mixture of iron oxide and molybdenum oxide. In chapter 5 the properties of iron-molybdenum mixed oxide absorbents are discussed. The effect of the iron to molybdenum ratio onto the formation of iron-(III)-sulphates and the stability of the molybdenum compound is examined. Chapter 6 deals with the preparation of iron-molybdenum mixed oxide absorbents by means of impregnation of modified pre-shaped alumina support bodies. In chapter 7 the effect of the hydrogen and carbon monoxide concentration and in chapter 8 the effect of the water concentration in the coal gas on the activity and the capacity of the iron-molybdenum mixed oxide absorbents is described. Regeneration of the loaded absorbents is an important part of the desulfurization process, dealt with in chapter 9. A number of regeneration procedures have been tested. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  19. Thermal-hydraulic Analysis of High-temperature Cover Gas Region in STELLA-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Youngchul; Son, Seok-Kwon; Yoon, Jung; Eoh, Jaehyuk; Jeong, Ji-Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The first phase of the program was focused on the key sodium component tests, and the second one has been concentrated on the sodium thermal-hydraulic integral effect test (STELLA-2). Based on its platform, simulation of the PGSFR transient will be made to evaluate plant dynamic behaviors as well as to demonstrate decay heat removal performance. Therefore, most design features of PGSFR have been modeled in STELLA-2 as closely as possible. The similarities of temperature and pressure between the model (STELLA-2) and the prototype (PGSFR) have been well preserved to reflect thermal-hydraulic behavior with natural convection as well as heat transfer between structure and sodium coolant inside the model reactor vessel (RV). For this reason, structural integrity of the entire test section should be confirmed as in the prototype. In particular, since the model reactor head in STELLA-2 supports key components and internal structures, its structural integrity exposed to high-temperature cover gas region should be confirmed. In order to reduce thermal radiation heat transfer from the hot sodium pool during normal operation, a dedicated insulation layer has been installed at the downward surface of the model reactor head to prevent direct heat flux from the sodium free surface at 545 .deg. C. Three-dimensional conjugate heat transfer analyses for the full-shape geometry of the upper part of the model reactor vessel in STELLA-2 have been carried out. Based on the results, steady-state temperature distributions in the cover gas region and the model reactor head itself have been obtained and the design requirement in temperature of the model reactor head has been newly proposed to be 350 .deg. C. For any elevated temperature conditions in STELLA-2, it was confirmed that the model reactor head generally satisfied the requirement. The CFD database constructed from this study will be used to optimize geometric parameters such as thicknesses and/or types of the insulator.

  20. Current status and future development of modular high temperature gas cooled reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    This report includes an examination of the international activities with regard to the development of the modular HTGR coupled to a gas turbine. The most significant of these gas turbine programmes include the pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) being designed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels plc. (BNFL) of the United Kingdom, and the gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) by a consortium of General Atomics of the United States of America, MINATOM of the Russian Federation, Framatome of France and Fuji Electric of Japan. Details of the design, economics and plans for these plants are provided in Chapters 3 and 4, respectively. Test reactors to evaluate the safety and general performance of the HTGR and to support research and development activities including electricity generation via the gas turbine and validation of high temperature process heat applications are being commissioned in Japan and China. Construction of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) at its Oarai Research Establishment has been completed with the plant currently in the low power physics testing phase of commissioning. Construction of the high temperature reactor (HTR-10) by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) in Beijing, China, is nearly complete with initial criticality expected in 2000. Chapter 5 provides a discussion of purpose, status and testing programmes for these two plants. In addition to the activities related to the above mentioned plants, Member States of the IWGGCR continue to support research associated with HTGR safety and performance as well as development of alternative designs for commercial applications. These activities are being addressed by national energy institutes and, in some projects, private industry, within China, France, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, the Netherlands, the Russian Federation, South Africa, United Kingdom and the USA. Chapter 6 includes details

  1. Application of assembly module to high-temperature gas-cooled reactor full-scope simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sifeng; Li Fu; Ma Yuanle; Shi Lei

    2007-01-01

    According to the circumstances that exist in the reactor full-scope simulators development as long development cycle, very difficult upgrade and narrow range of applicability, a kind of new model was developed based on assembly module which root in Linux kernel and successfully applied to the design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor full-scope simulator system. The simulation results are coincident with the experimental ones, and it indicates that the new model based on assembly module is feasible to design of high-temperature gas cooled reactor simulation system. (authors)

  2. The gas-cooled high temperature reactor: perspectives, problems and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.; Engelmann, P.; Erb, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly 20 years, extensive research and development programs on Helium-cooled high-temperature reactors (HTR) have been carried out in several countries of the world, in particular in Germany and in the United States. This reactor system offers major potential advantages as a source of electricity or of nuclear process heat: it shows high nuclear fuel conversion efficiency, permitting a better utilization of uranium and in particular of thorium resources; it offers a high degree of inherent nuclear safety and thus a good potential for adoption to very strict safety standards; it permits high-efficiency electricity generation using either the indirect steam or the direct Helium cycle; dry air cooling can be employed without major economic penalties; it permits direct use of the nuclear heat for the production of gaseous or liquid secondary fuels from coal and other fossil fuels or - on a more extended time scale - by thermochemical water splitting. As a result of the longstanding efforts, satisfactory solutions have been found for many of the basic problems of this new reactor system, particularly in the field of high-temperature fuels and materials technology. Three small experimental plants - Peach Bottom in USA, Dragon in England, and AVR in Germany - have been operated successfully over extended periods of time. The AVR is still in operation; since 1974 it has performed satisfactorily with an average gas outlet temperature of 950 0 C. Prototype steam-cycle plants of 300 MW(e) are underway at Fort St. Vrain, USA (full-power operation scheduled for 1977), and at Schmehausen, Germany (scheduled for 1979). Major delays have occured in the construction and commissioning of these plants; they are due to various reasons and do not reveal specific problems of the HTR. Commercial market introduction of the steam-cycle electricity generating system has been attempted, but the first approach has not been successfull. Major effects by both government and industry are

  3. Heterogeneous all-solid multicore fiber based multipath Michelson interferometer for high temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Li; Zhang, Peng; Tang, Ming; Wang, Ruoxu; Zhao, Zhiyong; Fu, Songnian; Gan, Lin; Zhu, Benpeng; Tong, Weijun; Liu, Deming; Shum, Perry Ping

    2016-09-05

    A compact high temperature sensor utilizing a multipath Michelson interferometer (MI) structure based on weak coupling multicore fiber (MCF) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The device is fabricated by program-controlled tapering the spliced region between single mode fiber (SMF) and a segment of MCF. After that, a spherical reflective structure is formed by arc-fusion splicing the end face of MCF. Theoretical analysis has been implemented for this specific multipath MI structure; beam propagation method based simulation and corresponding experiments were performed to investigate the effect of taper and spherical end face on system's performance. Benefiting from the multipath interferences and heterogeneous structure between the center core and surrounding cores of the all-solid MCF, an enhanced temperature sensitivity of 165 pm/°C up to 900°C and a high-quality interference spectrum with 25 dB fringe visibility were achieved.

  4. Fracture toughness evaluation of elastic-plastic J-integral for high temperature components of gas turbine in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Nam Yong; Kim, Moon Young; Kim, Jong Woo

    1999-01-01

    In the study, the analysis of elastic-plastic J-integral was performed in high temperature components for gas turbine based on elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. It had been operated on the range of about 700 deg C and degraded by high temperature. It was tested for material properties of used component because of material properties changing at high temperature condition. The elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter, J is obtained with finite element method. A method is suggested which determines J Ic applying analysis of elastic-plastic finite element method and results of experimental load-displacements with CT specimen. It is also investigated that J-integral is applied for the elastic-plastic analysis in high temperature components. The elastic-plastic fracture toughness. J Ic determined by finite element was obtained with high accuracy using the experimental method.=20

  5. R and D programme on generation IV nuclear energy systems: the high temperatures gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Billot, P.; Anzieu, P.; Brossard, P.

    2005-01-01

    The Generation IV Technology Roadmap selected, among others, a sequenced development of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors as one of the main focus for R and D on future nuclear energy systems. The selection of this research objective originates both from the significance of high temperature and fast neutrons for nuclear energy to meet the needs for a sustainable development for the medium-long term (2020/2030 and beyond), and from the significant common R and D pathway that supports both medium term industrial projects and more advanced versions of gas cooled reactors. The first step of the 'Gas Technology Path' aims to support the development of a modular HTR to meet specific international market needs around 2020. The second step is a Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR (>950 C) - to efficiently produce hydrogen through thermo-chemical or electro-chemical water splitting or to generate electricity with an efficiency above 50%, among other applications of high temperature nuclear heat. The third step of the Path is a Gas Fast Reactor - GFR - that features a fast-spectrum helium-cooled reactor and closed fuel cycle, with a direct or indirect thermodynamic cycle for electricity production and full recycle of actinides. Hydrogen production is also considered for the GFR. The paper succinctly presents the R and D program currently under definition and partially launched within the Generation IV International Forum on this consistent set of advanced gas cooled nuclear systems. (orig.)

  6. R and D on the power conversion system for gas turbine high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Takakazu; Takada, Shoji; Yan Xing; Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Katanishi, Shoji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    surely validate the GTHTR300 power conversion system design and the results will be incorporated in the design in the upgrading stage. The R and D program as a whole will well demonstrate the technical feasibility of the high-efficiency gas-turbine system for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor plants

  7. Study on the properties of the fuel compact for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chung-yong; Lee, Sung-yong; Choi, Min-young; Lee, Seung-jae; Jo, Young-ho; Lee, Young-woo; Cho, Moon-sung

    2015-01-01

    High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR), one of the Gen-IV reactors, have been using the fuel element which is manufactured by the graphite matrix, surrounding Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO)-coated Uranium particles. Factors with these characteristics effecting on the matrix of fuel compact are chosen and their impacts on the properties are studied. The fuel elements are considered with two types of concepts for HTGR, which are the block type reactor and the pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the cylinder-formed fuel element for the block type reactor is focused on, which consists of the large part of graphite matrix. One of the most important properties of the graphite matrix is the mechanical strength with the high reliability because the graphite matrix should be enabled to protect the TRISO particles from the irradiation environment and the impact from the outside. In this study, the three kinds of candidate graphites and the two kinds of candidate binder (Phenol and Polyvinyl butyral) were chosen and mixed with each other, formed and heated to measure mechanical properties. The objective of this research is to optimize the materials and composition of the mixture and the forming process by evaluating the mechanical properties before/after carbonization and heat treatment. From the mechanical test results, the mechanical properties of graphite pellets was related to the various conditions such as the contents and kinds of binder, the kinds of graphite and the heat treatments. In the result of the compressive strength and Vicker's hardness, the 10 wt% phenol binder added R+S graphite pellet was relatively higher mechanical properties than other pellets. The contents of Phenol binder, the kinds of graphite powder and the temperature of carbonization and heat treatment are considered important factors for the properties. To optimize the mechanical properties of fuel elements, the role of binders and the properties of graphites will be investigated as

  8. Options for treating high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel for repository disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotts, A.L.; Bond, W.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Glass, R.W.; Harrington, F.E.; Micheals, G.E.; Notz, K.J.; Wymer, R.G.

    1992-02-01

    This report describes the options that can reasonably be considered for disposal of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel in a repository. The options include whole-block disposal, disposal with removal of graphite (either mechanically or by burning), and reprocessing of spent fuel to separate the fuel and fission products. The report summarizes what is known about the options without extensively projecting or analyzing actual performance of waste forms in a repository. The report also summarizes the processes involved in convert spent HTGR fuel into the various waste forms and projects relative schedules and costs for deployment of the various options. Fort St. Vrain Reactor fuel, which utilizes highly-enriched {sup 235}U (plus thorium) and is contained in a prismatic graphite block geometry, was used as the baseline for evaluation, but the major conclusions would not be significantly different for low- or medium-enriched {sup 235}U (without thorium) or for the German pebble-bed fuel. Future US HTGRs will be based on the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fuel form. The whole block appears to be a satisfactory waste form for disposal in a repository and may perform better than light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. From the standpoint of process cost and schedule (not considering repository cost or value of fuel that might be recycled), the options are ranked as follows in order of increased cost and longer schedule to perform the option: (1) whole block, (2a) physical separation, (2b) chemical separation, and (3) complete chemical processing.

  9. Options for treating high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel for repository disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Bond, W.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Glass, R.W.; Harrington, F.E.; Micheals, G.E.; Notz, K.J.; Wymer, R.G.

    1992-02-01

    This report describes the options that can reasonably be considered for disposal of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel in a repository. The options include whole-block disposal, disposal with removal of graphite (either mechanically or by burning), and reprocessing of spent fuel to separate the fuel and fission products. The report summarizes what is known about the options without extensively projecting or analyzing actual performance of waste forms in a repository. The report also summarizes the processes involved in convert spent HTGR fuel into the various waste forms and projects relative schedules and costs for deployment of the various options. Fort St. Vrain Reactor fuel, which utilizes highly-enriched 235 U (plus thorium) and is contained in a prismatic graphite block geometry, was used as the baseline for evaluation, but the major conclusions would not be significantly different for low- or medium-enriched 235 U (without thorium) or for the German pebble-bed fuel. Future US HTGRs will be based on the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fuel form. The whole block appears to be a satisfactory waste form for disposal in a repository and may perform better than light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. From the standpoint of process cost and schedule (not considering repository cost or value of fuel that might be recycled), the options are ranked as follows in order of increased cost and longer schedule to perform the option: (1) whole block, (2a) physical separation, (2b) chemical separation, and (3) complete chemical processing

  10. Research and development associated with licensing of MHTGR [Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, H.

    1990-01-01

    The Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) currently under development by the US Department of Energy (US-DOE) for commercial applications has top-level goals of producing safe, economical power for the US utility industry. The utility industry has been represented in formulating design and licensing requirements through both a ''Utility User Requirements Document'' and by participating in the DOE system engineering process known as the ''Integrated Approach.'' The result of this collaboration has been to set stringent goals for both the safety and operational reliability of the MHTGR. To achieve these goals, the designer must have access to a more comprehensive data base of properties in several fields of technology than is currently available. A technology development program has been planned to provide this data to the designer in time to support both his design activities and the submittal of formal licensing application documents. The US-DOE has chosen the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to take the lead in planning and executing these technology programs. When completed these will augment the designer's current data base and provide the necessary depth to meet the stringent goals which have been set for the MHTGR. It is worth noting that the goals of safety and operational reliability are complementary, and the data required from the technology development program will be similar. Therefore, the program to support the licensing of the MHTGR is not separate from that required for design, but is a subset of that which meets all the requirements that result from implementing the US-DOE's integrated approach. 38 figs

  11. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is an indispensable element of any substantial attempt in reactor simulation validation. The quantification of uncertainties in nuclear engineering has grown more important and the IAEA Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) initiated in 2012 aims to investigate the various uncertainty quantification methodologies for this type of reactors. The first phase of the CRP is dedicated to the estimation of cell and lattice model uncertainties due to the neutron cross sections co-variances. Phase II is oriented towards the investigation of propagated uncertainties from the lattice to the coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics core calculations. Nominal results for the prismatic single block (Ex.I-2a) and super cell models (Ex.I-2c) have been obtained using the SCALE 6.1.3 two-dimensional lattice code NEWT coupled to the TRITON sequence for cross section generation. In this work, the TRITON/NEWT-flux-weighted cross sections obtained for Ex.I-2a and various models of Ex.I-2c is utilized to perform a sensitivity analysis of the MHTGR-350 core power densities and eigenvalues. The core solutions are obtained with the INL coupled code PHISICS/RELAP5-3D, utilizing a fixed-temperature feedback for Ex. II-1a.. It is observed that the core power density does not vary significantly in shape, but the magnitude of these variations increases as the moderator-to-fuel ratio increases in the super cell lattice models.

  12. Survey on Cooled-Vessel Designs in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Hwan; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    The core outlet temperature of the coolant in the high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) has been increased to improve the overall efficiency of their electricity generation by using the Brayton cycle or their nuclear hydrogen production by using thermo-chemical processes. The increase of the outlet temperature accompanies an increase of the coolant inlet temperature. A high coolant inlet temperature results in an increase of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) operation temperature. The conventional steels, proven vessel material in light water reactors, cannot be used as materials for the RPV in the elevated temperatures which necessitate its design to account for the creep effects. Some ferritic or martensitic steels like 2 1/4Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo-V are very well established creep resistant materials for a temperature range of 400 to 550 C. Although these materials have been used in a chemical plant, there is limited experience with using these materials in nuclear reactors. Even though the 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was used to manufacture the RPV for HTR-10 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency(JAEA), a large RPV has not been manufactured by using this material or 9Cr-1Mo-V steel. Due to not only its difficulties in manufacturing but also its high cost, the JAEA determined that they would exclude these materials from the GTHTR design. For the above reasons, KAERI has been considering a cooled-vessel design as an option for the RPV design of a NHDD plant (Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration). In this study, we surveyed several HTGRs, which adopt the cooled-vessel concept for their RPV design, and discussed their design characteristics. The survey results in design considerations for the NHDD cooled-vessel design

  13. Assessments of Water Ingress Accidents in a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Dong Yujie; Scherer, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    Severe water ingress accidents in the 200-MW HTR-module were assessed to determine the safety margins of modular pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR-module). The 200-MW HTR-module was designed by Siemens under the criteria that no active safety protection systems were necessary because of its inherent safe nature. For simulating the behavior of the HTR-module during severe water ingress accidents, a water, steam, and helium multiphase cavity model was developed and implemented in the dynamic simulator for nuclear power plants (DSNP) simulation system. Comparisons of the DSNP simulations incorporating these models with experiments and with calculations using the time-dependent neutronics and temperature dynamics code were made to validate the simulation. The analysis of the primary circuit showed that the maximum water concentration increase in the reactor core was 3 s). The water vaporization in the steam generator and characteristics of water transport from the steam generator to the reactor core would reduce the rate of water ingress into the reactor core. The analysis of a full cavitation of the feedwater pump showed that if the secondary circuit could be depressurized, the feedwater pump would be stopped by the full cavitation. This limits the water transported from the deaerator to the steam generator. A comprehensive simulation of the HTR-module power plant showed that the water inventory in the primary circuit was limited to ∼3000 kg. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress would lead to a fast power excursion, which would be inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. The integrity of the fuel elements, because the safety-relevant temperature limit of 1600 deg. C is not reached in any case, is not challenged

  14. Numerical simulation of severe water ingress accidents in a modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Scherer, W.

    1996-01-01

    This report analyzes reverse water ingress accidents in the SIEMENS 200 MW Modular Pebble-Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-MODULE) under the assumption of no active safety protection systems in order to find the safety margins of the current HTR-MODULE design and to realize a catastrophe-free nuclear technology. A water, steam and helium multi-phase cavity model is developed and implemented in the DSNP simulation system. The DSNP system is then used to simulate the primary and secondary circuit of a HTR-MODULE power plant. Comparisons of the model with experiments and with TINTE calculations serve as validation of the simulation. The analysis of the primary circuit tries to answer the question how fast the water enters the reactor core. It was found that the maximum H 2 O concentration increase in the reactor core is smaller than 0.3 kg/(m 3 s). The liquid water vaporization in the steam generator and H 2 O transport from the steam generator to the reactor core reduce the ingress velocity of the H 2 O into the reactor core. In order to answer the question how much water enters the primary circuit, the full cavitation of the feed water pumps is analyzed. It is found that if the secondary circuit is depressurized enough, the feed water pumps will be inherently stopped by the full cavitation. This limits the water to be pumped from the deaerator to the steam generator. A comprehensive simulation of the MODUL-HTR power plant then shows that the H 2 O inventory in the primary circuit can be limited to about 3000 kg. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress leads to a fast power excursion, which, however, is inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. Concerning the integrity of the fuel elements, the safety relevant temperature limit of 1600 C was not reached in any case. (orig.) [de

  15. Studies Related to the Oregon State University High Temperature Test Facility: Scaling, the Validation Matrix, and Similarities to the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; William T. Taitano; James R. Wolf; Glenn E. McCreery

    2010-09-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5 year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Because the NRC interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC). Since DOE has incorporated the HTTF as an ingredient in the NGNP thermal-fluids validation program, several important outcomes should be noted: 1. The reference prismatic reactor design, that serves as the basis for scaling the HTTF, became the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR has also been chosen as the reference design for all of the other NGNP thermal-fluid experiments. 2. The NGNP validation matrix is being planned using the same scaling strategy that has been implemented to design the HTTF, i.e., the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology developed by Zuber in 1991. Using this approach a preliminary validation matrix has been designed that integrates the HTTF experiments with the other experiments planned for the NGNP thermal-fluids verification and validation project. 3. Initial analyses showed that the inherent power capability of the OSU infrastructure, which only allowed a total operational facility power capability of 0.6 MW, is

  16. MOTHER MK II: An advanced direct cycle high temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.; Kendall, J.M.; Marsden, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    The MOTHER (MOdular Thermal HElium Reactor) power plant concepts employ high temperature gas reactors utilizing TRISO fuel, graphite moderator, and helium coolant, in combination with a direct Brayton cycle for electricity generation. The helium coolant from the reactor vessel passes through a Power Conversion Unit (PCU), which includes a turbine-generator, recuperator, precooler, intercooler and turbine-compressors, before being returned to the reactor vessel. The PCU substitutes for the reactor coolant system pumps and steam generators and most of the Balance Of Plant (BOP), including the steam turbines and condensers, employed by conventional nuclear power plants utilizing water cooled reactors. This provides a compact, efficient, and relatively simple plant configuration. The MOTHER MK I conceptual design, completed in the 1987 - 1989 time frame, was developed to economically meet the energy demands for extracting and processing heavy oil from the tar sands of western Canada. However, considerable effort was made to maximize the market potential beyond this application. Consistent with the remote and very high labour rate environment in the tar sands region, simplification of maintenance procedures and facilitation of 'change-out' in lieu of in situ repair was a design focus. MOTHER MK I had a thermal output of 288 MW and produced 120 MW electrical when operated in the electricity only production mode. An annular Prismatic reactor core was utilized, largely to minimize day-to-day operations activities. Key features of the power conversion system included two Power Conversion Units (144 MW th each), the horizontal orientation of all rotating machinery and major heat exchangers axes, high speed rotating machinery (17,030 rpm for the turbine-compressors and 10,200 rpm for the power turbine-generator), gas (helium) bearings for all rotating machinery, and solid state frequency conversion from 170 cps (at full power) to the grid frequency. Recognizing that the on

  17. Study on the seismic verification test program on the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taketani, K.; Aochi, T.; Yasuno, T.; Ikushima, T.; Shiraki, K.; Honma, T.; Kawamura, N.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a program of experimental research necessary for qualitative and quantitative determination of vibration characteristics and aseismic safety on structure of reactor core in the multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor (VHTR Experimental Reactor) by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

  18. Thermocouple evaluation model and evaluation of chromel--alumel thermocouples for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, B.W.

    1977-03-01

    Factors affecting the performance and reliability of thermocouples for temperature measurements in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors are investigated. A model of an inhomogeneous thermocouple, associated experimental technique, and a method of predicting measurement errors are described. Error drifts for Type K materials are predicted and compared with published stability measurements. 60 references

  19. AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM FOR REGULATED HIGH TEMPERATURE MAIN COMBUSTION CHAMBER OF MANEUVERABLE AIRCRAFT MULTIMODE GAS TURBINE ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Gras’Ko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes choosing and substantiating the control laws, forming the appearance the automatic control system for regulated high temperature main combustion chamber of maneuverable aircraft multimode gas turbine engine aimed at sustainable and effective functioning of main combustion chamber within a broad operation range.

  20. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-3: High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module…

  1. Development of strong-sense validation benchmarks for the fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandford, E. D.

