WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-speed solar wind

  1. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Vennerstrom, Susanne; Schoengassner, Florian; Hofmeister, Stefan J.

    2016-01-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the ACE spacecraft for ...

  2. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Vennerstrom, Susanne; Schöngassner, Florian; Hofmeister, Stefan J.

    2016-07-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft for the years 2011 to 2014. While the ESWF makes use of an empirical relation between the coronal hole area observed in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images and solar wind properties at the near-Earth environment, the WSA model establishes a link between properties of the open magnetic field lines extending from the photosphere to the corona and the background solar wind conditions. We found that both solar wind models are capable of predicting the large-scale features of the observed solar wind speed (root-mean-square error, RMSE ≈100 km/s) but tend to either overestimate (ESWF) or underestimate (WSA) the number of high-speed solar wind streams (threat score, TS ≈ 0.37). The predicted high-speed streams show typical uncertainties in the arrival time of about 1 day and uncertainties in the speed of about 100 km/s. General advantages and disadvantages of the investigated solar wind models are diagnosed and outlined.

  3. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate...... high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft for the years 2011 to 2014. While the ESWF makes use of an empirical relation...... between the coronal hole area observed in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images and solar wind properties at the near-Earth environment, the WSA model establishes a link between properties of the open magnetic field lines extending from the photosphere to the corona...

  4. Verification of high-speed solar wind stream forecasts using operational solar wind models

    CERN Document Server

    Reiss, Martin A; Veronig, Astrid M; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Vennerstrom, Susanne; Schoengassner, Florian; Hofmeister, Stefan J

    2016-01-01

    High-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. Modeling high-speed solar wind streams is thus an essential element of successful space weather forecasting. Here we evaluate high-speed stream forecasts made by the empirical solar wind forecast (ESWF) and the semiempirical Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model based on the in situ plasma measurements from the ACE spacecraft for the years 2011 to 2014. While the ESWF makes use of an empirical relation between the coronal hole area observed in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images and solar wind properties at the near-Earth environment, the WSA model establishes a link between properties of the open magnetic field lines extending from the photosphere to the corona and the background solar wind conditions. We found that both solar wind models are capable of predicting the large-scale features of the observed sol...

  5. The interaction of the galactic cosmic rays with the high-speed solar wind streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyuyeva, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Based on statistical and comparative analysis of neutron monitor data from 1995 to 2013 years the influence of recurrent and sporadic high-speed streams of solar wind on the intensity of the galactic cosmic rays near Earth orbit was studied. Both types of high-speed solar wind streams modulate the galactic cosmic rays flux and cause Forbush decreases of different nature. The main parameters of Forbush decreases such as typical shape, magnitude, duration of decrease, delay, size of modulation area etc was studied.

  6. On capture and acceleration of heavy ions (a-particle) in high-speed solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Liting(宋礼庭); XIAO; Chijie(肖池阶)

    2002-01-01

    The α-particles and other heavy ions, as well es a few protons are observed to be faster than the main part of protons by about the local Alfven speed in the high-speed solar wind. It is suggested that when the velocity of the solar wind is equal to the local Alfven velocity, another Iow-frequency kinetic Alfvan wave will be excitated, and trap ail the α-particles and a few protons, so these ions have a local Alfven velocity faster than the other parts of the solar wind. The undamping kinetic Alfven waves change into Iow-frequency Alfven solitons in the solar wind. This model can explain the observation and give the conditions of wave excitated and ions trapped.

  7. Shrinkage of magnetosphere observed by TC-1 satellite during the high-speed solar wind stream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LiuYuan; CAO JinBin; ZHOU GuoCheng; YANG JunYing; YAN ChunXiao; ZHANG TieLong; H. REME; I. DANDOURAS; C. M. CARR

    2008-01-01

    During the interval 06:14-07:30 UT on August 24, 2005, since the Earth's magneto-pause was suddenly compressed by the persistent high-speed solar wind stream with the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the magnetopause moved Inward for about 3.1 RE. Meanwhile, TC-1 satellite shifted from northern plasma sheet to the northern lobe/mantle region, although it kept Inward flying during the Interval 06:00-07:30UT. The shift of TC-1 from the plasma sheet to the lobe/mantle is caused by the simultaneous inward displacements of the plasma sheet and near-Earth lobe/mantle region, and their inward movement velocity is larger than the inward motion velocity of TC-1. The Joint inward dis-placements of the magnetopause, the lobe/mantle region and the plasma sheet indicate that the whole magnetosphere shrinks inward due to the magnetospheric compression by the high-speed solar wind stream, and the magnetospheric ions are attached to the magnetic field lines (i.e. 'frozen' in magnetic field) and move inward in the shrinking process of magnetosphere. The large shrinkage of magne-tosphere indicates that the near-Earth magnetotail compression caused by the strong solar wind dynamic pressure is much larger than its thickening caused by the southward component of the IMF, and the locations of magnetospheric regions with different plasmas vary remarkably with the variation of the solar wind dynamic pressure.

  8. The Generation of Smooth High Speed Solar Wind from Plume-Interplume Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhi, Shyamsundar; Suess, Steven T.; Sulkanen, Martin E.

    1998-01-01

    Plumes and rays are magnetic field aligned density striations in coronal holes with different values of plasma beta. The overall plasma beta is very small in the low corona but exceeds unity beyond 15-20 solar radius. High speed solar wind reported beyond 0.3 AU is relatively smooth and uniform and known to originate from the much filamented coronal hole. Thus the obvious question is how to generate a smooth solar wind from seemingly filamentary structure. Hence one has to find a mechanism to substantiate this apparent observed (Ulysses) phenomenon. To do this we model plumes as jets (or wakes) of plasma emitted from the solar surface. The shear between a jet and its ambient is known to become unstable to the MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz ("KH") instability if the Alfven Mach number of the jet is greater than one and the uniform external magnetic field is small. Starting with a simple configuration we consider a jet of half thickness R, having uniform density and uniform internal magnetic field. The external medium has also a uniform density and uniform magnetic field. The jet is perturbed at the boundary with a linear amplitude and fixed frequency. We simulate the coronal jet using the 3D ZEUS code. The first results indicate the slab jet is unstable to the MHD KH instability at 5-10 solar radius for some angle of wave propagation. The propagating instability may smooth the filamented flow. It may also produce the entrained Alfvenic fluctuations observed by Ulysses in the high speed wind. We are at present determining the parameters which induce large growth rate. This may clarify the mystery behind the emergence of fast smooth solar wind from very filamentary structures in coronal holes. Also, using the dispersion relation already available for such a flow we obtain some general description of the instability criteria for the KH instability at a jet interface.

  9. Predicting the arrival of high-speed solar wind streams at Earth using the STEREO Heliospheric Imagers

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Chris J.; Davies, J. A.; Owens, Matt; Lockwood, Mike

    2012-01-01

    High-speed solar wind streams modify the Earth's geomagnetic environment, perturbing the ionosphere, modulating the flux of cosmic rays into the Earth atmosphere, and triggering substorms. Such activity can affect modern technological systems. To investigate the potential for predicting the arrival of such streams at Earth, images taken by the Heliospheric Imager (HI) on the STEREO-A spacecraft have been used to identify the onsets of high-speed solar wind streams from observations of regions...

  10. A link between high-speed solar wind streams and explosive extratropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikryl, Paul; Iwao, Koki; Muldrew, Donald B.; Rušin, Vojto; Rybanský, Milan; Bruntz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    A link between solar wind magnetic sector boundary (heliospheric current sheet) crossings by the Earth and the upper-level tropospheric vorticity was discovered in the 1970s. These results have been later confirmed but the proposed mechanisms remain controversial. Extratropical-cyclone tracks obtained from two meteorological reanalysis datasets are used in superposed epoch analysis of time series of solar wind plasma parameters and green coronal emission line intensity. The time series are keyed to times of maximum growth of explosively developing extratropical cyclones in the winter season. The new statistical evidence corroborates the previously published results (Prikryl et al., 2009). This evidence shows that explosive extratropical cyclones tend to occur after arrivals of solar wind disturbances such as high-speed solar wind streams from coronal holes when large amplitude magneto-hydrodynamic waves couple to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. These MHD waves modulate Joule heating and/or Lorentz forcing of the high-latitude thermosphere generating medium-scale atmospheric gravity waves that propagate energy upward and downward from auroral zone through the atmosphere. At the tropospheric level, in spite of significantly reduced amplitudes, these gravity waves can provide a lift of unstable air to release the moist symmetric instability thus initiating slantwise convection and forming cloud/precipitation bands. The release of latent heat is known to provide energy for rapid development and intensification of extratropical cyclones.

  11. Shrinkage of magnetosphere observed by TC-1 satellite during the high-speed solar wind stream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.; RME; I.; DANDOURAS; C.; M.; CARR

    2008-01-01

    During the interval 06:14―07:30 UT on August 24, 2005, since the Earth’s magneto- pause was suddenly compressed by the persistent high-speed solar wind stream with the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the magnetopause moved inward for about 3.1 RE. Meanwhile, TC-1 satellite shifted from northern plasma sheet to the northern lobe/mantle region, although it kept inward flying during the interval 06:00―07:30UT. The shift of TC-1 from the plasma sheet to the lobe/mantle is caused by the simultaneous inward displacements of the plasma sheet and near-Earth lobe/mantle region, and their inward movement velocity is larger than the inward motion velocity of TC-1. The joint inward dis-placements of the magnetopause, the lobe/mantle region and the plasma sheet indicate that the whole magnetosphere shrinks inward due to the magnetospheric compression by the high-speed solar wind stream, and the magnetospheric ions are attached to the magnetic field lines (i.e. ‘frozen’ in magnetic field) and move inward in the shrinking process of magnetosphere. The large shrinkage of magne-tosphere indicates that the near-Earth magnetotail compression caused by the strong solar wind dynamic pressure is much larger than its thickening caused by the southward component of the IMF, and the locations of magnetospheric regions with different plasmas vary remarkably with the variation of the solar wind dynamic pressure.

  12. AE Geomagnetic Index Predictability for High Speed Solar Wind Streams: A Wavelet Decomposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    High speed solar wind streams cause geomagnetic activity at Earth. In this study we have applied a wavelet interactive filtering and reconstruction technique on the solar wind magnetic field components and AE index series to allowed us to investigate the relationship between the two. The IMF Bz component was found as the most significant solar wind parameter responsible by the control of the AE activity. Assuming magnetic reconnection associated to southward directed Bz is the main mechanism transferring energy into the magnetosphere, we adjust parameters to forecast the AE index. The adjusted routine is able to forecast AE, based only on the Bz measured at the L1 Lagrangian point. This gives a prediction approximately 30-70 minutes in advance of the actual geomagnetic activity. The correlation coefficient between the observed AE data and the forecasted series reached values higher than 0.90. In some cases the forecast reproduced particularities observed in the signal very well.The high correlation values observed and the high efficacy of the forecasting can be taken as a confirmation that reconnection is the main physical mechanism responsible for the energy transfer during HILDCAAs. The study also shows that the IMF Bz component low frequencies are most important for AE prediction.

  13. AE Geomagnetic Index Predictability for High Speed Solar Wind Streams: A Wavelet Decomposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    High speed solar wind streams cause geomagnetic activity at Earth. In this study we have applied a wavelet interactive filtering and reconstruction technique on the solar wind magnetic field components and AE index series to allowed us to investigate the relationship between the two. The IMF Bz component was found as the most significant solar wind parameter responsible by the control of the AE activity. Assuming magnetic reconnection associated to southward directed Bz is the main mechanism transferring energy into the magnetosphere, we adjust parameters to forecast the AE index. The adjusted routine is able to forecast AE, based only on the Bz measured at the L1 Lagrangian point. This gives a prediction approximately 30-70 minutes in advance of the actual geomagnetic activity. The correlation coefficient between the observed AE data and the forecasted series reached values higher than 0.90. In some cases the forecast reproduced particularities observed in the signal very well.The high correlation values observed and the high efficacy of the forecasting can be taken as a confirmation that reconnection is the main physical mechanism responsible for the energy transfer during HILDCAAs. The study also shows that the IMF Bz component low frequencies are most important for AE prediction.

  14. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-SPEED SOLAR WIND STREAMS OVER THE GRAND MODERN MAXIMUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mursula, K.; Holappa, L. [ReSoLVE Centre of Excellence, Department of Physics, University of Oulu (Finland); Lukianova, R., E-mail: kalevi.mursula@oulu.fi [Geophysical Center of Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-01

    In the declining phase of the solar cycle (SC), when the new-polarity fields of the solar poles are strengthened by the transport of same-signed magnetic flux from lower latitudes, the polar coronal holes expand and form non-axisymmetric extensions toward the solar equator. These extensions enhance the occurrence of high-speed solar wind (SW) streams (HSS) and related co-rotating interaction regions in the low-latitude heliosphere, and cause moderate, recurrent geomagnetic activity (GA) in the near-Earth space. Here, using a novel definition of GA at high (polar cap) latitudes and the longest record of magnetic observations at a polar cap station, we calculate the annually averaged SW speeds as proxies for the effective annual occurrence of HSS over the whole Grand Modern Maximum (GMM) from 1920s onward. We find that a period of high annual speeds (frequent occurrence of HSS) occurs in the declining phase of each of SCs 16-23. For most cycles the HSS activity clearly reaches a maximum in one year, suggesting that typically only one strong activation leading to a coronal hole extension is responsible for the HSS maximum. We find that the most persistent HSS activity occurred in the declining phase of SC 18. This suggests that cycle 19, which marks the sunspot maximum period of the GMM, was preceded by exceptionally strong polar fields during the previous sunspot minimum. This gives interesting support for the validity of solar dynamo theory during this dramatic period of solar magnetism.

  15. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  16. High-speed solar wind streams and polar mesosphere winter echoes at Troll, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, S.; Belova, E. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden). Polar Atmospheric Research; Osepian, A. [Polar Geophysical Institute, Murmansk (Russian Federation); Lee, Y.S. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A small, 54 MHz wind-profiler radar, MARA, was operated at Troll, Antarctica (72 S, 2.5 E), continuously from November 2011 to January 2014, covering two complete Antarctic winters. Despite very low power, MARA observed echoes from heights of 55-80 km (polar mesosphere winter echoes, PMWE) on 60% of all winter days (from March to October). This contrasts with previous reports from radars at high northern latitudes, where PWME have been reported only by very high power radars or during rare periods of unusually high electron density at PMWE heights, such as during solar proton events. Analysis shows that PWME at Troll were not related to solar proton events but were often closely related to the arrival of high-speed solar wind streams (HSS) at the Earth, with PWME appearing at heights as low as 56 km and persisting for up to 15 days following HSS arrival. This demonstrates that HSS effects penetrate directly to below 60 km height in the polar atmosphere. Using local observations of cosmic-noise absorption (CNA), a theoretical ionization/ion-chemistry model and a statistical model of precipitating energetic electrons associated with HSS, the electron density conditions during the HSS events are estimated. We find that PMWE detectability cannot be explained by these variations in electron density and molecular-ion chemistry alone. PWME become detectable at different thresholds depending on solar illumination and height. In darkness, PWME are detected only when the modelled electron density is above a threshold of about 1000 cm{sup -3}, and only above 75 km height, where negative ions are few. In daylight, the electron density threshold falls by at least 2 orders of magnitude and PWME are found primarily below 75 km height, even in conditions when a large proportion of negative ions is expected. There is also a strong dawn-dusk asymmetry with PWME detected very rarely during morning twilight but often during evening twilight. This behaviour cannot be explained if PMWE

  17. A Numerical Investigation of the Recurrent High-speed Jets as a Possibility of Solar Wind Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Liping; Peter, Hardi; Tu, Chuanyi; Zhang, Lei; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua; Feng, Xueshang

    2015-01-01

    In the solar atmosphere, jets are prevalent and they are significant for the mass and energy transport. Here we conduct numerical simulations to investigate the mass and energy contributions of the recently observed high-speed jets to the solar wind. With a one-dimensional hydrodynamic solar wind model, the time-dependent pulses are imposed at the bottom to simulate the jets. The simulation results show that without other energy source, the injected plasmas are accelerated effectively to be a transonic wind with a substantial mass flux. The rapid acceleration occurs close to the Sun, and the resulting asymptotic speed, number density at 0.3 AU, as well as mass flux normalized to 1 AU are compatible with in situ observations. As a result of the high speed, the imposed pulses generate a train of shocks traveling upward. By tracing the motions of the injected plasma, it is found that these shocks heat and accelerate the injected plasmas successively step by step to push them upward and eventually allow them to e...

  18. Characteristics of PMSE associated with the geomagnetic disturbance driven by corotating interaction region and high-speed solar wind streams in the declining solar cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Kwak, Young-Sil; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Yang, Tae-Yong; Kero, Antti

    2015-04-01

    We report interannual variations of the correlation between the reflectivity of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) and solar wind parameters (speed and dynamic pressure), and AE index as a proxy of geomagnetic disturbances, and cosmic noise absorption (CNA) in the declining phase (2001-2008) of solar cycle 23. PMSEs are observed by 52 MHz VHF radar measurements at Esrange (67.8°N, 20.4°E), Sweden. In approaching the solar minimum years, high-speed solar wind streams emanate from frequently emerging coronal holes, leading to 7, 9, and 13.5 day periodicities in their arrival at Earth. Periodicities of 7 and/or 9 days are found in PMSE reflectivity in 2005-2006 and 2008. Periodicity-resolved correlations at 7 and 9 days of both D region ionization observed by cosmic noise absorption (CNA) and PMSE with solar wind speed and AE index vary from year to year but generally increase as solar minimum is approached. PMSEs have a higher periodicity-resolved correlation with AE index than the solar wind speed. In addition, cross correlation of PMSE reflectivity with AE index is mostly higher than with CNA in solar minimum years (2005-2008). This can signify that high-speed solar wind stream-induced high-energy particles possibly have strong influence on CNA, but not as much as on PMSE, especially for the years of significant periodicities occurring.

  19. Changes in Sea-Level Pressure over South Korea Associated with High-Speed Solar Wind Events

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Il-Hyun; Marubashi, Katsuhide; Kim, Yeon-Han; Park, Young-Deuk; Chang, Heon-Young

    2011-01-01

    We explore a possibility that the daily sea-level pressure (SLP) over South Korea responds to the high-speed solar wind event. This is of interest in two aspects: First, if there is a statistical association this can be another piece of evidence showing that various meteorological observables indeed respond to variations in the interplanetary environment. Second, this can be a very crucial observational constraint since most models proposed so far are expected to preferentially work in higher latitude regions than the low latitude region studied here. We have examined daily solar wind speed ${\\rm V}$, daily SLP difference ${\\rm \\Delta SLP}$, and daily ${\\rm \\log(BV^{2})}$ using the superposed epoch analysis in which the key date is set such that the daily solar wind speed exceeds 800 ${\\rm kms^{-1}}$. We find that the daily ${\\rm \\Delta SLP}$ averaged out of 12 events reaches its peak at day +1 and gradually decreases back to its normal level. The amount of positive deviation of ${\\rm \\Delta SLP}$ is +2.5 hPa...

