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Sample records for high-temperature engineering test

  1. Present status of high temperature engineering test and research, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors have excellent features such as the generation of high temperature close to 1000degC, very high inherent safety and high fuel burnup. By the advanced basic research under high temperature irradiation condition, the creation of various new technologies which become the momentum of future technical innovation can be expected. The construction of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) was decided in 1987, which aims at the thermal output of 30 MW and the coolant temperature at reactor exit of 950degC. The initial criticality is scheduled in 1998. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the high temperature engineering test and research, and plans the safety verifying test of the HTTR, the test of connecting heat utilization plants and so on. In this report, mainly the results obtained for one year from May, 1993 are summarized. The outline of the high temperature engineering test and development of the HTTR technologies are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Design of high temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Sudo, Yukio

    1994-09-01

    Construction of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is now underway to establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs and to conduct innovative basic research at high temperatures. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 850degC for rated operation and 950degC for high temperature test operation. It is planned to conduct various irradiation tests for fuels and materials, safety demonstration tests and nuclear heat application tests. JAERI received construction permit of HTTR reactor facility in February 1990 after 22 months of safety review. This report summarizes evaluation of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic characteristics, design outline of major systems and components, and also includes relating R and D result and safety evaluation. Criteria for judgment, selection of postulated events, major analytical conditions for anticipated operational occurrences and accidents, computer codes used in safety analysis and evaluation of each event are presented in the safety evaluation. (author)

  3. Reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    The reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) consists of a control rod system and a reserve shutdown system. During normal operation, reactivity is controlled by the control rod system, which consists of 32 control rods (16 pairs) and 16 control rod drive mechanisms except for the case when the center control rods are removed to perform an irradiation test. In an unlikely event that the control rods fail to be inserted, reserve shutdown system is provided to insert pellets of neutron-absorbing material into the core. Alloy 800H is chosen for the metallic parts of the control rods. Because the maximum temperature of the control rods reaches about 900 deg. C at reactor scrams, structural design guideline and design material data on Alloy 800H are needed for the high temperature design. The design guideline for the HTTR control rod is based on ASME Code Case N-47-21. Design material data is also determined and shown in this paper. Observing the guideline, temperature and stress analysis were conducted; it can be confirmed that the target life of the control rods of 5 years can be achieved. Various tests conducted for the control rod system and the reserve shutdown system are also described

  4. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). FY2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed at the Oarai Research Establishment of The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30MW of thermal power. Coolant of helium-gas circulates under the pressure of about 4Mpa, and the reactor inlet and outlet temperature are 395degC and 950degC (maximum), respectively coated particle fuel is used as fuel, and the HTTR core is composed of graphite prismatic blocks. The full power operation of 30MW was attained in December, 2001, and then JAERI received the commissioning license for the HTTR in March, 2002. Since 2002, we have been carrying out rated power operation, safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, etc., and conducted the high-temperature test operation of 950degC in April, 2004. This report summarizes activities and test results on HTTR operation and maintenance as well as safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year of 2003 before the high temperature test operation of 950degC. (author)

  5. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). (FY2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW of thermal power. The full power operation of 30 MW was attained in December, 2001, and then JAERI (JAEA) received the commissioning license for the HTTR in March, 2002. Since 2002, we have been carrying out rated power operation, safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, etc., and conducted the high-temperature test operation of 950degC in April, 2004. In fiscal 2005 year, periodical inspection and overhaul of reactivity control system were conducted, and safety demonstration tests were promoted. This report summarizes activities and test results on HTTR operation and maintenance as well as safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year of 2005. (author)

  6. Operation, test, research and development of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). FY2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30MW of thermal power, constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan. The HTTR was attained at the full power operation of 30MW in December 2001 and achieved the 950degC of outlet coolant temperature at the outside the reactor pressure vessel in June 2004. To establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs, we have obtained demonstration test data necessary for several R and Ds, and accumulated operation and maintenance experience of HTGRs throughout the HTTR's operation such as rated power operations, safety demonstration tests and long-term high temperature operations, and so on. In fiscal year 2013, we started to prepare the application document of reactor installation license for the HTTR to prove conformity with the new research reactor's safety regulatory requirements taken effect from December 2013. We had been making effort to restart the HTTR which was stopped since the 2011 when the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (2011.3.11) occurred. This report summarizes activities and results of HTTR operation, maintenance, and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year 2013. (author)

  7. Operation, test, research and development of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). FY2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW of thermal power, constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan. The HTTR was attained at the full power operation of 30 MW in December 2001 and achieved the 950degC of coolant outlet temperature at outside of the reactor pressure vessel in June 2004. To establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs, we have obtained demonstration test data necessary for several R and Ds, and accumulated operation and maintenance experience of HTGRs throughout the HTTR's operation such as rated power operations, safety demonstration tests and long-term high temperature operations, and so on. In fiscal year 2014, we started to apply the application document of reactor installation license for the HTTR to prove conformity with the new research reactor's safety regulatory requirements taken effect from December 2013. We had been making effort to restart the HTTR which was stopped since the 2011 by the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. This report summarizes activities and results of HTTR operation, maintenance, and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year 2014. (author)

  8. Research program of the high temperature engineering test reactor for upgrading the HTGR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Tachibana, Yukio; Takeda, Takeshi; Saikusa, Akio; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    1997-07-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is a graphite-moderated and helium-cooled reactor with an outlet power of 30 MW and outlet coolant temperature of 950degC, and its first criticality will be attained at the end of 1997. In the HTTR, researches establishing and upgrading the technology basis necessary for an HTGR and innovative basic researches for a high temperature engineering will be conducted. A research program of the HTTR for upgrading the technology basis for the HTGR was determined considering realization of future generation commercial HTGRs. This paper describes a research program of the HTTR. (author)

  9. Data on test results of vessel cooling system of high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saikusa, Akio; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    2003-02-01

    High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is the first graphite-moderated helium gas cooled reactor in Japan. The rise-to-power test of the HTTR started on September 28, 1999 and thermal power of the HTTR reached its full power of 30 MW on December 7, 2001. Vessel Cooling System (VCS) of the HTTR is the first Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) applied for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors. The VCS cools the core indirectly through the reactor pressure vessel to keep core integrity during the loss of core flow accidents such as depressurization accident. Minimum heat removal of the VCS to satisfy its safety requirement is 0.3MW at 30 MW power operation. Through the performance test of the VCS in the rise-to-power test of the HTTR, it was confirmed that the VCS heat removal at 30 MW power operation was higher than 0.3 MW. This paper shows outline of the VCS and test results on the VCS performance. (author)

  10. Operating experiences since rise-to-power test in high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shuji; Motegi, Toshihiro; Kawano, Shuichi; Kameyama, Yasuhiko; Sekita, Kenji; Kawasaki, Kozo

    2007-03-01

    The rise-to-power test of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was actually started in April 2000. The rated thermal power of 30MW and the rated reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850degC were achieved in the middle of Dec. 2001. After that, the reactor thermal power of 30MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC were achieved in the final rise-to-power test in April 2004. After receiving the operation licensing at 850degC, the safety demonstration tests have conducted to demonstrate inherent safety features of the HTGRs as well as to obtain the core and plant transient data for validation of safety analysis codes and for establishment of safety design and evaluation technologies. This paper summarizes the HTTR operating experiences for six years from start of the rise-to-power test that are categorized into (1) Operating experiences related to advanced gas-cooled reactor design, (2) Operating experiences for improvement of the performance, (3) Operating experiences due to fail of system and components. (author)

  11. Design and safety consideration in the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiuki; Sudo, Yukio; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru

    1990-01-01

    The budget for construction of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was recently committed by the Government in Japan. The HTTR is a test reactor with thermal output of 30 MW and reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 deg. C at high temperature test operation. The HTTR plant uses a pin-in-block design core and will be used as an experience leading to high temperature applications. Several major important safety considerations are adopted in the design of the HTTR. These are as follows: 1) A coated particle fuel must not be failed during a normal reactor operation and an anticipated operational occurrence; 2) Two independent and diverse reactor shut-down systems are provided in order to shut down the reactor safely and reliably in any condition; 3) Back-up reactor cooling systems which are safety ones are provided in order to remove residual heat of reactor in any condition; 4) Multiple barriers and countermeasures are provided to contain fission products such as a containment, pressure gradient between the primary and secondary cooling circuit and so on, though coated particle fuels contain fission products with high reliability; 5) The functions of materials used in the primary cooling circuit are separated to be pressure-resisting and heat-resisting in order to resolve material problems and maintain high reliability. The detailed design of the HTTR was completed with extensive accumulation of material data and component tests. (author)

  12. Heat removal performance of auxiliary cooling system for the high temperature engineering test reactor during scrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Takenaka, Satsuki

    2003-01-01

    The auxiliary cooling system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is employed for heat removal as an engineered safety feature when the reactor scrams in an accident when forced circulation can cool the core. The HTTR is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor in Japan with reactor outlet gas temperature of 950 degree sign C and thermal power of 30 MW. The auxiliary cooling system should cool the core continuously avoiding excessive cold shock to core graphite components and water boiling of itself. Simulation tests on manual trip from 9 MW operation and on loss of off-site electric power from 15 MW operation were carried out in the rise-to-power test up to 20 MW of the HTTR. Heat removal characteristics of the auxiliary cooling system were examined by the tests. Empirical correlations of overall heat transfer coefficients were acquired for a helium/water heat exchanger and air cooler for the auxiliary cooling system. Temperatures of fluids in the auxiliary cooling system were predicted on a scram event from 30 MW operation at 950 degree sign C of the reactor outlet coolant temperature. Under the predicted helium condition of the auxiliary cooling system, integrity of fuel blocks among the core graphite components was investigated by stress analysis. Evaluation results showed that overcooling to the core graphite components and boiling of water in the auxiliary cooling system should be prevented where open area condition of louvers in the air cooler is the full open

  13. Present status and prospects of high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1995-01-01

    It is essentially important in Japan, which has limited amount of natural resources, to make efforts to obtain more reliable and stable energy supply by extended use of nuclear energy including high temperature heat from nuclear reactors. Hence, efforts are to be continuously devoted to establish and upgrade High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technologies and to make much of research resources accumulated so far. It is also expected that making basic researches at high temperature using HTGR will contribute to innovative basic research in future. Then, the construction of High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is an HTGR with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950degC at the reactor outlet, was decided by the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) in 1987 and is now under way by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991, with first criticality in 1998 to be followed after commissioning testing. At present the HTTR reactor building and its containment vessel have been nearly completed and its main components, such as a reactor pressure vessel, an intermediate heat exchanger, hot gas pipings and core support structures, have been manufactured at their factories and delivered to the Oarai Research Establishment of the JAERI for their installation in the middle of 1994. Fuel fabrication will be started as well. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. The IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on Design and Evaluation of Heat Utilization Systems for the HTTR, such as steam reforming of methane and thermochemical water splitting for hydrogen production, was launched successfully in January 1994. Some heat utilization system is planned to be connected to the HTTR and demonstrated at the former stage of the second core. At present, steam-reforming of methane is the first candidate. The JAERI also plans to conduct material

  14. Manufacturing and material properties of forgings for reactor pressure vessel of high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, I.; Suzuki, K.

    1994-01-01

    For the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) which has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel is used first in the world. Material confirmation test has been carried out to demonstrate good applicability of forged low Si 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel to the RPV of HTTR. Recently, JSW has succeeded in the manufacturing of large size ring forgings and large size forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for stand pipe for the RPV. This paper describes the results of the material confirmation test as well as the manufacturing and material properties of the large forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for stand pipe. (orig.)

  15. An inspection standard of fuel for the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Sato, Sadao; Hayashi, Kimio; Fukuda, Kosaku; Kaneko, Mitsunobu; Sato, Tsutomu.

    1992-06-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) uses the fuel comprising coated fuel particles. A general inspection standard for the coated particle fuel, however, has not been established in Japan. Therefore, it has been necessary to prescribe the inspection standard of the fuel for HTTR. Under these circumstances, a fuel inspection standard of HTTR has been established under cooperation of fuel specialists both inside and outside of JAERI on referring to the inspection methods adopted in USA, Germany and Japan for HTGR fuels. Since a large number of coated fuel particle samples is needed to inspect the HTTR fuel, the sampling inspection standard has also been established considering the inspection efficiency. This report presents the inspection and the sampling standards together with an explanation of these standards. These standards will be applied to the HTTR fuel acceptance tests. (author)

  16. Design and evaluation of heat utilization systems for the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    The primary focus of this CRP was to perform detailed investigation of the high temperature industrial processes that are attainable through incorporation of an HTGR, and for their possible demonstration in the HTTR. The HTGR has the capability to achieve a core outlet temperature approaching 1,000 deg. C in a safe and effective manner. These attributes, coupled with the offer by JAERI to utilize the HTTR, resulted in the initiation of this CRP by the IAEA. High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) utilizes a 30 MW(th) HTGR comprised of 30 fuel columns of hexagonal pin-in-pin graphite block type fuel elements. The fuel consists of UO 2 TRISO coated particles with an enrichment of ∼ 6% wt. Relative to the demonstration of high temperature heat applications, the HTTR will be capable of producing 10 MW(th) of heat at 950 deg. C. However, the thermal power for these applications has the potential to be increased up to 30 MW(th) in the future, which may be required for demonstration of gas turbine system components. The HTTR reached initial criticality in November 1998. Initial operational plans includes a series of rise to power tests followed by tests to demonstrate the safety and operational characteristics of the HTTR. In addition to completion of the HTTR demonstration tests, it was recommended that the R and D be performed within the HTTR project. JAERI is encouraged to publicize the results of the HTTR tests and 'lessons learned' from their experiences including potential capabilities of the HTGR for heat applications. The next priority application was determined to be the generation of electricity through the use of the gas turbine. Application of the Brayton Cycle utilizing high temperature helium from a modular HTGR was chosen for development because of its projected benefits as an economic and efficient means for the production of electricity. Evaluation of the remaining high temperature heat utilization applications chosen for investigation resulted

  17. Investigation of water content in primary upper shield of high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Mogi, Haruyoshi; Itahashi, Shuuji; Kitami, Toshiyuki; Akutu, Youichi; Fuchita, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Toru; Moriya, Masahiro

    1999-09-01

    A primary upper shield of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is composed of concrete (grout) which is packed into iron frames. The main function of the primary upper shield is to attenuate neutron and gamma ray from the core, that leads to satisfy dose equivalent rate limit of operating floor and stand-pipe room. Water content in the concrete is one of the most important things because it strongly affects neutron-shielding ability. Then, we carried out out-of-pile experiments to investigate relationship between temperature and water content in the concrete. Based on the experimental results, a hydrolysis-diffusion model was developed to investigate water release behavior from the concrete. The model showed that water content used for shielding design in the primary upper shield of the HTTR will be maintained if temperature during operating life is under 110degC. (author)

  18. Assessment of damage domains of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Alain; Izquierdo, José María; Tuček, Kamil; Gallego, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed an adequate model for the identification of damage domains of the HTTR. • We analysed an anticipated operational transient, using the HTTR5+/GASTEMP code. • We simulated several transients of the same sequence. • We identified the corresponding damage domains using two methods. • We calculated exceedance frequency using the two methods. - Abstract: This paper presents an assessment analysis of damage domains of the 30 MW th prototype High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) operated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). For this purpose, an in-house deterministic risk assessment computational tool was developed based on the Theory of Stimulated Dynamics (TSD). To illustrate the methodology and applicability of the developed modelling approach, assessment results of a control rod (CR) withdrawal accident during subcritical conditions are presented and compared with those obtained by the JAEA

  19. Development of operation and maintenance technology for HTGRs by using HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Atsushi, E-mail: shimizu.atsushi35@jaea.go.jp [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kawamoto, Taiki [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Tochio, Daisuke [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Saito, Kenji; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Honma, Fumitaka; Furusawa, Takayuki; Saikusa, Akio [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Takada, Shoji [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Shinozaki, Masayuki [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    To establish the technical basis of HTGR (High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor), the long term high temperature operation using HTTR was carried out in the high temperature test operation mode during 50-day since January till March, 2010. It is necessary to establish the technical basis of operation and maintenance by demonstrating the stability of plant during long-term operation and the reliability of components and facilities special to HTGRs, in order to attain the stable supply of the high temperature heat to the planned heat utilization system of HTTR. Test data obtained in the operation were evaluated for the technical issues which were extracted before the operation. As the results, it was confirmed that the temperatures and flow rate of primary and secondary coolant were well controlled within sufficiently small deviation against the disturbance by the atmospheric temperature variation in daily. Stability and reliability of the components and facility special to HTGRs was demonstrated through the long term high temperature operation by evaluating the heat transfer performance of high temperature components, the stability performance of pressure control to compensate helium gas leak, the reliability of the dynamic components such as helium gas circulators, the performance of heat-up protection of radiation shielding. Through the long term high temperature operation of HTTR, the technical basis for the operation and maintenance technology of HTGRs was established.

  20. Development of operation and maintenance technology for HTGRs by using HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Atsushi; Kawamoto, Taiki; Tochio, Daisuke; Saito, Kenji; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Honma, Fumitaka; Furusawa, Takayuki; Saikusa, Akio; Takada, Shoji; Shinozaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    To establish the technical basis of HTGR (High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor), the long term high temperature operation using HTTR was carried out in the high temperature test operation mode during 50-day since January till March, 2010. It is necessary to establish the technical basis of operation and maintenance by demonstrating the stability of plant during long-term operation and the reliability of components and facilities special to HTGRs, in order to attain the stable supply of the high temperature heat to the planned heat utilization system of HTTR. Test data obtained in the operation were evaluated for the technical issues which were extracted before the operation. As the results, it was confirmed that the temperatures and flow rate of primary and secondary coolant were well controlled within sufficiently small deviation against the disturbance by the atmospheric temperature variation in daily. Stability and reliability of the components and facility special to HTGRs was demonstrated through the long term high temperature operation by evaluating the heat transfer performance of high temperature components, the stability performance of pressure control to compensate helium gas leak, the reliability of the dynamic components such as helium gas circulators, the performance of heat-up protection of radiation shielding. Through the long term high temperature operation of HTTR, the technical basis for the operation and maintenance technology of HTGRs was established

  1. Feasibility study on silicon doping using high temperature test engineering reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masaya; Takaki, Naoyuki; Goto, Minoru; Shimakawa, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility study on silicon doping using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is performed by numerical simulations. The HTTR is a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) situated at JAEA Oarai research and development center. It has a 30MW thermal power and the outlet coolant temperature is 950degC. The objective of this study is to evaluate the following issues, 1. The impact of loading Si-ingots into the core on the criticality, 2. The uniformity of the neutron capture reaction rate in Si-ingots, and 3. The production rate of silicon semiconductor. In this study, six Si-ingots are loaded into the irradiation area which is located in the peripheral region of the core. They are irradiated with rotation movement around the axial direction to obtain uniform neutron capture reaction rate in the radial direction. Additionally, the neutron filter, which is made of graphite containing boron, is used to obtain uniform neutron capture reaction rate in the axial direction. The evaluations were conducted by performing the HTTR whole core calculations with the Monte Carlo code MVP-2.0. In the calculations, several tally regions were defined on the Si-ingots to investigate the uniformity of the neutron capture reaction rate. As a result, loading the Si-ingots into the core causes negative reactivity by about 0.7%dk/k. Uniform neutron capture reaction rate of Si-ingot is obtained 98% in the radial and the axial direction. In case of the target of semiconductor resistivity is set to 50 Ωcm, the required irradiation time becomes 10 hours. The HTTR is able to produce silicon semiconductor of 540kg in one-time irradiation. This study was conducted as a joint research with JAEA, Nuclear Fuel Industries, LTD, Toyota Tsusho Corporation and Tokai University. (author)

  2. Basic data for surveillance test on core support graphite structures for the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Ishihara, Masahiro; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2007-02-01

    Both of the visual inspection by a TV camera and the measurement of material properties by surveillance test on core support graphite structures are planned for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to confirm their structural integrity and characteristics. The surveillance test is aimed to investigate the change of material properties by aging effects such as fast neutron irradiation and oxidation. The obtained data will be used not only for evaluating the structural integrity of the core support graphite structures of the HTTR but also for design of advanced Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) discussed at generation IV international forum. This report describes the initial material properties of surveillance specimens before installation and installed position of surveillance specimens in the HTTR. (author)

  3. Development of evaluation method of fuel failure fraction during the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshimuta, Shigeharu; Tobita, Tsutomu; Sato, Masashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1997-05-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) uses coated particles as fuel. During normal operation, short-lived noble gases are mainly released by diffusion from fuel particles with defects in their coating layers (i.e., failed particle). Since noble gases do not plate out on the inner surfaces of primary cooling system, their activities in primary coolant reflect fuel failure fraction in the core. An evaluation method was developed to predict failure fraction of coated fuel particles during normal operation of the HTTR. The method predicts core-average and hot plenum regionwise failure fractions based on the fractional releases, (R/B)s, of noble gases. The (R/B)s are calculated by fission gas concentration measurements in the primary cooling system of the HTTR. Recent fabrication data show that through-coatings failure fraction is extremely low. Then, fractional release from matrix contamination uranium, which is background for accurate evaluation of the fuel failure fraction, should be precisely predicted. This report describes an evaluation method of fuel failure fraction from measurements in the HTTR together with a fission gas release model from fuel compact containing failed particles and matrix contamination uranium. (author)

  4. Investigation of the loss of forced cooling test by using the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Inaba, Yoshitomo; Goto, Minoru; Tochio, Daisuke

    2007-09-01

    The three gas circulators trip test and the vessel cooling system stop test as the safety demonstration test by using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) are under planning to demonstrate inherent safety features of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. All three gas circulators to circulate the helium gas as the coolant are stopped to simulate the loss of forced cooling in the three gas circulators trip test. The stop of the vessel cooling system located outside the reactor pressure vessel to remove the residual heat of the reactor core follows the stop of all three gas circulators in the vessel cooling system stop test. The analysis of the reactor transient for such tests and abnormal events postulated during the test was performed. From the result of analysis, it was confirmed that the three gas circulators trip test and the vessel cooling system stop test can be performed within the region of the normal operation in the HTTR and the safety of the reactor facility is ensured even if the abnormal events would occur. (author)

  5. Nondestructive testing on graphite structures for high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Kambe, Mamoru; Tsuji, Nobumasa.

    1994-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic (for internal defects) and eddy current testing (for surface defects) were investigated on the structures of nuclear-grade IG-110 and PGX graphite for the HTTR. The equipment were developed in order to detect the specific configuration of graphite blocks and the testing conditions were defined as the practical testing methods. The established testing methods are being used for the acceptance tests of graphite structures in the HTTR. (author)

  6. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). FY1999-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    The HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) with the thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850/950 degC is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which uses coated fuel particle, graphite for core components, and helium gas for primary coolant. The HTTR, which locates at the south-west area of 50,000 m{sup 2} in the Oarai Research Establishment, had been constructed since 1991 before accomplishing the first criticality on November 10, 1998. Rise to power tests of the HTTR started in September, 1999 and the rated thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850 degC was attained in December 2001. JAERI received the certificate of pre-operation test, that is, the commissioning license for the HTTR in March 2002. This report summarizes operation, tests, maintenance, radiation control, and construction of components and facilities for the HTTR as well as R and Ds on HTGRs from FY1999 to 2001. (author)

  7. Data on loss of off-site electric power simulation tests of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    2002-07-01

    The high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR), the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, achieved the first full power of 30 MW on December 7 in 2001. In the rise-to-power test of the HTTR, simulation tests on loss of off-site electric power from 15 and 30 MW operations were carried out by manual shutdown of off-site electric power. Because helium circulators and water pumps coasted down immediately after the loss of off-site electric power, flow rates of helium and water decreased to the scram points. To shut down the reactor safely, the subcriticality should be kept by the insertion of control rods and the auxiliary cooling system should cool the core continuously avoiding excessive cold shock to core graphite components. About 50 s later from the loss of off-site electric power, the auxiliary cooling system started up by supplying electricity from emergency power feeders. Temperature of hot plenum block among core graphite structures decreased continuously after the startup of the auxiliary cooling system. This report describes sequences of dynamic components and transient behaviors of the reactor and its cooling system during the simulation tests from 15 and 30 MW operations. (author)

  8. UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} utilization in high temperature engineering test reactor with helium coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waris, Abdul, E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id; Novitrian,; Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Su’ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Aji, Indarta K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is one of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) types which has been developed by Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The HTTR is a graphite moderator, helium gas coolant, 30 MW thermal output and 950 °C outlet coolant temperature for high temperature test operation. Original HTTR uses UO{sub 2} fuel. In this study, we have evaluated the use of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} in form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in HTTR. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. The result shows that HTTR can obtain its criticality condition if the enrichment of {sup 235}U in loaded fuel is 18.0% or above.

  9. Full integrated system of real-time monitoring based on distributed architecture for the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subekti, Muhammad; Ohno, Tomio; Kudo, Kazuhiko; Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Nabeshima, Kunihiko

    2005-01-01

    A new monitoring system scheme based on distributed architecture for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is proposed to assure consistency of the real-time process of expanded system. A distributed monitoring task on client PCs as an alternative architecture maximizes the throughput and capabilities of the system even if the monitoring tasks suffer a shortage of bandwidth. The prototype of the on-line monitoring system has been developed successfully and will be tested at the actual HTTR site. (author)

  10. Present status of high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1994-01-01

    The 30MWt HTTR is a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950degC at the reactor outlet. The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991, with first criticality to be followed in 1998 after commissioning testing. At present the HTTR reactor building (underground part) and its containment vessel have been almost completed and its main components, such as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an intermediate heat exchanger, hot gas pipings and graphite core structures, are now manufacturing at their factories at the target of their installation starting in 1994. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) also plans to conduct material and fuel irradiation tests as an innovative basic research after attaining rated power and coolant temperature. Innovative basic researches are now in great request. The paper describes major features of HTTR, present status of its construction and research and test using HTTR. (author)

  11. Present status of High-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1993-01-01

    The 30MWt HTTR is a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950 deg C at the reactor outlet. The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991, with first criticality to be followed in 1998 after commissioning testing. At present the HTTR reactor building (underground part) and its containment vessel have been almost completed and its main components, such as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an intermediate heat exchanger, hot gas pipings and graphite core structures, are now manufacturing at their factories at the target of their installation starting in 1994. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) also plans to conduct material and fuel irradiation tests as an innovative basic research after attaining rated power and coolant temperature. Innovative basic researches are now in great request. The paper describes major features of HTTR, present status of its construction and research and test plan using HTTR. (author)

  12. The approaches of safety design and safety evaluation at HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iigaki, Kazuhiko; Saikusa, Akio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Shinozaki, Masayuki; Tochio, Daisuke; Honma, Fumitaka; Tachibana, Yukio; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Kawasaki, Kozo; Baba, Osamu

    2006-06-01

    Gas Cooled Reactor has long history of nuclear development, and High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) has been expected that it can be supply high temperature energy to chemical industry and to power generation from the points of view of the safety, the efficiency, the environment and the economy. The HTGR design is tried to installed passive safety equipment. The current licensing review guideline was made for a Low Water Reactor (LWR) on safety evaluation therefore if it would be directly utilized in the HTGR it needs the special consideration for the HTGR. This paper describes that investigation result of the safety design and the safety evaluation traditions for the HTGR, comparison the safety design and safety evaluation feature for the HTGT with it's the LWR, and reflection for next HTGR based on HTTR operational experiment. (author)

  13. High temperature turbine engine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, W.D.; Boyd, G.L.

    1993-07-20

    A hybrid ceramic/metallic gas turbine is described comprising; a housing defining an inlet, an outlet, and a flow path communicating the inlet with the outlet for conveying a flow of fluid through the housing, a rotor member journaled by the housing in the flow path, the rotor member including a compressor rotor portion rotatively inducting ambient air via the inlet and delivering this air pressurized to the flow path downstream of the compressor rotor, a combustor disposed in the flow path downstream of the compressor receiving the pressurized air along with a supply of fuel to maintain combustion providing a flow of high temperature pressurized combustion products in the flow path downstream thereof, the rotor member including a turbine rotor portion disposed in the flow path downstream of the combustor and rotatively expanding the combustion products toward ambient for flow from the turbine engine via the outlet, the turbine rotor portion providing shaft power driving the compressor rotor portion and an output shaft portion of the rotor member, a disk-like metallic housing portion journaling the rotor member to define a rotational axis therefore, and a disk-like annular ceramic turbine shroud member bounding the flow path downstream of the combustor and circumscribing the turbine rotor portion to define a running clearance therewith, the disk-like ceramic turbine shroud member having a reference axis coaxial with the rotational axis and being spaced axially from the metallic housing portion in mutually parallel concentric relation therewith and a plurality of spacers disposed between ceramic disk-like shroud member and the metallic disk-like housing portion and circumferentially spaced apart, each of the spacers having a first and second end portion having an end surface adjacent the shroud member and the housing portion respectively, the end surfaces having a cylindrical curvature extending transversely relative to the shroud member and the housing portion.

  14. An explication of the Graphite Structural Design Code of core components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1991-05-01

    The integrity evaluation of the core graphite components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) will be carried out based upon the Graphite Structural Design Code for core components. In the application of this design code, it is necessary to make clear the basic concept to evaluate the integrity of core components of HTTR. Therefore, considering the detailed design of core graphite structures such as fuel graphite blocks, etc. of HTTR, this report explicates the design code in detail about the concepts of stress and fatigue limits, integrity evaluation method of oxidized graphite components and thermal irradiation stress analysis method etc. (author)

  15. Survey report on high temperature irradiation experiment programs for new ceramic materials in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor). 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    A survey research on status of research activities on new ceramic materials in Japan was carried out under contract between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The purpose of the survey is to provide information to prioritize prospective experiments and tests in the HTTR. The HTTR as a high temperature gas cooled reactor has a unique and superior capability to irradiate large-volumed specimen at high temperature up to approximately 800degC. The survey was focused on mainly the activities of functional ceramics and heat resisting ceramics as a kind of structural ceramics. As the result, the report recommends that the irradiation experiment of functional ceramics is feasible to date. (K. Itami)

  16. Analytical evaluation on loss of off-side electric power simulation of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Tachibana, Yukio; Takada, Eiji; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2000-03-01

    A rise-to-power test of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) started on September 28 in 1999 for establishing and upgrading the technological basis for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). A loss of off-site electric power test of the HTTR from the normal operation under 15 and 30 MW thermal power will be carried out in the rise-to-power test. Analytical evaluations on transient behaviors of the reactor and plant during the loss of off-site electric power were conducted. These estimations are proposed as benchmark problems for the IAEA coordinated research program on 'Evaluation of HTGR Performance'. This report describes an event scenario of transient during the loss of off-site electric power, the outline of major components and system, detailed thermal and nuclear data set for these problems and pre-estimation results of the benchmark problems by an analytical code 'ACCORD' for incore and plant dynamics of the HTGR. (author)

  17. Development of in-service inspection system for core support graphite structures in the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumita, Junya; Hanawa, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Ishihara, Masahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Visual inspection of core support graphite structures using TV camera as in-service inspection and measurement of material characteristics using surveillance test specimens are planned in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to confirm structural integrity of the core support graphite structures. For the visual inspection, in-service inspection system developed from September 1996 to June 1998, and pre-service inspection using the system was carried out. As the result of the pre-service inspection, it was validated that high quality of visual inspection with TV camera can be carried out, and also structural integrity of the core support graphite structures at the initial stage of the HTTR operation was confirmed. (author)

  18. Rise-to-power test in High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. Test progress and summary of test results up to 30 MW of reactor thermal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Shimakawa, Satoshi

    2002-08-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is a graphite moderated and gas cooled reactor with the thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850degC/950degC. Rise-to-power test in the HTTR was performed from April 23rd to June 6th in 2000 as phase 1 test up to 10 MW in the rated operation mode, from January 29th to March 1st in 2001 as phase 2 test up to 20 MW in the rated operation mode and from April 14th to June 8th in 2001 as phase 3 test up to 20 MW in the high temperature test the mechanism of the reactor outlet coolant temperature becomes 850degC at 30 MW in the rated operation mode and 950degC in the high temperature test operation mode. Phase 4 rise-to-power test to achieve the thermal reactor power of 30 MW started on October 23rd in 2001. On December 7th in 2001 it was confirmed that the thermal reactor power and the reactor outlet coolant temperature reached to 30 MW and 850degC respectively in the single loaded operation mode in which only the primary pressurized water cooler is operating. Phase 4 test was performed until March 6th in 2002. JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) obtained the certificate of the pre-operation test from MEXT (Ministry of Education Culture Sports Science and Technology) after all the pre-operation tests by MEXT were passed successfully with the reactor transient test at an abnormal event as a final pre-operation test. From the test results of the rise-up-power test up to 30 MW in the rated operation mode, performance of the reactor and cooling system were confirmed, and it was also confirmed that an operation of reactor facility can be performed safely. Some problems to be solved were found through the tests. By solving them, the reactor operation with the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC will be achievable. (author)

  19. Outlines and verifications of the codes used in the safety analysis of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Maruyama, Soh; Fujita, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Shindoh, Masami; Sudo, Yukio; Hirano, Masashi.

    1990-03-01

    This paper presents brief description of the computer codes used in the safety analysis of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. The list of the codes is: 1. BLOOST-J2 2. THYDE-HTGR 3. TAC-NC 4. RATSAM6 5. COMPARE-MOD1 6. GRACE 7. OXIDE-3F 8. FLOWNET/TRUMP. Of described above, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 were developed for the multi-hole type gas cooled reactor and improved for HTTR and 2 was originated by THYDE-codes which were developed to treat the transient thermo-hydraulics during LOCA of LWR. Each code adopted the models and properties which yield conservative analytical results. Adequacy of each code was verified by the comparison with the experimental results and/or the analytical results obtained from the other codes which were already proven. (author)

  20. Artificial neural networks for dynamic monitoring of simulated-operating parameters of high temperature gas cooled engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, Serhat; Tuerkcan, Erdinc; Ayaz, Emine; Barutcu, Burak

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses to the problem of utilisation of the artificial neural networks (ANNs) for detecting anomalies as well as physical parameters of a nuclear power plant during power operation in real time. Three different types of neural network algorithms were used namely, feed-forward neural network (back-propagation, BP) and two types of recurrent neural networks (RNN). The data used in this paper were gathered from the simulation of the power operation of the Japan's High Temperature Engineering Testing Reactor (HTTR). For the wide range of power operation, 56 signals were generated by the reactor dynamic simulation code for several hours of normal power operation at different power ramps between 30 and 100% nominal power. Paper will compare the outcomes of different neural networks and presents the neural network system and the determination of physical parameters from the simulated operating data

  1. Measures ensuring safety of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    JAERI has conducted research and development of an HTGR type reactor since 1969 under the project of the multi-purpose high-temperate gas-cooled experimental reactor, whose design was changed to the HTTR in 1985. The reactor license was granted by the Government in 1990 and the construction started next year. Various functions and performances have been tested since 1996 and the initial criticality achieved in 1998. This document consists of six chapters, describing safety matters examined in several development phases. The first chapter deals with succession of the multi-purpose experimental reactor technology and its exchange between JAERI and domestic industries. Chapter 2 reviews new technical findings after the licensing which were reflected to the current safety assessment. These technical items are given in the table form of extensive pages. Chapter 3 and 4 describe the performance tests and the criticality access, respectively. Chapter 5 and 6 deal with the detection of fuel failures and helium gas leaks, respectively. (H.Y.)

  2. Biennial report of the Department of High Temperature Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Research activities conducted in the Department of High Temperature Engineering during fiscal 1982 and 1983 are described. Research and development works of the department are mainly related to a multipurpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) and a fusion reactor. This report deals with the main results obtained on material test, heat transfer, fluid-dynamics, structural mechanics, development of computer codes and operation of an M + A (Mother and Adapter) section and a T 1 test section of the HENDEL (Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop). (author)

  3. Application of automatic inspection system to nondestructive test of heat transfer tubes of primary pressurized water cooler in the high temperature engineering test reactor. Joint research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Furusawa, Takayuki

    2001-07-01

    Heat transfer tubes of a primary pressurized water cooled (PPWC) in the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) form the reactor pressure boundary of the primary coolant, therefore are important from the viewpoint of safety. To establish inspection techniques for the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC, an automatic inspection system was developed. The system employs a bobbin coil probe, a rotating probe for eddy current testing (ECT) and a rotating probe for ultrasonic testing (UT). Nondestructive test of a half of the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC was carried out by the automatic inspection system during reactor shutdown period of the HTTR (about 55% in the maximum reactor power in this paper). The nondestructive test results showed that the maximum signal-to-noise ratio was 1.8 in ECT. Pattern and phase of Lissajous wave, which were obtained for the heat transfer tube of the PPWC, were different from those obtained for the artificially defected tube. In UT echo amplitude of the PPWC tubes inspected was lower than 20% of distance-amplitude calibration curve. Thus, it was confirmed that there was no defect in depth, which was more than the detecting standard of the probes, on the outer surface of the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC inspected. (author)

  4. Annual report of the Division of High Temperature Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    Research activities conducted in the Division of High Temperature Engineering during fiscal 1981 are described. R and D works of our division are mainly related to a multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) and a fusion reactor. This report deals with the main results obtained on material test, development of computer codes, heat transfer, fluid-dynamics, structural mechanics and the construction of an M + A (Mother and Adapter) section of a HENDEL (Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop) as well. (author)

  5. Application of C/C composites to the combustion chamber of rocket engines. Part 1: Heating tests of C/C composites with high temperature combustion gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadano, Makoto; Sato, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yukio; Kusaka, Kazuo; Ueda, Shuichi; Suemitsu, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Kude, Yukinori

    1995-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) has various superior properties, such as high specific strength, specific modulus, and fracture strength at high temperatures of more than 1800 K. Therefore, C/C composite is expected to be useful for many structural applications, such as combustion chambers of rocket engines and nose-cones of space-planes, but C/C composite lacks oxidation resistivity in high temperature environments. To meet the lifespan requirement for thermal barrier coatings, a ceramic coating has been employed in the hot-gas side wall. However, the main drawback to the use of C/C composite is the tendency for delamination to occur between the coating layer on the hot-gas side and the base materials on the cooling side during repeated thermal heating loads. To improve the thermal properties of the thermal barrier coating, five different types of 30-mm diameter C/C composite specimens constructed with functionally gradient materials (FGM's) and a modified matrix coating layer were fabricated. In this test, these specimens were exposed to the combustion gases of the rocket engine using nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) / monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) to evaluate the properties of thermal and erosive resistance on the thermal barrier coating after the heating test. It was observed that modified matrix and coating with FGM's are effective in improving the thermal properties of C/C composite.

  6. High temperature high vacuum creep testing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Creep is the term used to describe time-dependent plastic flow of metals under conditions of constant load or stress at constant high temperature. Creep has an important considerations for materials operating under stresses at high temperatures for long time such as cladding materials, pressure vessels, steam turbines, boilers,...etc. These two creep machines measures the creep of materials and alloys at high temperature under high vacuum at constant stress. By the two chart recorders attached to the system one could register time and temperature versus strain during the test . This report consists of three chapters, chapter I is the introduction, chapter II is the technical description of the creep machines while chapter III discuss some experimental data on the creep behaviour. Of helium implanted stainless steel. 13 fig., 3 tab

  7. Investigation on cause of malfunction of wide range monitor (WRM) in high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). Sample tests and destructive tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Masanori; Saito, Kenji; Haga, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shinji; Katsuyama, Kozo; Motegi, Toshihiro; Takada, Kiyoshi; Higashimura, Keisuke; Fujii, Junichi; Ukai, Takayuki; Moriguchi, Yusuke

    2012-11-01

    An event, in which one of WRMs were disabled to detect the neutron flux in the reactor core, occurred during the period of reactor shut down of HTTR in March, 2010. The actual life time of WRM was unexpectedly shorter than the past developed life time. Investigation of the cause of the outage of WRM toward the recovery of the life time up to the past developed life is one of the issues to develop the technology basis of High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR). Then, two experimental investigations were carried out to reveal the cause of the malfunction by specifying the damaged part causing the event in the WRM. One is an experiment using a mock-up sample test which strength degradation at assembly process and heat cycle to specify the damaged part in the WRM. The other is a destructive test in Fuels Monitoring Facility (FMF) to specify the damaged part in the WRM. This report summarized the results of the destructive test and the experimental investigation using the mock-up to reveal the cause of malfunction of WRM. (author)

  8. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  9. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    with 3 cm diameter graphite-based fuel pebbles slowly circulating up through the core. Molten salt coolant (FLiBe) at 700°C flows concurrently (at significantly higher velocity) with the pebbles and is used to remove heat generated in the reactor core (approximately 1280 W/pebble), and supply it to a power conversion system. Refueling equipment continuously sorts spent fuel pebbles and replaces spent or damaged pebbles with fresh fuel. By combining greater or fewer numbers of pebble channel assemblies, multiple reactor designs with varying power levels can be offered. The PB-AHTR design is discussed in detail in Reference [1] and is shown schematically in Fig. 1. Fig. 1. PB-AHTR concept (drawing taken from Peterson et al., Design and Development of the Modular PB-AHTR Proceedings of ICApp 08). Pebble behavior within the core is a key issue in proving the viability of this concept. This includes understanding the behavior of the pebbles thermally, hydraulically, and mechanically (quantifying pebble wear characteristics, flow channel wear, etc). The experiment being developed is an initial step in characterizing the pebble behavior under realistic PB-AHTR operating conditions. It focuses on thermal and hydraulic behavior of a static pebble bed using a convective salt loop to provide prototypic fluid conditions to the bed, and a unique inductive heating technique to provide prototypic heating in the pebbles. The facility design is sufficiently versatile to allow a variety of other experimentation to be performed in the future. The facility can accommodate testing of scaled reactor components or sub-components such as flow diodes, salt-to-salt heat exchangers, and improved pump designs as well as testing of refueling equipment, high temperature instrumentation, and other reactor core designs.

  10. Test of high temperature fuel element, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Norio; Shiina, Yasuaki; Nekoya, Shin-ichi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Emori, Koichi

    1980-11-01

    Heat transfer experiment to measure the characteristics of a VHTR fuel in the same condition of the reactor core was carried out using HTGL (High Temperature Helium Gas Loop) and its test section. In this report, the details of the test section, related problems of construction and some typical results are described. The newly developed heater with graphite heat transfer surface was used as a simulated fuel element to determine the heat transfer characteristics. Following conclusions were obtained; (1) Reynolds number between turbulent and transitional region is about 2600. (2) Reynolds number between transitional and laminar region is about 4800. (3) The laminarization phenomena have not been observed and are hardly occurred in annular tubes comparing with round tube. (4) Measured Nusselt numbers agree to the established correlations in turbulent and laminar regions. (author)

  11. Creep properties of base metal and welded joint of Hastelloy XR produced for High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor in simulated primary coolant helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Shindo, Masami; Suzuki, Tomio; Tanabe, Tatsuhiko; Mutoh, Isao; Hiraga, Kenjiro

    1999-01-01

    Creep tests of base metal, weld metal and welded joint of Hastelloy XR, which had the same chemical composition as Hastelloy XR produced for an intermediate heat exchanger of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, were conducted in simulated primary coolant helium. The weld metal and welded joint showed almost equal to or longer rupture time than the base metal of Hastelloy XR at 850 and 900degC, although they gave shorter rupture time at 950degC under low stress and at 1,000degC. The welded joint of Hastelloy XR ruptured at the base metal region at 850 and 900degC. On the other hand, it ruptured at the weld metal region at 950 and 1,000degC. The steady-state creep rate of weld metal of Hastelloy XR was lower than that of base metal at 850, 900 and 950degC. The creep rupture strengths of base metal, weld metal and welded joint of Hastelloy XR obtained in this study were confirmed to be much higher than the design allowable creep-rupture stress (S R ) of the Design Allowable Limits below 950degC. (author)

  12. Analysis of irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Kikuchi, Teruo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Sato, Sadao; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Kashimura, Satoru.

    1991-07-01

    Irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles were analyzed by the MICROS-2 code for the fuels of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) under its operating conditions. The analyses were made on the standard core fuel (A-type) and the test fuels comprising the advanced SiC-coated particle fuel (B-1 type) and the ZrC-coated particle fuel (B-2 type). For the B-1 type fuel, the stresses were relieved due to the thicker buffer and SiC layers than for the A type fuel. The slightly decreased thickness of the fourth layer for the B-1 type than for the A type fuel had no significant effect on the stresses. As for the B-2 type fuel, almost the same results as for the B-1 type were obtained under an assumption that the ZrC layer as well as the SiC layer undergoes negligible dimension change within the analysis conditions. The obtained results indicated that the B-1 and B-2 type fuels are better than the A type fuel in terms of integrity against the irradiation-induced stresses. Finally, research subjects for development of the analysis code on the fuel behavior are discussed. (author)

  13. Proposal of a neutron transmutation doping facility for n-type spherical silicon solar cell at high-temperature engineering test reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hai Quan; Honda, Yuki; Motoyama, Mizuki; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Ishii, Toshiaki; Ishitsuka, Etsuo

    2018-05-01

    The p-type spherical silicon solar cell is a candidate for future solar energy with low fabrication cost, however, its conversion efficiency is only about 10%. The conversion efficiency of a silicon solar cell can be increased by using n-type silicon semiconductor as a substrate. This study proposed a new method of neutron transmutation doping silicon (NTD-Si) for producing the n-type spherical solar cell, in which the Si-particles are irradiated directly instead of the cylinder Si-ingot as in the conventional NTD-Si. By using a 'screw', an identical resistivity could be achieved for the Si-particles without a complicated procedure as in the NTD with Si-ingot. Also, the reactivity and neutron flux swing could be kept to a minimum because of the continuous irradiation of the Si-particles. A high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR), which is located in Japan, was used as a reference reactor in this study. Neutronic calculations showed that the HTTR has a capability to produce about 40t/EFPY of 10Ωcm resistivity Si-particles for fabrication of the n-type spherical solar cell. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Changes in the flexural strength of engineering ceramics after high temperature sodium corrosion test. Influence after sodium exposure for 1000 hours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Tachi, Yoshiaki; Kano, Shigeki; Hirakawa, Yasushi; Komine, Ryuji; Yoshida, Eiichi

    1998-02-01

    Engineering ceramics have excellent properties such as high strength, high hardness and high heat resistance compared with metallic materials. To apply the ceramic in fast reactor environment, it is necessary to evaluate the sodium compatibility and the influence of sodium on the mechanical properties of ceramics. In this study, the influence of high temperature sodium on the mechanical properties of sintered ceramics of conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 , SiC, SiAlON, AlN and unidirectional solidified ceramics of Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite were investigated by means of flexure tests. Test specimens were exposed in liquid sodium at 823K and 923K for 3.6Ms. There were no changes in the flexural strength of the conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 , AlN and Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite after the sodium exposure at 823K. On the contrary, the decrease in the flexural strength was observed in SiC and SiAlON. After the sodium exposure at 923K, there were also no changes in the flexural strength of AlN and Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite. In the conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 and SiC, the flexural strength decreased and signs of grain boundary corrosion were detected by surface observation. The flexural strength of SiAlON after the sodium exposure at 923K increased instead of severe corrosion. In the specimens those showed no changes in the flexural strength, further exposure in sodium is needed to verify whether the mechanical properties degrade or not. For SiAlON, it is necessary to clarify the reason for the increased strength after the sodium exposure at 923K. (author)

  15. A high temperature testing system for ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, John

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic composites are presently being developed for high temperature use in heat engine and space power system applications. The operating temperature range is expected to be 1090 to 1650 C (2000 F to 3000 F). Very little material data is available at these temperatures and, therefore, it is desirable to thoroughly characterize the basic unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic composite. This includes testing mainly for mechanical material properties at high temperatures. The proper conduct of such characterization tests requires the development of a tensile testing system includes unique gripping, heating, and strain measuring devices which require special considerations. The system also requires an optimized specimen shape. The purpose of this paper is to review various techniques for measuring displacements or strains, preferably at elevated temperatures. Due to current equipment limitations it is assumed that the specimen is to be tested at a temperature of 1430 C (2600F) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For the most part, previous high temperature material characterization tests, such as flexure and tensile tests, have been performed in inert atmospheres. Due to the harsh environment in which the ceramic specimen is to be tested, many conventional strain measuring techniques can not be applied. Initially a brief description of the more commonly used mechanical strain measuring techniques is given. Major advantages and disadvantages with their application to high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites are discussed. Next, a general overview is given for various optical techniques. Advantages and disadvantages which are common to these techniques are noted. The optical methods for measuring strain or displacement are categorized into two sections. These include real-time techniques. Finally, an optical technique which offers optimum performance with the high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites is recommended.