    2012-01-01

    The Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of reactor concepts currently under development for the U. S. Dept. of Energy. The FHR is defined as a Generation IV reactor that features low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. Recent experimental work using simulant fluids have been performed to demonstrate key 'proof of principle' FHR concepts and have helped inform the reactor design process. An important element of developing FHR technology is to sufficiently validate the predictive accuracy of the computer codes used to model system response. This paper presents a set of thermal-hydraulics experiments, defined as Strong-Sense Benchmarks (SSB's), which will help establish the FHR validation domain for simulant fluid suitability. These SSB's are more specifically designed to investigate single-phase natural circulation which is the dominant mode of FHR decay heat removal during off-normal conditions. SSB s should be viewed as engineering reference standards and differ from traditional confirmatory experiments in the sense that they are more focused on fundamental physics as opposed to reproducing high levels of physical similarity with the prototypical design. (authors)

  2. A charge regulating system for turbo-generator gas-cooled high-temperature reactor power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegtnes, K.O.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to a regulating system for gas-cooled high-temperature reactors power stations (helium coolant), equipped with several steam-boilers, each of which deriving heat from a corresponding cooling-gas flow circulating in the reactor, so as to feed superheated steam into a main common steam-manifold and re-superheated steam into a re-superheated hot common manifold [fr

  3. Use of a Nuclear High Temperature Gas Reactor in a Coal-To-Liquids Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert S. Cherry; Richard A. Wood

    2006-01-01

    AREVA's High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) can potentially provide nuclear-generated, high-level heat to chemical process applications. The use of nuclear heat to help convert coal to liquid fuels is particularly attractive because of concerns about the future availability of petroleum for vehicle fuels. This report was commissioned to review the technical and economic aspects of how well this integration might actually work. The objective was to review coal liquefaction processes and propose one or more ways that nuclear process heat could be used to improve the overall process economics and performance. Shell's SCGP process was selected as the gasifier for the base case system. It operates in the range of 1250 to 1600 C to minimize the formation of tars, oil, and methane, while also maximizing the conversion of the coal's carbon to gas. Synthesis gas from this system is cooled, cleaned, reacted to produce the proper ratio of hydrogen to carbon monoxide and fed to a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction and product upgrading system. The design coal-feed rate of 18,800 ton/day produces 26.000 barrels/day of FT products. Thermal energy at approximately 850 C from a HTGR does not directly integrate into this gasification process efficiently. However, it can be used to electrolyze water to make hydrogen and oxygen, both of which can be beneficially used in the gasification/FT process. These additions then allow carbon-containing streams of carbon dioxide and FT tail-gas to be recycled in the gasifier, greatly improving the overall carbon recovery and thereby producing more FT fuel for the same coal input. The final process configuration, scaled to make the same amount of product as the base case, requires only 5,800 ton/day of coal feed. Because it has a carbon utilization of 96.9%, the process produces almost no carbon dioxide byproduct Because the nuclear-assisted process requires six AREVA reactors to supply the heat, the capital cost is high. The conventional plant is

  4. Heat and momentum transfer in a gas coolant flow through a circular pipe in a high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masuro

    1989-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), a very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) has been researched and developed with a purpose of attaining a coolant temperature of around 1000degC at the reactor outlet. In order to design VHTR, comprehensive knowledge is required on thermo-hydraulic characteristics of laminar-turbulent transition, of coolant flow with large thermal property variation due to temperature difference, and of heat transfer deterioration. In the present investigation, experimental and analytical studies are made on a gas flow in a circular tube to elucidate the thermo-hydraulic characteristics. Friction factors and heat transfer coefficients in transitional flows are obtained. Influence of thermal property variation on the friction factor is qualitatively determined. Heat transfer deterioration in the turbulent flow subjected to intense heating is experimentally found to be caused by flow laminarization. The analysis based on a k-kL two-equation model of turbulence predicts well the experimental results on friction factors and heat transfer coefficients in flows with thermal property variation and in laminarizing flows. (author)

  5. Characteristic behaviour of Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors during water ingress events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoza, Samukelisiwe N.; Serfontein, Dawid E.; Reitsma, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The presence of water on the tube-side of the steam generators in high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with indirect cycle layouts presents a possibility for a penetration of neutron moderating steam into the core, which may cause a power excursion. This article presents results on the effect of water ingress into the core of the two South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor design concepts, i.e. the PBMR-200 MW th and the PBMR-400 MW th developed by PBMR SOC Ltd. The VSOP 99/05 suite of codes was used for the simulation of this event. Partial steam vapour pressures were added in stages into the primary circuit in order to investigate the effect of water ingress on reactivity, power profiles and thermal neutron flux profiles. The effects of water ingress into the core are explained by increased neutron moderation, due to the addition of 1 H, which leads to a decrease in resonance capture by 238 U and therefore an increase in the multiplication factor. The more effective moderation of neutrons by definition reduces the fast neutron flux and increases the thermal flux in the core, i.e. leads to a softer spectrum. The more effective moderation also increases the average increase in lethargy between collisions of a neutron with successive fuel kernels, which reduces the probability for neutron capture in the radiative capture resonances of 238 U. The resulting higher resonance escape probability also increases the thermal flux in the core. The softening of the neutron spectrum leads to an increased effective microscopic fission cross section in the fissile isotopes and thus to increased neutron absorption for fission, which reduces the remaining number of neutrons that can diffuse into the reflectors. Therefore water ingress into the core leads to a reduced thermal neutron flux in the reflectors. The power density spatial distribution behaved similarly to the thermal neutron flux in the core. Analysis of possible mechanisms was conducted. The results show that

  6. Safeguards-by-Design: Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) With Pebble Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Casey Durst; Mark Schanfein

    2012-08-01

    The following is a guidance document from a series prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), to assist facility designers and operators in implementing international Safeguards-by-Design (SBD). SBD has two main objectives: (1) to avoid costly and time consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear fuel cycle facilities and (2) to make the implementation of international safeguards more effective and efficient at such facilities. In the long term, the attainment of these goals would save industry and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) time, money, and resources and be mutually beneficial. This particular safeguards guidance document focuses on pebble fuel high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). The purpose of the IAEA safeguards system is to provide credible assurance to the international community that nuclear material and other specified items are not diverted from peaceful nuclear uses. The safeguards system consists of the IAEA’s statutory authority to establish safeguards; safeguards rights and obligations in safeguards agreements and additional protocols; and technical measures implemented pursuant to those agreements. Of foremost importance is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). According to a 1992 IAEA Board of Governors decision, countries must: notify the IAEA of a decision to construct a new nuclear facility as soon as such decision is taken; provide design information on such facilities as the designs develop; and provide detailed design information based on construction plans at least 180 days prior to the start of construction, and on "as-built" designs at least 180 days before the first receipt of nuclear material. Ultimately, the design information will be captured in an IAEA Design Information

  7. High temperature ultrasonic sensor for fission gas characterization in MTR harsh environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatsa, O.; Combette, P.; Rozenkrantz, E.; Fourmentel, D.; Destouches, C.; Ferrandis, J. Y. AD(; )

    2018-01-01

    device operating at high temperature level (400°). Piezoelectric parameters enhancement and loss reduction at elevated temperatures are envisaged to be optimized. Further sensor development and test in MTR are expected to be realized in the near future.

  8. Plutonium-burn high temperature gas-cooled reactor for 3E+3S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Development in Japan is facing a very difficult conditions after Fukushima-Daiichi NPP Accident. Nuclear Energy has strong advantages on 3E, i.e., Energy security, Economical efficiency and Environment. However, people does not believe the Safety 'S' of Nuclear Energy, now. The disadvantage of 'S' overrides the advantages of '3E'. In Nuclear Energy, 'S' is expanded into 3S, i.e., Safety, Security and Safeguards. Especially, the management of Plutonium inventory in Spent Fuel generated by the NPP operation is very important in the viewpoints of non-proliferation. The high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is the solution of these disadvantages of '3S' in Nuclear Energy. The fuel of HTGR is composed by 1 mm spherical fuel particle, i.e., TRISO made by fuel, graphite and silicon-carbide. The silicon-carbide can confine the fission products in any conditions of fuel life cycle, i.e., during operation, accidents and disposal for 1 million years. The confinement of the radioactive materials can be confirmed by the TRISO. The HTGR core has strong negative feedback for temperature. So, the fission automatically stopped at the accidental conditions, such as loss of flow and LOCA. Also, the residual heat can be cooled by the radiation heat transfer to reactor vessel wall. The HTGR system usually has passive vessel wall cooling system. When the passive cooling system had been failed, the heat can be transferred to the land by heat conductions, and fuel does not reach the SiC broken temperature. The fission chain reaction has been stopped automatically by negative feedback, i.e., physics. The residual heat had been cooled automatically by radiation. The radioactive materials had been confined automatically by silicon-carbide. The HTGR is superior for 'S' safety. Plutonium can be burned by the HTGR. In the viewpoints of non-proliferation, the fuel should be made by YSZ-PuO 2 , stabilized buffer

  9. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-[TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    A point design for a graphite-moderated, high-temperature, gas-cooled test reactor (HTG TR) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of a United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) initiative to explore and potentially expand the existing U.S. test reactor capabilities. This paper provides a summary of the design and its main attributes. The 200 MW HTG TR is a thermal-neutron spectrum reactor composed of hexagonal prismatic fuel and graphite reflector blocks. Twelve fuel columns (96 fuel blocks total and 6.34 m active core height) are arranged in two hexagonal rings to form a relatively compact, high-power density, annular core sandwiched between inner, outer, top, and bottom graphite reflectors. The HTG-TR is designed to operate at 7 MPa with a coolant inlet/outlet temperature of 325°C/650°C, and utilizes TRISO particle fuel from the DOE AGR Program with 425 ?m uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels and an enrichment of 15.5 wt% 235U. The primary mission of the HTG TR is material irradiation and therefore the core has been specifically designed and optimized to provide the highest possible thermal and fast neutron fluxes. The highest thermal neutron flux (3.90E+14 n/cm2s) occurs in the outer reflector, and the maximum fast flux levels (1.17E+14 n/cm2s) are produced in the central reflector column where most of the graphite has been removed. Due to high core temperatures under accident conditions, all the irradiation test facilities have been located in the inner and outer reflectors where fast flux levels decline. The core features a large number of irradiation positions with large test volumes and long test lengths, ideal for thermal neutron irradiation of large test articles. The total available test volume is more than 1100 liters. Up to four test loop facilities can be accommodated with pressure tube boundaries to isolate test articles and test fluids (e.g., liquid metal, liquid salt, light water) from the helium primary coolant system.

  10. Tunable Diode Laser Sensors to Monitor Temperature and Gas Composition in High-Temperature Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Ronald [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Whitty, Kevin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) when combined with carbon capture and storage can be one of the cleanest methods of extracting energy from coal. Control of coal and biomass gasification processes to accommodate the changing character of input-fuel streams is required for practical implementation of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technologies. Therefore a fast time-response sensor is needed for real-time monitoring of the composition and ideally the heating value of the synthesis gas (here called syngas) as it exits the gasifier. The goal of this project was the design, construction, and demonstration an in situ laserabsorption sensor to monitor multiple species in the syngas output from practical-scale coal gasifiers. This project investigated the hypothesis of using laser absorption sensing in particulateladen syngas. Absorption transitions were selected with design rules to optimize signal strength while minimizing interference from other species. Successful in situ measurements in the dusty, high-pressure syngas flow were enabled by Stanford’s normalized and scanned wavelength modulation strategy. A prototype sensor for CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O was refined with experiments conducted in the laboratory at Stanford University, a pilot-scale at the University of Utah, and an engineering-scale gasifier at DoE’s National Center for Carbon Capture with the demonstration of a prototype sensor with technical readiness level 6 in the 2014 measurement campaign.

  11. Water-ingress analysis for the 200 MWe pebble-bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yanhua; Shi Lei; Wang Yan

    2010-01-01

    Water ingress into the primary circuit is generally recognized as one of the severe accidents with potential hazard to the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor adopting steam-turbine cycle, which will cause a positive reactivity introduction, as well as the chemical corrosion of graphite fuel elements and reflector structure material. Besides, increase of the primary pressure may result in the opening of the safety valves, consequently leading the release of radioactive isotopes and flammable water gas. The analysis of such a kind of important and particular accident is significant to verify the inherent safety characteristics of the modular HTR plants. Based on the preliminary design of the 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM), the design basis accident of a double-ended guillotine break of one heating tube and the beyond design basis accident of a large break of the main steam collection plate have been analyzed by using TINTE code, which is a special transient analysis program for high temperature gas-cooled reactors. Some safety relevant concerns, such as the fuel temperature, the primary loop pressure, the graphite corrosion, the water gas releasing amount, as well as the natural convection influence on the condition of failing to close the blower flaps, have been studied in detail. The calculation results indicate that even under some severe hypothetical postulates, the HTR-PM is able to keep the inherent safeties of the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor and has a relatively good natural plant response, which will not result in environmental radiation hazard.

  12. Low NOx combustion technologies for high-temperature natural gas combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamme, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Because of the high process temperature which is required for some processes like glass melting and the high temperature to which the combustion air is preheated, NOx emission are extremely high. Even at these high temperatures, NOx emissions could be reduced drastically by using advanced combustion techniques such as staged combustion or flame-less oxidation, as experimental work has shown. In the case of oxy-fuel combustion, the NOx emission are also very high if conventional burners are used. The new combustion techniques achieve similar NOx reductions. (author)

  13. Design Configurations and Coupling High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor and Hydrogen Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Steven Sherman

    2008-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood

  14. Sustainability and Efficiency Improvements of Gas-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmier, A.

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis covers three fundamental aspects of High Temperature Reactor (HTR) performance, namely fuel testing under irradiation for maximized safety and sustainability, fuel architecture for improved economy and sustainability, and a novel Balance of Plant concept to enable

  15. A novel fibre Bragg grating sensor packaging design for ultra-high temperature sensing in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhari, Amir; Liang, Richard; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a novel packaging of conventional Corning SMF-28™ single-mode fibre Bragg grating sensors for ultra-high temperature sensing. The package is in a cylindrical shape made of yttria-stabilized zirconia tubes. The fibre optic sensor is epoxied to one end inside the tube to be protected from high external temperatures and also harsh environments. Highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite tube with an exceptional anisotropic thermal conductivity with higher conductivity in transverse than radial direction is positioned around the fibre to protect it from high temperatures. Air cooling system is also provided from the other end to dissipate the transferred heat from inside the tube. The shift in the Bragg wavelength is influenced by the thermal expansion of the package and internal temperature variations, which translates into thermal expansion of the fibre. The modelling and experimental results revealed that the Bragg wavelength shift increases to 1.4 pm °C-1 at higher temperatures with linear behaviour at temperatures above 600 °C. The finite element modelling and the experimental results are also in good proximity indicating the similar trend for the shift in the Bragg wavelength.

  16. Disintegration of graphite matrix from the simulative high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel element by electrochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Lifang; Wen Mingfen; Li Linyan; Chen Jing

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemical method with salt as electrolyte has been studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from the simulative high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel elements. Ammonium nitrate was experimentally chosen as the appropriate electrolyte. The volume average diameter of disintegrated graphite fragments is about 100 μm and the maximal value is less than 900 μm. After disintegration, the weight of graphite is found to increase by about 20% without the release of a large amount of CO 2 probably owing to the partial oxidation to graphite in electrochemical process. The present work indicates that the improved electrochemical method has the potential to reduce the secondary nuclear waste and is a promising option to disintegrate graphite matrix from high temperature gas-cooled reactor spent fuel elements in the head-end of reprocessing.

  17. Hypothetical accident scenario analyses for a 250-MW(t) modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1985-11-01

    This paper describes calculations performed to characterize the inherent safety of a 250-MW(t), 100-MW(e), pebble bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design with vertical in-line arrangement (i.e., upflow core with steam generators directly above the core). A variety of postulated accident sequences involving combinations of loss of forced primary coolant (helium) circulation, loss of primary coolant pressurization, and loss of heat sink were studied and were discussed

  18. Application of artificial neural networks in fault diagnosis for 10MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hui; Wang Ruipian; Hu Shouyin

    2003-01-01

    This paper makes researches on 10 MW High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fault diagnosis system using Artificial Neural Network, and uses the tendency value and real value of the data under the accidents to train and test two BP networks respectively. The final diagnostic result is the combination of the results of the two networks. The compound system can enhance the accuracy and adaptability of the diagnosis compared to the single network system

  19. Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrell, Gary [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Scott, Brian [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2014-06-30

    This report covers the technical progress on the program “Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems”, funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering Departments at Virginia Tech, and summarizes technical progress from July 1st, 2005 –June 30th, 2014. The objective of this program was to develop novel fiber materials for high temperature gas sensors based on evanescent wave absorption in optical fibers. This project focused on two primary areas: the study of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber (SPCF) for operation at high temperature and long wavelengths, and a porous glass based fiber optic sensor for gas detection. The sapphire component of the project focused on the development of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber, modeling of the new structures, fabrication of the optimal structure, development of a long wavelength interrogation system, testing of the optical properties, and gas and temperature testing of the final sensor. The fabrication of the 6 rod SPCF gap bundle (diameter of 70μm) with a hollow core was successfully constructed with lead-in and lead-out 50μm diameter fiber along with transmission and gas detection testing. Testing of the sapphire photonic crystal fiber sensor capabilities with the developed long wavelength optical system showed the ability to detect CO2 at or below 1000ppm at temperatures up to 1000°C. Work on the porous glass sensor focused on the development of a porous clad solid core optical fiber, a hollow core waveguide, gas detection capabilities at room and high temperature, simultaneous gas species detection, suitable joining technologies for the lead-in and lead-out fibers and the porous sensor, sensor system sensitivity improvement, signal processing improvement, relationship between pore structure and fiber

  20. Measurement of flow field in the pebble bed type high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sa Ya; Lee, Jae Young

    2008-01-01

    In this study, flow field measurement of the Pebble Bed Reactor(PBR) for the High Temperature Gascooled Reactor(HTGR) was performed. Large number of pebbles in the core of PBR provides complicated flow channel. Due to the complicated geometries, numerical analysis has been intensively made rather than experimental observation. However, the justification of computational simulation by the experimental study is crucial to develop solid analysis of design method. In the present study, a wind tunnel installed with pebbles stacked was constructed and equipped with the Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). We designed the system scaled up to realize the room temperature condition according to the similarity. The PIV observation gave us stagnation points, low speed region so that the suspected high temperature region can be identified. With the further supplementary experimental works, the present system may produce valuable data to justify the Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) simulation method

  1. Incoloy 800 stands up to radiation and corrosion in high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Incoloy 800 has been selected for heat exchangers in helium cooled nuclear reactor prototypes for exposure to 350 to 800 0 C helium and high temperature high purity water and steam. 304H stainless steel used in heat exchangers in original design cracked in the superheater area, bellows and tubing after static pressure tests but before exposure to steam. Residual stress, chlorides, and oxygen were deduced to have caused the failures

  2. High-Temperature, High-Bandwidth Fiber Optic Pressure and Temperature Sensors for Gas Turbine Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fielder, Robert S; Palmer, Matthew E

    2003-01-01

    The accurate measurement of gas flow conditions in the compressor, combustors, and turbines of gas turbine engines is important to assess performance, predict failure, and facilitate data-driven maintenance...

  3. Study on a method for loading a Li compound to produce tritium using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: nakaya@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Matsuura, Hideaki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Katayama, Kazunari [Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga 8168580 (Japan); Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Tritium production by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor was studied. • The loading method considering tritium outflow suppression was estimated. • A reactor with 600 MWt produced 400–600 g of tritium for 180 days. • A possibility that tritium outflow can be sufficiently suppressed was shown. - Abstract: Tritium production using high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and its outflow from the region loading Li compound into the helium coolant are estimated when considering the suppression of tritium outflow. A Li rod containing a cylindrical Li compound placed in an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cladding tube is assumed as a method for loading Li compound. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300 MW electrical nominal capacity (GTHTR300) with 600 MW thermal output power is considered and modeled using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, where burn-up simulations are carried out. Tritium outflow is estimated from equilibrium solution for the tritium diffusion equation in the cladding tube. A GTHTR300 can produce 400–600 g of tritium over a 180-day operation using the chosen method of loading the Li compound while minimizing tritium outflow from the cladding tube. Optimizing tritium production while suppressing tritium outflow is discussed.

  4. Control room conceptual design of nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Qianqian; Qu Ronghong; Zhang Liangju

    2014-01-01

    A conceptual design of the control room layout for the nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors has been developed. The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors may need to be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands to realize the economic efficiency. There are many differences between the multi-modular plant and the current NPPs in the control room. These differences may include the staffing level, the human-machine interface design, the operation mode, etc. The potential challenges of the human factor engineering (HFE) in the control room of the multi-modular plant are analyzed, including the operation workload of the multi-modular tasks, how to help the crew to keep situation awareness of all modules, and how to support team work, the control of shared system between modules, etc. A concept design of control room for the multi-modular plant is presented based on the design aspect of HTR-PM (High temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble bed module). HFE issues are considered in the conceptual design of control room for the multi-modular plant and some design strategies are presented. As a novel conceptual design, verifications and validations are needed, and focus of further work is sketch out. (author)

  5. Basic policy of maintenance for the power conversion system of the gas turbine high temperature reactor 300 (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Yan, Xing; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji

    2003-01-01

    Basic policy of maintenance was determined for major equipment in the power conversion system of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300). It was developed based on the current maintenance practice in Light Water Reactors (LWRs), High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and conventional combined cycle power plants while taking into account of unique design features of GTHTR300. First, potential degradation phenomena in operations were identified and corresponding maintenance approaches were proposed for the equipment. Such degradations encountered typically in LWRs as corrosion, erosion and stress corrosion cracking are unlikely to occur since the working fluid of GTHTR300 is inert helium. Main causes of the degradations are high operating temperature and pressure. The gas turbine, compressor, generator, control valves undergo opening and dismantling maintenance in a suitable time interval. The power conversion vessel, heat exchanger vessel, primary system piping and heat exchanging tubes of precooler are subjected to in-service inspections similar to those done in LWRs. As turbine blades represent the severest material degradation because of their high-temperature and high-stress operating conditions, a lifetime management scheme was suggested for them. The longest interval of open-casing maintenance of the gas turbine is estimated to be six to seven years from technical point of view. Present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  6. Development of safety analysis codes and experimental validation for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh

    2006-01-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 900 C and operational fuel temperatures above 1250 C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR's higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gases (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. Research Objectives As described above, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release in the VHTR. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration were to develop and validate advanced computational methods for VHTR safety analysis. The methods that have been developed are now

  7. Development of safety analysis codes and experimental validation for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh

    2006-03-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. Research Objectives As described above, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release in the VHTR. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration were to develop and validate advanced computational methods for VHTR safety analysis. The methods that have been developed are now

  8. Development of Safety Analysis Codes and Experimental Validation for a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H. Oh, PhD; Cliff Davis; Richard Moore

    2004-11-01

    The very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTGRs) are those concepts that have average coolant temperatures above 900 degrees C or operational fuel temperatures above 1250 degrees C. These concepts provide the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation and nuclear hydrogen generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperatures to support process heat applications, such as desalination and cogeneration, the VHTGR's higher temperatures are suitable for particular applications such as thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the high temperature operation can be detrimental to safety following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) initiated by pipe breaks caused by seismic or other events. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air from the containment will enter the core by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structures and fuel. The oxidation will release heat and accelerate the heatup of the reactor core. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has investigated this event for the past three years for the HTGR. However, the computer codes used, and in fact none of the world's computer codes, have been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably predict this event. New code development, improvement of the existing codes, and experimental validation are imperative to narrow the uncertaninty in the predictions of this type of accident. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration are to develop advanced computational methods for VHTGR safety analysis codes and to validate these computer codes.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and gas sensing performance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For the first time, this study reports the gas sensing performance of aluminosilicate azide cancrinite. The effect of annealing andoperating temperature on gas sensing characteristic of azide cancrinite thick film is investigated systematically for various gases at different operating temperatures. This sensor was observed to be ...

  10. Development of gas cooled reactors and experimental setup of high temperature helium loop for in-pile operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletić, Marija, E-mail: marija_miletic@live.com [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Fukač, Rostislav, E-mail: fuk@cvrez.cz [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Rez (Czech Republic); Pioro, Igor, E-mail: Igor.Pioro@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada); Dragunov, Alexey, E-mail: Alexey.Dragunov@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Gas as a coolant in Gen-IV reactors, history and development. • Main physical parameters comparison of gas coolants: carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen with water. • Forced convection in turbulent pipe flow. • Gas cooled fast reactor concept comparisons to very high temperature reactor concept. • High temperature helium loop: concept, development, mechanism, design and constraints. - Abstract: Rapidly increasing energy and electricity demands, global concerns over the climate changes and strong dependence on foreign fossil fuel supplies are powerfully influencing greater use of nuclear power. In order to establish the viability of next-generation reactor concepts to meet tomorrow's needs for clean and reliable energy production the fundamental research and development issues need to be addressed for the Generation-IV nuclear-energy systems. Generation-IV reactor concepts are being developed to use more advanced materials, coolants and higher burn-ups fuels, while keeping a nuclear reactor safe and reliable. One of the six Generation-IV concepts is a very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The VHTR concept uses a graphite-moderated core with a once-through uranium fuel cycle, using high temperature helium as the coolant. Because helium is naturally inert and single-phase, the helium-cooled reactor can operate at much higher temperatures, leading to higher efficiency. Current VHTR concepts will use fuels such as uranium dioxide, uranium carbide, or uranium oxycarbide. Since some of these fuels are new in nuclear industry and due to their unknown properties and behavior within VHTR conditions it is very important to address these issues by investigate their characteristics within conditions close to those in VHTRs. This research can be performed in a research reactor with in-pile helium loop designed and constructed in Research Center Rez Ltd. One of the topics analyzed in this article are also physical characteristic and benefits of gas

  11. Specialists' meeting on high temperature metallic materials for application in gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the meeting overviews of current programmes for the development of high temperature materials in Japan, F.R. Germany and the United States of America were presented. Some papers were presented dealing with various aspects of microstructural studies, surface reactions and the changes of microstructure and dimensions due mainly to the associated interfacial material transports, protective surface coatings for HTGR and AGR applications. Other topics presented were mechanical properties of materials and also the influence of materials' properties data on design at temperatures in the creep region where time dependent behaviour must be considered

  12. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite

  13. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Majumdar, Saurindranath [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite.

  14. Thermodynamics of high-temperature and high-density hadron gas by a numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Miyamura, Osamu [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1998-07-01

    We study thermodynamical properties of hot and dense hadronic gas an event generator URASiMA. In our results, the increase of temperature is suppressed. It indicates that hot and dense hadronic gas has a large specific heat at constant volume. (author)

  15. Research activities on high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) in the 5. EURATOM RTD Framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Bermejo, J.; Hugon, M.; Van Goethem, G.

    2002-01-01

    One of the areas of research of the 'nuclear fission' key action of the 5. EURATOM RTD Framework Programme (FP5) is the safety and efficiency of future systems. The main objective of this area is to investigate and evaluate new or revisited concepts (both reactors and alternative fuels) for nuclear energy that offer potential longer term benefits in terms of cost, safety, waste management, use of fissile material, less risk of diversion and sustainability. Several projects related to high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) were retained by the European Commission (EC) services. They address important issues such as HTR fuel technology, HTR fuel cycle, HTR materials, power conversion systems and licensing. Most of these projects have already started and are progressing according to the schedule. They are the initial core of activities of a European Network on 'High-temperature Reactor Technology' (HTR-TN) recently set up by 18 EU organisations. (authors)

  16. Oxidation damage evaluation by non-destructive method for graphite components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Tada, Tatsuya; Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    To develop non-destructive evaluation methods for oxidation damage on graphite components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), the applicability of ultrasonic wave and micro-indentation methods were investigated. Candidate graphites, IG-110 and IG-430, for core components of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) were used in this study. These graphites were oxidized uniformly by air at 500degC. The following results were obtained from this study. (1) Ultrasonic wave velocities with 1 MHz can be expressed empirically by exponential formulas to burn-off, oxidation weight loss. (2) The porous condition of the oxidized graphite could be evaluated with wave propagation analysis with a wave-pore interaction model. It is important to consider the non-uniformity of oxidized porous condition. (3) Micro-indentation method is expected to determine the local oxidation damage. It is necessary to assess the variation of the test data. (author)

  17. Modeling the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor process heat plant: a nuclear to chemical conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfremmer, R.D.; Openshaw, F.L.

    1982-05-01

    The high-temperature heat available from the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) makes it suitable for many process applications. One of these applications is a large-scale energy production plant where nuclear energy is converted into chemical energy and stored for industrial or utility applications. This concept combines presently available nuclear HTGR technology and energy conversion chemical technology. The design of this complex plant involves questions of interacting plant dynamics and overall plant control. This paper discusses how these questions were answered with the aid of a hybrid computer model that was developed within the time-frame of the conceptual design studies. A brief discussion is given of the generally good operability shown for the plant and of the specific potential problems and their anticipated solution. The paper stresses the advantages of providing this information in the earliest conceptual phases of the design

  18. High temperature ultrasonic sensor for fission gas characterization in MTR harsh environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatsa O.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present NBT thick film fabrication by screen printing, characterization of piezoelectric, dielectric properties and material parameters studies in dependence of temperature. Relatively high resistivity in the range of 1.1013 Ohm.cm for fabricated thick film is explained by Aurivillius structure in which a-and b-layers form perovskite structure between oxides of c-layer. Main results of this study are presented and discussed in terms of feasibility for an application to a new sensor device operating at high temperature level (400°. Piezoelectric parameters enhancement and loss reduction at elevated temperatures are envisaged to be optimized. Further sensor development and test in MTR are expected to be realized in the near future.