  20. The Generation of Smooth High Speed Solar Wind From Plume-Interplume Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Steve; Parhi, Shyam; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Ulysses has shown that fast solar wind is extremely smooth, with a variance of less than 5%, in contrast to slow wind with a variance of approximately 30%. Now UVCS has produced the surprising result that the flow speed within coronal holes, the source of fast wind, is not at all smooth. Specifically, Giordano et al. (ApJ, v531, L79-L82, 2000) report that at 1.7 R(sub SUN) the interplume flow speed is typically more than twice the plume flow speed. Other less direct evidence supports this same result, with speeds from less than 300 to over 1000 km/s reported at approximately 5 R(sub SUN). This presents the paradox of how strongly differing plume and interplume flow speeds can exist near the Sun and be absent far from the Sun. The only answer is that plume and interplume material or momentum must be strongly mixed and that the mixing must occur mainly inside 0.3 AU to be consistent with Helios observations of smooth fast wind. Pressure balance structures (PBSs) and He abundance anomalies (Reisenfeld, et al., GRL, v26(13), 1805-1808, 1999) have been identified as interplanetary remnants of plumes, implying momentum mixing is the dominant coronal process. One possible source for plume/interplume momentum mixing is MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) shear instabilities occurring on the velocity shear interfaces. The velocity shear is a source of free energy and KH fluctuations could, through nonlinear cascade, provide the forcing required for the plasma oscillations (Cranmer, ApJ, v532, 1197-1208, 2000) reported to exist in coronal holes. The physical properties in coronal holes are now sufficiently well known that we can show plume/interplume shear interfaces become unstable to the KH instability at 5 - 10 R(sub SUN). The KH dispersion relation can be used to analyze marginal stability, the most unstable wavelengths, and linear growth rates. Numerical simulations can be used to verify results from the linear analysis and study the nonlinear development of KH modes. Here we

  1. Polar summer mesospheric extreme horizontal drift speeds during interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) and high-speed solar wind streams: Coupling between the solar wind and the mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shepherd, Gordon G.

    2014-05-01

    We report the observation of echo extreme horizontal drift speed (EEHS, ≥ 300 m s-1) during polar mesospheric (80-90 km) summer echoes (PMSEs) by the VHF (52 MHz) radar at Esrange, Sweden, in years of 2006 and 2008. The EEHS occur in PMSEs as correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs), observed at least once in 12-17% of all hours of observation for the two summers. The EEHS rate peaks occur either during high solar wind speed in the early part of the PMSE season or during the arrival of interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) followed by peaks in PMSE occurrence rate after 1-4 days, in the latter part of the 2006 summer. The cause of EEHS rate peaks is likely under the competition between the interval of the CIR and HSS passage over the magnetosphere. A candidate process in producing EEHS is suggested to be localized strong electric field, which is caused by solar wind energy transfer from the interaction of CIR and HSS with the magnetosphere in a sequential manner. We suggest that EEHS are created by strong electric field, estimated as > 10-30 V m-1 at 85 km altitude, exceeding the mesospheric breakdown threshold field.

  2. On forecasting ionospheric total electron content responses to high-speed solar wind streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Xing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions in the ionosphere have become increasingly important to forecast, since more and more spaceborne and ground-based technological systems rely on ionospheric weather. Here we explore the feasibility of ionospheric forecasts with the current generation of physics-based models. In particular, we focus on total electron content (TEC predictions using the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM. Simulations are configured in a forecast mode and performed for four typical high-speed-stream events during 2007–2012. The simulated TECs are quantified through a metric, which divides the globe into a number of local regions and robustly differentiates between quiet and disturbed periods. Proposed forecast products are hourly global maps color-coded by the TEC disturbance level of each local region. To assess the forecasts, we compare the simulated TEC disturbances with global TEC maps derived from Global Positioning System (GPS satellite observations. The forecast performance is found to be merely acceptable, with a large number of regions where the observed variations are not captured by the simulations. Examples of model-data agreements and disagreements are investigated in detail, aiming to understand the model behavior and improve future forecasts. For one event, we identify two adjacent regions with similar TEC observations but significant differences in how local chemistry versus plasma transport contribute to electron density changes in the simulation. Suggestions for further analysis are described.

  3. On forecasting ionospheric total electron content responses to high-speed solar wind streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xing; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-04-01

    Conditions in the ionosphere have become increasingly important to forecast, since more and more spaceborne and ground-based technological systems rely on ionospheric weather. Here we explore the feasibility of ionospheric forecasts with the current generation of physics-based models. In particular, we focus on total electron content (TEC) predictions using the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM). Simulations are configured in a forecast mode and performed for four typical high-speed-stream events during 2007-2012. The simulated TECs are quantified through a metric, which divides the globe into a number of local regions and robustly differentiates between quiet and disturbed periods. Proposed forecast products are hourly global maps color-coded by the TEC disturbance level of each local region. To assess the forecasts, we compare the simulated TEC disturbances with global TEC maps derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite observations. The forecast performance is found to be merely acceptable, with a large number of regions where the observed variations are not captured by the simulations. Examples of model-data agreements and disagreements are investigated in detail, aiming to understand the model behavior and improve future forecasts. For one event, we identify two adjacent regions with similar TEC observations but significant differences in how local chemistry versus plasma transport contribute to electron density changes in the simulation. Suggestions for further analysis are described.

  4. Origin of the High-speed Jets Fom Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Solar Transition Region as well as Their Mass and Energy Contribuctions to the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liping, Y.; He, J.; Peter, H.; Tu, C. Y.; Feng, X. S.

    2015-12-01

    In the solar atmosphere, the jets are ubiquitous and found to be at various spatia-temporal scales. They are significant to understand energy and mass transport in the solar atmosphere. Recently, the high-speed transition region jets are reported from the observation. Here we conduct a numerical simulation to investigate the mechanism in their formation, as well as their mass and energy contributions to the solar wind. Driven by the supergranular convection motion, the magnetic reconnection between the magnetic loop and the background open flux occurring in the transition region is simulated with a two-dimensional MHD model. The simulation results show that not only a fast hot jet, much resemble the found transition region jets, but also a adjacent slow cool jet, mostly like classical spicules, is launched. The force analysis shows that the fast hot jet is continually driven by the Lorentz force around the reconnection region, while the slow cool jet is induced by an initial kick through the Lorentz force associated with the emerging magnetic flux. Also, the features of the driven jets change with the amount of the emerging magnetic flux, giving the varieties of both jets.With the developed one-dimensional hydrodynamic solar wind model, the time-dependent pulses are imposed at the bottom to simulate the jet behaviors. The simulation results show that without other energy source, the injected plasmas are accelerated effectively to be a transonic wind with a substantial mass flux. The rapid acceleration occurs close to the Sun, and the resulting asymptotic speeds, number density at 0.3 AU, as well as mass flux normalized to 1 AU are compatible with in site observations. As a result of the high speed, the imposed pulses lead to a train of shocks traveling upward. By tracing the motions of the injected plasma, it is found that these shocks heat and accelerate the injected plasma to make part of them propagate upward and eventually escape. The parametric study shows

  5. Pressure enhancement associated with meridional flow in high-speed solar wind: possible evidence for an interplanetary magnetic flux rope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Tu

    Full Text Available A sizable total-pressure (magnetic pressure plus kinetic pressure enhancement was found within the high-speed wind stream observed by Helios 2 in 1976 near 0.3 AU. The proton density and temperature and the magnetic magnitude simultaneously increased for about 6 h. This pressure rise was associated with a comparatively large southward flow velocity component (with Vz ≈ –100 km · s–1 and magnetic-field rotation. The pressure enhancement was associated with unusual features in the electron distribution function. It shows a wide angular distribution of electron counting rates in the low-energy (57.8 eV channel, while previous to the enhancement it exhibits a wide angular distribution of electron count rate in the high-energy (112, 221 and 309 eV channels, perhaps indicating the mirroring of electrons in the converging field lines of the background magnetic field. These fluid and kinetic phenomena may be explained as resulting from an interplanetary magnetic flux rope which is not fully convected by the flow but moves against the background wind towards the Sun.

  6. Long-periodic strong radar echoes in the summer polar D region correlated with oscillations of high-speed solar wind streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    2013-08-01

    We report long-periodic oscillations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs) as observed between 1 June and 8 August in the solar minimum years 2006 and 2008. PMSEs (80-90 km altitudes) were observed by 52 MHz VHF radar measurements at Esrange, Sweden (67.8°N, 20.4°E). Correlations between PMSE volume reflectivity/counts, HSSs, and AE index are primarily found at 7-day, 9-day, and 13-day periodicities as well as 9-day and 13.5-day periodicities in 2006 and 2008, respectively. The observations show that the effects of HSSs appear in PMSEs. During corotating interaction region (CIR)-induced HSSs, the long-lasting enhancement of PMSEs, geomagnetic disturbances, and D-region ionization suggests that a favorable condition in generating PMSEs can be provided by the precipitating energetic electrons (>30 keV), which are frequently multiplied in the magnetosphere during HSSs.

  7. Enhanced horizontal extreme-echo speed occurrence leading to polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) increase at solar-wind pressure enhancement during high-speed solar wind stream events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Kirkwood, S.; Kwak, Y.; Kim, K.; Shepherd, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    We report on horizontal extreme echo speeds (HEES, ≥ 300 ms^{-1}) observed in long-periodic polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) correlated with solar-wind speed in high speed solar wind streams (HSS) events. The observations were made from VHF 52 MHz radar measurements at Esrange (67.8°N, 20.4°E) between June 1-August 8 in 2006 and 2008. The periodicities of PMSE counts and the volume reflectivity primarily occur at 7, 9 and 13.5 days possibly by the effects of HSS, while the periodicities at 4-6 days are competitively coherent between planetary waves appearing in temperature and solar-wind speed during HSS events. The peaks of both HEES occurrence rate relative to PMSE and turbulence dominantly occur at solar-wind pressure enhancement with minor peaks continued under the passage of HSS over the magnetopause, followed by PMSE peaks in 1-3 days later. This study gives the results that the precipitating high-energetic particles (> 30 keV) during HSS likely induce D-region ionization involved with the consecutive processes of HEES, turbulence and PMSE. The turbulence evolved from the HEES can be explained with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which was observed in PMSE by Röttger et al. [11th International Workshop on technical and scientific aspects of MST Radar, 2006] and firstly simulated for PMSE generation by Hill et al. [Earth Planets Space, 1999]. The HEES is understood as the speed of fast moving ions, accelerated by strong electric field as Lee & Shepherd [JGR, 2010] suggested with the supersonic velocities persisting in polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) region observed at enhanced O(^1S) emission rate ( 10 kR) by WINDII/UARS satellite.

  8. Day-to-day variability of VTEC and ROTI in October 2012 with impact of high-speed solar wind stream on 13 October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouzi, I.; Migoya-Orue, Y. O.; Coisson, P.; Amory Mazaudier, C.; Fleury, R.; Radicella, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the day-to-day variability of the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) and the Rate of change of TEC Index (ROTI) in October 2012. We focused our attention to the impact of a high-speed solar wind stream (HSSWS) on the ionosphere in middle and low latitudes on 13 October 2012. This event was preceded by two other disturbances caused by a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) at 05:26UT on 8 October and a HSSWS around 19:00UT on 9 October. The changes in the VTEC observed during the period between 8 and 12 October preceding the 13 October case showed a comparable response of the ionosphere in both hemispheres, varying mainly with latitude and presenting a stronger impact in the Northern hemisphere. The VTEC increased at the arrival of the CME on 8 October, then decreased, and increased again on 13 October. The solar wind speed associated with the second HSSWS reached its peak, 580 km/s around 17:00UT during the recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm started around 00:00UT on 13 October. Its impact was observed in Africa and in Eastern South America on the ROTI, an indicator of ionospheric scintillation. On 13 October, the ROTI was small over whole Africa and in Eastern South America at the moment the impact of the second HSSWS. These observations are interpreted as due to the ionospheric disturbance dynamo electric field associated with the Joule heating produced in the auroral zone by the HSSWS.

  9. 622 Mbps High-speed satellite communication system for WINDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Yukio; Yoshimura, Naoko; Suzuki, Ryutaro; Gedney, Richard T.; Dollard, Mike

    2006-07-01

    WINDS is the experimental communications satellite currently under joint development by Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The high-speed satellite communication system is very effective for quick deployment of high-speed networks economically. The WINDS will realize ultra high-speed networking and demonstrate operability of satellite communication systems in high-speed internet. NICT is now developing high-speed satellite communication system for WINDS. High-speed TDMA burst modem with high performance TPC error correction is underdevelopment. Up to the DAC on the transmitter and from the ADC on the receiver, all modem functions are performed in the digital processing technology. Burst modem has been designed for a user data rate up to 1244 Mbps. NICT is developing the digital terminal as a user interface and a network controller for this earth station. High compatibility with the Internet will be provided.

  10. Observation of summer daytime aurora in the noctilucent cloud layer and its link to high-energy particle precipitation during high-speed solar wind streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Kwak, Y. S.; Kim, K. C.; Solheim, B.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    Aurora produced by precipitating low-energy electrons can be suppressed in summer daytime. However, the high-energy electrons (>30 keV) that are unsuppressed by sunlight are capable of penetrating deep into the mesosphere, where they can produce the odd hydrogen (HOx) and eventually lead to catalytic ozone (O3) loss. By elevating the D-region ionization level, they also play the important role of facilitating the production of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) as a precursor of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC). In the present study, it was discovered that high-energy electrons induce supersonic luminous phenomena, including the enhancement of O(1S) 557.7-nm emission with an intensity of up to 300 kR (horizontally integrated) and a supersonic velocity (300-1500 m s-1) as seen within a field of view that is 150-km wide, also called a supersonic burst (SB). SB-accompanied O(1S) emission enhancement is differentiated from aurora because the former occurs only in summer daytime, at a low altitude of ~80 km, and in the form of an intense localised burst. The source of the SB energy might be linked to the precipitation of high-energy electrons (>30 keV), especially as observed during high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs). In producing O(1S) emission, the secondary electron number flux of the precipitated primary electrons increases in magnitude by as much as an order of four, and a local process is required to provide the supplement. The supplementary local process may involve a supersonic velocity possibly caused by ion acceleration in a strong electric field, resulting in the inducement of electron acceleration in the field.

  11. Ionization and NO production in the polar mesosphere during high-speed solar wind streams. Model validation and comparison with NO enhancements observed by Odin-SMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, S.; Belova, E. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden). Polar Atmospheric Research; Osepian, A. [Polar Geophysical Institute, Murmansk (Russian Federation); Urban, J.; Perot, K. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Radio and Space Science; Sinha, A.K. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India)

    2015-09-01

    Precipitation of high-energy electrons (EEP) into the polar middle atmosphere is a potential source of significant production of odd nitrogen, which may play a role in stratospheric ozone destruction and in perturbing large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns. High-speed streams of solar wind (HSS) are a major source of energization and precipitation of electrons from the Earth's radiation belts, but it remains to be determined whether these electrons make a significant contribution to the odd-nitrogen budget in the middle atmosphere when compared to production by solar protons or by lower-energy (auroral) electrons at higher altitudes, with subsequent downward transport. Satellite observations of EEP are available, but their accuracy is not well established. Studies of the ionization of the atmosphere in response to EEP, in terms of cosmic-noise absorption (CNA), have indicated an unexplained seasonal variation in HSS-related effects and have suggested possible order-of-magnitude underestimates of the EEP fluxes by the satellite observations in some circumstances. Here we use a model of ionization by EEP coupled with an ion chemistry model to show that published average EEP fluxes, during HSS events, from satellite measurements (Meredith et al., 2011), are fully consistent with the published average CNA response (Kavanagh et al., 2012). The seasonal variation of CNA response can be explained by ion chemistry with no need for any seasonal variation in EEP. Average EEP fluxes are used to estimate production rate profiles of nitric oxide between 60 and 100 km heights over Antarctica for a series of unusually well separated HSS events in austral winter 2010. These are compared to observations of changes in nitric oxide during the events, made by the sub-millimetre microwave radiometer on the Odin spacecraft. The observations show strong increases of nitric oxide amounts between 75 and 90 km heights, at all latitudes poleward of 60 S, about 10 days after the

  12. Orbiting observatory SOHO finds source of high-speed "wind" blowing from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    "The search for the source of the solar wind has been like the hunt for the source of the Nile," said Dr. Don Hassler of the Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado, lead author of the paper in Science. "For 30 years, scientists have observed high-speed solar wind coming from regions in the solar atmosphere with open magnetic field lines, called coronal holes. However, only recently, with the observations from SOHO, have we been able to measure the detailed structure of this source region". The solar wind comes in two varieties : high-speed and low-speed. The low-speed solar wind moves at "only" 1.5 million kilometres per hour, while the high-speed wind is even faster, moving at speeds as high as 3 million kilometres per hour. As it flows past Earth, the solar wind changes the shape and structure of the Earth's magnetic field. In the past, the solar wind didn't affect us directly, but as we become increasingly dependent on advanced technology, we become more susceptible to its effects. Researchers are learning that variations in the solar wind flow can cause dramatic changes in the shape of the Earth's magnetic field, which can damage satellites and disrupt communications and electrical power systems. The nature and origin of the solar wind is one of the main mysteries ESA's solar observatory SOHO was designed to solve. It has long been thought that the solar wind flows from coronal holes; what is new is the discovery that these outflows are concentrated in specific patches at the edges of the honeycomb-shaped magnetic fields. Just below the surface of the Sun there are large convection cells, and each cell has a magnetic field associated with it. "If one thinks of these cells as paving stones in a patio, then the solar wind is breaking through like grass around the edges, concentrated in the corners where the paving stones meet", said Dr. Helen Mason, University of Cambridge, England, and co-author of the paper to appear in Science. "However, at speeds

  13. Solar cycle variations in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, John W.; Lopez, Ramon E.

    1986-01-01

    The solar cycle variations of various solar wind parameters are reviewed. It is shown that there is a gradual decrease in the duration of high-speed streams from the declining phase of solar cycle 20 through the ascending phase of cycle 21 and a corresponding decrease in the annual average of the proton speed toward solar maximum. Beta, the ratio of the proton thermal pressure to magnetic pressure, undergoes a significant solar cycle variation, as expected from the variation in the IMF. Individual hourly averages of beta often exceed unity with 20 cases exceeding 10 and one case as high as 25. The Alfven Mach number shows a solar cycle variation similar to beta, lower aboard solar maximum. High-speed streams can be seen clearly in epsilon and the y component of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  14. Vibration measurement of a model wind turbine using high speed photogrammetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalpoe, D.; Khoshelham, K.; Gorte, B.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the application of the photogrammetric approach to measuring the vibration of a model wind turbine in a sequence of stereo image pairs acquired by high speed cameras. The challenge of the photogrammetric measurement of a highly dynamic phenomenon is the efficiency of the point measure

  15. Pose Measurement Method and Experiments for High-Speed Rolling Targets in a Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyuan Jia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High-precision wind tunnel simulation tests play an important role in aircraft design and manufacture. In this study, a high-speed pose vision measurement method is proposed for high-speed and rolling targets in a supersonic wind tunnel. To obtain images with high signal-to-noise ratio and avoid impacts on the aerodynamic shape of the rolling targets, a high-speed image acquisition method based on ultrathin retro-reflection markers is presented. Since markers are small-sized and some of them may be lost when the target is rolling, a novel markers layout with which markers are distributed evenly on the surface is proposed based on a spatial coding method to achieve highly accurate pose information. Additionally, a pose acquisition is carried out according to the mentioned markers layout after removing mismatching points by Case Deletion Diagnostics. Finally, experiments on measuring the pose parameters of high-speed targets in the laboratory and in a supersonic wind tunnel are conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the position measurement precision is less than 0.16 mm, the pitching and yaw angle precision less than 0.132° and the roll angle precision 0.712°.