  16. High temperature engineering research facilities and experiments in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yuanhui; Liu, Meisheng; Yao, Huizhong; Ju, Huaiming

    1998-01-01

    June 14, 1995, the construction of a pebble bed type high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) started in China. It is a test reactor with 10 MW thermal power output (termed HTR- 10). The test reactor is located on the site of Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in the northwest suburb of Beijing, about 40 km away from the city. Design of the HTR-10 test reactor represents the features of HTR-Modular design: 'side-by-side' arrangement, spherical fuel elements with 'multi-pass' loading scheme, completely passive decay heat removal, reactor shutdown systems in the side reflector, etc. However, in the HTR-10 design some modifications from the HTR-Module were made to satisfy Chinese conditions. For example, the steam generator is composed of a number of modular helical tubes with small diameter, pulse pneumatic discharging apparatus are used in the fuel handling system and step motor driving control rods are designed. These modifications would cause some uncertainty in our design. It is necessary to do engineering experiments to prove these new or modified ideas. Therefore, a program of engineering experiments for HTR-10 key technologies is being conducted at INET. The main aims of these engineering experiments are to verify the designed characteristics and performance of the components and systems, to feedback on design and to obtain operational experiences. Those engineering experiments are depressurization test of the hot gas duct at room temperature and operating pressure, performance test of the hot gas duct at operating helium temperature and pressure, performance test of the pulse pneumatic fuel handling system, test of the control rods driving apparatus, two phase flow stability test for the once through steam generator and cross mixture test at the bottom of the reactor core

  17. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 ◦C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive...... media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells...... and facilitate different types of electrochemical measurements. Selected examples of materials and electrochemical cells examined in the test station are provided, ranging from the evaluation of the ionic conductivity of liquid electrolytic solutions immobilized in mesoporous ceramic structures...

  18. Probability based high temperature engineering creep and structural fire resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Razdolsky, Leo

    2017-01-01

    This volume on structural fire resistance is for aerospace, structural, and fire prevention engineers; architects, and educators. It bridges the gap between prescriptive- and performance-based methods and simplifies very complex and comprehensive computer analyses to the point that the structural fire resistance and high temperature creep deformations will have a simple, approximate analytical expression that can be used in structural analysis and design. The book emphasizes methods of the theory of engineering creep (stress-strain diagrams) and mathematical operations quite distinct from those of solid mechanics absent high-temperature creep deformations, in particular the classical theory of elasticity and structural engineering. Dr. Razdolsky’s previous books focused on methods of computing the ultimate structural design load to the different fire scenarios. The current work is devoted to the computing of the estimated ultimate resistance of the structure taking into account the effect of high temperatur...

  19. High temperature gas dynamics an introduction for physicists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Tarit K

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Dynamics is a primer for scientists, engineers, and students who would like to have a basic understanding of the physics and the behavior of high-temperature gases. It is a valuable tool for astrophysicists as well. The first chapters treat the basic principles of quantum and statistical mechanics and how to derive thermophysical properties from them. Special topics are included that are rarely found in other textbooks, such as the thermophysical and transport properties of multi-temperature gases and a novel method to compute radiative transfer. Furthermore, collision processes between different particles are discussed. Separate chapters deal with the production of high-temperature gases and with electrical emission in plasmas, as well as related diagnostic techniques.This new edition adds over 100 pages and includes the following updates: several sections on radiative properties of high temperature gases and various radiation models, a section on shocks in magneto-gas-dynamics, a sectio...

  20. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston

  1. Results and future plans for the innovative basic research on high temperature engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is under the rise-to-power stage at the Oarai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). This reactor is aimed not only at establishment of the infrastructural technology on high temperature gas-cooled reactor and its upgrading, but also at promotion of the innovative basic research on high temperature engineering. The research is a series of innovative high-temperature irradiation studies, making the best use of the characteristic of the HTTR that it provides a very wide irradiation space at high temperatures. The JAERI has been conducting preliminary tests of the innovative research since 1994, in collaboration with universities and other research institutes, in the fields of 1) new materials development, 2) high temperature radiation chemistry and fusion-related research, and 3) high temperature irradiation techniques and other nuclear research. The HTTR Utilization Research Committee has been examining the results and methodology of the preliminary tests and the future plans, as well as examining the preparatory arrangements of facilities for the HTTR irradiation and post-irradiation examinations. This report presents a summary of results of the preliminary tests and preparatory arrangements for about seven years, together with an outline of the future plans. (author)

  2. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O& #39; Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing

  3. Evaluation test on stability of high temperature strain gage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Toshimi (Kyowa Electronic Instruments Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Ito, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro

    1983-08-01

    This report deals with the results on a stability test of high temperature strain gage which is utilized for development of the Stethoscope for OGL - 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Services (ab. SOCETS). The test has proved that the weldable strain gage (KHC - 20 - G5) exhibits excellent stability at 500/sup 0/C during 3000 to 4000 hours service and can be applied sufficiently to evaluate integrity of OGL - 1 high temperature pipings and others.

  4. Evaluation test on stability of high temperature strain gage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshimi; Ito, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro.

    1983-01-01

    This report deals with the results on a stability test of high temperature strain gage which is utilized for development of the Stethoscope for OGL - 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Services (ab. SOCETS). The test has proved that the weldable strain gage (KHC - 20 - G5) exhibits excellent stability at 500 0 C during 3000 to 4000 hours service and can be applied sufficiently to evaluate integrity of OGL - 1 high temperature pipings and others. (author)

  5. Technology Requirements and Development for Affordable High-Temperature Distributed Engine Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    long lasting, high temperature modules is to use high temperature electronics on ceramic modules. The electronic components are “ brazed ” onto the...Copyright © 2012 by ISA Technology Requirements and Development for Affordable High - Temperature Distributed Engine Controls Alireza Behbahani 1...with regards to high temperature capability. The Government and Industry Distributed Engine Controls Working Group (DECWG) [5] has been established

  6. Investigation on cause of outage of Wide Range Monitor (WRM) in High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Transport operation toward investigation for cause of outage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Masanori; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Taiki; Saito, Kenji; Takada, Shoji; Yoshida, Naoaki; Isozaki, Ryosuke; Katsuyama, Kozo; Motegi, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    An event, in which one of WRMs were disabled to detect the neutron flux in the reactor core, occurred during the period of reactor shut down of HTTR in March, 2010. The actual life time of WRM was unexpectedly shorter than the past developed life time. Investigation of the cause of the outage of WRM toward the recovery of the life time up to the developed life is one of the issues to develop the technology basis of High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR). Then, a post irradiation examination was planned to specify the damaged part causing the event in the WRM was also planned. For the investigation, the X-ray computed tomography scanner in Fuels Monitoring Facility (FMF). This report describes the preliminary investigation on the cause of outage of the WRM. The results of study for transportation method of the irradiated WRM from HTTR to FMF is also reported with the record to complete the transport operation. (author)

  7. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  8. Development and Performance Verification of Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors in High Temperature Engine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kren, Lawrence A.; Floyd, Bertram M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Martinez, Martel

    2014-01-01

    A High Temperature Fiber Optic Sensor (HTFOS) has been developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for aircraft engine applications. After fabrication and preliminary in-house performance evaluation, the HTFOS was tested in an engine environment at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The engine tests enabled the performance of the HTFOS in real engine environments to be evaluated along with the ability of the sensor to respond to changes in the engine's operating condition. Data were collected prior, during, and after each test in order to observe the change in temperature from ambient to each of the various test point levels. An adequate amount of data was collected and analyzed to satisfy the research team that HTFOS operates properly while the engine was running. Temperature measurements made by HTFOS while the engine was running agreed with those anticipated.

  9. Investigation on cause of outage of Wide Range Monitor (WRM) in High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) toward investigation of the cause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Masanori; Saito, Kenji; Takada, Shoji; Ishimi, Akihiro; Katsuyama, Kozo; Motegi, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    An event, in which one of WRMs were disabled to detect the neutron flux in the reactor core, occurred during the period of reactor shut down of HTTR in March, 2010. The actual life time of WRM was unexpectedly shorter than the past developed life time. Investigation of the cause of the outage of WRM toward the recovery of the life time up to the past developed life is one of the issues to develop the technology basis of High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR). Then, two experimental investigations were carried out to reveal the cause of the outage by specifying the damaged part causing the event in the WRM. The one is a post irradiation examination using the X-ray computed tomography scanner in Fuels Monitoring Facility (FMF) to specify the damaged part in the WRM. The other is an experiment using a mock-up simulating the WRM fabricated by the fabricator. The characteristic impedance of the damaged WRM was measured by Time Domain Reflectometry, which was compared with that of the mock-up, which could narrow down the damaged part in the WRM. This report summarized the results of the PIE and the experimental investigation using the mock-up to reveal the cause of outage of WRM. (author)

  10. Seismic test of high temperature piping for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobatake, Kiyokazu; Midoriyama, Shigeru; Ooka, Yuzi; Suzuki, Michiaki; Katsuki, Taketsugu

    1983-01-01

    Since the high temperature pipings for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor contain helium gas at 1000 deg C and 40 kgf/cm 2 , the double-walled pipe type consisting of the external pipe serving as the pressure boundary and the internal pipe with heat insulating structure was adopted. Accordingly, their aseismatic design is one of the important subjects. Recently, for the purpose of grasping the vibration characteristics of these high temperature pipings and obtaining the data required for the aseismatic design, two specimens, that is, a double-walled pipe model and a heat-insulating structure, were made, and the vibration test was carried out on them, using a 30 ton vibration table of Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. In the high temperature pipings of the primary cooling system for the multi-purpose, high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor, the external pipes of 32 B bore as the pressure boundary and the internal pipes of 26 B bore with internal heat insulation consisting of double layers of fiber and laminated metal insulators as the temperature boundary were adopted. The testing method and the results are reported. As the spring constant of spacers is larger and clearance is smaller, the earthquake wave response of double-walled pipes is smaller, and it is more advantageous. The aseismatic property of the heat insulation structure is sufficient. (Kako, I.)

  11. Proposal of the concept of selection of accidents that release large amounts of radioactive substances in the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Masato; Honda, Yuki; Takada, Shoji; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In Position, construction and equipment of testing and research reactor to be subjected to the use standards for rules Article 53 (prevention of expansion of the accident to release a large amount of radioactive material) generation the frequency is a lower accident than design basis accident, when what is likely to release a large amount of radioactive material or radiation from the facility has occurred, and take the necessary measures in order to prevent the spread of the accident. There is provided a lower accident than frequency design basis accidents, for those that may release a large amount of radioactive material or radiation. (author)

  12. Waste Heat Recovery from a High Temperature Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jonas E.

    engine to reduce uncertainty. Changes to exhaust emissions were recorded using a 5-gas analyzer. The engine condition was also monitored throughout the tests by engine compression testing, oil analysis, and a complete teardown and inspection after testing was completed. The integrity of the head gasket seal proved to be a significant problem and leakage of engine coolant into the combustion chamber was detected when testing ended. The post-test teardown revealed problems with oil breakdown at locations where temperatures were highest, with accompanying component wear. The results from the experiment were then used as inputs for a WHR system model using ethanol as the working fluid, which provided estimates of system output and improvement in efficiency. Thermodynamic models were created for eight different WHR systems with coolant temperatures of 90 °C, 150 °C, 175 °C, and 200 °C and condenser temperatures of 60 °C and 90 °C at a single operating point of 3100 rpm and 24 N-m of torque. The models estimated that WHR output for both condenser temperatures would increase by over 100% when the coolant temperature was increased from 90 °C to 200 °C. This increased WHR output translated to relative efficiency gains as high as 31.0% for the 60 °C condenser temperature and 24.2% for the 90 °C condenser temperature over the baseline engine efficiency at 90 °C. Individual heat exchanger models were created to estimate the footprint for a WHR system for each of the eight systems. When the coolant temperature increased from 90 °C to 200 °C, the total heat exchanger volume increased from 16.6 x 103 cm3 to 17.1 x 10 3 cm3 with a 60 °C condenser temperature, but decreased from 15.1 x 103 cm3 to 14.2 x 10 3 cm3 with a 90 °C condenser temperature. For all cases, increasing the coolant temperature resulted in an improvement in the efficiency gain for each cubic meter of heat exchanger volume required. Additionally, the engine oil coolers represented a significant portion of

  13. Verification of in-core thermal and hydraulic analysis code FLOWNET/TRUMP for the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Soh; Sudo, Yukio; Saito, Shinzo; Kiso, Yoshihiro; Hayakawa, Hitoshi

    1989-01-01

    The FLOWNET/TRUMP code consists of a flow network analysis code 'FLOWNET' for calculations of coolant flow distribution and coolant temperature distribution in the core with a thermal conduction analysis code 'TRUMP' for calculation of temperature distribution in solid structures. The verification of FLOWNET/TRUMP was made by the comparison of the analytical results with the results of steady state experiments by the HENDEL multichannel test rig, T1-M, which consisted of twelve simulated fuel rods heated electrically and eleven hexagonal graphite fuel blocks. The T1-M simulated the one fuel column in the core. The analytical results agreed well with the results of the experiment in which the HTTR operating conditions were simulated. (orig.)

  14. Tests of ball bearing used in high-temperature and high-purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Chengmu; Hao Shouxin.

    1987-01-01

    According to the particular conditions and the operation environments in high-temperature and high-purity water, the test content and the measurement instrumentation for the ball bearing were defined. Through various tests, operational performances of the bearing have preliminarily been understood. It provided some useful information for the engineering application of the bearing

  15. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  16. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  17. LVDT Development for High Temperature Irradiation Test and Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Yong; Ban, Chae Min; Choo, Kee Nam; Jun, Byung Hyuk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The LVDT (Linear Variable Differential Transformer) is used to measure the elongation and pressure of a nuclear fuel rod, or the creep and fatigue of the material during a reactor irradiation test. This device must be a radiation-resistant LVDT for use in a research reactor. Norway Halden has LVDTs for an irradiation test by the own development and commercialized. But Halden's LVDTs have limited the temperature of the use until to 350 .deg. C. So, KAERI has been developing a new LVDT for high temperature irradiation test. This paper describes the design of a LVDT, the fabrication process of a LVDT, and the result of the performance test. The designed LVDT uses thermocouple cable for coil wire material and one MI cable as signal cable. This LVDT for a high temperature irradiation test can be used until a maximum of 900 .deg. C. Welding is a very important factor for the fabrication of an LVDT. We are using a 150W fiber laser welding system that consists of a welding head, monitoring vision system and rotary index.

  18. Development of monitoring system using acoustic emission for detection of helium gas leakage for primary cooling system and flow-induced vibration for heat transfer tube of heat exchangers for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Furusawa, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Masayuki; Satoh, Yoshiyuki; Yanagibashi, Minoru

    1998-10-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) uses helium gas for its primary coolant, whose leakage inside reactor containment vessel is considered in design of the HTTR. It is necessary to detect leakage of helium gas at an early stage so that total amount of the leakage should be as small as possible. On the other hand, heat transfer tubes of heat exchangers of the HTTR are designed not to vibrate at normal operation, but the flow-induced vibration is to be monitored to provide against an emergency. Thus monitoring system of acoustic emission for detection of primary coolant leakage and vibration of heat transfer tubes was developed and applied to the HTTR. Before the application to the HTTR, leakage detection test was performed using 1/4 scaled model of outer tube of primary concentric hot gas duct. Result of the test covers detectable minimum leakage rate and effect of difference in gas, pressure, shape of leakage path and distance from the leaking point. Detectable minimum leakage rate was about 5 Ncc/sec. The monitoring system is promising in leakage detection, though countermeasure to noise is to be needed after the HTTR starts operating. (author)

  19. The high-temperature helium test facility (HHV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, G.; Weiskopf, H.

    1977-03-01

    The report describes the high-temperature helium test facility (HHV). Construction of this plant was started in 1972 by Messrs. BBC, Mannheim, on behalf of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich. By the end of 1976, the construction work is in its last stage, so that the plant may start operation early in 1977. First of all, the cycle system and the arrangement of components are dealt with, followed by a discussion of individual components. Here, emphasis is laid on components typical for HHT systems, while conventional components are mentioned without further structural detail. The projected test programme for the HHV facility in phase IB of the HHT project is shortly dealt with. After this, the potential of this test facility with regard to the possible use of test components and to fluid- and thermodynamic boundary conditions is pointed out. With the unique potential the facility offers here, aspects of shortened service life at higher cycle temperatures do not remain disregarded. (orig./UA) [de

  20. Corrosion tests of high temperature alloys in impure helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Jan; Kalivodova, Jana; Vilemova, Monika; Skoumalova, Zuzana; Brabec, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Czech research organizations take part several projects concerning technologies and materials for advanced gas cooled reactors, as an example international project ARCHER supported by EU within FP7, also several national projects supported by Technology Agency of the Czech Republic are solved in cooperation with industrial and research organization. Within these projects the material testing program is performed. The results presented in these paper concerning high temperature corrosion and degradation of alloys (800 H, SS 316 and P91) in helium containing minor impurities (H_2, CO, CH_4, HZO) at temperatures up to 760°C. After corrosion tests (up to 1500 hours) the specimens was investigated by several methods (gravimetry, SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, hardness and micro-hardness testing etc. (author)

  1. An investigation of high-temperature irradiation test program of new ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Terai, Takayuki; Oku, Tatsuo

    1999-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute entrusted the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with an investigation into the trend of irradiation processing/damage research on new ceramic materials. The present report describes the result of the investigation, which was aimed at effective execution of irradiation programs using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) by examining preferential research subjects and their concrete research methods. Objects of the investigation were currently on-going preliminary tests of functional materials (high-temperature oxide superconductor and high-temperature semiconductor) and structural materials (carbon/carbon and SiC/SiC composite materials), together with newly proposed subjects of, e.g., radiation effects on ceramics-coated materials and super-plastic ceramic materials as well as microscopic computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ceramics. These works have revealed 1) the background of each research subject, 2) its objective and significance from viewpoints of science and engineering, 3) research methodology in stages from preliminary tests to real HTTR irradiation, and 4) concrete HTTR-irradiation methods which include main specifications of test specimens, irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination facilities and apparatuses. The present efforts have constructed the important fundamentals in the new ceramic materials field for further planning and execution of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  2. Testing and evaluation of high temperature superconductor current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Anand; Puntambekar, Avinash; Manekar, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    National Institute for Inter-disciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Trivandrum (formerly Regional Research Laboratory) has accomplished a DAE-BRNS project with Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) as principal collaborator for the development of high temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads. These HTS current leads have self-field critical currents (Ic) ranging from 50 A to 1000 A at liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) temperature. These HTS are made out of silver sheathed Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide (BSCCO-2223), for direct application in superconducting (SC) systems involving transportation of high electric currents from power sources at room temperature to superconducting devices at cryogenic temperatures. RRCAT has participated in this project by testing and evaluation of these HTS current leads and carried out actual load trials. In this paper, we will describe the HTS testing setup, tests performed with their testing procedure and the test results. The testing of these HTS has been done with joint effort of Materials Advanced Accelerator Science and Cryogenics Div. and Superconducting Technology Lab (SCT Lab), Advanced Accelerator Module Development Div., using the test facility available at the SCT Lab. (author)

  3. Engineering design of a high-temperature superconductor current lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R.; Daugherty, M.A.; Buckles, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's Superconductivity Pilot Center Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Superconductivity, Inc., are developing high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads suitable for application to superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. The principal objective of the development program is to design, construct, and evaluate the performance of HTS current leads suitable for near-term applications. Supporting objectives are to (1) develop performance criteria; (2) develop a detailed design; (3) analyze performance; (4) gain manufacturing experience in the areas of materials and components procurement, fabrication and assembly, quality assurance, and cost; (5) measure performance of critical components and the overall assembly; (6) identify design uncertainties and develop a program for their study; and (7) develop application-acceptance criteria

  4. Engineering design of a high-temperature superconductor current lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, R. C.; Cha, Y. S.; Hull, J. R.; Daugherty, M. A.; Buckles, W. E.

    As part of the US Department of Energy's Superconductivity Pilot Center Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Superconductivity, Inc., are developing high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads suitable for application to superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. The principal objective of the development program is to design, construct, and evaluate the performance of HTS current leads suitable for near-term applications. Supporting objectives are to (1) develop performance criteria; (2) develop a detailed design; (3) analyze performance; (4) gain manufacturing experience in the areas of materials and components procurement, fabrication and assembly, quality assurance, and cost; (5) measure performance of critical components and the overall assembly; (6) identify design uncertainties and develop a program for their study; and (7) develop application-acceptance criteria.

  5. Product engineering by high-temperature flame synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue; Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid

    product gas can be applied directly in additional product engineering concepts. A brief overview of on-going product developments and product engineering projects is outlined below. These projects, which are all founded on flame synthesis of nano-structured materials, include: • Preparation of catalyzed...... hardware by direct deposition of catalysts on process equipment • Modifications of the substrate surfaces to obtain good adhesion during flame-coating • Formation of membrane layers by gas-phase deposition of nano-particles • Catalyst deposition in micro-reactors for rapid catalyst screening...

  6. Considerations in Execution of High Temperature Steam Oxidation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign is currently supporting a range of experimental efforts aimed at development and qualification of so-called ‘accident tolerant’ nuclear fuel forms. Numerous criteria have been developed by which proposed systems will be investigated; foremost among these will be their resistance to oxidation at high temperatures by steamdominated atmospheres. Experimental characterization of the various proposed systems is currently ongoing at numerous national laboratories as well as at industrial and university partners using a wide range of different laboratory equipment and techniques. This requires consideration of differences that may develop among test protocols due to both intrinsic (e.g. differences between experimental capabilities) and extrinsic (e.g. methodology of test execution) factors. These are essential to understand to provide confidence across institutions in the data collected if it is used to justify resources for further investigation. The focus of this document is to provide an initial discussion of factors that may play a role in governing the observed oxidation of a test sample. It will remain up to the principle investigator to judge whether a specific factor discussed is directly applicable to the system under investigation. The purpose of the specific experiment must also guide determination of whether a given factor requires careful consideration or not.

  7. High temperature mechanical tests performed on doped fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugay, C.; Mocellin, A.; Dehaudt, P.; Sladkoff, M.

    1998-01-01

    The high-temperature compressive deformation of large-grained UO 2 doped with metallic oxides has been investigated and compared with that of pure UO 2 with a standard microstructure. All the specimens are made from a single batch of UO 2 powder. Tests with constant applied strain rate of 20μm.min -1 show that Cr 2 O 3 additions cause a decrease in the flow stress of about 15 MPa compared with the reference material. When reduced in hydrogen at 1500 deg. C the specimens present a peak stress close to the flow stress of the pure UO 2 . Measurements of creep rates are made at 1500 deg. C at applied stresses varying from 20 to 70 MPa. Cr 2 O 3 additions increase the creep-rate, up to several orders of magnitude-change from the pure material to a doped one. All the doped materials exhibit power-law creep with exponents in the range of 4.9 to 6.3. The activation energy varies from 466 to 451 kJ/mol depending on the dopant concentration. The creep of the undoped material is divided into three regimes of deformation depending on stress. At low stresses the strain rate shows a second power dependence on stress. At high stress levels a higher stress dependence is observed. The creep power-law breaks down and an exponential law holds true at higher stresses. The activation energies are found to be 410 and 560 kJ/mol in the low- and high-stress regions respectively. The former value is in good agreement with the grain boundary diffusion energy in stoichiometric polycrystalline uranium dioxide and the latter corresponds to that found for self-diffusion energy of uranium. Creep behaviours are discussed in terms of deformation mechanisms. (author)

  8. High-Temperature Cast Aluminum for Efficient Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobel, Andrew C.

    both rod and plate-like precipitates. The model accurately accounts for the temperature dependence of particle nucleation and growth, solid solution strengthening, Si eutectic strength, and base aluminum yield strength. Strengthening model predictions of tensile yield strength are in excellent agreement with experimental observations over a wide range of aluminum alloy systems, aging temperatures, and test conditions. The developed models enable the prediction of the required particle morphology and volume fraction necessary to achieve target property goals in the design of future aluminum alloys. The effect of partitioning elements to the Q-phase was also considered for the potential to control the nucleation rate, reduce coarsening, and control the evolution of particle morphology. Elements were selected based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations showing the prevalence of certain elements to partition to the Q-phase. 3DAPT experiments were performed on Q-phase containing wrought alloys with these additions and show segregation of certain elements to the Q-phase with relative agreement to DFT predictions.

  9. 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2006-01-01

    This work demonstrates the operation of a 30 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. This prototype stack has been developed at the Institute of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, as a proof-of-concept for a low pressure cathode air cooled HTPEM stack. The membranes used are Celtec...

  10. Deterministic Modeling of the High Temperature Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortensi, J.; Cogliati, J.J.; Pope, M.A.; Ferrer, R.M.; Ougouag, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with the development of reactor physics analysis capability of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) project. In order to examine INL's current prismatic reactor deterministic analysis tools, the project is conducting a benchmark exercise based on modeling the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR). This exercise entails the development of a model for the initial criticality, a 19 column thin annular core, and the fully loaded core critical condition with 30 columns. Special emphasis is devoted to the annular core modeling, which shares more characteristics with the NGNP base design. The DRAGON code is used in this study because it offers significant ease and versatility in modeling prismatic designs. Despite some geometric limitations, the code performs quite well compared to other lattice physics codes. DRAGON can generate transport solutions via collision probability (CP), method of characteristics (MOC), and discrete ordinates (Sn). A fine group cross section library based on the SHEM 281 energy structure is used in the DRAGON calculations. HEXPEDITE is the hexagonal z full core solver used in this study and is based on the Green's Function solution of the transverse integrated equations. In addition, two Monte Carlo (MC) based codes, MCNP5 and PSG2/SERPENT, provide benchmarking capability for the DRAGON and the nodal diffusion solver codes. The results from this study show a consistent bias of 2-3% for the core multiplication factor. This systematic error has also been observed in other HTTR benchmark efforts and is well documented in the literature. The ENDF/B VII graphite and U235 cross sections appear to be the main source of the error. The isothermal temperature coefficients calculated with the fully loaded core configuration agree well with other benchmark participants but are 40% higher than the experimental values. This discrepancy with the measurement stems from the fact that during the experiments the control

  11. High temperature compression tests performed on doped fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duguay, C.; Mocellin, A.; Dehaudt, P. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, CEA Grenoble (France); Fantozzi, G. [INSA Lyon - GEMPPM, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-12-31

    The use of additives of corundum structure M{sub 2}O{sub 3} (M=Cr, Al) is an effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. The high-temperature compressive deformation of large-grained UO{sub 2} doped with these oxides has been investigated and compared with that of pure UO{sub 2} with a standard microstructure. Such doped fuels are expected to exhibit enhanced plasticity. Their use would therefore reduce the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and thus improve the performances of the nuclear fuel. (orig.) 5 refs.

  12. High temperature compression tests performed on doped fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguay, C.; Mocellin, A.; Dehaudt, P.; Fantozzi, G.

    1997-01-01

    The use of additives of corundum structure M 2 O 3 (M=Cr, Al) is an effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. The high-temperature compressive deformation of large-grained UO 2 doped with these oxides has been investigated and compared with that of pure UO 2 with a standard microstructure. Such doped fuels are expected to exhibit enhanced plasticity. Their use would therefore reduce the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and thus improve the performances of the nuclear fuel. (orig.)

  13. Advanced high temperature materials for the energy efficient automotive Stirling engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titran, R.H.; Stephens, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Stirling engine is under investigation jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternative to the internal combustion engine for automotive applications. The Stirling engine is an external combustion engine that offers the advantage of high fuel economy, low emissions, low noise, and low vibrations compared to current internal combustion automotive engines. The most critical component from a materials viewpoint is the heater head consisting of the cylinders, heating tubes, and regenerator housing. Materials requirements for the heater head include compatibility with hydrogen, resistance to hydrogen permeation, high temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance, and high temperature creep-rupture and fatigue properties. A continuing supporting materials research and technology program has identified the wrought alloys CG-27 and 12RN72, and the cast alloys XF-818 and NASAUT 4G-A1 as candidate replacements for the cobalt containing alloys used in current prototype engines. Based on the materials research program in support of the automotive Stirling engine it is concluded that manufacture of the engine is feasible from low cost iron-base alloys rather than the cobalt alloys used in prototype engines. This paper presents results of research that led to this conclusion

  14. High temperature helium test rig with prestressed concrete pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidl, H.

    1975-10-01

    The report gives a short description of the joint project prestressed concrete vessel-helium test station as there is the building up of the concrete structure, the system of instrumentation, the data processing, the development of the helium components as well as the testing programs. (author)

  15. SCC Initiation Testing of Alloy 600 in High Temperature Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etien, Robert A.; Richey, Edward; Morton, David S.; Eager, Julie

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation tests have been conducted on Alloy 600 at temperatures from 304 to 367°C. Tests were conducted with in-situ monitored smooth tensile specimens under a constant load in hydrogenated environments. A reversing direct current electric potential drop (EPD) system was used for all of the tests to detect SCC initiation. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of stress (and strain), coolant hydrogen, and temperature on SCC initiation time. The thermal activation energy of SCC initiation was measured as 103 ± 18 kJ/mol in hydrogenated water, which is similar to the thermal activation energy for SCC growth. Results suggest that the fundamental mechanical parameter which controls SCC initiation is plastic strain not stress. SCC initiation was shown to have a different sensitivity than SCC growth to dissolved hydrogen level. Specifically, SCC initiation time appears to be relatively insensitive to hydrogen level in the nickel stability region.

  16. High temperature corrosion investigation in an oxyfuel combustion test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Bjurman, M.; Hjörnhede, A

    2014-01-01

    Oxyfuel firing and subsequent capture of CO2 is a way to reduce CO2 emissions from coal‐fired boilers. Literature is summarized highlighting results which may contribute to understanding of the corrosion processes in an oxyfuel boiler.Tests were conducted in a 500 kWth oxyfuel test facility...... constructed by Brandenburg Technical University to gain understanding into oxyfuel firing. Two air‐cooled corrosion probes were exposed in this oxyfuel combustion chamber where the fuel was lignite. Gas composition was measured at the location of testing. Various alloys from a 2½ Cr steel, austenitic steels...... to nickel alloys were exposed at set metal temperatures of 570 and 630 °C for 287 h. The specimens were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy and X‐ray diffraction.The deposit on the probe contained predominantly CaSO4 and Fe2O3. Oxide thickness and depth of the precipitated...

  17. Evaluation of Integrated High Temperature Component Testing Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael Soto; David Duncan; Vincent Tonc

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a large-scale component test capability to support the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and their adaptation to commercial applications that advance U.S. energy economy, reliability, and security and reduce carbon emissions.

  18. Research and Development of Some Advanced High Temperature Titanium Alloys for Aero-engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Jian-ming

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Some advanced high temperature titanium alloys are usually selected to be manufactured into blade, disc, case, blisk and bling under high temperature environment in compressor and turbine system of a new generation high thrust-mass ratio aero-engine. The latest research progress of 600℃ high temperature titanium alloy, fireproof titanium alloy, TiAl alloy, continuous SiC fiber reinforced titanium matrix composite and their application technology in recent years in China were reviewed in this paper. The key technologies need to be broken through in design, processing and application of new material and component are put forward, including industrial ingot composition of high purified and homogeneous control technology, preparation technology of the large size bar and special forgings, machining technology of blisk and bling parts, material property evaluation and application design technique. The future with the continuous application of advanced high temperature titanium alloys, will be a strong impetus to the development of China's aero-engine technology.

  19. Design and testing of high temperature micro-ORC test stand using Siloxane as working fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu; Uusitalo, Antti; Honkatukia, Juha

    2017-03-01

    Organic Rankine Cycle is a mature technology for many applications e.g. biomass power plants, waste heat recovery and geothermal power for larger power capacity. Recently more attention is paid on an ORC utilizing high temperature heat with relatively low power. One of the attractive applications of such ORCs would be utilization of waste heat of exhaust gas of combustion engines in stationary and mobile applications. In this paper, a design procedure of the ORC process is described and discussed. The analysis of the major components of the process, namely the evaporator, recuperator, and turbogenerator is done. Also preliminary experimental results of an ORC process utilizing high temperature exhaust gas heat and using siloxane MDM as a working fluid are presented and discussed. The turbine type utilized in the turbogenerator is a radial inflow turbine and the turbogenerator consists of the turbine, the electric motor and the feed pump. Based on the results, it was identified that the studied system is capable to generate electricity from the waste heat of exhaust gases and it is shown that high molecular weight and high critical temperature fluids as the working fluids can be utilized in high-temperature small-scale ORC applications. 5.1 kW of electric power was generated by the turbogenerator.

  20. High temperature superconductivity: Concept, preparation and testing of high Tc superconductor compounds, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harara, Wafik

    1992-06-01

    Many studies have been carried out on high temperature superconductors with transition temperature above that of the liquid nitrogen. In this scientific study the concept and the mechanism of this phenomena are discussed, in addition the examples of preparation and testing of high temperature superconductors compounds are shown. Also the most important applications in industry are explained. (author). 15 refs., 2 tabs., 18 figs

  1. Some new fatigue tests in high temperature water and liquid sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Takayoshi; Kanasaki, Hiroshi; Kondo, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Tadayoshi.

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the fatigue strength of structural materials for PWR or FBR plants, fatigue test data must be obtained in an environment of simulated primary and secondary water for PWR or of high temperature liquid sodium for FBR. Generally, such tests make it necessary to prepare expensive facilities, so when large amount of fatigue data are required, it is necessary to rationalize and simplify the fatigue tests while maintaining high accuracy. At the Takasago Research Development Center, efforts to rationalize facilities and maintain accuracy in fatigue tests have been made by developing new test methods and improving conventional techniques. This paper introduces a new method of low cycle fatigue test in high temperature water, techniques for automatic measurement of crack initiation and propagation in high temperature water environment and a multiple type fatigue testing machine for high temperature liquid sodium. (author)

  2. The reliability of structural systems operating at high temperature: Replacing engineering judgement with operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, M.J.; Smith, D.J.; Dean, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Deterministic assessments are used to assess the integrity of structural systems operating at high temperature by providing a lower bound lifetime prediction, requiring considerable engineering judgement. However such a result may not satisfy the structural integrity assessment purpose if the results are overly conservative or conversely plant observations (such as failures) could undermine the assessment result if observed before the lower bound lifetime. This paper develops a reliability methodology for high temperature assessments and illustrates the impact and importance of managing the uncertainties within such an analysis. This is done by separating uncertainties into three classifications; aleatory uncertainty, quantifiable epistemic uncertainty and unquantifiable epistemic uncertainty. The result is a reliability model that can predict the behaviour of a structural system based upon plant observations, including failure and survival data. This can be used to reduce the over reliance upon engineering judgement which is prevalent in deterministic assessments. Highlights: ► Deterministic assessments are shown to be heavily reliant upon engineering judgment. ► Based upon the R5 procedure, a reliability model for a structural system is developed. ► Variables must be classified as either aleatory or epistemic to model their impact on reliability. ► Operation experience is then used to reduce reliance upon engineering judgment. ► This results in a model which can predict system behaviour and learn from operational experience.

  3. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted

  4. Coal upgrading based on the high temperature reactor - engineering and economic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert, H.; Neis, H.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the high temperature reactor in the FRG was opened with the aim of economically producing electricity which might be achieved with the next project works. Moreover, the HTR supplies process heat of very high temperature which may be used with metallic heat exchangers in the range up to 1000 0 C. From these reasons and regarding the world power prospects and the special power situation in our own country, the FRG began to develop methods of upgrading fossil primary energy sources using high-temperature heat from the HTR about 15 years ago. Meanwhile great progress has been achieved in research, development and test works; the modules are developed to a great extent. Economical service is expected for future utilization of selected processes. Problems to be still accomplished are first of all related to system testing as well as further exhaustion of the HTR's temperature potential. The proposed extension of the AVR to some process heat facility offers the possibility of testing the system in a low-cost and accelerated manner. (author)

  5. Gas reactor and associated nuclear experience in the UK relevant to high temperature reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beech, D.J.; May, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the UK, the NNC played a leading role in the design and build of all of the UK's commercial magnox reactors and advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs). It was also involved in the DRAGON project and was responsible for producing designs for large scale HTRs and other gas reactor designs employing helium and carbon dioxide coolants. This paper addresses the gas reactor experience and its relevance to the current HTR designs under development which use helium as the coolant, through the consideration of a representative sample of the issues addressed in the UK by the NNC in support of the AGR and other reactor programmes. Modern HTR designs provide unique engineering challenges. The success of the AGR design, reflected in the extended lifetimes agreed upon by the licensing authorities at many stations, indicates that these challenges can be successfully overcome. The UK experience is unique and provides substantial support to future gas reactor and high temperature engineering studies. (authors)

  6. Grain-boundary engineering applied to grain growth in a high temperature material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Crystallography of grain boundaries are determined for a high temperature material, before and after grain growth processes, so as to study the induction of special properties useful for application in components of a gas-turbine engine. The philosophy of grain-boundary engineering is applied to grain growth in APK-6, a powder formed nickel-base superalloy so as to establish the possible structure/property relationships. The alloy in the as received condition is shown to possess a strong texture and contained coincident site lattices (CSL) boundaries with most boundaries having sigma values in the range of 3 > sigma > 25. A normal grain-growth heat treatment result in a good population of low angle grain boundaries, and drastically reduces the proportion of CSL boundaries. A strong [011] annealing texture is observed after an intermediate grain growth; most grain boundaries, here, tend to be high angle indicating a possibility of possessing special properties. (author)

  7. High temperature continuous operation in the HTTR (HP-11). Summary of the test results in the high temperature operation mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Ueta, Shohei; Sumita, Junya; Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Tochio, Daisuke

    2010-11-01

    A high temperature (950 degrees C) continuous operation has been performed for 50 days on the HTTR from January to March in 2010, and the potential to supply stable heat of high temperature for hydrogen production for a long time was demonstrated for the first time in the world. JAEA has evaluated the experimental data obtained by this operation and past rated continuous one, and built the database necessary for commercial HTGRs. According to the results, the concentration of FP released from the fuels in the HTTR was a single through triple-digit lower than that in the foreign HTGRs. It became apparent that the fuels used in the HTTR are the best quality in the world. This successful operation could establish technological basis of HTGRs and show potential of nuclear energy as heat source for innovative thermo-chemical-based hydrogen production, emitting greenhouse gases on a 'low-carbon path' for the first time in the world. We have a plan to progress R and D for practical use of hydrogen production system with HTGRs in the future. (author)

  8. Performance Testing of a High Temperature Linear Alternator for Stirling Convertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metscher, Jonathan F.; Geng, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted performance testing of a high temperature linear alternator (HTLA) in support of Stirling power convertor development for potential future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). The high temperature linear alternator is a modified version of that used in Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), and is capable of operation at temperatures up to 200 deg. Increasing the temperature capability of the linear alternator could expand the mission set of future Stirling RPS designs. High temperature Neodymium-Iron-Boron (Nd-Fe-B) magnets were selected for the HTLA application, and were fully characterized and tested prior to use. Higher temperature epoxy for alternator assembly was also selected and tested for thermal stability and strength. A characterization test was performed on the HTLA to measure its performance at various amplitudes, loads, and temperatures. HTLA endurance testing at 200 deg is currently underway.

  9. High-Temperature Test of 800HT Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger in HELP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Soo; Hong, Sung-Deok; Kim, Min Hwan; Shim, Jaesool

    2014-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has developed high-temperature Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHE) for a Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor and operated a very high temperature Helium Experimental LooP (HELP) to verify the performance of the high temperature heat exchanger at the component level environment. PCHE is one of the candidates for the intermediate heat exchanger in a VHTR, because its design temperature and pressure are larger than any other compact heat exchanger types. High temperature PCHEs in HELP consist of an alloy617 PCHE and an 800HT PCHE. This study presents the high temperature test of an 800HT PCHE in HELP. The experimental data include the pressure drops, the overall heat transfer coefficients, and the surface temperature distributions under various operating conditions. The experimental data are compared with the thermo-hydraulic analysis from COMSOL. In addition, the single channel tests are performed to quantify the friction factor under normal nitrogen and helium inlet conditions. (author)

  10. Study on Waste Heat Utilization Device of High-Temperature Freshwater in the Modern Marine Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuaijun; Liu, Chentao; Zhou, Yao

    2018-01-01

    Based on using the waste heat recycling from high temperature freshwater in marine diesel engine to heat fuel oil tank, lubrication oil tank and settling tank and so on to achieve energy saving, improve fuel efficiency as the goal, study on waste heat utilization device of high-temperature freshwater in the modern marine diesel engine to make the combustion chamber effectively cooled by high-temperature freshwater and the inner liner freshwater temperature heat is effectively utilized and so on to improve the overall efficiency of the power plant of the ship and the diesel optimum working condition.

  11. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  12. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  13. The high temperature out-of-pile test of LVDT for elongation measurement of fuel pellet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J. M.; Kim, B. K.; Jo, M. S.; Joo, K. N.; Park, S. J.; Gang, Y. H.; Kim, Y. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    As a part of the development of instrumentation technologies for the nuclear fuel irradiation test in HANARO(High-flux Advanced Nuclear Application Reactor), the elongation measurement technique of the fuel pellet is being developed using LVDT(Linear Variable Differential Transformer). The well qualified out-of-pile test were needed to understand the LVDT's detail characteristics at high temperature for the detail design of the fuel irradiation instrumented capsule, because LVDT is very sensitive to variation of temperature. Therefore, the high temperature out-of-pile test system for fuel pellet elongation was developed, and this test was performed under the temperature condition between room temperature and 300 .deg. C with increasing the elongation from 0 to 5 mm. The LVDT's high temperature characteristics and temperature sensitivity of LVDT were analyzed through this experiment. Based on the result of this test, the method for the application of LVDT and elongation detector at high temperature was introduced. It is known that the results will be used to predict accurately the elongation of fuel pellet during irradiation test.

  14. Study on elastic-plastic fracture toughness test in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Structural integrity of internal components in light water reactors is important for the safety of operation and service lifetime. Fracture toughness is important parameter for structural integrity assessment of nuclear power plant. In general, fracture toughness of materials which compose the components in light water reactor is obtained with fracture toughness tests in air although some components are subjected to high temperature water because of the difficulty of fracture toughness test in high temperature water. However, the effects of high temperature water and hydrogen on fracture behavior of the structural materials in nuclear power plant such as low alloy steel, cast austenitic stainless steel, and Ni base alloy are concerned recently. In this study, elastic-plastic fracture toughness test of low alloy steel in simulated BWR water environment was studied. Fracture toughness test in high temperature water with original clip gage and normalization data reduction technique was established. The difference of fracture toughness J_Q tested in air between using elastic unload compliance method and normalization data reduction technique was also discussed. As a result, obtained value with normalization data reduction technique tended to be higher than the value with elastic unload compliance. (author)

  15. Very High Temperature Test of Alloy617 Compact Heat Exchanger in Helium Experimental Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Soo; Park, Byung-Ha; Kim, Eung-Seon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The Intermediate Heat eXchanger (IHX) is a key-challenged high temperature component which determines the efficiency and the economy of VHTR system. Heat generated in the VHTR fuel block is transferred from the VHTR to the intermediate loop through IHX. In the present, the shell-helical tube heat exchanger is generally used as IHX of the helium cooled reactor. Recently, a Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) is one of the candidates for the IHX in a VHTR because its operation temperature and pressure are larger than any other compact heat exchanger types. These test results show that there is no problem in operation of HELP at the very high temperature experimental condition and the alloy617 compact heat exchanger can be operated in the very high temperature condition above 850℃. In the future, the high temperature structural analysis will be studied to estimate the thermal stress during transient and thermal shock condition. The conditions and evaluation standard for the alloy 617 diffusion bonding will be minutely studied to fabricate the large-scale PCHE for the high temperature condition.

  16. Summary report on technical experiences from high-temperature helium turbomachinery testing in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisbrodt, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    In Germany a comprehensive research and development program was initiated in 1968 for a Brayton (closed) cycle power conversion system. The program was for ultimate use with a high temperature, helium cooled nuclear reactor heat source (the HHT project) for electricity generation using helium as the working fluid. The program continued until 1982 in international cooperation with the United States and Switzerland. This document describes the designs and reports the results of testing activities that addressed the development of turbines, compressors, hot gas ducts, materials, heat exchangers and other equipment items for use with a helium working fluid at high temperatures. 67 refs, 34 figs, tabs

  17. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    2000-06-01

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  18. High Temperature Test Facility Preliminary RELAP5-3D Input Model Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A RELAP5-3D input model is being developed for the High Temperature Test Facility at Oregon State University. The current model is described in detail. Further refinements will be made to the model as final as-built drawings are released and when system characterization data are available for benchmarking the input model.