  19. Influence of gas generation on high-temperature melt/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Accidents involving fuel melting and eventual contact between the high temperature melt and structural concrete may be hypothesized for both light water thermal reactors and liquid metal cooled breeder reactors. Though these hypothesized accidents have a quite low probability of occurring, it is necessary to investigate the probable natures of the accidents if an adequate assessment of the risks associated with the use of nuclear reactors is to be made. A brief description is given of a program addressing the nature of melt/concrete interactions which has been underway for three years at Sandia Laboratories. Emphasis in this program has been toward the behavior of prototypic melts of molten core materials with concrete representative of that found in existing or proposed reactors. The goals of the experimentation have been to identify phenomena particularly pertinent to questions of reactor safety, and phenomena particularly pertinent to questions of reactor safety, and provide quantitative data suitable for the purposes of risk assessment

  20. The gas-cooled high temperature reactor. Perspectives, problems and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.; Engelmann, P.; Erb, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly 20 years extensive research and development programmes on helium-cooled high temperature reactors (HTR) have been carried out in several countries of the world. As a result of the long-standing efforts, satisfactory solutions have been found for many of the basic problems of this new reactor system, particularly in the field of high temperature fuels and materials technology. Three small experimental plants have been operated successfully over extended periods of time. Prototype steam-cycle plants of 300MW(e) are under way at Fort St. Vrain (full-power operation scheduled for 1977) and at Schmehausen (scheduled for 1979). Major delays have occurred in the construction and commissioning of these plants for various reasons but do not reveal specific problems of the HTR. Commercial market introduction of the steam-cycle electricity generating system has been attempted, but the first approach has not been successful. Major efforts both by governments and industry are now required to ensure a successful second approach. To reach competitivity with established nuclear power systems and to take full advantage of the fuel conservation potential of the HTR requires the implementation of the closed thorium fuel cycle on a commercial scale. While some key steps of this cycle have been implemented on a laboratory scale, progress towards a prototype recycling facility has been slow. Closing the thorium fuel cycle represents a major challenge and can only be achieved in a close international collaboration. The paper discusses the world-wide status and potential of HTR technology and reviews the major international development programmes. (author)

  1. Fission gas release and grain growth in THO2-UO2 fuel irradiated at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, I.; Waldman, L.A.; Giovengo, J.F.; Campbell, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented on fission gas release and grain growth in ThO 2 -UO 2 fuels irradiated as part of the LWBR fuel element development program. These data for rods that experienced peak linear power outputs ranging from 15 to 22 KW/ft supplement fission gas release data previously reported for 51 rods containing ThO 2 and ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel irradiated at peak linear powers predominantly below 14 KW/ft. Fission gas release was relatively high (up to 15.0 percent) for the rods operated at high power in contrast to the relatively low fission gas release (0.1 to 5.2 percent) measured for the rods operated at lower power. Metallographic examination revealed extensive equiaxed grain growth in the fuel at the high power axial locations of the three rods

  2. High-Temperature, High-Bandwidth Fiber Optic Pressure and Temperature Sensors for Gas Turbine Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fielder, Robert S; Palmer, Matthew E

    2003-01-01

    ..., and redesign compressor and turbine stages based on actual measurements. There currently exists no sensor technology capable of making pressure measurements in the critical hot regions of gas turbine engines...

  3. Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    This report is a preliminary comparison of conventional and potential HTGR-integrated processes in several common industrial areas: (1) Producing electricity via a traditional power cycle; (2) Producing hydrogen; (3) Producing ammonia and ammonia-derived products, such as fertilizer; (4) Producing gasoline and diesel from natural gas or coal; (5) Producing substitute natural gas from coal; and (6) Steam-assisted gravity drainage (extracting oil from tar sands).

  4. Future perspectives for high-temperature gas turbines; Zukunftsperspektiven fuer die Hochtemperaturgasturbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lietmeyer, Christoph; Guendogdu, Yavuz; Kleppa, Oliver; Oehlert, Karsten; Vorreiter, Arne; Seume, Joerg [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Turbomaschinen und Fluid-Dynamik

    2009-07-01

    Research approaches for reducing operating cost, investment and maintenance expenses for stationary gas turbines are presented. Operating expenses are reduced by increasing compressor efficiency using a functional surface structure which is oriented in flow direction. Within the planned collaborative research centre ''Regeneration of durable goods'' new scientific fundamentals and research results for the systematic regeneration of gas turbines will be developed. (orig.)

  5. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  6. High Temperature and High Sensitive NOx Gas Sensor with Hetero-Junction Structure using Laser Ablation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Shi, Liqin; Hasegawa, Yuki; Katsube, Teruaki

    In order to develop a high temperature (200°C˜400°C) and high sensitive NOx gas sensor, we developed a new structure of SiC-based hetero-junction device Pt/SnO2/SiC/Ni, Pt/In2O3/SiC/Ni and Pt/WO3/SiC/Ni using a laser ablation method for the preparation of both metal (Pt) electrode and metal-oxide film. It was found that Pt/In2O3/SiC/Ni sensor shows higher sensitivity to NO2 gas compared with the Pt/SnO2/SiC/Ni and Pt/WO3/SiC/Ni sensor, whereas the Pt/WO3/SiC/Ni sensor had better sensitivity to NO gas. These results suggest that selective detection of NO and NO2 gases may be obtained by choosing different metal oxide films.

  7. Production analysis of methanol and hydrogen of a modificated blast furnace gas using nuclear energy of the high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, W.

    1985-12-01

    Modern blast furnaces are operated with a coke ration of 500 kg/t pig iron. The increase of the coke ratio to 1000 kg/t pig iron raises the content of carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the blast furnace gas. On the basis of a blast furnace gas modificated in such a way, the production of methanol and hydrogen is investigated under the coupling of current and process heat from the high temperature reactor. Moreover the different variants are discussed, for which respectively a material and energetic balance as well as an estimation of the production costs is performed. Regarding the subsequent treatment of the blast furnace gas it turns out favourably in principle to operate the blast furnace with a nitrogen-free wind consisting only of oxygen and steam. The production costs show a strong dependence on the raw material costs, whose influence is shown in a nomograph. (orig.) [de

  8. Metal oxide nanostructures as gas sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, G

    2016-01-01

    Metal Oxide Nanostructures as Gas Sensing Devices explores the development of an integrated micro gas sensor that is based on advanced metal oxide nanostructures and is compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication technology. This sensor can then be used to create a compact, low-power, handheld device for analyzing air ambience. The book first covers current gas sensing tools and discusses the necessity for miniaturized sensors. It then focuses on the materials, devices, and techniques used for gas sensing applications, such as resistance and capacitance variations. The author addresses the issues of sensitivity, concentration, and temperature dependency as well as the response and recovery times crucial for sensors. He also presents techniques for synthesizing different metal oxides, particularly those with nanodimensional structures. The text goes on to highlight the gas sensing properties of many nanostructured metal oxides, from aluminum and cerium to iron and titanium to zinc and zirconium. The final...

  9. Heat pump cycle by hydrogen-absorbing alloys to assist high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in producing hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoshi, Fukada; Nobutaka, Hayashi

    2010-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system using two hydrogen-absorbing alloys is proposed to utilise heat exhausted from a high-temperature source such as a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), more efficiently. The heat pump system is designed to produce H 2 based on the S-I cycle more efficiently. The overall system proposed here consists of HTGR, He gas turbines, chemical heat pumps and reaction vessels corresponding to the three-step decomposition reactions comprised in the S-I process. A fundamental research is experimentally performed on heat generation in a single bed packed with a hydrogen-absorbing alloy that may work at the H 2 production temperature. The hydrogen-absorbing alloy of Zr(V 1-x Fe x ) 2 is selected as a material that has a proper plateau pressure for the heat pump system operated between the input and output temperatures of HTGR and reaction vessels of the S-I cycle. Temperature jump due to heat generated when the alloy absorbs H 2 proves that the alloy-H 2 system can heat up the exhaust gas even at 600 deg. C without any external mechanical force. (authors)

  10. POWER CYCLE AND STRESS ANALYSES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang H; Davis, Cliff; Hawkes, Brian D; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold (1) efficient low cost energy generation and (2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with three turbines and four compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with three stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and a 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to

  11. Methanol from coal without CO2 production via the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, R.W. Jr.; Engler, D.; Labar, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    Displacement options for petroleum fuels include natural gas (compressed or liquified), synthetic gasoline, biomass fuels, electric vehicles, hydrogen, and methanol. This paper reports that although no alternative meets all the desired characteristics of economics, environmental impact, supply logistics, and vehicle technology, methanol has often been cited as a good compromise and is perhaps the best coal derived fuel. The main criticism leveled at methanol is whether it can be produced economically in sufficient quantities to significantly displace petroleum-derived fuels. Although methanol can be manufactured from biomass, natural gas or coal feedstocks, only coal offers the potential for a substantial long term indigenous U.S. feedstock

  12. Transport properties of natural gas through polyethylene nanocomposites at high temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adewole, Jimoh K.; Jensen, Lars; Al-Mubaiyedh, Usamah A.

    2012-01-01

    High density polyethylene (HDPE)/clay nanocomposites containing nanoclay concentrations of 1, 2.5, and 5 wt% were prepared by a melt blending process. The effects of various types of nanoclays and their concentrations on permeability, solubility, and diffusivity of natural gas in the nanocomposites...... at constant temperature had little influence on the permeability, whereas increasing the temperature from 30 to 70 degrees C significantly increased the permeability of the gas. Additionally, the effect of crystallinity on permeability, solubility, and diffusivity was investigated. Thus, the permeability...

  13. Radiochemical analysis of the first plateout probe from the Fort St. Vrain high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnette, R.D.

    1982-06-01

    This report presents the analysis of radioactive elements on the first plateout probe from the Fort St. Vrain high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The plateout probe is a device which samples the primary coolant for condensible fission products. Circuit inventories of individual radionuclides are estimated from the probe analysis. The analysis shows that the radioactive contamination in the primary circuit is remarkable low, with activation product concentrations much greater than that of fission products. The analysis demonstrates that the concentrations of the key fission products I-131 and Sr-90 are far below the limits allowed by the technical specification

  14. Dynamic simulation for scram of high temperature gas-cooled reactor with indirect helium turbine cycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenlong; Xie Heng

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic analysis code for this system was developed after the mathematical modeling and programming of important equipment of 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Helium Turbine Power Generation (HTR-10GT), such as reactor core, heat exchanger and turbine-compressor system. A scram accident caused by a 0.1 $ reactivity injection at 5 second was simulated. The results show that the design emergency shutdown plan for this system is safe and reasonable and that the design of bypass valve has a large safety margin. (authors)

  15. Scaling analysis of the coupled heat transfer process in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1986-08-01

    The differential equations representing the coupled heat transfer from the solid nuclear core components to the helium in the coolant channels are scaled in terms of representative quantities. This scaling process identifies the relative importance of the various terms of the coupled differential equations. The relative importance of these terms is then used to simplify the numerical solution of the coupled heat transfer for two bounding cases of full-power operation and depressurization from full-system operating pressure for the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. This analysis rigorously justifies the simplified system of equations used in the nuclear safety analysis effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  16. Hydrogen production system coupled with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Shusaku

    2003-01-01

    On the HTTR program, R and D on nuclear reactor technology and R and D on thermal application technology such as hydrogen production and so on, are advanced. When carrying out power generation and thermal application such as hydrogen production and so on, it is, at first, necessary to supply nuclear heat safely, stably and in low cost, JAERI carries out some R and Ds on nuclear reactor technology using HTTR. In parallel to this, JAERI also carries out R and D for jointing nuclear reactor system with thermal application systems because of no experience in the world on high temperature heat of about 1,000 centigrade supplied by nuclear reactor except power generation, and R and D on thermochemical decomposition method IS process for producing hydrogen from water without exhaust of carbon dioxide. Here were described summaries on R and D on nuclear reactor technology, R and D on jointing technology using HTTR hydrogen production system, R and D on IS process hydrogen production, and comparison hydrogen production with other processes. (G.K.)

  17. Evaluation of Indirect Combined Cycle in Very High Temperature Gas--Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Robert Barner; Cliff Davis; Steven Sherman; Paul Pickard

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and Idaho National Laboratory are developing a very high temperature reactor to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is twofold: (a) efficient, low-cost energy generation and (b) hydrogen production. Although a next-generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual purpose, as assumed here. A dual-purpose design with a combined cycle of a Brayton top cycle and a bottom Rankine cycle was investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting heat to a hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and a helium-nitrogen mixture were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms of the cycle efficiency. The relative component sizes were estimated for the different working fluids to provide an indication of the relative capital costs. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the cycle were performed to determine the effects of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of the cycle to various operating conditions as well as trade-offs between efficiency and component size. Parametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling

  18. Application of a vortex shedding flowmeter to the wide range measurement of high temperature gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.P.; Ennis, R.M. Jr.; Herndon, P.G.

    1981-01-01

    A single flowmeter was required for helium gas measurement in a Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor loss of coolant simulator. Volumetric flow accuracy of +-1.0% of reading was required over the Reynolds Number range 6 x 10 3 to 1 x 10 6 at flowing pressures from 0.2 to 9 MPa (29 to 1305 psia) at 350 0 C (660 0 F) flowing temperature. Because of its inherent accuracy and rangeability, a vortex shedding flowmeter was selected and specially modified to provide for a remoted thermal sensor. Experiments were conducted to determine the relationship between signal attenuation and sensor remoting geometry, as well as the relationship between gas flow parameters and remoted thermal sensor signal for both compressed air and helium gas. Based upon the results of these experiments, the sensor remoting geometry was optimized for this application. The resultant volumetric flow rangeability was 155:1. The associated temperature increase at the sensor position was 9 0 C above ambient (25 0 F) at a flowing temperature of 350 0 C. The volumetric flow accuracy was measured over the entire 155:1 flow range at parametric values of flowing density. A volumetric flow accuracy of +- % of reading was demonstrated

  19. The dynamic characteristics of HTGR (High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor) system, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Masao; Kawasaki, Hidenori

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of a HTGR plant, which has two cooling loops, was investigated. The analytical model consists of the core with fuel sleeves, coolant channels and blocks, the upper and lower reflectors, the high and low temperature plenums, two double wall pipings, two intermediate heat exchangers and the secondary system. The key plant parameters for calculation were as follows: the core outlet gas temperature 1000 deg C, the reactor thermal output 50 MW, the flow rate of primary coolant gas 7.96 kg/sec-loop and the pressure of primary coolant gas 40 kg/cm 2 at the rated operating condition. The calculating parameters were fixed as follows: the time interval for core characteristic analysis 0.1 sec, the time interval for thermal characteristic analysis 5.0 sec, the number of division of fuel channels 130, and the number of division of an intermediate heat exchanger 200. The assumptions for making the model were evaluated especially for the power distribution in the core and the heat transmission coefficients in the core, the double wall piping and the intermediate heat exchangers. Concerning the analytical results, the self-control to the outer disturbance of reactivity and the plant dynamic behavior due to the change of flow rate of primary and secondary coolants, and the change of gas temperature of secondary coolant at the inlet of intermediate heat exchangers, are presented. (Nakai, Y.)

  20. Parametric analysis of a high temperature packed bed thermal storage design for a solar gas turbine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klein, P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available as the storage medium and air from the gas turbine cycle as the heat transfer fluid. A detailed model of the storage system is developed that accounts for transient heat transfer between discrete fluid and solid phases. The model includes all relevant convective...

  1. Experimental and numerical investigations of high temperature gas heat transfer and flow in a VHTR reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin Rodriguez, Francisco Ivan

    High pressure/high temperature forced and natural convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. VHTRs are designed with the capability to withstand accidents by preventing nuclear fuel meltdown, using passive safety mechanisms; a product of advanced reactor designs including the implementation of inert gases like helium as coolants. The present experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced and natural circulation experiments. This work examines fundamental aspects of high temperature gas heat transfer applied to VHTR operational and accident scenarios. Two different types of experiments, forced convection and natural circulation, were conducted under high pressure and high temperature conditions using three different gases: air, nitrogen and helium. The experimental data were analyzed to obtain heat transfer coefficient data in the form of Nusselt numbers as a function of Reynolds, Grashof and Prandtl numbers. This work also examines the flow laminarization phenomenon (turbulent flows displaying much lower heat transfer parameters than expected due to intense heating conditions) in detail for a full range of Reynolds numbers including: laminar, transition and turbulent flows under forced convection and its impact on heat transfer. This phenomenon could give rise to deterioration in convection heat transfer and occurrence of hot spots in the reactor core. Forced and mixed convection data analyzed indicated the occurrence of flow laminarization phenomenon due to the buoyancy and acceleration effects induced by strong heating. Turbulence parameters were also measured using a hot wire anemometer in forced convection experiments to confirm the existence of the flow laminarization phenomenon. In particular, these results demonstrated the influence of pressure on delayed transition between laminar and turbulent flow. The heat

  2. Adsorption purification of helium coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varezhkin, A.V.; Zel'venskij, Ya.D.; Metlik, I.V.; Khrulev, A.A.; Fedoseenkin, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    A series experiments on adsorption purification of helium of CO 2 using national adsorbent under the conditions characteristic of HTGR type reactors cleanup system is performed. The experimnts have been conducted under the dynamic mode with immobile adsorbent layer (CaA zeolite) at gas flow rates from 0,02 to 0,055 m/s in the pressure range from 0,8 to 5 MPa at the temperature of 273 and 293 K. It is shown that the adsorption grows with the decrease of gas rate, i.e. with increase of contact time with adsorbent. The helium pressure, growth noticeably whereas the temperature decrease from 293 to 273 K results in adsorption 2,6 times increase. The conclusion is drawn that it is advisable drying and purification of helium of CO 2 to perform separately using different zeolites: NaA - for water. CaA - for CO 2 . Estimations of purification unit parameters are realized

  3. Wide-range vortex shedding flowmeter for high-temperature helium gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S.P.; Herndon, P.G.; Ennis, R.M. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The existing design of a commercially available vortex shedding flowmeter (VSFM) was modified and optimized to produce three 4-in. and one 6-in. high-performance VSFMs for measuring helium flow in a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) test loop. The project was undertaken because of the significant economic and performance advantages to be realized by using a single flowmeter capable of covering the 166:1 flow range (at 350/sup 0/C and 45:1 pressure range) of the tests. A detailed calibration in air and helium at the Colorado Engineering Experiment Station showed an accuracy of +-1% of reading for a 100:1 helium flow range and +-1.75% of reading for a 288:1 flow range in both helium and air. At an extended gas temperature of 450/sup 0/C, water cooling was necessary for reliable flowmeter operation.

  4. Development of a wide range vortex shedding flowmeter for high temperature helium gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S.P.; Ennis, R.M. Jr.; Herndon, P.G.

    1981-07-01

    A flowmeter was required to measure recirculating helium gas flow over a wide range of conditions in a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) core flow simulator, the ORNL Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL). The flow measurement requirements of the CFTL exceeded the proven performance of any single conventional flowmeter. Therefore, a special purpose vortex shedding flowmeter (VSFM) was developed. A single flowmeter capable of meeting all the CFTL requirements would provide significant economic and performance advantages in the operation of the loop. The development, conceptual design, and final design of a modified VSFM are described. The results of extensive flow calibration of the flowmeter at the Colorado Engineering Experiment Station (CEES) are presented. The report closes with recommendations for application of the VSFM to the CFTL and for future development work.

  5. Numerical investigation of high temperature synthesis gas premixed combustion via ANSYS Fluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashchenko Dmitry

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model of the synthesis gas pre-mixed combustion is developed. The research was carried out via ANSYS Fluent software. Verification of the numerical results was carried out using experimental data. A visual comparison of the flame contours that obtained by the synthesis gas combustion for Re = 600; 800; 1000 was performed. A comparison of the wall temperature of the combustion chamber, obtained with the help of the developed model, with the results of a physical experiment was also presented. For all cases, good convergence of the results is observed. It is established that a change in the temperature of the syngas/air mixture at the inlet to the combustion chamber does not significantly affect the temperature of the combustion products due to the dissipation of the H2O and CO2 molecules. The obtained results are of practical importance for the design of heat engineering plants with thermochemical heat recovery.

  6. Preparation of gas diffusion electrodes for high temperature PEM-type fuel cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazur, P.; Mališ, J.; Paidar, M.; Schauer, Jan; Bouzek, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 14, 1-3 (2010), s. 101-105 ISSN 1944-3994. [PERMEA 2009. Prague, 07.06.2009-11.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0465 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : gas diffusion electrode * polymer electrolyte * ionic liquid Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2010

  7. Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects of Gas-Metal-Oxide Mass Transfer in High-Temperature Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, Stephano P. T.; Pistorius, P. Chris; Webler, Bryan A.

    2018-05-01

    During high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscopy (HT-CSLM) of liquid steel samples, thermal Marangoni flow and rapid mass transfer between the sample and its surroundings occur due to the relatively small sample size (diameter around 5 mm) and large temperature gradients. The resulting evaporation and steel-slag reactions tend to change the chemical composition in the metal. Such mass transfer effects can change observed nonmetallic inclusions. This work quantifies oxide-metal-gas mass transfer of solutes during HT-CSLM experiments using computational simulations and experimental data for (1) dissolution of MgO inclusions in the presence and absence of slag and (2) Ca, Mg-silicate inclusion changes upon exposure of a Si-Mn-killed steel to an oxidizing gas atmosphere.

  8. A system for regulating the pressure of resuperheated steam in high temperature gas-cooled reactor power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegines, K.O.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to a system for regulating steam-pressure in the re-superheating portion of a steam-boiler receiving heat from a gas-cooled high temperature nuclear reactor, provided with gas distributing pumps driven by steam-turbines. The system comprises means for generating a pressure signal of desired magnitude for the re-superheating portion, and means for providing a real pressure in the re-superheating portion, means (including a by-passing device) for generating steam-flow rate signal of desired magnitude, a turbine by-pass device comprising a by-pass tapping means for regulating the steam-flow-rate in said turbine according to the desired steam-flow rate signal and means for controlling said by-pass tapping means according to said desired steam-flow-rate signal [fr

  9. Development of THYDE-HTGR: computer code for transient thermal-hydraulics of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Masashi; Hada, Kazuhiko

    1990-04-01

    The THYDE-HTGR code has been developed for transient thermal-hydraulic analyses of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, based on the THYDE-W code. THYDE-W is a code developed at JAERI for the simulation of Light Water Reactor plant dynamics during various types of transients including loss-of-coolant accidents. THYDE-HTGR solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for compressible gas, or single-phase or two-phase flow. The major code modification from THYDE-W is to treat helium loops as well as water loops. In parallel to this, modification has been made for the neutron kinetics to be applicable to helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, for the heat transfer models to be applicable to various types of heat exchangers, and so forth. In order to assess the validity of the modifications, analyses of some of the experiments conducted at the High Temperature Test Loop of ERANS have been performed. In this report, the models applied in THYDE-HTGR are described focusing on the present modifications and the results from the assessment calculations are presented. (author)

  10. An atmospheric pressure high-temperature laminar flow reactor for investigation of combustion and related gas phase reaction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oßwald, Patrick; Köhler, Markus [Institute of Combustion Technology, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    A new high-temperature flow reactor experiment utilizing the powerful molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) technique for detailed observation of gas phase kinetics in reacting flows is presented. The reactor design provides a consequent extension of the experimental portfolio of validation experiments for combustion reaction kinetics. Temperatures up to 1800 K are applicable by three individually controlled temperature zones with this atmospheric pressure flow reactor. Detailed speciation data are obtained using the sensitive MBMS technique, providing in situ access to almost all chemical species involved in the combustion process, including highly reactive species such as radicals. Strategies for quantifying the experimental data are presented alongside a careful analysis of the characterization of the experimental boundary conditions to enable precise numeric reproduction of the experimental results. The general capabilities of this new analytical tool for the investigation of reacting flows are demonstrated for a selected range of conditions, fuels, and applications. A detailed dataset for the well-known gaseous fuels, methane and ethylene, is provided and used to verify the experimental approach. Furthermore, application for liquid fuels and fuel components important for technical combustors like gas turbines and engines is demonstrated. Besides the detailed investigation of novel fuels and fuel components, the wide range of operation conditions gives access to extended combustion topics, such as super rich conditions at high temperature important for gasification processes, or the peroxy chemistry governing the low temperature oxidation regime. These demonstrations are accompanied by a first kinetic modeling approach, examining the opportunities for model validation purposes.

  11. An atmospheric pressure high-temperature laminar flow reactor for investigation of combustion and related gas phase reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oßwald, Patrick; Köhler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A new high-temperature flow reactor experiment utilizing the powerful molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) technique for detailed observation of gas phase kinetics in reacting flows is presented. The reactor design provides a consequent extension of the experimental portfolio of validation experiments for combustion reaction kinetics. Temperatures up to 1800 K are applicable by three individually controlled temperature zones with this atmospheric pressure flow reactor. Detailed speciation data are obtained using the sensitive MBMS technique, providing in situ access to almost all chemical species involved in the combustion process, including highly reactive species such as radicals. Strategies for quantifying the experimental data are presented alongside a careful analysis of the characterization of the experimental boundary conditions to enable precise numeric reproduction of the experimental results. The general capabilities of this new analytical tool for the investigation of reacting flows are demonstrated for a selected range of conditions, fuels, and applications. A detailed dataset for the well-known gaseous fuels, methane and ethylene, is provided and used to verify the experimental approach. Furthermore, application for liquid fuels and fuel components important for technical combustors like gas turbines and engines is demonstrated. Besides the detailed investigation of novel fuels and fuel components, the wide range of operation conditions gives access to extended combustion topics, such as super rich conditions at high temperature important for gasification processes, or the peroxy chemistry governing the low temperature oxidation regime. These demonstrations are accompanied by a first kinetic modeling approach, examining the opportunities for model validation purposes.