  16. A study on high speed coupling design for wind turbine using a finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyoung Woo; Kang, Jong Hun [Dept. of Mechatronics Engineering, Jungwon University, Geosan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jeong Young [Pusan Educational Center for Computer Aided Machine Design, Pusan University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The purpose of this study is to design a high speed coupling for 3 MW wind turbines and evaluate its structural stability. A basic analysis was performed to assess the structural stability of two materials, SPS6 steel plate and a composite material (Glass7628, Glass/Epoxy), in relation to misalignment in the axial and radial directions. The entire model was analyzed for a high speed coupling based on the SPS6 steel plate, which was found to have higher stability among the two materials, and safety factors were estimated for various levels of power delivery. To test the proposed high speed coupling design, a performance test was carried out to verify the stability of the final product.

  17. Installation position determination of wind speed sensors on steel pole along a high-speed railway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊小慧; 梁习锋

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the influence of steel pole on the measurement of wind speed sensors and determinate the installation position of wind speed sensors, the flow field around wind speed sensors was investigated. Based on the three-dimensional steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations andk-ε double equations turbulent model, the field flow around the wind speed sensor and the steel pole along a high-speed railway was simulated on an unstructured grid. The grid-independent validation was conducted and the accuracy of the present numerical simulation method was validated by experiments and simulations carried out by previous researchers. Results show that the steel pole has a significant influence on the measurement results of wind speed sensors. As the distance between two wind speed sensors is varied from 0.3 to 1.0 m, the impact angles are less than ±20°, it is proposed that the distance between two wind speed sensors is 0.8 m at least, and the interval between wind speed sensors and the steel pole is more than 1.0 m with the sensors located on the upstream side.

  18. World′s first telepathology experiments employing WINDS ultra-high-speed internet satellite, nicknamed "KIZUNA"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sawai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent advances in information technology have allowed the development of a telepathology system involving high-speed transfer of high-volume histological figures via fiber optic landlines. However, at present there are geographical limits to landlines. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA has developed the "Kizuna" ultra-high speed internet satellite and has pursued its various applications. In this study we experimented with telepathology in collaboration with JAXA using Kizuna. To measure the functionality of the Wideband InterNet working engineering test and Demonstration Satellite (WINDS ultra-high speed internet satellite in remote pathological diagnosis and consultation, we examined the adequate data transfer speed and stability to conduct telepathology (both diagnosis and conferencing with functionality, and ease similar or equal to telepathology using fiber-optic landlines. Materials and Methods: We performed experiments for 2 years. In year 1, we tested the usability of the WINDS for telepathology with real-time video and virtual slide systems. These are state-of-the-art technologies requiring massive volumes of data transfer. In year 2, we tested the usability of the WINDS for three-way teleconferencing with virtual slides. Facilities in Iwate (northern Japan, Tokyo, and Okinawa were connected via the WINDS and voice conferenced while remotely examining and manipulating virtual slides. Results: Network function parameters measured using ping and Iperf were within acceptable limits. However; stage movement, zoom, and conversation suffered a lag of approximately 0.8 s when using real-time video, and a delay of 60-90 s was experienced when accessing the first virtual slide in a session. No significant lag or inconvenience was experienced during diagnosis and conferencing, and the results were satisfactory. Our hypothesis was confirmed for both remote diagnosis using real-time video and virtual slide systems, and also

  19. High speed wind tunnel tests of the PTA aircraft. [Propfan Test Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabri, A. S.; Little, B. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Propfans, advanced highly-loaded propellers, are proposed to power transport aircraft that cruise at high subsonic speeds, giving significant fuel savings over the equivalent turbofan-powered aircraft. NASA is currently sponsoring the Propfan Test Assessment Program (PTA) to provide basic data on the structural integrity and acoustic performance of the propfan. The program involves installation design, wind-tunnel tests, and flight tests of the Hamilton Standard SR-7 propfan in a wing-mount tractor installation on the Gulfstream II aircraft. This paper reports on the high-speed wind-tunnel tests and presents the computational aerodynamic methods that were employed in the analyses, design, and evaluation of the configuration. In spite of the complexity of the configuration, these methods provide aerodynamic predictions which are in excellent agreement with wind-tunnel data.

  20. Interplanetary shocks and solar wind extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Hari

    The interplanetary shocks have a very high correlation with the annual sunspot numbers during the solar cycle; however the correlation falls very low on shorter time scale. Thus poses questions and difficulty in the predictability. Space weather is largely controlled by these interplanetary shocks, solar energetic events and the extremes of solar wind. In fact most of the solar wind extremes are related to the solar energetic phenomena. It is quite well understood that the energetic events like flares, filament eruptions etc. occurring on the Sun produce high speed extremes both in terms of density and speed. There is also high speed solar wind steams associated with the coronal holes mainly because the magnetic field lines are open there and the solar plasma finds it easy to escape from there. These are relatively tenuous high speed streams and hence create low intensity geomagnetic storms of higher duration. The solar flares and/or filament eruptions usually release excess coronal mass into the interplanetary medium and thus these energetic events send out high density and high speed solar wind which statistically found to produce more intense storms. The other extremes of solar wind are those in which density and speed are much lower than the normal values. Several such events have been observed and are found to produce space weather consequences of different kind. It is found that such extremes are more common around the maximum of solar cycle 20 and 23. Most of these have significantly low Alfven Mach number. This article is intended to outline the interplanetary and geomagnetic consequences of observed by ground based and satellite systems for the solar wind extremes.

  1. Solar Wind Five

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Topics of discussion were: solar corona, MHD waves and turbulence, acceleration of the solar wind, stellar coronae and winds, long term variations, energetic particles, plasma distribution functions and waves, spatial dependences, and minor ions.

  2. Geo-effectiveness of Solar Wind Extremes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Om Vats

    2006-06-01

    Examples of extreme events of solar wind and their effect on geomagnetic conditions are discussed here. It is found that there are two regimes of high speed solar wind streams with a threshold of ∼ 850 km s-1. Geomagnetic activity enhancement rate (GAER) is defined as an average increase in Ap value per unit average increase in the peak solar wind velocity (Vp) during the stream. GAER was found to be different in the two regimes of high speed streams with +ve and -ve IMF. GAER is 0.73 and 0.53 for solar wind streams with +ve and -ve IMF respectively for the extremely high speed streams (< 850 km s-1). This indicates that streams above the threshold speed with +ve IMF are 1.4 times more effective in enhancing geomagnetic activity than those with -ve IMF. However, the high speed streams below the threshold with -ve IMF are 1.1 times more effective in enhancing geomagnetic activity than those with +ve IMF. The violent solar activity period (October–November 2003) of cycle 23 presents a very special case during which many severe and strong effects were seen in the environment of the Earth and other planets; however, the z-component of IMF (Bz) is mostly positive during this period. The most severe geomagnetic storm of this cycle occurred when Bz was positive.

  3. CIGS thin-film solar module processing: case of high-speed laser scribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gečys, Paulius; Markauskas, Edgaras; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Buecheler, Stephan; de Loor, Ronny; Burn, Andreas; Romano, Valerio; Račiukaitis, Gediminas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the laser processing of the CIGS thin-film solar cells in the case of the high-speed regime. The modern ultra-short pulsed laser was used exhibiting the pulse repetition rate of 1 MHz. Two main P3 scribing approaches were investigated - ablation of the full layer stack to expose the molybdenum back-contact, and removal of the front-contact only. The scribe quality was evaluated by SEM together with EDS spectrometer followed by electrical measurements. We also modelled the electrical behavior of a device at the mini-module scale taking into account the laser-induced damage. We demonstrated, that high-speed process at high laser pulse repetition rate induced thermal damage to the cell. However, the top-contact layer lift-off processing enabled us to reach 1.7 m/s scribing speed with a minimal device degradation. Also, we demonstrated the P3 processing in the ultra-high speed regime, where the scribing speed of 50 m/s was obtained. Finally, selected laser processes were tested in the case of mini-module scribing. Overall, we conclude, that the top-contact layer lift-off processing is the only reliable solution for high-speed P3 laser scribing, which can be implemented in the future terawatt-scale photovoltaic production facilities.

  4. CIGS thin-film solar module processing: case of high-speed laser scribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gečys, Paulius; Markauskas, Edgaras; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Buecheler, Stephan; De Loor, Ronny; Burn, Andreas; Romano, Valerio; Račiukaitis, Gediminas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the laser processing of the CIGS thin-film solar cells in the case of the high-speed regime. The modern ultra-short pulsed laser was used exhibiting the pulse repetition rate of 1 MHz. Two main P3 scribing approaches were investigated – ablation of the full layer stack to expose the molybdenum back-contact, and removal of the front-contact only. The scribe quality was evaluated by SEM together with EDS spectrometer followed by electrical measurements. We also modelled the electrical behavior of a device at the mini-module scale taking into account the laser-induced damage. We demonstrated, that high-speed process at high laser pulse repetition rate induced thermal damage to the cell. However, the top-contact layer lift-off processing enabled us to reach 1.7 m/s scribing speed with a minimal device degradation. Also, we demonstrated the P3 processing in the ultra-high speed regime, where the scribing speed of 50 m/s was obtained. Finally, selected laser processes were tested in the case of mini-module scribing. Overall, we conclude, that the top-contact layer lift-off processing is the only reliable solution for high-speed P3 laser scribing, which can be implemented in the future terawatt-scale photovoltaic production facilities. PMID:28084403

  5. Application of Rapid Prototyping Methods to High-Speed Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A. M.

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken in MSFC's 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel to determine if rapid prototyping methods could be used in the design and manufacturing of high speed wind tunnel models in direct testing applications, and if these methods would reduce model design/fabrication time and cost while providing models of high enough fidelity to provide adequate aerodynamic data, and of sufficient strength to survive the test environment. Rapid prototyping methods utilized to construct wind tunnel models in a wing-body-tail configuration were: fused deposition method using both ABS plastic and PEEK as building materials, stereolithography using the photopolymer SL-5170, selective laser sintering using glass reinforced nylon, and laminated object manufacturing using plastic reinforced with glass and 'paper'. This study revealed good agreement between the SLA model, the metal model with an FDM-ABS nose, an SLA nose, and the metal model for most operating conditions, while the FDM-ABS data diverged at higher loading conditions. Data from the initial SLS model showed poor agreement due to problems in post-processing, resulting in a different configuration. A second SLS model was tested and showed relatively good agreement. It can be concluded that rapid prototyping models show promise in preliminary aerodynamic development studies at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds.

  6. Turbulence measurements in high-speed wind tunnels using focusing laser differential interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulghum, Matthew R.

    Characterization of freestream disturbances and their effect on laminar boundary layer transition is of great importance in high-speed wind tunnel testing, where significant differences between the behavior of scale-model and free-flight transition have long been noted. However, the methods traditionally used to perform this characterization in low-speed flows present significant difficulties when applied to supersonic and especially hypersonic wind tunnels. The design and theory of a focusing laser differential interferometer (FLDI) instrument, originally invented by Smeets at the Institut Saint-Louis in the 1970s and used recently by Parziale in the CalTech T5 shock tunnel, is presented. It is a relatively-simple, non-imaging common-path interferometer for measuring refractive signals from transition and turbulence, and it has a unique ability to look through facility windows, ignore sidewall boundary-layers and vibration, and concentrate only on the refractive signal near a pair of sharp beam foci in the core flow. The instrument's low cost and ease of implementation make it a promising alternative to traditional hot-wire anemometry and particle-based methods for turbulence characterization. Benchtop experiments using a turbulent supersonic air jet demonstrate its focusing ability, frequency response, unwanted signal rejection, and ease of use. The instrument is used to optically interrogate the flow in the Penn State University Supersonic Wind Tunnel and USAF AEDC Hypervelocity Tunnel 9 for measurement of the overall intensity and spectra of freestream disturbances. Precise characterization of the strength and spectral content of the disturbances provides insight into their nature and potential effect upon boundary layer transition. A special feature of the FLDI instrument used here is the replacement of traditional fixed Wollaston prisms with variable Sanderson prisms for laser-beam separation and recombination.

  7. Wave and wave-particle processes induced by interplanetary high-speed stream impact on the magnetosphere under conditions of the moderate and very low solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Alexander; Polyushkina, Tatyana

    2010-05-01

    Unusually prolonged minimum of solar activity in 2008-2009 gave to scientists a unique opportunity to retrace solar-magnetospheric phenomena in their pure form, without a superposition of concurrent events or extraneous disturbances. In this work, we study a wave aspect of the solar wind - magnetosphere interaction by way of two examples of high-speed streams flowing around the magnetosphere. One of these streams was observed in January 2005 when the solar activity was moderate during the declining phase of the 23rd sunspot cycle. The other event occurred in March 2009 against the background of very low solar activity. In the latter case we found a clear demonstration of direct penetration of the ULF waves from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. In the January 2005 event, however, indications of the direct wave penetration are far less evident. The reason is a high level of magnetic disturbance caused by an interplanetary shock wave forestalling the high speed stream in January 2005. In spite of different kinds of conditions for magnetospheric ULF wave generation in these two cases, both events launch similar chains of processes leading to enhancement of relativistic electron flux at the geosynchronous orbit within two days after a peak of a high-speed solar wind stream. This suggests that even with the very low solar activity the high energy particles can present problem for satellite electronics. The mechanisms of particles acceleration under the action of Alfvèn waves in the magnetosphere are discussed briefly. The work was partly supported by RFBR grants 09-06-00048 and 10-05-00661.

  8. Sources of solar wind over the solar activity cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Giannina

    2013-05-01

    Fast solar wind has been recognized, about 40 years ago, to originate in polar coronal holes (CHs), that, since then, have been identified with sources of recurrent high speed wind streams. As of today, however, there is no general consensus about whether there are, within CHs, preferential locations where the solar wind is accelerated. Knowledge of slow wind sources is far from complete as well. Slow wind observed in situ can be traced back to its solar source by backward extrapolation of magnetic fields whose field lines are streamlines of the outflowing plasma. However, this technique often has not the necessary precision for an indisputable identification of the region where wind originates. As the Sun progresses through its activity cycle, different wind sources prevail and contribute to filling the heliosphere. Our present knowledge of different wind sources is here summarized. Also, a Section addresses the problem of wind acceleration in the low corona, as inferred from an analysis of UV data, and illustrates changes between fast and slow wind profiles and possible signatures of changes along the solar cycle. A brief reference to recent work about the deep roots of solar wind and their changes over different solar cycles concludes the review.

  9. Variability of ionospheric TEC during solar and geomagnetic minima (2008 and 2009: external high speed stream drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Verkhoglyadova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We study solar wind–ionosphere coupling through the late declining phase/solar minimum and geomagnetic minimum phases during the last solar cycle (SC23 – 2008 and 2009. This interval was characterized by sequences of high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs. The concomitant geomagnetic response was moderate geomagnetic storms and high-intensity, long-duration continuous auroral activity (HILDCAA events. The JPL Global Ionospheric Map (GIM software and the GPS total electron content (TEC database were used to calculate the vertical TEC (VTEC and estimate daily averaged values in separate latitude and local time ranges. Our results show distinct low- and mid-latitude VTEC responses to HSSs during this interval, with the low-latitude daytime daily averaged values increasing by up to 33 TECU (annual average of ~20 TECU near local noon (12:00 to 14:00 LT in 2008. In 2009 during the minimum geomagnetic activity (MGA interval, the response to HSSs was a maximum of ~30 TECU increases with a slightly lower average value than in 2008. There was a weak nighttime ionospheric response to the HSSs. A well-studied solar cycle declining phase interval, 10–22 October 2003, was analyzed for comparative purposes, with daytime low-latitude VTEC peak values of up to ~58 TECU (event average of ~55 TECU. The ionospheric VTEC changes during 2008–2009 were similar but ~60% less intense on average. There is an evidence of correlations of filtered daily averaged VTEC data with Ap index and solar wind speed.

    We use the infrared NO and CO2 emission data obtained with SABER on TIMED as a proxy for the radiation balance of the thermosphere. It is shown that infrared emissions increase during HSS events possibly due to increased energy input into the auroral region associated with HILDCAAs. The 2008–2009 HSS intervals were ~85% less intense than the 2003 early declining phase event, with annual averages of daily infrared NO emission power of ~ 3.3

  10. Assessing trophic linkages in and around offshore wind farms using two high-speed optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudeck, Tim; Hufnagl, Marc; Auch, Dominik; Eckhardt, André; Möller, Klas-Ove; van Beusekom, Justus; Walter, Bettina; Möllmann, Christian; Floeter, Jens

    2016-04-01

    In search for clean, renewable energy sources European countries have built and planned numerous Offshore Wind Farms (OWF) in the North Sea region. While some research has been carried out on their influence on marine mammals and bottom-dwelling organisms, less is known about fish and lower trophic levels in these areas. Yet, marine mammals purposely seek these structures and there are indications that there are higher chances of fish encounters. However, the local bottom-up effects probably driving these aggregations of higher trophic level organisms are poorly understood. In this study we show preliminary results of primary and secondary production in and around German OWFs in the North Sea using a Laser Optical Particle Counter and a Video Plankton Recorder. With the two sensors working simultaneously on the TRIAXUS system at high speed, we were able to investigate and ground-truth size-spectrum changes on a very high spatial resolution making it possible to detect OWF effects from local to larger scales. Our results show new possibilities in OWF research and the necessity to collect highly resolved field data for meaningful results in these dynamic environments. Furthermore, the use of size spectra simplifies the integration of energy flow through low and medium trophic levels into biogeochemical models by using only a single automatically measurable variable such as size.

  11. Magnetic-Driven Winds from Post-AGB Stars: Solutions for High Speed Winds and Extreme Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    García-Segura, G; Franco, J; Garcia-Segura, Guillermo; Lopez, Jose Alberto; Franco, Jose

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of post-AGB winds driven solely by magnetic pressure from the stellar surface. It is found that winds can reach high speeds under this assumption, and lead to the formation of highly collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Bipolar knotty jets with periodic features and constant velocity are well reproduced by the models. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of $\\kms$ up to $10^3$ $\\kms$ are calculated, yielding outflows with linear momenta in the range $10^{36}-10^{40} \\gcms$, and kinetic energies in the range $10^{42}-10^{47} $ erg. These results are in accord with recent observations of proto-planetary nebulae that have pointed out serious energy and momentum deficits if radiation pressure is considered as the only driver for these outflows. Our models strengthen the notion that the large mass-loss rates of post-AGB stars, together with the short transition times from the late AGB to the planetary nebula stage, could be directly linked with the generation ...

  12. In Situ Measurement of Wind-Induced Pulse Response of Sound Barrier Based on High-Speed Imaging Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Chunli Zhu; Jie Guo; Dashan Zhang; Yuan Shen; Dongcai Liu

    2016-01-01

    The lifetime of the sound barrier is threatened by high-speed train-induced impulsive wind pressure as it passes by. The vibration response of the sound barrier during the process of train passing is difficult to be measured using conventional measurement methods because of the inconvenience of the installation of markers on the sound barrier. In this paper, the high-speed camera is used to record the whole process of the train passing by the sound barrier. Then, a displacement extraction alg...