  19. Design of project management system for 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yan; Xu Yuanhui

    1998-01-01

    A framework of project management information system (MIS) for 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor is introduced. Based on it, the design of nuclear project management information system and project monitoring system (PMS) are given. Additionally, a new method of developing MIS and Decision Support System (DSS) has been tried

  20. High temperature piezoresistive {beta}-SiC-on-SOI pressure sensor for combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J. von; Ziermann, R.; Reichert, W.; Obermeier, E. [Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany). Microsensor and Actuator Technol. Center; Eickhoff, M.; Kroetz, G. [Daimler Benz AG, Munich (Germany); Thoma, U.; Boltshauser, T.; Cavalloni, C. [Kistler Instrumente AG, Winterthur (Switzerland); Nendza, J.P. [TRW Deutschland GmbH, Barsinghausen (Germany)

    1998-08-01

    For measuring the cylinder pressure in combustion engines of automobiles a high temperature pressure sensor has been developed. The sensor is made of a membrane based piezoresistive {beta}-SiC-on-SOI (SiCOI) sensor chip and a specially designed housing. The SiCOI sensor was characterized under static pressures of up to 200 bar in the temperature range between room temperature and 300 C. The sensitivity of the sensor at room temperature is approximately 0.19 mV/bar and decreases to about 0.12 mV/bar at 300 C. For monitoring the dynamic cylinder pressure the sensor was placed into the combustion chamber of a gasoline engine. The measurements were performed at 1500 rpm under different loads, and for comparison a quartz pressure transducer from Kistler AG was used as a reference. The maximum pressure at partial load operation amounts to about 15 bar. The difference between the calibrated SiCOI sensor and the reference sensor is significantly less than 1 bar during the whole operation. (orig.) 8 refs.

  1. High temperature, high pressure gas loop - the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.; Sanders, J.P.; Young, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    The high-pressure, high-temperature, gas-circulating Component Flow Test Loop located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was designed and constructed utilizing Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The quality assurance program for operating and testing is also based on applicable ASME standards. Power to a total of 5 MW is available to the test section, and an air-cooled heat exchanger rated at 4.4 MW serves as heat sink. The three gas-bearing, completely enclosed gas circulators provide a maximum flow of 0.47 m 3 /s at pressures to 10.7 MPa. The control system allows for fast transients in pressure, power, temperature, and flow; it also supports prolonged unattended steady-state operation. The data acquisition system can access and process 10,000 data points per second. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor components are being tested

  2. Rapid high temperature field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcite scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    A test method is described which allows the rapid field testing of calcite scale inhibitors in high- temperature geothermal brines. Five commercial formulations, chosen on the basis of laboratory screening tests, were tested in brines with low total dissolved solids at ca 500 F. Four were found to be effective; of these, 2 were found to be capable of removing recently deposited scale. One chemical was tested in the full-flow brine line for 6 wks. It was shown to stop a severe surface scaling problem at the well's control valve, thus proving the viability of the rapid test method. (12 refs.)

  3. Conceptual Design for a High-Temperature Gas Loop Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James B. Kesseli

    2006-08-01

    This report documents an early-stage conceptual design for a high-temperature gas test loop. The objectives accomplished by the study include, (1) investigation of existing gas test loops to determine ther capabilities and how the proposed system might best complement them, (2) development of a preliminary test plan to help identify the performance characteristics required of the test unit, (3) development of test loop requirements, (4) development of a conceptual design including process flow sheet, mechanical layout, and equipment specifications and costs, and (5) development of a preliminary test loop safety plan.

  4. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  5. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  6. High-Temperature Polymer Composites Tested for Hypersonic Rocket Combustor Backup Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, James K.; Shin, E. Eugene; Thesken, John C.; Fink, Jeffrey E.

    2005-01-01

    Significant component weight reductions are required to achieve the aggressive thrust-toweight goals for the Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) third-generation, reusable liquid propellant rocket engine, which is one possible engine for a future single-stage-toorbit vehicle. A collaboration between the NASA Glenn Research Center and Boeing Rocketdyne was formed under the Higher Operating Temperature Propulsion Components (HOTPC) program and, currently, the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project to develop carbon-fiber-reinforced high-temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMCs). This program focused primarily on the combustor backup structure to replace all metallic support components with a much lighter polymer-matrixcomposite- (PMC-) titanium honeycomb sandwich structure.

  7. Forming limit diagram of aluminum AA6063 tubes at high temperatures by bulge tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Naeini, Hassan Moslemi; Liaghat, Gholamhossein; Tafti, Rooholla Azizi; Rahmani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    A free bulge test and ductile fracture criteria were used to obtain the forming limit diagrams (FLD) of aluminum alloy AA6063 tubes at high temperatures. Ductile fracture criteria were calibrated using the results of uniaxial tension tests at various elevated temperatures and different strain rates through adjusting the Zener-Holloman parameter. High temperature free bulge test of tubes was simulated in finite element software Abaqus, and tube bursting was predicted using ductile fracture criteria under different loading paths. FLDs which were obtained from finite element simulation were compared to experimental results to select the most accurate criterion for prediction of forming limit diagram. According to the results, all studied ductile fracture criteria predict similarly when forming condition is close to the uniaxial tension, while Ayada criterion predicts the FLD at 473 K and 573 K very well.

  8. Forming limit diagram of aluminum AA6063 tubes at high temperatures by bulge tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Naeini, Hassan Moslemi; Liaghat, Gholamhossein [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafti, Rooholla Azizi [Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmani, Farzad [Kar Higher Education Institute, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    A free bulge test and ductile fracture criteria were used to obtain the forming limit diagrams (FLD) of aluminum alloy AA6063 tubes at high temperatures. Ductile fracture criteria were calibrated using the results of uniaxial tension tests at various elevated temperatures and different strain rates through adjusting the Zener-Holloman parameter. High temperature free bulge test of tubes was simulated in finite element software Abaqus, and tube bursting was predicted using ductile fracture criteria under different loading paths. FLDs which were obtained from finite element simulation were compared to experimental results to select the most accurate criterion for prediction of forming limit diagram. According to the results, all studied ductile fracture criteria predict similarly when forming condition is close to the uniaxial tension, while Ayada criterion predicts the FLD at 473 K and 573 K very well.

  9. High temperature oxidation test of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasushi

    2006-07-01

    In a feasibility study of ODS steel cladding, its high temperature oxidation resistance was evaluated. Although addition of Cr is effective for preventing high temperature oxidation, excessively higher amount of Cr leads to embrittlement due to the Cr-rich α' precipitate formation. In the ODS steel developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Cr content is controlled in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite. In this study, high temperature oxidation test was conducted for ODS steels, and their results were compared with that of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. Following results were obtained in this study. (1) 9Cr-ODS martensitic and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11mass%Cr PNC-FMS and even 17mass% SUS430 and equivalent to austenitic PNC316. (2) The superior oxidation resistance of ODS steel was attributed to earlier formation of the protective alpha-Cr 2 O 3 layer at the matrix and inner oxide scale interface. The grain size of ODS steel is finer than that of PNC-FMS, so the superior oxidation resistance of ODS steel can be attributed to the enhanced Cr-supplying rate throughout the accelerated grain boundary diffusion. Finely dispersed Y 2 O 3 oxide particles in the ODS steel matrix may also stabilized the adherence between the protective alpha-Cr 2 O 3 layer and the matrix. (author)

  10. State of art report for high temperature wear test of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Hu; Lee, Jae Seon; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Jong In

    2000-03-01

    Wear resistance properties of machine elements has been more critical in view of its significant effect on life extension, economics and material saving because it has been recognized that nearly 80 percent of damages of mechanical elements in the friction pairs are due to the material loss by wear. And wear properties have direct influence on the life of a machine in a great extend under extremely severe operating condition. Therefore highly improved wear properties of machine elements operating in such circumstances is heavily required. The purpose of this report is to survey current technology for high temperature wear test in order to establish the test plan for the life evaluation of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing materials. Friction and wear test will be done under high pressure (170 MPa) and high temperature (350 degree C) with water as lubricant to simulate the operating condition of the nuclear power reactor. Because pump type for MCP is selected as the caned motor pump which needs no mechanical sealing, the rotating shaft on which bearing is fully submerged by main coolant with high temperature. So MCP bearing operates without additional lubricant. CEDM is adopted as the ball-screw type with fine controllability. So the driving part is designed as the immersed-in type by main coolant. Therefore the anti-wear and reliability of driving parts are much consequent to guarantee the lifetime and the safety of the whole system. Tribometer adapted to high temperature and pressure circumstance is needed to execute bearing material testing. Test parameters are material, sliding speed, sliding distance and applied load. In order to identify the wear mechanism, optical microscope and surface roughness testers are required. The result of this report will provide an elementary data to develop bearing materials and to estimate bearing lifetime for the bearings of MCP and CEDM in SMART. (author)

  11. An experimental platform for triaxial high-pressure/high-temperature testing of rocks using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Guenther; Lapene, Alexandre; Castanier, Louis M.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

    2018-04-01

    A conventional high-pressure/high-temperature experimental apparatus for combined geomechanical and flow-through testing of rocks is not X-ray compatible. Additionally, current X-ray transparent systems for computed tomography (CT) of cm-sized samples are limited to design temperatures below 180 °C. We describe a novel, high-temperature (>400 °C), high-pressure (>2000 psi/>13.8 MPa confining, >10 000 psi/>68.9 MPa vertical load) triaxial core holder suitable for X-ray CT scanning. The new triaxial system permits time-lapse imaging to capture the role of effective stress on fluid distribution and porous medium mechanics. System capabilities are demonstrated using ultimate compressive strength (UCS) tests of Castlegate sandstone. In this case, flooding the porous medium with a radio-opaque gas such as krypton before and after the UCS test improves the discrimination of rock features such as fractures. The results of high-temperature tests are also presented. A Uintah Basin sample of immature oil shale is heated from room temperature to 459 °C under uniaxial compression. The sample contains kerogen that pyrolyzes as temperature rises, releasing hydrocarbons. Imaging reveals the formation of stress bands as well as the evolution and connectivity of the fracture network within the sample as a function of time.

  12. Testing of a Microfluidic Sampling System for High Temperature Electrochemical MC&A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Candido [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nichols, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-11-27

    This report describes the preliminary validation of a high-temperature microfluidic chip system for sampling of electrochemical process salt. Electroanalytical and spectroscopic techniques are attractive candidates for improvement through high-throughput sample analysis via miniaturization. Further, microfluidic chip systems are amenable to micro-scale chemical processing such as rapid, automated sample purification to improve sensor performance. The microfluidic chip was tested to determine the feasibility of the system for high temperature applications and conditions under which microfluidic systems can be used to generate salt droplets at process temperature to support development of material balance and control systems in a used fuel treatment facility. In FY13, the project focused on testing a quartz microchip device with molten salts at near process temperatures. The equipment was installed in glove box and tested up to 400°C using commercial thermal transfer fluids as the carrier phase. Preliminary tests were carried out with a low-melting halide salt to initially characterize the properties of this novel liquid-liquid system and to investigate the operating regimes for inducing droplet flow within candidate carrier fluids. Initial results show that the concept is viable for high temperature sampling but further development is required to optimize the system to operate with process relevant molten salts.

  13. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage

  14. Development and Performance Evaluation of Optical Sensors for High Temperature Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, G.; Varga, D.; Floyd, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses fiber optic sensors designed and constructed to withstand extreme temperatures of aircraft engine. The paper describes development and performance evaluation of fiber optic Bragg grating based sensors. It also describes the design and presents test results of packaged sensors subjected to temperatures up to 1000 C for prolonged periods of time.

  15. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  16. Molecular Tagging Velocimetry Development for In-situ Measurement in High-Temperature Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The High Temperature Test Facility, HTTF, at Oregon State University (OSU) is an integral-effect test facility designed to model the behavior of a Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) during a Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) event. It also has the ability to conduct limited investigations into the progression of a Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) event in addition to phenomena occurring during normal operations. Both of these phenomena will be studied with in-situ velocity field measurements. Experimental measurements of velocity are critical to provide proper boundary conditions to validate CFD codes, as well as developing correlations for system level codes, such as RELAP5 (http://www4vip.inl.gov/relap5/). Such data will be the first acquired in the HTTF and will introduce a diagnostic with numerous other applications to the field of nuclear thermal hydraulics. A laser-based optical diagnostic under development at The George Washington University (GWU) is presented; the technique is demonstrated with velocity data obtained in ambient temperature air, and adaptation to high-pressure, high-temperature flow is discussed.

  17. Assessment of very high-temperature reactors in process applications. Appendix III. Engineering evaluation of process heat applications for very-high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggins, D.S.; Williams, J.J.

    1977-04-01

    An engineering and economic evaluation is made of coal conversion processes that can be coupled to a very high-temperature nuclear reactor heat source. The basic system developed by General Atomic/Stone and Webster (GA/S and W) is similar to the H-coal process developed by Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., but is modified to accommodate a nuclear heat source and to produce synthetic natural gas (SNG), synthesis gas, and hydrogen in addition to synthetic crude liquids. The synthetic crude liquid production is analyzed by using the GA/S and W process coupled to either a nuclear- or fossil-heat source. Four other processes are included for comparison: (1) the Lurgi process for production of SNG, (2) the Koppers-Totzek process for production of either hydrogen or synthesis gas, (3) the Hygas process for production of SNG, and (4) the Westinghouse thermal-chemical water splitting process for production of hydrogen. The production of methanol and iron ore reduction are evaluated as two potential applications of synthesis gas from either the GA/S and W or Koppers-Totzek processes. The results indicate that the product costs for each of the gasification and liquefaction processes did not differ significantly, with the exception that the unproven Hygas process was cheaper and the Westinghouse process considerably more expensive than the others

  18. AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM FOR REGULATED HIGH TEMPERATURE MAIN COMBUSTION CHAMBER OF MANEUVERABLE AIRCRAFT MULTIMODE GAS TURBINE ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Gras’Ko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes choosing and substantiating the control laws, forming the appearance the automatic control system for regulated high temperature main combustion chamber of maneuverable aircraft multimode gas turbine engine aimed at sustainable and effective functioning of main combustion chamber within a broad operation range.

  19. EC static high-temperature leach test. Summary report of an European Community interlaboratory round robin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koennecke, R.; Kirsch, J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an interlaboratory static high-temperature leach test conducted by the Commission of the European Communities in 1983 over a period of 9 months are compiled and statistically evaluated. A total of 12 laboratories - 10 from Member States of the EC and one from Finland and the USA - provided information concerning the test method and the analytical test results in the frame of a round robin test (RRT). All together these laboratories tested 366 waste from specimens of the borosilicate glass UK 209 containing simulated high-level radioactive waste. Leach tests were performed on the basis of the ''Document on the EC static high-temperature leach test method'' in autoclaves at leaching temperatures of 90 0 C, 110 0 C, 150 0 C, and 190 0 C over time periods of 3,7,14,28 and 56 days using dionized water as leachant. The resulting leachates were analysed for the elemental concentrations of Si,B,Sr,Nd and Cs by all laboratories and for the concentrations of the optional elements Na, Al,Ce,Mo,Cr,Fe,Li,Mg and Zn by some of the participating laboratories. Additionally, the F content of the blank leachates was analysed by all laboratories

  20. Results of the LIRES Round Robin test on high temperature reference electrodes for LWR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, R.W. [SCK.CEN, Nuclear Research Centre Belgium, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Nagy, G. [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia KFKI Atomenergia Kutatointezet, AEKI, Konkoly Thege ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Feron, D. [CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Navas, M. [CIEMAT, Edificio 30, Dpto. Fision Nuclear, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid, (Spain); Bogaerts, W. [KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 31, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Karnik, D. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Dorsch, T. [Framatone ANP, Inc., Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Molander, A. [Studsvik AB SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Maekelae, K. [Materials and Structural Integrity, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Kemistintie 3, P.O. Box 1704, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    A European sponsored research project has been started on 1 October 2000 to develop high temperature reference electrodes that can be used for in-core electrochemical measurements in Light Water Reactors (LWR's). This LIRES-project (Development of Light Water Reactor Reference Electrodes) consists of 9 partners (SCK-CEN, AEKI, CEA, CIEMAT, KU Leuven, NRI Rez, Framatone ANP, Studsvik Nuclear and VTT) and will last for four years. The main objective of this LIRES project is to develop a reference electrode, which is robust enough to be used inside a LWR. Emphasize is put on the radiation hardness of both the mechanical design of the electrode as the proper functioning of the electrode. A four steps development trajectory is foreseen: (1) To set a testing standard for a Round Robin, (2) To develop different reference electrodes, (3) To perform a Round Robin test of these reference electrodes followed by selection of the best reference electrode(s), (4) To perform irradiation tests under appropriate LWR conditions in a Material Test Reactor (MTR). Four different high temperature reference electrodes have been developed and are being tested in a Round Robin test. These electrodes are: A Ceramic Membrane Electrode (CME), a Rhodium electrode, an external Ag/AgCl electrode and a Palladium electrode. The presentation will focus on the results obtained with the Round Robin test. (authors)

  1. THORS: a high-temperature sodium test facility rated at 2.0 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnadt, P.A.; Anderson, A.H.; Clapp, N.E.; Montgomery, B.H.; Collins, C.W.; Stulting, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    The Thermal--Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) facility at Oak Ridge Naitonal Laboratory (ORNL) is a high-temperature sodium test facility operated for the United States Breeder Reactor Safety Program. The facility is primarily used for testing large simulated Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel subassemblies. The facility has recently been upgraded to provide a 2.0-MW test bundle power input and heat removal capability. A new test section, which will be capable of operating at 980 0 C and which will accommodate a 217-pin bundle, has also been added. A 61-pin bundle is currently under test in the facility. A description of the test facility is presented, along with a brief summary of the 8-year operating history of this safety-related test facility

  2. Metrology to enable high temperature erosion testing - A new european initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, A.T.; Gee, M.G.; Clausen, Sønnik

    2014-01-01

    is required. However, limitations in current measurement capability within this form of test prevent the advancement. A new European initiative, METROSION, on the development of high temperature solid particle erosion testing has a primary aim to develop this metrological framework. Several key parameters...... have been identified for measurement and control; these include temperature (of the sample, gas and particles), flow rate, size and shape of the erodent, angle of incidence of the particle stream and nozzle design. This paper outlines the aims and objectives of this new initiative. With a particular...

  3. A Study on the High Temperature Irradiation Test Possibility for the HANARO Outer Core Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Cho, M. S.; Choo, K. N.; Shin, Y. T.; Sohn, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. G

    2008-01-15

    1. Information on the neutron flux levels and the gamma heat of the concerned test holes, which have been produced from a series of nuclear analysis and tests performed at KAERI since 1993, were collected and analyzed to develop the nuclear data for the concerned test holes of HANARO and to develop the new design concepts of a capsule for the high temperature irradiation devices. 2. From the literature survey and analysis about the system design characteristics of the new concepts of irradiation devices in the ATR and MIT reactor, U.S. and the JHR reactor, France, which are helpful in understanding the key issues for the on-going R and D programmes related to a SFR and a VHTR, the most important parameters for the design of high temperature irradiation devices are identified as the neutron spectrum, the heat generation density, the fuel and cladding temperature, and the coolant chemistry. 3. From the thermal analysis of a capsule by using a finite element program ANSYS, high temperature test possibility at the OR and IP holes of HANARO was investigated based on the data collected from a literature survey. The OR holes are recommended for the tests of the SFR and VHTR nuclear materials. The IP holes could be applicable for an intermediate temperature irradiation of the SWR and LMR materials. 4. A thermal analysis for the development of a capsule with a new configuration was also performed. The size of the center hole, which is located at the thermal media of a capsule, did not cause specimen temperature changes. The temperature differences are found to be less than 2%. The introduction of an additional gap in the thermal media was able to contribute to an increase in the specimen temperature by up to 27-90 %.

  4. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tettamanti, S. [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy); Crudeli, R. [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)

    1998-12-31

    CISE and ENEL are involved for years in a miniaturization creep methodology project to obtain similar non-destructive test with the same standard creep test reliability. The goal can be reached with `Small punch creep test` that collect all the requested characteristics; quasi nondestructive disk specimens extracted both on external or internal side of components, than accurately machined and tested on little and cheap apparatus. CISE has developed complete creep small punch procedure that involved peculiar test facility and correlation`s law comparable with the more diffused isostress methodology for residual life evaluation on ex-serviced high temperature plant components. The aim of this work is to obtain a simple and immediately applicable relationship useful for plant maintenance managing. More added work is need to validate the Small Punch methodology and for relationship calibration on most diffusion high temperature structural materials. First obtained results on a comparative work on ASTM A355 P12 ex-serviced pipe material are presented joint with a description of the Small Punch apparatus realized in CISE. (orig.) 6 refs.

  5. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tettamanti, S [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy); Crudeli, R [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)

    1999-12-31

    CISE and ENEL are involved for years in a miniaturization creep methodology project to obtain similar non-destructive test with the same standard creep test reliability. The goal can be reached with `Small punch creep test` that collect all the requested characteristics; quasi nondestructive disk specimens extracted both on external or internal side of components, than accurately machined and tested on little and cheap apparatus. CISE has developed complete creep small punch procedure that involved peculiar test facility and correlation`s law comparable with the more diffused isostress methodology for residual life evaluation on ex-serviced high temperature plant components. The aim of this work is to obtain a simple and immediately applicable relationship useful for plant maintenance managing. More added work is need to validate the Small Punch methodology and for relationship calibration on most diffusion high temperature structural materials. First obtained results on a comparative work on ASTM A355 P12 ex-serviced pipe material are presented joint with a description of the Small Punch apparatus realized in CISE. (orig.) 6 refs.

  6. Research, Development, and Field Testing of Thermochemical Recuperation for High Temperature Furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Harry; Kozlov, Aleksandr

    2014-03-31

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of utilizing a non-catalytic ThermoChemical Recuperation System (TCRS) to recover a significant amount of energy from the waste gases of natural gas fired steel reheat furnaces. The project was related to DOE-AMO’s (formerly known as ITP) one of the technical areas of interest: Technologies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the carbon footprint of equipment currently used in energy-intensive industries such as iron and steel, and reduce by at least 30% energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission compared to the conventional technologies. ThermoChemical Recuperation (TCR) is a technique that recovers sensible heat in the exhaust gas from an industrial process, furnace, engine etc., when a hydrocarbon fuel is used for combustion. TCR enables waste heat recovery by both combustion air preheat and hydrocarbon fuel (natural gas, for example) reforming into a higher calorific fuel. The reforming process uses hot flue gas components (H2O and CO2) or steam to convert the fuel into a combustible mixture of hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), and some unreformed hydrocarbons (CnHm). Reforming of natural gas with recycled exhaust gas or steam can significantly reduce fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and cost as well as increase process thermal efficiency. The calorific content of the fuel can be increased by up to ~28% with the TCR process if the original source fuel is natural gas. In addition, the fuel is preheated during the TCR process adding sensible heat to the fuel. The Research and Development work by GTI was proposed to be carried out in three Phases (Project Objectives). • Phase I: Develop a feasibility study consisting of a benefits-derived economic evaluation of a ThermoChemical Recuperation (TCR) concept with respect to high temperature reheat furnace applications within the steel industry (and cross-cutting industries). This will establish the design parameters and

  7. Testing and Modeling Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic (UHTC) Materials For Hypersonic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    Ridge, D. G. Fletcher, C. O. Asma , O. Chazot, and J. Thömel, “Oxidation of ZrB2-SiC Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites in Dissociated Air...Fletcher, C. O. Asma , “Characterization of ZrB2-SiC Ceramics Tested by Plasma Stream Oxidation,” poster, 32 th International Conference...Fahrenholtz, W.G., Hilmas, G.E., Zhu, S.M., Ridge, J., Fletcher, D.G., Asma , C.O., and Thomel, J., "Oxidation of ZrB2-SiC Ultrahigh-Temperature

  8. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  9. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections

  10. High Temperature Testing with Sapphire Fiber White-Light Michelson Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, A.; Pedrazzani, J.; May, R.; Murphy, K.; Tran, T.; Coate, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the design of new aerospace materials, developmental testing is conducted to characterize the behavior of the material under severe environmental conditions of high stress, temperature, and vibration. But to test these materials under extreme conditions requires sensors that can perform in harsh environments. Current sensors can only monitor high temperature test samples using long throw instrumentation, but this is inherently less accurate than a surface mounted sensor, and provides no means for fabrication process monitoring. A promising alternative is the use of sapphire optical fiber sensors. Sapphire is an incredibly rugged material, being extremely hard (9 mhos), chemically inert, and having a melting temperature (over 2000 C). Additionally, there is a extensive background of optical fiber sensors upon which to draw for sapphire sensor configurations.

  11. Test Plan for Long-Term Operation of a Ten-Cell High Temperature Electrolysis Stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-01-01

    This document defines a test plan for a long-term (2500 Hour) test of a ten-cell high-temperature electrolysis stack to be performed at INL during FY09 under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This test was originally planned for FY08, but was removed from our work scope as a result of the severe budget cuts in the FY08 NHI Program. The purpose of this test is to evaluate stack performance degradation over a relatively long time period and to attempt to identify some of the degradation mechanisms via post-test examination. This test will be performed using a planar ten-cell Ceramatec stack, with each cell having dimensions of 10 cm x 10 cm. The specific makeup of the stack will be based on the results of a series of shorter duration ten-cell stack tests being performed during FY08, funded by NGNP. This series of tests was aimed at evaluating stack performance with different interconnect materials and coatings and with or without brazed edge rails. The best performing stack from the FY08 series, in which five different interconnect/coating/edge rail combinations were tested, will be selected for the FY09 long-term test described herein

  12. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A., E-mail: paul.demkowicz@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, MS 3860, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Laug, David V.; Scates, Dawn M.; Reber, Edward L.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Walter, John B.; Harp, Jason M. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, MS 3860, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Morris, Robert N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A system has been developed for safety testing of irradiated coated particle fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FACS system is designed to facilitate remote operation in a shielded hot cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System will measure release of fission gases and condensable fission products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuel performance can be evaluated at temperatures as high as 2000 Degree-Sign C in flowing helium. - Abstract: The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 Degree-Sign C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated

  13. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Hensley, W.K.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.; Panisko, F.E.; Hartwell, J.K.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes and presents data from a severe fuel damage test that was conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test, designated FLHT-5, was the fourth in a series of full-length high-temperature (FLHT) tests on light-water reactor fuel. The tests were designed and performed by staff from the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The test operation and test results are described in this report. The fuel bundle in the FLHT-5 experiment included 10 unirradiated full-length pressurized-water reactor (PWR) rods, 1 irradiated PWR rod and 1 dummy gamma thermometer. The fuel rods were subjected to a very low coolant flow while operating at low fission power. This caused coolant boilaway, rod dryout and overheating to temperatures above 2600 K, severe fuel rod damage, hydrogen generation, and fission product release. The test assembly and its effluent path were extensively instrumented to record temperatures, pressures, flow rates, hydrogen evolution, and fission product release during the boilaway/heatup transient. Post-test gamma scanning of the upper plenum indicated significant iodine and cesium release and deposition. Both stack gas activity and on-line gamma spectrometer data indicated significant (∼50%) release of noble fission gases. Post-test visual examination of one side of the fuel bundle revealed no massive relocation and flow blockage; however, rundown of molten cladding was evident

  14. High temperature testing of TRUPACT-I materials: Kevlar, honeycomb, rigid polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, M.L.

    1985-12-01

    When the Transuranic Package Transporter Model-I (TRUPACT-I) failed to afford sufficient containment after a 35-minute JP-4 fueled open-pool fire, component tests were conducted, in conjunction with analyses, to guide and assess the redesign of TRUPACT-I. Since materials which change phase or combust are difficult to numerically analyze, the component tests determined the behavior of these materials in TRUPACT-I. The component tests approximated the behavior of Kevlar (registered trademark of DuPont), metal honeycomb, and rigid polyurethane foam, as they appear in TRUPACT-I, in an open-pool fire environment. Six series of tests were performed at Sandia's Radiant Heat Facility and one test at the wind-shielded fire test facility (LAARC Chimney). Each test facility was controlled to yield temperatures or heat fluxes equivalent to those measured in the TRUPACT-I, Unit 0, open-pool fire. This extensive series of component tests (34 runs total) provided information on the high-temperature behavior of unique materials which was not previously available or otherwise attainable. The component tests were a timely and cost-effective means of providing the data for the TRUPACT-I redesign

  15. Dynamic motion modes of high temperature superconducting maglev on a 45-m long ring test line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W. Y.; Qian, N.; Zheng, J.; Jin, L. W.; Zhang, Y.; Deng, Z. G.

    2017-10-01

    With the development of high temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev, studies on the running stability have become more and more significant to ensure the operation safety. An experimental HTS maglev vehicle was tested on a 45-m long ring test line under the speed from 4 km/h to 20 km/h. The lateral and vertical acceleration signals of each cryostat were collected by tri-axis accelerometers in real time. By analyzing the phase relationship of acceleration signals on the four cryostats, several typical motion modes of the HTS maglev vehicle, including lateral, yaw, pitch and heave motions were observed. This experimental finding is important for the next improvement of the HTS maglev system.

  16. Evaluation of Candidate Linear Variable Displacement Transducers for High Temperature Irradiations in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, D.L.; Rempe, J.L.; Daw, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to promote nuclear science and technology in the U.S. Given this designation, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A fundamental component of the ATR NSUF program is to develop in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation experiments. Dimensional change is a key parameter that must be monitored during irradiation of new materials being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant changes during high temperature irradiation. Currently, dimensional changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a defined period of time in the ATR and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data (i.e., only characterizing the end state when samples are removed from the reactor) and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To address these issues, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently initiated efforts to evaluate candidate linear variable displacement transducers (LVDTs) for use during high temperature irradiation experiments in typical ATR test locations. Two nuclear grade LVDT vendor designs were identified for consideration - a smaller diameter design qualified for temperatures up to 350 C and a larger design with capabilities to 500 C. Initial evaluation efforts include collecting calibration data as a function of temperature, long duration testing of LVDT response while held at high temperature, and the assessment of changes

  17. Potential drop crack growth monitoring in high temperature biaxial fatigue tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, B.P.; Krempl, E.

    1993-01-01

    The present work describes a procedure for monitoring crack growth in high temperature, biaxial, low cycle fatigue tests. The reversing DC potential drop equipment monitors smooth, tubular type 304 stainless steel specimens during fatigue testing. Electrical interference from an induction heater is filtered out by an analog filter and by using a long integration time. A Fourier smoothing algorithm and two spline interpolations process the large data set. The experimentally determined electrical potential drop is compared with the theoretical electrostatic potential that is found by solving Laplace's equation for an elliptical crack in a semi-infinite conducting medium. Since agreement between theory and experiment is good, the method can be used to measure crack growth to failure from the threshold of detectability

  18. Planning of the in-situ creep test in sedimentary soft rocks under high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Nozomu; Yoshikawa, Kazuo; Okada, Tetsuji; Sawada, Masataka; Tani, Kazuo; Takeda, Kayo

    2007-01-01

    Research has been conducted on underground facilities for energy storage and waste disposal in sedimentary soft rocks. One of the research topics is that the long-term mechanical behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperatures or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the long-term stability of caverns in sedimentary soft rocks as influenced by changes in the external environment. This report presents the plan of field creep test for the purpose to establish the evaluation method of long-term stability of caverns in soft rocks. A series of field creep test is performed to study the influence of high temperature in an underground facility at a depth of 50 meters. (author)

  19. Fabrication of High Temperature and High Pressure Vessel for the Fuel Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kook Nam; Lee, Jong Min; Sim, Bong Shick; Shon, Jae Min; Ahn, Seung Ho; Yoo, Seong Yeon

    2007-01-01

    The Fuel Test Loop(FTL) which is capable of an irradiation testing under a similar operating condition to those of PWR and CANDU nuclear power plants has been developed and installed in HANARO, KAERI. It is consisted of In-Pile Section(IPS) and Out-of Pile System(OPS). The IPS which is located inside the pool is divided into 3-parts; they are in-pool pipes, IVA(IPS Vessel Assembly) and the support structures. The test fuel is loaded inside a double wall, inner pressure vessel and outer pressure vessel, to keep the functionality of the reactor coolant pressure boundary. The localization of the IVA is achieved by manufacturing through local company and the functional test and verification were done through pressure drop, vibration, hydraulic and leakage tests. The brazing technique of the instrument lines has been checked for its functionality and yield. A IVA has been manufactured by local technique and will be finally tested under out of the high temperature and high pressure test

  20. Performance test of ex-core high temperature and high pressure water loop test equipment (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hiroko; Uehara, Toshiaki; Takeuchi, Tomoaki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Jinichi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency, we started research and development so as to monitor the situations in the Nuclear Plant Facilities during a severe accident, such as a radiation-resistant monitoring camera, a radiation-resistant transmission system for conveying the in-core information, and a heat-resistant signal cable. As a part of developments of the heat-resistant signal cable, we prepared ex-core high-temperature and high-pressure water loop test equipment, which can simulate the conditions of BWRs and PWRs, for evaluating reliability and properties of sheath materials of the cable. This equipment consists of autoclave, water conditioning tank, high-pressure metering pump, preheater, heat exchanger and water purification equipment, etc. This report describes the basic design and the performance test results of ex-core high-temperature and high-pressure water loop test equipment. (author)

  1. Design, Qualification and Integration Testing of the High-Temperature Resistance Temperature Device for Stirling Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jack; Hill, Dennis H.; Elisii, Remo; White, Jonathan R.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), developed from 2006 to 2013 under the joint sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to provide a high-efficiency power system for future deep space missions, employed Sunpower Incorporated's Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) with operating temperature up to 840 C. High-temperature operation was made possible by advanced heater head materials developed to increase reliability and thermal-to-mechanical conversion efficiency. During a mission, it is desirable to monitor the Stirling hot-end temperature as a measure of convertor health status and assist in making appropriate operating parameter adjustments to maintain the desired hot-end temperature as the radioisotope fuel decays. To facilitate these operations, a Resistance Temperature Device (RTD) that is capable of high-temperature, continuous long-life service was designed, developed and qualified for use in the ASRG. A thermal bridge was also implemented to reduce the RTD temperature exposure while still allowing an accurate projection of the ASC hot-end temperature. NASA integrated two flight-design RTDs on the ASCs and assembled into the high-fidelity Engineering Unit, the ASRG EU2, at Glenn Research Center (GRC) for extended operation and system characterization. This paper presents the design implementation and qualification of the RTD, and its performance characteristics and calibration in the ASRG EU2 testing.

  2. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  3. High Temperature Test Possibility at the HANARO Out-core Region through a Thermal Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young-Hwan; Choi, Myung-Hwan; Cho, Man-Soon; Choo, Kee-Nam; Kim, Bong-Goo

    2007-01-01

    The development of an advanced reactor system such as a next generation nuclear plant and other generation IV systems require new fuels, claddings, and structural materials. To characterize the performance of these new materials, it is necessary for us to have a leading-edge technology to satisfy the specific test requirements such as the conditions of high neutron exposures and high operating temperatures. Thus, nuclear data on HANARO's vertical test holes have been gathered and reviewed to evaluate the usability of the test holes located at the out-core zone of HANARO. In 2007, neutron flux levels of the concerned test holes and the gamma heat of the specimens and two different specimen holder materials of Al and Mo at the concerned test hole were obtained to enhance the utilization of the HANARO reactor and to develop new design concepts for high temperature irradiation tests. Based on the data, a series of thermal analyses was implemented to provide a reasonable demonstration and guidance on limitations or application

  4. SPECIFICATIONS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE LATTICE TEST REACTOR BUILDING 318 PROJECT CAH-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitro Engineering Company

    1964-07-15

    This is the specifications for the High Temperature Lattice Test Reactor Building 318 and it is divided into the following 21 divisions or chapters: (1) Excavating, Backfill & Grading; (2) Reinforced Concrete; (3) Masonry; (4) Structural Steel & Miscellaneous Metal Items, Contents - Division V; (5) Plumbing, Process & Service Piping; (6) Welding; (7) Insulated Metal Siding; (8) Roof Decks & Roofing; (9) Plaster Partitions & Ceiling; (10) Standard Doors, Windows & Hardware; (11) Shielding Doors; (12) Sprinkler System & Fire Extinguishers, Contents - Division XIII; (13) Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning; (14) Painting, Protective Coating & Floor Covering, Contents - Division XV; (15) Electrical; (16) Communications & Alarm Systems; (17) Special Equipment & Furnishings; (18) Overhead Bridge Crane; (19) Prefabricated Steel Building; (20) Paved Drive; and (21) Landscaping & Irrigation Sprinklers.

  5. Development of thermal mixing enhancement method for lower plenum of the High Temperature Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gradecka, Malwina Joanna, E-mail: malgrad@gmail.com; Woods, Brian G., E-mail: brian.woods@oregonstate.edu

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Coolant mixing in lower plenum might be insufficient and pose operational issues. • Two mixing methods were developed to lower the coolant temperature variation. • The methods resulted with reduction of the temperature variation by 60% and 71%. - Abstract: The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the most mature Gen IV reactor concepts under development today. The High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) at Oregon State University is a test facility that supports the R&D needs for HTGRs. This study focuses on the issue of helium mixing after the core section in the HTTF, the results of which are generally applicable in HTGRs. In the HTTF, hot helium jets at different temperatures are supposed to uniformly mix in the lower plenum (LP) chamber. However, the level of mixing is not sufficient to reduce the peak helium temperature before the hot jet impinges the LP structure, which can cause issues with structural materials and operational issues in the heat exchanger downstream. The maximum allowable temperature variation in the outlet duct connected to the lower plenum is defined as 40 K (±20 K from the average temperature), while the CFD simulations of this study indicate that the reference design suffers temperature variations in the duct as high as 100 K. To solve this issue, the installation of mixing-enhancing structures within the outlet duct were proposed and analyzed using CFD modeling. We show that using either an optimized “Kwiat” structure (developed in this study) or a motionless mixer installed in the outlet duct, the temperature variations can be brought dramatically, with acceptable increases in pressure drop. The optimal solution appears to be to install double motionless mixers with long blades in the outlet duct, which brings the temperature variation into the acceptable range (from 100 K down to 18 K), with a resulting pressure drop increase in the HTTF loop of 0.73 kPa (6% of total pressure drop).

  6. Development of thermal mixing enhancement method for lower plenum of the High Temperature Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradecka, Malwina Joanna; Woods, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Coolant mixing in lower plenum might be insufficient and pose operational issues. • Two mixing methods were developed to lower the coolant temperature variation. • The methods resulted with reduction of the temperature variation by 60% and 71%. - Abstract: The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the most mature Gen IV reactor concepts under development today. The High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) at Oregon State University is a test facility that supports the R&D needs for HTGRs. This study focuses on the issue of helium mixing after the core section in the HTTF, the results of which are generally applicable in HTGRs. In the HTTF, hot helium jets at different temperatures are supposed to uniformly mix in the lower plenum (LP) chamber. However, the level of mixing is not sufficient to reduce the peak helium temperature before the hot jet impinges the LP structure, which can cause issues with structural materials and operational issues in the heat exchanger downstream. The maximum allowable temperature variation in the outlet duct connected to the lower plenum is defined as 40 K (±20 K from the average temperature), while the CFD simulations of this study indicate that the reference design suffers temperature variations in the duct as high as 100 K. To solve this issue, the installation of mixing-enhancing structures within the outlet duct were proposed and analyzed using CFD modeling. We show that using either an optimized “Kwiat” structure (developed in this study) or a motionless mixer installed in the outlet duct, the temperature variations can be brought dramatically, with acceptable increases in pressure drop. The optimal solution appears to be to install double motionless mixers with long blades in the outlet duct, which brings the temperature variation into the acceptable range (from 100 K down to 18 K), with a resulting pressure drop increase in the HTTF loop of 0.73 kPa (6% of total pressure drop).

  7. Demonstration of high temperature thermoelectric waste heat recovery from exhaust gases of a combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trottmann, Matthias; Weidenkaff, Anke; Populoh, Sascha; Brunko, Oliver; Veziridis, Angelika; Bach, Christian; Cabalzar, Urs [Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The energy efficiency of passenger cars becomes increasingly important due to a growing awareness in terms of climate change and shortages of resources associated with rising fuel prices. In addition to the efforts towards the optimization of the engine's internal efficiency, waste heat recovery is the main objective. In this respect, thermoelectric (TE) devices seem to be suited as heat recuperation systems. Thermoelectric generators allow for direct transformation of thermal into electrical energy. In order to thoroughly investigate this type of recovery system a TE demonstrator was mounted on the muffler of a VW Touran and tested. The waste heat of the exhaust gas was converted into electricity with a conversion rate of {proportional_to}. 3.5%. The limiting factor was the low thermal stability of the commercial modules used in this pre-study to elaborate reference values. Thermoelectric modules based on sustainable and temperature-stable materials are being developed to improve the measured values. A thermoelectric test generator with perovskite-type oxide modules was constructed confirm the function and stability at elevated temperatures. Despite all the advantages of this material class, the TE performance is still to be improved. A quantitative measure of a material's TE performance is the temperature-independent Figure of Merit ZT. ZT increases with decreasing thermal and increasing electrical conductivity. An approach to thermal conductivity reduction is nanostructuring of the material. The Ultrasonic Spray Combustion (USC) technique allows to produce powders with a grain size on the nanoscale and was tested in this study. (orig.)

  8. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, R.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. Pre and post test metallurgical analyses were conducted on the Hastelloy-X structures and reference specimens. The results gave evidence of aging in the form of noticeable changes in room temperature tensile and reduction in area parameters. The Hastelloy-X welds exhibited greater changes in properties due to thermal aging. The antifriction coating (Cr 3 C 2 ) performed well without spallation or excessive wear. (orig.)

  9. Tensile toughness test and high temperature fracture analysis of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, G.; Nakamura, T.; Berndt, C.C.; Leigh, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, an effective fracture toughness test which uses interface fracture mechanics theory is introduced. This method is ideally suited for determining fracture resistance of multilayered thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) consisting of ceramic and bond layers and, unlike other fracture experiments, requires minimal set-up over a simple tensile adhesion test. Furthermore, while other test methods usually use edge cracked specimens, the present test models a crack embedded within the coatings, which is more consistent with actual TBCs where failure initiates from internal voids or defects. The results of combined computational and experimental analysis show that any defects located within the ceramic coating can significantly weaken a TBC, whereas the debonding resistances of the bond coating and its interfaces are found to be much higher. In a separate analysis, the authors have studied fracture behavior of TBCs subjected to thermal loading in a high temperature environment. The computed fracture parameters reveal that when the embedded crack size is on order of the coating thickness, the fracture driving force is comparable to the fracture resistance of the coating found in the toughness test. In addition, the major driving force for fracture derives from the thermal insulating effect across the crack faces rather than the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion. The authors have also investigated the effects of functionally graded material (FGM) within TBCs and found its influences on the fracture parameters to be small. This result implies that the FGM may not contribute toward enhancing the fracture toughness of the TBCs considered here

  10. A new thermal conductivity probe for high temperature tests for the characterization of molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovesecchi, G.; Coppa, P.; Pistacchio, S.

    2018-05-01

    A new thermal conductivity probe for high temperature (HT-TCP) has been built and tested. Its design and construction procedure are adapted from the ambient temperature thermal conductivity probe (AT-TCP) due to good performance of the latter device. The construction procedure and the preliminary tests are accurately described. The probe contains a Pt wire as a heater and a type K thermocouple (TC) as a temperature sensor, and its size is so small (0.6 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length) as to guarantee a length to diameter ratio of about 100. Calibration tests with glycerol for temperatures between 0 °C and 60 °C have shown good agreement with literature data, within 3%. Preliminary tests were also carried on a ternary molten salt for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) (18% in mass of NaNO3, 52% KNO3, and 30% LiNO3) at 120 °C and 150 °C. Obtained results are within λ range of the Hitec® salt (53% KNO3, 7% NaNO3, 40% NaNO2). Unfortunately, at the higher temperature tested (200 °C), the viscosity of the salt highly decreases, and free convection starts, making the measurements unreliable.

  11. High Temperature "Smart" P3 Sensors and Electronics for Distributed Engine Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current engine control architectures impose limitations on the insertion of new control capabilities due to weight penalties and reliability issues related to...

  12. High Temperature "Smart" P3 Sensors and Electronics for Distributed Engine Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current engine control architectures impose limitations on the insertion of new control capabilities due to weight penalties and reliability issues related to...

  13. Engineering Deinococcus geothermailis for Bioremediation of High-Temperature Radioactive Waste Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brim, Hassan; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Daly, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis is an extremely radiation-resistant thermophilic bacterium closely related to the mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans, which is being engineered for in situ bioremediation of radioactive wastes

  14. Solar-Thermal Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stephen; Salvail, Pat; Haynes, Davy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A solar-thermal engine serves as a high-temperature solar-radiation absorber, heat exchanger, and rocket nozzle. collecting concentrated solar radiation into an absorber cavity and transferring this energy to a propellant as heat. Propellant gas can be heated to temperatures approaching 4,500 F and expanded in a rocket nozzle, creating low thrust with a high specific impulse (I(sub sp)). The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) solar-thermal engine is made of 100 percent chemical vapor deposited (CVD) rhenium. The engine 'module' consists of an engine assembly, propellant feedline, engine support structure, thermal insulation, and instrumentation. Engine thermal performance tests consist of a series of high-temperature thermal cycles intended to characterize the propulsive performance of the engines and the thermal effectiveness of the engine support structure and insulation system. A silicone-carbide electrical resistance heater, placed inside the inner shell, substitutes for solar radiation and heats the engine. Although the preferred propellant is hydrogen, the propellant used in these tests is gaseous nitrogen. Because rhenium oxidizes at elevated temperatures, the tests are performed in a vacuum chamber. Test data will include transient and steady state temperatures on selected engine surfaces, propellant pressures and flow rates, and engine thrust levels. The engine propellant-feed system is designed to Supply GN2 to the engine at a constant inlet pressure of 60 psia, producing a near-constant thrust of 1.0 lb. Gaseous hydrogen will be used in subsequent tests. The propellant flow rate decreases with increasing propellant temperature, while maintaining constant thrust, increasing engine I(sub sp). In conjunction with analytical models of the heat exchanger, the temperature data will provide insight into the effectiveness of the insulation system, the structural support system, and the overall engine performance. These tests also provide experience on operational

  15. Testing of molded high temperature plastic actuator road seals for use in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, A. W.; Huxford, R. L.; Nelson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Molded high temperature plastic first and second stage rod seal elements were evaluated in seal assemblies to determine performance characteristics. These characteristics were compared with the performance of machined seal elements. The 6.35 cm second stage Chevron seal assembly was tested using molded Chevrons fabricated from five molding materials. Impulse screening tests conducted over a range of 311 K to 478 K revealed thermal setting deficiencies in the aromatic polyimide molding materials. Seal elements fabricated from aromatic copolyester materials structurally failed during impulse cycle calibration. Endurance testing of 3.85 million cycles at 450 K using MIL-H-83283 fluid showed poorer seal performance with the unfilled aromatic polyimide material than had been attained with seals machined from Vespel SP-21 material. The 6.35 cm first stage step-cut compression loaded seal ring fabricated from copolyester injection molding material failed structurally during impulse cycle calibration. Molding of complex shape rod seals was shown to be a potentially controllable technique, but additional molding material property testing is recommended.