  12. A new small modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor plant concept based on proven technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Goodjohn, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the established and proven high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technologies from the Peach Bottom 1 and Fort St. Vrain utility-operated units, a new small modular HTGR reactor is currently being evaluated. The basic nuclear reactor heat source, with a prismatic core, is being designed so that the decay heat can be removed by passive means (i.e., natural circulation). Although this concept is still in the preconceptual design stage, emphasis is being placed on establishing an inherently safe or benign concept which, when engineered, will have acceptable capital cost and power generation economics. The proposed new HTGR concept has a variety of applications, including electrical power generation, cogeneration, and high-temperature process heat. This paper discusses the simplest application, i.e., a steam Rankine cycle electrical power generating version. The gas-cooled modular reactor concepts presented are based on a graphite moderated prismatic core of low-power density (i.e., 4.1 W/cm 3 ) with a thermal rating of 250 MW(t). With the potential for inherently safe characteristics, a new small reactor could be sited close to industrial and urban areas to provide electrical power and thermal heating needs (i.e., district and space heating). Incorporating a multiplicity of small modular units to provide a larger power output is also discussed. The potential for a small, inherently safe HTGR reactor concept is highlighted

  13. Preliminary study on application of Pd composite membrane in helium purification system of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianhua; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie; Yu Suyuan

    2008-01-01

    Helium purification system (HPS) is the main part of the helium auxiliary system of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR), also in fusion reactors. Some exploratory work was carried out on the application of Pd composite membrane in the separation of He and H 2 . A typical single stripper permeator with recycle (SSP) system was designed, based on the design parameters of a small scale He purification test system CIGNE in CADARACHE, CEA, France, and finite element analysis method was used to solve the model. The total length of membrane module is fixed to 0.5 m. The results show that the concentration of H 2 is found to reduce from 1 000 μL/L in feed gas to 5 μL/L in the product He (the upper limitation of HPS in HTGR). And the molar ratio of product He to feed gas is 96.18% with the optimized ratio of sweep gas to retentive gas 0. 3970. It's an exponential distribution of H 2 concentration along the membrane module. The results were also compared with the other two popular designs, two stripper in series permeator (TSSP) and continuous membrane column (CMC). (authors)

  14. Performance of candidate gas turbine abradeable seal materials in high temperature combustion atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, N.J. [Cranfield University, Power Generation Technology Centre, Cranfield, Beds, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Norton, J.F. [Cranfield University, Power Generation Technology Centre, Cranfield, Beds, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Consultant in Corrosion Science and Technology, Hemel Hempstead, Herts HP1 1SR (United Kingdom); McColvin, G. [Siemens Industrial Turbines Ltd., Lincoln, LN5 7FD (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    The development of abradeable gas turbine seals for higher temperature duties has been the target of an EU-funded R and D project, ADSEALS, with the aim of moving towards seals that can withstand surface temperatures as high as {proportional_to} 1100 C for periods of at least 24,000 h. The ADSEALS project has investigated the manufacturing and performance of a number of alternative materials for the traditional honeycomb seal design and novel alternative designs. This paper reports results from two series of exposure tests carried out to evaluate the oxidation performance of the seal structures in combustion gases and under thermal cycling conditions. These investigations formed one part of the evaluation of seal materials that has been carried out within the ADSEALS project. The first series of three tests, carried out for screening purposes, exposed candidate abradeable seal materials to a simulated natural gas combustion environment at temperatures within the range 1050-1150 C in controlled atmosphere furnaces for periods of up to {proportional_to} 2,500 h with fifteen thermal cycles. The samples were thermally cycled to room temperature on a weekly basis to enable the progress of the degradation to be monitored by mass change and visual observation, as well as allowing samples to be exchanged at planned intervals. The honeycombs were manufactured from PM2000 and Haynes 214. The backing plates for the seal constructions were manufactured from Haynes 214. Some seals contained fillers or had been surface treated (e.g. aluminised). The second series of three tests were carried out in a natural gas fired ribbon furnace facility that allowed up to sixty samples of candidate seal structures (including honeycombs, hollow sphere structures and porous ceramics manufactured from an extended range of materials including Aluchrom YHf, PM2Hf, Haynes 230, IN738LC and MarM247) to be exposed simultaneously to a stream of hot combustion gas. In this case the samples were cooled

  15. Development status and operational features of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkleblack, R.K.

    1976-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the maturity of HTR-technology and to look out for possible technical problems, concerning introduction of large HTR power plants into the market. Further state and problems of introducing and closing the thorium fuel cycle is presented and judged. Finally, the state of development of advanced HTR-concepts for electricity production, the direct cycle HTR with helium turbine, and the gas-cooled fast breeder is discussed. In preparing the study, both HTR concepts with spherical and block-type fuel elements have been considered

  16. Detailed analysis for a control rod worth of the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Tetsuo; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Yan, Xing; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    GTHTR300 is composed of a simplified and economical power plant based on an inherent safe 600 MWt reactor and a nearly 50% high efficiency gas turbine power conversion cycle. GTHTR300 core consist of annular fuel region, center and outer side reflectors because of cooling it effectively in depressurized accident conditions, and all control rods are located in both side reflectors of annular core. As a thermal neutron spectrum is strongly distorted in reflector regions, an accurate calculation is especially required for the control rod worth evaluation. In this study, we applied the detailed Monte Carlo calculations of a full core model, and confirmed that our design method has enough accuracy. (author)

  17. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR): long term program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The FY 1980 effort was to investigate four technology options identified by program participants as potentially viable candidates for near-term demonstration: the Gas Turbine system (HTGR-GT), reflecting its perceived compatibility with the dry-cooling market, two systems addressing the process heat market, the Reforming (HTGR-R) and Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC) systems, and a more developmental reactor system, The Nuclear Heat Source Demonstration Reactor (NHSDR), which was to serve as a basis for both the HTGR-GT and HTGR-R systems as well as the further potential for developing advanced applications such as steam-coal gasification and water splitting

  18. A possible origin of EL6 chondrites from a high temperature-high pressure solar gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blander, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Unger, L. [Purdue Univ., Westiville, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Pelton, A.; Eriksson, G. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering

    1994-05-01

    Condensates from a gas of ``solar`` composition were calculated to investigate the origins of EL6 chondrites using a free energy minimization program with a data base for the thermodynamic properties of multicomponent molten silicates as well as for other liquids solids, solid solutions and gaseous species. Because of high volatility of silicon and silica, the high silicon content of metal (2.6 mole %) can only be produced at pressures 10{sup {minus}2} atm at temperatures above 1475 K. At 100--500 atm, a liquid silicate phase crystallizes at a temperature where the silicon content of the metal, ferrosilite content of the enstatite and albite concentration in the plagioclase are close to measured values. In pyrometallurgy, liquid silicates are catalysts for reactions in which Si-O-Si bridging bonds are broken or formed. Thus, one attractive mode for freezing in the compositions of these three phases is disappearance of fluxing liquid. If the plagioclase can continue to react with the nebula without a liquid phase, lower pressures of 10{sup {minus}1} to 1 atm might be possible. Even if the nebula is more reducing than a solar gas, the measured properties of EL6 chondrites might be reconciled with only slightly lower pressures (less than 3X lower). The temperatures would be about the same as indicated in our calculations since the product of the silicon content of the metal and the square of the ferrosilite content of the enstatite constitute a cosmothermometer for the mineral assemblage in EL6 chondrites.

  19. FACTORS INFLUENCING HUMAN RELIABILITY OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS COOLED REACTOR OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Santoso

    2016-10-01

    ABSTRAK Peran dan tindakan operator pada reaktor berpendingin gas akan berbeda dengan peran operator pada operasi tipe reaktor lain. Analisis unjuk kerja operator dan faktor yang berpengaruh dapat dilakukan secara komprehensif melalui analisis keandalan manusia(HRA. Melalui HRA dampak dari kesalahan manusia pada sistem maupun cara untuk mengurangi dampak dan frekuensi kesalahan dapat diketahui. Makalah membahas faktor yang berpengaruh pada tindakan operator, yaitu pada kejadian kecelakaan pendingin reaktor gas bersuhu tinggi-HTGR. Analisis untuk kualifikasi faktor pembentuk kinerja(PSF dilakukan berdasarkan kurva keandalan fungsi waktu, dan metode keandalan manusia yang dikembangkan berdasar pada aspek kognitif yaitu Cognitive Reliability and Error Analysis Method (CREAM. Hasil analisis berdasar kurva keandalan fungsi waktu menunjukkan komponen waktu berkontribusi positif pada peningkatan keandalan operator (PSF<1 pada kondisi semua fitur keselamatan berfungsi sesuai rancangan. Sedangkan pada metoda analisis dengan pendekatan kognitif CREAM diketahui selain faktor ketersediaan waktu, faktor pelatihan dan rancangan HMI juga berkontribusi meningkatkan keandalan operator. Faktor pembentuk kinerja keseluruhan diketahui sebesar 0,25 dengan faktor kontribusi positif dominan atau berpengaruh pada penurunan kesalahan manusia adalah ketersediaan waktu (PSF=0,01, dan faktor kontribusi negatif dominan adalah prosedur dan siklus kerja (PSF=5. Nilai PSF tersebut sebagai faktor pengali dalam perhitungan probabilitas kesalahan manusia. Analisis faktor pembentuk kinerja perlu dikembangkan pada skenario kejadian lain untuk selanjutnya digunakan untuk perhitungan dan analisis keandalan manusia yang komprehensif dan perancangan sistem interaksi manusia mesin di ruang kendali. Kata kunci: PSF, HTGR, operator, ruang kendali, keandalan manusia

  20. A systems CFD model of a packed bed high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Toit, C.G.; Rousseau, P.G.; Greyvenstein, G.P.; Landman, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The theoretical basis and conceptual formulation of a comprehensive reactor model to simulate the thermal-fluid phenomena of the PBMR reactor core and core structures is given. Through a rigorous analysis the fundamental equations are recast in a form that is suitable for incorporation in a systems CFD code. The formulation of the equations results in a collection of one-dimensional elements (models) that can be used to construct a comprehensive multi-dimensional network model of the reactor. The elements account for the pressure drop through the reactor; the convective heat transport by the gas; the convection heat transfer between the gas and the solids; the radiative, contact and convection heat transfer between the pebbles and the heat conduction in the pebbles. Results from the numerical model are compared with that of experiments conducted on the SANA facility covering a range of temperatures as well as two different fluids and different heating configurations. The good comparison obtained between the simulated and measured results show that the systems CFD approach sufficiently accounts for all of the important phenomena encountered in the quasi-steady natural convection driven flows that will prevail after critical events in a reactor. The fact that the computer simulation time for all of the simulations was less than three seconds on a standard notebook computer also indicates that the new model indeed achieves a fine balance between accuracy and simplicity. The new model can therefore be used with confidence and still allow quick integrated plant simulations. (authors)

  1. Gas sensing in 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengxue; Jiang, Chengbao; Wei, Su-huai

    2017-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered inorganic nanomaterials have attracted huge attention due to their unique electronic structures, as well as extraordinary physical and chemical properties for use in electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics, catalysts, energy generation and storage, and chemical sensors. Graphene and related layered inorganic analogues have shown great potential for gas-sensing applications because of their large specific surface areas and strong surface activities. This review aims to discuss the latest advancements in the 2D layered inorganic materials for gas sensors. We first elaborate the gas-sensing mechanisms and introduce various types of gas-sensing devices. Then, we describe the basic parameters and influence factors of the gas sensors to further enhance their performance. Moreover, we systematically present the current gas-sensing applications based on graphene, graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), functionalized GO or rGO, transition metal dichalcogenides, layered III-VI semiconductors, layered metal oxides, phosphorene, hexagonal boron nitride, etc. Finally, we conclude the future prospects of these layered inorganic materials in gas-sensing applications.

  2. Analysis on blow-down transient in water ingress accident of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Yanhua; Li, Fu; Shi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Water ingress into the primary circuit is generally recognized as one of the severe accidents with potential hazard to the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor, which will cause a positive reactivity introduction with the increase of steam density in reactor core to enhance neutron slowing-down, also the chemical corrosion of graphite fuel elements and the damage of reflector structure material. The increase of the primary pressure may result in the opening of the safety valves, consequently leading the release of radioactive isotopes and flammable water gas. The research on water ingress transient is significant for the verification of inherent safety characteristics of high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-PM), designed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, is exampled to be analyzed in this paper. The design basis accident (DBA) scenarios of double-ended guillotine break of single heat-exchange tube (steam generator heat-exchange tube rupture) are simulated by the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, and some key concerns which are relative to the amount of water into the reactor core during the blow-down transient are analyzed in detail. The results show that both of water mass and steam ratio of the fluid spouting from the broken heat-exchange tube are affected by break location, which will increase obviously with the broken location closing to the outlet of the heat-exchange tube. The double-ended guillotine rupture at the outlet of the heat-exchange will result more steam penetrates into the reactor core in the design basis accident of water ingress. The mass of water ingress will also be affected by the draining system. It is concluded that, with reasonable optimization on design to balance safety and economy, the total mass of water ingress into the primary circuit of reactor could be limited effectively to meet the safety requirements, and the pollution of

  3. Fission gas induced fuel swelling in low and medium burnup fuel during high temperature transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of light water reactor fuel elements under postulated accident conditions is being studied by the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Thermal Fuels Behavior Program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. As a part of this program, unirradiated and previously irradiated, pressurized-water-reactor type fuel rods were tested under power-cooling-mismatch (PCM) conditions in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). During these integral in-reactor experiments, film boiling was produced on the fuel rods which created high fuel and cladding temperatures. Fuel rod diameters increased in the film boiling region to a greater extent for irradiated rods than for unirradiated rods. The purpose of the study was to investigate and assess the fuel swelling which caused the fuel rod diameter increases and to evaluate the ability of an analytical code, the Gas Release and Swelling Subroutine - Steady-State and Transient (GRASS-SST), to predict the results

  4. Fission gas induced fuel swelling in low and medium burnup fuel during high temperature transients. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of light water reactor fuel elements under postulated accident conditions is being studied by the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Thermal Fuels Behavior Program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. As a part of this program, unirradiated and previously irradiated, pressurized-water-reactor type fuel rods were tested under power-cooling-mismatch (PCM) conditions in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). During these integral in-reactor experiments, film boiling was produced on the fuel rods which created high fuel and cladding temperatures. Fuel rod diameters increased in the film boiling region to a greater extent for irradiated rods than for unirradiated rods. The purpose of the study was to investigate and assess the fuel swelling which caused the fuel rod diameter increases and to evaluate the ability of an analytical code, the Gas Release and Swelling Subroutine - Steady-State and Transient (GRASS-SST), to predict the results.

  5. Design and simulation of resistive SOI CMOS micro-heaters for high temperature gas sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, T; Covington, J A; Udrea, F; Ali, S Z; Guha, P K; Gardner, J W

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the design of doped single crystal silicon (SCS) microhotplates for gas sensors. Resistive heaters are formed by an n+/p+ implantation into a Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) wafer with a post-CMOS deep reactive ion etch to remove the silicon substrate. Hence they are fully compatible with CMOS technologies and allows for the integration of associated drive/detection circuitry. 2D electro-thermal models have been constructed and the results of numerical simulations using FEMLAB[reg] are given. Simulations show these micro-hotplates can operate at temperatures of 500 deg. C with a drive voltage of only 5 V and a power consumption of less than 100 mW

  6. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  7. In Situ Apparatus to Study Gas-Metal Reactions and Wettability at High Temperatures for Hot-Dip Galvanizing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltsov, A.; Cornu, M.-J.; Scheid, J.

    2018-02-01

    The understanding of gas-metal reactions and related surface wettability at high temperatures is often limited due to the lack of in situ surface characterization. Ex situ transfers at low temperature between annealing furnace, wettability device, and analytical tools induce noticeable changes of surface composition distinct from the reality of the phenomena.Therefore, a high temperature wettability device was designed in order to allow in situ sample surface characterization by x-rays photoelectron spectroscopy after gas/metal and liquid metal/solid metal surface reactions. Such airless characterization rules out any contamination and oxidation of surfaces and reveals their real composition after heat treatment and chemical reaction. The device consists of two connected reactors, respectively, dedicated to annealing treatments and wettability measurements. Heat treatments are performed in an infrared lamp furnace in a well-controlled atmosphere conditions designed to reproduce gas-metal reactions occurring during the industrial recrystallization annealing of steels. Wetting experiments are carried out in dispensed drop configuration with the precise control of the deposited droplets kinetic energies. The spreading of drops is followed by a high-speed CCD video camera at 500-2000 frames/s in order to reach information at very low contact time. First trials have started to simulate phenomena occurring during recrystallization annealing and hot-dip galvanizing on polished pure Fe and FeAl8 wt.% samples. The results demonstrate real surface chemistry of steel samples after annealing when they are put in contact with liquid zinc alloy bath during hot-dip galvanizing. The wetting results are compared to literature data and coupled with the characterization of interfacial layers by FEG-Auger. It is fair to conclude that the results show the real interest of such in situ experimental setup for interfacial chemistry studies.

  8. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  9. Maintenance for power conversion system of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300). Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Takada, Shoji; Katanishi, Shoji; Yan, Xing; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    In order to be a suitable next generation nuclear power plant from reliable and economical points of view, it is necessary for GTHTR300 to have good maintenability and inspectability. Appropriate maintenance concept for the power conversion system of GTHTR300 consisting of a gas turbine, a compressor, a generator, a recuperator, a precooler and so on was studied based on results of the basic design of GTHTR300 in fiscal 2001. Considering degradation phenomena which could occur on each objective equipment, it is technically possible to reduce several maintenance items and extend maintenance interval for some equipment compared to those for existing LWR power plants and combined cycle fossil power plants. But owing to structural feature and installed location of each equipment, and fission product plate-out on each equipment, it became clear that some problems must be solved for making the maintenance works realistic and efficient. Solving the problems and confirming appropriateness of the proposed maintenance concept and plans will be done in coming detailing work of GTHTR300 design. (author)

  10. Testing and analyses of a high temperature thermal barrier for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Betts, W.S.; Felten, P.

    1979-01-01

    A full size, multi-panel section of a thermal barrier system was fabricated from a nickel-base superalloy and a combination of fibrous blanket insulation materials for specific application in a steam cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The 2.4 m square array was representative of the sidewall of the lower core outlet plenum and included coverplates, attachments, seals, and a simulated water-cooled liner. Testing was conducted in a reactor grade, helium-filled chamber at 816 0 C for 100 hours, which established a normal (baseline) condition; 982 0 C for 10 hours, which satisfied an emergency condition; 1093 0 C for 1 hour, which simulated a faulted condition; and 1260 0 C, which was a non-design condition test to demonstrate the temperature overshoot capability of the system. Post-test examination indicated: (1) an acceptable performance by the anti-friction chromium carbide (Cr 3 C 2 ) coating; (2) no significant galling between non-coated surfaces; (3) no distortion of attachment fixtures; (4) predictable coverplate deflection during the design conditions testing (normal, emergency, and faulted); and (5) considerable plastic deformation resulting from the near-incipient melting temperature. (orig.)

  11. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations.

  12. Steam generator materials performance in high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafey, J.E.; Roberts, D.I.

    1980-11-01

    This paper reviews the materials technology aspects of steam generators for HTGRs which feature a graphite-moderated, uranium-thorium, all-ceramic core and utilizes high-pressure helium as the primary coolant. The steam generators are exposed to gas-side temperatures approaching 760 0 C and produce superheated steam at 538 0 C and 16.5 MPa (2400 psi). The prototype Peach Bottom I 40-MW(e) HTGR was operated for 1349 EFPD over 7 years. Examination after decommissioning of the U-tube steam generators and other components showed the steam generators to be in very satisfactory condition. The 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain HTGR, now in the final stages of startup, has achieved 70% power and generated more than 1.5 x 10 6 MWh of electricity. The steam generators in this reactor are once-through units of helical configuration, requiring a number of new materials factors including creep-fatigue and water chemistry control. Current designs of larger HTGRs also feature steam generators of helical once-through design. Materials issues that are important in these designs include detailed consideration of time-dependent behavior of both base metals and welds, as required by current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code rules, evaluation of bimetallic weld behavior, evaluation of the properties of large forgings, etc

  13. Analysis of oxidised heavy paraffininc products by high temperature comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, H; Bekker, R; Beigley, J; Rohwer, E

    2017-08-04

    Heavy petroleum fractions are produced during crude and synthetic crude oil refining processes and they need to be upgraded to useable products to increase their market value. Usually these fractions are upgraded to fuel products by hydrocracking, hydroisomerization and hydrogenation processes. These fractions are also upgraded to other high value commercial products like lubricant oils and waxes by distillation, hydrogenation, and oxidation and/or blending. Oxidation of hydrogenated heavy paraffinic fractions produces high value products that contain a variety of oxygenates and the characterization of these heavy oxygenates is very important for the control of oxidation processes. Traditionally titrimetric procedures are used to monitor oxygenate formation, however, these titrimetric procedures are tedious and lack selectivity toward specific oxygenate classes in complex matrices. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) is a way of increasing peak capacity for the comprehensive analysis of complex samples. Other groups have used HT-GC×GC to extend the carbon number range attainable by GC×GC and have optimised HT-GC×GC parameters for the separation of aromatics, nitrogen-containing compounds as well as sulphur-containing compounds in heavy petroleum fractions. HT-GC×GC column combinations for the separation of oxygenates in oxidised heavy paraffinic fractions are optimised in this study. The advantages of the HT-GC×GC method in the monitoring of the oxidation reactions of heavy paraffinic fraction samples are illustrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations

  15. Treatment and Disposal of the Radioactive Graphite Waste of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) represent one of the Gen IV reactors in the future market, with efficient generation of energy and the supply of process heat at high temperature utilised in many industrial processes. HTGR development has been carried out within China’s National High Technology Research and Development Program. The first industrial demonstration HTGR of 200 MWe is under construction in Shandong Province China. HTGRs use ceramic-coated fuel particles that are strong and highly resistant to irradiation. Graphite is used as moderator and helium is used as coolant. The fuel particles and the graphite block in which they are imbedded can withstand very high temperature (up to ~1600℃). Graphite waste presents as the fuel element components of HTGR with up to 95% of the whole element beside the graphite blocks in the core. For example, a 200 MWe reactor could discharge about 90,000 fuel elements with 17 tonnes irradiated graphite included each year. The core of the HTGR in China consists of a pebble bed with spherical fuel elements. The UO 2 fuel kernel particles (0.5mm diameter) (triple-coated isotropic fuel particles) are coated by several layers including inner buffer layer with less dense pyrocarbon, dense pyro-carbon, SiC layer and outer layer of dense pyro-carbon, which can prevent the leaking of fission products (Fig. 1). Spherical fuel elements (60mm diameter) consist of a 50mm diameter inner zone and 5mm thick shell of fuel free zone [3]. The inner zone contains about 8300 triple-coated isotropic fuel particles of 0.92mm in diameter dispersed in the graphite matrix

  16. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes (1000 and 3000 MW(t)) and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950/sup 0/C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG.

  17. High temperature gas-cooled reactors - once-through fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The HTGR, because of a unique combination of design characteristics, is a resource-efficient and cost-effective reactor. In the HTGR, the low power density core, coated particle fuel design, and gas cooling combine to provide high neutron economy, fuel burnup and thermodynamic efficiency. The uranium resource requirements for the current MEU/Th cycle with annual refueling results in a 30-year net U 3 O 8 requirement of 4280 ST/GWe. The basic design of the HTGR refueling scheme, whereby only selected regions of the core need be accessible during each refueling, makes fuel utilization improvements through semi-annual refueling an acceptable alternative in terms of plant availability. This alternative reduces the 30-year U 3 O 8 requirement by about 9%. Additional resource utilization improvements of 10% could be realized by improved fuel management techniques. In addition to improvements achieved in reactor technology, uranium utilization can also be improved by reducing the U-235 content in the depleted uranium (tails) produced by the isotope separation facility. If the Advanced Isotope Separation Technology program, currently under development by the United States, results in a lowering of the tails assay from 0.20 w/o to 0.05 w/o the uranium feed requirement for MEU/Th cycles would be further reduced by 22%. A total improvement of 41% over the already relatively low 4280 ST/GWe net lifetime U 3 O 8 requirement would result in a 2525 ST/GWe 30-year yet U 3 O 8 requirement if all of the potential improvements were realized

  18. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes [1000 and 3000 MW(t)] and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950 0 C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950 0 C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG

  19. Electron Scattering Studies of Gas Phase Molecular Structure at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhorter, Richard J., Jr.

    A high precision counting electron diffraction study of the structure of gaseous sulfur dioxide as a function of temperature from 300(DEGREES) to 1000(DEGREES)K is presented. The results agree well with current theory, and yield insight into the effects of anharmonicity on molecular structure. Another aspect of molecular structure is the molecular charge density distribution. The difference (DELTA)(sigma) is between the electron scattering cross sections for the actual molecule and independent atom model (IAM) are a sensitive measure of the change in this distribution due to bond formation. These difference cross sections have been calculated using ab initio methods, and the results for a wide range of simple polyatomic molecules are presented. Such calculations are routinely done for a single, fixed molecular geometry, an approach which neglects the effects of the vibrational motion of real molecules. The effect of vibrational averaging is studied in detail for the three normal vibrational modes of H(,2)O in the ground state. The effects are small, lending credence to the practice of comparing cross sections calculated at a fixed geometry with inherently averaged experimental data. The efficacy of the standard formula used to account for vibrational averaging in the IAM is also examined. Finally, the nature of the ionic bond is probed with an experimental study of the structure of alkali chlorides, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl, in the gas phase. Temperatures from 840-960(DEGREES)K were required to achieve the necessary vapor pressures of approximately 0.01 torr. A planar rhombic structure for the dimer molecule is confirmed, with a fairly uniform decrease of the chlorine-alkali-chlorine angle as the alkalis increase in size. The experiment also yields information on the amount of dimer present in the vapor, and these results are compared with thermodynamic values.

  20. Nanogenerators for Self-Powered Gas Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhen; Shen, Qingqing; Sun, Xuhui

    2017-10-01

    Looking toward world technology trends over the next few decades, self-powered sensing networks are a key field of technological and economic driver for global industries. Since 2006, Zhong Lin Wang's group has proposed a novel concept of nanogenerators (NGs), including piezoelectric nanogenerator and triboelectric nanogenerator, which could convert a mechanical trigger into an electric output. Considering motion ubiquitously exists in the surrounding environment and for any most common materials used every day, NGs could be inherently served as an energy source for our daily increasing requirements or as one of self-powered environmental sensors. In this regard, by coupling the piezoelectric or triboelectric properties with semiconducting gas sensing characterization, a new research field of self-powered gas sensing has been proposed. Recent works have shown promising concept to realize NG-based self-powered gas sensors that are capable of detecting gas environment without the need of external power sources to activate the gas sensors or to actively generate a readout signal. Compared with conventional sensors, these self-powered gas sensors keep the approximate performance. Meanwhile, these sensors drastically reduce power consumption and additionally reduce the required space for integration, which are significantly suitable for the wearable devices. This paper gives a brief summary about the establishment and latest progress in the fundamental principle, updated progress and potential applications of NG-based self-powered gas sensing system. The development trend in this field is envisaged, and the basic configurations are also introduced.