  13. Solar wind travel time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.

    A useful rule of thumb in solar terrestrial studies is that the solar wind travels 4 Earth radii (RE) per minute. Long-term studies of solar wind velocity [e.g., Luhmann et al., 1993; 1994] show that the median velocity is about 420 km/s, corresponding to 3.96 RE min-1. The quartiles are about 370 km/s and 495 km/s, corresponding to 3.48 Re min-1 and 4.66 Re min-1 respectively. This number helps estimate the delays expected when observing a discontinuity at a solar wind monitor; one example is ISEE-3 when it was at the forward libration point (about 60 min). It is also helpful for estimating how much time passes before the dayside magnetosphere is compressed as denser solar wind flows by (about 2.5 min).

  14. In Situ Measurement of Wind-Induced Pulse Response of Sound Barrier Based on High-Speed Imaging Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The lifetime of the sound barrier is threatened by high-speed train-induced impulsive wind pressure as it passes by. The vibration response of the sound barrier during the process of train passing is difficult to be measured using conventional measurement methods because of the inconvenience of the installation of markers on the sound barrier. In this paper, the high-speed camera is used to record the whole process of the train passing by the sound barrier. Then, a displacement extraction algorithm based on the theory of Taylor expansion is proposed to obtain the vibration response curve. Compared with the result simulated by using the finite element method, the video extraction result shows the same head wave and tail wave phenomenon, demonstrating that the vibration measurement by using the high-speed imaging technology is an effective measuring way. It can achieve noncontact and remote vibration measurement and has important practical value.

  15. The Next Generation of High-Speed Dynamic Stability Wind Tunnel Testing (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomek, Deborah M.; Sewall, William G.; Mason, Stan E.; Szchur, Bill W. A.

    2006-01-01

    Throughout industry, accurate measurement and modeling of dynamic derivative data at high-speed conditions has been an ongoing challenge. The expansion of flight envelopes and non-conventional vehicle design has greatly increased the demand for accurate prediction and modeling of vehicle dynamic behavior. With these issues in mind, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) embarked on the development and shakedown of a high-speed dynamic stability test technique that addresses the longstanding problem of accurately measuring dynamic derivatives outside the low-speed regime. The new test technique was built upon legacy technology, replacing an antiquated forced oscillation system, and greatly expanding the capabilities beyond classic forced oscillation testing at both low and high speeds. The modern system is capable of providing a snapshot of dynamic behavior over a periodic cycle for varying frequencies, not just a damping derivative term at a single frequency.

  16. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Hegde; K. M. Hiremath; Vijayakumar H. Doddamani; Shashanka R. Gurumath

    2015-09-01

    Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wave-lengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and radiative flux of coronal holes are extracted and are examined for the association with high speed solar wind parameters. We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the same height where 193 Å line is formed in the corona.

  17. Solar wind and its interaction with the magnetosphere - Measured parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenn, R.

    1981-01-01

    The sun and the solar wind are considered in terms of the 'ballerina' model first proposed by Alfven (1977), taking into account high speed streams, the slow solar wind, stream-stream interactions, the relation of streams and magnetic structure, and transients caused by solar activity. The main features of the solar wind behavior are illustrated with the aid of data, covering one complete solar rotation in 1974/1975, which were obtained with instruments aboard the Helios-1 solar probe. It is pointed out that the solar wind acts like a huge buffer pushing onto the earth's magnetosphere with a highly variable pressure. Of the energy in the highly variable solar wind reservoir only a tiny fraction is absorbed by the magnetosphere in an obviously very nonstationary way.

  18. Solar wind and its interaction with the magnetosphere - Measured parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenn, R.

    The sun and the solar wind are considered in terms of the 'ballerina' model first proposed by Alfven (1977), taking into account high speed streams, the slow solar wind, stream-stream interactions, the relation of streams and magnetic structure, and transients caused by solar activity. The main features of the solar wind behavior are illustrated with the aid of data, covering one complete solar rotation in 1974/1975, which were obtained with instruments aboard the Helios-1 solar probe. It is pointed out that the solar wind acts like a huge buffer pushing onto the earth's magnetosphere with a highly variable pressure. Of the energy in the highly variable solar wind reservoir only a tiny fraction is absorbed by the magnetosphere in an obviously very nonstationary way.

  19. Characterization of the High-Speed-Stage Bearing Skidding of Wind Turbine Gearboxes Induced by Dynamic Electricity Grid Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helsen, Jan; Guillaume, Patrick; Guo, Yi; Keller, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Bearing behavior is an important factor for wind turbine drivetrain reliability. Extreme loads and dynamic excitations pose challenges to the bearing design and therefore its performance. Excessive skidding of the bearing rollers should be avoided because it can cause scuffing failures. Excitations coming from wind and the electricity grid can subject the drivetrain to fluctuating torque and nontorque loads. Wind-induced excitations have been investigated predominantly in literature. However, modern wind turbines are subjected more and more to grid-induced loads because of stricter electricity grid regulations. For example, during fault-ride-through events, turbines are required to stay connected for a longer period of time during the grid failure. This work investigates the influence of electrically induced excitations on the skidding behaviour of the tapered roller bearings on the high-speed stage of a wind turbine gearbox. This skidding behaviour during dynamic events is described as a potential bearing failure initiator by many researchers; however, only limited full-scale dynamic testing is documented. Therefore, a dedicated gridloss-type event is defined in the paper and conducted in a dynamometer test on a full-scale wind turbine nacelle. During the event, a complete electricity grid failure is simulated while the turbine is at rated speed and predefined torque levels. Particular focus is on the characterization of the high-speed shaft tapered roller bearing slip behavior. Strain-gauge bridges in grooves along the circumference of the outer ring are used to characterize the bearing load zone in detail. It is shown that during the torque reversals of the transient event, roller slip can be induced. This indicates the potential of the applied load case to go beyond the preload of the tapered roller bearing. Furthermore, the relation between the applied torque and skidding level is studied.

  20. Characterization of the High-Speed-Stage Bearing Skidding of Wind Turbine Gearboxes Induced by Dynamic Electricity Grid Events: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helsen, Jan; Guillaume, Patrick; Guo, Yi; Keller, Jonathan

    2016-05-18

    Bearing behavior is an important factor for wind turbine drivetrain reliability. Extreme loads and dynamic excitations pose challenges to the bearing design and therefore its performance. Excessive skidding of the bearing rollers should be avoided because it can cause scuffing failures. Excitations coming from wind and the electricity grid can subject the drivetrain to fluctuating torque and nontorque loads. Wind-induced excitations have been investigated predominantly in literature. However, modern wind turbines are subjected more and more to grid-induced loads because of stricter electricity grid regulations. For example, during fault-ride-through events, turbines are required to stay connected for a longer period of time during the grid failure. This work investigates the influence of electrically induced excitations on the skidding behaviour of the tapered roller bearings on the high-speed stage of a wind turbine gearbox. This skidding behaviour during dynamic events is described as a potential bearing failure initiator by many researchers; however, only limited full-scale dynamic testing is documented. Therefore, a dedicated gridloss-type event is defined in the paper and conducted in a dynamometer test on a full-scale wind turbine nacelle. During the event, a complete electricity grid failure is simulated while the turbine is at rated speed and predefined torque levels. Particular focus is on the characterization of the high-speed shaft tapered roller bearing slip behavior. Strain-gauge bridges in grooves along the circumference of the outer ring are used to characterize the bearing load zone in detail. It is shown that during the torque reversals of the transient event, roller slip can be induced. This indicates the potential of the applied load case to go beyond the preload of the tapered roller bearing. Furthermore, the relation between the applied torque and skidding level is studied.

  1. CONSTRAINING HIGH-SPEED WINDS IN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES THROUGH OBSERVATIONS OF ANOMALOUS DOPPLER SHIFTS DURING TRANSIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller-Ricci Kempton, Eliza [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rauscher, Emily, E-mail: ekempton@ucolick.org [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) dynamical models of hot Jupiter atmospheres predict very strong wind speeds. For tidally locked hot Jupiters, winds at high altitude in the planet's atmosphere advect heat from the day side to the cooler night side of the planet. Net wind speeds on the order of 1-10 km s{sup -1} directed towards the night side of the planet are predicted at mbar pressures, which is the approximate pressure level probed by transmission spectroscopy. These winds should result in an observed blueshift of spectral lines in transmission on the order of the wind speed. Indeed, Snellen et al. recently observed a 2 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1} blueshift of CO transmission features for HD 209458b, which has been interpreted as a detection of the day-to-night (substellar to anti-stellar) winds that have been predicted by 3D atmospheric dynamics modeling. Here, we present the results of a coupled 3D atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model, which predicts the Doppler-shifted spectrum of a hot Jupiter during transit resulting from winds in the planet's atmosphere. We explore four different models for the hot Jupiter atmosphere using different prescriptions for atmospheric drag via interaction with planetary magnetic fields. We find that models with no magnetic drag produce net Doppler blueshifts in the transmission spectrum of {approx}2 km s{sup -1} and that lower Doppler shifts of {approx}1 km s{sup -1} are found for the higher drag cases, results consistent with-but not yet strongly constrained by-the Snellen et al. measurement. We additionally explore the possibility of recovering the average terminator wind speed as a function of altitude by measuring Doppler shifts of individual spectral lines and spatially resolving wind speeds across the leading and trailing terminators during ingress and egress.

  2. Fault Tolerant and Optimal Control of Wind Turbines with Distributed High-Speed Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Giger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the control scheme of a distributed high-speed generator system with a total amount of 12 generators and nominal generator speed of 7000 min − 1 is studied. Specifically, a fault tolerant control (FTC scheme is proposed to keep the turbine in operation in the presence of up to four simultaneous generator faults. The proposed controller structure consists of two layers: The upper layer is the baseline controller, which is separated into a partial load region with the generator torque as an actuating signal and the full-load operation region with the collective pitch angle as the other actuating signal. In addition, the lower layer is responsible for the fault diagnosis and FTC characteristics of the distributed generator drive train. The fault reconstruction and fault tolerant control strategy are tested in simulations with several actuator faults of different types.

  3. Acceleration of weakly collisional solar-type winds

    CERN Document Server

    Zouganelis, I; Landi, S; Maksimovic, M; Pantellini, F

    2005-01-01

    One of the basic properties of the solar wind, that is the high speed of the fast wind, is still not satisfactorily explained. This is mainly due to the theoretical difficulty of treating weakly collisional plasmas. The fluid approach implies that the medium is collision dominated and that the particle velocity distributions are close to Maxwellians. However the electron velocity distributions observed in the solar wind depart significantly from Maxwellians. Recent kinetic collisionless models (called exospheric) using velocity distributions with a suprathermal tail have been able to reproduce the high speeds of the fast solar wind. In this letter we present new developments of these models by generalizing them over a large range of corona conditions. We also present new results obtained by numerical simulations that include collisions. Both approaches calculate the heat flux self-consistently without any assumption on the energy transport. We show that both approaches - the exospheric and the collisional one...

  4. Research on dual-stator winding multi-phase high-speed induction generator with rectifier load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on analysis and calculation of the relation between current harmonics and MMF harmonics in the dual-stator winding multi-phase high-speed induction gen-erator with a rectifier load, a new idea, which divides the generator system into two sub-systems to be analyzed individually, is presented. For the sub-system of the 12-phase power winding with a rectifier load, the loop current method is used to establish network equation set in terms of the network graph theory. The numerical stability problem is solved by alternating use of fixed time-step and varied time-step, and the voltage and current with their fundamental components of the power winding are obtained. For the other sub-system of the induction generator with dual-stator winding and solid cage rotor, the electromagnetic field analysis method and the multi-variable optimization approach are combined to get the con-trol winding current and stator frequency. Calculated results well match experiment results, indicating that the new proposed method is of effectiveness and high ac-curacy.

  5. High speed video shooting with continuous-wave laser illumination in laboratory modeling of wind - wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Caulliez, Guillemette; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim

    2014-05-01

    Three examples of usage of high-speed video filming in investigation of wind-wave interaction in laboratory conditions is described. Experiments were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) and at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m, wind velocity up to 10 m/s). A combination of PIV-measurements, optical measurements of water surface form and wave gages were used for detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. The modified PIV-method is based on the use of continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination of the airflow seeded by particles and high-speed video. During the experiments on the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS Green (532 nm) CW laser with 1.5 Wt output power was used as a source for light sheet. High speed digital camera Videosprint (VS-Fast) was used for taking visualized air flow images with the frame rate 2000 Hz. Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave profile. The mean wind velocity profiles were retrieved using conditional in phase averaging like in [1]. In the experiments on the LASIF more powerful Argon laser (4 Wt, CW) was used as well as high-speed camera with higher sensitivity and resolution: Optronics Camrecord CR3000x2, frame rate 3571 Hz, frame size 259×1696 px. In both series of experiments spherical 0.02 mm polyamide particles with inertial time 7 ms were used for seeding airflow. New particle seeding system based on utilization of air pressure is capable of injecting 2 g of particles per second for 1.3 - 2.4 s without flow disturbance. Used in LASIF this system provided high particle density on PIV-images. In combination with high-resolution camera it allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from

  6. Electric solar wind sail mass budget model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The electric solar wind sail (E-sail is a new type of propellantless propulsion system for Solar System transportation, which uses the natural solar wind to produce spacecraft propulsion. The E-sail consists of thin centrifugally stretched tethers that are kept charged by an onboard electron gun and, as such, experience Coulomb drag through the high-speed solar wind plasma stream. This paper discusses a mass breakdown and a performance model for an E-sail spacecraft that hosts a mission-specific payload of prescribed mass. In particular, the model is able to estimate the total spacecraft mass and its propulsive acceleration as a function of various design parameters such as the number of tethers and their length. A number of subsystem masses are calculated assuming existing or near-term E-sail technology. In light of the obtained performance estimates, an E-sail represents a promising propulsion system for a variety of transportation needs in the Solar System.

  7. Corona and solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withbroe, G. L.

    1986-04-01

    The Pinhole/Occulter Facility is a powerful tool for studying the physics of the extended corona and origins of the solar wind. Spectroscopic data acquired by the P/OF coronal instruments can greatly expand empirical information about temperatures, densities, flow velocities, magnetic fields, and chemical abundances in the corona out to r or approx. 10 solar radii. Such information is needed to provide tight empirical constraints on critical physical processes involved in the transport and dissipation of energy and momentum, the heating and acceleration of plasma, and the acceleration of energetic particles. Because of its high sensitivity, high spatial and temporal resolutions, and powerful capabilities for plasma diagnostics, P/OF can significantly increase our empirical knowledge about coronal streamers and transients and thereby advance the understanding of the physics of these phenomena. P/OF observations can be used to establish the role in solar wind generation, if any, of small-scale dynamical phenomena, such as spicules, macrospicules and coronal bullets, and the role of the fine-scale structures, such as polar plumes. Finally, simultaneous measurements by the P/OF coronal and hard X-ray instruments can provide critical empirical information concerning nonthermal energy releases and acceleration of energetic particles in the corona.

  8. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  9. Detached-eddy simulation of flow around high-speed train on a bridge under cross winds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敬文; 高广军; 朱春丽

    2016-01-01

    In order to describe an investigation of the flow around high-speed train on a bridge under cross winds using detached-eddy simulation (DES), a 1/8th scale model of a three-car high-speed train and a typical bridge model are employed, Numerical wind tunnel technology based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used, and the CFD models are set as stationary models. The Reynolds number of the flow, based on the inflow velocity and the height of the vehicle, is 1.9×106. The computations are conducted under three cases, train on the windward track on the bridge (WWC), train on the leeward track on the bridge (LWC) and train on the flat ground (FGC). Commercial software FLUENT is used and the mesh sensitivity research is carried out by three different grids: coarse, medium and fine. Results show that compared with FGC case, the side force coefficients of the head cars for the WWC and LWC cases increases by 14% and 29%, respectively; the coefficients of middle cars for the WWC and LWC increase by 32% and 10%, respectively; and that of the tail car increases by 45% for the WWC whereas decreases by 2% for the LWC case. The most notable thing is that the side force and the rolling moment of the head car are greater for the LWC, while the side force and the rolling moment of the middle car and the tail car are greater for the WWC. Comparing the velocity profiles at different locations, the flow is significantly influenced by the bridge−train system when the air is close to it. For the three cases (WWC, LWC and FGC), the pressure on the windward side of train is mostly positive while that of the leeward side is negative. The discrepancy of train’s aerodynamic force is due to the different surface area of positive pressure and negative pressure zone. Many vortices are born on the leeward edge of the roofs. Theses vortices develop downstream, detach and dissipate into the wake region. The eddies develop irregularly, leading to a noticeably turbulent flow at leeward side

  10. Forecasting Solar Wind Speeds

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K

    2006-01-01

    By explicitly taking into account effects of Alfven waves, I derive from a simple energetics argument a fundamental relation which predicts solar wind (SW) speeds in the vicinity of the earth from physical properties on the sun. Kojima et al. recently found from their observations that a ratio of surface magnetic field strength to an expansion factor of open magnetic flux tubes is a good indicator of the SW speed. I show by using the derived relation that this nice correlation is an evidence of the Alfven wave which accelerates SW in expanding flux tubes. The observations further require that fluctuation amplitudes of magnetic field lines at the surface should be almost universal in different coronal holes, which needs to be tested by future observations.

  11. Martian ionosphere response to solar wind variability during solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Lester, Mark; Witasse, Olivier; Mays, M. Leila; Hall, Benjamin E. S.; Milan, Stephen E.; Cartacci, Marco; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Andrews, David; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2016-04-01

    Solar cycle variations in solar radiation create notable density changes in the Martian ionosphere. In addition to this long-term variability, there are numerous short-term and non-recurrent solar events that hit Mars which need to be considered, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), Co-Rotation Interaction Regions (CIRs), solar flares, or solar wind high speed streams. The response of the Martian plasma system to each of these events is often unusual, especially during the long period of extreme low solar activity in 2008 and 2009. This work shows the long-term solar cycle impact on the ionosphere of Mars using data from The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS), and The Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3), and with empirical and numerical models on Mars Express. Particular attention is given to the different ionospheric responses observed during the last, extended solar minimum. Mars' ionospheric response followed a similar pattern to the response observed in the Earth's ionosphere, despite the large differences related to the inner-origin of the magnetic field of both planets. The ionospheric temperature was cooler, the topside scale height was smaller and almost constant with altitude, the secondary ionospheric layer practically disappeared and the whole atmospheric total electron content (TEC) suffered an extreme reduction of about 30-40%, not predicted before by models. Moreover, there is a larger probability for the induced magnetic field to be present in the ionosphere, than in other phases of the solar cycle. The short-term variability is also addressed with the study of an ICME followed by a fast stream that hit Mars in March 2008, where solar wind data are provided by ACE and STEREO-B and supported by simulations using the WSA-ENLIL Model. The solar wind conditions lead to the formation of a CIR centred on the interface of the fast and the slow solar wind streams. Mars' system reacted to

  12. Validation of the solar heating and cooling high speed performance (HISPER) computer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D. B.

    1980-10-01

    Developed to give a quick and accurate predictions HISPER, a simplification of the TRNSYS program, achieves its computational speed by not simulating detailed system operations or performing detailed load computations. In order to validate the HISPER computer for air systems the simulation was compared to the actual performance of an operational test site. Solar insolation, ambient temperature, water usage rate, and water main temperatures from the data tapes for an office building in Huntsville, Alabama were used as input. The HISPER program was found to predict the heating loads and solar fraction of the loads with errors of less than ten percent. Good correlation was found on both a seasonal basis and a monthly basis. Several parameters (such as infiltration rate and the outside ambient temperature above which heating is not required) were found to require careful selection for accurate simulation.