  16. Some problems on materials tests in high temperature hydrogen base gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Tanabe, Tatsuhiko; Fujitsuka, Masakazu; Yoshida, Heitaro; Watanabe, Ryoji

    1980-01-01

    Some problems have been examined on materials tests (creep rupture tests and corrosion tests) in high temperature mixture gas of hydrogen (80%H 2 + 15%CO + 5%CO 2 ) simulating the reducing gas for direct steel making. H 2 , CO, CO 2 and CH 4 in the reducing gas interact with each other at elevated temperature and produce water vapor (H 2 O) and carbon (soot). Carbon deposited on the walls of retorts and the water condensed at pipings of the lower temperature gas outlet causes blocking of gas flow. The gas reactions have been found to be catalyzed by the retort walls, and appropriate selection of the materials for retorts has been found to mitigate the problems caused by water condensation and carbon deposition. Quartz has been recognized to be one of the most promising materials for minimizing the gas reactions. And ceramic coating, namely, BN (born nitride) on the heat resistant superalloy, MO-RE II, has reduced the amounts of water vapor and deposited carbon (sooting) produced by gas reactions and has kept dew points of outlet gas below room temperature. The well known emf (thermo-electromotive force) deterioration of Alumel-Chromel thermocouples in the reducing gases at elevated temperatures has been also found to be prevented by the ceramic (BN) coating. (author)

  17. Design and Test of a Thermal Triggered Persistent Current System using High Temperature Superconducting Tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Keun [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyoungku [Electro-Mechanical Research Institute, Hyundai Heavy Industries, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Min Cheol [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Seong Eun [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yong Soo [Department of Electrical Engineering, Ansan College of Technology, 671 Choji-Dong, Danwon-Gu, Ansan, 425-792 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jin [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Tae Kuk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Shinchon-Dong 134, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-01

    A superconducting magnet which is operated in persistent current mode in SMES, NMR, MRI and MAGLEV has many advantages such as high uniformity of magnetic field and reduced thermal loss. A high temperature superconducting (HTS) persistent current switch (PCS) system was designed and tested in this research. The HTS PCS was optimally designed using two different HTS tapes, second generation coated conductor (CC) HTS tape and Bi-2223 HTS tape by the finite element method (FEM) in thermal quench characteristic view. The CC tape is more prospective applicable wire in these days for its high n value and critical current independency from external magnetic field than Bi-2223 tape. Also a prototype PCS system using Bi-2223 tape was manufactured and tested. The PCS system consists of a PCS part, a heater which induces the PCS to quench, and a superconducting magnet. The test was performed in various conditions of transport current. An initial current decay appeared when the superconducting magnet was energized in a PCS system was analyzed. This paper would be foundation of HTS PCS researches.

  18. Enhancing the Accuracy of Advanced High Temperature Mechanical Testing through Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Jones

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the advantages and enhanced accuracy thermography provides to high temperature mechanical testing. This technique is not only used to monitor, but also to control test specimen temperatures where the infra-red technique enables accurate non-invasive control of rapid thermal cycling for non-metallic materials. Isothermal and dynamic waveforms are employed over a 200–800 °C temperature range to pre-oxidised and coated specimens to assess the capability of the technique. This application shows thermography to be accurate to within ±2 °C of thermocouples, a standardised measurement technique. This work demonstrates the superior visibility of test temperatures previously unobtainable by conventional thermocouples or even more modern pyrometers that thermography can deliver. As a result, the speed and accuracy of thermal profiling, thermal gradient measurements and cold/hot spot identification using the technique has increased significantly to the point where temperature can now be controlled by averaging over a specified area. The increased visibility of specimen temperatures has revealed additional unknown effects such as thermocouple shadowing, preferential crack tip heating within an induction coil, and, fundamental response time of individual measurement techniques which are investigated further.

  19. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 October 2016 – 26 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Liquid Rocket Engine Testing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Liquid Rocket Engine Testing SFTE Symposium 21 October 2016 Jake Robertson, Capt USAF AFRL...Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance 16493 Liquid Rocket Engine TestingEngines and their components are extensively static-tested in development • This

  20. Development of a high temperature austenitic stainless steel for Stirling engine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, D.L.; Lemkey, F.D.

    1986-01-01

    An alloy, designed NASAUT 4G-A1, was developed which exhibited an excellent balance of oxidation resistance and high temperature strength while maintaining an austenitic matrix necessary for hydrogen compatibility. This alloy, having the composition 15Cr-15Mn-2Mo-1Nb-1Si-1.5C-bal. Fe in wt%, was microstructurally characterized and shown to contain a fine M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated phase. Subsequent heat treatments were shown to substantially modify this microstructure resulting in improved mechanical properties. Yield, creep and low cycle fatigue strengths were found to be superior to the best iron base alloy thus far identified as a potential heater head candidate material, XF-818

  1. Digital Information Platform Design of Fuel Element Engineering For High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yuwei

    2014-01-01

    This product line provide fuel element for high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear power plant which is being constructed in Shidao bay in Shandong province. Its annual productive capacity is thirty ten thousands fuel elements whose shape is spherical . Compared with pressurized water fuel , this line has the feature of high radiation .In order to reduce harm to operators, the comprehensive information platform is designed , which can realize integration of automation and management for plant. This platform include two nets, automation net using field bus technique and information net using Ethernet technique ,which realize collection ,control, storage and publish of information.By means of construction, automatization and informatization of product line can reach high level. (author)

  2. High temperature heat exchanger application in power engineering and energy-technological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpilrain, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    The possibilities for intensification of various processes in metallurgy and chemical technology, the prospects for enhancing power plant efficiency are often linked with temperature increase of reagents, heat carriers and working fluids. In some cases elevated temperatures give the opportunity to use new and principally different technologies, enhance capacities of power production units and technological apparatuses, improve their economical performance. The variety of problems where high temperature heat exchangers are or can be used are extremely wide. It is therefore impossible to overview all of them in one lecture. Therefore the author tries to consider only some examples which are typical and gives an impression of what kind of problems arise in these cases

  3. Test results of a 20 kA high temperature superconductor current lead using REBCO tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R.; Fietz, W. H.; Gröner, F.; Heiduk, M.; Hollik, M.; Lange, C.; Lietzow, R.

    2018-05-01

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology has developed a 20 kA high temperature superconductor (HTS) current lead (CL) using the second generation material REBCO, as industry worldwide concentrate on the production of this material. The aim was to demonstrate the possibility of replacing the Bi-2223/AgAu tapes by REBCO tapes, while for easy comparison of results, all other components are copies of the 20 kA HTS CL manufactured for the satellite tokamak JT-60SA. After the manufacture of all CL components including the newly developed REBCO module, the assembly of the CL has been executed at KIT and an experiment has been carried out in the CuLTKa test facility where the REBCO CL was installed and connected to a JT-60SA CL via a superconducting bus bar. The experiment covers steady state operation up to 20 kA, pulsed operation, measurement of the heat load at 4.5 K end, loss-of-flow-accident simulations, and quench performance studies. Here the results of these tests are reported and directly compared to those of the JT-60SA CL.

  4. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Roberge, A.; Felten, P.; Bastien, D.

    1979-01-01

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 100 0 C to 760 0 C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. The insulation retained an acceptable degree of resiliency. However, some fiber damage was observed within both the high and low temperature insulation blankets. A thermal analysis was conducted to correlate the hot duct heat transfer results with those obtained from the analytical techniques used for the HTGR design using a computer thermal model representative of the duct and test setup. The thermal performance of the insulation, the temperature gradient through the structural components, the heating load to the cooling system and the permeation flow effect on heat transfer were verified. Exellent correlation between the experimental data and the analytical techniques were obtained

  5. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SAFETY TESTING OF IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Chrisensen, Cad L.

    2016-11-01

    High-Temperature Safety Testing of Irradiated AGR-1 TRISO Fuel John D. Stempien, Paul A. Demkowicz, Edward L. Reber, and Cad L. Christensen Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Corresponding Author: john.stempien@inl.gov, +1-208-526-8410 Two new safety tests of irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel have been completed in the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In the first test, three fuel compacts from the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation experiment (AGR-1) were simultaneously heated in the FACS furnace. Prior to safety testing, each compact was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to a burnup of approximately 15 % fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a fast fluence of 3×1025 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV), and a time-average volume-average (TAVA) irradiation temperature of about 1020 °C. In order to simulate a core-conduction cool-down event, a temperature-versus-time profile having a peak temperature of 1700 °C was programmed into the FACS furnace controllers. Gaseous fission products (i.e., Kr-85) were carried to the Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) by a helium sweep gas and captured in cold traps featuring online gamma counting. By the end of the test, a total of 3.9% of an average particle’s inventory of Kr-85 was detected in the FGMS traps. Such a low Kr-85 activity indicates that no TRISO failures (failure of all three TRISO layers) occurred during the test. If released from the compacts, condensable fission products (e.g., Ag-110m, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-154, Eu-155, and Sr-90) were collected on condensation plates fitted to the end of the cold finger in the FACS furnace. These condensation plates were then analyzed for fission products. In the second test, five loose UCO fuel kernels, obtained from deconsolidated particles from an irradiated AGR-1 compact, were heated in the FACS furnace to a peak temperature of 1600 °C. This test had two

  6. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is an indispensable element of any substantial attempt in reactor simulation validation. The quantification of uncertainties in nuclear engineering has grown more important and the IAEA Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) initiated in 2012 aims to investigate the various uncertainty quantification methodologies for this type of reactors. The first phase of the CRP is dedicated to the estimation of cell and lattice model uncertainties due to the neutron cross sections co-variances. Phase II is oriented towards the investigation of propagated uncertainties from the lattice to the coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics core calculations. Nominal results for the prismatic single block (Ex.I-2a) and super cell models (Ex.I-2c) have been obtained using the SCALE 6.1.3 two-dimensional lattice code NEWT coupled to the TRITON sequence for cross section generation. In this work, the TRITON/NEWT-flux-weighted cross sections obtained for Ex.I-2a and various models of Ex.I-2c is utilized to perform a sensitivity analysis of the MHTGR-350 core power densities and eigenvalues. The core solutions are obtained with the INL coupled code PHISICS/RELAP5-3D, utilizing a fixed-temperature feedback for Ex. II-1a.. It is observed that the core power density does not vary significantly in shape, but the magnitude of these variations increases as the moderator-to-fuel ratio increases in the super cell lattice models.

  7. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-[TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    A point design for a graphite-moderated, high-temperature, gas-cooled test reactor (HTG TR) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of a United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) initiative to explore and potentially expand the existing U.S. test reactor capabilities. This paper provides a summary of the design and its main attributes. The 200 MW HTG TR is a thermal-neutron spectrum reactor composed of hexagonal prismatic fuel and graphite reflector blocks. Twelve fuel columns (96 fuel blocks total and 6.34 m active core height) are arranged in two hexagonal rings to form a relatively compact, high-power density, annular core sandwiched between inner, outer, top, and bottom graphite reflectors. The HTG-TR is designed to operate at 7 MPa with a coolant inlet/outlet temperature of 325°C/650°C, and utilizes TRISO particle fuel from the DOE AGR Program with 425 ?m uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels and an enrichment of 15.5 wt% 235U. The primary mission of the HTG TR is material irradiation and therefore the core has been specifically designed and optimized to provide the highest possible thermal and fast neutron fluxes. The highest thermal neutron flux (3.90E+14 n/cm2s) occurs in the outer reflector, and the maximum fast flux levels (1.17E+14 n/cm2s) are produced in the central reflector column where most of the graphite has been removed. Due to high core temperatures under accident conditions, all the irradiation test facilities have been located in the inner and outer reflectors where fast flux levels decline. The core features a large number of irradiation positions with large test volumes and long test lengths, ideal for thermal neutron irradiation of large test articles. The total available test volume is more than 1100 liters. Up to four test loop facilities can be accommodated with pressure tube boundaries to isolate test articles and test fluids (e.g., liquid metal, liquid salt, light water) from the helium primary coolant system.

  8. Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, Graydon L. Jr.; Elkassabgi, Yousri M.; De Leon, Gerardo I.; Fetterly, Caitlin N.; Ramos, Jorge A.; Cunningham, Richard Burns

    2012-01-01

    Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental

  9. Assessment of current structural design methodology for high-temperature reactors based on failure tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corum, J.M.; Sartory, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    A mature design methodology, consisting of inelastic analysis methods, provided in Department of Energy guidelines, and failure criteria, contained in ASME Code Case N-47, exists in the United States for high-temperature reactor components. The objective of this paper is to assess the adequacy of this overall methodology by comparing predicted inelastic deformations and lifetimes with observed results from structural failure tests and from an actual service failure. Comparisons are presented for three types of structural situations: (1) nozzle-to-spherical shell specimens, where stresses at structural discontinuities lead to cracking, (2) welded structures, where metallurgical discontinuities play a key role in failures, and (3) thermal shock loadings of cylinders and pipes, where thermal discontinuities can lead to failure. The comparison between predicted and measured inelastic responses are generally reasonalbly good; quantities are sometimes overpredicted somewhat, and, sometimes underpredicted. However, even seemingly small discrepancies can have a significant effect on structural life, and lifetimes are not always as closely predicted. For a few cases, the lifetimes are substantially overpredicted, which raises questions regarding the adequacy of existing design margins

  10. Studies Related to the Oregon State University High Temperature Test Facility: Scaling, the Validation Matrix, and Similarities to the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; William T. Taitano; James R. Wolf; Glenn E. McCreery

    2010-09-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5 year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Because the NRC interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC). Since DOE has incorporated the HTTF as an ingredient in the NGNP thermal-fluids validation program, several important outcomes should be noted: 1. The reference prismatic reactor design, that serves as the basis for scaling the HTTF, became the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR has also been chosen as the reference design for all of the other NGNP thermal-fluid experiments. 2. The NGNP validation matrix is being planned using the same scaling strategy that has been implemented to design the HTTF, i.e., the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology developed by Zuber in 1991. Using this approach a preliminary validation matrix has been designed that integrates the HTTF experiments with the other experiments planned for the NGNP thermal-fluids verification and validation project. 3. Initial analyses showed that the inherent power capability of the OSU infrastructure, which only allowed a total operational facility power capability of 0.6 MW, is

  11. Development testing of high temperature bearings for SP-100 control drive assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalcher, Alfred W.; Kjaer-Olsen, Christian G.; Martinez, Carlos; Ogawa, Stanley Y.; Springer, Dwight R.; Yaspo, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Initial phases of two distinct SP-100 control drive assembly bearing test programs were successfully completed at elevated temperature in vacuum. The first was for the reflector drive line spherical self-aligning bearings. Each bearing consisted of a carbon-graphite ball mounted on an aluminum oxide-coated Ta-10%W shaft, captured by an aluminum oxide-coated Ta-10%W socket. One set of these bearings was exposed to temperatures up to 1180K (1665°F) at 1.33×10-6 Pa (1×10-8 torr) and subjected to 38000 cycles of motion. Friction coefficients were found to be between 0.11 and 0.25 over the full range of operation. Overall performance of the bearings was excellent, with only slight wear observed. The second test program was for the safety rod slider bearing. Zirconium carbide coated Nb-1%Zr bearings pads were stroked inside a molybdenum tube at temperatures up to 1422 K (2100°F) at ˜1.33×10-6 Pa with a normal load of 1.02 Kg between each sliding surface. Coefficients of sliding friction were found to increase from 0.90 at 293 K to 1.20 at 1422 K prior to high temperature dwells. Results were consistent over the range of stroke velocities; 5.1 to 51 mm (0.2 to 2.0 inches) per second. Following dwells of 92, 72, and 110 hours at 1422 K, static friction coefficients as high as 5.4 were observed prior to initiation of sliding, after which sliding friction coefficients of ˜1.6 were seen. Breakaway forces were well within the actuator design limits.

  12. Accident Testing of High Temperature Reactor Fuel Elements with the KueFA Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, O.; Laurie, M.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Ferreira-Teixeira, A.E.; Van Winckel, S.; Rondinella, V.V.; Allelein, H.J.

    2013-06-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is characterised by an advanced design with passive safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with Tri-Isotropic (TRISO) coating, designed to provide high fission product retention. During a loss of coolant accident scenario in a HTR the maximum temperature is foreseen to be in the range of 1600-1650 deg. C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. The Cold Finger Apparatus (KueFA) is used to observe the combined effects of Depressurization and Loss of Forced Circulation (DLOFC) accident scenarios on HTR fuel. Originally designed at the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), an adapted KueFA operates on irradiated fuel in hot cell at JRC-ITU. A fuel pebble is heated in He atmosphere for several hundred hours, mimicking accident temperatures up to 1800 deg. C and realistic temperature transients. Non-gaseous volatile fission products released from the fuel condense on a water cooled stainless steel plate dubbed 'Cold Finger'. Exchanging plates frequently during the experiment and analysing plate deposits by means of HPGe gamma spectroscopy allows a reconstruction of the fission product release as a function of time and temperature. In order to achieve a good quantification of the release, a careful calibration of the setup is mandatory. An especially tailored collimator was designed to perform plate scanning with high spatial resolution, thus yielding information about the fission product distribution on the condensation plates. The analysis of condensation plates from recent KueFA tests shows that fission product release quantification is possible at high and low activity levels. Chemical dissolution has been performed for some condensation plates in order to assess beta nuclides of interest such as 90 Sr and possibly 129 I using an Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) and to cross check the HPGe gamma spectroscopy measurements

  13. Evaluation test of high temperature strain gages used in a stethoscope for OGL-1 components in an elevated temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshimi; Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki; Toshiaki.

    1982-01-01

    The stethoscope for OGL-1 components in a elevated temperature service (SOCETS) is a measuring system of evaluation integrity of structures for high temperature pipings during operations of Japan Material Testing Reactor. This paper is described about the results on fundamental performance on high temperature strain gages. From their test results that have been based on correlation of temperature-timestrain factors, it became clear that two weldable strain gages and a capacitance strain gage were available for strain measurements of OGL-1 components. (author)

  14. Evaluation test of high temperature strain gages used in a stethoscope for OGL-1 components in an elevated temperature service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Toshimi (Kyowa Electronic Inst. Co. Ltd. (Japan)); Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki; Toshiaki

    1982-08-01

    The stethoscope for OGL-1 components in a elevated temperature service (SOCETS) is a measuring system of evaluation integrity of structures for high temperature pipings during operations of Japan Material Testing Reactor. This paper is described about the results on fundamental performance on high temperature strain gages. From their test results that have been based on correlation of temperature-timestrain factors, it became clear that two weldable strain gages and a capacitance strain gage were available for strain measurements of OGL-1 components.

  15. The high temperature out-of-pile test of LVDT for internal pressure measurement of nuclear fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J. M.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, D. S.; Yoon, K. B.; Sin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Kang, Y. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    As a part of the development of instrumentation technologies for the nuclear fuel irradiation test in HANARO(High-flux Advanced Nuclear Application Reactor), the internal pressure measurement technique of the nuclear fuel rod is being developed using LVDT(Linear Variable Differential Transformer). As the results of out-of-pile test at room temperature, it was concluded that the well qualified out-of-pile tests were needed to understand the LVDT's detail characteristics at high temperature for the detail design of the fuel irradiation capsule, because LVDT is very sensitive to variation of temperature. Therefore, the high temperature out-of-pile test system for pressure measurement was developed, and this test was performed under the temperature condition between room temperature and 300 .deg. C increasing the pressure from 0 bar to 30 bar. The LVDT's high temperature characteristics and temperature sensitivity of LVDT were analyzed through this experiment. Based on the result of this test, the method for the application of LVDT at high temperature was introduced. It is known that the results will be used to predict accurately the internal pressure of fuel rod during irradiation test.

  16. Evaluation of thermal displacement behavior of high temperature piping system in power-up test of HTTR. No. 1 results up to 20 MW operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Satoshi; Kojima, Takao; Sumita, Junya; Tachibana, Yukio

    2002-03-01

    Temperature of the primary cooling system of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, HTTR, becomes very high because the coolant temperature at the reactor outlet reaches 950degC, and 400degC at inlet of the reactor. Therefore, it is important to confirm the thermal displacement behavior of the high temperature piping system in the primary cooling system from the viewpoint of the structural integrity. Moreover, newly designed 3-dimensional floating support system is adopted to the cooling system, it is meaningful to verify the thermal displacement behavior of the piping system applied the 3-dimensional floating support system. In the power-up test (up to 20 MW operation), thermal displacement behavior of the high temperature piping system was measured. This paper describes the experimental and analytical results of thermal displacement characteristics of the high temperature piping system. The results showed that the resistance force induced from the supporting system effects to the thermal displacement behavior of cooling system, and the analytical results have a good agreement with the experimental results by optimizing the resistant force of the floating support system. Additionally, structural integrity at the 30 MW operation was confirmed by the analysis. (author)

  17. Monitoring of high temperature zone by resistivity tomography during in-situ heater test in sedimentary soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    In-situ heater test has been conducted to evaluate the influence of high temperature in an underground facility at a depth of 50 m. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of the high temperature zone. So we have conducted resistivity tomography during the heater test. As a result, low resistivity zone was appeared near the heated area as starting the heating, and the zone was expanded. Resistivity of rock is proportional to resistivity of pore water. It is known that pore water resistivity decreases as the temperature rise. This suggests that high temperature zone is detected and spatial distribution of temperature can be mapped by resistivity tomography. (author)

  18. First Results from Tests of High Temperature Superconductor Magnets on Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryaznevich, M.; Todd, T.T., E-mail: mikhail.gryaznevich@ccfe.ac.uk [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Svoboda, V.; Markovic, T.; Ondrej, G. [Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Stockel, J.; Duran, I.; Kovarik, K. [IPP Prague, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Sykes, A.; Kingham, D. [Tokamak Solutions, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Melhem, Z.; Ball, S.; Chappell, S. [Oxford Instruments, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Lilley, M. K.; De Grouchy, P.; Kim, H. -T. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: It has long been known that high temperature superconductors (HTS) could have an important role to play in the future of tokamak fusion research. Here we report on first results of the use of HTS in a tokamak magnet and on the progress in design and construction of the first fully-HTS tokamak. In the experiment, the two copper vertical field coils of the small tokamak GOLEM were replaced by two coils each with 6 turns of HTS (Re)BCO tape. Liquid nitrogen was used to cool the coils to below the critical temperature at which HTS becomes superconducting. Little effect on the HTS critical current has been observed for perpendicular field up to 0.5 T and superconductivity has been achieved at {approx} 90.5K during bench tests. There had been concerns that the plasma pulses and pulsed magnetic fields might cause a 'quench' in the HTS, i.e., a sudden and potentially damaging transition from superconductor to normal conductor. However, many plasma pulses were fired without any quenches even when disruptions occurred with corresponding induced electrical fields. In addition, experiments without plasma have been performed to study properties of the HTS in a tokamak environment, i.e., critical current and its dependence on magnetic and electrical fields generated in a tokamak both in DC and pulsed operations, maximum current ramp-up speed, performance of the HTS tape after number of artificially induced quenches etc. No quench has been observed at DC currents up to 200 A (1.2 kA-turns through the coil). In short pulses, current up to 1 kA through the tape (6 kA-turns) has been achieved with no subsequent degradation of the HTS performance with a current ramp rate up to 0.6 MA/s. In future experiments, increases in both the plasma current and pulse duration are planned. Considerable experience has been gained during design and fabrication of the cryostat, coils, isolation and insulation, feeds and cryosystems, and GOLEM is now routinely operated with HTS coils. The

  19. Deterministic Modeling of the High Temperature Test Reactor with DRAGON-HEXPEDITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortensi, J.; Pope, M.A.; Ferrer, R.M.; Cogliati, J.J.; Bess, J.D.; Ougouag, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with the development of reactor physics analysis capability of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) project. In order to examine the INL's current prismatic reactor analysis tools, the project is conducting a benchmark exercise based on modeling the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR). This exercise entails the development of a model for the initial criticality, a 19 fuel column thin annular core, and the fully loaded core critical condition with 30 fuel columns. Special emphasis is devoted to physical phenomena and artifacts in HTTR that are similar to phenomena and artifacts in the NGNP base design. The DRAGON code is used in this study since it offers significant ease and versatility in modeling prismatic designs. DRAGON can generate transport solutions via Collision Probability (CP), Method of Characteristics (MOC) and Discrete Ordinates (Sn). A fine group cross-section library based on the SHEM 281 energy structure is used in the DRAGON calculations. The results from this study show reasonable agreement in the calculation of the core multiplication factor with the MC methods, but a consistent bias of 2-3% with the experimental values is obtained. This systematic error has also been observed in other HTTR benchmark efforts and is well documented in the literature. The ENDF/B VII graphite and U235 cross sections appear to be the main source of the error. The isothermal temperature coefficients calculated with the fully loaded core configuration agree well with other benchmark participants but are 40% higher than the experimental values. This discrepancy with the measurement partially stems from the fact that during the experiments the control rods were adjusted to maintain criticality, whereas in the model, the rod positions were fixed. In addition, this work includes a brief study of a cross section generation approach that seeks to decouple the domain in order to account for neighbor effects. This spectral

  20. Effects of Novel Fin Shape of High Temperature Heat Exchanger on 1 kW Class Stirling Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Joon; Kim, Seok Yeon [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    In this research, numerical analysis was carried out on novel and existing fins, adjusted in terms of factors such as length, spacing, and angle, of a high-temperature heat exchanger for a 1 kW class Stirling engine, designed as a prime mover for a domestic cogeneration system. The performance improvement as a result of shape optimization was confirmed with numerical analysis by including the air preheater, which was not considered during optimization. However, a negative heat flux was observed in the cylinder head portion. This phenomenon was clarified by analyzing the exhaust gas and wall surface temperature of the combustion chamber. Furthermore, assuming an ideal cycle, the effects of heat transfer enhancement on the thermodynamic cycle and system performance were predicted.

  1. Testing of Sapphire Optical Fiber and Sensors in Intense Radiation Fields When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Thomas [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Windl, Wolfgang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-12-15

    The primary objective of this project was to determine the optical attenuation and signal degradation of sapphire optical fibers & sensors (temperature & strain), in-situ, operating at temperatures up to 1500°C during reactor irradiation through experiments and modeling. The results will determine the feasibility of extending sapphire optical fiber-based instrumentation to extremely high temperature radiation environments. This research will pave the way for future testing of sapphire optical fibers and fiber-based sensors under conditions expected in advanced high temperature reactors.

  2. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  3. The engineering test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Becraft, W.R.; Sager, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper describes the design status of the ETF. (orig.)

  4. Engineering test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Becraft, W.R.; Sager, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper described the design status of the ETF

  5. High temperature (salt melt) corrosion tests with ceramic-coated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, Adelheid [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Günthner, Martin; Motz, Günter [University Bayreuth, Ceramic Materials Engineering, L.-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Greißl, Oliver [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Schelmenwasenstraße 13-15, D-70567 Stuttgart (Germany); Glatzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.glatzel@uni-bayreuth.de [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Thermal recycling of refuse in waste-to-energy plants reduces the problems connected to waste disposal, and is an alternative source of electric energy. However, the combustion process in waste incinerators results in a fast degradation of the steam-carrying superheater steel tubes by corrosive attack and abrasive wear. Higher firing temperatures are used to increase their efficiency but lead to higher corrosion rates. It is more economical to apply protective coatings on the superheater steel tubes than to replace the base material. In-situ tests were conducted in a waste-to-energy plant first in order to identify and quantify all involved corrosive elements. Laboratory scale experiments with salt melts were developed accordingly. The unprotected low-alloyed steel displayed substantial local corrosion. Corrosion was predominant along the grain boundaries of α-ferrite. The corrosion rate was further increased by FeCl{sub 3} and a mixture of HCL and FeCl{sub 3}. Coatings based on pre-ceramic polymers with specific filler particles were engineered to protect superheater tubes. Tests proved their suitability to protect low-alloYed steel tubes from corrosive attack under conditions typical for superheaterS in waste incinerators, rendering higher firing temperatures in waste-to-energy plants possible. - Highlights: • Corrosion wall thickness losses of 400 μm/2 weeks occurred in a waste incinerator. • Abrasion is a major problem on superheater tubes in waste incinerators. • Laboratory salt melt tests can simulate metal corrosion in waste incinerators. • Corrosion protection coatings for steel (temperature: max. 530 °C) were developed. • Higher steam temperatures are possible in WIs with the developed coatings.

  6. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  7. High-Temperature Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy Studies of Ferrite Formation in Inclusion-Engineered Steels: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wangzhong; Hedström, Peter; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Jönsson, Pär G.; Nakajima, Keiji

    2018-05-01

    The concepts of oxide metallurgy and inclusion engineering can be utilized to improve the properties of low-alloy steels. These concepts aim at controlling the formation of intragranular ferrite (IGF), often a desirable microstructure providing good mechanical properties without the need for expensive alloying elements. IGF formation is stimulated to occur at non-metallic inclusions and form an arrangement of fine, interlocking ferrite grains. A method that has contributed significantly to investigations in this field lately is high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy (HT-CLSM). HT-CLSM is suited for in situ studies of inclusion behavior in liquid steel and phase transformations in solid-state steel, where in particular, displacive phase transformations can be studied, since they provide sufficient topographic contrast. The purpose of the present report is to provide a brief review of the state of the art of HT-CLSM and its application for in situ observations of ferrite formation in inclusion-engineered steels. The scientific literature in this field is surveyed and supplemented by new work to reveal the capability of HT-CLSM as well as to discuss the effect of factors such as cooling rate and parent grain size on IGF formation and growth kinetics. The report concludes with an outlook on the opportunities and challenges of HT-CLSM for applications in oxide metallurgy.

  8. R and D status and requirements for PIE in the fields of the HTGR fuel and the innovative basic research on High-Temperature Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Tobita, Tsutomu; Sumita, Junya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Ishihara, Masahiro; Hayashi, Kimio; Hoshiya, Taiji; Sekino, Hajime; Ooeda, Etsurou

    1999-09-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, achieved its first criticality in November 1998 at the Oarai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In the field of HTGR fuel development, JAERI will proceed research and development (R and D) works by the following steps: (STEP-1) confirmation of irradiation performance of the first-loading fuel of the HTTR, (STEP-2) study on irradiation performance of high burnup SiC-coated fuel particle and (STEP-3) development of ZrC-coated fuel particle. Requirements for post-irradiation examination (PIE) are different for each R and D step. In STEP-1, firstly, hot cells will be prepared in the HTTR reactor building to handle spent fuels. In parallel, general equipments such as those for deconsolidation of fuel compacts and for handling coated fuel particles will be installed in the Hot Laboratory at Oarai. In STEP-2, precise PIE techniques, for example, Raman spectroscopy for measurement of stress on irradiated SiC layer, will be investigated. In STEP-3, new PIE techniques should be developed to investigate irradiation behavior of ZrC-coated particle. In the field of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering, some preliminary tests have been made on the research areas of (1) new materials development, (2) fusion technology, (3) radiation chemistry and (4) high-temperature in-core instrumentation. Requirements for PIE are under investigation, in particular in the field of the new materials development. Besides more general apparatuses including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), some special apparatuses such as an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer, a specific resistance/Hall coefficient measuring system and a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) are planned to install in the Hot Laboratory at Oarai. Acquisition of advanced knowledge on the irradiation behavior is expected in

  9. High temperature testing - a contribution to alloy development, alloy qualification and simulation of component Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, A.; Schwienheer, M.; Mueller, F.; Linn, S.; Schein, M.; Walther, C.; Berger, C.

    2007-01-01

    In parallel to continued developments of steam and gas turbines as well as traffic engineering machines on the one hand, and marginal conditions like low specific fuel consumption and sufficient environment-friendliness on the other hand, the aim of improving the degree of efficiency by augmenting process parameters such as temperature and pressure is being followed. These efforts impact especially components of thermic machines and facilities subject to high thermal and mechanic exposure. Still largely unexplored is the interaction between microstructure characteristics determined through chemical composition, production processes and heat treatment, changes in the microstructure due to multiaxial load and the time-dependent deformation and stability resulting hereof. With regard to this background, improved methods of material properties determination, their modelling and transfer on the component enable to optimize wall thicknesses and degrees of efficiency. In the course of evaluation of static and cyclic material properties carried out also on faulty specimens, uncertainties occur which can originate from the testing process and analysis, as well as being influenced by the material itself and its process of production. Altogether, the demand for reliable determination of material properties and methods of scatterband treatment and their mathematical-statistical evaluation is in business. For simulation, consistent material datasets that describe the complex interaction between temperature, period of exposure and type of exposure are needed. Summarizing, the tasks dealt with qualify the entire process from production to the operational behaviour of components. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  10. Employing various metallography methods at high temperature alloy fatigue tests evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Belan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available . Microstructures of superalloys have dramatically changed throughout the years, as modern technology of its casting or forging has become more sophisticated. The first superalloys have polyedric microstructure consisting of gamma solid solution, some fraction of gamma prime and of course grain boundaries. As demands on higher performance of aero jet engine increases, the changes in superalloys microstructure become more significant. A further step in microstructure evolution was directionally solidified alloys with columnar gamma prime particles. The latest microstructures are mostly monocrystalline, oriented in [001] direction of FCC gamma matrix. All microstructure changes bring necessity of proper preparation and evaluation of microstructure. Except for the already mentioned structures have gamma double prime and various carbides form can be seen. These structural parameters have mainly positive influence on important mechanical properties of superalloys. The paper deals with a microstructural evaluation of both groups of alloys – cast and as well as wrought. Microstructure evaluation helps to describe mechanism at various loading and failure of progressive superalloys. Such an example where microstructure evaluation is employed is fractography of failure surfaces after fatigue tests, which are examples of metallography evaluation described in this paper as a secondary objective.

  11. Study on simulation, control and online assistance integrated system of 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, S.; Shi, L.; Zhu, S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide a convenient tool for engineering designed, safety analysis, operator training and control system design of the high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR), an integrated system for simulation, control and online assistance of the HTR-10 has been designed and is still under development by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. The whole system is based on a network environment and includes three subsystems: the simulation subsystem (SIMUSUB), the visualized control designed subsystem (VCDSUB) and the online assistance subsystem (OASUB). The SIMUSUB consists of four parts: the simulation calculating server (SCS), the main control client (MCC), the data disposal client (DDC) and the results graphic display client (RGDC), all of which can communicate with each other via network. The SIMUSUB is intended to analyze and calculate the physical processes of the reactor core, the main loop system and the stream generator, etc., as well as to simulate the normal operation and transient accidents, and the result data can be graphically displayed through the RGDC dynamically. The VCDSUB provides a platform for control system modeling where the control flow systems can be automatically generated and graphically simulated. Based on the data from the field bus, the OASUB provides some of the reactor core parameter, which are difficult to measure. This whole system can be used as an educational tool to understand the design and operational characteristics of the HTR-10, and can also provide online supports for operators in the main control room, or as a convenient powerful tool for the control system design. (authors)

  12. Study on computer-aided control system design platform of 10MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan; Shi Lei; Sun Yuliang; Luo Shaojie

    2004-01-01

    the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR-10) is the first modular pebble bed reactor built in China, which needs to be researched on engineering design, control study, safety analysis and operator training. An integrated system for simulation, control design and online assistance of the HTR-10 (HTRSIMU) has been developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University. The HTRSIMU system is based on a high-speed local area network, on which a computer-aided control system design platform (CDP) is developed and combined with the simulating subsystem in order to provide a visualized and convenient tool for the HTR-10 control system design. The CDP has friendly man-machine interface and good expansibility, in which eighteen types of control items are integrated. These control items are divided into two types: linear and non-linear control items. The linear control items include Proportion, Integral, Differential, Inertial, Leed-lag, Oscillation, Pure-lag, Common, PID and Fuzzy, while the non-linear control items include Saturation, Subsection, Insensitive, Backlash, Relay, Insensi-Relay, Sluggish-Relay and Insens-Slug. The CDP provides a visualized platform for control system modeling and the control loop system can be automatically generated and graphically simulated. Users can conveniently design control loop, modify control parameters, study control method, and analyze control results just by clicking mouse buttons. This kind of control system design method can provide a powerful tool and good reference for the actual system operation for HTR-10. A control scheme is also given and studied to demonstrate the functions of the CDP in this article. (author)

  13. Three-dimensional study of grain boundary engineering effects on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of 316 stainless steel in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingguang; Xia, Shuang; Bai, Qin; Zhou, Bangxin; Zhang, Lefu; Lu, Yonghao; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2018-01-01

    The intergranular cracks and grain boundary (GB) network of a GB-engineered 316 stainless steel after stress corrosion cracking (SCC) test in high temperature high pressure water of reactor environment were investigated by two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) characterization in order to expose the mechanism that GB-engineering mitigates intergranular SCC. The 3D microstructure shown that the essential characteristic of the GB-engineered microstructure is formation of many large twin-boundaries as a result of multiple-twinning, which results in the formation of large grain-clusters. The large grain-clusters played a key role to the improvement of intergranular SCC resistance by GB-engineering. The main intergranular cracks propagated in a zigzag along the outer boundaries of these large grain-clusters because all inner boundaries of the grain-clusters were twin-boundaries (∑3) or twin-related boundaries (∑3n) which had much lower susceptibility to SCC than random boundaries. These large grain-clusters had tree-ring-shaped topology structure and very complex morphology. They got tangled so that difficult to be separated during SCC, resulting in some large crack-bridges retained in the crack surface.

  14. Characterization and Aging Test Methodology for Power Electronic Devices at High Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, A.; Khatir, Z.; Dupont, L.

    2011-01-01

    Power electronic modules are key elements in the chain of power conversion. The application areas include aerospace, aviation, railway, electrical distribution, automotive, home automation, oil industry ... But the use of power electronics in high temperature environments is a major strategic issue in the coming years especially in transport. However, the active components based on silicon are limited in their applications and not suitable for those require both high voltages and high ambient temperatures. The materials with wide energy gap like SiC, GaN and diamond, have the advantage of being able to exceed these limits [1,2]. These materials seem adequate to extremely harsh temperature environments and allow the reduction of cooling systems, but also the increasing of switching frequency. (author)

  15. Pistons and engine testing

    CERN Document Server

    GmbH, Mahle

    2012-01-01

    The ever-increasing demands placed on combustion engines are just as great when it comes to this centerpiece - the piston. Achieving less weight or friction, or even greater wear resistance, requires in-depth knowledge of the processes taking place inside the engine, suitable materials, and appropriate design and machining processes for pistons, including the necessary testing measures. It is no longer possible for professionals in automotive engineering to manage without specific know-how of this kind, whether they work in the field of design, development, testing, or maintenance. This techni

  16. Design, analysis, and initial testing of a fiber-optic shear gage for three-dimensional, high-temperature flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Matthew W.

    This investigation concerns the design, analysis, and initial testing of a new, two-component wall shear gage for 3D, high-temperature flows. This gage is a direct-measuring, non-nulling design with a round head surrounded by a small gap. Two flexure wheels are used to allow small motions of the floating head. Fiber-optic displacement sensors measure how far the polished faces of counterweights on the wheels move in relation to a fixed housing as the primary measurement system. No viscous damping was required. The gage has both fiber-optic instrumentation and strain gages mounted on the flexures for validation of the newer fiber optics. The sensor is constructed of Haynes RTM 230RTM, a high-temperature nickel alloy. The gage housing is made of 316 stainless steel. All components of the gage in pure fiber-optic form can survive to a temperature of 1073 K. The bonding methods of the backup strain gages limit their maximum temperature to 473 K. The dynamic range of the gage is from 0--500 Pa (0--10g) and higher shears can be measured by changing the floating head size. Extensive use of finite element modeling was critical to the design and analysis of the gage. Static structural, modal, and thermal analyses were performed on the flexures using the ANSYS finite element package. Static finite element analysis predicted the response of the flexures to a given load, and static calibrations using a direct force method confirmed these results. Finite element modal analysis results were within 16.4% for the first mode and within 30% for the second mode when compared with the experimentally determined modes. Vibration characteristics of the gage were determined from experimental free vibration data after the gage was subjected to an impulse. Uncertainties in the finished geometry make this level of error acceptable. A transient thermal analysis examined the effects of a very high heat flux on the exposed head of the gage. The 100,000 W/m2 heat flux used in this analysis is

  17. An experimental test facility to support development of the fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, Graydon L.; Aaron, Adam; Cunningham, Burns; Fugate, David; Holcomb, David; Kisner, Roger; Peretz, Fred; Robb, Kevin; Wilgen, John; Wilson, Dane

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • • A forced convection test loop using FLiNaK salt was constructed to support development of the FHR. • The loop is built of alloy 600, and operating conditions are prototypic of expected FHR operation. • The initial test article is designed to study pebble bed heat transfer cooled by FLiNaK salt. • The test facility includes silicon carbide test components as salt boundaries. • Salt testing with silicon carbide and alloy 600 confirmed acceptable loop component lifetime. - Abstract: The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 °C) energy transport systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 °C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system, a trace heating system, and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride-salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed

  18. Production of porous sintered materials using wastes of manufacturing engineering in self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Povstyana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amount of wastes produced by the manufacturing engineering, as well as their physical and mechanical properties and restorability provide a search for sphere of their application. The actual problem of modern science is the utilization of wastes and using them in further production that will minimize their harmful impact on the environment and reduce the cost of expensive raw materials. Wastes are ideally suitable for the manufacture of porous permeable materials (filters. Powder metallurgy allows obtaining products with controlled filtration, physical and mechanical properties. Such materials are good filters for regeneration of technical liquids, oils, cooling fluids, sewage etc. The article analyzes the methods and technologies for the manufacture of porous ceramic materials and a new technology for their manufacture, which is based on use of mill scale and natural mineral – saponite as the main components. Compression technology provides products at low pressures and sintering by passing high-temperature synthesis. The proposed technology is characterized by low cost and good physical and mechanical properties of the product that gives a reason to use them for filtering and regeneration of technical liquids.

  19. Development and testing of nuclear graphite for the German pebble-bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, G.; Delle, W.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.; Wilhelmi, G.

    1987-01-01

    Several types of high temperature reactors have been developed in the Federal Republic of Germany. They are all based on spherical fuel elements being surrounded by graphite as reflector material. As an example, HTR-500 developed by the Hochtemperatur Reaktorbau GmbH is shown. The core consists of the top reflector, the side reflector with inner and outer parts, the bottom reflector and the core support columns. The most serious problem with respect to fast neutron radiation damage had to be solved for the materials of those parts near the pebble bed. Regarding the temperature profile in the core, the top reflector is at 300 deg C, and as cooling gas flows from the top downward, the temperature of the inner side reflector rises to about 700 deg C at the bottom. Fortunately, the highest fast neutron load accumulated during the life time of a reactor corresponds to the lowest temperature. This makes graphite components easier to survive neutron exposure without being mechanically damaged, although the maximum fast neutron fluence is as high as 4 x 10 22 /cm 2 at about 400 deg C. HTR graphite components are divided into four classes according to loading. The raw materials for nuclear graphite, the development of pitch coke nuclear graphite, the irradiation behavior of ATR-2E and ASR-IRS and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Pistons and engine testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The ever-increasing demands placed on combustion engines are just as great when it comes to this centerpiece—the piston. Achieving less weight or friction, or even greater wear resistance, requires in-depth knowledge of the processes taking place inside the engine, suitable materials, and appropriate design and manufacturing processes for pistons, including the necessary testing measures. It is no longer possible for professionals in automotive engineering to manage without specific expertise of this kind, whether they work in the field of design, development, testing, or maintenance. This technical book answers these questions in detail and in a very clear and comprehensible way. In this second, revised edition, every chapter has been revised and expanded. The chapter on “Engine testing”, for example, now include extensive results in the area of friction power loss measurement and lube oil consumption measurement. Contents Piston function, requirements, and types Design guidelines Simulation of the ope...

  1. Stability of test environments for performance evaluation of materials for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgemon, G.L.; Wilson, D.F.; Bell, G.E.C.

    1993-01-01

    Stability of the primary helium-based coolant test gas for use in performance ests of materials for the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) was determined. Results of tests of the initial gas chemistry from General Atomics (GA) at elevated temperatures, and the associated results predicted by the SOLGASMIX trademark modelling package are presented. Results indicated that for this gas composition and at flow rates obtainable in the test loop, 466 ± 24C is the highest temperature that can be maintained without significantly altering the specified gas chemistry. Four additional gas chemistries were modelled using SOLGASMIX trademark

  2. Development and testing of a high temperature (673-1273K), high pressure regenerative desulphurization process for IGCC concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, F.J.J.G.; Meijer, R. (KEMA Fossil Power Plants, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1994-01-01

    In the period 1990-1993 a European Community (EC) subsidized international project on the subject of high-temperature and high-pressure desulfurization of coal gas has been carried out within the framework of the JOULE 1 program. This report is a summary of the final report, in which an overview is given of the developed and tested absorbents and the results of a feasibility study for a 100 MWe Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) in combination with a high-temperature desulfurization process. The Utrecht University in Utrecht, Netherlands, developed absorbents in cooperation with The Dutch Centre for Gas Technology GASTEC in Apeldoorn, Netherlands. The absorbents are tested by KEMA and the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation in Petten, Netherlands. Foster Wheeler in Livingston, New Jersey, USA, executed the feasibility study. The combination of iron oxide/molybdenum oxide on aluminium phosphate appears to be the most promising absorbent. The preparation method has been patented. From the feasibility study it appeared that by means of a high-temperature desulfurization process the investment and operational costs can be reduced considerably. Further development of the absorbent and the accompanying reactor concept already has started in a new EC project within the framework of the JOULE 1 program

  3. Space Electronic Test Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Rodney D.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch at NASA Glenn Research center has the important duty of controlling electronic test engineering services. These services include test planning and early assessment of Space projects, management and/or technical support required to safely and effectively prepare the article and facility for testing, operation of test facilities, and validation/delivery of data to customer. The Space Electronic Test Engineering Branch is assigned electronic test engineering responsibility for the GRC Space Simulation, Microgravity, Cryogenic, and Combustion Test Facilities. While working with the Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch I am working on several different assignments. My primary assignment deals with an electrical hardware unit known as Sunny Boy. Sunny Boy is a DC load Bank that is designed for solar arrays in which it is used to convert DC power form the solar arrays into AC power at 60 hertz to pump back into the electricity grid. However, there are some researchers who decided that they would like to use the Sunny Boy unit in a space simulation as a DC load bank for a space shuttle or even the International Space Station hardware. In order to do so I must create a communication link between a computer and the Sunny Boy unit so that I can preset a few of the limits (such power, set & constant voltage levels) that Sunny Boy will need to operate using the applied DC load. Apart from this assignment I am also working on a hi-tech circuit that I need to have built at a researcher s request. This is a high voltage analog to digital circuit that will be used to record data from space ion propulsion rocket booster tests. The problem that makes building this circuit so difficult is that it contains high voltage we must find a way to lower the voltage signal before the data is transferred into the computer to be read. The solution to this problem was to transport the signal using infrared light which will lower

  4. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  5. Rapid, high-temperature, field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcium carbonate scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1986-09-01

    A new test method is described that allows the rapid field testing of calcium carbonate scale inhibitors at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). The method evolved from use of a full-flow test loop on a well with a mass flow rate of about 1 x 10/sup 6/ lbm/hr (126 kg/s). It is a simple, effective way to evaluate the effectiveness of inhibitors under field conditions. Five commercial formulations were chosen for field evaluation on the basis of nonflowing, laboratory screening tests at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). Four of these formulations from different suppliers controlled calcium carbonate scale deposition as measured by the test method. Two of these could dislodge recently deposited scale that had not age-hardened. Performance-profile diagrams, which were measured for these four effective inhibitors, show the concentration interrelationship between brine calcium and inhibitor concentrations at which the formulations will and will not stop scale formation in the test apparatus. With these diagrams, one formulation was chosen for testing on the full-flow brine line. The composition was tested for 6 weeks and showed a dramatic decrease in the scaling occurring at the flow-control valve. This scaling was about to force a shutdown of a major, long-term flow test being done for reservoir economic evaluations. The inhibitor stopped the scaling, and the test was performed without interruption.