  1. Evaluation for reasonableness of power conversion system concepts in the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minatsuki, I.; Mizokami, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual design study for the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300) was completed in 2004. In GTHTR300, SECO (Simple, Economical Competitiveness and Originality) is advocated as design philosophy in order to minimize technical and economical requirement. Furthermore the design of the GTHTR300 was developed with reflecting various view points from utilities, manufacturers and research organizations. In GTHTR300, the horizontal turbo machine rotor, the turbo machine in a separated vessel, the turbo machine with single rotor, the generator inside the power conversion vessel, and the power conversion system without inter-coolers were selected as major power conversion system concepts. This paper describes the investigation and analysis about the major concepts of GTHTR300 power conversion system in order to evaluate reasonableness of GTHTR300 design approach and acceptability with using experience and engineering knowledge of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., which were accumulated through the activities of HTGR-GT and HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) designing, manufacturing, fabricating and testing. From the result of the evaluation, it was concluded that the selection of each concept in GTHTR300 was reasonable as based on the original design philosophy SECO. As a conclusion, we expect the GTHTR300 to become one of the most promising concepts for commercialization in near future. (authors)

  2. Development of analytical code `ACCORD` for incore and plant dynamics of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Itakura, Hirofumi

    1996-11-01

    Safety demonstration test of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor will be carried out to demonstrate excellent safety features of a next generation High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). Analytical code for incore and plant dynamics is necessary to assess the results of the safety demonstration test and to perform a design and safety analysis of the next generation HTGR. Existing analytical code for incore and plant dynamics of the HTGR can analyze behavior of plant system for only several thousand seconds after an event occurrence. Simulator on site can analyze only behavior of specific plant system. The `ACCORD` code has been, therefore, developed to analyze the incore and plant dynamics of the HTGR. The followings are the major characteristics of this code. (1) Plant system can be analyzed for over several thousand seconds after an event occurrence by modeling the heat capacity of the core. (2) Incore and plant dynamics of any plant system can be analyzed by rearranging packages which simulate plant system components one by one. (3) Thermal hydraulics for each component can be analyzed by separating heat transfer calculation for component from fluid flow calculation for helium and pressurized water systems. The validity of the `ACCORD` code including models for nuclear calculation, heat transfer and fluid flow calculation, control system and safety protection system, was confirmed through cross checks with other available codes. (author)

  3. New concept of composite strengthening in Co-Re based alloys for high temperature applications in gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherji, D.; Roesler, J.; Fricke, T.; Schmitz, F. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (DE). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde (IfW); Piegert, S. [Siemens AG, Berlin (DE). Energy Sector (F PR GT EN)

    2010-07-01

    High temperature material development is mainly driven by gas turbine needs. Today, Ni-based superalloys are the dominant material class in the hot section of turbines. Material development will continue to push the maximum service temperature of Ni-superalloys upwards. However, this approach has a fundamental limit and can not be sustained indefinitely, as the Ni-superalloys are already used very close to their melting point. Within the frame work of a DFG Forschergruppe program (FOR 727) - ''Beyond Ni-base Superalloys'' - Co-Re based alloys are being developed as a new generation of high temperature materials that can be used at +100 C above single crystal Ni-superalloys. Along with other strengthening concepts, hardening by second phase is explored to develop a two phase composite alloy. With quaternary Co-Re-Cr-Ni alloys we demonstrate this development concept, where Co{sub 2}Re{sub 3}-type {sigma} phase is used in a novel way as the hardening phase. Thermodynamic calculation was used for designing model alloy compositions. (orig.)

  4. Development of analytical code 'ACCORD' for incore and plant dynamics of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Itakura, Hirofumi.

    1996-11-01

    Safety demonstration test of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor will be carried out to demonstrate excellent safety features of a next generation High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). Analytical code for incore and plant dynamics is necessary to assess the results of the safety demonstration test and to perform a design and safety analysis of the next generation HTGR. Existing analytical code for incore and plant dynamics of the HTGR can analyze behavior of plant system for only several thousand seconds after an event occurrence. Simulator on site can analyze only behavior of specific plant system. The 'ACCORD' code has been, therefore, developed to analyze the incore and plant dynamics of the HTGR. The followings are the major characteristics of this code. (1) Plant system can be analyzed for over several thousand seconds after an event occurrence by modeling the heat capacity of the core. (2) Incore and plant dynamics of any plant system can be analyzed by rearranging packages which simulate plant system components one by one. (3) Thermal hydraulics for each component can be analyzed by separating heat transfer calculation for component from fluid flow calculation for helium and pressurized water systems. The validity of the 'ACCORD' code including models for nuclear calculation, heat transfer and fluid flow calculation, control system and safety protection system, was confirmed through cross checks with other available codes. (author)

  5. Long-term creep behavior of high-temperature gas turbine materials under constant and variable stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granacher, J.; Preussler, T.

    1987-01-01

    Within the framework of the documented research project, extensive creep rupture tests were carried out with characteristic, high-temperature gas turbine materials for establishment of improved design data. In the range of the main application temperatures and in stress ranges down to application-relevant values the tests extended over a period of about 40,000 hours. In addition, long-term annealing tests were carried out in the most important temperature ranges for the measurement of the density-dependent straim, which almost always manifested itself as a material contraction. Furthermore, hot tensile tests were carried out for the description of the elastoplastic short-term behavior. Several creep curves were derived from the results of the different tests with a differentiated evaluation method. On the basis of these creep curves, creep equations were set up for a series of materials which are valid in the entire examined temperature range and stress range and up to the end of the secondary creep range. Also, equations for the time-temperature-dependent description of the material contraction behavior were derived. With these equations, the high-temperature deformation behavior of the examined materials under constant creep stress can be described simply and application-oriented. (orig.) With 109 figs., 19 tabs., 77 refs [de

  6. On-Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (∼ 1-mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4%-10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  7. The design, safety and project development status of the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mears, L.D.; Dean, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The cooperative government and industry Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) Program in the United States has advanced a 350 MW(t) plant design through the conceptual development stage. The system incorporates an annular core of prismatic fuel elements within a steel pressure vessel connected, in a side-by-side arrangement, by a concentric duct to a second steel vessel containing a steam generator and helium coolant circulator. The reference plant design consists of four reactor modules installed in separate below-grade silos, providing steam to two conventional turbine generators. The nominal net plant output is 540 MW(e). The small reactor system takes unique advantage of the high temperature capability of the refractory coated fuel and the large thermal inertia of the graphite moderator to provide a design capable of withstanding a complete loss of active core cooling without causing excessive core heatup and significant release of fission products from the fuel. Present program activities are concentrated on interactions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission aimed at obtaining a Licensability Statement. A project initiative to build a prototype plant which would demonstrate the MHTGR-unique licensing process, plant performance, costs and schedule plus establish an industrial infrastructure to proceed with follow-on commercial MHTGR plants by the turn of the century, is being undertaken by the utility/vendor participants (author)

  8. Proposed master-slave and automated remote handling system for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel refabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, J.G.

    1974-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thorium-Uranium Recycle Facility (TURF) will be used to develop High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel recycle technology which can be applied to future HTGR commercial fuel recycling plants. To achieve recycle capabilities it is necessary to develop an effective material handling system to remotely transport equipment and materials and to perform maintenance tasks within a hot cell facility. The TURF facility includes hot cells which contain remote material handling equipment. To extend the capabilities of this equipment, the development of a master-slave manipulator and a 3D-TV system is necessary. Additional work entails the development of computer controls to provide: automatic execution of tasks, automatic traverse of material handling equipment, automatic 3D-TV camera sighting, and computer monitoring of in-cell equipment positions to prevent accidental collisions. A prototype system which will be used in the development of the above capabilities is presented. (U.S.)

  9. Development of advanced fabrication technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel. Reduction of coating failure fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Fukuda, Kousaku; Tobita, Tsutomu; Yoshimuta, Sigeharu; Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Tomimoto, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Kazuhisa; Oda, Takafumi

    1998-11-01

    The advanced fabrication technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel has been developed to reduce the coating failure fraction of the fuel particles, which leads to an improvement of the reactor safety. The present report reviews the results of the relevant work. The mechanisms of the coating failure of the fuel particles during coating and compaction processes of the fuel fabrication were studied to determine a way to reduce the coating failure fraction of the fuel. The coating process was improved by optimizing the mode of the particle fluidization and by developing the process without unloading and loading of the particles at intermediate coating process. The compaction process was improved by optimizing the combination of the pressing temperature and the pressing speed of the overcoated particles. Through these modifications of the fabrication process, the quality of the fuel was improved outstandingly. (author)

  10. Magnitude and reactivity consequences of accidental moisture ingress into the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, O.L.

    1992-01-01

    Accidental admission of moisture into the primary system of a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) has been identified in US Department of Energy-sponsored studies as an important safety concern. The work described here develops an analytical methodology to quantify the pressure and reactivity consequences of steam-generator tube rupture and other moistureingress-related incidents. Important neutronic and thermohydraulic processes are coupled with reactivity feedback and safety and control system responses. Rate and magnitude of steam buildup are found to be dominated by major system features such as break size in comparison with safety valve capacity and reliability, while being less sensitive to factors such as heat transfer coefficients. The results indicate that ingress transients progress at a slower pace than previously predicted by bounding analyses, with milder power overshoots and more time for operator or automatic corrective actions

  11. Magnitude and reactivity consequences of moisture ingress into the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, O.L.

    1992-12-01

    Inadvertent admission of moisture into the primary system of a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor has been identified in US Department of Energy-sponsored studies as an important safety concern. The work described here develops an analytical methodology to quantify the pressure and reactivity consequences of steam-generator tube rupture and other moisture-ingress-related incidents. Important neutronic and thermohydraulic processes are coupled with reactivity feedback and safety and control system responses. The rate and magnitude of steam buildup are found to be dominated by major system features such as break size compared with safety valve capacity and reliability and less sensitive to factors such as heat transfer coefficients. The results indicate that ingress transients progress at a slower pace than previously predicted by bounding analyses, with milder power overshoots and more time for operator or automatic corrective actions

  12. Study on introduction scenario of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor hydrogen cogeneration system (GTHTR300C). Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Tetsuo; Takeda, Tetsuaki

    2005-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is carrying out the research and development of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor hydrogen cogeneration system (GTHTR300C) aiming at the practical use around 2030. Preconditions of GTHTR300C introduction are the increase of hydrogen demand and the needs of new nuclear power plants. In order to establish the introduction scenario, it should be clarified that the operational status of existing nuclear power plants, the introduction number of fuel cell vehicles as a main user of hydrogen and the capability of hydrogen supply by existing plants. In this report, estimation of the nuclear power plants that will be decommissioned with a high possibility by 2030 and selection of the model district where the GTHTR300C can be introduced as an alternative system are conducted. Then the hydrogen demand and the capability of hydrogen supply in this district are investigated and the hydrogen supply scenario in 2030 is considered. (author)

  13. Mechanical characterization of metallic materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors in air and in helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainfort, G.; Cappelaere, M.; Gregoire, J.; Sannier, J.

    1984-01-01

    In the French R and D program for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), three metallic alloys were studied: steel Chromesco-3 with 2.25% chromium, alloy 800H, and Hastelloy-X. The Chromesco-3 and alloy 800H creep behavior is the same in air and in HTGR atmosphere (helium). The tensile tests of Hastelloy-X specimens reveal that aging has embrittlement and hardening effects up to 700 0 C, but the creep tests at 800 0 C show opposite effects. This particular behavior could be due to induced precipitation by aging and the depletion of hardening elements from the matrix. Tests show a low influence of cobalt content on mechanical properties of Hastelloy-X

  14. MORECA: A computer code for simulating modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core heatup accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.

    1991-10-01

    The design features of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) have the potential to make it essentially invulnerable to damage from postulated core heatup accidents. This report describes the ORNL MORECA code, which was developed for analyzing postulated long-term core heatup scenarios for which active cooling systems used to remove afterheat following the accidents can be assumed to the unavailable. Simulations of long-term loss-of-forced-convection accidents, both with and without depressurization of the primary coolant, have shown that maximum core temperatures stay below the point at which any significant fuel failures and fission product releases are expected. Sensitivity studies also have been done to determine the effects of errors in the predictions due both to uncertainties in the modeling and to the assumptions about operational parameters. MORECA models the US Department of Energy reference design of a standard MHTGR

  15. DELIGHT-B/REDEL, point reactivity burnup code for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Ryuiti; Watanabe, Takashi.

    1977-03-01

    Code DELIGHT-2 was previously developed to analyze cell burnup characteristics and to produce few-group constants for core burnup calculation in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. In the code, burnup dependency of the burnable poison, boron-10, is considered with the homogeneous model of space. In actuality, however, the burnable poison is used as homogeneous rods or uniform rods of small granular poison and graphite, to control the reactivity and power distribution. Precise analysis of the burnup characteristics is thus difficult because of the heterogeneity due to the configuration of poison rods. In cell burnup calculation, the DELIGHT-B, which is a modification of DELIGHT-2, takes into consideration this heterogeneous effect. The auxiliary code REDEL, a reduction of DELIGHT-B, used in combination with 3 dimensional diffusion code CITATION, is for core burnup calculation with the macro-scopic cross section model. (auth.)

  16. A review of reactor physics uncertainties and validation requirements for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, A.M.; Lane, R.K.; Hettergott, E.; Lefler, W.

    1991-01-01

    The important, safety-related, physics parameters for the low-enriched Modular High-Temperature gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) such as control rod worth, shutdown margins, temperature coefficients, and reactivity worths, are considered, and estimates are presented of the uncertainties in the calculated values of these parameters. The basis for the uncertainty estimate in several of the important calculated parameters is reviewed, including the available experimental data used in obtaining these estimates. Based on this review, the additional experimental data needed to complete the validation of the methods used to calculate these parameters is presented. The role of benchmark calculations in validating MHTGR reactor physics data is also considered. (author). 10 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  17. A global model for gas cooled reactors for the Generation-4: application to the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limaiem, I.

    2006-12-01

    Gas cooled high temperature reactor (HTR) belongs to the new generation of nuclear power plants called Generation IV. The Generation IV gathers the entire future nuclear reactors concept with an effective deployment by 2050. The technological choices relating to the nature of the fuel, the moderator and the coolant as well as the annular geometry of the core lead to some physical characteristics. The most important of these characteristics is the very strong thermal feedback in both active zone and the reflectors. Consequently, HTR physics study requires taking into account the strong coupling between neutronic and thermal hydraulics. The work achieved in this Phd consists in modeling, programming and studying of the neutronic and thermal hydraulics coupling system for block type gas cooled HTR. The coupling system uses a separate resolution of the neutronic and thermal hydraulics problems. The neutronic scheme is a double level Transport (APOLLO2) /Diffusion (CRONOS2) scheme respectively on the scale of the fuel assembly and a reactor core scale. The thermal hydraulics model uses simplified Navier Stokes equations solved in homogeneous porous media in code CAST3M CFD code. A generic homogenization model is used to calculate the thermal hydraulics parameters of the porous media. A de-homogenization model ensures the link between the porous media temperatures of the temperature defined in the neutronic model. The coupling system is made by external procedures communicating between the thermal hydraulics and neutronic computer codes. This Phd thesis contributed to the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) physics studies. In this field, we studied the VHTR core in normal operating mode. The studies concern the VHTR core equilibrium cycle with the control rods and using the neutronic and thermal hydraulics coupling system. These studies allowed the study of the equilibrium between the power, the temperature and Xenon. These studies open new perspective for core

  18. Development status on hydrogen production technology using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at JAEA, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Shusaku; Ogawa, Masuro; Hino, Ryutaro

    2006-01-01

    The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which is graphite-moderated and helium-cooled, is attractive due to its unique capability of producing high temperature helium gas and its fully inherent reactor safety. In particular, hydrogen production using the nuclear heat from HTGR (up to 900 deg. C) offers one of the most promising technological solutions to curb the rising level of CO 2 emission and resulting risk of climate change. The interests in HTGR as an advanced nuclear power source for the next generation reactor, therefore, continue to rise. This is represented by the Japanese HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) Project and the Chinese HTR-10 Project, followed by the international Generation IV development program, US nuclear hydrogen initiative program, EU innovative HTR technology development program, etc. To enhance nuclear energy application to heat process industries, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has continued extensive efforts for development of hydrogen production system using the nuclear heat from HTGR in the framework of the HTTR Project. The HTTR Project has the objectives of establishing both HTGR technology and heat utilization technology. Using the HTTR constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA, reactor performance and safety demonstration tests have been conducted as planned. The reactor outlet temperature of 950 deg. C was successfully achieved in April 2004. For hydrogen production as heat utilization technology, R and D on thermo-chemical water splitting by the 'Iodine-Sulfur process' (IS process) has been conducted step by step. Proof of the basic IS process was made in 1997 on a lab-scale of hydrogen production of 1 L/h. In 2004, one-week continuous operation of the IS process was successfully demonstrated using a bench-scale apparatus with hydrogen production rate of 31 L/h. Further test using a pilot scale facility with greater hydrogen production rate of 10 - 30 m 3 /h is planned as

  19. Microstructure actuation and gas sensing by the Knudsen thermal force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strongrich, Andrew; Alexeenko, Alina, E-mail: alexeenk@purdue.edu [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    The generation of forces and moments on structures immersed in rarefied non-isothermal gas flows has received limited practical implementation since first being discovered over a century ago. The formation of significant thermal stresses requires both large thermal gradients and characteristic dimensions which are comparable to the gas molecular mean free path. For macroscopic geometries, this necessitates impractically high temperatures and very low pressures. At the microscale, however, these conditions are easily achieved, allowing the effects to be exploited, namely, for gas-property sensing and microstructure actuation. In this letter, we introduce and experimentally evaluate performance of a microelectromechanical in-plane Knudsen radiometric actuator, a self-contained device having Knudsen thermal force generation, sensing, and tuning mechanisms integrated onto the same platform. Sensitivity to ambient pressure, temperature gradient, as well as gas composition is demonstrated. Results are presented in terms of a non-dimensional force coefficient, allowing measurements to be directly compared to the previous experimental and computational data on out-of-plane cantilevered configurations.

  20. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  1. Gas erosion of impeller housing in the operation of a high-temperature, high-pressure helium circulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, J.P.; Heestand, R.L.; Young, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Three gas-bearing circulators are installed in series in a high-pressure, high-temperature loop to provide helium flow up to 0.47 m 3 /s at a total head of 78 kJ/kg. The design pressure is 10.7 MPa, and temperatures of 1000 0 C can be obtained in the test section. The inlet temperature to the circulators is limited to 450 0 C. During a routine examination of the circulator, deep V-shaped grooves were found in the stationary surface of this cavity. At the same time, a very fine, dark particulate was observed in crevices of the housing. At first it was assumed that the grooves were formed by particulate erosion; however, examination of the grooves and discussions with persons experienced with large circulator operation changed this opinion. Erosion caused by particulate is characteristically rounded on the bottom and has a greater width to depth aspect than the V-shaped grooves, which were observed. Analysis of the particulate indicated that it was essentially the material of the housing that had undergone reactions with impurities in the circulating gas. It was subsequently concluded that the impeller housing had not been heat treated in a sufficiently oxidizing atmosphere after machining to form an adherent oxide coating. This suboxide coating was eroded by the shear forces in the gas. The exposed layer of metal was then further oxidized by the impurities in the gas, and these layers of oxide were successively eroded to produce the grooves. This erosion problem was eliminated by machining a ring of the same material, heat treating it to form an adherent stable oxide, and bolting it in place in the cavity

  2. Experimental optimization of temperature distribution in the hot-gas duct through the installation of internals in the hot-gas plenum of a high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henssen, J.; Mauersberger, R.

    1990-01-01

    The flow conditions in the hot-gas plenum and in the adjacent hot-gas ducts and hot-gas pipes for the high-temperature reactor project PNP-1000 (nuclear process heat project for 1000 MW thermal output) have been examined experimentally. The experiments were performed in a closed loop in which the flow model to be analyzed, representing a 60deg sector of the core bottom of the PNP-1000 with connecting hot-gas piping and diverting arrangements, was installed. The model scale was approx. 1:5.6. The temperature and flow velocity distribution in the hot-gas duct was registered by means of 14 dual hot-wire flowmeters. Through structural changes and/or the installation of internals into the hot-gas plenum of the core bottom offering little flow resistance coolant gas temperature differentials produced in the core could be reduced to such an extent that a degree of mixture amounting to over 80% was achieved at the entrance of the connected heat exchanger systems. Thereby the desired goal of an adequate degree of mixture of the hot gas involving an acceptable pressure loss was reached. (orig.)

  3. Phenomena identification ranking table and knowledge base gaps and needs for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Potirniche, Gabriel; Rink, Karl

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. is developing a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP); also known as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The generic MHTGR is a graphite-moderated, gas-cooled reactor (GCR) of either a prismatic modular (block-type, PMR) or pebble-bed (PBR) core configuration. The pebble-bed design requires new attention with respect to neutronics, materials, thermal hydraulic, safety and licensing relative to the set of phenomena and engineering analyses associated with the current fleet of legacy LWRs. In fact, the relative knowledge and experiential base on gas reactors is small in comparison to the LWR. There is a dated body of knowledge from some 25+ years ago on GCRs; recently there is a renewed interest. Thus in the present design and development phase of the NGNP/VHTR, there are relevant thermohydraulic safety issues surrounding the MHTGR with issues impacting foremost the design review process. A common phenomena with respect to PMR and PBR core design, is that concerning 'graphite dust' and its interaction and transport with potential fission products (FP) that may be present within the graphite and subsequently in the primary system. The nature of the graphite and FPs, when circulated or transported in the primary, and possibly beyond, is of concern as potentially an relevant 'source term' (radionuclide inventory) of the MHTGR. Based on NUREG/CR-6944, Volumes 1-5, the author briefly describes the state-of-the art knowledge base on graphite dust and FP transport with respect to the anticipated design of the MHTGR. In addition, from the Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) developed in these reports we concurrently identify and describe 'gaps and needs' of the knowledge base. That is, we also present the knowledge base gaps and needs with respect to the following: 1) R and D needs relative to PIRTs, 2) (experimental) database needs relative to PIRTs, and 3) simulation and modeling

  4. Numerical prediction on turbulent heat transfer of a spacer ribbed fuel rod for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Kazuyuki

    1994-11-01

    The turbulent heat transfer of a fuel rod with three-dimensional trapezoidal spacer ribs for high temperature gas-cooled reactors was analyzed numerically using the k-ε turbulence model, and investigated experimentally using a simulated fuel rod under the helium gas condition of a maximum outlet temperature of 1000degC and pressure of 4MPa. From the experimental results, it found that the turbulent heat transfer coefficients of the fuel rod were 18 to 80% higher than those of a concentric smooth annulus at a region of Reynolds number exceeding 2000. On the other hand, the predicted average Nusselt number of the fuel rod agreed well with the heat transfer correlation obtained from the experimental data within a relative error of 10% with Reynolds number of more than 5000. It was verified that the numerical analysis results had sufficient accuracy. Furthermore, the numerical prediction could clarify quantitatively the effects of the heat transfer augmentation by the spacer rib and the axial velocity increase due to a reduction in the annular channel cross-section. (author)

  5. Adsorption removal of carbon dioxide from the helium coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varezhin, A.V.; Fedoseenkov, A.N.; Khrulev, A.A.; Metlik, I.V.; Zel venskii, Y.D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper conducts experiments on the removal of CO 2 from helium by means of a Soviet-made adsorbent under the conditions characteristic of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cleaning systems. The adsorption of CO 2 from helium was studied under dynamic conditions with a fixed layer of adsorbent in a flow-through apparatus with an adsorber 16 mm in diameter. The analysis of the helium was carried out by means of a TVT chromatograph. In order to compare the adsorption of CO 2 on CaA zeolite under dynamic conditions from the helium stream under pressure with the equilibrium adsorption on the basis of pure CO 2 , the authors determined the adsorption isotherm at 293 K by the volumetric method over a range of CO 2 equilibrium pressures from 260 to 11,970 Pa. Reducing the adsorption temperature to 273 K leads to a considerable reduction in the energy costs for regeneration, owing to the increase in adsorption and the decrease in the number of regeneration cycles; the amount of the heating gas used is reduced to less than half

  6. Tritium permeation behavior through pyrolytic carbon in tritium production using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor for fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ushida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Under tritium production method using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor loaded Li compound, Li compound has to be coated by ceramic materials in order to suppress the spreading of tritium to the whole reactor. Pyrolytic carbon (PyC is a candidate of the coating material because of its high resistance for gas permeation. In this study, hydrogen permeation experiments using a PyC-coated isotropic graphite tube were conducted and hydrogen diffusivity, solubility and permeability were evaluated. Tritium permeation behavior through PyC-coated Li compound particles was simulated by using obtained data. Hydrogen permeation flux through PyC in a steady state is proportional to the hydrogen pressure and is larger than that through Al2O3 which is also candidate coating material. However, total tritium leak within the supposed reactor operation period through the PyC-coated Li compound particles is lower than that through the Al2O3-coated ones because the hydrogen absorption capacity in PyC is considerably larger than that in Al2O3.