  13. Anisotropy of solar wind fluctuations: fast wind vs slow wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasso, S.; Milano, L. J.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    The fluctuations in the solar wind are often modeled in terms of two distinct populations: (a) a 'wave-like' population with quasi-parallel wavenumbers and (b) a quasi-two dimensional 'turbulent-like' fluctuations with perpendicular wavenumbers. Here the qualification "quasi-parallel" or "quasi-2D" means that nearby wavevectors are grouped together in an idealzed way, for simplicity. The relative abundance of these two populations is important in gaining insight on the dynamics of waves or turbulence in the solar wind, and also in understanding the transport of energetic particle populations, as turbulence geometry has a major impact on scattering. It has been established in the literature that turbulence is, generally speaking, more developed in the slow solar wind, with power spectra closer to the kolmogorov value at 1AU, while the fast solar wind is more "Alfvenic", typically with higher values of the cross helicity. It seems natural therefore to investigate the anisotropy structure of solar wind fluctuations as a function of wind speed. We present here our preliminary results in this regard, obtained from magnetic and plasma data from the ACE specraft, at 1AU, essentially in the ecliptic plane. We also discuss possible implications for the modeling the evolution of waves and turbulence in the solar wind.

  14. Highly Alfvenic Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly thought that fast solar wind tends to be highly Alfvenic, with strong correlations between velocity and magnetic fluctuations, but examples have been known for over 20 years in which slow wind is both Alfvenic and has many other properties more typically expected of fast solar wind. This paper will present a search for examples of such flows from more recent data, and will begin to characterize the general characteristics of them. A very preliminary search suggests that such intervals are more common in the rising phase of the solar cycle. These intervals are important for providing constraints on models of solar wind acceleration, and in particular the role waves might or might not play in that process.

  15. Wind in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor I am always looking for commonly experienced Earthly phenomena to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote short "TPT" articles on frost and precipitation. The present article is on winds in the solar system. A windy day or storm might…

  16. Wind in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor I am always looking for commonly experienced Earthly phenomena to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote short "TPT" articles on frost and precipitation. The present article is on winds in the solar system. A windy day or storm might motivate…

  17. Wind in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor I am always looking for commonly experienced Earthly phenomena to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote short "TPT" articles on frost and precipitation. The present article is on winds in the solar system. A windy day or storm might…

  18. Constraints on neon and argon isotopic fractionation in solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshik, Alex; Mabry, Jennifer; Hohenberg, Charles; Marrocchi, Yves; Pravdivtseva, Olga; Burnett, Donald; Olinger, Chad; Wiens, Roger; Reisenfeld, Dan; Allton, Judith; McNamara, Karen; Stansbery, Eileen; Jurewicz, Amy J G

    2007-10-19

    To evaluate the isotopic composition of the solar nebula from which the planets formed, the relation between isotopes measured in the solar wind and on the Sun's surface needs to be known. The Genesis Discovery mission returned independent samples of three types of solar wind produced by different solar processes that provide a check on possible isotopic variations, or fractionation, between the solar-wind and solar-surface material. At a high level of precision, we observed no significant inter-regime differences in 20Ne/22Ne or 36Ar/38Ar values. For 20Ne/22Ne, the difference between low- and high-speed wind components is 0.24 +/- 0.37%; for 36Ar/38Ar, it is 0.11 +/- 0.26%. Our measured 36Ar/38Ar ratio in the solar wind of 5.501 +/- 0.005 is 3.42 +/- 0.09% higher than that of the terrestrial atmosphere, which may reflect atmospheric losses early in Earth's history.

  19. Development of a high-speed H-alpha camera system for the observation of rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.; Dennis, Brian R.; Orwig, Larry E.; Chen, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    A solid-state digital camera was developed for obtaining H alpha images of solar flares with 0.1 s time resolution. Beginning in the summer of 1988, this system will be operated in conjunction with SMM's hard X-ray burst spectrometer (HXRBS). Important electron time-of-flight effects that are crucial for determining the flare energy release processes should be detectable with these combined H alpha and hard X-ray observations. Charge-injection device (CID) cameras provide 128 x 128 pixel images simultaneously in the H alpha blue wing, line center, and red wing, or other wavelength of interest. The data recording system employs a microprocessor-controlled, electronic interface between each camera and a digital processor board that encodes the data into a serial bitstream for continuous recording by a standard video cassette recorder. Only a small fraction of the data will be permanently archived through utilization of a direct memory access interface onto a VAX-750 computer. In addition to correlations with hard X-ray data, observations from the high speed H alpha camera will also be correlated and optical and microwave data and data from future MAX 1991 campaigns. Whether the recorded optical flashes are simultaneous with X-ray peaks to within 0.1 s, are delayed by tenths of seconds or are even undetectable, the results will have implications on the validity of both thermal and nonthermal models of hard X-ray production.

  20. A survey of solar wind conditions at 5 AU: A tool for interpreting solar wind-magnetosphere interactions at Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wilkes Ebert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examine Ulysses solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF observations at 5 AU for two ~13 month intervals during the rising and declining phases of solar cycle 23 and the predicted response of the Jovian magnetosphere during these times. The declining phase solar wind, composed primarily of corotating interaction regions and high-speed streams, was, on average, faster, hotter, less dense, and more Alfvénic relative to the rising phase solar wind, composed mainly of slow wind and interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Interestingly, none of solar wind and IMF distributions reported here were bimodal, a feature used to explain the bimodal distribution of bow shock and magnetopause standoff distances observed at Jupiter. Instead, many of these distributions had extended, non-Gaussian tails that resulted in large standard deviations and much larger mean over median values. The distribution of predicted Jupiter bow shock and magnetopause standoff distances during these intervals were also not bimodal, the mean/median values being larger during the declining phase by ~1 – 4%. These results provide data-derived solar wind and IMF boundary conditions at 5 AU for models aimed at studying solar wind-magnetosphere interactions at Jupiter and can support the science investigations of upcoming Jupiter system missions. Here, we provide expectations for Juno, which is scheduled to arrive at Jupiter in July 2016. Accounting for the long-term decline in solar wind dynamic pressure reported by McComas et al. (2013, Jupiter’s bow shock and magnetopause is expected to be at least 8 – 12% further from Jupiter, if these trends continue.

  1. Nonlinear analysis of wind-induced vibration of high-speed railway catenary and its influence on pantograph-catenary interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Hongrui; Lu, Xiaobing; Zhang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The wind-induced vibration of the high-speed catenary and the dynamic behaviour of the pantograph-catenary under stochastic wind field are firstly analysed. The catenary model is established based on nonlinear cable and truss elements, which can fully describe the nonlinearity of each wire and the initial configuration. The model of the aerodynamic forces acting on the messenger/contact wire is deduced by considering the effect of the vertical and horizontal fluctuating winds. The vertical and horizontal fluctuating winds are simulated by employing the Davenport and Panofsky spectrums, respectively. The aerodynamic coefficients of the contact/messenger wire are calculated through computational fluid dynamics. The wind-induced vibration response of catenary is analysed with different wind speeds and angles. Its frequency-domain characteristics are discussed using Auto Regression model. Finally, a pantograph model is introduced and the contact force of the pantograph-catenary under stochastic wind is studied. The results show that both the wind speed and the attack angle exert a significant effect on the wind-induced vibration. The existence of the groove on the contact wire cross-section leads to a significant change of the aerodynamic coefficient, which affects largely the aerodynamic forces applied on the catenary wires, as well as the vibration response. The vibration frequency with high spectral power mainly concentrates on the predominant frequency of the fluctuating wind and the natural frequency of catenary. The increase in the wind speed results in a significant deterioration of the current collection. The numerical example shows that a relatively stable current collection can be ensured when the wind flows at the relatively horizontal direction.

  2. Wind loads on solar energy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, B.J.M. van; Geurts, C.P.W.; Borsboom, W.A.; Blackmore, P.

    2005-01-01

    Wind loads on solar energy systems are not covered by current wind loading standards. This paper describes results of a parametric study into the wind loads 0on solar energy systems,. which are placed on flat roofs. Wind tunnel measurements have been carried out on a number of configurations. The

  3. Wind loads on solar energy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, B.J.M. van; Geurts, C.P.W.; Borsboom, W.A.; Blackmore, P.

    2005-01-01

    Wind loads on solar energy systems are not covered by current wind loading standards. This paper describes results of a parametric study into the wind loads 0on solar energy systems,. which are placed on flat roofs. Wind tunnel measurements have been carried out on a number of configurations. The re

  4. Wind loads on solar energy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, B.J.M. van; Geurts, C.P.W.; Borsboom, W.A.; Blackmore, P.

    2005-01-01

    Wind loads on solar energy systems are not covered by current wind loading standards. This paper describes results of a parametric study into the wind loads 0on solar energy systems,. which are placed on flat roofs. Wind tunnel measurements have been carried out on a number of configurations. The re

  5. Velocity and abundance of silicon ions in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochsler, P.

    1989-03-01

    Using data from the ISEE-3 ion composition instrument (ICI), velocities and abundances of silicon ions in the solar wind have been determined. The period of investigation covers the maximum of solar cycle 21, beginning with launch of ISEE-3 in August 1978 and ending at the removal of the spacecraft from the Lagrangian Point L1 in June 1982. The results generally confirm previous ICI observations of iron, the other heavy element with a low first ionization potential measured with the ICI. Silicon ions (and other ions in the same M/Q range) tend to stream at the bulk velocity of /sup 4/He/sup + +/ in low-speed solar wind. At high-speed solar wind. Si lags by up to or about 20 km/s after /sup 4/He/sup + +/. By means of a minimum variance estimation technique, fluxes (and densities) of silicon in the solar wind have been obtained free of bias. An average Si/O flux ratio of 0.19 +- 0.04 is derived. This value is larger by a factor of 3 or 4 than the Si/O abundance ratio at the solar surface. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  6. 77 FR 61597 - Avalon Wind, LLC; Avalon Wind 2, LLC; Catalina Solar, LLC; Catalina Solar 2, LLC; Pacific Wind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Avalon Wind, LLC; Avalon Wind 2, LLC; Catalina Solar, LLC; Catalina Solar 2, LLC; Pacific Wind Lessee, LLC; Pacific Wind 2, LLC; Valentine Solar, LLC; EDF Renewable Development, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on September 27, 2012, Avalon Wind...

  7. Turbulence in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of solar wind turbulence from both the theoretical and observational perspective. It argues that the interplanetary medium offers the best opportunity to directly study turbulent fluctuations in collisionless plasmas. In fact, during expansion, the solar wind evolves towards a state characterized by large-amplitude fluctuations in all observed parameters, which resembles, at least at large scales, the well-known hydrodynamic turbulence. This text starts with historical references to past observations and experiments on turbulent flows. It then introduces the Navier-Stokes equations for a magnetized plasma whose low-frequency turbulence evolution is described within the framework of the MHD approximation. It also considers the scaling of plasma and magnetic field fluctuations and the study of nonlinear energy cascades within the same framework. It reports observations of turbulence in the ecliptic and at high latitude, treating Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations separately in...

  8. Solar Wind Variation with the Cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I. S. Veselovsky; A. V. Dmitriev; A. V. Suvorova; M. V. Tarsina

    2000-09-01

    The cyclic evolution of the heliospheric plasma parameters is related to the time-dependent boundary conditions in the solar corona. "Minimal" coronal configurations correspond to the regular appearance of the tenuous, but hot and fast plasma streams from the large polar coronal holes. The denser, but cooler and slower solar wind is adjacent to coronal streamers. Irregular dynamic manifestations are present in the corona and the solar wind everywhere and always. They follow the solar activity cycle rather well. Because of this, the direct and indirect solar wind measurements demonstrate clear variations in space and time according to the minimal, intermediate and maximal conditions of the cycles. The average solar wind density, velocity and temperature measured at the Earth's orbit show specific decadal variations and trends, which are of the order of the first tens per cent during the last three solar cycles. Statistical, spectral and correlation characteristics of the solar wind are reviewed with the emphasis on the cycles.

  9. Genesis Solar Wind Interstream, Coronal Hole and Coronal Mass Ejection Samples: Update on Availability and Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent refinement of analysis of ACE/SWICS data (Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) and of onboard data for Genesis Discovery Mission of 3 regimes of solar wind at Earth-Sun L1 make it an appropriate time to update the availability and condition of Genesis samples specifically collected in these three regimes and currently curated at Johnson Space Center. ACE/SWICS spacecraft data indicate that solar wind flow types emanating from the interstream regions, from coronal holes and from coronal mass ejections are elementally and isotopically fractionated in different ways from the solar photosphere, and that correction of solar wind values to photosphere values is non-trivial. Returned Genesis solar wind samples captured very different kinds of information about these three regimes than spacecraft data. Samples were collected from 11/30/2001 to 4/1/2004 on the declining phase of solar cycle 23. Meshik, et al is an example of precision attainable. Earlier high precision laboratory analyses of noble gases collected in the interstream, coronal hole and coronal mass ejection regimes speak to degree of fractionation in solar wind formation and models that laboratory data support. The current availability and condition of samples captured on collector plates during interstream slow solar wind, coronal hole high speed solar wind and coronal mass ejections are de-scribed here for potential users of these samples.

  10. High speed data converters

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed MA

    2016-01-01

    This book covers high speed data converters from the perspective of a leading high speed ADC designer and architect, with a strong emphasis on high speed Nyquist A/D converters. For our purposes, the term 'high speed' is defined as sampling rates that are greater than 10 MS/s.

  11. Astrospheres and Solar-like Stellar Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Brian E.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Stellar analogs for the solar wind have proven to be frustratingly difficult to detect directly. However, these stellar winds can be studied indirectly by observing the interaction regions carved out by the collisions between these winds and the interstellar medium (ISM. These interaction regions are called "astrospheres", analogous to the "heliosphere" surrounding the Sun. The heliosphere and astrospheres contain a population of hydrogen heated by charge exchange processes that can produce enough H I Ly alpha absorption to be detectable in UV spectra of nearby stars from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST. The amount of astrospheric absorption is a diagnostic for the strength of the stellar wind, so these observations have provided the first measurements of solar-like stellar winds. Results from these stellar wind studies and their implications for our understanding of the solar wind are reviewed here. Of particular interest are results concerning the past history of the solar wind and its impact on planetary atmospheres.

  12. Distributed Wind Cost Reduction: Learning from Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-02-23

    The distributed wind energy industry can learn several lessons from the solar industry regarding reducing soft costs. Suzanne Tegen presented this overview at the 2016 Distributed Wind Energy Association Business Conference in Washington, D.C., on February 23, 2016.

  13. Development of a high speed wideband frequency tunable infrared laser source for real time wind turbine array sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Philip; Janssen, Adrian; Partov Poor, Bahar

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports the development of an infra-red circa 193THz (~1.5μm) frequency tunable laser source selected and evaluated for photonic environment sensing systems. LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) offers a method of remote wind speed measurement. Widespread deployment of the technique has been limited by the expense and complexity of LIDAR systems. However development of systems based on optical fiber and photonic components from the telecommunications industry promises improvements in cost, compactness, and reliability, so that it becomes viable to consider deployment of such systems on large wind turbines for the advance detection of fluctuations of wind speed. A monolithic multi-section laser, originally designed as a tunable source for telecommunications applications, has been modified and re-evaluated as a source for sensing applications, based on the technique of coherent laser radar (CLR), and coherent doppler LIDAR (CDL). A tunable frequency optical source should fulfil specific technical criteria to fulfil the applications requirements; speed of frequency selection, absolute accuracy of emitted frequency, spectral purity, and stability. Custom electronics and firmware were developed to realise an improvement in frequency switching speed by a factor of 10 relative to equivalent commercially available telecoms (DBR) sources, satisfying the target application requirements. An overview of the sensing architecture is presented, a detailed description of the fast tuning process described, including the custom hardware and firmware, and specifically the laser energising sequence. The results of the laser module are then presented with detailed consideration of the target application.

  14. Wind-solar Hybrid Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Fei

    2014-01-01

    In the development and utilization of new energy sources, the solar energy and wind energy are paid more attention by various countries, and have become a new field of energy development and utilization of the highest level, the most mature technology, the most widely used and commercial development conditions for new energy. But both the traditional wind power system and solar power system have the characteristic of energy instability. Therefore, wind-solar hybrid power system was proposed i...

  15. Solar wind thermal electron distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Solar wind thermal electron distributions exhibit distinctive trends which suggest Coulomb collisions and geometric expansion in the interplanetary magnetic field play keys roles in electron transport. We introduce a simple numerical model incorporating these mechanisms, discuss the ramifications of model results, and assess the validity of the model in terms of ISEE-3 and Ulysses observations. Although the model duplicates the shape of the electron distributions, and explains certain other observational features, observed gradients in total electron temperature indicate the importance of additional heating mechanisms. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Solar wind thermal electron distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    Solar wind thermal electron distributions exhibit distinctive trends which suggest Coulomb collisions and geometric expansion in the interplanetary magnetic field play keys roles in electron transport. We introduce a simple numerical model incorporating these mechanisms, discuss the ramifications of model results, and assess the validity of the model in terms of ISEE-3 and Ulysses observations. Although the model duplicates the shape of the electron distributions, and explains certain other observational features, observed gradients in total electron temperature indicate the importance of additional heating mechanisms. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Solar wind influence on Jupiter's aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyalay, Szilard; Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Bunce, Emma J.

    2016-10-01

    Jupiter's main auroral emission is driven by a system of corotation enforcement currents that arises to speed up outflowing Iogenic plasma and is not due to the magnetosphere-solar wind interaction like at Earth. The solar wind is generally expected to have only a small influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora compared to the influence of rotational stresses due to the planet's rapid rotation. However, there is considerable observational evidence that the solar wind does affect the magnetopause standoff distance, auroral radio emissions, and the position and brightness of the UV auroral emissions. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter we have identified intervals of high and low solar wind dynamic pressure in the Galileo dataset, and use this information to quantify how a magnetospheric compression affects the magnetospheric field configuration. We have developed separate spatial fits to the compressed and nominal magnetic field data, accounting for variations with radial distance and local time. These two fits can be used to update the flux equivalence mapping model of Vogt et al. (2011), which links auroral features to source regions in the middle and outer magnetosphere. The updated version accounts for changing solar wind conditions and provides a way to quantify the expected solar wind-induced variability in the ionospheric mapping of the main auroral emission, satellite footprints, and other auroral features. Our results are highly relevant to interpretation of the new auroral observations from the Juno mission.

  18. Near-Earth Solar Wind Flows and Related Geomagnetic Activity During more than Four Solar Cycles (1963-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian G.; Cane, Hilary V.

    2012-01-01

    In past studies, we classified the near-Earth solar wind into three basic flow types based on inspection of solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters in the OMNI database and additional data (e.g., geomagnetic indices, energetic particle, and cosmic ray observations). These flow types are: (1) High-speed streams associated with coronal holes at the Sun, (2) Slow, interstream solar wind, and (3) Transient flows originating with coronal mass ejections at the Sun, including interplanetary coronal mass ejections and the associated upstream shocks and post-shock regions. The solar wind classification in these previous studies commenced with observations in 1972. In the present study, as well as updating this classification to the end of 2011, we have extended the classification back to 1963, the beginning of near-Earth solar wind observations, thereby encompassing the complete solar cycles 20 to 23 and the ascending phase of cycle 24. We discuss the cycle-to-cycle variations in near-Earth solar wind structures and l1e related geomagnetic activity over more than four solar cycles, updating some of the results of our earlier studies.