  6. Influence of heat treatment and indenter tip material on depth sensing hardness tests at high temperatures of fusion relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredl, Julian; Dany, Manuel; Albinski, Bartlomiej; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Kraft, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Operation of a custom-made indentation device designed for test temperatures up to 650 °C and a remote handled operation in a Hot Cell. • Instrumented indentation and conventional hardness testing of unirradiated MANET II and EUROFER. • Comparison of diamond and sapphire as indenter tip materials. - Abstract: The instrumented indentation is a suitable method for testing of even small neutron-irradiated specimens. From the continuously recorded indentation depth and the indentation force, it is possible to deduce mechanical parameters of the tested material. In this paper, a brief description of the high temperature device is given and representative results are presented. In the study, unirradiated steels are investigated by instrumented indentation at temperatures up to 500 °C. It is shown that the hardness is highly depending on the testing-temperature and can be correlated to the results of conventional tensile testing experiments. A not negligible influence of the indenter tip material is observed. The results show the functionality of the high-temperature indentation device.

  7. Influence of heat treatment and indenter tip material on depth sensing hardness tests at high temperatures of fusion relevant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredl, Julian, E-mail: julian.bredl@kit.edu; Dany, Manuel; Albinski, Bartlomiej; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Kraft, Oliver

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Operation of a custom-made indentation device designed for test temperatures up to 650 °C and a remote handled operation in a Hot Cell. • Instrumented indentation and conventional hardness testing of unirradiated MANET II and EUROFER. • Comparison of diamond and sapphire as indenter tip materials. - Abstract: The instrumented indentation is a suitable method for testing of even small neutron-irradiated specimens. From the continuously recorded indentation depth and the indentation force, it is possible to deduce mechanical parameters of the tested material. In this paper, a brief description of the high temperature device is given and representative results are presented. In the study, unirradiated steels are investigated by instrumented indentation at temperatures up to 500 °C. It is shown that the hardness is highly depending on the testing-temperature and can be correlated to the results of conventional tensile testing experiments. A not negligible influence of the indenter tip material is observed. The results show the functionality of the high-temperature indentation device.

  8. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Chen, Xiang [ORNL

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  9. Challenges in high temperature low cycle fatigue testing of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandhya, R.; Valsan, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of the high strain Low Cycle Fatigue properties of structural materials is an involved and complicated procedure requiring skill and diligence from the experimentalist. This presentation describes the various testing methods to evaluate the LCF properties of structural materials, the complexities involved and some solutions to exacting requirements, not covered by the testing procedure standards. The basic components of servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machines is described, as are the calibration and maintenance procedures. Results of LCF tests conducted at the authors' laboratory on AISI 316L(N) stainless steel and Mod.9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel are described. The complications in total strain controlled testing of weld joints is brought out and soft zone development in Mod. 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is described. The special requirements for testing in environmental chambers is a challenging task. In-house chambers, designed to carry out testing in dynamic sodium environment is highlighted. These chambers have provision to accommodate extensometers for strain measurements, and also house all the safety instrumentation needed to carry out to mechanical testing in dynamic sodium environment. The variation of LCF results as a function of specimen geometry is examined. The various failure criteria adopted by laboratories in different countries are also touched upon. (author)

  10. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped PBI Membrane Based High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela

    2014-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation. Continuous tests with H2 and simulated reformate which was composed...... of H2, water steam and methanol as the fuel were performed on both single cells. 12-h-startup/12-h-shutdown dynamic tests were performed on the first single cell with pure dry H2 as the fuel and on the second single cell with simulated reformate as the fuel. Along with the tests electrochemical...... techniques such as polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to study the degradation mechanisms of the fuel cells. Both single cells showed an increase in the performance in the H2 continuous tests, because of a decrease in the ORR kinetic resistance probably due...

  11. Material characterization of Inconel 718 from free bulging test at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Joon Tae; Yoon, Jong Hoon; Lee, Ho Sung [Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Sung Kie [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Macroscopic superplastic behavior of metallic or non metallic materials is usually represented by the strain rate sensitivity, and it can be determined by tensile tests in uniaxial stress state and bulging tests in multi axial stress state, which is the actual hot forming process. And macroscopic behavior of Non SPF grade materials could be described in a similar way as that of superplastic materials, including strain hardening, cavity and so on. In this study, the material characterization of non SPF grade Inconel 718 has been carried out to determine the material parameters for flow stress throughout free bulging test under constant temperature. The measured height of bulged plate during the test was used for estimation of strain rate sensitivity, strain hardening index and cavity volume fraction with the help of numerical analysis. The bulged height obtained from the simulation showed good agreement with the experimental findings. The effects of strain hardening and cavity volume fraction factor for flow stress were also compared.

  12. Degradation of Solar Array Components in a Combined UV/VUV High Temperature Test Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nömayr Christel

    2017-01-01

    A design verification test under UV/VUV conditions of sun exposed materials and technologies on component level is presented which forms part of the overall verification and qualification of the solar array design of the MTM and MPO. The test concentrates on the self-contamination aspects and the resulting performance losses of the solar array under high intensity and elevated temperature environment representative for the photovoltaic assembly (PVA.

  13. High temperature tensile testing of modified 9Cr-1Mo after irradiation with high energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Hamilton, M.L.; Maloy, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the effect of tensile test temperatures ranging from 50 to 600 deg. C on the tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel after high energy proton irradiation at about 35-67 deg. C to doses from 1 to 3 dpa and 9 dpa. For the specimens irradiated to doses between 1 and 3 dpa, it was observed that the yield strength and ultimate strength decreased monotonically as a function of tensile test temperature, whereas the uniform elongation (UE) remained at approximately 1% for tensile test temperatures up to 250 deg. C and then increased for tensile test temperatures up to and including 500 deg. C. At 600 deg. C, the UE was observed to be less than the values at 400 and 500 deg. C. UE of the irradiated material tensile tested at 400-600 deg. C was observed to be greater than the values for the unirradiated material at the same temperatures. Tensile tests on the 9 dpa specimens followed similar trends

  14. High temperature strength analysis of welded joint of RAF's by small punch test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineeering, Hokkaido (Japan); Komazaki, S.; Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran (Japan); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Nucleation and growth of microvoids and/or small cracks in fine-grained heat affected zone (HAZ) after long-term service operation, which is recognized as Type IV creep damage, has recently been a worldwide issue for high Cr ferritic steels. In our group, a small punch (SP) creep test has been successfully applied to evaluate this damage of low alloy ferritic steel. However, the HAZ of fusion reactor material welded by electron-beam (EB) welding is so narrow that it is not easy to evaluate its mechanical properties by conventional tests including the SP creep test with a plate-type specimen (10 x 10 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}). In this study, the SP creep test using a further miniaturized specimen was developed and applied to the welded joint of reduced activation ferritic steels (RAFs), F82H-IEA (Fe-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.02Ta), for measuring creep properties of the HAZ. For the SP creep test, TEM disk-type samples (diam. 3.0 x 0.30 mm) were removed from the base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and HAZ, respectively. The specimen surfaces were polished up to a 0.05 {mu}m alumina powder finish and the specimen's thickness was finally adjusted to 0.25 mm. The SP creep tests were performed at temperatures of 823{approx}973 K and under loads ranging from 20 to 200 N. A constant load was applied to the center of the specimen through the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} bail (diam. 1.0 mm) using the electric servo motor. The central deflection of the specimen was monitored by measuring the displacement of the compression rod. The tests were carried out in an argon gas atmosphere and the gas was continuously passed through during the test to prevent severe oxidation of the specimen. The differences in SP creep properties such as rupture time and minimum creep rate between the BM, WM and HAZ were discussed in terms of microstructural changes during welding thermal cycles. In addition, the result obtained from the BM was correlated with those of uniaxial creep test

  15. Monitoring of high temperature area by resistivity tomography during in-situ heating test in sedimentary soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    One of the major issues in disposal of nuclear waste is that the long term behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperature, mechanical conditions or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the long term stability of caverns in sedimentary soft rocks as subjected to changes of environment. We have conducted in-situ heating test to evaluate the influence of high temperature to the surrounding rock mass at a depth of 50 m. The well with a diameter of 30 cm and 60 cm of height, was drilled and filled with groundwater. The heater was installed in the well for heating the surrounding rock mass. During the heating, temperature and deformation around the well were measured. To evaluate the influence of heating on sedimentary soft rocks, it is important to monitor the extent of heated area. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of the high temperature area. So we have conducted resistivity tomography during the heating test. The results demonstrated that the resistivity of the rock mass around the heating well decreased and this area was gradually expanded from the heated area during the heating. The decreasing rate of resistivity on temperature is correlated to that of laboratory experimental result and existing empirical formula between aqueous solution resistivity and temperature. Resistivity is changed by many other factors, but it is expected that resistivity change by other factors is very few in this test. This suggests that high temperature area is detected and spatial distribution of temperature can be mapped by resistivity tomography. So resistivity tomography is expected to be one of the promising methods to monitor the area heated by nuclear waste. (author)

  16. In-situ heater test in sedimentary soft rocks under high temperature (Phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Okada, Tetsuji; Sawada, Masataka; Hirano, Kouhei; Tani, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Various researches have been conducted on high level radioactive waste geological disposal in sedimentary soft rocks. It's noted that the long-term mechanical behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperatures or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, in-situ heater test was conducted in an underground cavern at a depth of 50 meters for the purpose of improving thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled analysis code. This report presents the test result demonstrating the changes of temperature and strain distributions with time at the elevated temperature of the heater up to 40 degrees Celsius. (author)

  17. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Thomas [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Windl, Wolfgang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Dickerson, Bryan [Luna Innovations, Inc. (United States)

    2013-01-03

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica's optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and

  18. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to High Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue, Thomas; Windl, Wolfgang; Dickerson, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica'@@s optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and

  19. Testing and analyses of a high temperature thermal barrier for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Betts, W.S.; Felten, P.

    1979-01-01

    A full size, multi-panel section of a thermal barrier system was fabricated from a nickel-base superalloy and a combination of fibrous blanket insulation materials for specific application in a steam cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The 2.4 m square array was representative of the sidewall of the lower core outlet plenum and included coverplates, attachments, seals, and a simulated water-cooled liner. Testing was conducted in a reactor grade, helium-filled chamber at 816 0 C for 100 hours, which established a normal (baseline) condition; 982 0 C for 10 hours, which satisfied an emergency condition; 1093 0 C for 1 hour, which simulated a faulted condition; and 1260 0 C, which was a non-design condition test to demonstrate the temperature overshoot capability of the system. Post-test examination indicated: (1) an acceptable performance by the anti-friction chromium carbide (Cr 3 C 2 ) coating; (2) no significant galling between non-coated surfaces; (3) no distortion of attachment fixtures; (4) predictable coverplate deflection during the design conditions testing (normal, emergency, and faulted); and (5) considerable plastic deformation resulting from the near-incipient melting temperature. (orig.)

  20. A new reciprocating sliding wear testing apparatus for high temperature gaseous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.; Radford, T.J.; Mawson, D.; Kaye, P.

    1988-01-01

    A new reciprocating wear testing rig is described that has been designed, built and commissioned at the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories, United Kingdom. The objectives of this work are to improve upon the range of parameters offered by the existing rigs and to provide additional facilities for data acquisition and analysis. (author)

  1. New reciprocating sliding wear testing apparatus for high temperature gaseous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.F.; Radford, T.J.; Mawson, D.; Kaye, P.

    1988-09-01

    A new reciprocating wear testing rig is described that has been designed, built and commissioned at the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories, United Kingdom. The objectives of this work are to improve upon the range of parameters offered by the existing rigs and to provide additional facilities for data acquisition and analysis.

  2. Long-Term Degradation Testing of High-Temperature Electrolytic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.M. Stoots; J.E. O' Brien; J.S. Herring; G.K. Housley; D.G. Milobar; M.S. Sohal

    2009-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cell for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. The INL has been testing various solid oxide cell designs to characterize their electrolytic performance operating in the electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Some results presented in this report were obtained from cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with ~10 µm thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes, ~1400 µm thick nickel-YSZ steam-hydrogen electrodes, and manganite (LSM) air-oxygen electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 to 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900°C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This report presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

  3. Long-Term Degradation Testing of High-Temperature Electrolytic Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoots, C.M.; O'Brien, J.E.; Herring, J.S.; Housley, G.K.; Milobar, D.G.; Sohal, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cell for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900 C. The INL has been testing various solid oxide cell designs to characterize their electrolytic performance operating in the electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Some results presented in this report were obtained from cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with ∼10 ∼m thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes, ∼1400 (micro)m thick nickel-YSZ steam-hydrogen electrodes, and manganite (LSM) air-oxygen electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 to 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900 C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This report presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

  4. A Foil Thrust Bearing Test Rig for Evaluation of High Temperature Performance and Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    composed of similar elements used in journal bearings, but are designed to support a shaft axially. Often, discrete compliant pads are attached... shaft designed to mate with a test thrust runner. The runner is mounted to the shaft with four high strength bolts, and an interference fit ensures...attached to the drive is able to stop the spindle quickly through dynamic braking of the shaft rotational energy. This spindle arrangement has

  5. On-Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (∼ 1-mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4%-10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  6. High temperature and dynamic testing of AHSS for an analytical description of the adiabatic cutting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S.; Schmitz, F.; Clausmeyer, T.; Tekkaya, A. E.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2017-03-01

    In the automotive industry, advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are widely used as sheet part components to reduce weight, even though this leads to several challenges. The demand for high-quality shear cutting surfaces that do not require reworking can be fulfilled by adiabatic shear cutting: High strain rates and local temperatures lead to the formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASB). While this process is well suited to produce AHSS parts with excellent cutting surface quality, a fundamental understanding of the process is still missing today. In this study, compression tests in a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar with an initial strain rate of 1000 s-1 were performed in a temperature range between 200 °C and 1000 °C. The experimental results show that high strength steels with nearly the same mechanical properties at RT may possess a considerably different behavior at higher temperatures. The resulting microstructures after testing at different temperatures were analyzed by optical microscopy. The thermo-mechanical material behavior was then considered in an analytical model. To predict the local temperature increase that occurs during the adiabatic blanking process, experimentally determined flow curves were used. Furthermore, the influence of temperature evolution with respect to phase transformation is discussed. This study contributes to a more complete understanding of the relevant microstructural and thermo-mechanical mechanisms leading to the evolution of ASB during cutting of AHSS.

  7. Small Engine & Accessory Test Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Small Engine and Accessories Test Area (SEATA) facilitates testaircraft starting and auxiliary power systems, small engines and accessories. The SEATA consists...

  8. Fretting wear of steam generator tubes: high-temperature tests on AECL rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerout, F.; Zbinden, M.

    1993-07-01

    The R and DD has undertaken the study of fretting-wear of Alloy 600 S.G. tubes which occurs by contact with migrating items. The test series was performed in Canada at AECL Research (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) as part of an exchange program. Four types of configuration were envisaged: a tube-to-drilled hole support contact which provides reference results and three types of tube-to-support contacts which simulate the tube fretting-wear induced by a welding rod, a threaded rod and a knife-edge rod support. This programme is completed by the study of the contact between a S.G. tube and a neighbouring S.G. tube which has been broken after plugging. (authors). 1 tab., 3 refs

  9. Optical Method for Detecting Displacements and Strains at Ultra-High Temperatures During Thermo-Mechanical Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russell W. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Sikora, Joseph G. (Inventor); Roth, Mark C. (Inventor); Johnston, William M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An ultra-high temperature optical method incorporates speckle optics for sensing displacement and strain measurements well above conventional measurement techniques. High temperature pattern materials are used which can endure experimental high temperature environments while simultaneously having a minimum optical aberration. A purge medium is used to reduce or eliminate optical distortions and to reduce, and/or eliminate oxidation of the target specimen.

  10. Behaviour of HTGR coated fuel particles at high-temperature tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Lyutikov, R.A.; Kurbakov, S.D.; Repnikov, V.M.; Khromonozhkin, V.V.; Soloviyov, G.I.

    1990-01-01

    At the temperature range 1200-2600 deg. C prereactor tests of TRISO fuel particles on the base of UO 2 , UC x O y and UO 2 +2Al 2 O 3 . SiO 2 kernels, and also fuel particle models with ZrC kernels were performed. Isothermal annealings carried out at temperatures of 1400-2600 deg. C, thermogradient ones at 1200-2200 deg. C (Δ T = 200-1200 deg. C/cm). It is shown that at heating to 2200 deg. C integrity of fuel particles is limited by different thermal expansion of PyC and SiC coatings, and also by thermal dissociation of SiC. At higher temperatures the failure is caused by development of high pressures within weakened fuel particles. It is found that uranium migration from alloyed fuel (UC x O y , UO 2 +2Al 2 O 3 .SiO 2 ) in the process of annealing is higher than that from UO 2 . (author)

  11. High-temperature steam oxidation testing of select advanced replacement alloys for potential core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Coupons from a total of fourteen commercial and custom fabricated alloys were exposed to 1 bar full steam with ~10 ppb oxygen content at 600 and 650°C. The coupons were weighed at 500-h intervals with a total exposure time of 5,000 h. The fourteen alloys are candidate alloys selected under the ARRM program, which include three ferritic steels (Grade 92, 439, and 14YWT), three austenitic stainless steels (316L, 310, and 800), seven Ni-base superalloys (X750, 725, C22, 690, 625, 625 direct-aging, and 625- plus), and one Zr-alloy (Zr–2.5Nb). Among the alloys, 316L and X750 are served as reference alloys for low- and high-strength alloys, respectively. The candidate Ni-base superalloy 718 was procured too late to be included in the tests. The corrosion rates of the candidate alloys can be approximately interpreted by their Cr, Ni and Fe content. The corrosion rate was significantly reduced with increasing Cr content and when Ni content is above ~15 wt%, but not much further reduced when Fe content is less than ~55 wt%. Simplified thermodynamics analyses of the alloy oxidation provided reasonable indications for the constituents of oxide scales formed on the alloys and explanations for the porosity and exfoliation phenomena because of the nature of specific types of oxides.

  12. High temperature outgassing tests on materials used in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtrop, K.L.; Hansink, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a continuation of previous work on determining the outgassing characteristics of materials used in the DIII-D magnetic fusion tokamak [K. L. Holtrop, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 17, 2064 (1999)]. Achievement of high performance plasma discharges in the DIII-D tokamak requires careful control of impurity levels. Among the techniques used to control impurities are routine bakes of the vacuum vessel to an average temperature of 350 deg. C. Materials used in DIII-D must release only very small amounts of impurities (below 2x10 -6 mole) at this temperature that could be transferred to the first wall materials and later contaminate plasma discharges. To better study the behavior of materials proposed for use in DIII-D at elevated temperatures, the initial outgassing test chamber was improved to include an independent heating control of the sample and a simple load lock chamber. The goal was to determine not only the total degassing rate of the material during baking, but to also determine the gas species composition and to obtain a quantitative estimate of the degassing rate of each species by the use of a residual gas analyzer. Initial results for aluminum anodized using three different processes, stainless steel plated with black oxide and black chrome, and a commercially available fiber optic feedthrough will be presented

  13. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

  14. High Temperature Steam Oxidation Testing of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nelson, Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parkison, Adam [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-12-23

    > formation, which reacted with the specimen to form a liquid reaction product. This behavior was not observed at lower temperatures where gas velocity and H2O content showed typical effects on the reaction rate. For LANL, the capabilities for oxidation testing as well as exploration of a methodology for measurement of hydrogen production of samples during oxidation under water vapor atmospheres is discussed. Results obtained for available commercial alloys are summarized, and data highlighting the performance of molybdenum, a recently proposed cladding material, are presented. Finally, leveraging of these techniques in conjunction with current and companion FCRD programs is discussed with respect to work in FY14.

  15. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-3: High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module…

  16. Development of evaluation technique of high temperature creep characteristics by small punch-creep test method (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Se; Na, Sung Hun; Yu, Hyo Sun; Na, Eui Gyun

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a Small Punch Creep(SP-Creep) test using miniaturized specimen(10 x 10 x 0.5mm) is described to develop the new creep test method for high temperature structural materials. The SP-Creep test is applied to 2.25Cr-1Mo(STBA24) steel which is widely used as boiler tube material. The test temperatures applied for the creep deformation of miniaturized specimens are between 550∼600 .deg. C. The SP-Creep curves depend definitely on applied load and creep temperature, and show the three stages of creep behavior like in conventional uniaxial tensile creep curves. The load exponent of miniaturized specimen decrease with increasing test temperature, and its behavior is similar to stress exponent behavior of uniaxial creep test. The creep activation energy obtained from the relationship between SP-Creep rate and test temperature decreases as the applied load increases. A predicting equation of SP-Creep rate for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel is suggested, and a good agreement between experimental and calculated data has been found

  17. Development of the high-level waste high-temperature melter feed preparation flowsheet for vitrification process testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    High-level waste (HLW) feed preparation flowsheet development was initiated in fiscal year (FY) 1994 to evaluate alternative flowsheets for preparing melter feed for high-temperature melter (HTM) vitrification testing. Three flowsheets were proposed that might lead to increased processing capacity relative to the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and that were flexible enough to use with other HLW melter technologies. This document describes the decision path that led to the selection of flowsheets to be tested in the FY 1994 small-scale HTM tests. Feed preparation flowsheet development for the HLW HTM was based on the feed preparation flowsheet that was developed for the HWVP. This approach allowed the HLW program to build upon the extensive feed preparation flowsheet database developed under the HWVP Project. Primary adjustments to the HWVP flowsheet were to the acid adjustment and glass component additions. Developmental background regarding the individual features of the HLW feed preparation flowsheets is provided. Applicability of the HWVP flowsheet features to the new HLW vitrification mission is discussed. The proposed flowsheets were tested at the laboratory-scale at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Based on the results of this testing and previously established criteria, a reductant-based flowsheet using glycolic acid and a nitric acid-based flowsheet were selected for the FY 1994 small-scale HTM testing

  18. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  19. Evaluation of a Ductility after High Temperature Oxidation with the Three-Point Bend Test in Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yang Il; Park, Sang Yoon; Park, Jeong Yong; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    2010-01-01

    In a light water reactor, the fuel cladding play an important role of preventing leakage of radioactive materials into the coolant, and thus the mechanical integrity of the cladding should be guaranteed under the conditions of normal and transient operation. In the case of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), the cladding is subjected to a high temperature oxidation which is finally quenched because of an emergency coolant reflooding into the core. In this situation, the current LOCA criteria consist of five separate requirements: i) peak cladding temperature, ii) maximum cladding oxidation, iii) maximum hydrogen generation, iv) coolable geometry, and v) long-term cooling. The claddings lose their ductility due to the microstructural phase transformation from beta to martensite alpha-prime. and hydrogen up-take after LOCA. Since the reduction in ductility can induce embrittlement of claddings, post-quench ductility is one of the major concerns in transient operation circumstances. For the analysis, usually ring compression test are performed on ring samples cut from the tube to examine the oxidized cladding ductility. However, the test would not be applicable to the platelet samples which are general form of a specimen for developing alloys. As a high burn-up fuel cladding materials, Zircaloys are being replaced by modern zirconium alloys such as ZIRLO, and M5. Korea has also developed a new fuel cladding material HANA (high performance alloy for nuclear application) by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Because of the different composition of the newer claddings in comparison with the conventional Zircaloy-4, the high temperature oxidation behavior and the ductility after the oxidation would be different, and the properties should be evaluated how much the newer claddings were improved

  20. Post-irradiation examinations and high-temperature tests on undoped large-grain UO{sub 2} discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirot, J., E-mail: jean.noirot@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, F-13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Pontillon, Y. [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, F-13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Yagnik, S. [EPRI, P.O. Box 10412, Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 (United States); Turnbull, J.A. [Independent Consultant (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Within the Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) programme, several fuel variants –in the form of thin circular discs – were irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) at burn-ups up to ∼100 GWd/t{sub HM}. The design of the fuel assembly was similar to that used in other HBWR programmes: the assembly contained several rods with fuel discs sandwiched between Mo discs, which limited temperature differences within each fuel disc. One such variant was made of large-grain UO{sub 2} discs (3D grain size = ∼45 μm) which were subjected to three burn-ups: 42, 72 and 96 GWd/t{sub HM}. Detailed characterizations of some of these irradiated large-grain UO{sub 2} discs were performed in the CEA Cadarache LECA-STAR hot laboratory. The techniques used included electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Comparisons were then carried out with more standard grain size UO{sub 2} discs irradiated under the same conditions. Examination of the high burn-up large-grain UO{sub 2} discs revealed the limited formation of a high burn-up structure (HBS) when compared with the standard-grain UO{sub 2} discs at similar burn-up. High burn-up discs were submitted to temperature transients up to 1200 °C in the heating test device called Merarg at a relatively low temperature ramp rate (0.2 °C/s). In addition to the total gas release during these tests, the release peaks throughout the temperature ramp were monitored. Tests at 1600 °C were also conducted on the 42 GWd/t{sub HM} discs. The fuels were then characterized with the same microanalysis techniques as those used before the tests, to investigate the effects of these tests on the fuel’s microstructure and on the fission gas behaviour. This paper outlines the high resistance of this fuel to gas precipitation at high temperature and to HBS formation at high burn-up. It also shows the similarity of the positions, within the grains, where HBS forms

  1. High temperature turbine technology program. Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Work performed on the High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Phase II - Technology Test and Support Studies during the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979 is summarized. Objectives of the program elements as well as technical progress and problems encountered during this Phase II annual reporting period are presented. Progress on design, fabrication and checkout of test facilities and test rigs is described. LP turbine cascade tests were concluded. 350 hours of testing were conducted on the LP rig engine first with clean distillate fuel and then with fly ash particulates injected into the hot gas stream. Design and fabrication of the turbine spool technology rig components are described. TSTR 60/sup 0/ sector combustor rig fabrication and testing are reviewed. Progress in the design and fabrication of TSTR cascade rig components for operation on both distillate fuel and low Btu gas is described. The new coal-derived gaseous fuel synthesizing facility is reviewed. Results and future plans for the supporting metallurgical programs are discussed.

  2. Program for tests on magnetic bearing suspended rotor dynamics for gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Kosugiyama, Shinichi; Yan, Xing

    2003-01-01

    A program for test on rotor dynamics was planned for the turbo-machine of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The rotor system of the turbo-machine consists of a turbo-compressor rotor and a generator rotor connected with a flexible coupling, each suspended with two radial magnetic bearings. The rotors, which are flexible rotors, pass over the critical speeds of bending mode. The magnetic bearing is required to have a high load capacity, about 10 times larger than any built thus far to support a flexible rotor. In the rotor design, the standard limit of the vibration amplitude of 75 μm at the rated rotational speed of 3,600 rpm was fulfilled by optimizing the stiffness of the magnetic bearings. A test apparatus was designed to verify the design of the magnetic bearing suspended turbo-machine rotor of the GTHTR300. The test apparatus is composed of 1/3-scale test rotors, which are connected with a flexible coupling and driven by a variable speed motor. The test magnetic bearing was designed within the state-of-the-art technology to have a load capacity about 1/10 of that of the actual one. The test rotors were designed to closely simulate the critical speeds and vibration modes of the actual ones. This paper shows the test apparatus and the test plan for the magnetic bearing suspended rotor system. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  3. Technique for the residual life assessment of high temperature components based on creep-rupture testing on welded miniature specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzillo, A.; Guardamagna, C.; Moscotti, L.; Ranzani, L. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Milan (Italy)

    1995-06-01

    Following the present trend in the development of advanced methodologies for residual life assessment of high temperature components operating in power plants, particularly in non destructive methods, a testing technique has been set up at ENEL-CRAM based on creep-rupture testa in an argon on welded miniature specimens. Five experimental systems for creep-rupture tests in an argon atmosphere have been set up which include high accuracy systems, vacuum chambers and exrwnsometer devices. With the aim of establishing and validating the suitability of the experimental methodology, creep-rupture and interrupted creep testing programmes have been performed on miniature specimens (2 mm diameter and 10 mm gauge lenght). On the basis of experience gathered by various European research laboratories, a miniature specimen construction procedure has been developed using a laser welding technique for joining threaded heads to sample material. Low alloy ferritic steels, such as virgin 2.25CrlMo, 0.5Cr 0.5Mo 0.25V, and IN 738 superalloy miniature specimens have been investigated and the results, compared with those from standard specimens, show a regular trend in deformation vs time. Additional efforts to provide guidelines for material sampling from each plant component will be required in order to reduce uncertainties in residual life prediction.

  4. Performance test of silver ion-exchanged zeolite for the removal of gaseous radioactive methyl iodide at high temperature condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byung-Seon Choi; Geun-Il Park; Jung-Won Lee; Ho-Yeon Yang; Seung-Kon Ryu

    2003-01-01

    Performance tests of silver ion-exchanged zeolite (AgX) adsorbent for the control of radioiodine gas generated from a high-temperature process were carried out using both non-radioactive and a radioactive methyl iodide tracers. From the identification of SEM-EDAX analysis, an experimental result of silver ion-exchanged ratio containing 10∼30 wt% of Ag was fit to that calculated by the weight increment, and it was confirmed that the silver was uniformly distributed inside the pores of the adsorbent. Demonstration test of AgX-10 adsorbent using radioactive methyl iodide tracer was performed. The removal efficiency of radioiodine with AgX-10 in the temperature ranges of 150 to 300 deg C was in the ranges of 99.9% to 99.99%, except for 300 deg C. The influence of the long-term weathering and the poisoning with NO 2 gas (200 ppm) on adsorption capacity of AgX-10 was also analyzed. The removal efficiency of radioactive methyl iodide by AgX-10 weathered for 14 weeks was 99.95%. Long-term poisoning test showed that the adsorption efficiency of methyl iodide started to decrease after 10 weeks, and the removal efficiency of radioiodine by AgX-10, poisoned for 16 weeks, was 99% (DF=100). (author)

  5. Corrosion testing of NiCrAl(Y) coating alloys in high-temperature and supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljan, S.; Huang, X.; Qian, Y.; Guzonas, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear power reactors, materials capable of operating in high-temperature and supercritical water environment are essential. This study focuses on the corrosion behavior of five alloys with compositions of Ni20Cr, Ni5Al, Ni50Cr, Ni20Cr5Al and Ni20Cr10AlY above and below the critical point of water. Corrosion tests were conducted at three different pressures, while the temperature was maintained at 460 o C, in order to examine the effects of water density on the corrosion. From the preliminary test results, it was found that the binary alloys Ni20Cr and Ni50Cr showed weight loss above the critical point (23.7 MPa and 460 o C). The higher Cr content alloy Ni50Cr suffered more weight loss than Ni-20Cr under the same conditions. Accelerated weight gain was observed above the critical point for the binary alloy Ni5Al. The combination of Cr, Al and Y in Ni20Cr10AlY provides stable scale formation under all testing conditions employed in this study. (author)

  6. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien; Duhamel, Cecile; Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane; Molins, Regine; Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O.; David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M.; Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Viguier, B.; Monceau, D.; Soustelle, M.; Pijolat, M.; Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K.; Wolski, K.; Barnier, V.; Rebillat, F.; Lavigne, O.; Brossard, J.M.; Ropital, F.; Mougin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  7. Program for aerodynamic performance tests of helium gas compressor model of the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kunimoto, Kazuhiko; Yan, Xing; Itaka, Hidehiko; Mori, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Research and development program for helium gas compressor aerodynamics was planned for the power conversion system of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). The axial compressor with polytropic efficiency of 90% and surge margin more than 30% was designed with 3-dimensional aerodynamic design. Performance and surge margin of the helium gas compressor tends to be lower due to the higher boss ratio which makes the tip clearance wide relative to the blade height, as well as due to a larger number of stages. The compressor was designed on the basis of methods and data for the aerodynamic design of industrial open-cycle gas-turbine. To validate the design of the helium gas compressor of the GTHTR300, aerodynamic performance tests were planned, and a 1/3-scale, 4-stage compressor model was designed. In the tests, the performance data of the helium gas compressor model will be acquired by using helium gas as a working fluid. The maximum design pressure at the model inlet is 0.88 MPa, which allows the Reynolds number to be sufficiently high. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  8. Design, Fabrication, Test Report of the Material Capsule(08M-10K) with Double Thermal Media for High-temperature Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, K. N.; Kang, Y. H.; Sohn, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. G.; Oh, S. Y.

    2010-01-01

    To overcome the restriction of the irradiation test at a high temperature of the existing material capsule with Al thermal media, a capsule suitable for the irradiation at the high temperature was developed and the performance test was undertaken. The 08M-10K capsule was designed and fabricated as that with double thermal media to verify the structural and external integrity in the high-temperature irradiation higher than 500 .deg. C. The thermal performance test was undertaken at the out-pile test facility, and the soundness of the double thermal media was confirmed with the naked eye after disassembling the capsule. Though the temperatures of the specimens reach 500±20 .deg. C as a result maintaining the capsule during 5 hours after setting the specimens temperatures in the target range, the high-temperature thermal media with double structure was confirmed to maintain the soundness. And the specimens and the thermal media were heated to 600 .deg. C for about 3 minutes, but the thermal media were maintained sound. Especially, the Al thermal media were heated for 5 hours in range of 500±20 .deg. C and for 3 minutes at the temperature of 600 .deg. C. However, the thermal media were confirmed to maintain the soundness. Whether a capsule has only Al thermal media or the high-temperature thermal media with double structure, any capsule can be used in the range of 500±20 .deg. C as the result of this experiment maintaining the specimens high-temperature

  9. Properties, degradation and high temperature fuel cell test of different types of PBI and PBI blend membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, Hans Christian; Chromik, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Polybenzimidazoles (PBIs) with synthetically modified structures and their blends with a partially fluorinated sulfonated aromatic polyether have been prepared and characterized for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Significant improvement in the polymer chemical stability...

  10. Brazing, high temperature brazing and diffusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Brazing and high temperature brazing is a major joining technology within the economically important fields of energy technology, aerospace and automotive engineering, that play a leading role for technical development everywhere in the world. Moreover diffusion welding has gained a strong position especially in advanced technologies due to its specific advantages. Topics of the conference are: 1. high-temperature brazing in application; 2. basis of brazing technology; 3. brazing of light metals; 4. nondestructive testing; 5. diffusion welding; 6. brazing of hard metals and other hard materials; and 7. ceramic-metal brazing. 28 of 20 lectures and 20 posters were recorded separately for the database ENERGY. (orig./MM) [de

  11. Use and Storage of Test and Operations Data from the High Temperature Test Reactor Acquired by the US Government from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gougar, Hans

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the use and storage of data from the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) acquired from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) by the U.S. Government for high temperature reactor research under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Data acquired from foreign entities by the United States Government is subject to protections and restrictions that depend upon the nature of the data and its intended use. The storage and use of nuclear data is subject to international agreements, federal laws and Department of Energy regulations. Security systems and personnel are deployed at Department of Energy national laboratories in order to ensure that these laws are observed. Laboratory employees undergo extensive training in operational security to protect all sensitive and classified information. This document describes the facilities at which data from the High Temperature Test Reactor will be used. It also described the procedures and policies that ensure that this data is used only by authorized personnel and only for the purposes for which it is intended.

  12. High Pressure Soxhlet Type Leachability testing device and leaching test of simulated high-level waste glass at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senoo, Muneaki; Banba, Tsunetaka; Tashiro, Shingo; Shimooka, Kenji; Araki, Kunio

    1979-11-01

    A High Pressure Soxhlet Type Leachability Testing Device (HIPSOL) was developed to evaluate long-period stability of high-level waste (HLW) solids. For simulated HLW solids, temperature dependency of the leachability was investigated at higher temperatures from 100 0 C to 300 0 C at 80 atm. Leachabilities of cesium and sodium at 295 0 C were 20 and 7 times higher than at 100 0 C, respectively. In the repository, the temperatures around solidified products may be hundred 0 C. It is essential to test them at such elevated temperatures. HIPSOL is also usable for accelerated test to evaluate long-period leaching behavior of HLW products. (author)

  13. Design and Integrity Evaluation of High-temperature Piping Systems in the STELLA-2 Sodium Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seok-Kwon; Lee, Hyeong-Yeon; Eoh, JaeHyuk; Kim, Jong-Bum; Jeong, Ji-Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Yong-Sun [KOASIS Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In this study, elevated temperature design and integrity evaluation have been conducted using two different piping design codes for the high-temperature piping systems of sodium integral effect test loop for safety simulation and assessment(STELLA-2) being developed by KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The design code of ASME B31.1 for power piping and French nuclear grade piping design guideline, RCC-MRx RD-3600 were applied, and conservatism of those codes was quantified based on the piping integrity evaluation results. The piping system of Model DHRS, Model IHTS and PSLS are to be installed in STELLA-2. The integrity evaluation results for the three piping systems according to the two design codes showed that integrity of the piping system was confirmed. As a code comparison result, ASME B31.1 was shown to be more conservative for sustained loads while RD-3600 was more conservative for thermal loads compared to B31.1.

  14. Preliminary test of an ultrasonic liquid film sensor for high-temperature steam-water two-phase flow experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Goro; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Baba, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    A prototype liquid film sensor for high-temperature steam-water experiments has been developed. The sensor shape simulates a boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rod. The pulse-echo method can be utilized to measure the thickness of the liquid film covering the sensor surface. A piezoelectric element is soldered onto the inside of the sensor casing which consists of two curved casing pieces. After the piezoelectric element is attached, the two casing pieces are laser welded together. It is confirmed that the temperature rise at the time of the laser welding does not influence soldering of the piezoelectric element. The pressure proof test shows that the sensor can be used at a high-pressure condition of 7 MPa. Simple air-water experiments are done at atmospheric pressure to confirm the liquid film thickness can be measured with the sensor. The fluctuation of the liquid film thickness is satisfactorily captured with the sensor. The minimum and maximum thicknesses are 0.084 and 0.180 mm, respectively. The amplitude of the waveform at 286°C is predicted by the calculation based on the acoustic impedance. It is expected that the sensor is able to measure the liquid film thickness even at BWR operating conditions. (author)

  15. Standard Test Method for Testing Polymeric Seal Materials for Geothermal and/or High Temperature Service Under Sealing Stress

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the initial evaluation of (screening) polymeric materials for seals under static sealing stress and at elevated temperatures. 1.2 This test method applies to geothermal service only if used in conjunction with Test Method E 1068. 1.3 The test fluid is distilled water. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  17. Electrophoretic characterization of protein interactions suggesting limited feasibility of accelerated shelf-life testing of ultra-high temperature milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Manpreet Kaur; Chandrapala, Jayani; Donkor, Osaana; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Vasiljevic, Todor

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated shelf-life testing is applied to a variety of products to estimate keeping quality over a short period of time. The industry has not been successful in applying this approach to ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk because of chemical and physical changes in the milk proteins that take place during processing and storage. We investigated these protein changes, applying accelerated shelf-life principles to UHT milk samples with different fat levels and using native- and sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Samples of UHT skim and whole milk were stored at 20, 30, 40, and 50°C for 28d. Irrespective of fat content, UHT treatment had a similar effect on the electrophoretic patterns of milk proteins. At the start of testing, proteins were bonded mainly through disulfide and noncovalent interactions. However, storage at and above 30°C enhanced protein aggregation via covalent interactions. The extent of aggregation appeared to be influenced by fat content; whole milk contained more fat than skim milk, implying aggregation via melted or oxidized fat, or both. Based on reduction in loss in absolute quantity of individual proteins, covalent crosslinking in whole milk was facilitated mainly by products of lipid oxidation and increased access to caseins for crosslinking reactions. Maillard and dehydroalanine products were the main contributors involved in protein changes in skim milk. Protein crosslinking appeared to follow a different pathway at higher temperatures (≥40°C) than at lower temperatures, making it very difficult to extrapolate these changes to protein interactions at lower temperatures. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Accelerated test techniques for micro-circuits: Evaluation of high temperature (473 k - 573 K) accelerated life test techniques as effective microcircuit screening methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The application of high temperature accelerated test techniques was shown to be an effective method of microcircuit defect screening. Comprehensive microcircuit evaluations and a series of high temperature (473 K to 573 K) life tests demonstrated that a freak or early failure population of surface contaminated devices could be completely screened in thirty two hours of test at an ambient temperature of 523 K. Equivalent screening at 398 K, as prescribed by current Military and NASA specifications, would have required in excess of 1,500 hours of test. All testing was accomplished with a Texas Instruments' 54L10, low power triple-3 input NAND gate manufactured with a titanium- tungsten (Ti-W), Gold (Au) metallization system. A number of design and/or manufacturing anomalies were also noted with the Ti-W, Au metallization system. Further study of the exact nature and cause(s) of these anomalies is recommended prior to the use of microcircuits with Ti-W, Au metallization in long life/high reliability applications. Photomicrographs of tested circuits are included.

  19. High temperature structural silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi 2 -based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi 2 single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi 2 possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi 2 -Si 3 N 4 composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi 2 -based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing

  20. Tokamak engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1975-07-01

    The design criteria for a tokamak engineering test reactor can be met by operating in the two-component mode with reacting ion beams, together with a new blanket-shield design based on internal neutron spectrum shaping. A conceptual reactor design achieving a neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m 2 is presented. The tokamak has a major radius of 3.05 m, the plasma cross-section is noncircular with a 2:1 elongation, and the plasma radius in the midplane is 55 cm. The total wall area is 149 m 2 . The plasma conditions are T/sub e/ approximately T/sub i/ approximately 5 keV, and ntau approximately 8 x 10 12 cm -3 s. The plasma temperature is maintained by injection of 177 MW of 200-keV neutral deuterium beams; the resulting deuterons undergo fusion reactions with the triton-target ions. The D-shaped toroidal field coils are extended out to large major radius (7.0 m), so that the blanket-shield test modules on the outer portion of the torus can be easily removed. The TF coils are superconducting, using a cryogenically stable TiNb design that permits a field at the coil of 80 kG and an axial field of 38 kG. The blanket-shield design for the inner portion of the torus nearest the machine center line utilizes a neutron spectral shifter so that the first structural wall behind the spectral shifter zone can withstand radiation damage for the reactor lifetime. The energy attenuation in this inner blanket is 8 x 10 -6 . If necessary, a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8 can be achieved using liquid lithium cooling in the []outer blanket only. The overall power consumption of the reactor is about 340 MW(e). A neutron wall loading greater than 1 MW/m 2 can be achieved by increasing the maximum magnetic field or the plasma elongation. (auth)

  1. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part I: experimental tests in full scale plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Rigamonti, Lucia; Marras, Roberto; Grosso, Mario

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, several waste-to-energy plants in Italy have experienced an increase of the concentration of acid gases (HCl, SO2 and HF) in the raw gas. This is likely an indirect effect of the progressive decrease of the amount of treated municipal waste, which is partially replaced by commercial waste. The latter is characterised by a higher variability of its chemical composition because of the different origins, with possible increase of the load of halogen elements such as chlorine (Cl) and fluorine (F), as well as of sulphur (S). A new dolomitic sorbent was then tested in four waste-to-energy plants during standard operation as a pre-cleaning stage, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber. For a sorbent injection of about 6 kg per tonne of waste, the decrease of acid gases concentration downstream the boiler was in the range of 7-37% (mean 23%) for HCl, 34-95% (mean 71%) for SO2 and 39-80% (mean 63%) for HF. This pre-abatement of acid gases allowed to decrease the feeding rate of the traditional low temperature sorbent (sodium bicarbonate in all four plants) by about 30%. Furthermore, it was observed by the plant operators that the sorbent helps to keep the boiler surfaces cleaner, with a possible reduction of the fouling phenomena and a consequent increase of the specific energy production. A preliminary quantitative estimate was carried out in one of the four plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Department of HTTR Project and Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology in Oarai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from December 2000 to February 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on December 8, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research. (author)

  3. Leakage and Power Loss Test Results for Competing Turbine Engine Seals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Proctor, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    .... To address engine manufacturers' concerns about the heat generation and power loss from these contacting seals, brush, finger, and labyrinth seals were tested in the NASA High Speed, High Temperature...

  4. Study on the seismic verification test program on the experimental multi-purpose high-temperature gas cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taketani, K.; Aochi, T.; Yasuno, T.; Ikushima, T.; Shiraki, K.; Honma, T.; Kawamura, N.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a program of experimental research necessary for qualitative and quantitative determination of vibration characteristics and aseismic safety on structure of reactor core in the multipurpose high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor (VHTR Experimental Reactor) by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

  5. Study of the Effects of High Temperatures on the Engineering Properties of Steel 42CrMo4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnic, Josip; Turkalj, Goran; Canadija, Marko; Lanc, Domagoj; Brcic, Marino

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents and analyzes the experimental results of the effect of elevated temperatures on the engineering properties of steel 42CrMo4. Experimental data relating to the mechanical properties of the material, the creep resistance as well as Charpy impact energy. Temperature dependence of the mentioned properties is also shown. Some of creep curves were simulated using rheological models and an analytical equation. Finally, an assessment of fracture toughness was made that was based on experimentally determined Charpy impact energy. Based on the obtained results it is visible that the tensile strength (617 MPa) and yield strength (415 MPa) have the highest value at the room temperature while at the temperature of 700 °C (973 K) these values significantly decrease. This steel can be considered resistant to creep at 400 °C (673 K), but at higher temperatures this steel can be subjected to low levels of stress in a shorter time.

  6. Applicability test of glass lining material for high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid in thermochemical water-splitting IS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatsuki, Jin; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Terada, Atsuhiko; Onuki, Kaoru; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    A key issue for realizing the thermochemical IS process for hydrogen production is the selection of materials for working with high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid. Glass lining material is a promising candidate, which is composed of steel having good strength and glass having good corrosion resistance. Since the applicability of glass lining material depends strongly on the service condition, corrosion tests using glass used in glass lining material and heat cycle tests using glass lining piping were carried out to examine the possibility of using the glass lining material with high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid. It was confirmed that the glass lining materials exhibited sufficient corrosion resistance and heat resistance in high-temperature sulfuric acid of the IS process. (author)

  7. Engineering test facility design center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This section describes the status of this design

  8. High Temperature Chemistry at NASA: Hot Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature issues in aircraft engines Hot section: Ni and Co based Superalloys Oxidation and Corrosion (Durability) at high temperatures. Thermal protection system (TPS) and RCC (Reinforced Carbon-Carbon) on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. High temperatures in other worlds: Planets close to their stars.