  7. Study on nuclear analysis method for high temperature gas-cooled reactor and its nuclear design (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru

    2015-03-01

    An appropriate configuration of fuel and reactivity control equipment in a nuclear reactor core, which allows the design of the nuclear reactor core for low cost and high performance, is performed by nuclear design with high accuracy. The accuracy of nuclear design depends on a nuclear data library and a nuclear analysis method. Additionally, it is one of the most important issues for the nuclear design of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) that an insertion depth of control rods into the reactor core should be retained shallow by reducing excess reactivity with a different method to keep fuel temperature below its limitation thorough a burn-up period. In this study, using experimental data of the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is a Japan's HTGR with 30 MW of thermal power, the following issues were investigated: applicability of nuclear data libraries to nuclear analysis for HTGRs; applicability of the improved nuclear analysis method for HTGRs; and effectiveness of a rod-type burnable poison on HTGR reactivity control. A nuclear design of a small-sized HTGR with 50 MW of thermal power (HTR50S) was performed using these results. In the nuclear design of the HTR50S, we challenged to decrease the kinds of the fuel enrichments and to increase the power density compared with the HTTR. As a result, the nuclear design was completed successfully by reducing the kinds of the fuel enrichment to only three from twelve of the HTTR and increasing the power density by 1.4 times as much as that of the HTTR. (author)

  8. Study on the conversion of H2 and CO from the helium carrier gas of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Cuiping; Zheng Zhenhong; Shi Fuen

    1995-01-01

    The conversions of hydrogen and carbon monoxide into water vapor and carbon dioxide on CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 catalyst are studied. The effects of different temperature, system atmospheric pressure, impurity gas concentration, flow and dew point on properties of cupric oxide bed are investigated. The conversion characteristics curves of H 2 and CO are given. Experimental data of conversion capacity, action period and conversion efficiency of CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 are obtained and the optimal parameters are determined. The results show that the concentration of H 2 and CO of the effluent gas after purification can reach below 2 x 10 -6 , respectively. So it can meet the demands of high temperature gas-cooled reactor and also provide optimal design parameters and reliable data for conversion of H 2 and CO on CuO-ZnO-Al 2 O 3 catalyst

  9. Study on the adsorption of H2O and CO2 from the carrier gas of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Cuiping; Zheng Zhenhong; Shi Fuen; Zhou Dasen

    1998-01-01

    The author is focused on the experimental studies of the adsorption of moisture and carbon dioxide from the carrier gas of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). A suitable adsorbent--5A type molecular sieve spherical particles with an average diameter of 3 mm is chosen to purify the carrier gas with impurities of moisture and carbon dioxide. Experimental data at different concentration, flow rate, adsorptive temperature, pressure and bed depth are obtained from isothermal adsorption tests in order to examine the effects of these parameters on adsorption dynamic and for the optimal parameters selection of adsorption process. Experimental breakthrough curves, dynamic single component and multicomponent adsorption curves are obtained. The outlet concentration of H 2 O and CO 2 can reach below 1.0 x 10 -5 , so this purification system can meet the demands of HTGR

  10. Gas erosion of impeller housing in the operation of a high-temperature, high-pressure helium circulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, J.P.; Heestand, R.L.; Young, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Three gas-bearing circulators are installed in series in a high-pressure, high-temperature loop to provide helium flow up to 0.47 m 3 /s at a total head of 78 kJ/kg. The design pressure is 10.7 MPa, and temperatures of 1000 deg. C can be obtained in the test section. The inlet temperature to the circulators is limited to 450 deg. C. The 200-kW motor for each circulator is enclosed in the pressure boundary, and the motor is cooled by circulating the gas within the cavity over a water-cooled coil. The full operating speed is 23,500 rpm. A full-flow filter, absolute for particulate above 10 μm, is installed upstream of the circulator to protect the gas bearing surfaces. The minimum clearances between these surfaces during operation are in the range of 15 to 30 μm. During a routine examination of the circulator, deep V-shaped grooves were found in the stationary surface of this cavity. At the same time, a very fine, dark particulate was observed in crevices of the housing. At first it was assumed that the grooves were formed by particulate erosion; however, examination of the grooves and discussions with persons experienced with large circulator operation changed this opinion. Erosion caused by particulate is characteristically rounded on the bottom and has a greater width to depth aspect than the V-shaped grooves, which were observed. Analysis of the particulate indicated that it was essentially the material of the housing that had undergone reactions with impurities in the circulating gas. It was subsequently concluded that the impeller housing had not been heat treated in a sufficiently oxidizing atmosphere after machining to form an adherent oxide coating. This suboxide coating was eroded by the shear forces in the gas. The exposed layer of metal was then further oxidized by the impurities in the gas, and these layers of oxide were successively eroded to produce the grooves. This erosion problem was eliminated by machining a ring of the same material, heat

  11. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION FROM COAL-DERIVED GAS STREAMS; F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Douglas Way; Robert L. McCormick

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances have shown that Pd-Cu composite membranes are not susceptible to the mechanical, embrittlement, and poisoning problems that have prevented widespread industrial use of Pd for high temperature H(sub 2) separation. These membranes consist of a thin ((approx)10(micro)m) film of metal deposited on the inner surface of a porous metal or ceramic tube. Based on preliminary results, thin Pd(sub 60)Cu(sub 40) films are expected to exhibit hydrogen flux up to ten times larger than commercial polymer membranes for H(sub 2) separation, and resist poisoning by H(sub 2)S and other sulfur compounds typical of coal gas. Similar Pd-membranes have been operated at temperatures as high as 750 C. The overall objective of the proposed project is to demonstrate the feasibility of using sequential electroless plating to fabricate Pd(sub 60)Cu(sub 40) alloy membranes on porous supports for H(sub 2) separation. These following advantages of these membranes for processing of coal-derived gas will be demonstrated: High H(sub 2) flux; Sulfur tolerant, even at very high total sulfur levels (1000 ppm); Operation at temperatures well above 500 C; and Resistance to embrittlement and degradation by thermal cycling. The proposed research plan is designed to providing a fundamental understanding of: Factors important in membrane fabrication; Optimization of membrane structure and composition; Effect of temperature, pressure, and gas composition on H(sub 2) flux and membrane selectivity; and How this membrane technology can be integrated in coal gasification-fuel cell systems

  12. Analysis and description of the long-term creep behaviour of high-temperature gas turbine materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, H.

    1985-01-01

    On a series of standard high-temperature gas turbine materials, creep tests were accomplished with the aim to obtain improved data on the long-term creep behaviour. The tests were carried out in the range of the main application temperatures of the materials and in the range of low stresses and elongations similar to operation conditions. They lasted about 5000 to 16000 h at maximum. At all important temperatures additional annealing tests lasting up to about 10000 h were carried out for the determination of a material-induced structure contraction. Thermal tension tests were effected for the description of elastoplastic short-time behaviour. As typical selection of materials the nickel investment casting alloys IN-738 LC, IN-939 and Udimet 500 for industrial turbine blades, IN-100 for aviation turbine blades and IN-713 C for integrally cast wheels of exhaust gas turbochargers were investigated, and also the nickel forge alloy Inconel 718 for industrial and aviation turbine disks and Nimonic 101 for industrial turbine blades and finally the cobalt alloy FSC 414 for guide blades and heat accumulation segments of industrial gas turbines. The creep tests were started on long-period individual creep testing machines with high strain measuring accuracy and economically continued on long-period multispecimen creep testing machines with long duration of test. The test results of this mixed test method were first subjected to a conventional evaluation in logarithmic time yield and creep diagrams which besides creep strength curves provided creep stress limit curves down to 0.2% residual strain. (orig./MM) [de

  13. Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn Scates

    2010-10-01

    A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

  14. A novel nuclear combined power and cooling system integrating high temperature gas-cooled reactor with ammonia–water cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Chending; Zhao, Fuqiang; Zhang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a novel nuclear ammonia–water power and cooling cogeneration system. • The high temperature reactor is inherently safe, with exhaust heat fully recovered. • The thermal performances are improved compared with nuclear combined cycle. • The base case attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%. • Energy conservation and emission reduction are achieved in this cogeneration way. - Abstract: A nuclear ammonia–water power and refrigeration cogeneration system (NAPR) has been proposed and analyzed in this paper. It consists of a closed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) topping Brayton cycle and a modified ammonia water power/refrigeration combined bottoming cycle (APR). The HTGR is an inherently safe reactor, and thus could be stable, flexible and suitable for various energy supply situation, and its exhaust heat is fully recovered by the mixture of ammonia and water in the bottoming cycle. To reduce exergy losses and enhance outputs, the ammonia concentrations of the bottoming cycle working fluid are optimized in both power and refrigeration processes. With the HTGR of 200 MW thermal capacity and 900 °C/70 bar reactor-core-outlet helium, the system achieves 88.8 MW net electrical output and 9.27 MW refrigeration capacity, and also attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%, which are higher by 5.3%-points and 2.6%-points as compared with the nuclear combined cycle (NCC, like a conventional gas/steam power-only combined cycle while the topping cycle is a closed HTGR Brayton cycle) with the same nuclear energy input. Compared with conventional separate power and refrigeration generation systems, the fossil fuel saving (based on CH 4 ) and CO 2 emission reduction of base-case NAPR could reach ∼9.66 × 10 4 t/y and ∼26.6 × 10 4 t/y, respectively. The system integration accomplishes the safe and high-efficiency utilization of nuclear energy by power and refrigeration

  15. Detailed Reaction Kinetics for CFD Modeling of Nuclear Fuel Pellet Coating for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, Francine

    2008-01-01

    The research project was related to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and was in direct alignment with advancing knowledge in the area of Nuclear Fuel Development related to the use of TRISO fuels for high-temperature reactors. The importance of properly coating nuclear fuel pellets received a renewed interest for the safe production of nuclear power to help meet the energy requirements of the United States. High-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors use fuel in the form of coated uranium particles, and it is the coating process that was of importance to this project. The coating process requires four coating layers to retain radioactive fission products from escaping into the environment. The first layer consists of porous carbon and serves as a buffer layer to attenuate the fission and accommodate the fuel kernel swelling. The second (inner) layer is of pyrocarbon and provides protection from fission products and supports the third layer, which is silicon carbide. The final (outer) layer is also pyrocarbon and provides a bonding surface and protective barrier for the entire pellet. The coating procedures for the silicon carbide and the outer pyrocarbon layers require knowledge of the detailed kinetics of the reaction processes in the gas phase and at the surfaces where the particles interact with the reactor walls. The intent of this project was to acquire detailed information on the reaction kinetics for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of carbon and silicon carbine on uranium fuel pellets, including the location of transition state structures, evaluation of the associated activation energies, and the use of these activation energies in the prediction of reaction rate constants. After the detailed reaction kinetics were determined, the reactions were implemented and tested in a computational fluid dynamics model, MFIX. The intention was to find a reduced mechanism set to reduce the computational time for a simulation, while still providing accurate results

  16. Dragon project reference design assessment study for a 528 MW (E) thorium cycle high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosegood, S.B.

    1967-05-01

    The report presents an assessment of the feasibility, safety and cost of a large nuclear power station employing a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. A thermal output 1250 MW was chosen for the study, resulting in a net electrical output of 528.34 MW from a single reactor station, or 1056.7 MW from a twin reactor station. A reference design has been developed and is described. The reactor uses a U-235/Th-232/U-233 fuel cycle, on a feed and breed basis. It is believed that such a reactor could be built at an early date, requiring only a relatively modest development programme. Building costs are estimated to be Pound46.66/kW for a single unit station and Pound42.6/kW for a twin station, with power generation costs of 1.67p/kWh and 1.50p/kWh respectively. Optimisation studies have not been carried out and it should be possible to improve on the costs. The design has been made as flexible as possible to allow units of smaller or larger outputs to be designed with a minimum of change. (U.K.)

  17. Output feedback dissipation control for the power-level of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Because of its strong inherent safety features and the high outlet temperature, the modular high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (MHTGR) is the chosen technology for a new generation of nuclear power plants. Such power plants are being considered for industrial applications with a wide range of power levels, thus power-level regulation is very important for their efficient and stable operation. Exploiting the large scale asymptotic closed-loop stability provided by nonlinear controllers, a nonlinear power-level regulator is presented in this paper that is based upon both the techniques of feedback dissipation and well-established backstepping. The virtue of this control strategy, i.e., the ability of globally asymptotic stabilization, is that it takes advantage of the inherent zero-state detectability property of the MHTGR dynamics. Moreover, this newly built power-level regulator is also robust towards modeling uncertainty in the control rod dynamics. If modeling uncertainty of the control rod dynamics is small enough to be omitted, then this control law can be simplified to a classical proportional feedback controller. The comparison of the control performance between the newly-built power controller and the simplified controller is also given through numerical study and theoretical analysis. (author)

  18. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, C.P. 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  19. Externally fired gas turbine cycles with high temperature heat exchangers utilising Fe-based ODS alloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, F.; Svensson, S.-A.; Duncan, R.

    2001-01-01

    This work is part of the BRITE / EuRAM Project 'Development of Torsional Grain Structures to Improve Biaxial Creep Performance of Fe-based ODS Alloy Tubing for Biomass Power Plant'. The main goal of this project is to heat exchanger tubes working at 1100 o C and above. The paper deals with design implications of a biomass power plant, using an indirectly fired gas turbine with a high temperature heat exchanger containing Fe-based ODS alloy tubing. In the current heat exchanger design, ODS alloy tubing is used in a radiant section, using a bayonet type tube arrangement. This enables the use of straight sections of ODS tubing and reduces the amount of material required. In order to assess the potential of the power plant system, thermodynamic calculations have been conducted. Both co-generation and condensing applications are studied and results so far indicate that the electrical efficiency is high, compared to values reached by conventional steam cycle power plants of the same size (approx. 5 MW e ). (author)

  20. Output Feedback Dissipation Control for the Power-Level of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of its strong inherent safety features and the high outlet temperature, the modular high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (MHTGR is the chosen technology for a new generation of nuclear power plants. Such power plants are being considered for industrial applications with a wide range of power levels, thus power-level regulation is very important for their efficient and stable operation. Exploiting the large scale asymptotic closed-loop stability provided by nonlinear controllers, a nonlinear power-level regulator is presented in this paper that is based upon both the techniques of feedback dissipation and well-established backstepping. The virtue of this control strategy, i.e., the ability of globally asymptotic stabilization, is that it takes advantage of the inherent zero-state detectability property of the MHTGR dynamics. Moreover, this newly built power-level regulator is also robust towards modeling uncertainty in the control rod dynamics. If modeling uncertainty of the control rod dynamics is small enough to be omitted, then this control law can be simplified to a classical proportional feedback controller. The comparison of the control performance between the newly-built power controller and the simplified controller is also given through numerical study and theoretical analysis.

  1. Experimental investigation on feasibility of two-region-designed pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xingtuan; Hu Wenping; Jiang Shengyao

    2009-01-01

    Phenomenological experiments were performed on a 2-dimensional scaled model of the two-region designed pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core consisting of the distinct fuel pebble region and graphite pebble region. Issues with respect to the feasibility of the two-region design, including the establishment of the two-region arrangement, the mixing zone between the two regions, and the stagnant zone existence, were investigated. Three equilibrium conditions were proposed to evaluate the stable two-region arrangement formation. The general characteristics of the flow of the pebble bed were analyzed on basis of the observed phenomenon. It was found that a stable two-region arrangement was formed under the experimental conditions: the pebbles' motion was to some extent random but also confined by the neighbors of pebbles so that the mixing zone is constrained to a reasonable size. Guide plates utilized to improve mixing are proved to be effective without noticeable effect on the two-region arrangement features. Stagnant zones were observed under the experimental conditions and they were expected to be avoided by improving the design of the experimental setup. (author)

  2. Research activities on high temperature gas-cooled rectors (HTRs) in the fifth EURATOM RTD framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Bermejo, J.; Hugon, M.

    2001-01-01

    One of the areas of research of the nuclear fission key action of the Fifth EURATOM RTD Framework Programme (FP5) is safety and efficiency of future systems, which has as an objective to investigate and evaluate new or revisited concepts for nuclear energy that offer potential longer-term benefits in terms of cost, safety, waste management, use of fissile material, less risk of diversion and sustainability. After the first call for proposals of FP5, several projects related to high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) were retained by the European Commission (EC) services. They address important issues such as HTR fuel technology, HTR fuel cycle and HTR materials. In the next call for proposals (deadline January 2001) the EC expects other important HTR-related items not covered by the first call (e.g. power conversion systems and system analysis) to be addressed. The EC also expects proposals for strategy studies and/or thematic networks on the assessment of applications of nuclear energy other than generation of electricity via hydrogen production. (authors)

  3. Software Project Management Plan for the Integrated Systems Code (ISC) of New Production Reactor -- Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.

    1990-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) as one of the concepts for the New Production Reactor (NPR). DOE has also established several Technical Working Groups (TWG's) at the national laboratories to provide independent design confirmation of the NPR-MHTGR design. One of those TWG's is concerned with Thermal Fluid Flow (TFF) and analysis methods to provide independent design confirmation of the NPR-MHTGR. Analysis methods are also needed for operational safety evaluations, performance monitoring, sensitivity studies, and operator training. The TFF Program Plan includes, as one of its principal tasks, the development of a computer program (called the Integrated Systems Code, or ISC). This program will provide the needed long-term analysis capabilities for the MHTGR and its subsystems. This document presents the project management plan for development of the ISC. It includes the associated quality assurance tasks, and the schedule and resource requirements to complete these activities. The document conforms to the format of ANSI/IEEE Std. 1058.1-1987. 2 figs

  4. An Artificial Neural Network Compensated Output Feedback Power-Level Control for Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Small modular reactors (SMRs could be beneficial in providing electricity power safely and also be viable for applications such as seawater desalination and heat production. Due to its inherent safety features, the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR has been seen as one of the best candidates for building SMR-based nuclear power plants. Since the MHTGR dynamics display high nonlinearity and parameter uncertainty, it is necessary to develop a nonlinear adaptive power-level control law which is not only beneficial to the safe, stable, efficient and autonomous operation of the MHTGR, but also easy to implement practically. In this paper, based on the concept of shifted-ectropy and the physically-based control design approach, it is proved theoretically that the simple proportional-differential (PD output-feedback power-level control can provide asymptotic closed-loop stability. Then, based on the strong approximation capability of the multi-layer perceptron (MLP artificial neural network (ANN, a compensator is established to suppress the negative influence caused by system parameter uncertainty. It is also proved that the MLP-compensated PD power-level control law constituted by an experientially-tuned PD regulator and this MLP-based compensator can guarantee bounded closed-loop stability. Numerical simulation results not only verify the theoretical results, but also illustrate the high performance of this MLP-compensated PD power-level controller in suppressing the oscillation of process variables caused by system parameter uncertainty.

  5. Automatic X-ray inspection for escaped coated particles in spherical fuel elements of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Min; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Hongsheng; Li, Ziqiang; Liu, Bing; Li, Xingdong; Meng, Fanyong

    2014-01-01

    As a core unit of HTGRs (high-temperature gas-cooled reactors), the quality of spherical fuel elements is directly related to the safety and reliability of HTGRs. In line with the design and performance requirements of the spherical fuel elements, no coated fuel particles are permitted to enter the fuel-free zone of a spherical fuel element. For fast and accurate detection of escaped coated fuel particles, X-ray DR (digital radiography) imaging with a step-by-step circular scanning trajectory was adopted for Chinese 10 MW HTGRs. The scanning parameters dominating the volume of the blind zones were optimized to ensure the missing detection of the escaped coated fuel particles is as low as possible. We proposed a dynamic calibration method for tracking the projection of the fuel-free zone accurately, instead of using a fuel-free zone mask of fixed size and position. After the projection data in the fuel-free zone were extracted, image and graphic processing methods were combined for automatic recognition of escaped coated fuel particles, and some practical inspection results were presented. - Highlights: • An X-ray DR imaging system for quality inspection of spherical fuel elements was introduced. • A method for optimizing the blind-zone-related scanning parameter was proposed. • A dynamic calibration method for tracking the fuel-free zone accurately was proposed. • Some inspection results of the disqualified spherical fuel elements with escaped coated fuel particles were presented

  6. ORTAP: a nuclear steam supply system simulation for the dynamic analysis of high temperature gas cooled reactor transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.C.; Hedrick, R.A.; Ball, S.J.; Delene, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    ORTAP was developed to predict the dynamic behavior of the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) Nuclear Steam Supply System for normal operational transients and postulated accident conditions. It was developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as an independent means of obtaining conservative predictions of the transient response of HTGRs over a wide range of conditions. The approach has been to build sufficient detail into the component models so that the coupling between the primary and secondary systems can be accurately represented and so that transients which cover a wide range of conditions can be simulated. System components which are modeled in ORTAP include the reactor core, a typical reheater and steam generator module, a typical helium circulator and circulator turbine and the turbine generator plant. The major plant control systems are also modeled. Normal operational transients which can be analyzed with ORTAP include reactor start-up and shutdown, normal and rapid load changes. Upset transients which can be analyzed with ORTAP include reactor trip, turbine trip and sudden reduction in feedwater flow. ORTAP has also been used to predict plant response to emergency or faulted conditions such as primary system depressurization, loss of primary coolant flow and uncontrolled removal of control poison from the reactor core

  7. Fuel Summary for Peach Bottom Unit 1 High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karel I. Kingrey

    2003-04-01

    This fuel summary report contains background and summary information for the Peach Bottom Unit 1, High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2. This report contains detailed information about the fuel in the two cores, the Peach Bottom Unit 1 operating history, nuclear parameters, physical and chemical characteristics, and shipping and storage canister related data. The data in this document have been compiled from a large number of sources and are not qualified beyond the qualification of the source documents. This report is intended to provide an overview of the existing data pertaining to spent fuel management and point to pertinent reference source documents. For design applications, the original source documentation must be used. While all referenced sources are available as records or controlled documents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), some of the sources were marked as informal or draft reports. This is noted where applicable. In some instances, source documents are not consistent. Where they are known, this document identifies those instances and provides clarification where possible. However, as stated above, this document has not been independently qualified and such clarifications are only included for information purposes. Some of the information in this summary is available in multiple source documents. An effort has been made to clearly identify at least one record document as the source for the information included in this report.

  8. Modeling and performance of the MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] reactor cavity cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1990-04-01

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) of the Modular High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy is designed to remove the nuclear afterheat passively in the event that neither the heat transport system nor the shutdown cooling circulator subsystem is available. A computer dynamic simulation for the physical and mathematical modeling of and RCCS is described here. Two conclusions can be made form computations performed under the assumption of a uniform reactor vessel temperature. First, the heat transferred across the annulus from the reactor vessel and then to ambient conditions is very dependent on the surface emissivities of the reactor vessel and RCCS panels. These emissivities should be periodically checked to ensure the safety function of the RCCS. Second, the heat transfer from the reactor vessel is reduced by a maximum of 10% by the presence of steam at 1 atm in the reactor cavity annulus for an assumed constant in the transmission of radiant energy across the annulus can be expected to result in an increase in the reactor vessel temperature for the MHTGR. Further investigation of participating radiation media, including small particles, in the reactor cavity annulus is warranted. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  9. Low-cycle fatigue of heat-resistant alloys in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, H.; Kondo, T.

    1984-01-01

    Strain controlled low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted on four nickel-base heat-resistant alloys at 900 0 C in simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) environments and high vacuums of about 10 -6 Pa. The observed behaviors of the materials were different and divided into two groups when tests were made in simulated HTGR helium, while all materials behaved similarly in vacuums. The materials that have relatively high ductility and compatibility with impure helium at test temperature showed considerable resistance to the fatigue damage in impure helium. On the other hand, the alloys qualified with their high creep strength were seen to suffer from the adverse effects of impure helium and the trend of intergranular cracking as well. The results were analyzed in terms of their susceptibility to the environmentenhanced fatigue damage by examining the ratios of the performance in impure helium to in vacuum. The materials that showed rather unsatisfactory resistance were considered to be characterized by their limited ductility partly due to their coarse grain structure and susceptibility to intergranular oxidation. Moderate carburization was commonly noted in all materials, particularly at the cracked portions, indicating that carbon intrusion had occurred during the crack growth stage

  10. The materials programme for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in the Federal Republic of Germany: Status of the development of high-temperature materials, integrity concept, and design codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.; Bodmann, E.; Seehafer, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the last 15 years, the research and development of materials for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) applications in the Federal Republic of Germany have been concentrated on the qualification of high-temperature structural alloys. Such materials are required for heat exchanger components of advanced HTGRs supplying nuclear process heat in the temperature range between 750 deg. and 950 deg. C. The suitability of the candidate alloys for service in the HTGR has been established, and continuing research is aimed at verification of the integrity of components over the envisaged service lifetimes. The special features of the HTGR which provide a high degree of safety are the use of ceramics for the core construction and the low power density of the core. The reactor integrity concept which has been developed is based on these two characteristics. Previously, technical guidelines and design codes for nuclear plants were tailored exclusively to light water reactor systems. An extensive research project was therefore initiated which led to the formulation of the basic principles on which a high temperature design code can be based. (author)

  11. Laser hybrid brazing of oxide ceramics for high temperature gas sensing applications in (V)HTRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, F. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). Corporate Research and Advance Engineering; Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Chair of Hydrogen- and Nuclear Engineering; Rixecker, G. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). Corporate Research and Advance Engineering; Boerner, F.D.; Lippmann, W.; Hurtado, A. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Chair of Hydrogen- and Nuclear Engineering

    2009-07-01

    It has been shown that the use of halogen lamps to assist laser brazing reduces total energy and joining time. For parts with specific geometries not suitable for a rotation process, an assistive heating with halogen lamps might be even more beneficial, to alleviate temperature gradients and transients. Forsterite-based ceramics are highly suitable as a joining partner for ZrO{sub 2}, especially in a laser brazing process based on volume heating. By adding Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the raw powder mixture, the absorptivity of the forsterite ceramic can be tuned with an optimum at 0.1 wt.% Fe, reducing the necessary laser energy input even more. (orig.)

  12. Influence of heat treatment and indenter tip material on depth sensing hardness tests at high temperatures of fusion relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredl, Julian; Dany, Manuel; Albinski, Bartlomiej; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Kraft, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Operation of a custom-made indentation device designed for test temperatures up to 650 °C and a remote handled operation in a Hot Cell. • Instrumented indentation and conventional hardness testing of unirradiated MANET II and EUROFER. • Comparison of diamond and sapphire as indenter tip materials. - Abstract: The instrumented indentation is a suitable method for testing of even small neutron-irradiated specimens. From the continuously recorded indentation depth and the indentation force, it is possible to deduce mechanical parameters of the tested material. In this paper, a brief description of the high temperature device is given and representative results are presented. In the study, unirradiated steels are investigated by instrumented indentation at temperatures up to 500 °C. It is shown that the hardness is highly depending on the testing-temperature and can be correlated to the results of conventional tensile testing experiments. A not negligible influence of the indenter tip material is observed. The results show the functionality of the high-temperature indentation device.