  19. Near-earth solar wind flows and related geomagnetic activity during more than four solar cycles (1963–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Ian G.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In past studies, we classified the near-Earth solar wind into three basic flow types based on inspection of solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters in the OMNI database and additional data (e.g., geomagnetic indices, energetic particle, and cosmic ray observations. These flow types are: (1 High-speed streams associated with coronal holes at the Sun, (2 Slow, interstream solar wind, and (3 Transient flows originating with coronal mass ejections at the Sun, including interplanetary coronal mass ejections and the associated upstream shocks and post-shock regions. The solar wind classification in these previous studies commenced with observations in 1972. In the present study, as well as updating this classification to the end of 2011, we have extended the classification back to 1963, the beginning of near-Earth solar wind observations, thereby encompassing the complete solar cycles 20 to 23 and the ascending phase of cycle 24. We discuss the cycle-to-cycle variations in near-Earth solar wind structures and the related geomagnetic activity over more than four solar cycles, updating some of the results of our earlier studies.

  20. Solar energy system with wind vane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grip, Robert E

    2015-11-03

    A solar energy system including a pedestal defining a longitudinal axis, a frame that is supported by the pedestal and that is rotateable relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis, the frame including at least one solar device, and a wind vane operatively connected to the frame to urge the frame relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis in response to wind acting on the wind vane.

  1. A comparative study on 3-D solar wind structure observed by Ulysses and MHD simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xueshang; XIANG Changqing; ZHONG Dingkun; FAN Quanlin

    2005-01-01

    During Ulysses' first rapid pole-to-pole transit from September 1994 to June 1995, its observations showed that middle- or high-speed solar winds covered all latitudes except those between -20° and +20° near the ecliptic plane,where the velocity was 300-450 km/s. At poleward 40°,however, only fast solar winds at the speed of 700-870 km/s were observed. In addition, the transitions from low-speed wind to high-speed wind or vice versa were abrupt. In this paper, the large-scale structure of solar wind observed by Ulysses near solar minimum is simulated by using the three-dimensional numerical MHD model. The model combines TVD Lax-Friedrich scheme and MacCormack Ⅱ scheme and decomposes the calculation region into two regions: one from 1 to 22 Rs and the other from 18 Rs to 1 AU.Based on the observations of the solar photospheric magnetic field and an addition of the volumetric heating to MHD equations, the large-scale solar wind structure mentioned above is reproduced by using the three-dimensional MHD model and the numerical results are roughly consistent with Ulysses' observations. Our simulation shows that the initial magnetic field topology and the addition of volume heating may govern the bimodal structure of solar wind observed by Ulysses and also demonstrates that the three-dimensional MHD numerical model used here is efficient in modeling the large-scale solar wind structure.

  2. Global Network of Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, N. U.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zhao, X.; Neugebauer, M.

    2012-01-01

    The streamer belt region surrounding the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is generally treated as the primary or sole source of the slow solar wind. Synoptic maps of solar wind speed predicted by the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model during selected periods of solar cycle 23, however, show many areas of slow wind displaced from the streamer belt. These areas commonly have the form of an arc that is connected to the streamer belt at both ends. The arcs mark the boundaries between fields emanating from different coronal holes of the same polarity and thus trace the paths of belts of pseudostreamers, i.e., unipolar streamers that form over double arcades and lack current sheets. The arc pattern is consistent with the predicted topological mapping of the narrow open corridor or singular separator line that must connect the holes and, thus, consistent with the separatrix-web model of the slow solar wind. Near solar maximum, pseudostreamer belts stray far from the HCS-associated streamer belt and, together with it, form a global-wide web of slow wind. Recognition of pseudostreamer belts as prominent sources of slow wind provides a new template for understanding solar wind stream structure, especially near solar maximum.

  3. High-latitude Conic Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Malova, Helmi V.; Kislov, Roman A.; Zelenyi, Lev M.; Obridko, Vladimir N.; Kharshiladze, Alexander F.; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Sokół, Justyna M.; Grzedzielski, Stan; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

    2017-02-01

    We provide observational evidence for the existence of large-scale cylindrical (or conic-like) current sheets (CCSs) at high heliolatitudes. Long-lived CCSs were detected by Ulysses during its passages over the South Solar Pole in 1994 and 2007. The characteristic scale of these tornado-like structures is several times less than a typical width of coronal holes within which the CCSs are observed. CCS crossings are characterized by a dramatic decrease in the solar wind speed and plasma beta typical for predicted profiles of CCSs. Ulysses crossed the same CCS at different heliolatitudes at 2-3 au several times in 1994, as the CCS was declined from the rotation axis and corotated with the Sun. In 2007, a CCS was detected directly over the South Pole, and its structure was strongly highlighted by the interaction with comet McNaught. Restorations of solar coronal magnetic field lines reveal the occurrence of conic-like magnetic separators over the solar poles in both 1994 and 2007. Such separators exist only during solar minima. Interplanetary scintillation data analysis confirms the presence of long-lived low-speed regions surrounded by the typical polar high-speed solar wind in solar minima. Energetic particle flux enhancements up to several MeV/nuc are observed at edges of the CCSs. We built simple MHD models of a CCS to illustrate its key features. The CCSs may be formed as a result of nonaxiality of the solar rotation axis and magnetic axis, as predicted by the Fisk-Parker hybrid heliospheric magnetic field model in the modification of Burger and coworkers.

  4. Wave Modeling of the Solar Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon

    The acceleration and heating of the solar wind have been studied for decades using satellite observations and models. However, the exact mechanism that leads to solar wind heating and acceleration is poorly understood. In order to improve the understanding of the physical mechanisms that are involved in these processes a combination of modeling and observational analysis is required. Recent models constrained by satellite observations show that wave heating in the low-frequency (MHD), and high-frequency (ion-cyclotron) range may provide the necessary momentum and heat input to coronal plasma and produce the solar wind. This review is focused on the results of several recent solar modeling studies that include waves explicitly in the MHD and the kinetic regime. The current status of the understanding of the solar wind acceleration and heating by waves is reviewed.

  5. DSCOVR High Time Resolution Solar Wind Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), previously known as Triana, spacecraft is expected to be launched in late 2014. It will carry a fluxgate magnetometer, Faraday Cup solar wind detector and a top-hat electron electrostatic analyzer. The Faraday Cup will provide an unprecedented 10 vectors/sec time resolution measurement of the solar wind proton and alpha reduced distribution functions. Coupled with the 40 vector/sec vector magnetometer measurements, the identification of specific wave modes in the solar wind will be possible for the first time. The science objectives and data products of the mission will be discussed.

  6. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  7. Differential Velocity between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Steinberg, John T.; Sakurai, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high-plasma beta feature in high-latitude, high-speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high-speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high-speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large-amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high-latitude, high-speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high-speed, high-latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

  8. Solar wind tans young asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    A new study published in Nature this week reveals that asteroid surfaces age and redden much faster than previously thought -- in less than a million years, the blink of an eye for an asteroid. This study has finally confirmed that the solar wind is the most likely cause of very rapid space weathering in asteroids. This fundamental result will help astronomers relate the appearance of an asteroid to its actual history and identify any after effects of a catastrophic impact with another asteroid. ESO PR Photo 16a/09 Young Asteroids Look Old "Asteroids seem to get a ‘sun tan' very quickly," says lead author Pierre Vernazza. "But not, as for people, from an overdose of the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, but from the effects of its powerful wind." It has long been known that asteroid surfaces alter in appearance with time -- the observed asteroids are much redder than the interior of meteorites found on Earth [1] -- but the actual processes of this "space weathering" and the timescales involved were controversial. Thanks to observations of different families of asteroids [2] using ESO's New Technology Telescope at La Silla and the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, as well as telescopes in Spain and Hawaii, Vernazza's team have now solved the puzzle. When two asteroids collide, they create a family of fragments with "fresh" surfaces. The astronomers found that these newly exposed surfaces are quickly altered and change colour in less than a million years -- a very short time compared to the age of the Solar System. "The charged, fast moving particles in the solar wind damage the asteroid's surface at an amazing rate [3]", says Vernazza. Unlike human skin, which is damaged and aged by repeated overexposure to sunlight, it is, perhaps rather surprisingly, the first moments of exposure (on the timescale considered) -- the first million years -- that causes most of the aging in asteroids. By studying different families of asteroids, the team has also shown that an asteroid

  9. Calculation method of cross wind security domain for high-speed train%高速列车侧风安全域计算方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔涛; 张卫华

    2011-01-01

    Based on parameter transmission,solution to control and dynamic mesh techniques,the cross wind fluid dynamics model and the multi-body system dynamics model of high-speed train were established.By collaboratively simulating the external flow field and system response of train,the stable attitudes and aerodynamic loads under different cross wind environments were obtained.The running safety indexes were studied,the critical speeds of running safety under different cross wind environments were analyzed,and the security domain was defined.Calculation result indicates that with the increases of train speed and cross wind strength,the transfinite phenomena of wheel unloading rate,derailment coefficient and lateral wheelset force appear successively.While train speed is less than 300 km·h-1,all wheelsets of leading vehicle almost have upwind migration.While train speed is 300 km·h-1 and cross wind speed is 30 m·s-1,and train speed is 350 km·h-1 and cross wind speed is more than 25 m·s-1,the first and second wheelsets have downwind migration,the third and fourth wheelsets have upwind migration.The higher train speed is,the lower the cross wind resistance ability is,and the sensitivity of train critical speed on cross wind strength will increase.2 tabs,13 figs,14 refs.%使用参数传递、求解控制以及动态网格技术,建立了侧风流体动力学模型和高速列车多体动力学模型,通过对列车外流场和系统响应进行协同仿真,获得不同侧风环境下列车的稳定姿态和气动载荷,研究了列车运行的安全性指标,分析了不同侧风环境下列车安全运行的临界速度,确定了列车的侧风作用安全域。计算结果表明:随着列车运行速度和侧风强度的增大,轮重减载率、脱轨系数和轮轴横向力依次出现超限现象;当列车运行速度小于300 km.h-1时,列车头车所有轮对均逆风向偏移;当列车运行速度为300 km.h-1且侧风风速为30 m.s-1

  10. Differential kinetic dynamics and heating of ions in the turbulent solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, F; Stabile, S; Pezzi, O; Servidio, S; De Marco, R; Marcucci, F; Bruno, R; Lavraud, B; De Keyser, J; Consolini, G; Brienza, D; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Retinò, A; Vaivads, A; Salatti, M; Veltri, P

    2016-01-01

    The solar wind plasma is a fully ionized and turbulent gas ejected by the outer layers of the solar corona at very high speed, mainly composed by protons and electrons, with a small percentage of helium nuclei and a significantly lower abundance of heavier ions. Since particle collisions are practically negligible, the solar wind is typically not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. Such a complex system must be described through self-consistent and fully nonlinear models, taking into account its multi-species composition and turbulence. We use a kinetic hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical code to reproduce the turbulent energy cascade down to ion kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the uncontaminated solar wind plasma, with the aim of exploring the differential kinetic dynamics of the dominant ion species, namely protons and alpha particles. We show that the response of different species to the fluctuating electromagnetic fields is different. In particular, a significant differential heating of alphas w...

  11. Electrostatic Solitary Waves in the Solar Wind: Evidence for Instability at Solar Wind Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David M.; Newman, David L.; Wilson, Lynn Bruce; Goetz, Keith; Kellogg, Paul J.; Kerstin, Kris

    2013-01-01

    A strong spatial association between bipolar electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) and magnetic current sheets (CSs) in the solar wind is reported here for the first time. This association requires that the plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, electron two stream) which generate ESWs are preferentially localized to solar wind CSs. Distributions of CS properties (including shear angle, thickness, solar wind speed, and vector magnetic field change) are examined for differences between CSs associated with ESWs and randomly chosen CSs. Possible mechanisms for producing ESW-generating instabilities at solar wind CSs are considered, including magnetic reconnection.

  12. Solar and Wind Site Screening Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and NREL created a decision tree to guide state and local governments and other stakeholders through a process for screening sites for their suitability for future redevelopment with solar photovoltaic (PV) energy and wind energy.

  13. Ceres interaction with the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Mats; Lindkvist, Jesper

    2016-10-01

    The solar wind interaction with Ceres is studied for a high water vapor release from its surface using a hybrid model including photoionization. We use a water vapor production rate thought to be due to subsurface sublimation, corresponding to a detection on 6 March 2013 by the Herschel Space Observatory. We present the general morphology of the plasma interactions, both close to Ceres and on a larger scale. Mass-loading of water ions causes a magnetic pile-up region in-front of Ceres, where the solar wind deflects and slows down. The large body makes an obstacle to the solar wind and creates an asymmetric wake downstream. On a global scale, Ceres has a comet-like interaction with the solar wind with observable perturbations far downstream of the body.

  14. Quantifying Solar Wind-Polar Cap Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, K. D.; Gerrard, A. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Huang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the solar wind is a major driver of ultra-low frequency [ULF] power at ground locations from low to high latitudes. However, due to the scarcity of deep polar cap magnetometer sites, it is not clear when, where, or if this is true deep inside the polar cap on open field lines where interplanetary magnetic field [IMF] ULF waves could possibly be directly detected. Given recent observations of very large Joule heating estimates from DMSP data, together with the large heating reported by the CHAMP satellite, it is important to understand the degree to which ULF waves in the solar wind can directly cause such heating. Using a time series of lagged correlation sequences ("dynamic correlograms") between GSM Bz ULF power (computed via data obtained from NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer [ACE] ahead of Earth in the solar wind) and the horizontal ULF power (H^2=N^2+E^2) from ground-based magnetometers in Earth's southern polar cap, we investigate the direct penetration of ULF waves from the solar wind into the polar ionosphere during a gamut of space weather conditions at a distributed network of Automated Geophysical Observatories [AGOs] in Antarctica. To infer causation, a predicted lag correlation maximum at each time step is computed by simply dividing the associated distance of ACE from Earth by the concurrent bulk solar wind speed. This technique helps parse out direct penetration of solar wind ULF waves from other sources (e.g., via leakage from closed field line resonances due to the bulk solar wind plasma viscously interacting at dawn/dusk flanks inducing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities [KHI] or compressional modes induced by impulses in solar wind dynamic pressure). The identified direct-penetrating ULF waves are related to the DMSP-derived Poynting fluxes by regression analysis, and conclusions are drawn for the importance of the ULF source for the measured heating.

  15. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  16. The interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    The expected characteristics of the solar wind, extrapolated from the vicinity of the earth are described. Several models are examined for the interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar plasma and magnetic field. Various aspects of the penetration of neutral interstellar gas into the solar wind are considered. The dynamic effects of the neutral gas on the solar wind are described. Problems associated with the interaction of cosmic rays with the solar wind are discussed.

  17. Wind loads on solar energy roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Bentum, C.A. van

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the wind loads on roofs, equipped with solar energy products, so called Active Roofs. Values given in this paper have been based on wind tunnel and full scale measurements, carried out at TNO, and on an interpretation of existing rules and guidelines. The results a

  18. Origin of the Ubiquitous Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, S. R.; Woo, R.; Fineschi, S.; O'Neal, R.; Kohl, J.; Noci, G.

    1997-01-01

    The solar wind is a direct manifestation of the coronal heating processes which continue to elude us. For over three decades, observations in interplanetary space have identified two types of wind: a slow component with highly variable physical properties also characterized by speeds typically beow 500 kn/s, and a much less variable fast wind flowing on average at 750 km/s1.

  19. Structure and sources of solar wind in the growing phase of 24th solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Goryaev, Farid; Shugay, Julia; Rodkin, Denis; Veselovsky, Igor

    2015-04-01

    We present analysis of the solar wind (SW) structure and its association with coronal sources during the minimum and rising phase of 24th solar cycle (2009-2011). The coronal sources prominent in this period - coronal holes, small areas of open magnetic fields near active regions and transient sources associated with small-scale solar activity have been investigated using EUV solar images and soft X-ray fluxes obtained by the CORONAS-Photon/TESIS/Sphinx, PROBA2/SWAP, Hinode/EIS and AIA/SDO instruments as well as the magnetograms obtained by HMI/SDO. It was found that at solar minimum (2009) velocity and magnetic field strength of high speed wind (HSW) and transient SW from small-scale flares did not differ significantly from those of the background slow speed wind (SSW). The major difference between parameters of different SW components was seen in the ion composition represented by the C6/C5, O7/O6, Fe/O ratios and the mean charge of Fe ions. With growing solar activity, the speed of HSW increased due to transformation of its sources - small-size low-latitude coronal holes into equatorial extensions of large polar holes. At that period, the ion composition of transient SW changed from low-temperature to high-temperature values, which was caused by variation of the source conditions and change of the recombination/ionization rates during passage of the plasma flow through the low corona. However, we conclude that criteria of separation of the SW components based on the ion ratios established earlier by Zhao&Fisk (2009) for higher solar activity are not applicable to the extremely weak beginning of 24th cycle. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement eHeroes (project n° 284461, www.eheroes.eu).

  20. Solar Wind Interaction With the Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.

    2005-12-01

    The Earth's Moon, lacking a substantial atmosphere or global magnetic field, presents one of the simpler obstacles to solar wind flow in our solar system. Despite this apparent simplicity, a rich array of interesting plasma physics occurs in the lunar environment. To first order, the Moon is completely unshielded from solar wind plasma and solar photons, and direct incidence of solar wind plasma can lead to implantation of volatiles and ion sputtering and pickup. The solar wind is blocked by the lunar obstacle, resulting in a plasma void on the night side. A potential drop across the wake boundary is generated as solar wind electrons attempt to refill the wake cavity, resulting in a tenuous high-temperature electron population and anisotropic ion beams in the wake. A system of diamagnetic currents is formed on the boundary surface, enhancing the magnetic field in the wake and reducing the field around it. Meanwhile, waves are generated by the unstable particle distributions generated by this interaction. On the day side, photon-driven positive charging of the lunar surface occurs. On the night side, on the other hand, charging is controlled by the tenuous wake plasma, and is generally electron-driven and negative. When the Moon traverses the Earth's magnetotail and is exposed to low-density plasma in the tail lobes and high-temperature plasma in the plasmasheet, extreme surface charging of up to hundreds of V positive and several keV negative can occur. Lunar surface charging may affect ion sputtering and likely results in significant dust transport. The presence of remanent crustal magnetism causes significant perturbations to this picture. Some crustal fields are large enough to stand off the solar wind (possibly affecting solar wind volatile implantation), and we observe large shock-like magnetic enhancements upstream from the largest crustal sources. The occurence of these "limb shocks" depends on solar wind parameters, suggesting that the crustal sources are

  1. The Distribution of Solar Wind Speeds During Solar Minimum: Calibration for Numerical Solar Wind Modeling Constraints on the Source of the Slow Solar Wind (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    2003) and Schwadron et al. (2005) as constraints. The new relationship was tested by using it to drive the ENLIL 3‐D MHD solar wind model and obtain...it to drive the ENLIL 3‐D MHD solar wind model and obtain solar wind parameters at Earth (1.0 AU) and Ulysses (1.4 AU). The improvements in speed...propagated out into the heliosphere using the ENLIL solar wind model . ENLIL is a 3‐D Magne- tohydrodynamic ( MHD ) model of the heliosphere [Odstrcil, 2003

  2. Yaglom law in the expanding solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Gogoberidze, G; Carbone, V

    2013-01-01

    We study the Yaglom law, which relates the mixed third order structure function to the average dissipation rate of turbulence, in a uniformly expanding solar wind by using the two scales expansion model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that due to the expansion of the solar wind two new terms appear in the Yaglom law. The first term is related to the decay of the turbulent energy by nonlinear interactions, whereas the second term is related to the non-zero cross-correlation of the Els\\"asser fields. Using magnetic field and plasma data from WIND and Helios 2 spacecrafts, we show that at lower frequencies in the inertial range of MHD turbulence the new terms become comparable to Yaglom's third order mixed moment, and therefore they cannot be neglected in the evaluation of the energy cascade rate in the solar wind.