  9. High temperature reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, C.D.; Beno, M.F.; Mulac, W.A.; Bartels, D.

    1985-01-01

    During the last year the dependence of the apparent rate of OD + CO on water pressure was measured at 305, 570, 865 and 1223 K. An explanation was found and tested for the H 2 O dependence of the apparent rate of OH(OD) + CO at high temperatures. The isotope effect for OH(D) with CO was determined over the temperature range 330 K to 1225 K. The reason for the water dependence of the rate of OH(OD) + CO near room temperatures has been investigated but no clear explanation has been found. 1 figure

  10. Radiation control monitoring system on the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minowa, Y.; Nakazawa, T.; Sato, K.; Kikuchi, H.; Nomura, T.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation control monitoring system of the HTTR is divided into three subsystems; exhaust monitoring equipment, room air monitoring equipment, dose equivalent rate monitoring equipment. The exhaust monitoring equipment consists of exhaust gas monitors, exhaust dust monitors, and a tritium and carbon sampling device at normal operation of the reactor. Accident gas monitors are also provided for the emergency. The tritium and carbon sampling device uses cupper oxide as a oxidizer, and ethanol amine as a sampling materials which collects continuously tritium and carbon in dust during about one month and is measured by a liquid scintillation counter. The accident gas monitors consist of two channels, for a low and a high range. The high range-gas monitor consists of two ionization chambers: one encloses argon gas and the other encloses xenon gas. Average energy of various gamma-rays, hence, accident exposure dose of the public can be estimated with the comparison of the sensitivity of two kinds of ionization chambers. The dose equivalent rate monitoring equipment consists of silicon semiconductor detectors for gamma-ray, a ionization chamber for gamma-ray, a BF 3 counter for neutron, and accident area monitors which are located in the reactor container. The message of 'check dose !' or 'temporary evacuation !' can be send to the workers in the reactor with a light and a sound. A computer system collects the radiation monitoring data every 10 sec cycle and accumulates them in a server computer. The leakage and the dispersion of helium gas must be taken into account on the radiation control monitoring system of the HTTR. (Suetake, M.)

  11. Uncertainties in calculations of nuclear design code system for the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, R.; Yamashita, K.; Murata, I.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear design code system for the HTTR consists of one dimensional cell burnup computer code, developed in JAERI and the TWOTRAN-2 transport code. In order to satisfy related design criteria, uncertainty of the calculation was investigated by comparing the calculated and experimental results. The experiments were performed with a graphite moderated critical assembly. It was confirmed that discrepancies between calculations and experiments were small enough to be allowed in the nuclear design of HTTR. 8 refs, 6 figs

  12. Testing of Commercial Milk Production Technology Using A Combination of High Temperature Short Time and Pulsed Electric Field

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi A; Widjanarko SB; Kusnadi J

    2016-01-01

    The development of milk processing technology has grown excessively, and it contains advantage and disadvantage. This study used mixed between PEF (Pulsed Electric Field) and High Temperature Short Time (HTST) to produce milk processed product which is effective and efficient in killing milk microorganism without changing its color, scent, and nutrient content of processed product, therefore producing commercial sterile milk product in accord with milk Indonesian National Standard (SNI). The ...

  13. Theoretical research on working fluid selection for a high-temperature regenerative transcritical dual-loop engine organic Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Hua; Liu, Lina; Shu, Gequn; Wei, Haiqiao; Liang, Xingyu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Among all examined working fluids, toluene possesses the maximum W net , highest η e and η ec . • The increase of T 3 worsens system performance, decreasing W net , η e and η ec . • Condenser C LT and turbine T LT possesses the least system irreversibility. • Turbines and exhaust evaporators are optimization components. - Abstract: In this paper, a regenerative transcritical dual-loop organic Rankine cycle is proposed to recover the waste heat of the exhaust, engine coolant and all the residual heat of the HT loop. Double regenerators are adopted in this system. Transcritical cycles are used in both loops. Hexamethyldisiloxane (MM), octamethyl cyclotetrasiloxane (D 4 ), octamethyltrisiloxane (MDM), cyclohexane, toluene and n-decane are chosen as the candidate working fluids of the HT loop and R143a is chosen as the working fluid of the LT loop. Influences of inlet temperature of turbine T HT (T 3 ) on mass flow rates (m f,HT and m f,LT ), net output power (W net ), energy conversion efficiency (η ec ), volumetric expansion ratio (VER), ratio of power consumed to power output (COR) and component irreversibility are analyzed and performance comparison of these working fluids is also evaluated. Results show that toluene possesses the maximum W net (42.46 kW), highest η e (51.92%) and η ec (12.77%). The increase of T 3 worsens system performance, decreasing W net , η e and η ec . Condenser C LT and turbine T LT possess the least system irreversibility. In addition, turbines and exhaust evaporators are optimized components

  14. Hydrogen production by high-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam. Test results obtained with an electrolysis tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1995-01-01

    High-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam is an advanced hydrogen production process decomposing high temperature steam up to 1,000degC, which applies an electro-chemical reaction reverse to the solid oxide fuel cell. At Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted using a practical electrolysis tube with 12 electrolysis cells in order to develop heat utilization systems for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The electrolysis cells of which electrolyte was yttria-stabilized zirconia were formed on a porous ceramic tube in series by plasma spraying. In the experiments, water steam mixed with argon carrier gas was supplied into the electrolysis tube heated at a constant temperature regulated in the range from 850degC to 950degC, and electrolysis power was supplied by a DC power source. Hydrogen production rate increased with applied voltage and electrolysis temperature; the maximum production rate was 6.9Nl/h at 950degC. Hydrogen production rate was correlated with applied current densities on the basis of experimental data. High energy efficiency was achieved under the applied current density ranging from 80 to 100 mA/cm 2 . (author)

  15. Supersymmetry at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Kaku, M.

    1978-01-01

    We investigate the properties of Green's functions in a spontaneously broken supersymmetric model at high temperatures. We show that, even at high temperatures, we do not get restoration of supersymmetry, at least in the one-loop approximation

  16. Turbine Engine Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    English climate. (c) Functional Testing Functional testing is a ’catch all’ title for the multitude of tests required to examine and confirm or correct the...rage I I I , I ’s slot envs Atar ONK propulsent les Miraiges IV de la levce A~rientic Strat~giqiie l-vanlaisc, tanilis tilit leg mcters Atar 91K50 sent...moignent. Irtuwi Atar 9 ~K50 est tine version MANv~ du motenr Atar 9K proptilsant le hirdaceur vi1 *c ~Ik (lttur 11 et dest in 5 6qtiiper I ’avion polyvalent

  17. Evolution of grain boundary character distributions in alloy 825 tubes during high temperature annealing: Is grain boundary engineering achieved through recrystallization or grain growth?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Qin; Zhao, Qing; Xia, Shuang; Wang, Baoshun; Zhou, Bangxin; Su, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE) of nickel-based alloy 825 tubes was carried out with different cold drawing deformations by using a draw-bench on a factory production line and subsequent annealing at various temperatures. The microstructure evolution of alloy 825 during thermal-mechanical processing (TMP) was characterized by means of the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique to study the TMP effects on the grain boundary network and the evolution of grain boundary character distributions during high temperature annealing. The results showed that the proportion of ∑ 3 n coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries of alloy 825 tubes could be increased to > 75% by the TMP of 5% cold drawing and subsequent annealing at 1050 °C for 10 min. The microstructures of the partially recrystallized samples and the fully recrystallized samples suggested that the proportion of low ∑ CSL grain boundaries depended on the annealing time. The frequency of low ∑ CSL grain boundaries increases rapidly with increasing annealing time associating with the formation of large-size highly-twinned grains-cluster microstructure during recrystallization. However, upon further increasing annealing time, the frequency of low ∑ CSL grain boundaries decreased markedly during grain growth. So it is concluded that grain boundary engineering is achieved through recrystallization rather than grain growth. - Highlights: •The grain boundary engineering (GBE) is applicable to 825 tubes. •GBE is achieved through recrystallization rather than grain growth. •The low ∑ CSL grain boundaries in 825 tubes can be increased to > 75%.

  18. A study on the equivalence of olive oil and the EU official substitute test media for migration testing at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnafouri, A J; Franz, R

    1999-10-01

    possibility of quantitative determination of the overall extract by GC-FID is recommendable and should be investigated in more depth. Concerning the overall migration test procedure in olive oil, the vacuum pre-conditioning at 60 degrees C should be given re-consideration to avoid the possibility of loss of volatile migrants whose determination should be within the scope of the overall migration test method itself. Finally, the specific migration related equivalence between olive oil, MPPO and iso-octane needs further investigations to clarify the net effect of strongly increased diffusion rates at the regular high temperature versus the substitute test solvent accelerated extraction effect at 60 degrees C. Stability aspects of migrants at the different test temperatures deserve further consideration.

  19. High-Temperature Structural Analysis of a Small-Scale PHE Prototype under the Test Condition of a Small-Scale Gas Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K.; Hong, S.; Park, H.

    2012-01-01

    A process heat exchanger (PHE) is a key component for transferring the high-temperature heat generated from a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) to a chemical reaction for the massive production of hydrogen. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has designed and assembled a small-scale nitrogen gas loop for a performance test on VHTR components and has manufactured a small-scale PHE prototype made of Hastelloy-X alloy. A performance test on the PHE prototype is underway in the gas loop, where different kinds of pipelines connecting to the PHE prototype are tested for reducing the thermal stress under the expansion of the PHE prototype. In this study, to evaluate the high-temperature structural integrity of the PHE prototype under the test condition of the gas loop, a realistic and effective boundary condition imposing the stiffness of the pipelines connected to the PHE prototype was suggested. An equivalent spring stiffness to reduce the thermal stress under the expansion of the PHE prototype was computed from the bending deformation and expansion of the pipelines connected to the PHE. A structural analysis on the PHE prototype was also carried out by imposing the suggested boundary condition. As a result of the analysis, the structural integrity of the PHE prototype seems to be maintained under the test condition of the gas loop.

  20. Compilation of three-dimensional coordinates and specific data of the instrumentation of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel/high temperature helium test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausinger, D.

    1977-04-01

    The positions of the thermoelements, strain gauges of various types, and of Gloetzl instruments installed by SGAE in the model vessel of the Common Project Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessel/High Temperature Helium Test Rig are defined in cylindrical coordinates. The specific data of the instruments are given like configuration of multiple instruments; type, group and number of the instrument; number of cable and of channel; calibration factors; resistances of instruments and cables. (author)

  1. High temperature interface superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T_c superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T_c Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  2. Accelerating Rate Calorimetry Tests of Lithium-Ion Cells Before and After Storage Degradation at High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza-Hernandez Omar Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the behavior of Li-ion cells during thermal runaway is critical to evaluate the safety of these energy storage devices under outstanding conditions. Li-ion cells possess a high energy density and are used to store and supply energy to many aerospace applications. Incidents related to the overheating or thermal runaway of these cells can cause catastrophic damages that could end up costly space missions; therefore, thermal studies of Li-ion cells are very important for ensuring safety and reliability of space missions. This work evaluates the thermal behavior of Li-ion cells before and after storage degradation at high temperature using accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC equipment to analyze the thermal behavior of Li-ion cells under adiabatic conditions. Onset temperature points of self-heating and thermal runaway reactions are obtained. The onset points are used to identify non-self-heating, self-heating and thermal runaway regions as a function of state of charge. The results obtained can be useful to develop accurate thermo-electrochemical models of Li-ion cells.

  3. 500 C Electronic Packaging and Dielectric Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for exploring the inner solar planets and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and application of high temperature electronics and sensors. High temperature passive components are also necessary for high temperature electronic systems. This talk will discuss ceramic packaging systems developed for high temperature electronics, and related testing results of SiC circuits at 500C and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integrated circuits at temperatures beyond commercial limit facilitated by these high temperature packaging technologies. Dielectric materials for high temperature multilayers capacitors will also be discussed. High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for probing the inner solar planets and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and eventual applications of high temperature electronics and sensors. High temperature passive components are also necessary for high temperature electronic systems. This talk will discuss ceramic packaging systems developed for high electronics and related testing results of SiC circuits at 500C and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integrated circuits at temperatures beyond commercial limit facilitated by high temperature packaging technologies. Dielectric materials for high temperature multilayers capacitors will also be discussed.

  4. Introduction to nuclear test engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, W.C.; Paquette, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The basic information in this report is from a vu-graph presentation prepared to acquaint new or prospective employees with the Nuclear Test Engineering Division (NTED). Additional information has been added here to enhance a reader's understanding when reviewing the material after hearing the presentation, or in lieu of attending a presentation

  5. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests; Mesures des tres hautes temperatures: Applications a des essais de surete des reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-09-27

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  6. Strength and rupture-life transitions caused by secondary carbide precipitation in HT-9 during high-temperature low-rate mechanical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Hughes, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    The martensitic-ferritic alloy HT-9 is slated for long-term use as a fuel-cladding material in the Integral Fast Reactor. Analysis of published high-temperature mechanical property data suggests that secondary carbide precipitation would occur during service life causing substantial strengthening of the as-heat-treated material. Aspects of the kinetics of this precipitation process are extracted from calculations of the back stress necessary to produce the observed strengthening effect under various creep loading conditions. The resulting Arrhenius factor is shown to agree quantitatively with shifts to higher strength of crept material in reference to the intrinsic strength of HT-9. The results of very low constant strain-rate high-temperature tensile tests on as-heat-treated HT-9 that focus on the transition in strength with precipitation will be presented and related to rupture-life

  7. Report of the review committee on evaluation of the R and D subjects in the field of high-temperature engineering and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods and the Practices Manuals of the Institution Evaluation Committee and Research Evaluation Committee, the Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research composed of nine experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the R and D subjects to be implemented for five years starting in FY 2000 in the Departments of HTTR Project and Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on December 27, 1999. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Department Directors. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on August 31, 2000. The Research Evaluation Committee recognized the review results as appropriate. This report describes the review results. (author)

  8. Dictionary materials engineering, materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This dictionary contains about 9,500 entries in each part of the following fields: 1) Materials using and selection; 2) Mechanical engineering materials -Metallic materials - Non-metallic inorganic materials - Plastics - Composites -Materials damage and protection; 3) Electrical and electronics materials -Conductor materials - Semiconductors - magnetic materials - Dielectric materials - non-conducting materials; 4) Materials testing - Mechanical methods - Analytical methods - Structure investigation - Complex methods - Measurement of physical properties - Non-destructive testing. (orig.) [de

  9. High Temperature Superconductor Machine Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Træholt, Chresten

    2011-01-01

    A versatile testing platform for a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) machine has been constructed. The stationary HTS field winding can carry up to 10 coils and it is operated at a temperature of 77K. The rotating armature is at room temperature. Test results and performance for the HTS field...

  10. Catalyst Degradation Under Potential Cycling as an Accelerated Stress Test for PBI-Based High-Temperature PEM Fuel Cells - Effect of Humidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Tonny; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Zhong, Lijie

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells were subjected to accelerated stress tests of 30,000 potential cycles between 0.6 and 1.0 V at 160 textdegreeC (133 h cycling time). The effect that humidity has on the catalyst durability was studied by testing either...... with or without humidification of the nitrogen that was used as cathode gas during cycling segments. Pronounced degradation was seen from the polarization curves in both cases, though permanent only in the humidified case. In the unhumidified case, the performance loss was more or less recoverable following 24 h...

  11. In-situ heating test in the sedimentary soft rock. Part 3. Monitoring of the extent of high temperature zone by resistivity tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    One of the major issues in disposal of nuclear waste is that the long term behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperature or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the long term stability of caverns in sedimentary soft rocks as subjected to changes of environment. We have conducted in-situ heating test to evaluate the influence of high temperature to the surrounding rock mass at a depth of 50m. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of high temperature zone. So resistivity tomography was conducted during the heating. The results demonstrated that the resistivity of the rock mass around the heater well was decreased and this area was gradually expanded from the heated area during the heating. Resistivity of rock is proportional to that of pore water which is known to decrease with increasing temperature. This suggests that high temperature zone is detected and spatial distribution of temperature can be mapped by resistivity tomography. So resistivity tomography is expected to be one of the promising methods to monitor the heated area by nuclear waste. (author)

  12. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membrane Based High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela

    2015-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation of the HT-PEM fuel cell. Continuous tests with pure dry H2 and meth...

  13. High temperature battery. Hochtemperaturbatterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulling, M.

    1992-06-04

    To prevent heat losses of a high temperature battery, it is proposed to make the incoming current leads in the area of their penetration through the double-walled insulating housing as thermal throttle, particularly spiral ones.

  14. "Green" High-Temperature Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    PMR-15 is a processable, high-temperature polymer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center in the 1970's principally for aeropropulsion applications. Use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in these applications can lead to substantial weight savings, thereby leading to improved fuel economy, increased passenger and payload capacity, and better maneuverability. PMR-15 is used fairly extensively in military and commercial aircraft engines components seeing service temperatures as high as 500 F (260 C), such as the outer bypass duct for the F-404 engine. The current world-wide market for PMR-15 materials (resins, adhesives, and composites) is on the order of $6 to 10 million annually.

  15. High temperature refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator is described which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle the working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot

  16. Bithermal and isothermal experimental test design and resulting influence on the pore formation during high-temperature-induced fatigue of the alloy 800 H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurta, S.

    1991-01-01

    For investigating the damaging mechanism, bithermal TMF tests have been carried out with the alloy 800H, applying fast pressure half-cycles at low temperature (e.g. 300 C) and slow tensile phases at high temperature (e.g. 700 C). The experimental data thus obtained have been compared with the results of isothermal tests performed at 700 C. Most of the experiments have been performed stress-controlled and with a constant range of plastic strain. Under this regime, deformation is induced in the case of asymmetric test design within the tensile load phase, at various constant tensile stresses each, wheras in the compressive load phase, the stress is constantly increased for compressive stress-governed testing. The results obtained from both test types show that the type of compressive load phase is the factor governing the efficiency of pore formation. (orig.) [de

  17. Metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796) tested in high-temperature uniaxial and multiaxial experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Houck, C.W.

    1984-03-01

    The results obtained from a number of metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel specimens were compiled. Samples were obtained from uniaxial and multiaxial tests covering a very broad span of temperatures and times. Special emphasis was on the identification of failure modes, cracking patterns, grain distortion, and grain-boundary microstructures. Uniaxial specimens exhibited the following sequence of failure modes with increasing temperature and time: ductile plastic tearing, ductile plastic shear, wedge cracking, and microvoid cracking. Over most of the temperature range examined (482 to 871/sup 0/C), M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated on grain boundaries at long times. Sigma phase and possibly ferrite were often present in the stressed areas at temperatures as low as 482/sup 0/C (900/sup 0/F). These metallurgical features promoted a severe loss in creep ductility at long times and low temperatures. Most multiaxial tests were performed under conditions that promoted wedge cracking. Stress gradients also favored surface crack initiation rather than bulk damage. Testing times for multiaxial tests were less than 10,000 h; hence, there was insufficient time for the development of embrittling features such as microvoids, sigma, and ferrite. Long-time multiaxial tests to failure are recommended.

  18. Laboratory and Field Test of Movable Conduction-Cooled High-Temperature SMES for Power System Stability Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Jiakun; Wen, J.; Wang, S.

    2013-01-01

    , the monitoring and control unit, and the container, etc. The proposed SMES can be loaded onto a truck to move to a desired location and put into operation with easy connection. Laboratory and field tests have been carried out to investigate the operational characteristics and to demonstrate the SMES...

  19. High temperature sensors for exhaust diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenningstorp, Henrik

    2000-07-01

    One of the largest problems that we will have to deal with on this planet this millennium is to stop the pollution of our environment. In many of the ongoing works to reduce toxic emissions, gas sensors capable of enduring rough environments and high temperatures, would be a great tool. The different applications where sensors like this would be useful vary between everything from online measurement in the paper industry and food industry to measurement in the exhaust pipe of a car. In my project we have tested Schottky diodes and MlSiCFET sensor as gas sensors operating at high temperatures. The measurement condition in the exhaust pipe of a car is extremely tough, not only is the temperature high and the different gases quite harmful, there are also a lot of particles that can affect the sensors in an undesirable way. In my project we have been testing Schottky diodes and MlSiCFET sensors based on SiC as high temperature sensors, both in the laboratory with simulated exhaust and after a real engine. In this thesis we conclude that these sensors can work in the hostile environment of an engines exhaust. It is shown that when measuring in a gas mixture with a fixed I below one, where the I-value is controlled by the O{sub 2} concentration, a sensor with a catalytic gate metal as sensitive material respond more to the increased O{sub 2} concentration than the increased HC concentration when varying the two correspondingly. A number of different sensors have been tested in simulated exhaust towards NO{sub x}. It was shown that resistivity changes in the thin gate metal influenced the gas response. Tests have been performed where sensors were a part of a SCR system with promising results concerning NH{sub 3} sensitivity. With a working temperature of 300 deg C there is no contamination of the metal surface.

  20. Reliability testing of wire-bond at high temperature storage: Abstract for HITEN 2007, The International Conference on High Temperature Electronics, 17-19 September 2007 in Oxford, United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Schelle, B.; Arik, B.; Klieber, R.; Trieu, H.-K.

    2007-01-01

    In integrated circuits chips are connected to the substrate with an electrical bonding. Generally Au bondwires are used on Al chip-pads with a Ni substrate; - denoted as an Al/Au/Ni system. The system can be used up to 150°C. At higher temperatures up to 250°C the system fails due to intermetallic phase growth also known as 'purple pest'. In this talk we present an alternative to the Au/Au/Au system for high temperature assembly, as a gold metallization on the chip side is expensive and not c...

  1. High temperature phase equilibria and phase diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Chu-Kun; Yan, Dong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    High temperature phase equilibria studies play an increasingly important role in materials science and engineering. It is especially significant in the research into the properties of the material and the ways in which they can be improved. This is achieved by observing equilibrium and by examining the phase relationships at high temperature. The study of high temperature phase diagrams of nonmetallic systems began in the early 1900s when silica and mineral systems containing silica were focussed upon. Since then technical ceramics emerged and more emphasis has been placed on high temperature

  2. High temperature mechanical properties of iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D. G.; Munoz-Morris, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the iron aluminide family of intermetallics over the past years since they offer considerable potential as engineering materials for intermediate to high temperature applications, particularly in cases where extreme oxidation or corrosion resistance is required. Despite efforts at alloy development, however, high temperature strength remains low and creep resistance poor. Reasons for the poor high-temperature strength of iron aluminides will be discussed, based on the ordered crystal structure, the dislocation structure found in the materials, and the mechanisms of dislocation pinning operating. Alternative ways of improving high temperature strength by microstructural modification and the inclusion of second phase particles will also be considered. (Author)

  3. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  4. Development of High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhattacharya, Rabi

    1999-01-01

    ... environment. To test this approach, UES and Cleveland State University have conducted experiments to form cesium oxythiotungstate, a high temperature lubricant, on Inconel 718 surface from composite coatings...

  5. Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn Scates

    2010-10-01

    A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

  6. Residual stresses in high temperature corrosion of pure zirconium using elasto-viscoplastic model: Application to the deflection test in monofacial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettré, D.; Bouvier, S.; Favergeon, J.; Kurpaska, L.

    2015-12-01

    The paper is devoted to modeling residual stresses and strains in an oxide film formed during high temperature oxidation. It describes the deflection test in isothermal high-temperature monofacial oxidation (DTMO) of pure zirconium. The model incorporates kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and takes into account elastic, viscoplastic, growth and chemical strains. Different growth strains models are considered, namely, isotropic growth strains given by Pilling-Bedworth ratio, anisotropic growth strains defined by Parise and co-authors and physically based model for growth strain proposed by Clarke. Creep mechanisms based on dislocation slip and core diffusion, are used. A mechanism responsible for through thickness normal stress gradient in the oxide film is proposed. The material parameters are identified using deflection tests under 400 °C, 500 °C and 600 °C. The effect of temperature on creep and stress relaxation is analyzed. Numerical sensitivity study of the DTMO experiment is proposed in order to investigate the effects of the initial foil thickness and platinum coating on the deflection curves.

  7. Design and test of a 5 kWe high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell system operated with diesel and kerosene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsun, Remzi Can; Pasel, Joachim; Janßen, Holger; Lehnert, Werner; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A fuel cell system for application as auxiliary power unit was developed. • Key components were a high-temperature PEFC stack and an autothermal reformer. • The system was tested with GTL kerosene, BTL diesel and premium diesel fuel. • The target electrical power of 5 kW was achieved with all fuels used. • Self-sustaining system operation was demonstrated with the integrated system design. - Abstract: A high-temperature PEFC system, developed with the aim of delivering 5 kW electrical power from the chemical energy stored in diesel and kerosene fuels for application as an auxiliary power unit, was simulated and tested. The key components of the system were an autothermal reformer, a water–gas shift reactor, a catalytic burner, and the HT-PEFC stack. The targeted power level of 5 kW was achieved using different fuels, namely GTL kerosene, BTL diesel and premium diesel. Using an integrated system approach, operation without external heat input was demonstrated. The overall analysis showed slight but non-continuous performance loss for 250 h operation time

  8. Virtual Turbine Engine Test Bench Using MGET Test Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Seonghee; Kong, Changduk; Ki, Jayoung

    2015-05-01

    Test device using virtual engine simulator can help reduce the number of engine tests through tests similar to the actual engine tests and repeat the test under the same condition, and thus reduce the engine maintenance and operating costs [1]. Also, as it is possible to easily implement extreme conditions in which it is hard to conduct actual tests, it can prevent engine damages that may happen during the actual engine test under such conditions. In this study, an upgraded MGET test device was developed that can conduct both real and virtual engine test by applying real-time engine model to the existing MGET test device that was developed and has been sold by the Company. This newly developed multi-purpose MGET test device is expected to be used for various educational and research purposes.

  9. High Temperature Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elder, Rachael; Cumming, Denis; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of carbon dioxide, or co-electrolysis of carbon dioxide and steam, has a great potential for carbon dioxide utilisation. A solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), operating between 500 and 900. °C, is used to reduce carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. If steam is also i...

  10. High Temperature Performance Evaluation of As-serviced 25Cr35Ni Type Heat-resistant Steel Based on Stress Relaxation Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Jun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on an as-serviced 25Cr35Ni type steel, the high temperature property evaluation using stress relaxation test(SRT method and residual life prediction were studied. The results show that creep rupture property decreases because of the formation of network carbides along grain boundaries and coarsening of secondary carbides in the austenitic matrix. Based on the relationship of stress relaxation strain rate curves obtained at different temperatures, and the extrapolation equation of stress relaxation rate-rupture time, it is capable to perform residual life evaluation by combining SRT data and a small amount of creep rupture test(CRT. Good agreement is observed for predicting results performed by current method and traditional method.

  11. A preliminary neutronic evaluation of the high temperature gas-cooled test reactor HTR-10 using the scale 6.0 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Romulo V.; Fortini, Angela; Pereira, Claubia; Carvalho, Fernando R. de; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2013-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Test Reactor HTR-10 is a 10 MW modular pebble bed type reactor, which core is filled with 27,000 spherical fuel elements, e.g. TRISO coated particles. This reactor was built by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET), Tsinghua University, China, and its first criticality was attained on December 1, 2000. The main objectives of the HTR-10 are to verify and demonstrate the technical and safety features of the modular HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) and to establish an experimental base for developing nuclear process heat applications. In this work, using the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 6.0, a nuclear code developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the HTR-10 first critical core is modeled by the DEN/UFMG. The K eff was obtained and compared with the reference value obtained by the Idaho National Laboratory. The result presents good agreement with experimental value. The goal is to validate the DEN/UFMG model to be applied in transmutation studies changing the fuel. (author)

  12. Initial tests of thermoacoustic space power engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backhaus, S.N.

    2002-01-01

    Future NASA deep-space missions will require radioisotope-powered electric generators that are just as reliable as current RTGs, but more efficient and of higher specific power (Wikg). Thennoacoustic engines at the -1-kW scale have converted high-temperature heat into acoustic, or PV, power without moving parts at 30% efficiency. Consisting of only tubes and a few heat exchangers, thennoacoustic engines are low mass and promise to be highly reliable. Coupling a thennoacoustic engine to a low mass, highly reliable and efficient linear alternator will create a heat-driven electric generator suitable for deep-space applications. Conversion efficiency data will be presented on a demonstration thennoacoustic engine designed for the 1 00-Watt power range.

  13. Periodic oxide cracking on Fe2.25Cr1Mo produced by high-temperature fatigue tests with a compression hold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, R.L.; Weertman, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Long, straight cracks perpendicular to the stress axis are seen on the oxidized surface of specimens of Fe2.25Cr1Mo cycled with a compressive hold at high temperatures. The cracks in the oxide are periodically spaced. They resemble cracks observed in a brittle film on a ductile substrate after a tension test of the substrate. They also resemble the parallel multiple fractures that occur in a brittle matrix of a composite with ductile fibers undergoing tension. The authors apply both the model of a brittle film on a ductile substrate and of the brittle matrix composite to explain the observed intercrack spacing. Cracks in the oxide film lead to localized oxidation of the metal in the region around their intersection with the oxide-metal interface. These cracks are seen to penetrate the metal. Stress concentrations from deep grooves that form during compression hold fatigue, together with crack initiation from the oxide, lead to a shortened cycle life

  14. Microscopic mapping of specific contact resistances and long-term reliability tests on 4H-silicon carbide using sputtered titanium tungsten contacts for high temperature device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.-K.; Zetterling, C.-M.; Ostling, M.

    2002-07-01

    We report on the microscopic mapping of specific contact resistances (rhoc) and long-term reliability tests using sputtered titanium tungsten (TiW) ohmic contacts to highly doped n-type epilayers of 4H-silicon carbide. The TiW ohmic contacts showed good uniformity with low contact resistivity of 3.3 x10-5 Omega cm2. Microscopic mapping of the rhoc showed that the rhoc had a distribution that decreased from the center to the edge of the wafer. This distribution of the rhoc is caused by variation of the doping concentration of the wafer. Sacrificial oxidation at high temperature partially recovered inductively coupled plasma etch damage. TiW contacts with platinum and gold capping layers have stable specific contact resistance at 500 and 600 degC in a vacuum chamber for 308 h.

  15. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1987-07-01

    After a short account of the history of experimental studies on superconductivity, the microscopic theory of superconductivity, the calculation of the control temperature and its possible maximum value are presented. An explanation of the mechanism of superconductivity in recently discovered superconducting metal oxide ceramics and the perspectives for the realization of new high-temperature superconducting materials are discussed. 56 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  16. High temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  17. Engineering test facility design definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercaw, R. W.; Seikel, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF) is the major focus of the Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Program to facilitate commercialization and to demonstrate the commercial operability of MHD/steam electric power. The ETF will be a fully integrated commercial prototype MHD power plant with a nominal output of 200 MW sub e. Performance of this plant is expected to meet or surpass existing utility standards for fuel, maintenance, and operating costs; plant availability; load following; safety; and durability. It is expected to meet all applicable environmental regulations. The current design concept conforming to the general definition, the basis for its selection, and the process which will be followed in further defining and updating the conceptual design.

  18. Software engineers and nuclear engineers: teaming up to do testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.; Cote, N.; Shepard, T.

    2007-01-01

    The software engineering community has traditionally paid little attention to the specific needs of engineers and scientists who develop their own software. Recently there has been increased recognition that specific software engineering techniques need to be found for this group of developers. In this case study, a software engineering group teamed with a nuclear engineering group to develop a software testing strategy. This work examines the types of testing that proved to be useful and examines what each discipline brings to the table to improve the quality of the software product. (author)

  19. Engine Test Cell Aeroacoustics and Recommendations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tam, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Ground testing of turbojet engines in test cells necessarily involves very high acoustic amplitudes, often enough and severe enough that testing is interrupted and facility hardware and test articles are damaged...

  20. Physical and engineering aspects of a fusion engineering test facility based on mirror confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, T.; Hirayama, S.; Hojo, H.; Kozaki, Y.; Yoshikawa, K.

    1986-01-01

    Controlled fusion research has accomplished great progress in the field of confinement of high-density and high-temperature plasmas and breakeven experiments are expected before the end of the 1980s. Many experiments have been proposed as the next step for fusion research. Among them is the study of ignited plasmas and another is the study of fusion engineering. Some of the important studies in fusion engineering are the integrated test in a fusion reactor environment as well as tests of first-wall materials and of the reactor structures, and test for tritium breeding and blanket modules or submodules. An ideal neutron source for the study of fusion engineering is the deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasma itself. A neutron facility based on a D-T-burning plasma consists of all of the components that a real fusion power reactor would have, so eventually the integrated test for fusion reactor engineering can be done as well as the tests for each engineering component

  1. Scaling and design analyses of a scaled-down, high-temperature test facility for experimental investigation of the initial stages of a VHTR air-ingress accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcilesi, David J.; Ham, Tae Kyu; Kim, In Hun; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N.; Oh, Chang H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 1/8th geometric-scale test facility that models the VHTR hot plenum is proposed. • Geometric scaling analysis is introduced for VHTR to analyze air-ingress accident. • Design calculations are performed to show that accident phenomenology is preserved. • Some analyses include time scale, hydraulic similarity and power scaling analysis. • Test facility has been constructed and shake-down tests are currently being carried out. - Abstract: A critical event in the safety analysis of the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is an air-ingress accident. This accident is initiated, in its worst case scenario, by a double-ended guillotine break of the coaxial cross vessel, which leads to a rapid reactor vessel depressurization. In a VHTR, the reactor vessel is located within a reactor cavity that is filled with air during normal operating conditions. Following the vessel depressurization, the dominant mode of ingress of an air–helium mixture into the reactor vessel will either be molecular diffusion or density-driven stratified flow. The mode of ingress is hypothesized to depend largely on the break conditions of the cross vessel. Since the time scales of these two ingress phenomena differ by orders of magnitude, it is imperative to understand under which conditions each of these mechanisms will dominate in the air ingress process. Computer models have been developed to analyze this type of accident scenario. There are, however, limited experimental data available to understand the phenomenology of the air-ingress accident and to validate these models. Therefore, there is a need to design and construct a scaled-down experimental test facility to simulate the air-ingress accident scenarios and to collect experimental data. The current paper focuses on the analyses performed for the design and operation of a 1/8th geometric scale (by height and diameter), high-temperature test facility. A geometric scaling analysis for the VHTR, a time

  2. Construction and performance tests of Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop (HENDEL) for VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, M.; Tanaka, T.; Shimomura, H.; Sanokawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    A helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL) was constructed and operated in JAERI in order to develop the high-temperature key components of an experimental very high temperature gas cooled reactor, like fuel stack, in-core reactor structure, hot gas duct, intermediate heat exchanger. Performance tests as well as demonstration of integrity are carried out with large-size or actual-size models of key components. The key components to be tested in HENDEL are: fuel stack and control rod; core supporting structure, or bottom structure of rector core exposed to direct impingement of high temperature core outlet flow; reactor internal components and structure; high temperature components in heat removal system (primary and secondary cooling systems)

  3. Simulation and material testing of jet engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA software engine simulator version U 1.7a beta has been used for simulation and material testing of jet engines. Specifications of Modem Jet Engines are stated, and then engine simulator is applied on these specifications. This simulator can simulate turbojet, afterburner, turbofan and ram jet. The material of many components of engine may be varied. Conventional and advanced materials for jet engines can be simulated and tested. These materials can be actively cooled to increase the operating temperature limit. As soon as temperature of any engine component exceeds the temperature limit of material, a warning message flashes across screen. Temperature Limits Exceeded. This flashing message remainst here until necessaryc hangesa re carried out in engine operationp rocedure. Selection Criteria of Engines is stated for piston prop, turboprop, turbofan, turbojet, and turbojet with afterburner and Ramjet. Several standard engines are modeled in Engine Simulator. These engines can. be compared by several engineering specifications. The design, modeling, simulation and testing of engines helps to better understand different types of materials used in jet engines. (author)

  4. High temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2010-01-01

    This essential reference provides the most comprehensive presentation of the state of the art in the field of high temperature superconductors. This growing field of research and applications is currently being supported by numerous governmental and industrial initiatives in the United States, Asia and Europe to overcome grid energy distribution issues. The technology is particularly intended for densely populated areas. It is now being commercialized for power-delivery devices, such as power transmission lines and cables, motors and generators. Applications in electric utilities include current limiters, long transmission lines and energy-storage devices that will help industries avoid dips in electric power.

  5. High temperature radioisotope capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    A high temperature radioisotope capsule made up of three concentric cylinders, with the isotope fuel located within the innermost cylinder is described. The innermost cylinder has hemispherical ends and is constructed of a tantalum alloy. The intermediate cylinder is made of a molybdenum alloy and is capable of withstanding the pressure generated by the alpha particle decay of the fuel. The outer cylinder is made of a platinum alloy of high resistance to corrosion. A gas separates the innermost cylinder from the intermediate cylinder and the intermediate cylinder from the outer cylinder

  6. The role of strain rate during deposition of CAP on Ti6Al4V by superplastic deformation-like method using high-temperature compression test machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramdan, R.D.; Jauhari, I.; Hasan, R.; Masdek, N.R. Nik

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an implementation of superplastic deformation method for the deposition of carbonated-apatite (CAP) on the well-know titanium alloy, Ti6Al4V. This deposition process was carried out using high-temperature compression test machine, at temperature of 775 deg. C, different strain rates, and conducted along the elastic region of the sample. Before the process, titanium substrate was cryogenically treated in order to approach superplastic characteristic during the process. After the process, thin film of CAP was created on the substrate with the thickness from 0.71 μm to 1.42 μm. The resulted film has a high density of CAP that covered completely the surface of the substrate. From the stress-strain relation chart, it can be observed that as the strain rate decreases, the area under stress-strain chart also decreases. This condition influences the density of CAP layer on the substrate that as this area decreases, the density of CAP layer also decreases as also confirmed by X-ray diffraction characterization. In addition, since the resulting layer of CAP is in the form of thin film, this layer did not alter the hardness of the substrate as measured by Vickers hardness test method. On the other hand, the resulting films also show a good bonding strength properties as the layer remain exist after friction test against polishing clothes for 1 h

  7. High-power stirling-type pulse tube cooler for power engineering applications of high temperature superconductivity; Hochleistungspulsrohrkuehler vom Stirling-Typ fuer energietechnische Anwendungen der Hochtemperatursupraleitung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Marc

    2015-12-15

    For the cooling of high temperature superconducting 4 MVA machines (motors or generators), a single-stage Stirling-type pulse-tube cryocooler was built. The cooling power, which the cryocooler was aimed for, is 80 - 100 W at 30 K with an electrical input power of 10 kW (8 kW pV-power). The advantages of this cooler type compared to traditional cooling concepts are an increased reliability and long maintenance intervals. While single-stage Stirling-type pulse-tube cryocoolers for the temperature range of liquid nitrogen (77 K) are already commercially available, there exist currently no commercial systems for the temperature range near 30 K, which is the important range for applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The experimental setup consisted of a 10 kW linear compressor, type 2S297W, from CFIC Inc. which was used as the pressure wave generator. The compressor was operated by a Micromaster 440 frequency inverter from Siemens, which was controlled by a custom-made computer program. The cold head was made in inline configuration, in order to avoid deflection losses. During the first cool-downs tests a temperature inhomogeneity occurred in the regenerator at low temperature and high pV-power, which was attributed to a constant mass flow (circular dc-flow) within the regenerator. This firstly observed dc-flow, generates a net energy flow from the hot end to the cold end of the regenerator, which reduces the cooling capacity considerably and hence the minimum attainable temperature is severely increased. For the design and optimization of the cold-head, a cryocooler model was initially created using the commercial simulation software Sage, which did not include the regenerator inhomogeneity seen in the experiment. For the modeling of the observed streaming inhomogeneity caused by the dc-flow, the regenerator was replaced by two identical parallel regenerators with variable transverse thermal coupling. In the inhomogeneous case (without dc-flow) the

  8. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  9. High-temperature materials and structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report gives a survey of research work in the area of high-temperature materials and structural ceramics of the KFA (Juelich Nuclear Research Center). The following topics are treated: (1) For energy facilities: ODS materials for gas turbine blades and heat exchangers; assessment of the remaining life of main steam pipes, material characterization and material stress limits for First-Wall components; metallic and graphitic materials for high-temperature reactors. (2) For process engineering plants: composites for reformer tubes and cracking tubes; ceramic/ceramic joints and metal/ceramic and metal/metal joints; Composites and alloys for rolling bearing and sliding systems up to application temperatures of 1000deg C; high-temperature corrosion of metal and ceramic material; porous ceramic high-temperature filters and moulding coat-mix techniques; electrically conducting ceramic material (superconductors, fuel cells, solid electrolytes); high-temperature light sources (high-temperature chemistry); oil vapor engines with caramic components; ODS materials for components in diesel engines and vehicle gas turbines. (MM) [de

  10. Summary: High Temperature Downhole Motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Directional drilling can be used to enable multi-lateral completions from a single well pad to improve well productivity and decrease environmental impact. Downhole rotation is typically developed with a motor in the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) that develops drilling power (speed and torque) necessary to drive rock reduction mechanisms (i.e., the bit) apart from the rotation developed by the surface rig. Historically, wellbore deviation has been introduced by a “bent-sub,” located in the BHA, that introduces a small angular deviation, typically less than 3 degrees, to allow the bit to drill off-axis with orientation of the BHA controlled at the surface. The development of a high temperature downhole motor would allow reliable use of bent subs for geothermal directional drilling. Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing the development of a high temperature motor that will operate on either drilling fluid (water-based mud) or compressed air to enable drilling high temperature, high strength, fractured rock. The project consists of designing a power section based upon geothermal drilling requirements; modeling and analysis of potential solutions; and design, development and testing of prototype hardware to validate the concept. Drilling costs contribute substantially to geothermal electricity production costs. The present development will result in more reliable access to deep, hot geothermal resources and allow preferential wellbore trajectories to be achieved. This will enable development of geothermal wells with multi-lateral completions resulting in improved geothermal resource recovery, decreased environmental impact and enhanced well construction economics.

  11. Development of internal CRD for next generation BWR-endurance and robustness tests of ball-bearing materials in high-pressure and high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji Goto; Shuichi Ohmori; Michitsugu Mori; Shohei Kawano; Tadashi Narabayashi; Shinichi Ishizato

    2005-01-01

    An internal CRD using a heatproof ceramics insulated coil is under development to be a competitive and higher performance as Next- Generation BWR. In the case of the 1700MWe next generation BWR, adapting the internal CRDs, the reactor pressure vessel is almost equivalent to that of 1356 MWe ABWR. The endurance and robustness tests were examined in order to confirm the durability of the bearing for the internal CRD. The durability of the ball bearing for the internal CRD was performed in the high-pressure and high-temperature reactor water of current BWR conditions. The experimental results confirmed the durability of rotational numbers for the operation length of 60 years. We added the cruds into water to confirm the robustness of the ball bearing. The test results also showed good robustness even in high-density crud conditions, compared with the current BWR. This program is conducted as one of the selected offers for the advertised technical developments of the Institute of Applied Energy founded by METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) of Japan. (authors)

  12. Development of crack growth and crack initiation test units for stress corrosion cracking examinations in high-temperature water environments under neutron irradiation (1) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumo, Hironobu; Ishida, Takuya; Kawamata, Kazuo; Inoue, Shuichi; Ide, Hiroshi; Saito, Takashi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Ise, Hideo; Miwa, Yukio; Ugachi, Hirokazu; Nakano, Junichi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Tsukada, Takashi

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate integrity of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) on in-core structural materials used in light water reactors (LWRs), useful knowledge regarding IASCC has been obtained mainly by post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). In the core of commercial LWRs, however, the actual IASCC occurs under the effects of irradiation on both materials and high-temperature water environment. Therefore, it is necessary to confirm the suitability of the knowledge by PIE with comparison to IASCC behaviors during in-core SCC tests. Fundamental techniques for in-core crack growth and crack initiation tests have been developed already at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). For the in-core crack growth test technique, to evaluate the effects of neutron irradiation on stainless steels irradiated to low neutron fluences, it is indispensable to develop new loading technique which is applicable to compact tension (CT) specimens with thickness of 0.5 inch (0.5T), from the viewpoint of validity based on the fracture mechanics. Based on the present technical investigation for the in-core loading technique, it is expected that a target load of 7.6 kN approximately can apply to a 0.5T-CT specimen by adopting a loading unit of a lever type instead of the previous uni-axial tension type. For the in-core crack initiation test technique, moreover, construction of a loading unit adopting linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) has been investigated and technical issues have examined. (author)

  13. High temperature materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  14. High temperature metallic recuperator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, M. E.; Solmon, N. G.; Smeltzer, C. E.

    1981-06-01

    An industrial 4.5 MM Btu/hr axial counterflow recuperator, fabricated to deliver 1600 F combustion air, was designed to handle rapid cyclic loading, a long life, acceptable costs, and a low maintenance requirement. A cost benefit anlysis of a high temperature waste heat recovery system utilizing the recurperator and components capable of 1600 F combustion air preheat shows that this system would have a payback period of less than two years. Fifteen companies and industrial associations were interviewed and expressed great interest in recuperation in large energy consuming industries. Determination of long term environmental effects on candidate recuperator tubing alloys was completed. Alloys found to be acceptable in the 2200 F flue gas environment of a steel billet reheat furnace, were identified.

  15. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  16. Radiation Protection Practices during the Helium Circulator Maintenance of the 10 MW High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor-Test Module (HTR-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengxiang Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current radiation protection methodology offers abundant experiences on light-water reactors, but very few studies on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR. To fill this gap, a comprehensive investigation was performed to the radiation protection practices in the helium circulator maintenance of the Chinese 10 MW HTR test module (HTR-10 in this paper. The investigation reveals the unique behaviour of HTR-10’s radiation sources in the maintenance as well as its radionuclide species and presents the radiation protection methods that were tailored to these features. Owing to these practices, the radioactivity level was kept low throughout the maintenance and only low-level radioactive waste was generated. The quantitative analysis further demonstrates that the decontamination efficiency was over 89% for surface contamination and over 34% for γ dose rate and the occupational exposure was much lower than both the limits of regulatory and the exposure levels in comparable literature. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the reported radiation protection practices, which directly provides hands-on experience for the future HTR-PM reactor and adds to the completeness of the radiation protection methodology.