  13. Influence of heat treatment and indenter tip material on depth sensing hardness tests at high temperatures of fusion relevant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredl, Julian, E-mail: julian.bredl@kit.edu; Dany, Manuel; Albinski, Bartlomiej; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Kraft, Oliver

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Operation of a custom-made indentation device designed for test temperatures up to 650 °C and a remote handled operation in a Hot Cell. • Instrumented indentation and conventional hardness testing of unirradiated MANET II and EUROFER. • Comparison of diamond and sapphire as indenter tip materials. - Abstract: The instrumented indentation is a suitable method for testing of even small neutron-irradiated specimens. From the continuously recorded indentation depth and the indentation force, it is possible to deduce mechanical parameters of the tested material. In this paper, a brief description of the high temperature device is given and representative results are presented. In the study, unirradiated steels are investigated by instrumented indentation at temperatures up to 500 °C. It is shown that the hardness is highly depending on the testing-temperature and can be correlated to the results of conventional tensile testing experiments. A not negligible influence of the indenter tip material is observed. The results show the functionality of the high-temperature indentation device.

  14. High temperature annealing effects on chromel (Ni90Cr10) thin films and interdiffusion study for sensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Arindom; Cheng Xudong; Miller, Michael A.; Li Xiaochun

    2008-01-01

    Metal embedded thin film thermocouples are very attractive for various applications in harsh environments. One promising technique to embed thin films micro sensors is diffusion bonding, which requires high temperatures and pressures typically in a vacuum. In this study, high temperature annealing effects on chromel (Ni90Cr10) thin film, an important sensor material as one of the components in type K thermocouple, were investigated in a diffusion bonding environment. Annealing was carried out at 800 deg. C for one hour in a diffusion bonder under vacuum without applying pressure. Under such conditions; surface, interface and interdiffusion phenomena were investigated using different characterization techniques including X-ray Diffraction, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. Results indicate that the present combination of dielectrics is quite reliable and Ni90Cr10 films of 500 nm thickness can be used for applications at least up to 800 deg. C due to a protective thin chromium oxide layer formation on top of the sensor film during annealing

  15. Status on the Component Models Developed in the Modelica Framework: High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis Plant & Gas Turbine Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk Kim, Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McKellar, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boardman, Richard D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This report has been prepared as part of an effort to design and build a modeling and simulation (M&S) framework to assess the economic viability of a nuclear-renewable hybrid energy system (N-R HES). In order to facilitate dynamic M&S of such an integrated system, research groups in multiple national laboratories have been developing various subsystems as dynamic physics-based components using the Modelica programming language. In fiscal year (FY) 2015, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed a dynamic analysis of two region-specific N-R HES configurations, including the gas-to-liquid (natural gas to Fischer-Tropsch synthetic fuel) and brackish water reverse osmosis desalination plants as industrial processes. In FY 2016, INL has developed two additional subsystems in the Modelica framework: a high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) plant and a gas turbine power plant (GTPP). HTSE has been proposed as a high priority industrial process to be integrated with a light water reactor (LWR) in an N-R HES. This integrated energy system would be capable of dynamically apportioning thermal and electrical energy (1) to provide responsive generation to the power grid and (2) to produce alternative industrial products (i.e., hydrogen and oxygen) without generating any greenhouse gases. A dynamic performance analysis of the LWR/HTSE integration case was carried out to evaluate the technical feasibility (load-following capability) and safety of such a system operating under highly variable conditions requiring flexible output. To support the dynamic analysis, the detailed dynamic model and control design of the HTSE process, which employs solid oxide electrolysis cells, have been developed to predict the process behavior over a large range of operating conditions. As first-generation N-R HES technology will be based on LWRs, which provide thermal energy at a relatively low temperature, complementary temperature-boosting technology was suggested for integration with the

  16. Saturated Adaptive Output-Feedback Power-Level Control for Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Small modular reactors (SMRs are those nuclear fission reactors with electrical output powers of less than 300 MWe. Due to its inherent safety features, the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR has been seen as one of the best candidates for building SMR-based nuclear plants with high safety-level and economical competitive power. Power-level control is crucial in providing grid-appropriation for all types of SMRs. Usually, there exists nonlinearity, parameter uncertainty and control input saturation in the SMR-based plant dynamics. Motivated by this, a novel saturated adaptive output-feedback power-level control of the MHTGR is proposed in this paper. This newly-built control law has the virtues of having relatively neat form, of being strong adaptive to parameter uncertainty and of being able to compensate control input saturation, which are given by constructing Lyapunov functions based upon the shifted-ectropies of neutron kinetics and reactor thermal-hydraulics, giving an online tuning algorithm for the controller parameters and proposing a control input saturation compensator respectively. It is proved theoretically that input-to-state stability (ISS can be guaranteed for the corresponding closed-loop system. In order to verify the theoretical results, this new control strategy is then applied to the large-range power maneuvering control for the MHTGR of the HTR-PM plant. Numerical simulation results show not only the relationship between regulating performance and control input saturation bound but also the feasibility of applying this saturated adaptive control law practically.

  17. Program for tests on magnetic bearing suspended rotor dynamics for gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Yan, Xing

    2003-01-01

    A program for test on rotor dynamics was planned for the turbo-machine of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The rotor system of the turbo-machine consists of a turbo-compressor rotor and a generator rotor connected with a flexible coupling, each suspended with two radial magnetic bearings. The rotors, which are flexible rotors, pass over the critical speeds of bending mode. The magnetic bearing is required to have a high load capacity, about 10 times larger than any built thus far to support a flexible rotor. In the rotor design, the standard limit of the vibration amplitude of 75 μm at the rated rotational speed of 3,600 rpm was fulfilled by optimizing the stiffness of the magnetic bearings. A test apparatus was designed to verify the design of the magnetic bearing suspended turbo-machine rotor of the GTHTR300. The test apparatus is composed of 1/3-scale test rotors, which are connected with a flexible coupling and driven by a variable speed motor. The test magnetic bearing was designed within the state-of-the-art technology to have a load capacity about 1/10 of that of the actual one. The test rotors were designed to closely simulate the critical speeds and vibration modes of the actual ones. This paper shows the test apparatus and the test plan for the magnetic bearing suspended rotor system. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  18. Evaluation, Comparison and Optimization of the Compact Recuperator for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Helium Turbine System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Haoran; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie; Ye Ping; Yu Xiaoli; Zhao Gang

    2014-01-01

    Helium turbine system is a promising method to covert the nuclear power generated by the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) into electricity with inherent safety, compact configuration and relative high efficiency. And the recuperator is one of the key components for the HTGR helium turbine system. It is used to recover the exhaust heat out of turbine and pass it to the helium from high pressure compressor, and hence increase the cycle’s efficiency dramatically. On the other hand, the pressure drop within the recuperator will reduce the cycle efficiency, especially on low pressure side of recuperator. It is necessary to optimize the design of recuperator to achieve better performance of HTGR helium turbine system. However, this optimization has to be performed with the restriction of the size of the pressure vessel which contains the power conversion unit. This paper firstly presents an analysis to investigate the effects of flow channel geometry, recuperator’s power and size on heat transfer and pressure drop. Then the relationship between the recuperator design and system performance is established with an analytical model, followed by the evaluations of the current recuperator designs of GT-MHR, GTHTR300 and PBMR, in which several effective technical measures to optimize the recuperator are compared. Finally it is found that the most important factors for optimizing recuperator design, i.e. the cross section dimensions and tortuosity of flow channel, which can also be extended to compact intermediate heat exchangers. It turns out that a proper optimization can increase the cycle’s efficiency by 1~2 percentage, which could also raise the economy and competitiveness of future commercial HTGR plants. (author)

  19. Effect of foundation embedment on the seismic response of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.H.; Thompson, R.W.; Charman, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of soil-structure interaction during seismic events upon the dynamic response of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor plant (HTGR) have been investigated for both surface-founded and embedded basemats. The influence from foundation embedment has been quantitatively assessed through a series of theoretical studies on plants of various sizes. The surface-founded analyses were performed using frequency-independent soil impedance parameters, while the embedded plant analyses utilized finite element models simulated on the FLUSH computer program. The seismic response of the surface-founded plants has been used to establish the standard-site design in-structure response spectra. These analyses were performed by using the linear modal formulation based on conventional soil stiffness and damping values. They serve as reference solutions to which the response data of the corresponding embedded plants are compared. In these comparison studies the responses of embedded plants were generally found to be lower than those of the corresponding surface-founded plants. Additional studies on the surface-founded plants have recently been performed by considering inelastic soil behavior. These inelastic solutions, which treat the soil as an elasto-plastic medium exhibiting hysteretic unloading-reloading characteristics in time, have reduced the response of surface-founded plants. Numerical results are presented in terms of in-structure response spectra along with other pertinent seismic load data at key levels of the plant. Analysis techniques for future studies using viscoelastic halfspace representation and inelastic finite element modeling for soil are also discussed

  20. Study on the nuclear heat application system with a high temperature gas-cooled reactor and its safety evaluation (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Yoshitomo

    2008-03-01

    Aiming at the realization of the nuclear heat application system with a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), research and development on the whole evaluation of the system, the connection technology between the HTGR and a chemical plant such as the safety evaluation against the fire and explosion and the control technology, and the vessel cooling system of the HTGR were carried out. In the whole evaluation of the nuclear heat application system, an ammonia production system using nuclear heat was examined, and the technical subjects caused by the connection of the chemical plant to the HTGR were distilled. After distilling the subjects, the safety evaluation method against the fire and explosion to the reactor, the mitigation technology of thermal disturbance to the reactor, and the reactor core cooling by the vessel cooling system were discussed. These subjects are very important in terms of safety. About the fire and explosion, the safety evaluation method was established by developing the process and the numerical analysis code system. About the mitigation technology of the thermal disturbance, it was demonstrated that the steam generator, which was installed at the downstream of the chemical reactor in the chemical plant, could mitigate the thermal disturbance to the reactor. In order to enhance the safety of the reactor in accidents, the heat transfer characteristic of the passive indirect core cooling system was investigated, and the heat transfer equation considering both thermal radiation and natural convection was developed for the system design. As a result, some technical subjects related to safety in the nuclear heat application system were solved. (author)

  1. Using high temperature gas-cooled reactors for energy neutral mineral development processes – A proposed IAEA Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneklaus, N.; Reitsma, F.; Tulsidas, H.; Dyck, G.; Koshy, T.; Tyobeka, B.; Schnug, E.; Allelein, H-J.; Birky, B.

    2014-01-01

    Today, uranium mined from various regions is the predominant reactor fuel of the present generation of nuclear power plants. The anticipated growth in nuclear energy may require introducing uranium/thorium from unconventional resources (e.g. phosphates, coal ash or sea water) as a future nuclear reactor fuel. The demand for mineral commodities is growing exponentially and high-grade, easily-extractable resources are being depleted rapidly. This shifts the global production to low-grade, or in certain cases unconventional mineral resources, the production of which is constrained by the availability of large amounts of energy. Numerous mining processes can benefit from the use of so-called “thermal processing”. This is in particular beneficial for (1) low grade deposits that cannot be treated using the presently dominant chemical processing techniques; (2) the extraction of high purity end products; and (3) the separation of high value or unwanted impurities (e.g. uranium, thorium, rare earths, etc.) that could be used/sold, when extracted, which will result in cleaner final products. The considerably lower waste products also make it attractive compared to chemical processing. In the future, we may need to extract nuclear fuel and minerals from the same unconventional resources to make nuclear fuel- and low grade ore processing feasible and cost-effective. These processes could be sustainable only if low-cost, carbon free, reliable energy is available for comprehensive extraction of all valuable commodities, for the entire life of the project. Nuclear power plants and specifically High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) can produce this energy and heat in a sustainable way, especially if enough uranium/thorium can be extracted to fuel these reactors.

  2. Study on simulation, control and online assistance integrated system of 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, S.; Shi, L.; Zhu, S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide a convenient tool for engineering designed, safety analysis, operator training and control system design of the high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR), an integrated system for simulation, control and online assistance of the HTR-10 has been designed and is still under development by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. The whole system is based on a network environment and includes three subsystems: the simulation subsystem (SIMUSUB), the visualized control designed subsystem (VCDSUB) and the online assistance subsystem (OASUB). The SIMUSUB consists of four parts: the simulation calculating server (SCS), the main control client (MCC), the data disposal client (DDC) and the results graphic display client (RGDC), all of which can communicate with each other via network. The SIMUSUB is intended to analyze and calculate the physical processes of the reactor core, the main loop system and the stream generator, etc., as well as to simulate the normal operation and transient accidents, and the result data can be graphically displayed through the RGDC dynamically. The VCDSUB provides a platform for control system modeling where the control flow systems can be automatically generated and graphically simulated. Based on the data from the field bus, the OASUB provides some of the reactor core parameter, which are difficult to measure. This whole system can be used as an educational tool to understand the design and operational characteristics of the HTR-10, and can also provide online supports for operators in the main control room, or as a convenient powerful tool for the control system design. (authors)

  3. Study on computer-aided control system design platform of 10MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan; Shi Lei; Sun Yuliang; Luo Shaojie

    2004-01-01

    the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR-10) is the first modular pebble bed reactor built in China, which needs to be researched on engineering design, control study, safety analysis and operator training. An integrated system for simulation, control design and online assistance of the HTR-10 (HTRSIMU) has been developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University. The HTRSIMU system is based on a high-speed local area network, on which a computer-aided control system design platform (CDP) is developed and combined with the simulating subsystem in order to provide a visualized and convenient tool for the HTR-10 control system design. The CDP has friendly man-machine interface and good expansibility, in which eighteen types of control items are integrated. These control items are divided into two types: linear and non-linear control items. The linear control items include Proportion, Integral, Differential, Inertial, Leed-lag, Oscillation, Pure-lag, Common, PID and Fuzzy, while the non-linear control items include Saturation, Subsection, Insensitive, Backlash, Relay, Insensi-Relay, Sluggish-Relay and Insens-Slug. The CDP provides a visualized platform for control system modeling and the control loop system can be automatically generated and graphically simulated. Users can conveniently design control loop, modify control parameters, study control method, and analyze control results just by clicking mouse buttons. This kind of control system design method can provide a powerful tool and good reference for the actual system operation for HTR-10. A control scheme is also given and studied to demonstrate the functions of the CDP in this article. (author)

  4. Stoichiometric effects on performance of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels from the U--C--O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Lindemer, T.B.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.; Beatty, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Two fuel failure mechanisms were identified for coated particle fuels that are directly related to fuel kernel stoichiometry. These mechanisms are thermal migration of the kernel through the coating layers and chemical interaction between rare-earth fission products and the silicon carbide (SiC) layer leading to failure of the SiC layer. Thermal migration appears to be most severe for oxide fuels, while chemical interaction is most severe with carbide systems. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that oxide-carbide fuel kernels may permit a stoichiometry that reduces both problems to manageable levels for currently planned high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Such stoichiometry adjustment is possible over the complete spectrum from UO 2 to UC 2 for the present recycle fuel, a weak acid resin (WAR)-derived fissile kernel. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that WAR kernels containing less than 15 percent UC 2 (greater than 85 percent UO 2 ) will develop excessive CO overpressures within the particle during irradiation. In 100 percent UO 2 particles, thermal migration and oxidation of the SiC layer were observed after irradiation. The calculations also indicate that WAR kernels containing greater than 70 percent UC 2 (less than 30 percent UC 2 ) contain insufficient oxygen to oxidize the rare-earth fission products formed in fuel operated to the maximum burnup levels of 75 percent fissions per initial metal atom (75 percent FIMA). Instead, the rare earths are present in part or completely as dicarbides. As such, they were observed to segregate from the kernel and collect at the SiC interface on the cold side of the particle, react with the SiC, and eventually fail this coating

  5. Preliminary analysis of compound systems based on high temperature fuel cell, gas turbine and Organic Rankine Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, D.; Muñoz de Escalona, J. M.; Monje, B.; Chacartegui, R.; Sánchez, T.

    This article presents a novel proposal for complex hybrid systems comprising high temperature fuel cells and thermal engines. In this case, the system is composed by a molten carbonate fuel cell with cascaded hot air turbine and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), a layout that is based on subsequent waste heat recovery for additional power production. The work will credit that it is possible to achieve 60% efficiency even if the fuel cell operates at atmospheric pressure. The first part of the analysis focuses on selecting the working fluid of the Organic Rankine Cycle. After a thermodynamic optimisation, toluene turns out to be the most efficient fluid in terms of cycle performance. However, it is also detected that the performance of the heat recovery vapour generator is equally important, what makes R245fa be the most interesting fluid due to its balanced thermal and HRVG efficiencies that yield the highest global bottoming cycle efficiency. When this fluid is employed in the compound system, conservative operating conditions permit achieving 60% global system efficiency, therefore accomplishing the initial objective set up in the work. A simultaneous optimisation of gas turbine (pressure ratio) and ORC (live vapour pressure) is then presented, to check if the previous results are improved or if the fluid of choice must be replaced. Eventually, even if system performance improves for some fluids, it is concluded that (i) R245fa is the most efficient fluid and (ii) the operating conditions considered in the previous analysis are still valid. The work concludes with an assessment about safety-related aspects of using hydrocarbons in the system. Flammability is studied, showing that R245fa is the most interesting fluid also in this regard due to its inert behaviour, as opposed to the other fluids under consideration all of which are highly flammable.

  6. Zeonex microstructured polymer optical fiber: fabrication friendly fibers for high temperature and humidity insensitive Bragg grating sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Fasano, Andrea; Markos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    In the quest of finding the ideal polymer optical fiber (POF) for Bragg grating sensing, we have fabricated and characterized an endlessly single mode microstructured POF (mPOF). This fiber is made from cyclo-olefin homopolymer Zeonex grade 480R which has a very high glass transition temperature...

  7. Capacitive Structures for Gas and Biological Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Sapsanis, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The semiconductor industry was benefited by the advances in technology in the last decades. This fact has an impact on the sensors field, where the simple transducer was evolved into smart miniaturized multi-functional microsystems. However, commercially available gas and biological sensors are mostly bulky, expensive, and power-hungry, which act as obstacles to mass use. The aim of this work is gas and biological sensing using capacitive structures. Capacitive sensors were selected due to its design simplicity, low fabrication cost, and no DC power consumption. In the first part, the dominant structure among interdigitated electrodes (IDEs), fractal curves (Peano and Hilbert) and Archimedean spiral was investigated from capacitance density perspective. The investigation consists of geometrical formula calculations, COMSOL Multiphysics simulations and cleanroom fabrication of the capacitors on a silicon substrate. Moreover, low-cost fabrication on flexible plastic PET substrate was conducted outside cleanroom with rapid prototyping using a maskless laser etching. The second part contains the humidity, Volatile Organic compounds (VOCs) and Ammonia sensing of polymers, Polyimide and Nafion, and metal-organic framework (MOF), Cu(bdc)2.xH2O using IDEs and tested in an automated gas setup for experiment control and data extraction. The last part includes the biological sensing of C - reactive protein (CRP) quantification, which is considered as a biomarker of being prone to cardiac diseases and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein quantification, which is used as a reference for quantifying unknown proteins.

  8. Review of the cost estimate and schedule for the 2240-MWt high-temperature gas-cooled reactor steam-cycle/cogeneration lead plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This report documents Bechtel's review of the cost estimate and schedule for the 2240 MWt High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (HTGR-SC/C) Lead Plant. The overall objective of the review is to verify that the 1982 update of the cost estimate and schedule for the Lead Plant are reasonable and consistent with current power plant experience

  9. Hydrogen production system based on high temperature gas cooled reactor energy using the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, L.; Gonzalez, D.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen production from water using nuclear energy offers one of the most attractive zero-emission energy strategies and the only one that is practical on a substantial scale. Recently, strong interest is seen in hydrogen production using heat of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The high-temperature characteristics of the modular helium reactor (MHR) make it a strong candidate for producing hydrogen using thermochemical or high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) processes. Eventually it could be also employ a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which is particularly attractive because it has unique capability, among potential future generation nuclear power options, to produce high-temperature heat ideally suited for nuclear-heated hydrogen production. Using heat from nuclear reactors to drive a sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production process has been interest of many laboratories in the world. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantity of hydrogen in an efficient way using the nuclear energy is the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Among the thermochemical cycles, the sulfur iodine process remains a very promising solution in matter of efficiency and cost. This work provides a pre-conceptual design description of a SI-Based H2-Nuclear Reactor plant. Software based on chemical process simulation (CPS) was used to simulate the thermochemical water splitting cycle Sulfur-Iodine for hydrogen production. (Author)

  10. Large-strain optical fiber sensing and real-time FEM updating of steel structures under the high temperature effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ying; Fang, Xia; Xiao, Hai; Bevans, Wesley James; Chen, Genda; Zhou, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Steel buildings are subjected to fire hazards during or immediately after a major earthquake. Under combined gravity and thermal loads, they have non-uniformly distributed stiffness and strength, and thus collapse progressively with large deformation. In this study, large-strain optical fiber sensors for high temperature applications and a temperature-dependent finite element model updating method are proposed for accurate prediction of structural behavior in real time. The optical fiber sensors can measure strains up to 10% at approximately 700 °C. Their measurements are in good agreement with those from strain gauges up to 0.5%. In comparison with the experimental results, the proposed model updating method can reduce the predicted strain errors from over 75% to below 20% at 800 °C. The minimum number of sensors in a fire zone that can properly characterize the vertical temperature distribution of heated air due to the gravity effect should be included in the proposed model updating scheme to achieve a predetermined simulation accuracy. (paper)

  11. High-temperature removal of sulphur for biogenic gas products; Hochtemperatur-Entschwefelung fuer biogene Produktgase. Design und Optimierung - Schlussbericht/Jahresbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schildhauer, T.; Biollaz, S.

    2009-12-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project concerning the development of basics ideas on the design and optimisation of high-temperature methods for the removal of sulphur from biogenic gas products. Tests made as part of the 'Methane from Wood' project at pilot installations in Switzerland and Austria are discussed. Low temperature and high-temperature methods are examined and discussed. A number of sulphur compounds were tested. Also, experiments made using nickel, HDS and CPO catalysers are discussed.

  12. Draft pre-application safety evaluation report for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.M.; King, T.L.; Wilson, J.N.

    1989-03-01

    This draft safety evaluation report (SER) presents the preliminary results of a pre-application design review for the standard modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) (Project 672). The MHTGR conceptual design was submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission(NRC) 'Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants' (51 FR 24643), which provides for early Commission review and interaction. The standard MHTGR consists of four identical reactor modules, each with a thermal output of 350 MWt, coupled with two steam turbine-generator sets to produce a total plant electrical output of 540 MWe. The reactors are helium cooled and graphite moderated and utilize ceramically coated particle-type nuclear fuel. The design includes passive reactor-shutdown and decay-heat-removal features. The staff and its contractors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Brookhaven National Laboratory have reviewed this design with emphasis on those unique provisions in the design that accomplish the key safety functions of reactor shutdown, decay-heat removal, and containment of radioactive material. This report presents the NRC staff's technical evaluation of those features in the MHTGR design important to safety, including their proposed research and testing needs. In addition this report presents the criteria proposed by the NRC staff to judge the acceptability of the MHTGR design and, where possible, includes statements on the potential of the MHTGR to meet these criteria. However, it should be recognized that final conclusions in all matters discussed in this report require approval by the Commission. Final determination on the acceptability of the MHTGR standard design is contingent on receipt and evaluation of additional information requested from DOE pertaining to the adequacy of the containment design and on the following: (1) satisfactory resolution of open safety issues identified

  13. Considerations in the development of safety requirements for innovative reactors: Application to modular high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    Member States of the IAEA have frequently requested this organization to assess, at the conceptual stage, the safety of the design of nuclear reactors that rely on a variety of technologies and are of a high degree of innovation. However, to date, for advanced and innovative reactors and for reactors with characteristics that are different from those of existing light water reactors, widely accepted design standards and rules do not exist. This TECDOC is an outcome of the efforts deployed by the IAEA to develop a general approach for assessing the safety of the design of advanced and innovative reactors, and of all reactors in general including research reactors, with characteristics that differ from those of light water reactors. This publication puts forward a method for safety assessment that is based on the well established and accepted principle of defence in depth. The need to develop a general approach for assessing the safety of the design of reactors that applies to all kinds of advanced reactors was emphasized by the request to the IAEA by South Africa to review the safety of the South African pebble bed modular reactor. This reactor, as other modular high temperature gas cooled reactors (MHTGRs), adopts very specific design features such as the use of coated particle fuel. The characteristics of the fuel deeply affect the design and the safety of the plant, thereby posing several challenges to traditional safety assessment methods and to the application of existing safety requirements that have been developed primarily for water reactors. In this TECDOC, the MHTGR has been selected as a case study to demonstrate the viability of the method proposed. The approach presented is based on an extended interpretation of the concept of defence in depth and its link with the general safety objectives and fundamental safety functions as set out in 'Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design', IAEA Safety Standards No. NS-R.1, issued by the IAEA in 2000. The objective

  14. Modeling and Application of Pneumatic Conveying for Spherical Fuel Element in Pebble-Bed Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shuyong; Wang Junsan; Wang Yuding; Cai Ruizhong; Zhang Xuan; Cao Jianting

    2014-01-01

    The fuel handling system is an important system for on-load refueling in pebble-bed modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. A dynamic model of pneumatic conveying for spherical fuel element in fuel handling system was established to describe the pneumatically conveying process. The motion characteristics of fuel elements in pipeline and the effect of fuel elements on gas velocity were studied using the model. The results show that the theoretical analyses are consistent with the experimental. The research has been used in developing full scope simulator for pebble-bed modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, also provides references for the design and optimization of the fuel handling system. (author)

  15. Report on evaluation of research and development of direct steel-making using high-temperature reducing gas. Phase 1. Draft; Koon kangen gas riyo ni yoru chokusetsu seitetsu no kenkyu kaihatsu (daiikki) ni kansuru hyoka hokokusho (an)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-01-01

    Described herein is development of direct steel-making using high-temperature reducing gas. A light hydrocarbon fraction (boiling point: 230 degrees C or lower), produced by steam cracking of vacuum residua, is reformed into a reducing gas in the presence of steam, using heat to be supplied by a nuclear plant which produces high-temperature gases for various purposes. This reducing gas is then supplied to a plant for producing reduced iron. This project has established basic techniques for designing, constructing and operating a direct steel-making pilot plant, to be connected to a 50 MWt high-temperature gas test furnace. The closed iron-making system and greatly reduced SOx emissions to several fractions of the current level are some of the expected effects. The environmental impacts of the high-temperature gas furnace will be on a level with those associated with a light-water reactor. Cracking and gasification of vacuum residua, which has found limited purposes so far, should expand its applicable areas and reduce dependence on fossil resources, leading to diversification of energy sources. The overall thermal efficiency of the high-temperature gas furnace is expected to increase to at least 60%, because its high-temperature gases of around 1,000 degrees C can be used for heating processes, and the waste heat can be further used for generation of steam for power production. (NEDO)

  16. 9th international conference on high-temperature reactors - coal and nuclear energy for electricity and gas generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The site of the high-temperatur reactor in the Ruhr region neighbouring on a coal-fired power plant is not accidental. The potential of the high-temperature reactor as a central plant element for the supply of heat for heating purposes and process heat covers also the possibility of coal gasification and liquefaction. Therefore the high-temperature reactor is, in the long term, a ray of hope for the coal region, able to compensate for the production-related competitive disadvantages of local coal. It can contribute to guaranteeing in the long term the task of German hard coal as an essential pillar of our energy supply. The VGB as a technical association of thermal power plant operators is particularly committed to the integration of coal and nuclear energy. Within the bounds of its possibilities, it will contribute to promoting the safe and environmentally beneficial generation of electricity from the two primary energy sources. (orig./DG) [de

  17. Novel High Temperature and Radiation Resistant Infrared Glasses and Optical Fibers for Sensing in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballato, John [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2018-01-22

    One binary and three series of ternary non-oxide pure sulfide glasses compositions were investigated with the goal of synthesizing new glasses that exhibit high glass transition (Tg) and crystallization (Tc) temperatures, infrared transparency, and reliable glass formability. The binary glass series consisted of Ges2 and La2S3 and the three glass series in the x(nBaS + mLa2S3) + (1-2x)GeS2 ternary system have BaS:La2S3 modifier ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 with . With these glasses, new insights were realized as to how ionic glasses form and how glass modifiers affect both structure and glass formability. All synthesized compositions were characterized by Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to better understand the fundamental structure, optical, and thermal characteristics of the glasses. After a range of these glasses were synthesized, optimal compositions were formed into glass disks and subjected to gamma irradiation. Glass disks were characterized both before and after irradiation by microscope imaging, measuring the refractive index, density, and UV-VIS-IR transmission spectra. The final total dose the samples were subjected to was ~2.5 MGy. Ternary samples showed a less than 0.4% change in density and refractive index and minimal change in transmission window. The glasses also resisted cracking as seen in microscope images. Overall, many glass compositions were developed that possess operating temperatures above 500 °C, where conventional chalcogenide glasses such as As2S3 and have Tgs from ~200-300 °C, and these glasses have a greater than Tc – Tg values larger than 100 °C and this shows that these glasses have good thermal stability of Tg such that they can be fabricated into optical fibers and as such can be considered candidates for high temperature infrared fiber optics. Initial fiber fabrication efforts showed that selected glasses could be drawn but larger

  18. A complementary and synergistic effect of Fe-Zn binary metal oxide in the process of high-temperature fuel gas desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁斯灏; 吴幼青

    1996-01-01

    57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to investigate the evolution of Fe-Zn binary metal oxide sorbent in the process of high-temperature fuel gas desulfurization. The results of phase analyses show that Fe-Zn binary metal oxide sorbent is rapidly reduced in hot fuel gas and decomposed to new phases of highly dispersed microcrystalline elemental iron and zinc oxide, both of which become the active desulfurization constituents. A complementary and synergistic effect between active iron acting as a high sulfur capacity constituent and active zinc oxide acting as a deep refining desulfurization constituent exists in this type of sorbent for hot fuel gas desulfurization.