  3. Ultra-High Speed Fabrication of TiO2 Photoanode by Flash Light for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a new way to fabricate nanoporous TiO2 photoanode by flash light is demonstrated. TiO2 nanoparticles are sintered on FTO glass by flash light irradiation at room temperature in ambient condition, which is dramatically simple, ultrahigh speed and one-shot large area fabrication process compared to a conventional high temperature (120 °C) thermal sintering process. The effect of the flash light conditions (flash light energy, pulse numbers and pulse duration) on the nanostructures of sintered TiO2 layer, was studied and discussed using several microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques such as SEM, FT-IR, XRD and XPS. The sintered TiO2 photoanodes by flash light were used in DSSC and its performance were compared with that of DSSC fabricated by conventional thermal sintering process. It was found that a flash light sintered TiO2 photoanode has efficiency which is similar to that of the thermal sintered photoanode. It is expected that the newly developed flash light sintering technique of TiO2 nanoparticles would be a strong alternative to realize the room temperature and in-situ sintering of photoanode fabrication for outdoor solar cell fabrication.

  4. High speed heterostructure devices

    CERN Document Server

    Beer, Albert C; Willardson, R K; Kiehl, Richard A; Sollner, T C L Gerhard

    1994-01-01

    Volume 41 includes an in-depth review of the most important, high-speed switches made with heterojunction technology. This volume is aimed at the graduate student or working researcher who needs a broad overview andan introduction to current literature. Key Features * The first complete review of InP-based HFETs and complementary HFETs, which promise very low power and high speed * Offers a complete, three-chapter review of resonant tunneling * Provides an emphasis on circuits as well as devices.

  5. Pluto-Charon solar wind interaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, J. P. M.; Paty, C. S.

    2017-05-01

    This work studies Charon's effects on the Pluto-solar wind interaction using a multifluid MHD model which simulates the interactions of Pluto and Charon with the solar wind as well as with each other. Specifically, it investigates the ionospheric dynamics of a two body system in which either one or both bodies possess an ionosphere. Configurations in which Charon is directly upstream and directly downstream of Pluto are considered. Depending on ionospheric and solar wind conditions, Charon could periodically pass into the solar wind flow upstream of Pluto. The results of this study demonstrate that in these circumstances Charon modifies the upstream flow, both in the case in which Charon possesses an ionosphere, and in the case in which Charon is without an ionosphere. This modification amounts to a change in the gross structure of the interaction region when Charon possesses an ionosphere but is more localized when Charon lacks an ionosphere. Furthermore, evidence is shown that supports Charon acting to partially shield Pluto from the solar wind when it is upstream of Pluto, resulting in a decrease in ionospheric loss by Pluto.

  6. Solar wind origin of terrestrial water

    CERN Document Server

    Merkl, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the Earth water reserves during the evolution of the planet is one of the big miracles in geophysics. Common explanations are storage of water in the Earth mantle at a time when the crust had not yet formed and depositing of water by comets during the time of late heavy bombardement. Both explanations have different problems - especially when comparing with the evolution of Mars and Venus. Here we discuss the possible role of hydrogen collected from the solar wind by the early Earth magnetosphere. While the water production by solar wind capture is very small today it may have been significant during the first billion years after planetary formation because solar wind was much stronger at that time and Earth magnetospheric configuration may have been different. We estimate that the contribution of solar wind hydrogen to the Earth water reserves can be up to 10% when we assume a that the Earth dipole acted as a collector and early solar wind was 1000 times stronger than today. We can not even exc...

  7. Ancient solar wind in lunar microbreccias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Clayton, R. N.

    1980-03-01

    Possible components of the ancient solar wind, particularly the N-15/N-14 ratio, are investigated on the basis of lunar microbreccia studies. Nitrogen contents and isotope ratios were determined for Apollo 11 and 15 microbreccia samples by means of vacuum pyrolysis techniques. The Apollo 11 soil breccias, which had been closed to the addition of recent solar wind due to their compaction, are found to contain the lowest N-15/N-14 ratios yet reported for the solar wind, extending the range of variation of the ratio to between a delta N-15 of -190% in the past to +120% at present. Nitrogen isotope analysis of the Apollo 15 drill core, which had undergone two episodes of solar wind exposure, also support the secular variation in the N-15 content of the solar wind, which is attributed to spallation reactions in the sun. The formation of the breccias at the Apollo 11 and 15 sites is discussed on the basis of the observed nitrogen systematics, and differences between N-15 and Ne-21 cosmic ray exposure ages implied are attributed to the diffusive loss of neon from lunar soils.

  8. Measuring the Turbulent Cascade in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBride, B. T.; Forman, M. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2006-12-01

    Kolmogorov's famous 4/5 law for the Navier-Stokes equation states that in isotropic hydrodynamic (HD) turbulence, the third moment of longitudinal velocity fluctuations at a spatial distance L is (4/5) ɛ ěrt L ěrt where ɛ is the turbulent energy cascade rate = heating rate per unit mass. A definite, signed, third moment is a fundamental property of the turbulent velocity fluctuations arising from the non-linear term in the Navier-Stokes equation, the only direct indicator that a cascade exists, the only measure of what direction that cascade takes (to smaller or larger spatial scales), and the truest indication of the cascade rate. The solar wind is MHD, however, and its turbulence is anisotropic. Dasso et al. (2005) perform a study on the anisotropy in the solar wind as a function of flow speed and find that there exists "quasi-two-dimensional" turbulence in low speed streams and a one dimensional "slab" structure in high speed flow. Politano and Pouquet (1998; PP) have derived an exact expression, valid in anisotropic situations, for the divergence with lag vector L of a certain vector third moment of the fluctuations in the Elsasser variables as a function of L. We perform an analysis of the third-order moment derived by PP. We use 8 years of ACE combine 64-s magnetic field and plasma measurements in variably defined subsets to compute the Elsasser variables in mean-field coordinates for different solar wind conditions (high/low wind speed, yearly, etc.). Most significantly, we attempt to separately resolve parallel and perpendicular cascades relative to the mean magnetic field. We find (1) the third moment structure functions are approximately proportional to lag as expected, (2) the inferred energy dissipation rate for outward-moving waves is larger than for inward-moving waves with many intervals showing evidence of an inverse cascade of the minority component, (3) the total energy-dissipation rate inferred by this method is frequently in disagreement

  9. Observations of Anisotropic Scaling of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Q. Y.; Wu, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Using high-speed solar wind data recorded by the Ulysses spacecraft, we investigate and estimate the anisotropic inertial range scaling of the interplanetary magnetic field. We apply the method of the magnetic structure function (MSF), Sn (τ) = lang|b(t + τ) - b(t)| n rang vprop τζ(n), to analyze the scaling of solar wind turbulence over the range from 1 s to 104 s. By sorting the fluctuations according to the direction of the local mean magnetic field, we obtain a second-order structure function in (r, Θ) coordinates that reveals the scale-dependent anisotropy of the power spectrum. The scale-dependent anisotropy of the MSF indicates that the fluctuation energy tends to cascade toward the direction perpendicular to the local field. The dependence of the MSF scaling index ζ on the direction of the local field is found to be similar to that reported in Horbury et al. and Podesta, with ζbottom = 0.53 ± 0.18 and ζpar = 1.00 ± 0.14. Furthermore, we estimate and find the scaling law between the perpendicular and parallel scales r par vprop r 0.614 bottom, which implies the elongation along the parallel direction as the turbulence eddy evolves toward the small lengthscales. These results are in agreement with the predictions of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence theory.

  10. Model for vortex turbulence with discontinuities in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Verkhoglyadova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of vortex with embedded discontinuities in plasma flow is developed in the framework of ideal MHD in a low b plasma. Vortex structures are considered as a result of 2-D evolution of nonlinear shear Alfvén waves in the heliosphere. Physical properties of the solutions and vector fields are analyzed and the observational aspects of the model are discussed. The ratio of normal components to the discontinuity Br /Vr can be close to -2. The alignment between velocity and magnetic field vectors takes place. Spacecraft crossing such vortices will typically observe a pair of discontinuities, but with dissimilar properties. Occurrence rate for different discontinuity types is estimated and agrees with observations in high-speed solar wind stream. Discontinuity crossing provides a backward rotation of magnetic field vector and can be observed as part of a backward arc. The Ulysses magnetometer data obtained in the fast solar wind are compared with the results of theoretical modelling.

  11. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993–2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future.

  12. WIND observations of coherent electrostatic waves in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mangeney

    Full Text Available The time domain sampler (TDS experiment on WIND measures electric and magnetic wave forms with a sampling rate which reaches 120 000 points per second. We analyse here observations made in the solar wind near the Lagrange point L1. In the range of frequencies above the proton plasma frequency fpi and smaller than or of the order of the electron plasma frequency fpe, TDS observed three kinds of electrostatic (e.s. waves: coherent wave packets of Langmuir waves with frequencies f ~ fpe, coherent wave packets with frequencies in the ion acoustic range fpi < f < fpe, and more or less isolated non-sinusoidal spikes lasting less than 1 ms. We confirm that the observed frequency of the low frequency (LF ion acoustic wave packets is dominated by the Doppler effect: the wavelengths are short, 10 to 50 electron Debye lengths λD. The electric field in the isolated electrostatic structures (IES and in the LF wave packets is more or less aligned with the solar wind magnetic field. Across the IES, which have a spatial width of the order of ~ 25λD, there is a small but finite electric potential drop, implying an average electric field generally directed away from the Sun. The IES wave forms, which have not been previously reported in the solar wind, are similar, although with a smaller amplitude, to the weak double layers observed in the auroral regions, and to the electrostatic solitary waves observed in other regions in the magnetosphere. We have also studied the solar wind conditions which favour the occurrence of the three kinds of waves: all these e.s. waves are observed more or less continuously in the whole solar wind (except in the densest regions where a parasite prevents the TDS observations. The type (wave packet or IES of the observed LF waves is mainly determined

  13. Complexity induced solar wind turbulence and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T.

    2003-04-01

    "Complexity" has become a hot topic in nearly every field of modern physics. Solar wind plasmas are of no exception. Recently, Chang [2002], in analogy with theories developed for phenomena observed in the magnetotail and the auroral zone [Chang, 1999; 2001], demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures arising from plasma resonances could be the origin of "complexity" of nonresonant pseudo-2D spatiotemporal fluctuations in solar wind turbulence and in the coronal hole base. Such nonresonant fluctuations were shown to exist in the solar wind by Matthaeus et al. [1990] in terms of the two-dimensional correlation as a function of distance parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field based on the ISEE-3 magnetometer data. Other evidences indicating the existence of such type of fluctuations in the solar wind have been reported by Tu et al. [1989], Tu and Marsch [1990, 1991], Bruno and Bavassano [1991], Bavassano and Bruno [1992], Bruno et al. [2001], and others. These results explain [Tu and Marsch, 1991] why the Alfvén ratio (a quantitative measure of Alfvénicity) is often found to be less than one in the solar wind [Belcher and Davis 1971, Solodyna et al., 1977, Bruno et al, 1985, Roberts et al., 1990], particularly for the space range farther than 0.3 AU. The above observational results are also consistent with the conclusions obtained from 2D MHD numerical simulations [Matthaeus and Larkin, 1986, Roberts and Goldstein, 1988, Goldstein et al., 1989, Roberts et al., 1991, and Roberts, 1992]. Such findings have led Chang [2002] to suggest the following evolutional scenario for the plasma turbulence in the generic fast solar wind. In and near the coronal hole base, the turbulent fluctuations are predominantly nonresonantly generated by pseudo-2D nonlinear interactions. As the fluctuations emerge from the coronal hole base, they propagate resonantly in the field-aligned direction primarily as Alfvén waves

  14. Energy dissipation processes in solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Feng, X S; Xu, X J; Zhang, J; Sun, T R; Zuo, P B

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation cannot be ultimately achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind magnetic reconnection region. We find that the magnetic reconnection region shows a unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for the intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a magnetic reconnection site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy...

  15. ENERGY DISSIPATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B. [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, X. J. [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China); Zhang, J., E-mail: yw@spaceweather.ac.cn [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 3F3, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  16. Research on new anti-wind facility of high-speed train in strong wind area%大风区高速铁路新型防风设施研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鲲

    2012-01-01

    兰新(甘肃兰州-新疆乌鲁木齐)第二双线是世界上1条已建成的最长高速铁路,也是世界首条穿越大风区的高速铁路,线路穿越大风区最大瞬时风速达64 m/s,严重威胁列车运行安全,针对既有防风设施(主要为挡风墙)难以满足大风条件下防止列车倾覆、保护受电弓和接触网安全及防沙等要求,提出一种新型防风设施即防风走廊,并通过数值计算、风洞试验、动模型试验等方法进行系统研究.研究结果表明:在防风走廊的防护下,动车组的倾覆力矩是无防风设施时的1%~2%,是有挡风墙时的4%左右;接触网处的风速度仅为环境风速的6%左右;半封闭防风走廊开口处的最大速度仅为6.08 m/s;而走廊内部和动车组表面的压力变化表明半封闭走廊更具优势,不会附带产生隧道空气动力效应等不利影响.这说明防风走廊既能实现对列车和接触网综合防护,兼具防沙功能,同时也不会产生隧道空气动力效应等不利影响,作为一种新型高等级铁路防风设施具有应用推广价值.%The second double line of Lanzhou-Xinjiang railway is not only the longest high-speed railway line in the world but also the first one crossing strong wind area, where the highest instantaneous wind speed across strong wind area is 60 m/s, which is a serious threat to train running safety, considering the existing anti-wind facility (mainly wind break wall) is difficult to meet the demands of train overturning prevention, pantograph-catenary system protection and sand prevention, a new anti-wind facility called anti-wind corridor through numerical simulation, wind tunnel test and dynamic model test was proposed and researched. The results show that electric multiple unit(EMU)'s overturning momentum with the protection of anti-wind corridor is \\%~2% of that without the protection of wind break wall, and account for 4% when it is with the protection of wind break wall. The

  17. Escape for the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    Plasma from the Sun known as the slow solar wind has been observed far away from where scientists thought it was produced. Now new simulations may have resolved the puzzle of where the slow solar wind comes from and how it escapes the Sun to travel through our solar system.An Origin PuzzleA full view of a coronal hole (dark portion) from SDO. The edges of the coronal hole mark the boundary between open and closed magnetic field lines. [SDO; adapted from Higginson et al. 2017]The Suns atmosphere, known as the corona, is divided into two types of regions based on the behavior of magnetic field lines. In closed-field regions, the magnetic field is firmly anchored in the photosphere at both ends of field lines, so traveling plasma is confined to coronal loops and must return to the Suns surface. In open-field regions, only one end of each magnetic field line is anchored in the photosphere, so plasma is able to stream from the Suns surface out into the solar system.This second type of region known as a coronal hole is thought to be the origin of fast-moving plasma measured in our solar system and known as the fast solar wind. But we also observe a slow solar wind: plasma that moves at speeds of less than 500 km/s.The slow solar wind presents a conundrum. Its observational properties strongly suggest it originates in the hot, closed corona rather than the cooler, open regions. But if the slow solar wind plasma originates in closed-field regions of the Suns atmosphere, then how does it escape from the Sun?Slow Wind from Closed FieldsA team of scientists led by Aleida Higginson (University of Michigan) has now used high-resolution, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to show how the slow solar wind can be generated from plasma that starts outin closed-field parts of the Sun.A simulated heliospheric arc, composed of open magnetic field lines. [Higginson et al. 2017]Motions on the Suns surface near the boundary between open and closed-field regions the boundary

  18. Solar wind-magnetosphere energy input functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargatze, L.F.; McPherron, R.L.; Baker, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    A new formula for the solar wind-magnetosphere energy input parameter, P/sub i/, is sought by applying the constraints imposed by dimensional analysis. Applying these constraints yields a general equation for P/sub i/ which is equal to rho V/sup 3/l/sub CF//sup 2/F(M/sub A/,theta) where, rho V/sup 3/ is the solar wind kinetic energy density and l/sub CF//sup 2/ is the scale size of the magnetosphere's effective energy ''collection'' region. The function F which depends on M/sub A/, the Alfven Mach number, and on theta, the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle is included in the general equation for P/sub i/ in order to model the magnetohydrodynamic processes which are responsible for solar wind-magnetosphere energy transfer. By assuming the form of the function F, it is possible to further constrain the formula for P/sub i/. This is accomplished by using solar wind data, geomagnetic activity indices, and simple statistical methods. It is found that P/sub i/ is proportional to (rho V/sup 2/)/sup 1/6/VBG(theta) where, rho V/sup 2/ is the solar wind dynamic pressure and VBG(theta) is a rectified version of the solar wind motional electric field. Furthermore, it is found that G(theta), the gating function which modulates the energy input to the magnetosphere, is well represented by a ''leaky'' rectifier function such as sin/sup 4/(theta/2). This function allows for enhanced energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented southward. This function also allows for some energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented northward. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Solar Wind Change Exchange from the Magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Steve

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a long (approximately 100 ks) XMM-Newton observation designed to observe solar wind charge exchange emission (SWCX) from Earth's magnetosheath. By luck, the observation took place during a period of minimal solar wind flux so the SWCX emission was also minimal. Never-the-less, there is a significant if not stunning correlation between the observed O VIII count rate and our model for magnetosheath emission. We also report on the observed O VII and O VII emission.

  20. Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0035 Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project 140200 Steven Sembay UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER Final Report 10/28/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...To) 01 Sep 2014 to 31 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP) 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1...0200 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Steven Sembay 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e.  TASK NUMBER 5f.   WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  1. Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Wind Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Whittlesey, P. L.

    2017-01-01

    Historically, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has operated a Solar Wind Facility (SWF) to provide long term particle and photon exposure to material samples. The requirements on the particle beam details were not stringent as the cumulative fluence level is the test goal. Motivated by development of the faraday cup instrument on the NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission, the MSFC SWF has been upgraded to included high fidelity particle beams providing broadbeam ions, broadbeam electrons, and narrow beam protons or ions, which cover a wide dynamic range of solar wind velocity and flux conditions. The large vacuum chamber with integrated cryo-shroud, combined with a 3-axis positioning system, provides an excellent platform for sensor development and qualification. This short paper provides some details of the SWF charged particle beams characteristics in the context of the Solar Probe Plus program requirements. Data will be presented on the flux and energy ranges as well as beam stability.

  2. Solar wind composition measurements by the Ulysses SWICS experiment during transient solar wind flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Shafer, C. M.; Geiss, J.; Ogilvie, K.