  17. Design and study of Engineering Test Facility - Helium Circulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Huijing; Ye Ping; Zhao Gang; Geng Yinan; Wang Jie

    2015-01-01

    Helium circulator is one of the key equipment of High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Pebble-bed Module (HTR-PM). In order to simulate most normal and accident operating conditions of helium circulator in HTR-PM, a full scale, rated flow rate and power, engineering test loop, which was called Engineering Test Facility - Helium Circulator (ETF-HC), was designed and established. Two prototypes of helium circulator, which was supported by Active Magnetic Bearing (AMB) or sealed by dry gas seals, would be tested on ETF-HC. Therefore, special interchangeable design was under consideration. ETF-HC was constructed compactly, which consisted of eleven sub-systems. In order to reduce the flow resistance of the circuit, special ducts, elbows, valves and flowmeters were selected. Two stages of heat exchange loops were designed and a helium - high pressure pure water heat exchanger was applied to ensure water wouldn't be vaporized while simulating accident conditions. Commissioning tests were carried out and operation results showed that ETF-HC meets the requirement of helium circulator operation. On this test facility, different kinds of experiments were supposed to be held, including mechanical and aerodynamic performance tests, durability tests and so on. These tests would provide the features and performance of helium circulator and verify its feasibility, availability and reliability. (author)

  18. Engineered Barrier Test Facility status report, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Adams, M.R.; Gilbert, T.W.; Meinhardt, C.C.; Mitchell, R.M.; Waugh, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    This report provides a general summary of activities completed to date at the Hanford Engineered Barrier Test Facility. This facility is used to test and compare construction practices and performance of alternative designs of engineered barrier cover systems. These cover systems are being evaluated for potential use for isolation and confinement of buried waste disposal structures

  19. High temperature PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianlu; Xie, Zhong; Zhang, Jiujun; Tang, Yanghua; Song, Chaojie; Navessin, Titichai; Shi, Zhiqing; Song, Datong; Wang, Haijiang; Wilkinson, David P.; Liu, Zhong-Sheng; Holdcroft, Steven [Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, National Research Council Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada V6T 1W5)

    2006-10-06

    There are several compelling technological and commercial reasons for operating H{sub 2}/air PEM fuel cells at temperatures above 100{sup o}C. Rates of electrochemical kinetics are enhanced, water management and cooling is simplified, useful waste heat can be recovered, and lower quality reformed hydrogen may be used as the fuel. This review paper provides a concise review of high temperature PEM fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) from the perspective of HT-specific materials, designs, and testing/diagnostics. The review describes the motivation for HT-PEMFC development, the technology gaps, and recent advances. HT-membrane development accounts for {approx}90% of the published research in the field of HT-PEMFCs. Despite this, the status of membrane development for high temperature/low humidity operation is less than satisfactory. A weakness in the development of HT-PEMFC technology is the deficiency in HT-specific fuel cell architectures, test station designs, and testing protocols, and an understanding of the underlying fundamental principles behind these areas. The development of HT-specific PEMFC designs is of key importance that may help mitigate issues of membrane dehydration and MEA degradation. (author)

  20. High-temperature uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timusk, T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments reveal that the mechanism responsible for the superconducting properties of cuprate materials is even more mysterious than we thought. Two decades ago, Georg Bednorz and Alex Mueller of IBM's research laboratory in Zurich rocked the world of physics when they discovered a material that lost all resistance to electrical current at the record temperature of 36 K. Until then, superconductivity was thought to be a strictly low-temperature phenomenon that required costly refrigeration. Moreover, the IBM discovery - for which Bednorz and Mueller were awarded the 1987 Nobel Prize for Physics - was made in a ceramic copper-oxide material that nobody expected to be particularly special. Proposed applications for these 'cuprates' abounded. High-temperature superconductivity, particularly if it could be extended to room temperature, offered the promise of levitating trains, ultra-efficient power cables, and even supercomputers based on superconducting quantum interference devices. But these applications have been slow to materialize. Moreover, almost 20 years on, the physics behind this strange state of matter remains a mystery. (U.K.)

  1. Role of well testing in civil engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, D.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose of well testing is to derive a value of the permeability of the geologic medium or to measure the velocity or quantity of fluid flow. The types of tests typically employed on civil engineering projects are simple borehole tests, packer or pressure tests in boreholes, permeameter tests, well pumping tests, and in-hole tests using well flow meters or tracer tests. New problem areas which demand new approaches are mentioned

  2. High temperature pipeline design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenslade, J.G. [Colt Engineering, Calgary, AB (Canada). Pipelines Dept.; Nixon, J.F. [Nixon Geotech Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Dyck, D.W. [Stress Tech Engineering Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    It is impractical to transport bitumen and heavy oil by pipelines at ambient temperature unless diluents are added to reduce the viscosity. A diluted bitumen pipeline is commonly referred to as a dilbit pipeline. The diluent routinely used is natural gas condensate. Since natural gas condensate is limited in supply, it must be recovered and reused at high cost. This paper presented an alternative to the use of diluent to reduce the viscosity of heavy oil or bitumen. The following two basic design issues for a hot bitumen (hotbit) pipeline were presented: (1) modelling the restart problem, and, (2) establishing the maximum practical operating temperature. The transient behaviour during restart of a high temperature pipeline carrying viscous fluids was modelled using the concept of flow capacity. Although the design conditions were hypothetical, they could be encountered in the Athabasca oilsands. It was shown that environmental disturbances occur when the fluid is cooled during shut down because the ground temperature near the pipeline rises. This can change growing conditions, even near deeply buried insulated pipelines. Axial thermal loads also constrain the design and operation of a buried pipeline as higher operating temperatures are considered. As such, strain based design provides the opportunity to design for higher operating temperature than allowable stress based design methods. Expansion loops can partially relieve the thermal stress at a given temperature. As the design temperature increase, there is a point at which above grade pipelines become attractive options, although the materials and welding procedures must be suitable for low temperature service. 3 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  3. Advanced Turbine Engine Seal Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-01

    Transpiration- Cooled Shroud Segments. 67. ATEST Shroud Rub Pin Heights and Mid-Chord Runout . 68. Locations of Nine-Point Runout Check on Shroud Surface...69. ATEST Shroud Leading Edge Runout . 70. ATEST Shroud Trailing Edge Runout . 71. ATEST Shroud Support Posttest Runout . 72. ATEST Shroud Flow Zones...at General Electric on many prior engines with good success. It Involves the use of a grinding wheel in conjunction with a cutting fluid which is

  4. Advances in high temperature chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    1969-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in the knowledge of the high temperature behavior of materials and the complex and unfamiliar characteristics of matter at high temperature. The book discusses the dissociation energies and free energy functions of gaseous monoxides; the matrix-isolation technique applied to high temperature molecules; and the main features, the techniques for the production, detection, and diagnosis, and the applications of molecular beams in high temperatures. The text also describes the chemical research in streaming thermal plasmas, as w

  5. High temperature oxidation behavior of ODS steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaito, T.; Narita, T.; Ukai, S.; Matsuda, Y.

    2004-08-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developing for application as advanced fast reactor cladding and fusion blanket materials, in order to allow increased operation temperature. Oxidation testing of ODS steel was conducted under a controlled dry air atmosphere to evaluate the high temperature oxidation behavior. This showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steels have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11 mass% Cr PNC-FMS and 17 mass% Cr ferritic stainless steel. This high temperature resistance is attributed to earlier formation of the protective α-Cr 2O 3 on the outer surface of ODS steels.

  6. Test results of full-scale high temperature superconductors cable models destined for a 36 kV, 2 kA(rms) utility demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daumling, M.; Rasmussen, C.N.; Hansen, F.

    2001-01-01

    Power cable systems using high temperature superconductors (HTS) are nearing technical feasibility. This presentation summarises the advancements and status of a project aimed at demonstrating a 36 kV, 2 kA(rms) AC cable system by installing a 30 m long full-scale functional model in a power...

  7. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the

  8. CFD Analysis for the Steady State Test of CS28-1 Simulating High Temperature Chemical Reactions in CANDU Fuel Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ju Hwan; Kang, Hyung Seok; Rhee, Bo Wook

    2006-05-01

    The establishment of safety analysis system and technology for CANDU reactors has been performed at KAERI. As for one of these researches, single CANDU fuel bundle has been simulated by CATHENA for the post-blowdown event to consider the complicated geometry and heat transfer in the fuel channel. In the previous LBLOCA analysis methodology adopted for Wolsong 2, 3, 4 licensing, the fuel channel blowdown phase was analyzed by a CANDU system analysis code CATHENA and the post-blowdown phase of fuel channel was analyzed by CHAN-IIA code. The use of one computer code in consecutive analyses appeared to be desirable for consistency and simplicity in the safety analysis process. However, validation of the high temperature post-blowdown fuel channel model in the CATHENA before being used in the accident analysis is necessary. Experimental data for the 37-element fuel bundle that fueled CANDU-6 has not been performed. The benchmark problems for the 37-element fuel bundle using CFD code will be compared with the test results of the 28-element fuel bundle in the CS28-1 experiment. A full grid model of FES to the calandria tube simulating the test section was generated. The number of the generated mesh in the grid model was 4,324,340 cells. The boundary and heat source conditions, and properties data in the CFD analysis were given according to the test results and reference data. Thermal hydraulic phenomena in the fuel channel were simulated by a compressible flow, a highly turbulent flow, and a convection/conduction/radiation heat transfer. The natural convection flow of CO 2 due to a large temperature difference in the gap between the pressure and the calandria tubes was treated by Boussinesq's buoyancy model. The CFD results showed good agreement with the test results as a whole. The inner/middle/outer FES temperature distributions of the CFD results showed a small overestimated value of about 30 .deg. C at the entrance region, but good agreement at the outlet region. The

  9. Measurement of gamma ray from fuel of high temperature engineering test reactor. Method of measurement and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nojiri, Naoki; Takada, Eiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-02-01

    To obtain information in the HTTR core directly, gamma ray from fuel blocks was measured when fuel blocks were discharged from the core and reloaded to the core. Gamma ray was measured using GM detector, CZT semiconductor detector installed in a door valve and area monitors installed in a stand pipe compartment. The measurement was carried out for 20 fuel blocks in 4 columns considering the symmetry of uranium enrichment distribution in the core. Relative axial distribution in each column obtained by the GM detector and CZT detector agreed with calculated results. However, calculation values showed higher values than measured values in upper region of the core, lower those in lower region of the core. The axial distributions were also evaluated by the area monitors. The measured values agreed with calculated values. It became clear that it was possible to obtain the data inside the core by this method. (author)

  10. Benchmark Evaluation of Start-Up and Zero-Power Measurements at the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Fujimoto, Nozomu

    2014-01-01

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate six cold-critical and two warm-critical, zero-power measurements of the HTTR. Additional measurements of a fully-loaded subcritical configuration, core excess reactivity, shutdown margins, six isothermal temperature coefficients, and axial reaction-rate distributions were also evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments. Insufficient information is publicly available to develop finely-detailed models of the HTTR as much of the design information is still proprietary. However, the uncertainties in the benchmark models are judged to be of sufficient magnitude to encompass any biases and bias uncertainties incurred through the simplification process used to develop the benchmark models. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the impurity content of the various graphite blocks that comprise the HTTR. Monte Carlo calculations of keff are between approximately 0.9 % and 2.7 % greater than the benchmark values. Reevaluation of the HTTR models as additional information becomes available could improve the quality of this benchmark and possibly reduce the computational biases. High-quality characterization of graphite impurities would significantly improve the quality of the HTTR benchmark assessment. Simulation of the other reactor physics measurements are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

  11. Space Shuttle Main Engine Public Test Firing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A new NASA Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) roars to the approval of more than 2,000 people who came to John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., on July 25 for a flight-certification test of the SSME Block II configuration. The engine, a new and significantly upgraded shuttle engine, was delivered to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for use on future shuttle missions. Spectators were able to experience the 'shake, rattle and roar' of the engine, which ran for 520 seconds - the length of time it takes a shuttle to reach orbit.

  12. PLA recycling by hydrolysis at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristina, Annesini Maria; Rosaria, Augelletti; Sara, Frattari, E-mail: sara.frattari@uniroma1.it; Fausto, Gironi [Department of Chemical Engineering Materials Environment, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Via Eudossiana 18– 00184 Roma (Italy)

    2016-05-18

    In this work the process of PLA hydrolysis at high temperature was studied, in order to evaluate the possibility of chemical recycling of this polymer bio-based. In particular, the possibility to obtain the monomer of lactic acid from PLA degradation was investigated. The results of some preliminary tests, performed in a laboratory batch reactor at high temperature, are presented: the experimental results show that the complete degradation of PLA can be obtained in relatively low reaction times.

  13. Engineering model cryocooler test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skimko, M.A.; Stacy, W.D.; McCormick, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent testing of diaphragm-defined, Stirling-cycle machines and components has demonstrated cooling performance potential, validated the design code, and confirmed several critical operating characteristics. A breadboard cryocooler was rebuilt and tested from cryogenic to near-ambient cold end temperatures. There was a significant increase in capacity at cryogenic temperatures and the performance results compared will with code predictions at all temperatures. Further testing on a breadboard diaphragm compressor validated the calculated requirement for a minimum axial clearance between diaphragms and mating heads

  14. Materials for high-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, San Ping; Lu, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in High-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in high-temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the most important solid oxide fuel cells. A related book will cover key mater

  15. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented.

  16. High Temperature Superconductor Resonator Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) infrared detectors were studied for years but never matured sufficiently for infusion into instruments. Several recent...

  17. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Yan, Xing; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2003-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been designing a Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled reactor) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a high efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) and fossil gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original features of this system are core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 Yen/kWh. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design except PCU design. Also, R and D for developing the power conversion unit is briefly described. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  18. Engineering solutions for a reflector change concept in the high-temperature reactor with pebble bed core and OTTO-fueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, K.J.

    1975-06-01

    In the field of reactor engineering an increasing tendency is visible towards a 'repairable reactor'. In the construction of the HTR with spherical fuel elements this fact should already be taken into account at an early stage. Additionally it is possible that in connection with the OTTO-fueling load conditions for the graphite reflector could result which are locally not far away from limiting values. Therefore the removability of the reflector is included in the reactor construction as an accompanying technical step of the physical lay-out of the core. The core arrangements, realized for HTR until recently, are discussed as well as the properties of the graphites used and the operating conditions in the reactors are stated. At the example of the PR 3,000 proposals are offered for the construction of a removable side and top reflector for a pebble bed reactor. Hereby a solution was found which, on one hand allows the changing of the reflector and on the other hand requires no significant increase of the costs for the reactor assembly. Moreover the requirements of reactor operation and of repairability are satisfied in an optimal manner. (orig.) [de

  19. Modern high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching Wu Chu

    1988-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, its unusual scientific challenge and great technological potential have been recognized. For the past three-quarters of a century, superconductivity has done well on the science front. This is because sueprconductivity is interesting not only just in its own right but also in its ability to act as a probe to many exciting nonsuperconducting phenomena. For instance, it has continued to provide bases for vigorous activities in condensed matter science. Among the more recent examples are heavy-fermion systems and organic superconductors. During this same period of time, superconductivity has also performed admirably in the applied area. Many ideas have been conceived and tested, making use of the unique characteristics of superconductivity - zero resistivity, quantum interference phenomena, and the Meissner effect. In fact, it was not until late January 1987 that it became possible to achieve superconductivity with the mere use of liquid nitrogen - which is plentiful, cheap, efficient, and easy to handle - following the discovery of supercondictivity above 90 K in Y-Ba-Cu-O, the first genuine quaternary superconductor. Superconductivity above 90 K poses scientific and technological challenges not previously encountered: no existing theories can adequately describe superconductivity above 40 K and no known techniques can economically process the materials for full-scale applications. In this paper, therefore, the author recalls a few events leading to the discovery of the new class of quaternary compounds with a superconducting transition temperature T c in the 90 K range, describes the current experimental status of high-temperature superconductivity and, finally, discusses the prospect of very-high-temperature superconductivity, i.e., with a T c substantially higher than 100 K. 97 refs., 7 figs

  20. Synchrotron radiation losses in Engineering Test Reactors (ETRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.

    1987-11-01

    In next-generation Engineering Test Reactors (ETRs), one major objective is envisioned to be a long-pulse or steady-state burn using noninductive current drive. At the high temperatures needed for efficient current drive, synchrotron radiation could represent a large power loss, especially if wall reflectivity (R) is very low. Many INTOR-class ETR designs [Fusion Engineering Reactor (FER), Next European Torus (NET), OTR, Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER), etc.] call for carbon-covered surfaces for which wall reflectivity is uncertain. Global radiation losses are estimated for these devices using empirical expressions given by Trubnikov (and others). Various operating scenarios are evaluated under the assumption that the plasma performance is limited by either the density limit (typical of the ignition phase) or the beta limit (typical of the current drive phase). For a case with ≥90% wall reflectivity, synchrotron radiation is not a significant contribution to the overall energy balance (the ratio of synchrotron to alpha power is less than 10 to 20%, even at ∼ 30 keV) and thus should not adversely alter performance in these devices. In extreme cases with 0% wall reflectivity, the ratio of synchrotron radiation to alpha power may approach 30 to 60% (depending on the device and limiting operating scenario), adversely affecting the performance characteristics. 12 refs., 7 tabs

  1. High temperature incineration. Densification of granules from high temperature incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorde, N. van de; Claes, J.; Taeymans, A.; Hennart, D.; Gijbels, J.; Balleux, W.; Geenen, G.; Vangeel, J.

    1982-01-01

    The incineration system of radioactive waste discussed in this report, is an ''integral'' system, which directly transforms a definite mixture of burnable and unburnable radioactive waste in a final product with a sufficient insolubility to be safely disposed of. At the same time, a significant volume reduction occurs by this treatment. The essential part of the system is a high temperature incinerator. The construction of this oven started in 1974, and while different tests with simulated inactive or very low-level active waste were carried out, the whole system was progressively and continuously extended and adapted, ending finally in an installation with completely remote control, enclosed in an alpha-tight room. In this report, a whole description of the plant and of its auxiliary installations will be given; then the already gained experimental results will be summarized. Finally, the planning for industrial operation will be briefly outlined. An extended test with radioactive waste, which was carried out in March 1981, will be discussed in the appendix

  2. Altitude Testing of Large Liquid Propellant Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Bryon T.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration entered a new age on January 14, 2004 with President Bush s announcement of the creation the Vision for Space Exploration that will take mankind back to the Moon and on beyond to Mars. In January, 2006, after two years of hard, dedicated labor, engineers within NASA and its contractor workforce decided that the J2X rocket, based on the heritage of the Apollo J2 engine, would be the new engine for the NASA Constellation Ares upper stage vehicle. This engine and vehicle combination would provide assured access to the International Space Station to replace that role played by the Space Shuttle and additionally, would serve as the Earth Departure Stage, to push the Crew Excursion Vehicle out of Earth Orbit and head it on a path for rendezvous with the Moon. Test as you fly, fly as you test was chosen to be the guiding philosophy and a pre-requisite for the engine design, development, test and evaluation program. An exhaustive survey of national test facility assets proved the required capability to test the J2X engine at high altitude for long durations did not exist so therefore, a high altitude/near space environment testing capability would have to be developed. After several agency concepts the A3 High Altitude Testing Facility proposal was selected by the J2X engine program on March 2, 2007 and later confirmed by a broad panel of NASA senior leadership in May 2007. This facility is to be built at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center located near Gulfport, Mississippi. 30 plus years of Space Shuttle Main Engine development and flight certification testing makes Stennis uniquely suited to support the Vision For Space Exploration Return to the Moon. Propellant handling infrastructure, engine assembly facilities, a trained and dedicated workforce and a broad and varied technical support base will all ensure that the A3 facility will be built on time to support the schedule needs of the J2X engine and the ultimate flight

  3. Safety philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji Katanishi; Kazuhiko Kunitomi; Shusaku Shiozawa

    2002-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has undertaken the study of an original design concept of gas turbine high temperature reactor, the GTHTR300. The general concept of this study is development of a greatly simplified design that leads to substantially reduced technical and cost requirements. Newly proposed design features enable the GTHTR300 to be an efficient and economically competitive reactor in 2010's. Also, the GTHTR300 fully takes advantage of its inherent safety characteristics. The safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is developed based on the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) of JAERI which is the first HTGR in Japan. Major features of the newly proposed safety philosophy for the GTHTR300 are described in this article. (authors)

  4. FEM Modeling of the Relationship between the High-Temperature Hardness and High-Temperature, Quasi-Static Compression Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Feng; Yan, Lan; Xu, Xipeng

    2017-12-26

    The high-temperature hardness test has a wide range of applications, but lacks test standards. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element method (FEM) model of the relationship between the high-temperature hardness and high-temperature, quasi-static compression experiment, which is a mature test technology with test standards. A high-temperature, quasi-static compression test and a high-temperature hardness test were carried out. The relationship between the high-temperature, quasi-static compression test results and the high-temperature hardness test results was built by the development of a high-temperature indentation finite element (FE) simulation. The simulated and experimental results of high-temperature hardness have been compared, verifying the accuracy of the high-temperature indentation FE simulation.The simulated results show that the high temperature hardness basically does not change with the change of load when the pile-up of material during indentation is ignored. The simulated and experimental results show that the decrease in hardness and thermal softening are consistent. The strain and stress of indentation were analyzed from the simulated contour. It was found that the strain increases with the increase of the test temperature, and the stress decreases with the increase of the test temperature.

  5. FEM Modeling of the Relationship between the High-Temperature Hardness and High-Temperature, Quasi-Static Compression Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The high-temperature hardness test has a wide range of applications, but lacks test standards. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element method (FEM model of the relationship between the high-temperature hardness and high-temperature, quasi-static compression experiment, which is a mature test technology with test standards. A high-temperature, quasi-static compression test and a high-temperature hardness test were carried out. The relationship between the high-temperature, quasi-static compression test results and the high-temperature hardness test results was built by the development of a high-temperature indentation finite element (FE simulation. The simulated and experimental results of high-temperature hardness have been compared, verifying the accuracy of the high-temperature indentation FE simulation.The simulated results show that the high temperature hardness basically does not change with the change of load when the pile-up of material during indentation is ignored. The simulated and experimental results show that the decrease in hardness and thermal softening are consistent. The strain and stress of indentation were analyzed from the simulated contour. It was found that the strain increases with the increase of the test temperature, and the stress decreases with the increase of the test temperature.

  6. High-Temperature Hybrid Rotor Support System Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The Army Research Laboratory Vehicle Technology Directorate and the NASA Glenn Research Center demonstrated a unique high-speed, high-temperature rotor support system in September 2003. Advanced turbomachinery is on its way to surpassing the capabilities of rolling-element bearings and conventional dampers. To meet these demands, gas turbine engines of the future will demand increased efficiency and thrust-to-weight ratio, and reduced specific fuel consumption and noise. The more-electric engine replaces oil-lubricated bearings, dampers, gears, and seals with electrical devices. One such device is the magnetic bearing. The Vehicle Technology Directorate and Glenn have demonstrated the operation of a radial magnetic bearing in combination with a hydrostatic bearing at 1000 F at 31,000 rpm (2.3 MDN1). This unique combination takes advantage of a high-temperature rub surface in the event of electrical power loss or sudden overloads. The hydrostatic bearings allow load sharing with the magnetic bearing. The magnetic-hydrostatic bearing combination eliminates wear and high contact stress from sudden acceleration of the rolling-element bearings and overheating. The magnetic bearing enables high damping, adaptive vibration control, and precise rotor positioning, diagnostics, and health monitoring. A model of the test facility used at Glenn for this technology demonstration is shown. A high-temperature heteropolar radial magnetic bearing is located at the center of gravity of the test rotor. There is a 0.022-in. radial air gap between the rotor and stator. Two rub surface hydrostatic bearings were placed on either side of the magnetic bearing. The rotor is supported by a 0.002-in. hydrostatic air film and the magnetic field. The prototype active magnetic bearing cost $24,000 to design and fabricate and a set of four high temperature, rub-surface, hydrostatic bearings cost $28,000. This work was funded by the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle program.

  7. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Beatty, J.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents selected preliminary results obtained during the first 54 days of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The test described is a precursor to the Engineered Barrier Systems Field Tests (EBSFT). The EBSFT will consist of in situ tests of the geohydrologic and geochemical environment in the near field (within a few meters) of heaters emplaced in welded tuff to simulate the thermal effects of waste packages. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The paper discusses the evolution of hydrothermal behavior during the prototype test, including rock temperatures, changes in rock moisture content, air permeability of fractures, gas pressures, and rock mass gas-phase humidity. 10 refs., 12 figs

  8. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm 2 , 1000 0 C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm 2 , 1200 0 C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370 0 C

  9. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  10. High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, Moises E. [Schlumberger Technology Corporation, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop a perforating system consisting of all the explosive components and hardware, capable of reliable performance in high temperatures geothermal wells (>200 ºC). In this light we will focused on engineering development of these components, characterization of the explosive raw powder and developing the internal infrastructure to increase the production of the explosive from laboratory scale to industrial scale.

  11. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  12. 1981 Annual status report. High-temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The high temperature materials programme is executed at the JRC, Petten Establishment and has for the 1980/83 programme period the objective to promote within the European Community the development of high temperature materials required for future energy technologies. A range of engineering studies is being carried out. A data bank storing factual data on alloys for high temperature applications is being developed and has reached the operational phase

  13. 1982 Annual status report: high-temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Voorde, M.

    1983-01-01

    The High Temperature Materials Programme is executed at the JRC, Petten Establishment and has for the 1980/83 programme period the objective to promote within the European Community the development of high temperature materials required for future energy technologies. Materials and engineering studies include: corrosion with or without load, mechanical properties under static or dynamic loads, surface protection creep of tubular components in corrosive environments and high temperature materials data bank

  14. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lybeck, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: (1) Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing - 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. (2) Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram - 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

  15. Structural behavior of reinforced concrete structures at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, N.; Yamazaki, M.; Mochida, T.; Mutoh, A.; Miyashita, T.; Ueda, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Sugiyama, K.; Hirakawa, K.; Kikuchi, R.; Hiramoto, M.; Saito, K.

    1995-01-01

    To establish a method to predict the behavior of reinforced concrete structures subjected simultaneously to high temperatures and external loads, this paper presents the results obtained in several series of tests carried out recently in Japan. This paper reports on the material properties of concrete and steel bars under high temperatures. It also considers the heat transfer properties of thick concrete walls under transient high temperatures, and the structural behavior of reinforced concrete beams subjected to high temperatures. In the tests, data up to 800 C were obtained for use in developing a computational method to estimate the non-linear behavior of reinforced concrete structures exposed to high temperatures. (orig.)

  16. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and

  17. High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The six user centers in the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML), a DOE User Facility, are dedicated to solving materials problems that limit the efficiency...

  18. High-Temperature Surface-Acoustic-Wave Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft-engine rotating equipment usually operates at high temperature and stress. Non-invasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for the non-destructive evaluation community. A low-profile ultrasonic guided wave sensor can detect cracks in situ. The key feature of the sensor is that it should withstand high temperatures and excite strong surface wave energy to inspect surface/subsurface cracks. As far as the innovators know at the time of this reporting, there is no existing sensor that is mounted to the rotor disks for crack inspection; the most often used technology includes fluorescent penetrant inspection or eddy-current probes for disassembled part inspection. An efficient, high-temperature, low-profile surface acoustic wave transducer design has been identified and tested for nondestructive evaluation of structures or materials. The development is a Sol-Gel bismuth titanate-based surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that can generate efficient surface acoustic waves for crack inspection. The produced sensor is very thin (submillimeter), and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. One major uniqueness of the Sol-Gel bismuth titanate SAW sensor is that it is easy to implement to structures of various shapes. With a spray coating process, the sensor can be applied to surfaces of large curvatures. Second, the sensor is very thin (as a coating) and has very minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance. Third, it can withstand temperatures up to 530 C, which is very useful for engine applications where high temperature is an issue.

  19. Sulfidation/regeneration Multi-cyclic Testing of Fe2O3/Al2O3 Sorbents for the High-temperature Removal of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Su, Y.-M.; Huang, C.-Y.; Chyou, Y.-P.; Svoboda, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 74, MAY (2017), s. 89-95 ISSN 1876-1070 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC14-09692J Grant - others:MOST(TW) 103-2923-E-042A-001-MY3; MOST(TW) 102WBS0300011 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : desulfurization * hydrogen sulfide * solid sorbent Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 4.217, year: 2016

  20. High-voltage engineering and testing

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Hugh M

    2013-01-01

    This 3rd edition of High Voltage Engineering Testing describes strategic developments in the field and reflects on how they can best be managed. All the key components of high voltage and distribution systems are covered including electric power networks, UHV and HV. Distribution systems including HVDC and power electronic systems are also considered.

  1. Development of high temperature property database for Alloy 800H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Norio; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Hajime.

    1993-07-01

    JAERI Material Performance Database (JMPD) has been developed since 1989 in JAERI with a view to utilizing the various kinds of characteristic data of nuclear materials efficiently. Using relational database management system, PLANNER on the mainframe, the JMPD provides the retrieval supporting system, graphic and statistical analyses system. The data obtained with 7868 sets on characteristic data of metallic materials including fatigue crack growth data, etc. have been stored in the JMPD at the end of March in 1993. A ferritic superalloy, Alloy 800H is used for the structural material of the control rods of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Thermal stress generates which might cause a severe creep damage at a reactor scram. It therefore needs to be designed with consideration on the fracture modes induced by creep deformation after neutron irradiation. The creep data (approximately 240 sets) and tensile data (approximately 100 sets) of Alloy 800H including the effects of test environment, aging treatment and neutron irradiation have been stored in the JMPD. Furthermore, using a personal computer, high temperature property database for Alloy 800H has been developed. The present report outlines the development of high temperature property database for Alloy 800H. (author)

  2. Conceptual studies of plasma engineering test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Toru; Tazima, Teruhiko; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Kasai, Masao; Shinya, Kichiro

    1979-04-01

    Conceptual studies have been made of a Plasma Engineering Test Facility, which is to be constructed following JT-60 prior to the experimental power reactor. The physical aim of this machine is to examine self-ignition conditions. This machine possesses all essential technologies for reactor plasma, i.e. superconducting magnet, remote maintenance, shielding, blanket test modules, tritium handling. Emphasis in the conceptual studies was on structural consistency of the machine and whether the machine would be constructed practically. (author)

  3. Doublet III construction and engineering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Progress during FY-78 on the construction and operation of the Doublet III is reported. Detailed discussions about the installation and testing of various components and subsystems, including the B-coil, E-coil, F-coils and support structure, vacuum vessel, vacuum pumping system, limiter, thermal insulation blanket, control system, B-coil power system, E-coil power system, F-coil power system, and motor-generator, are presented. A brief review of the engineering test operation is given

  4. Application of new design methodologies to very high-temperature metallic components of the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Kazuhiko; Ohkubo, Minoru; Baba, Osamu

    1991-01-01

    The high-temperature piping and helium-to-helium intermediate heat exchanger of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) are designed to be operating at very high temperatures of about 900deg C among the class 1 components of the HTTR. At such a high temperature, mechanical strength of heat-resistant metallic materials is very low and thermal expansions of structural members are large. Therefore, innovative design methodologies are needed to reduce both mechanical and thermal loads acting on these components. To the HTTR, the design methodologies which can separate the heat-resistant function from the pressure-retaining functions and allow them to expand freely are applied to reduce pressure and thermal loads. Since these design methodologies need to verify their applicability, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been performing many design and research works on their verifications. The details of the design methodologies and their verifications are given in this paper. (orig.)

  5. Sandia_HighTemperatureComponentEvaluation_2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashion, Avery T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform independent evaluation of high temperature components to determine their suitability for use in high temperature geothermal tools. Development of high temperature components has been increasing rapidly due to demand from the high temperature oil and gas exploration and aerospace industries. Many of these new components are at the late prototype or first production stage of development and could benefit from third party evaluation of functionality and lifetime at elevated temperatures. In addition to independent testing of new components, this project recognizes that there is a paucity of commercial-off-the-shelf COTS components rated for geothermal temperatures. As such, high-temperature circuit designers often must dedicate considerable time and resources to determine if a component exists that they may be able to knead performance out of to meet their requirements. This project aids tool developers by characterization of select COTS component performances beyond published temperature specifications. The process for selecting components includes public announcements of project intent (e.g., FedBizOps), direct discussions with candidate manufacturers,and coordination with other DOE funded programs.

  6. Engineering Abstractions in Model Checking and Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achenbach, Michael; Ostermann, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstractions are used in model checking to tackle problems like state space explosion or modeling of IO. The application of these abstractions in real software development processes, however, lacks engineering support. This is one reason why model checking is not widely used in practice yet...... and testing is still state of the art in falsification. We show how user-defined abstractions can be integrated into a Java PathFinder setting with tools like AspectJ or Javassist and discuss implications of remaining weaknesses of these tools. We believe that a principled engineering approach to designing...... and implementing abstractions will improve the applicability of model checking in practice....

  7. An investigation of methods for neutron dose measurement in high temperature irradiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosako, Toshisou; Sugiura, Nobuyuki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Kudo, Kazuhiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    2000-10-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been conducting the innovative basic research on high temperature since 1994, which is a series of high temperature irradiation studies using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). 'The Task Group for Evaluation of Irradiation Dose under High Temperature Radiation' was founded in the HTTR Utilization Research Committee, which is the promoting body of the innovative basic research. The present report is a summary of investigation which has been made by the Task Group on the present status and subjects of research and development of neutron detectors in high temperature irradiation fields, in view of contributing to high temperature irradiation research using the HTTR. Detectors investigated here in the domestic survey are the following five kinds of in-core detectors: 1) small fission counter, 2) small fission chamber, 3) self-powered detector, 4) activation detector, and 5) optical fiber. In addition, the research and development status in Russia has been investigated. The present report will also be useful as nuclear instrumentation of high temperature gas-cooled reactors. (author)

  8. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  9. RANS simulation of the thermal mixing in HTTF LP during normal operation conditions – High Temperature Test Facility at Oregon State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradecka, Malwina J.; Woods, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Since High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors are being considered as the most promising design of upcoming IV Gen reactors, key research areas were identified to address safety aspects of this design. A number of simulations and experiments need to be conducted in this field. In this paper, thermal-hydraulics aspects of coolant flow through Lower Plenum (LP) of HTGR were considered, specifically flow characteristics to identify the risk of temperature stratification in LP and hot spotting on LP floor. Local temperature gradients can cause material degradation. As the power profile is non-uniform across the core, jets of coolant exit the core region at different temperatures and enter the LP impinging on LP floor causing hot spots at LP structure and temperature stratification. To address those issues numerical simulation and an experiment are being developed. The numerical simulation provides coolant flow velocity and temperature fields. The purpose of this study is to investigate the mixing phenomenon in the LP due to risk of the hot streaking and thermal stratification phenomena during normal operation of HTTF. The following aspect are being examined: identification of gas flow behavior in lower plenum of HTTF based on CFD simulations, identification of hot streaking issue in the HTTF lower plenum using CFD tools, and computational investigation of gas mixing efficiency. This paper includes a description of experimental setup of HTTF, guidance for LP CFD modeling, and the results and analysis of CFD simulation. (author)

  10. AJ26 rocket engine testing news briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (center) stands in front of a 'pathfinder' rocket engine with Orbital Sciences Corp. President and Chief Operating Officer J.R. Thompson (left) and Aerojet President Scott Seymour during a Feb. 24 news briefing at the south Mississippi facility. The leaders appeared together to announce a partnership for testing Aerojet AJ26 rocket engines at Stennis. The engines will be used to power Orbital's Taurus II space vehicles to provide commercial cargo transportation missions to the International Space Station for NASA. During the event, the Stennis partnership with Orbital was cited as an example of the new direction of NASA to work with commercial interests for space travel and transport.

  11. Development and test of a Stirling engine driven by waste gases for the micro-CHP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tie; Tang Dawei; Li Zhigang; Du Jinglong; Zhou Tian; Jia Yu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, micro-CHP systems are attracting world attention. As one kind of external heating engines, Stirling engines could be applied to the micro-CHP systems driven by solar, biogas, mid-high temperature waste gases and many other heat sources. The development of a Stirling engine driven by mid-high temperature waste gases is presented first. The thermodynamic design method, the key parameters of the designed Stirling engine and its combustion chamber adapted for waste gases are described in detail. Then the performance test of the Stirling engine is carried out. During the test, the temperature of the heater head is monitored by thermocouples, and the pressure of the working fluid helium in the Stirling engine is monitored by pressure sensors. The relationships among the output shaft power, torque and speed are studied, and the pressure losses of the working fluid in the heat exchanger system are also analyzed. The test results demonstrate that the output shaft power could reach 3476 W at 1248 RPM, which is in good agreement with the predicted value of 3901 W at 1500 RPM. The test results confirm the fact that Stirling engines driven by mid-high temperature waste gases are able to achieve a valuable output power for engineering application. - Highlights: ► A β-type Stirling engine whose output power could reach about 3.5 kW is developed by ourselves. ► Waste gases are used as the heat source to drive the Stirling engine. ► Test on the relationship among the power, torque, and speed are presented. ► The pressure changing process of the working fluid in the heat exchanger system during the test is recorded and analyzed.

  12. High Temperature Fiberoptic Thermal Imaging System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase 1 program will fabricate and demonstrate a small diameter single fiber endoscope that can perform high temperature thermal imaging in a jet engine...

  13. Quality engineering in FFTF irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplinger, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    The design and fabrication of an irradiation test for the Fast Flux Test Facility are planned, controlled and documented in accordance with the Department of Energy standards. Tests built by Westinghouse Hanford Company are further controlled and guided by a series of increasingly specific documents, including guidelines for program control, procedures for engineering operations, standard practices and detailed operating procedures. In response to this guidance, a series of five documents is prepared covering each step of the experiment from conception through fabrication and assembly. This paper describes the quality assurance accompanying these five steps

  14. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90... Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and II engines and 2-mode test cycle for Class I-A, III, IV, and V engines when testing spark-ignition engines...

  15. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 μm) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  16. High temperature testing - a contribution to alloy development, alloy qualification and simulation of component Loading; Hochtemperaturpruefung - Ein Beitrag zur Werkstoffentwicklung und -qualifizierung sowie Simulation der Bauteilbeanspruchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, A.; Schwienheer, M.; Mueller, F.; Linn, S.; Schein, M.; Walther, C.; Berger, C. [Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde der TU-Darmstadt, Grafenstrasse 2, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    In parallel to continued developments of steam and gas turbines as well as traffic engineering machines on the one hand, and marginal conditions like low specific fuel consumption and sufficient environment-friendliness on the other hand, the aim of improving the degree of efficiency by augmenting process parameters such as temperature and pressure is being followed. These efforts impact especially components of thermic machines and facilities subject to high thermal and mechanic exposure. Still largely unexplored is the interaction between microstructure characteristics determined through chemical composition, production processes and heat treatment, changes in the microstructure due to multiaxial load and the time-dependent deformation and stability resulting hereof. With regard to this background, improved methods of material properties determination, their modelling and transfer on the component enable to optimize wall thicknesses and degrees of efficiency. In the course of evaluation of static and cyclic material properties carried out also on faulty specimens, uncertainties occur which can originate from the testing process and analysis, as well as being influenced by the material itself and its process of production. Altogether, the demand for reliable determination of material properties and methods of scatterband treatment and their mathematical-statistical evaluation is in business. For simulation, consistent material datasets that describe the complex interaction between temperature, period of exposure and type of exposure are needed. Summarizing, the tasks dealt with qualify the entire process from production to the operational behaviour of components. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Parallel zur fortlaufenden Weiterentwicklung von Dampf- und Gasturbinen sowie Maschinen der Verkehrstechnik einerseits und Randbedingungen wie niedrigem spezifischen Brennstoffverbrauch und hinreichender Umweltvertraeglichkeit andererseits wird

  17. Highly efficient high temperature electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Ebbesen, Sune; Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    2008-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of water and steam may provide an efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly production of H-2 Using electricity produced from sustainable, non-fossil energy sources. To achieve cost competitive electrolysis cells that are both high performing i.e. minimum...... internal resistance of the cell, and long-term stable, it is critical to develop electrode materials that are optimal for steam electrolysis. In this article electrolysis cells for electrolysis of water or steam at temperatures above 200 degrees C for production of H-2 are reviewed. High temperature...... electrolysis is favourable from a thermodynamic point of view, because a part of the required energy can be supplied as thermal heat, and the activation barrier is lowered increasing the H-2 production rate. Only two types of cells operating at high temperature (above 200 degrees C) have been described...

  18. High-temperature metallography setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, M.; Shmarjahu, D.; Elfassy, S.

    1979-06-01

    A high-temperature metallography setup is presented. In this setup the observation of processes such as that of copper recrystallization was made possible, and the structure of metals such as uranium could be revealed. A brief historical review of part of the research works that have been done with the help of high temperature metallographical observation technique since the beginning of this century is included. Detailed description of metallographical specimen preparation technique and theoretical criteria based on the rate of evaporation of materials present on the polished surface of the specimens are given

  19. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Wate

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  20. High-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics

  1. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  2. High temperature electronic gain device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.B.; Depp, S.W.; Hamilton, D.J.; Kerwin, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments is described. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube

  3. Containment of high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, R.W.; Ferguson, H.R.P.; Fletcher, H. Jr.; Gardner, J.; Harrison, B.K.; Larsen, K.M.

    1973-01-01

    Apparatus is described for confining a high temperature plasma which comprises: 1) envelope means shaped to form a toroidal hollow chamber containing a plasma, 2) magnetic field line generating means for confining the plasma in a smooth toroidal shape without cusps. (R.L.)

  4. Chemistry of high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    This review volume contains the most up-to-date articles on the chemical aspects of high temperature oxide superconductors. These articles are written by some of the leading scientists in the field and includes a comprehensive list of references. This is an essential volume for researchers working in the fields of ceramics, materials science and chemistry.

  5. Properties of high temperature SQUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falco, C.M.; Wu, C.T.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the present status of weak links and dc and rf biased SQUIDs made with high temperature superconductors. A method for producing reliable, reproducible devices using Nb 3 Sn is outlined, and comments are made on directions future work should take

  6. High temperature component life assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, G A

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book is to investigate and explain the rapid advances in the characterization of high temperature crack growth behaviour which have been made in recent years, with reference to industrial applications. Complicated mathematics has been minimized with the emphasis placed instead on finding solutions using simplified procedures without the need for complex numerical analysis.

  7. Technology development for high temperature logging tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F.; Coquat, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A set of prototype, high temperature logging tools (temperature, pressure and flow) were tested successfully to temperatures up to 275/sup 0/C in a Union geothermal well during November 1978 as part of the Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program. This program is being conducted by Sandia Laboratories for the Department of Energy's Division of Geothermal Energy. The progress and plans of this industry based program to develop and apply the high temperature instrumentation technology needed to make reliable geothermal borehole measurements are described. Specifically, this program is upgrading existing sondes for improved high temperature performance, as well as applying new materials (elastomers, polymers, metals and ceramics) and developing component technology such as high temperature cables, cableheads and electronics to make borehole measurements such as formation temperature, flow rate, high resolution pressure and fracture mapping. In order to satisfy critical existing needs, the near term goal is for operation up to 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi by the end of FY80. The long term goal is for operation up to 350/sup 0/C and 20,000 psi by the end of FY84.

  8. Effects of high temperature ECC injection on small and large break BWR LOCA simulation tests in ROSA-III program (RUNs 940 and 941)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hideo; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Anoda, Yoshinari; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Murata, Hideo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1990-03-01

    The ROSA-III program, of which principal results are summarized in a report of JAERI 1307, conducted small and large-break loss-of-coolant experiments (RUNs 940 and 941) with high water temperature of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) are one of the parametric study with respect to the ECCS effect on core cooling. This report presents all the experiment results of these two tests and describes additional finding with respect to the hot ECC effects on core cooling phenomena. By comparing these two tests (water temperature of 393 K) with the standard ECC tests of RUNs 922 and 926 (water temperature of 313 K), it was found that the ECC subcooling variation had a small influence on the core cooling phenomena in 5 % small break tests but had larger influence on them in 200 % break tests. The ECC subcooling effects described in the previous report are reviewed and the temperature distribution in the pressure vessel is investigated for these four tests. (author)

  9. The conversion of a room temperature NaK loop to a high temperature MHD facility for Li/V blanket testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, C.B.; Haglund, R.C.; Miller, M.E.; Nasiatka, J.R.; Kirillov, I.R.; Ogorodnikov, A.P.; Preslitski, G.V.; Goloubovitch, G.P.; Xu, Zeng Yu

    1996-01-01

    The Vanadium/Lithium system has been the recent focus of ANL's Blanket Technology Pro-ram, and for the last several years, ANL's Liquid Metal Blanket activities have been carried out in direct support of the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) breeding blanket task area. A key feasibility issue for the ITER Vanadium/Lithium breeding blanket is the Near the development of insulator coatings. Design calculations, Hua and Gohar, show that an electrically insulating layer is necessary to maintain an acceptably low magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the current ITER design. Consequently, the decision was made to convert Argonne's Liquid Metal EXperiment (ALEX) from a 200 degrees C NaK facility to a 350 degrees C lithium facility. The upgraded facility was designed to produce MHD pressure drop data, test section voltage distributions, and heat transfer data for mid-scale test sections and blanket mockups at Hartmann numbers (M) and interaction parameters (N) in the range of 10 3 to 10 5 in lithium at 350 degrees C. Following completion of the upgrade work, a short performance test was conducted, followed by two longer multiple-hour, MHD tests, all at 230 degrees C. The modified ALEX facility performed up to expectations in the testing. MHD pressure drop and test section voltage distributions were collected at Hartmann numbers of 1000

  10. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89... Procedures § 89.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Emissions shall be measured using one of the test cycles specified...) through (a)(4) of this section. These cycles shall be used to test engines on a dynamometer. (1) The 8...

  11. Development of high temperature turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Kitao; Nouse, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Toyoaki; Minoda, Mitsuhiro; Matsusue, Katsutoshi; Yanagi, Ryoji

    1988-07-01

    For the contribution to the development of FJR710, high by-pass ratio turbofan engine, with the study for many years of the development of high efficiency turbine for the jet engine, the first technical prize from the Energy Resource Research Committee was awarded in April, 1988. This report introduced its technical contents. In order to improve the thermal efficiency and enlarge the output, it is very effective to raise the gas temperature at the inlet of gas turbine. For its purpose, by cooling the nozzle and moving blades and having those blades operate at lower temperature than that of the working limitation, they realized, for the first time in Japan, the technique of cooling turbine to heighten the operational gas temperature. By that technique, it was enabled to raise the gas temperature at the inlet of turbine, to 1,350/sup 0/C from 850/sup 0/C. This report explain many important points of study covering the basic test, visualizing flow experiment, material discussion and structural design in the process of development. (9 figs)

  12. 40 CFR 1065.405 - Test engine preparation and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... has undergone a stabilization step (or in-use operation). If the engine has not already been... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test engine preparation and...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065...

  13. Irradiation test HT-31: high-temperature irradiation behavior of LASL-made extruded fuel rods and LASL-made coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.; Reiswig, R.D.; Hollabaugh, C.M.; White, R.W.; Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1977-04-01

    Three LASL-made extruded graphite and coated particle fuel rods have been irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Fluence Isotope Reactor test HT-31. Test conditions were about 9 x 10 21 nvt(E > .18 MeV) at 1250 0 C. The graphite matrix showed little or no effect of the irradiation. LASL-made ZrC containing coated particles with ZrC coats and ZrC-doped pyrolytic carbon coats showed no observable effects of the irradiation

  14. High Temperature Operational Experiences of Helium Experimental Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Soo; Hong, Sung-Deok; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Min Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The development of high temperature components of VHTR is very important because of its higher operation temperature than that of a common light water reactor and high pressure industrial process. The development of high temperature components requires the large helium loop. Many countries have high temperature helium loops or a plan for its construction. Table 1 shows various international state-of-the-art of high temperature and high pressure gas loops. HELP performance test results show that there is no problem in operation of HELP at the very high temperature experimental condition. These experimental results also provide the basic information for very high temperature operation with bench-scale intermediate heat exchanger prototype in HELP. In the future, various heat exchanger tests will give us the experimental data for GAMMA+ validation about transient T/H behavior of the IHX prototype and the optimization of the working fluid in the intermediate loop

  15. Ceramics for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocellin, A.

    1977-01-01

    Problems related to materials, their fabrication, properties, handling, improvements are examined. Silicium nitride and silicium carbide are obtained by vacuum hot-pressing, reaction sintering and chemical vapour deposition. Micrographs are shown. Mechanical properties i.e. room and high temperature strength, creep resistance fracture mechanics and fatigue resistance. Recent developments of pressureless sintered Si C and the Si-Al-O-N quaternary system are mentioned

  16. High-temperature geothermal cableheads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquat, J. A.; Eifert, R. W.