  19. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.

    2013-01-01

    The PUMA project - the acronym stands for “Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors” - was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the Euratom 6th Framework (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO2-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR designs and their ability to accept a variety

  20. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Chauvet, V.; Cerullo, N.; Cetnar, J.; Abram, T.; Bakker, K.; Bomboni, E.; Bernnat, W.; Domanska, J.G.; Girardi, E.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Hesketh, K.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hossain, K.; Jonnet, J.; Kim, Y.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Kopec, M.; Murgatroyd, J.; Millington, D.; Lecarpentier, D.; Lomonaco, G.; McEachern, D.; Meier, A.; Mignanelli, M.; Nabielek, H.; Oppe, J.; Petrov, B.Y.; Pohl, C.; Ruetten, H.J.; Schihab, S.; Toury, G.; Trakas, C.; Venneri, F.; Verfondern, K.; Werner, H.; Wiss, T.; Zakova, J.

    2010-11-01

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO 2 -free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR designs and their ability to accept a

  1. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C., E-mail: kuijper@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Somers, J; Van Den Durpel, L; Chauvet, V; Cerullo, N; Cetnar, J; Abram, T; Bakker, K; Bomboni, E; Bernnat, W; Domanska, J G; Girardi, E; De Haas, J B.M.; Hesketh, K; Hiernaut, J P; Hossain, K; Jonnet, J; Kim, Y; Kloosterman, J L; Kopec, M; Murgatroyd, J; Millington, D; Lecarpentier, D; Lomonaco, G; McEachern, D; Meier, A; Mignanelli, M; Nabielek, H; Oppe, J; Petrov, B Y; Pohl, C; Ruetten, H J; Schihab, S; Toury, G; Trakas, C; Venneri, F; Verfondern, K; Werner, H; Wiss, T; Zakova, J

    2010-11-15

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO{sub 2}-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR designs and their ability to accept a

  2. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C., E-mail: kuijper@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Chauvet, V.; Cerullo, N.; Cetnar, J.; Abram, T.; Bakker, K.; Bomboni, E.; Bernnat, W.; Domanska, J.G.; Girardi, E.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Hesketh, K.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hossain, K.; Jonnet, J.; Kim, Y.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Kopec, M.; Murgatroyd, J.; Millington, D.; Lecarpentier, D.; Lomonaco, G.; McEachern, D.; Meier, A.; Mignanelli, M.; Nabielek, H.; Oppe, J.; Petrov, B.Y.; Pohl, C.; Ruetten, H.J.; Schihab, S.; Toury, G.; Trakas, C.; Venneri, F.; Verfondern, K.; Werner, H.; Wiss, T.; Zakova, J.

    2010-11-15

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO{sub 2}-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR

  3. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  4. Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckels, David E.; Hass, William J.

    1989-05-30

    A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses.

  5. Ultra Efficient CHHP Using a High Temperature Fuel Cell to Provide On-Site Process Reducing Gas, Clean Power, and Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnke, Fred C. [Fuelcell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2015-06-30

    FuelCell Energy and ACuPowder investigated and demonstrated the use of waste anode exhaust gas from a high temperature fuel cell for replacing the reducing gas in a metal processing furnace. Currently companies purchase high pressure or liquefied gases for the reducing gas which requires substantial energy in production, compression/liquefaction, and transportation, all of which is eliminated by on-site use of anode exhaust gas as reducing gas. We performed research on the impact of the gas composition on product quality and then demonstrated at FuelCell Energy’s manufacturing facility in Torrington, Connecticut. This demonstration project continues to operate even though the research program is completed as it provides substantial benefits to the manufacturing facility by supplying power, heat, and hydrogen.

  6. High-Temperature Structural Analysis of a Small-Scale PHE Prototype under the Test Condition of a Small-Scale Gas Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K.; Hong, S.; Park, H.

    2012-01-01

    A process heat exchanger (PHE) is a key component for transferring the high-temperature heat generated from a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) to a chemical reaction for the massive production of hydrogen. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has designed and assembled a small-scale nitrogen gas loop for a performance test on VHTR components and has manufactured a small-scale PHE prototype made of Hastelloy-X alloy. A performance test on the PHE prototype is underway in the gas loop, where different kinds of pipelines connecting to the PHE prototype are tested for reducing the thermal stress under the expansion of the PHE prototype. In this study, to evaluate the high-temperature structural integrity of the PHE prototype under the test condition of the gas loop, a realistic and effective boundary condition imposing the stiffness of the pipelines connected to the PHE prototype was suggested. An equivalent spring stiffness to reduce the thermal stress under the expansion of the PHE prototype was computed from the bending deformation and expansion of the pipelines connected to the PHE. A structural analysis on the PHE prototype was also carried out by imposing the suggested boundary condition. As a result of the analysis, the structural integrity of the PHE prototype seems to be maintained under the test condition of the gas loop.

  7. Reactor for tracking catalyst nanoparticles in liquid at high temperature under a high-pressure gas phase with X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2018-02-01

    Structure of catalyst nanoparticles dispersed in liquid phase at high temperature under gas phase of reactant(s) at higher pressure (≥5 bars) is important for fundamental understanding of catalytic reactions performed on these catalyst nanoparticles. Most structural characterizations of a catalyst performing catalysis in liquid at high temperature under gas phase at high pressure were performed in an ex situ condition in terms of characterizations before or after catalysis since, from technical point of view, access to the catalyst nanoparticles during catalysis in liquid phase at high temperature under high pressure reactant gas is challenging. Here we designed a reactor which allows us to perform structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy including X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to study catalyst nanoparticles under harsh catalysis conditions in terms of liquid up to 350 °C under gas phase with a pressure up to 50 bars. This reactor remains nanoparticles of a catalyst homogeneously dispersed in liquid during catalysis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization.

  8. Mechanical properties data of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel for the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo; Kikuyama, Toshihiko; Fukaya, Kiyoshi; Kodaira, Tsuneo

    1978-11-01

    This is a collection of mechanical properties data of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel necessary for structural design and safety analysis of the pressure vessel of the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR). These include physical properties, mechanical properties, temper embrittlement, creep with fatigue, fracture toughness and irradiation effects. A review of the data shows the research areas to be carried out particularly in the future for more data. (author)

  9. Co and Fe-catalysts supported on sepiolite: effects of preparation conditions on their catalytic behaviors in high temperature gas flow treatment of dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiangfeng; Fang, Jian; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Su, Chengyuan

    2016-08-01

    An efficient adsorbent/catalyst Co and Fe-catalysts loaded on sepiolite (Co-Fe/sepiolite) was successfully prepared for high temperature gas flow catalytic reaction by a simple impregnation method. The impact of preparation conditions (such as pH value of impregnation solution, impregnation time, calcination temperature, and time) on catalytic activity was studied. We found that the catalytic activity of Co-Fe/sepiolite was strongly influenced by all the investigated parameters. The regeneration efficiency (RE) was used to evaluate the catalytic activity. The RE is more noticeable at pH 5.0 of impregnation solution, impregnation time 18 h, calcination temperature 650 °C, and calcination time 3 h. This Co-Fe/sepiolite has great adsorption capacity in absorbing dye. It is used for an adsorbent to adsorb dye from wastewater solution under dynamic adsorption and saturated with dye, then regenerated with high temperature gas flow for adsorption/oxidation cycles. The Co-Fe/sepiolite acts as a catalyst to degrade the dye during regeneration under high temperature gas flow. Hence, the Co-Fe/sepiolite is not only an adsorbent but also a catalyst. The Co-Fe/sepiolite is more stable than sepiolite when applied in the treatment of plant's wastewater. The Co-Fe/sepiolite can be reused in adsorption-regeneration cycle. The results indicate the usability of the proposed combined process, dye adsorption on Co-Fe/sepiolite followed by the catalytic oxidation in high temperature gas flow.

  10. Thermal response of core and central-cavity components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in the absence of forced convection coolant flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, R.L.; Sanders, J.P.

    1976-09-01

    A means of determining the thermal responses of the core and the components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor after loss of forced coolant flow is discussed. A computer program, using a finite-difference technique, is presented together with a solution of the confined natural convection. The results obtained are reasonable and demonstrate that the computer program adequately represents the confined natural convection

  11. Some effects of gas adsorption on the high temperature volatile release behavior of a terrestrial basalt, tektite and lunar soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. G.; Muenow, D. W.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Mass pyrograms obtained from high-temperature, mass psectrometric pyrolysis of a glassy theoleiitic submarine basalt and a tektite, ground in air to less than 64 microns, have shown N2 and SO release patterns very similar to those from the pyrolysis of mature lunar soil fines. The N2 and CO release behavior from the terrestrial samples reproduces the biomodal, high-temperature (approximately 700 and 1050 C) features from the lunar samples. Unground portions of the basalt and tektite show no release of N2 and CO during pyrolysis. Grinding also alters the release behavior and absolute amounts of H2O and CO2. It is suggested that adsorption of atmospheric gases in addition to solar wind implantation of ions may account for the wide range of values in previously reported concentrations of carbon and nitrogen from lunar fines.

  12. The study on water ingress mass in the steam generator heat-exchange tube rupture accident of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Shi Lei; Li Fu; Zheng Yanhua

    2012-01-01

    The steam generator heat-exchange tube rupture (SGTR) accident is an important and particular accident which will result in water ingress to the primary loop of reactor. Water ingress will result in chemical reaction of graphite fuel and structure with water, which may cause overpressure due to generation of explosive gaseous in large quantity. The study on the water ingress accident is significant for the verification of the inherent characteristics of high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The previous research shows that the amount of water ingress mass is the dominant key factor on the severity of the accident consequence. The 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-PM), which is the first modular pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor in China designed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, is selected to be analyzed in this paper. The different DBA accident scenarios of double-ended break of single heat-exchange tube are simulated respectively by the thermal-hydraulic analysis code RETRAN-02. The results show the water ingress mass through the broken heat-exchange tube is related to the break location. The amount of water ingress mass is affected obviously by the capacity of the emptier system. With the balance of safety and economical efficiency, the amount of water ingress mass from the secondary side of steam generator into the primary coolant loop will be reduced by increasing properly the diameter of the draining lines. (authors)

  13. The strategic study of pebble model high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant with power generation feature and industrial application prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Mu; Ma Bo; Dong Yujie

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of the technical feature of pebble model high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-PM) plant, its developmental advantage and future are deeply investigated from inherent safety and economics. It is explored about the business opportunity and future financing mode of HTR-PM plant. Industrial distribution and potential user are studied. It is resulted that the technical potential can be developed fully using Gas turbine power generation technology. It has wide market and great significance to build more group modules at home and developing countries. (authors)

  14. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  15. Numerical analysis of performance of steam reformer of methane reforming hydrogen production system connected with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Huaqiang; Jiang Shengyao; Zhang Youjie

    2007-01-01

    Methane conversion rate and hydrogen output are important performance indexes of the steam reformer. The paper presents numerical analysis of performance of the reformer connected with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor HTR-10. Setting helium inlet flow rate fixed, performance of the reformer was examined with different helium inlet temperature, pressure, different process gas temperature, pressure, flow rate, and different steam to carbon ratio. As the range concerned, helium inlet temperature has remarkable influence on the performance, and helium inlet temperature, process gas temperature and pressure have little influence on the performance, and improving process gas flow rate, methane conversion rate decreases and hydrogen output increases, however improving steam to carbon ratio has reverse influence on the performance. (authors)

  16. Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura; Xu, Jennifer C.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    A report describes the fabrication and testing of nanoscale metal oxide semiconductors (MOSs) for gas and chemical sensing. This document examines the relationship between processing approaches and resulting sensor behavior. This is a core question related to a range of applications of nanotechnology and a number of different synthesis methods are discussed: thermal evaporation- condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed, providing a processing overview to developers of nanotechnology- based systems. The results of a significant amount of testing and comparison are also described. A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. The TECsynthesized single-crystal nanowires offer uniform crystal surfaces, resistance to sintering, and their synthesis may be done apart from the substrate. The TECproduced nanowire response is very low, even at the operating temperature of 200 C. In contrast, the electrospun polycrystalline nanofiber response is high, suggesting that junction potentials are superior to a continuous surface depletion layer as a transduction mechanism for chemisorption. Using a catalyst deposited upon the surface in the form of nanoparticles yields dramatic gains in sensitivity for both nanostructured, one-dimensional forms. For the nanowire materials, the response magnitude and response rate uniformly increase with increasing operating temperature. Such changes are interpreted in terms of accelerated surface diffusional processes, yielding greater access to chemisorbed oxygen species and faster dissociative chemisorption, respectively. Regardless of operating temperature, sensitivity of the nanofibers is a factor of 10 to 100 greater than that of nanowires with the same catalyst for the same test condition. In summary, nanostructure appears critical to governing the reactivity, as measured by electrical

  17. Development of plate-fin heat exchanger for intermediate heat exchanger of high-temperature gas cooled reactor. Fabrication process, high-temperature strength and creep-fatigue life prediction of plate-fin structure made of Hastelloy X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizokami, Yorikata; Igari, Toshihide; Nakashima, Keiichi; Kawashima, Fumiko; Sakakibara, Noriyuki; Kishikawa, Ryouji; Tanihira, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    The helium/helium heat exchanger (i.e., intermediate heat exchanger: IHX) of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) system with nuclear heat applications is installed between a primary system and a secondary system. IHX is operated at the highest temperature of 950degC and has a high capacity of up to 600 MWt. A plate-fin-type heat exchanger is the most suitable for IHX to improve construction cost. The purpose of this study is to develop an ultrafine plate-fin-type heat exchanger with a finer pitch fin than a conventional technology. In the first step, fabrication conditions of the ultrafine plate fin were optimized by press tests. In the second step, a brazing material was selected from several candidates through brazing tests of rods, and brazing conditions were optimized for plate-fin structures. In the third step, tensile strength, creep rupture, fatigue, and creep-fatigue tests were performed as typical strength tests for plate-fin structures. The obtained data were compared with those of the base metal and plate-fin element fabricated from SUS316. Finally, the accuracy of the creep-fatigue life prediction using both the linear cumulative damage rule and the equivalent homogeneous solid method was confirmed through the evaluation of creep-fatigue test results of plate-fin structures. (author)

  18. Gas sensor with multiple internal reference electrodes and sensing electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a potentiometric gas sensor, or potentiometric gas detection element, with multiple internal reference electrodes and multiple sensing electrodes for determining the concentrations of gas components in a gaseous mixture. The sensor for gas detection comprises: a solid...

  19. High temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  20. Intensive evaporation and boiling of a heterogeneous liquid droplet with an explosive disintegration in high-temperature gas area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The using of the high-speed (not less than 105 frames per second video recording tools (“Phantom” and the software package ("TEMA Automotive" allowed carrying out an experimental research of laws of intensive vaporization with an explosive disintegration of heterogeneous (with a single solid nontransparent inclusion liquid droplet (by the example of water in high-temperature (500-800 K gases (combustion products. Times of the processes under consideration and stages (liquid heat-up, evaporation from an external surface, bubble boiling at internal interfaces, growth of bubble sizes, explosive droplet breakup were established. Necessary conditions of an explosive vaporization of a heterogeneous droplet were found out. Mechanisms of this process and an influence of properties of liquid and inclusion material on them were determined.

  1. An integrated high temperature environmental cell for atom probe tomography studies of gas-surface reactions: Instrumentation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumpala, S.; Broderick, S.R.; Bagot, P.A.J.; Rajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    An integrated environmental cell has been designed and developed for the latest generation of Atom Probe Tomography LEAP™ instruments, allowing controlled exposure of samples to gases at high temperatures. Following treatment, samples can be transferred through the LEAP vacuum system for subsequent APT analysis, which provides detailed information on changes to chemical microstructures following the reactions with near-atomic resolution. A full description of the cell is presented, along with some sample results on the oxidation of aluminum and two platinum-group alloys, demonstrating the capability of combining exposure/characterization functionality in a single instrument. - Highlights: • Designed and built atom probe environmental cell for in situ reactions. • Investigated Al oxidation, and demonstrated improvement with new cell. • in situ APT analysis of Pt-alloys showed surface segregation of Rh and Ir

  2. Artificial neural networks for dynamic monitoring of simulated-operating parameters of high temperature gas cooled engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, Serhat; Tuerkcan, Erdinc; Ayaz, Emine; Barutcu, Burak

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses to the problem of utilisation of the artificial neural networks (ANNs) for detecting anomalies as well as physical parameters of a nuclear power plant during power operation in real time. Three different types of neural network algorithms were used namely, feed-forward neural network (back-propagation, BP) and two types of recurrent neural networks (RNN). The data used in this paper were gathered from the simulation of the power operation of the Japan's High Temperature Engineering Testing Reactor (HTTR). For the wide range of power operation, 56 signals were generated by the reactor dynamic simulation code for several hours of normal power operation at different power ramps between 30 and 100% nominal power. Paper will compare the outcomes of different neural networks and presents the neural network system and the determination of physical parameters from the simulated operating data

  3. Stress relaxation and creep of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core support ceramic materials: a literature search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.; Tennery, V.J.

    1980-05-01

    Creep and stress relaxation in structural ceramics are important properties to the high-temperature design and safety analysis of the core support structure of the HTGR. The ability of the support structure to function for the lifetime of the reactor is directly related to the allowable creep strain and the ability of the structure to withstand thermal transients. The thermal-mechanical response of the core support pads to steady-state stresses and potential thermal transients depends on variables, including the ability of the ceramics to undergo some stress relaxation in relatively short times. Creep and stress relaxation phenomena in structural ceramics of interest were examined. Of the materials considered (fused silica, alumina, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide), alumina has been more extensively investigated in creep. Activation energies reported varied between 482 and 837 kJ/mole, and consequently, variations in the assigned mechanisms were noted. Nabarro-Herring creep is considered as the primary creep mechanism and no definite grain size dependence has been identified. Results for silicon nitride are in better agreement with reported activation energies. No creep data were found for fused silica or silicon carbide and no stress relaxation data were found for any of the candidate materials. While creep and stress relaxation are similar and it is theoretically possible to derive the value of one property when the other is known, no explicit demonstrated relationship exists between the two. For a given structural ceramic material, both properties must be experimentally determined to obtain the information necessary for use in high-temperature design and safety analyses

  4. Flash pyrolysis at high temperature of ligno-cellulosic biomass and its components - production of synthesis gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couhert, C.

    2007-11-01

    Pyrolysis is the first stage of any thermal treatment of biomass and governs the formation of synthesis gas for the production of electricity, hydrogen or liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to establish a link between the composition of a biomass and its pyrolysis gas. We study experimental flash pyrolysis and fix the conditions in which quantities of gas are maximal, while aiming at a regime without heat and mass transfer limitations (particles about 100 μm): temperature of 950 C and residence time of about 2 s. Then we try to predict gas yields of any biomass according to its composition, applicable in this situation where thermodynamic equilibrium is not reached. We show that an additivity law does not allow correlating gas yields of a biomass with fractions of cellulose, hemi-cellulose and lignin contained in this biomass. Several explanations are suggested and examined: difference of pyrolytic behaviour of the same compound according to the biomass from which it is extracted, interactions between compounds and influence of mineral matter. With the aim of industrial application, we study pyrolysis of millimetric and centimetric size particles, and make a numerical simulation of the reactions of pyrolysis gases reforming. This simulation shows that the choice of biomass affects the quantities of synthesis gas obtained. (author)

  5. Study on restriction method for end-wall boundary layer thickness in axial helium gas compressor for gas turbine high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Yan, Xing; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance test was carried out using a 1/3 scale, 4-stage model of the helium gas compressor to investigate an effect of end-wall over-camber to prevent decrease of axial velocity in the end-wall boundary layer. The model compressor consists of a rotor, 500 mm in diameter, which is driven by an electric motor at a rotational speed of 10800 rpm. The rotor blade span of the first stage is 34 mm. The test was carried out under the condition that the helium gas pressure of 0.88 MPa, temperature of 30degC, and mass flow rate of 12.47 kg/s at the inlet. A 3-dimensional aerodynamic code, which was verified using the test data, showed that axial velocity was lowered by using a blade which increased the inlet blade angle around the end-wall region of the casing side in comparison with that using the original design blade, because the inlet flow angle mismatched with the inlet blade angle of the rotor blade, as opposed to the prediction by a conventional air compressor design method. The overall adiabatic efficiency of the full scale 20-stage helium gas compressor was predicted 89.7% from the Reynolds number dependency of the test data by using the original design blade. (author)

  6. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor steam-cycle/cogeneration lead plant. Plant Protection and Instrumentation System design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Plant Protection and Instrumentation System provides plant safety system sense and command features, actuation of plant safety system execute features, preventive features which maintain safety system integrity, and safety-related instrumentation which monitors the plant and its safety systems. The primary function of the Plant Protection and Instrumentation system is to sense plant process variables to detect abnormal plant conditions and to provide input to actuation devices directly controlling equipment required to mitigate the consequences of design basis events to protect the public health and safety. The secondary functions of the Plant Protection and Instrumentation System are to provide plant preventive features, sybsystems that monitor plant safety systems status, subsystems that monitor the plant under normal operating and accident conditions, safety-related controls which allow control of reactor shutdown and cooling from a remote shutdown area

  7. Experimental study on cryogenic adsorption of methane by activated carbon for helium coolant purification of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hua; Wu, Zong-Xin; Jia, Hai-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The cryogenic CH 4 adsorption on activated carbon was studied for design of HTGR. • The breakthrough curves at different conditions were analyzed by the MTZ model. • The CH 4 adsorption isotherm was fitted well by the Toth model and the D-R model. • The work provides valuable reference data for helium coolant purification of HTGR. - Abstract: The cryogenic adsorption behavior of methane on activated carbon was investigated for helium coolant purification of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor by using dynamic column breakthrough method. With helium as carrier gas, experiments were performed at −196 °C and low methane partial pressure range of 0–120 Pa. The breakthrough curves at different superficial velocities and different feed concentrations were measured and analyzed by the mass-transfer zone model. The methane single-component adsorption isotherm was obtained and fitted well by the Toth model and the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The adsorption heat of methane on activated carbon was estimated. The cryogenic adsorption process of methane on activated carbon has been verified to be effective for helium coolant purification of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor.

  8. High temperature radioisotope capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    A high temperature radioisotope capsule made up of three concentric cylinders, with the isotope fuel located within the innermost cylinder is described. The innermost cylinder has hemispherical ends and is constructed of a tantalum alloy. The intermediate cylinder is made of a molybdenum alloy and is capable of withstanding the pressure generated by the alpha particle decay of the fuel. The outer cylinder is made of a platinum alloy of high resistance to corrosion. A gas separates the innermost cylinder from the intermediate cylinder and the intermediate cylinder from the outer cylinder

  9. Pressure transients analysis of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor with direct helium turbine cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, M.; Dupont, J. F.; Jacquemoud, P.; Mylonas, R. [Eidgenoessisches Inst. fuer Reaktorforschung, Wuerenlingen (Switzerland)

    1981-01-15

    The direct coupling of a gas cooled reactor with a closed gas turbine cycle leads to a specific dynamic plant behaviour, which may be summarized as follows: a) any operational transient involving a variation of the core mass flow rate causes a variation of the pressure ratio of the turbomachines and leads unavoidably to pressure and temperature transients in the gas turbine cycle; and b) very severe pressure equalization transients initiated by unlikely events such as the deblading of one or more turbomachines must be taken into account. This behaviour is described and illustrated through results gained from computer analyses performed at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR) in Wurenlingen within the scope of the Swiss-German HHT project.

  10. Development of a neutronics cod