    1981-11-01

    Two high temperature, corrosion resistant logging cable heads which use metal seals and a stable fluid to achieve proper electrical terminations and cable sonde interfacings are described. A tensile bar provides a calibrated yield point, and a cone assembly anchors the cable armor to the head. Electrical problems of the sort generally ascribable to the cable sonde interface were absent during demonstration hostile environment loggings in which these cable heads were used.

  17. High temperature fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.; dePaz, J.F.; Gohar, M.Y.; Stevens, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Fusion energy may have unique advantages over other systems as a source for high temperature process heat. A conceptual design of a blanket for a 7 m tokamak reactor has been developed that is capable of producing 1100 0 C process heat at a pressure of approximately 10 atmospheres. The design is based on the use of a falling bed of MgO spheres as the high temperature heat transfer system. By preheating the spheres with energy taken from the low temperature tritium breeding part of the blanket, 1086 MW of energy can be generated at 1100 0 C from a system that produces 3000 MW of total energy while sustaining a tritium breeding ratio of 1.07. The tritium breeding is accomplished using Li 2 O modules both in front of (6 cm thick) and behind (50 cm thick) the high temperature ducts. Steam is used as the first wall and front tritium breeding module coolant while helium is used in the rear tritium breeding region. The system produces 600 MW of net electricity for use on the grid

  18. Radionuclides release from re-irradiated fuel under high temperature and pressure conditions. Gamma-ray measurements of VEGA-5 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kanazawa, Toru; Kiuchi, Toshio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to clarify mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents and to improve source term predictability. The fifth VEGA-5 test was conducted in January 2002 to confirm the reproducibility of decrease in cesium release under elevated pressure that was observed in the VEGA-2 test and to investigate the release behavior of short-life radionuclides. The PWR fuel of 47 GWd/tU after about 8.2 years of cooling was re-irradiated at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) for 8 hours before the heat-up test. After that, the two pellets of 10.9 g without cladding were heated up to about 2,900 K at 1.0 MPa under the inert He condition. The experiment reconfirmed the decrease in cesium release rate under the elevated pressure. The release data on short-life radionuclides such as Ru-103, Ba-140 and Xe-133 that have never been observed in the previous VEGA tests without re-irradiation was obtained using the {gamma} ray measurement. (author)

  19. Features, present condition of development and future scope on the high temperature gas reactor as an innovative one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Shusaku

    2001-01-01

    The high temperature gas reactor has some features without previous reactors such as high temperature capable of taking-out, high specific safety, feasibility adaptable to versatile fuel cycle, and so on. Then, it is expected to be an innovative reactor to contribute to diversification of energy supply and expansion of energy application field. In Japan, under the HTTR (high temperature engineering test reactor) plan, construction of HTTR, which is the first high temperature gas reactor in Japan, was finished and its output upgrading test has been promoted. And, on the HTTR plan, together with promotion of full power operation, reactor performance tests, safety proof test, and so on, it is planned to carry out study on application of the high temperature heat such as hydrogen production and so on to aim to practise establishment and upgrading of technologies on high temperature gas reactor in Japan. Here were introduced features and present condition of development of the high temperature gas reactor as an innovative type reactor and described role and future scope in Japan. (G.K.)

  20. Analysis and description of high temperature alloy data and their representation in the high temperature materials data bank of the Joint Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krefeld, R.; Kroeckel, H.; Fattori, G.; Maurandy, C.

    1985-01-01

    In the frame of the high temperature materials programme the JRC has set up a pilot data bank for mechanical and corrosion properties of materials for high temperature application in energy conversion and chemical systems. The scope of the data bank content embraces mechanical properties and corrosion tests with emphasis on 600 to 1000 0 C test temperature and C-O-H type test environments. The basic information on materials properties obtained by test is analysed and the data items and their structure are described. The logical structure of the 250 data items involved and their organization in the data bank by file and record using ADABAS dbms is presented. The design is discussed with respect to its adaptability to changes in the scope of data content and to its versatile data access resulting in easy handling of complex structured queries which represent the interest of materials scientists and engineers as well as those of non-specialist users. (orig.)

  1. Development and high temperature sealing performance study of double sealing flange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qinhua; Fu Yuan; Xie Leidong; Li Zhong; Tang Zhongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Background: Flange is an important component used in the connection between pipes or between pipe and equipment. It is widely used in mechanical industry, petrochemical industry and nuclear industry. Ordinary flange could be oxidized oi corroded under high temperature and strong corrosion condition, which leads to flange's failure. Purpose: The aim is to design and validate the double sealing flange which could be used in high temperature and strong corrosion condition stably and supplied as a reliable detachable connection for petrochemical industry and nuclear industry under high temperature and strong corrosion environment. Methods: New flange is designed using flexible graphite spiral wound gaskets and C style metal ring double sealing structure. The unique protection gas design ensures the graphite spiral wound gasket used in high temperature reliably. Test bed is built to verify the stability of the flange. Results: Pressure reducing of graphite spiral wound gasket is only 0.01 MPa at 750℃, 0.7 MPa for 43 h, there is not obvious oxidation phenomenon at the same time. The leakage rate of metal C sealing ring is 11.51×10 -4 atm cc/s, and the metal C ring sealing's performance meets the engineering requirements. Conclusion: The leakage rate of double sealing flange is almost zero under 0.7 MPa at 750℃, which meets the engineering requirements. It avoids oxidizing at high temperature and corroding under strong corrosion condition. (authors)

  2. Irradiation test OF-2: high-temperature irradiation behavior of LASL-made fuel rods and LASL-made coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.; Reiswig, R.D.; Hollabaugh, C.M.; White, R.W.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1977-10-01

    Three LASL-made, substoichiometric ZrC-coated particles with inert kernels, and two high-density molded graphite fuel rods that contained LASL-made, ZrC-coated fissile particles were irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor test OF-2. The severest test conditions were 8.36 x 10 21 nvt (E greater than 0.18 MeV) at 1350 0 C. The graphite matrix showed no effect of the irradiation. There was no interaction between the matrix and any of the particle coats. The loose ZrC coated particles with inert kernels showed no irradiation effects. The graded ZrC-C coats on the fissile particles were cracked. It is postulated that the cracking is associated with the low LTI deposition rate and is not related to the ZrC

  3. Determination of necking time in tensile test specimens, under high-temperature creep conditions, subjected to distribution of stresses over the cross-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokoshchenko, A.; Teraud, W.

    2018-04-01

    The work describes an experimental research of creep of cylindrical tensile test specimens made of aluminum alloy D16T at a constant temperature of 400°C. The issue to be examined was the necking at different values of initial tensile stresses. The use of a developed noncontacting measuring system allowed us to see variations in the specimen shape and to estimate the true stress in various times. Based on the obtained experimental data, several criteria were proposed for describing the point of time at which the necking occurs (necking point). Calculations were carried out at various values of the parameters in these criteria. The relative interval of deformation time in which the test specimen is uniformly stretched was also determined.

  4. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, M.B.; Takahashi, Y.; Ainsworth, R.A.

    1989-08-01

    The current program represents a joint effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the USA, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan, and the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) in the UK. The goal is to develop an interim high-temperature flaw assessment procedure for high-temperature reactor components. This is to be accomplished through exploratory experimental and analytical studies of high-temperature crack growth. The state-of-the-art assessment and the fracture mechanics database for both types 304 and 316 stainless steels, completed in 1988, serve as a foundation for the present work. Work in the three participating organizations is progressing roughly on schedule. Results to-date are presented in this document. Fundamental tests results are discussed in Section 2. Section 3 focuses on results of exploratory subcritical crack growth tests. Progress in subcritical crack growth modeling is reported in Section 4. Exploratory failure tests are outlined in Section 5. 21 refs., 70 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Influence of High Temperature Treatment on Mechanical Behavior of a Coarse-grained Marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, G.; Peng, J.; Jiang, M.

    2017-12-01

    High temperature has a significant influence on the physical and mechanical behavior of rocks. With increasing geotechnical engineering structures concerning with high temperature problems such as boreholes for oil or gas production, underground caverns for storage of radioactive waste, and deep wells for injection of carbon dioxides, etc., it is important to study the influence of temperature on the physical and mechanical properties of rocks. This paper experimentally investigates the triaxial compressive properties of a coarse-grained marble after exposure to different high temperatures. The rock specimens were first heated to a predetermined temperature (200, 400, and 600 oC) and then cooled down to room temperature. Triaxial compression tests on these heat-treated specimens subjected to different confining pressures (i.e., 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 MPa) were then conducted. Triaxial compression tests on rock specimens with no heat treatment were also conducted for comparison. The results show that the high temperature treatment has a significant influence on the microstructure, porosity, P-wave velocity, stress-strain relation, strength and deformation parameters, and failure mode of the tested rock. As the treatment temperature gradually increases, the porosity slightly increases and the P-wave velocity dramatically decreases. Microscopic observation on thin sections reveals that many micro-cracks will be generated inside the rock specimen after high temperature treatment. The rock strength and Young's modulus show a decreasing trend with increase of the treatment temperature. The ductility of the rock is generally enhanced as the treatment temperature increases. In general, the high temperature treatment weakens the performance of the tested rock. Finally, a degradation parameter is defined and a strength degradation model is proposed to characterize the strength behavior of heat-treated rocks. The results in this study provide useful data for

  6. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700 °C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haboub, Abdel; Nasiatka, James R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300 °C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750 °C

  7. Testing of improved polyimide actuator rod seals at high temperature and under vacuum conditions for use in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellereite, B. K.; Waterman, A. W.; Nelson, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Polyimide second-stage rod seals were evaluated to determine their suitability for applications in space station environments. The 6.35-cm (2.5-in.)K-section seal was verified for thermal cycling operation between room temperature and 478 K (400 F) and for operation in a 133 micron PA(0.000001 mm Hg) vacuum environment. The test seal completed the scheduled 96 thermal cycles and 1438 hr in vacuum with external rod seal leakage well within the maximum allowable of two drops per 25 actuation cycles. At program completion, the seals showed no signs of structural degradation. Posttest inspection showed the seals retained a snug fit against the shaft and housing walls, indicating additional wear life capability. Evaluation of a molecular flow section during vacuum testing, to inhibit fluid loss through vaporization, showed it to be beneficial with MIL-H-5606, a petroleum-base fluid, in comparison with MIL-H-83282, a synthetic hydrocarbon-base fluid.

  8. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine test cycle. (a) The 5-mode cycle specified in Table 2 in appendix A to this subpart shall be followed...

  9. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.

    2011-01-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B and PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface 2 shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN 2 cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  10. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

    1991-08-01

    This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT

  11. Improvement in the technology of thermocouples for the detection of high temperatures with a view to using them in irradiation safety tests in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schley, R.; Liermann, J.; Aujollet, J.M.; Wilkins, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    The safety tests carried out under the CABRI and PHEBUS programmes have made it possible to improve the technology of W/Re thermocouples and their reliability in particularly hard operating conditions. An element of response is provided to the problem of W/Re thermocouple drift under neutron flux by defining the new thermocouple Mo 5% Nb/Nb 10% Mo which, because of the low capture cross section of thermoelectric elements, gives one reason to hope for a less significant drift of these thermocouples under neutron flux than that found with W/Re thermocouples. Finally, determining the surface temperature of fuel element cladding with the Mo/Zircaloy thermocouple may prove worthwhile providing the temperatures do not exceed 1300 0 C and the electric insulator is aluminium oxide which up to 1300 0 C does not appear to react with thermoelectric wires [fr

  12. HTGR fuel behavior at very high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimura, Satoru; Ogawa, Touru; Fukuda, Kousaku; Iwamoto, Kazumi

    1986-03-01

    Fuel behavior at very high temperature simulating abnormal transient of the reactor operation and accidents have been investigated on TRISO coating LEU oxide particle fuels at JAERI. The test simulating the abnormal transient was carried out by irradiation of loose coated particles above 1600 deg C. The irradiation test indicated that particle failure was principally caused by kernel migration. For simulation of the core heat-up accident, two experiments of out-of-pile heating were made. Survival temperature limits were measured and fuel performance at very high temperature were investigated by the heatings. Study on the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident was made by NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) pulse irradiation, where maximum temperature was higher than 2800 deg C. It was found in the pulse irradiation experiments that the coated particles incorporated in the compacts did not so severely fail unlike the loose coated particles at ultra high temperature above 2800 deg C. In the former particles UO 2 material at the center of the kernel vaporized, leaving a spherical void. (author)

  13. Deformation of high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.; Miller, D.J.; Chen, N.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Jimenez-Melendo, M.; De Arellano-Lopez, A.R.

    1994-08-01

    Of the many families of high-temperature superconductors, only the properties of those discovered prior to 1989 - Y-Ba-Cu-O, Tl-Ba(Sr)-Ca-Cu-O, and Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O - have been studied extensively. Deformation tests have been performed on YBa 2 Cu 3 O x (Y-123), YBa 2 Cu 4 O x (Y-124), TlBa 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O x (Bi-2223). The tests have revealed that plasticity is generally limited in these compounds and that the rate-controlling diffusional kinetics for creep are very slow. Nevertheless, hot forming has proved to be quite successful for fabrication of bulk high-temperature superconductors, so long as deformation rates are low or large hydrostatic stresses are applied. Steady-state creep data have proved to be useful in designing optimal heat treatments for superconductors and in support of more-fundamental diffusion experiments. The high-temperature superconductors are highly complex oxides, and it is a challenge to understand their deformation responses. In this paper, results of interest and operant creep mechanisms will be reviewed

  14. Generation of a high temperature material data base and its application to creep tests with French or German RPV-steel. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willschuetz, H.G.; Altstadt, E.

    2002-08-01

    Considering the hypothetical core melt down scenario for a light water reactor (LWR) a possible failure mode of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its failure time has to be investigated for a determination of the loadings on the containment. Numerous experiments have been performed accompanied with material properties evaluation, theoretical, and numerical work /REM 1993/, /THF 1997/, /CHU 1999/. For pre- and post-test calculations of Lower Head Failure experiments like OLHF or FOREVER it is necessary to model creep and plasticity processes. Therefore a Finite Element Model is developed at the FZR using a numerical approach which avoids the use of a single creep law employing constants derived from the data for a limited stress and temperature range. Instead of this a numerical creep data base (CDB) is developed where the creep strain rate is evaluated in dependence on the current total strain, temperature and equivalent stress. A main task for this approach is the generation and validation of the CDB. Additionally the implementation of all relevant temperature dependent material properties has been performed. For an evaluation of the failure times a damage model according to an approach of Lemaitre is applied. The validation of the numerical model is performed by the simulation of and comparison with experiments. This is done in 3 levels: starting with the simulation of single uniaxial creep tests, which is considered as a 1D-problem. In the next level so called ''tube-failure-experiments'' are modeled: the RUPTHER-14 and the ''MPA-Meppen''-experiment. These experiments are considered as 2D-problems. Finally the numerical model is applied to scaled 3D-experiments, where the lower head of a PWR is represented in its hemispherical shape, like in the FOREVER-experiments. This report deals with the 1D- and 2D-simulations. An interesting question to be solved in this frame is the comparability of the French 16MND5 and the German 20MnMoNi55 RPV-steels, which are

  15. R+D works for the further development of high temperature reactors. (1) Captive bearing experiments for active magnetic bearings. (2) Captive bearing test for HTR blowers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    When using active magnetic bearings as blower shaft bearings, blower motors and bearings must be protected against mechanical damage in case of faults (example: total electrical supply failure due to the supply cables breaking). So-called captive bearings are provided, in order to be able to shut the blowers down safely in such faults. These captive bearings are roller bearings which are additionally fitted in the area of the blower shaft bearings, to prevent mechanical contact between the blower rotor and stator. As there was little experience available for the given boundary conditions, such as - speed, - acceleration, - bearing load, - bearing dimensions, - ambient conditions, appropriate development and tests had to be carried out. It was important to determine suitable captive bearings and the necessary ambient conditions, which will make it possible to support the failures of the magnetic bearings to be expected in 40 years' operation of the reactor without damage and to meet the requirements of the captive bearings. (orig./GL) [de

  16. Liquid chromatographic analysis of a formulated ester from a gas-turbine engine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Morales, W.

    1983-01-01

    Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) utilizing mu-Bondagel and mu-Styragel columns with a tetrahydrofuran mobile phase was used to determine the chemical degradation of lubricant samples from a gas-turbine engine test. A MIL-L-27502 candidate, ester-based lubricant was run in a J57-29 engine at a bulk oil temperature of 216 C. In general, the analyses indicated a progressive loss of primary ester, additive depletion, and formation of higher molecular weight material. An oil sample taken at the conclusion of the test showed a reversal of this trend because of large additions of new oil. The high-molecular-weight product from the degraded ester absorbed strongly in the ultraviolet region at 254 nanometers. This would indicate the presence of chromophoric groups. An analysis of a similar ester lubricant from a separate high-temperature bearing test yielded qualitatively similar results.

  17. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  18. High temperature structural sandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Christos G.

    High strength composites are being used for making lightweight structural panels that are being employed in aerospace, naval and automotive structures. Recently, there is renewed interest in use of these panels. The major problem of most commercial available sandwich panels is the fire resistance. A recently developed inorganic matrix is investigated for use in cases where fire and high temperature resistance are necessary. The focus of this dissertation is the development of a fireproof composite structural system. Sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices have an excellent potential for use in applications where exposure to high temperatures or fire is a concern. Commercial available sandwich panels will soften and lose nearly all of their compressive strength temperatures lower than 400°C. This dissertation consists of the state of the art, the experimental investigation and the analytical modeling. The state of the art covers the performance of existing high temperature composites, sandwich panels and reinforced concrete beams strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The experimental part consists of four major components: (i) Development of a fireproof syntactic foam with maximum specific strength, (ii) Development of a lightweight syntactic foam based on polystyrene spheres, (iii) Development of the composite system for the skins. The variables are the skin thickness, modulus of elasticity of skin and high temperature resistance, and (iv) Experimental evaluation of the flexural behavior of sandwich panels. Analytical modeling consists of a model for the flexural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels, and a model for deflection calculations of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP subjected to fatigue loading. The experimental and analytical results show that sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices and ceramic spheres do not lose their load bearing capability during severe fire exposure, where temperatures reach several

  19. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  20. High temperature divertor plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi.

    1991-02-01

    High temperature divertor plasma operation has been proposed, which is expected to enhance the core energy confinement and eliminates the heat removal problem. In this approach, the heat flux is guided through divertor channel to a remote area with a large target surface, resulting in low heat load on the target plate. This allows pumping of the particles escaping from the core and hence maintaining of the high divertor temperature, which is comparable to the core temperature. The energy confinement is then determined by the diffusion coefficient of the core plasma, which has been observed to be much lower than the thermal diffusivity. (author)

  1. High temperature superconductors and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruvalds, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a superconductive compound having the formula: Ni/sub 1-x/M/sub x/Z/sub y/ wherein M is a metal which will destroy the magnetic character of nickel (preferably copper, silver or gold); Z is hydrogen or deuterium; x is 0.1 to 0.9; and y, correspondingly, 0.9 to 0.1, and method of conducting electric current with no resistance at relatively high temperature of T>1 0 K comprising a conductor consisting essentially of the superconducting compound noted above

  2. High temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable advances were made in the late '50's and early early '60's in the theory and development of materials for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion. This early work culminated in a variety of materials, spanning a range of temperatures, with the product of the figure of merit, Z, and temperature, T, i.e., the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, of the order of one. This experimental limitation appeared to be universal and led a number of investigators to explore the possibility that a ZT - also represents a theoretical limitation. It was found not to be so

  3. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Wilder, D.G.

    1991-02-01

    This progress report presents the interpretation of data obtained (up to November 1, 1988) from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test site. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for the field tests for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities, at a potential high-level radioactive waste repository site in Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the tests is to provide the basis for determining whether tests planned for Yucca Mountain have the potential to be successful. Thirteen chapters discuss the following: mapping the electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate of the rock mass; changes in moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe; characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the heater borehole; electrical resistance heater installed in a 30-cm borehole; relative humidity measurements; the operation, design, construction, calibration, and installation of a microwave circuit that might provide partial pressure information at temperatures in excess of 200 degree C (392 degree F); pressure and temperature measurements in the G-Tunnel; the moisture collection system, which attempts to collect steam that migrates into the heater borehole; The borehole television and borescope surveys that were performed to map the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures intersecting the boreholes; preliminary scoping calculations of the hydrothermal conditions expected for this prototype test; the Data Acquisition System; and the results of the PEBSFT, preliminary interpretations of these results, and plans for the remainder of the test. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  4. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  5. GES [Ground Engineering System] test site preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, C.M.; Mahaffey, M.K.; Miller, W.C.; Schade, A.R.; Toyoda, K.G.

    1987-10-01

    Activities are under way at Hanford to convert the 309 containment building and its associated service wing to a nuclear test facility for the Ground Engineering System (GES) test. Conceptual design is about 80% complete, encompassing facility modifications, a secondary heat transport system, a large vacuum system, a test article cell and handing system, control and data handling systems, and safety andl auxiliary systems. The design makes extensive use of existing equipment to minimize technical risk and cost. Refurbishment of this equipment is 25% complete. Cleanout of some 1000 m 3 of equipment from the earlier reactor test in the facility is 85% complete. An Environmental Assessment was prepared and revised to incorporate Department of Energy (DOE) comments. It is now in the DOE approval chain, where a Finding of No Significant Impact is expected. During the next year, definite design will be well advanced, long-lead procurements will be initiated, construction planning will be completed, an operator training plan will be prepared, and the site (preliminary) safety analysis report will be drafted

  6. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system and..., reliability, and durability. (c) Each unpressurized hydraulic fluid tank may not fail or leak when subjected... hydraulic fluid tank must meet the requirements of § 33.64. (d) For an engine type certificated for use in...

  7. High temperature creep-fatigue design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, A. A. F.; Fournier, B.; Sauzay, M.

    2010-01-01

    Generation IV fission and future fusion reactors envisage development of more efficient high temperature concepts where materials performances are key to their success. This paper examines different types of high temperature creep-fatigue interactions and their implications on design rules for the structural materials retained in both programmes. More precisely, the paper examines current status of design rules for the stainless steel type 316L(N), the conventional Modified 9Cr-1Mo martensitic steel and the low activation Eurofer steel. Results obtained from extensive high temperature creep, fatigue and creep-fatigue tests performed on these materials and their welded joints are presented. These include sequential creep-fatigue and relaxation creep-fatigue tests with hold times in tension, in compression or in both. Effects of larger plastic deformations on fatigue properties are studied through cyclic creep tests or fatigue tests with extended hold time in creep. In most cases, mechanical test results are accompanied with microstructural and fractographic observations. In the case of martensitic steels, the effect of oxidation is examined by performing creep-fatigue tests on identical specimens in vacuum. Results obtained are analyzed and their implications on design allowable and creep-fatigue interaction diagrams are presented. While reasonable confidence is found in predicting creep-fatigue damage through existing code procedures for austenitic stainless steels, effects of cyclic softening and coarsening of microstructure of martensitic steels throughout the fatigue life on materials properties need to be taken into account for more precise damage calculations. In the long-term, development of ferritic/martensitic steels with stable microstructure, such as ODS steels, is proposed. (authors)

  8. High temperature creep-fatigue design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A. A. F.; Fournier, B.; Sauzay, M. [CEA Saclay, DEN DMN, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2010-07-01

    Generation IV fission and future fusion reactors envisage development of more efficient high temperature concepts where materials performances are key to their success. This paper examines different types of high temperature creep-fatigue interactions and their implications on design rules for the structural materials retained in both programmes. More precisely, the paper examines current status of design rules for the stainless steel type 316L(N), the conventional Modified 9Cr-1Mo martensitic steel and the low activation Eurofer steel. Results obtained from extensive high temperature creep, fatigue and creep-fatigue tests performed on these materials and their welded joints are presented. These include sequential creep-fatigue and relaxation creep-fatigue tests with hold times in tension, in compression or in both. Effects of larger plastic deformations on fatigue properties are studied through cyclic creep tests or fatigue tests with extended hold time in creep. In most cases, mechanical test results are accompanied with microstructural and fractographic observations. In the case of martensitic steels, the effect of oxidation is examined by performing creep-fatigue tests on identical specimens in vacuum. Results obtained are analyzed and their implications on design allowable and creep-fatigue interaction diagrams are presented. While reasonable confidence is found in predicting creep-fatigue damage through existing code procedures for austenitic stainless steels, effects of cyclic softening and coarsening of microstructure of martensitic steels throughout the fatigue life on materials properties need to be taken into account for more precise damage calculations. In the long-term, development of ferritic/martensitic steels with stable microstructure, such as ODS steels, is proposed. (authors)

  9. Studies of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlikar, A.

    1989-01-01

    The high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) discovered are from the family of ceramic oxides. Their large scale utilization in electrical utilities and in microelectronic devices are the frontal challenges which can perhaps be effectively met only through consolidated efforts and expertise of a multidisciplinary nature. During the last two years the growth of the new field has occurred on an international scale and perhaps has been more rapid than in most other fields. There has been an extraordinary rush of data and results which are continually being published as short texts dispersed in many excellent journals, some of which were started to ensure rapid publication exclusively in this field. As a result, the literature on HTSCs has indeed become so massive and so diffuse that it is becoming increasingly difficult to keep abreast with the important and reliable facets of this fast-growing field. This provided the motivation to evolve a process whereby both professional investigators and students can have ready access to up-to- date in-depth accounts of major technical advances happening in this field. The present series Studies of High Temperature Superconductors has been launched to, at least in part, fulfill this need

  10. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, B.; Kugel, H.W.; Goranson, P.; Kaita, R.

    1999-01-01

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed

  11. Sodium immersible high temperature microphone design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, A.P.; Anderson, T.T.; Janicek, J.J.

    1975-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a rugged high-temperature (HT) microphone for use as a sodium-immersed acoustic monitor in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs). Microphones of this design have been extensively tested in room temperature water, in air up to 1200 0 F, and in sodium up to 1200 0 F. They have been successfully installed and employed as acoustic monitors in several operating liquid metal systems. The design, construction sequence, calibration, and testing of these microphones are described. 6 references. (U.S.)

  12. The SPHINX reactor for engineering tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Artamkin, K.N.; Bovin, A.P.; Bulkin, Y.M.; Kartashev, E.F.; Korneev, A.A.; Stenbok, I.A.; Terekhov, A.S.; Khmel'Shehikov, V.V.; Cherkashov, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    A research reactor known as SPHINX is under development in the USSR. The reactor will be used mainly to carry out tests on mock-up power reactor fuel assemblies under close-to-normal parameters in experimental loop channels installed in the core and reflector of the reactor, as well as to test samples of structural materials in ampoule and loop channels. The SPHINX reactor is a channel-type reactor with light-water coolant and moderator. Maximum achievable neutron flux density in the experimental channels (cell composition 50% Fe, 50% H 2 O) is 1.1 X 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 · s for fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.7 X 10 15 for thermal neutrons at a reactor power of 200 MW. The design concepts used represent a further development of the technical features which have met with approval in the MR and MIR channel-type engineering test reactors currently in use in the USSR. The 'in-pond channel' construction makes the facility flexible and eases the carrying out of experimental work while keeping discharges of radioactivity into the environment to a low level. The reactor and all associated buildings and constructions conform to modern radiation safety and environmental protection requirements

  13. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  14. Laboratory Test of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-04

    Control Module (ECM) torque horsepower engine speed boost turbocharger throttle injector power curve...13 2.4 Calibration ............................................................................. 14...Control Units (ECU). Originally, diesel engines were naturally aspirated, but most have evolved to include forced induction devices (turbochargers

  15. Design of a fusion engineering test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    The fusion Engineering Test Facility (ETF) is being designed to provide for engineering testing capability in a program leading to the demonstration of fusion as a viable energy option. It will combine power-reactor-type components and subsystems into an integrated tokamak system and provide a test bed to test blanket modules in a fusion environment. Because of the uncertainties in impurity control two basic designs are being developed: a design with a bundle divertor (Design 1) and one with a poloidal divertor (Design 2). The two designs are similar where possible, the latter having somewhat larger toroidal field (TF) coils to accommodate removal of the larger torus sectors required for the single-null poloidal divertor. Both designs have a major radius of 5.4 m, a minor radius of 1.3 m, and a D-shaped plasma with an elongation of 1.6. Ten TF coils are incorporated in both designs, producing a toroidal field of 5.5 T on-axis. The ohmic heating and equilibrium field (EF) coils supply sufficient volt-seconds to produce a flat-top burn of 100 s and a duty cycle of 135 s, including a start of 12 s, a burn termination of 10 s, and a pumpdown of 13 s. The total fusion power during burn is 750 MW, giving a neutron wall loading of 1.5 MW/m 2 . In Design 1 of the poloidal field (PF) coils except the fast-response EF coils are located outside the FT coils and are superconducting. The fast-response coils are located inside the TF coil bore near the torus and are normal conducting so that they can be easily replaced.In Design 2 all of the PF coils are located outside the TF coils and are superconducting. Ignition is achieved with 60 MW of neutral beam injection at 150 keV. Five megawatts of radio frequency heating (electron cyclotron resonance heating) is used to assist in the startup and limit the breakdown requirement to 25 V

  16. HIgh Temperature Photocatalysis over Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Thomas A.

    Due in large part to in prevalence of solar energy, increasing demand of energy production (from all sources), and the uncertain future of petroleum energy feedstocks, solar energy harvesting and other photochemical systems will play a major role in the developing energy market. This dissertation focuses on a novel photochemical reaction process: high temperature photocatalysis (i.e., photocatalysis conducted above ambient temperatures, T ≥ 100°C). The overarching hypothesis of this process is that photo-generated charge carriers are able to constructively participate in thermo-catalytic chemical reactions, thereby increasing catalytic rates at one temperature, or maintaining catalytic rates at lower temperatures. The photocatalytic oxidation of carbon deposits in an operational hydrocarbon reformer is one envisioned application of high temperature photocatalysis. Carbon build-up during hydrocarbon reforming results in catalyst deactivation, in the worst cases, this was shown to happen in a period of minutes with a liquid hydrocarbon. In the presence of steam, oxygen, and above-ambient temperatures, carbonaceous deposits were photocatalytically oxidized over very long periods (t ≥ 24 hours). This initial experiment exemplified the necessity of a fundamental assessment of high temperature photocatalytic activity. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that affect photocatalytic activity as a function of temperatures was achieved using an ethylene photocatalytic oxidation probe reaction. Maximum ethylene photocatalytic oxidation rates were observed between 100 °C and 200 °C; the maximum photocatalytic rates were approximately a factor of 2 larger than photocatalytic rates at ambient temperatures. The loss of photocatalytic activity at temperatures above 200 °C is due to a non-radiative multi-phonon recombination mechanism. Further, it was shown that the fundamental rate of recombination (as a function of temperature) can be effectively modeled as a

  17. 40 CFR 91.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... at rated speed and maximum power for 25 to 30 minutes; (iv) Option. For four-stroke engines, where... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 91.409... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.409...

  18. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... Diesel engine test cycle. (a) The following 13-mode cycle shall be followed in dynamometer operation... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for...

  19. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T c superconductors

  20. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F. [Prairie View A& M Univ., Texas (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T{sub c} superconductors.

  1. The high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, U.

    1991-01-01

    The book deals with the development of the German high-temperature reactor (pebble-bed), the design of a prototype plant and its (at least provisional) shut-down in 1989. While there is a lot of material on the HTR's competitor, the fast breeder, literature is very incomplete on HTRs. The author describes HTR's history as a development which was characterised by structural divergencies but not effectively steered and monitored. There was no project-oriented 'community' such as there was for the fast breeder. Also, the new technology was difficult to control there were situations where no one quite knew what was going on. The technical conditions however were not taken as facts but as a basis for interpretation, wishes and reservations. The HTR gives an opportunity to consider the conditions under which large technical projects can be carried out today. (orig.) [de

  2. High temperature creep of vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasz, A.; Kovacs, I.

    1978-01-01

    The creep behaviour of polycrystalline vanadium of 99.7% purity has been investigated in the temperature range 790-880 0 C in a high temperature microscope. It was found that the creep properties depend strongly on the history of the sample. To take this fact into account some additional properties such as the dependence of the yield stress and the microhardness on the pre-annealing treatment have also been studied. Samples used in creep measurements were selected on the basis of their microhardness. The activation energy of creep depends on the microhardness and on the creep temperature. In samples annealed at 1250 0 C for one hour (HV=160 kgf mm -2 ) the rate of creep is controlled by vacancy diffusion in the temperature range 820-880 0 C with an activation energy of 78+-8 kcal mol -1 . (Auth.)

  3. High temperature industrial heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berghmans, J. (Louvain Univ., Heverlee (Belgium). Inst. Mechanica)

    1990-01-01

    The present report intends to describe the state of the art of high temperature industrial heat pumps. A description is given of present systems on the market. In addition the research and development efforts on this subject are described. Compression (open as well as closed cycle) systems, as well as absorption heat pumps (including transformers), are considered. This state of the art description is based upon literature studies performed by a team of researchers from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium. The research team also analysed the economics of heat pumps of different types under the present economic conditions. The heat pumps are compared with conventional heating systems. This analysis was performed in order to evaluate the present condition of the heat pump in the European industry.

  4. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Reichert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  5. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs

  6. Initial testing of a variable-stroke Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, L. G.

    1985-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems Program, NASA Lewis Research Center is evaluating variable-stroke control for Stirling engines. The engine being tested is the Advenco Stirling engine; this engine was manufactured by Philips Research Laboratories of the Netherlands and uses a variable-angle swash-plate drive to achieve variable stroke operation. The engine is described, initial steady-state test data taken at Lewis are presented, a major drive system failure and subsequent modifications are described. Computer simulation results are presented to show potential part-load efficiency gains with variable-stroke control.

  7. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, M.B.; Takahashi, Y.; Ainsworth, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    Described is the background work performed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom with the purpose of developing a high-temperature flaw assessment procedure for reactor components. Existing creep-fatigue crack-growth models are reviewed, and the most promising methods are identified. Sources of material data are outlined, and results of the fundamental deformation and crack-growth tests are discussed. Results of subcritical crack-growth exploratory tests, creep-fatigue crack-growth tests under repeated thermal transient conditions, and exploratory failure tests are presented and contrasted with the analytical modeling. Crack-growth assessment methods are presented and applied to a typical liquid-metal reactor component. The research activities presented herein served as a foundation for the Flaw Assessment Guide for High-Temperature Reactor Components Subjected to Creep-Fatigue Loading published separately. 30 refs., 108 figs., 13 tabs

  8. New Waste Calciner High Temperature Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A new Calciner flowsheet has been developed to process the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the INTEC Tank Farm. The new flowsheet increases the normal Calciner operating temperature from 500 C to 600 C. At the elevated temperature, sodium in the waste forms stable aluminates, instead of nitrates that melt at calcining temperatures. From March through May 2000, the new high-temperature flowsheet was tested in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Calciner. Specific test criteria for various Calciner systems (feed, fuel, quench, off-gas, etc.) were established to evaluate the long-term operability of the high-temperature flowsheet. This report compares in detail the Calciner process data with the test criteria. The Calciner systems met or exceeded all test criteria. The new flowsheet is a visible, long-term method of calcining SBW. Implementation of the flowsheet will significantly increase the calcining rate of SBW and reduce the amount of calcine produced by reducing the amount of chemical additives to the Calciner. This will help meet the future waste processing milestones and regulatory needs such as emptying the Tank Farm

  9. Off reactor testings. Technological engineering applicative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, Cezar

    2001-01-01

    By the end of year 2000 over 400 nuclear electro-power units were operating world wide, summing up a 350,000 MW total capacity, with a total production of 2,300 TWh, representing 16% of the world's electricity production. Other 36 units, totalizing 28,000 MW, were in construction, while a manifest orientation towards nuclear power development was observed in principal Asian countries like China, India, Japan and Korea. In the same world's trend one find also Romania, the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 generating electrical energy into the national system beginning with 2 December 1996. Recently, the commercial contract was completed for finishing the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 and launching it into operation by the end of year 2004. An important role in developing the activity of research and technological engineering, as technical support for manufacturing the CANDU type nuclear fuel and supplying with equipment the Cernavoda units, was played by the Division 7 TAR of the INR Pitesti. Qualification testings were conducted for: - off-reactor CANDU type nuclear fuel; - FARE tools, pressure regulators, explosion proof panels; channel shutting, as well as functional testing for spare pushing facility as a first step in the frame of the qualification tests for the charging/discharging machine (MID) 4 and 5 endings. Testing facilities are described, as well as high pressure hot/cool loops, measuring chains, all of them fulfilling the requirements of quality assurance. The nuclear fuel off-reactor tests were carried out to determine: strength; endurance; impact, pressure fall and wear resistance. For Cernavoda NPP equipment testings were carried out for: the explosion proof panels, pressure regulators, behaviour to vibration and wear of the steam generation tubings, effects of vibration upon different electronic component, channel shutting (for Cernavoda Unit 2), MID operating at 300 and 500 cycles. A number of R and D programs were conducted in the frame of division 7 TAR of INR

  10. High-Temperature Graphite/Phenolic Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Ellis C.; Bodepudi, Venu P.; Biggs, Robert W., Jr.; Cranston, John A.

    1995-01-01

    Graphite-fiber/phenolic-resin composite material retains relatively high strength and modulus of elasticity at temperatures as high as 1,000 degrees F. Costs only 5 to 20 percent as much as refractory materials. Fabrication composite includes curing process in which application of full autoclave pressure delayed until after phenolic resin gels. Curing process allows moisture to escape, so when composite subsequently heated in service, much less expansion of absorbed moisture and much less tendency toward delamination. Developed for nose cone of external fuel tank of Space Shuttle. Other potential aerospace applications for material include leading edges, parts of nozzles, parts of aircraft engines, and heat shields. Terrestrial and aerospace applications include structural firewalls and secondary structures in aircraft, spacecraft, and ships. Modified curing process adapted to composites of phenolic with other fiber reinforcements like glass or quartz. Useful as high-temperature circuit boards and electrical insulators.

  11. Development of VHTR high temperature piping in KHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Takano, Shiro

    1981-01-01

    The high temperature pipings used for multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors are the internally insulated pipings for transporting high temperature, high pressure helium at 1000 deg C and 40 kgf/cm 2 , and the influences exerted by their performance as well as safety to the plants are very large. Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., has engaged in the development of the high temperature pipings for VHTRs for years. In this report, the progress of the development, the test carried out recently and the problems for future are described. KHI manufactured and is constructing a heater and internally insulated helium pipings for the large, high temperature structure testing loop constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The design concept for the high temperature pipings is to separate the temperature boundary and the pressure boundary, therefore, the double walled construction with internal heat insulation was adopted. The requirements for the high temperature pipings are to prevent natural convection, to prevent bypass flow, to minimize radiation heat transfer and to reduce heat leak through insulator supporters. The heat insulator is composed of two layers, metal laminate insulator and fiber insulator of alumina-silica. The present state of development of the high temperature pipings for VHTRs is reported. (Kako, I.)

  12. Japanese HTTR program for demonstration of high temperature applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, T.; Hada, K.; Shiozawa, S.

    1997-01-01

    Construction works of the HTTR started in March 1991 in order to establish and upgrade the HTGR technology basis, to carry out innovative basic researches on high temperature engineering and to demonstrate high temperature heat utilization and application of nuclear heat. This report describes the demonstration program of high temperature heat utilization and application. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Engineered Barrier Testing at the INEEL Engineered Barriers Test Facility: FY-1997 and FY-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, K. N.; Porro, I.

    1998-01-01

    Engineered barriers of two designs are being tested at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility (EBTF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the test facility, barrier designs, and instruments used to monitor the test plots. Wetting tests conducted on the test plots in FY-97 are described and data collected from monitoring the test plots before, during and after the wetting tests are used to evaluate the performance of the covers during FY-97 and FY-98. Replicates of two engineered barrier designs were constructed in the EBTF cells. The first design comprises a thick, vegetated soil cover. The second design incorporates a capillary/biobarrier within the vegtated soil cover. The capillary barrier uses the textural break between an upper, fine textured soil and a lower, coarser-textured gravel layer to inhibit drainage under unsaturated conditions while increasing soil moisture storage in the root zone. Evaporation and transpiration by plants (although the test plots have not yet been vegetated) are used to recycle water stored in the soil back to the atmosphere. A geotextile fabric is used to maintain separation of the soil and gravel layers. A thick layer of cobbles beneath the gravel layer serves as a biobarrier to prevent intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into underlying waste (there is no waste in the test plots). Each test plot was instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes and neutron probe access tubes to measure moisture contents, tensiometers, heat dissipation sensors, and thermocouple psychrometers to measure matric potentials, thermocouples to measure soil temperature, and ion-exchange resin beads to monitor tracer movement. Each drainage sump is equipped with a tipping bucket instrument and pressure transducer to measure drainage. Precipitation is measured using a heated rain gauge located at the EBTF. Instrument calibration equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction

  14. Long duration performance of high temperature irradiation resistant thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.; Knudson, D.; Condie, K.; Cole, J.; Wilkins, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    Many advanced nuclear reactor designs require new fuel, cladding, and structural materials. Data are needed to characterize the performance of these new materials in high temperature, radiation conditions. However, traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1100 C degrees. To address this instrumentation need, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed and evaluated the performance of a high temperature irradiation-resistant thermocouple that contains alloys of molybdenum and niobium. To verify the performance of INL's recommended thermocouple design, a series of high temperature (from 1200 to 1800 C) long duration (up to six months) tests has been initiated. This paper summarizes results from the tests that have been completed. Data are presented from 4000 hour tests conducted at 1200 and 1400 C that demonstrate the stability of this thermocouple (less than 2% drift). In addition, post test metallographic examinations are discussed which confirm the compatibility of thermocouple materials throughout these long duration, high temperature tests. (authors)

  15. Experimental needs of high temperature concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chern, J.C.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The needs of experimental data on concrete structures under high temperature, ranging up to about 370 0 C for operating reactor conditions and to about 900 0 C and beyond for hypothetical accident conditions, are described. This information is required to supplement analytical methods which are being implemented into the finite element code TEMP-STRESS to treat reinforced concrete structures. Recommended research ranges from material properties of reinforced/prestressed concrete, direct testing of analytical models used in the computer codes, to investigations of certain aspects of concrete behavior, the phenomenology of which is not well understood. 10 refs

  16. Annual report on the high temperature triaxial compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, N.D.; Menk, P.; Tully, R.; Houston, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    The investigation of the environmental effects on the mechanical and engineering properties of deep-sea sediments was initiated on June 15, 1980. The task is divided into three categories. First, the design and fabrication of a High Temperature Triaxial Compression Device (HITT). Second, an investigation of the mechanical and engineering properties of the deep-sea sediments at temperatures ranging from 277 to 473 degrees kelvin. Third, assist in the development of constitutive relationships and an analytical model which describe the temperature dependent creep deformations of the deep-sea sediments. The environmental conditions under which the soil specimens are to be tested are variations in temperature from 277 to 473 degrees kelvin. The corresponding water pressure will vary up to about 2.75 MPa as required to prevent boiling of the water and assure saturation of the test specimens. Two groups of tests are to be performed. First, triaxial compression tests during which strength measurements and constant head permeability determinations shall be made. Second, constant stress creep tests, during which axial and lateral strains shall be measured. In addition to the aforementioned variables, data shall also be acquired to incorporate the effects of consolidation history, strain rate, and heating rate. The bulk of the triaxial tests are to be performed undrained. The strength measurement tests are to be constant-rate-of-strain and the creep tests are to be constant-stress tests. The study of the mechanical properties of the deep-sea sediments as a function of temperature is an integrated program

  17. Engine Performance Test of the 1975 Chrysler - Nissan Model CN633 Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-09-01

    An engine test of the Chrysler-Nissan Model CN633 diesel engine was performed to determine its steady-state fuel consumption and emissions (HC, CO, NOx) maps. The data acquired are summarized in this report.

  18. High temperature superconductor current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimetz, B.; Liu, H.K.; Dou, S.X.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The use of superconductors in high electrical current applications (magnets, transformers, generators etc.) usually requires cooling with liquid Helium, which is very expensive. The superconductor itself produces no heat, and the design of Helium dewars is very advanced. Therefore most of the heat loss, i.e. Helium consumption, comes from the current lead which connects the superconductor with its power source at room temperature. The current lead usually consists of a pair of thick copper wires. The discovery of the High Temperature Superconductors makes it possible to replace a part of the copper with superconducting material. This drastically reduces the heat losses because a) the superconductor generates no resistive heat and b) it is a very poor thermal conductor compared with the copper. In this work silver-sheathed superconducting tapes are used as current lead components. The work comprises both the production of the tapes and the overall design of the leads, in order to a) maximize the current capacity ('critical current') of the superconductor, b) minimize the thermal conductivity of the silver clad, and c) optimize the cooling conditions

  19. Container floor at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reutler, H.; Klapperich, H.J.; Mueller-Frank, U.

    1978-01-01

    The invention describes a floor for container which is stressed at high, changing temperatures and is intended for use in gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Due to the downward cooling gas flow in these types of reactor, the reactor floor is subjected to considerable dimensional changes during switching on and off. In the heating stage, the whole graphite structure of the reactor core and floor expands. In order to avoid arising constraining forces, sufficiently large expansion spaces must be allowed for furthermore restoring forces must be present to close the gaps again in the cooling phase. These restoring forces must be permanently present to prevent loosening of the core cuits amongst one another and thus uncontrollable relative movement. Spring elements are not suitable due to fast fatigue as a result of high temperatures and radiation exposure. It is suggested to have the floor elements supported on rollers whose rolling planes are downwards inclined to a fixed point for support. The construction is described in detail by means of drawings. (GL) [de

  20. High Temperature Superconductor Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079328; de Rijk, Gijs; Dhalle, Marc

    2016-11-10

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding $20T$. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and development before they can be applied in a practical accelerator magnet. In order to study HTS in detail, a five tesla demonstrator magnet named Feather-M2 is designed and constructed. The magnet is based on ReBCO coated conductor, which is assembled into a $10kA$ class Roebel cable. A new and optimized Aligned Block layout is used, which takes advantage of the anisotropy of the conductor. This is achieved by providing local alignment of the Roebel cable in the coil windings with the magnetic field lines. A new Network Model capable of analyzing transient electro-magnetic and thermal phenomena in coated conductor cables and coils is developed. This model is necessary to solve critical issues in coated conductor ac...