    1993-01-01

    For the March/April 1991 time period, the alpha/proton abundance ratio, the proton kinetic temperature and speed distributions, and the relative abundance of O(+7) to O(+6) is determined over each 13-minute duty cycle of the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICs) experiment on Ulysses. The ratio O(+7)/O(+6) (as a relative measure of ionization temperature) is shown to be useful in identifying possible coronal mass ejection (CME) events. We report measurements of silicon/oxygen abundance ratios and silicon and oxygen charge state distributions in the solar wind during a CME event and compare these compositions to a 'normal' solar wind time period.

  3. Solar wind drivers of geomagnetic storms during more than four solar cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Ian G.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a classification of the near-Earth solar wind into three basic flow types: (1 High-speed streams associated with coronal holes at the Sun; (2 Slow, interstream solar wind; and (3 Transient flows originating with coronal mass ejections (CMEs at the Sun, including interplanetary CMEs and the associated upstream shocks and post-shock regions, we determine the drivers of geomagnetic storms of various size ranges based on the Kp index and the NOAA “G” criteria since 1964, close to the beginning of the space era, to 2011, encompassing more than four solar cycles (20–23. We also briefly discuss the occurrence of storms since the beginning of the Kp index in 1932, in the minimum before cycle 17. We note that the extended low level of storm activity during the minimum following cycle 23 is without precedent in this 80-year interval. Furthermore, the “typical” numbers of storm days/cycle quoted in the standard NOAA G storm table appear to be significantly higher than those obtained from our analysis, except for the strongest (G5 storms, suggesting that they should be revised downward.

  4. Magnetospheric Cavity Modes Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Claudepierre, S G; Elkington, S R; Lotko, W; Hudson, M K; 10.1029/2009GL039045

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. We use these simulations to investigate the role that solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations play in the generation of magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) pulsations. The simulations presented in this study are driven with idealized solar wind input conditions. In four of the simulations, we introduce monochromatic ULF fluctuations in the upstream solar wind dynamic pressure. In the fifth simulation, we introduce a continuum of ULF frequencies in the upstream solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations. In this numerical experiment, the idealized nature of the solar wind driving conditions allows us to study the magnetospheric response to only a fluctuating upstream dynamic pressure, while holding all other solar wind driving parameters constant. The simulation results suggest that ULF fluctuations in the solar wind dynamic pressure can drive magnet...

  5. Wind and Solar Curtailment: International Experience and Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew, Debra; Bird, Lori; Milligan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    High penetrations of wind and solar generation on power systems are resulting in increasing curtailment. Wind and solar integration studies predict increased curtailment as penetration levels grow. This paper examines experiences with curtailment on bulk power systems internationally. It discusse...

  6. Wind/solar resource in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Gaines, H. [West Texas A& M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Data are being collected at 17 sites to delineate a baseline for the wind and solar resource across Texas. Wind data are being collected at 10, 25, and 40 m (in some cases at 50 m) to determine wind shear and power at hub heights of large turbines. Many of the sites are located in areas of predicted terrain enhancement. The typical day in a month for power and wind turbine output was calculated for selected sites and combination of sites; distributed systems. Major result to date is that there is the possibility of load matching in South Texas during the summer months, even though the average values by month indicate a low wind potential.

  7. Implications of solar wind measurements for solar models and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serenelli, Aldo; Scott, Pat; Villante, Francesco L.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Asplund, Martin; Basu, Sarbani; Grevesse, Nicolas; Peña-Garay, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    We critically examine recent claims of a high solar metallicity by von Steiger & Zurbuchen (2016, vSZ16) based on in situ measurements of the solar wind, rather than the standard spectroscopically inferred abundances (Asplund et al. 2009, hereafter AGSS09). We test the claim by Vagnozzi et al. (2016) that a composition based on the solar wind enables one to construct a standard solar model in agreement with helioseismological observations and thus solve the decades-old solar modelling problem. We show that, although some helioseismological observables are improved compared to models computed with spectroscopic abundances, most are in fact worse. The high abundance of refractory elements leads to an overproduction of neutrinos, with a predicted 8B flux that is nearly twice its observed value, and 7Be and CNO fluxes that are experimentally ruled out at high confidence. A combined likelihood analysis shows that models using the vSZ16 abundances are worse than AGSS09 despite a higher metallicity. We also present astrophysical and spectroscopic arguments showing the vSZ16 composition to be an implausible representation of the solar interior, identifying the first ionization potential effect in the outer solar atmosphere and wind as the likely culprit.

  8. Combined Solar and Wind Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Souliotis, M.; Makris, Th.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the new concept of combined solar and wind energy systems for buildings applications. Photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines (WTs) can be install on buildings, in case of sufficient wind potential, providing the building with electricity. PVs can be combined with thermal collectors to form the hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) systems. The PVs (or the PV/Ts) and WT subsystems can supplement each other to cover building electrical load. In case of using PV/T collectors, the surplus of electricity, if not used or stored in batteries, can increase the temperature of the thermal storage tank of the solar thermal unit. The description of the experimental set-up of the suggested PV/T/WT system and experimental results are presented. In PV/T/WT systems the output from the solar part depends on the sunshine time and the output of the wind turbine part depends on the wind speed and is obtained any time of day or night. The use of the three subsystems can cover a great part of building energy load, contributing to conventional energy saving and environment protection. The PV/T/WT systems are considered suitable in rural and remote areas with electricity supply from stand-alone units or mini-grid connection. PV/T/WT systems can also be used in typical grid connected applications.

  9. THOR Cold Solar Wind (CSW) instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavraud, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission concept dedicated to the study of plasma turbulence. We present the Cold Solar Wind (CSW) instrument that is being designed for THOR. CSW will measure the full three dimensional distribution function of solar wind protons and alphas with unprecedented accuracies. It will measure solar wind proton distributions down to at least 50 ms with energy resolution of 7% and angular resolution of 1.5°. CSW is based on a top-hat electrostatic analyzer (with very large geometric factor) design with deflectors at the entrance. The particle detection system uses Channel Electron Multipliers (CEM) associated with an analog front end Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). CSW electronics comprises a fast sweeping high voltage board, as well as an FPGA and low voltage power supply boards to perform its operations. CSW is designed to address many of the key science objectives of THOR, in particular regarding ion-scale kinetic aspects of solar wind turbulence.

  10. Solar wind and motion of dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J; Pastor, P; Komar, L

    2009-01-01

    Action of solar wind on arbitrarily shaped interplanetary dust particle is investigated. The final relativistically covariant equation of motion of the particle contains both orbital evolution and change of particle's mass. Non-radial solar wind velocity vector is also included. The covariant equation of motion reduces to the Poynting-Robertson effect in the limiting case when spherical particle is treated, the speed of the incident solar wind corpuscles tends to the speed of light and the corpuscles spread radially from the Sun. The results of quantum mechanics have to be incorporated into the physical considerations, in order to obtain the limiting case. The condition for the solar wind effect on motion of spherical interplanetary dust particle is $\\vec{p}'_{out}$ $=$ (1 $-$ $\\sigma'_{pr} / \\sigma'_{tot}$) $\\vec{p}'_{in}$, where $\\vec{p}'_{in}$ and $\\vec{p}'_{out}$ are incoming and outgoing radiation momenta (per unit time) measured in the proper frame of reference of the particle; $\\sigma'_{pr}$ and $\\sigm...

  11. Energy Primer: Solar, Water, Wind, and Biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portola Inst., Inc., Menlo Park, CA.

    This is a comprehensive, fairly technical book about renewable forms of energy--solar, water, wind, and biofuels. The biofuels section covers biomass energy, agriculture, aquaculture, alcohol, methane, and wood. The focus is on small-scale systems which can be applied to the needs of the individual, small group, or community. More than one-fourth…

  12. Energy Primer: Solar, Water, Wind, and Biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portola Inst., Inc., Menlo Park, CA.

    This is a comprehensive, fairly technical book about renewable forms of energy--solar, water, wind, and biofuels. The biofuels section covers biomass energy, agriculture, aquaculture, alcohol, methane, and wood. The focus is on small-scale systems which can be applied to the needs of the individual, small group, or community. More than one-fourth…

  13. The Solar Wind as a Turbulence Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Carbone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review we will focus on a topic of fundamental importance for both astrophysics and plasma physics, namely the occurrence of large-amplitude low-frequency fluctuations of the fields that describe the plasma state. This subject will be treated within the context of the expanding solar wind and the most meaningful advances in this research field will be reported emphasizing the results obtained in the past decade or so. As a matter of fact, Helios inner heliosphere and Ulysses' high latitude observations, recent multi-spacecrafts measurements in the solar wind (Cluster four satellites and new numerical approaches to the problem, based on the dynamics of complex systems, brought new important insights which helped to better understand how turbulent fluctuations behave in the solar wind. In particular, numerical simulations within the realm of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD turbulence theory unraveled what kind of physical mechanisms are at the basis of turbulence generation and energy transfer across the spectral domain of the fluctuations. In other words, the advances reached in these past years in the investigation of solar wind turbulence now offer a rather complete picture of the phenomenological aspect of the problem to be tentatively presented in a rather organic way.

  14. Solar Wind and Motion of Meteoroids

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J

    1999-01-01

    The effect of nonradial component of solar wind is discussed from the qualitative point of view. It is shown that the direction of nonradial component is opposite in comparison with the direction used in papers dealing with orbital evolution of meteoroids.

  15. Wind loads on solar energy systems, mounted on flat roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Bentum, C.A. van; Blackmore, P.

    2005-01-01

    Wind loads on solar energy systems are not covered by current wind loading standards. This paper describes results of a parametric study into the wind loads on solar energy systems, which are placed on flat roofs. Wind tunnel measurements have been carried out on a number of configurations. The resu

  16. Wind loads on solar energy systems, mounted on flat roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Bentum, C.A. van; Blackmore, P.

    2005-01-01

    Wind loads on solar energy systems are not covered by current wind loading standards. This paper describes results of a parametric study into the wind loads on solar energy systems, which are placed on flat roofs. Wind tunnel measurements have been carried out on a number of configurations. The resu

  17. Wind and solar energy in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, S.M.; Raza, S.M. (Balochistan Univ., Quetta (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1993-04-01

    Hourly wind-speed data at four meteorological observatories (Quetta, Karachi, Peshawar, and Lahore) in Pakistan have been analysed to determine monthly and annual wind power and these are then compared with the monthly mean solar radiation energies for the period 1980-1984. The monthly average wind speeds for the four stations range from 2.5 to 4.4, 2.75 to 6.7, 0.6 to 1.7, and 0.7 to 1.6 m/sec while the solar radiation varies from 3.6 to 7.65, 3.39 to 6.31, 2.4 to 6.35, and 2.8 to 6.27 kWh/m[sup 2], respectively. (author)

  18. Kinetic Physics of the Solar Corona and Solar Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsch Eckart

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic plasma physics of the solar corona and solar wind are reviewed with emphasis on the theoretical understanding of the in situ measurements of solar wind particles and waves, as well as on the remote-sensing observations of the solar corona made by means of ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging. In order to explain coronal and interplanetary heating, the microphysics of the dissipation of various forms of mechanical, electric and magnetic energy at small scales (e.g., contained in plasma waves, turbulences or non-uniform flows must be addressed. We therefore scrutinise the basic assumptions underlying the classical transport theory and the related collisional heating rates, and also describe alternatives associated with wave-particle interactions. We elucidate the kinetic aspects of heating the solar corona and interplanetary plasma through Landau- and cyclotron-resonant damping of plasma waves, and analyse in detail wave absorption and micro instabilities. Important aspects (virtues and limitations of fluid models, either single- and multi-species or magnetohydrodynamic and multi-moment models, for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are critically discussed. Also, kinetic model results which were recently obtained by numerically solving the Vlasov–Boltzmann equation in a coronal funnel and hole are presented. Promising areas and perspectives for future research are outlined finally.

  19. Decoding solar wind-magnetosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beharrell, M. J.; Honary, F.

    2016-10-01

    We employ a new NARMAX (Nonlinear Auto-Regressive Moving Average with eXogenous inputs) code to disentangle the time-varying relationship between the solar wind and SYM-H. The NARMAX method has previously been used to formulate a Dst model, using a preselected solar wind coupling function. In this work, which uses the higher-resolution SYM-H in place of Dst, we are able to reveal the individual components of different solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes as they contribute to the geomagnetic disturbance. This is achieved with a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based NARMAX code that is around 10 orders of magnitude faster than previous efforts from 2005, before general-purpose programming on GPUs was possible. The algorithm includes a composite cost function, to minimize overfitting, and iterative reorthogonalization, which reduces computational errors in the most critical calculations by a factor of ˜106. The results show that negative deviations in SYM-H following a southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are first a measure of the increased magnetic flux in the geomagnetic tail, observed with a delay of 20-30 min from the time the solar wind hits the bow shock. Terms with longer delays are found which represent the dipolarization of the magnetotail, the injections of particles into the ring current, and their subsequent loss by flowout through the dayside magnetopause. Our results indicate that the contribution of magnetopause currents to the storm time indices increase with solar wind electric field, E = v × B. This is in agreement with previous studies that have shown that the magnetopause is closer to the Earth when the IMF is in the tangential direction.

  20. High Speed Video Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janess, Don C.

    1984-11-01

    This paper describes a means of inserting alphanumeric characters and graphics into a high speed video signal and locking that signal to an IRIG B time code. A model V-91 IRIG processor, developed by Instrumentation Technology Systems under contract to Instrumentation Marketing Corporation has been designed to operate in conjunction with the NAC model FHS-200 High Speed Video Camera which operates at 200 fields per second. The system provides for synchronizing the vertical and horizontal drive signals such that the vertical sync precisely coincides with five millisecond transitions in the IRIG time code. Additionally, the unit allows for the insertion of an IRIG time message as well as other data and symbols.

  1. Elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepko, L.; Viall, N. M.; Lepri, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is well understood to be linked to coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained elusive. A distinguishing characteristic of the slow solar wind is the high variability of the plasma parameters, such as magnetic field, velocity, density, composition, and charge state. Many previous studies of the slow solar wind have examined trends in the composition and charge states over long time scales and using data with comparatively low temporal resolution. In this study, we take advantage of high time resolution (12 min) measurements of the charge-state abundances recently reprocessed by the ACE SWICS science team to probe the timescales of solar wind variability of coherent structures at relatively small scales (<2000 Mm, or ~ 90 minutes at slow wind speeds). We use an interval of slow solar wind containing quasi pressure-balanced, periodic number density structures previously studied by Kepko et al and shown to be important in solar wind-magnetospheric coupling. The combination of high temporal resolution composition measurements and the clearly identified boundaries of the periodic structures allows us to probe the elemental slow solar wind flux tubes/structures. We use this train of 2000Mm periodic density structures as tracers of solar wind origin and/or acceleration. We find that each 2000 Mm parcel of slow solar wind, though its speed is steady, exhibits the complete range of charge state and composition variations expected for the entire range of slow solar wind, in a repeated sequence. Each parcel cycles through three states: 1) 'normal' slow wind, 2) compositionally slow wind with very high density, and 3) compositionally fast but typical slow solar wind density. We conclude by suggesting these structures form elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind, and discuss whether it is necessary to decouple separately the process(es) responsible for the release and acceleration.

  2. On the Analytical Approach to Present Engineering Problems: Photovoltaic Systems Behavior, Wind Speed Sensors Performance, and High-Speed Train Pressure Wave Effects in Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pindado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, engineering problems required quite a sophisticated calculation means. However, analytical models still can prove to be a useful tool for engineers and scientists when dealing with complex physical phenomena. The mathematical models developed to analyze three different engineering problems: photovoltaic devices analysis; cup anemometer performance; and high-speed train pressure wave effects in tunnels are described. In all cases, the results are quite accurate when compared to testing measurements.

  3. Solar wind correlations: Statistical and case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.; Zastenker, G. N.; Dalin, P. A.

    1999-06-01

    Recent work on solar wind plasma correlations using data from several widely-separated spacecraft (IMP 8, INTERBALL-1, WIND, and ISEE-3) has shown that, for 6-hour periods, the average plasma correlation is ~0.7. The focus of these studies has been directed toward a statistical understanding of gross solar wind correlation behavior. In all correlations examined, lower average correlations are caused by the presence of many points from the low correlation subpopulation; nevertheless, data points from the high correlation population are still present. No single organizational factor has yet been found which adequately separates low-correlation periods from high-correlation periods. Some of the spread in correlations is due to the spatial orientations and dimensions of solar wind structures, and thus to the locational alignments of the spacecraft being correlated, but this does not adequately explain all the good or poor correlations since sometimes three nearby spacecraft show poor correlations, while sometimes three widely-separated space-craft show good correlations. Thus, in order to understand the underlying physics, detailed investigation of individual cases has been undertaken. These results will be important in assigning quality measures to space weather predictions using satellite measurements taken at L1, for example.

  4. Proceedings of the Flat-plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the High-speed Growth and Characterization of Crystals for Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, K. A. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental phenomena, applications, and characterization including stress/strain and other problem areas that limit the rate of growth of crystals suitable for processing into efficient, cost-effective solar cells are discussed. Melt spinning, ribbon growth, rapid solidification, laser recrystallization, and ignot growth of silicon and metals are also discussed.

  5. High speed flywheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Stephen V.

    1991-01-01

    A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

  6. Suprathermal Solar Wind Electrons and Langmuir Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunjung; Yoon, Peter H.; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-09-01

    The steady-state model recently put forth for the solar wind electron velocity distribution function during quiet time conditions, was originally composed of three population electrons (core, halo, and superhalo) with the core remaining nonresonant with any plasma waves while the halo and superhalo separately maintained steady-state resonance with whistler- and Langmuir-frequency range fluctuations, respectively. However, a recent paper demonstrates that whistler-range fluctuations in fact have no significant contribution. The present paper represents a consummation of the model in that a self-consistent model of the suprathermal electron population, which encompasses both the halo and the superhalo, is constructed solely on the basis of the Langmuir fluctuation spectrum. Numerical solutions to steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations are obtained on the basis of an initial trial electron distribution and Langmuir wave spectrum. Such a finding offers a self-consistent explanation for the observed steady-state electron distribution in the solar wind.

  7. Solar wind thermally induced magnetic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R E; Moya, P S; Muñoz, V; Araneda, J A; F-Viñas, A; Valdivia, J A

    2014-06-20

    A kinetic description of Alfvén-cyclotron magnetic fluctuations for anisotropic electron-proton quasistable plasmas is studied. An analytical treatment, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, consistently shows that spontaneous fluctuations in plasmas with stable distributions significantly contribute to the observed magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind, as seen, for example, in [S. D. Bale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 211101 (2009)], even far below from the instability thresholds. Furthermore, these results, which do not require any adjustable parameters or wave excitations, are consistent with the results provided by hybrid simulations. It is expected that this analysis contributes to our understanding of the nature of magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind.

  8. Deimos: an obstacle to the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, K; Dubinin, E; Baumgärtel, K; Bogdanov, A

    1995-08-25

    Two isolated solar wind disturbances about 5 minutes in duration were detected aboard the Russian spacecraft Phobos-2 upon its crossing the wake of the martian moon Deimos about 15,000 kilometers downstream from the moon on 1 February 1989. These plasma and magnetic events are interpreted as the inbound and outbound crossings of a Mach cone that is formed as a result of an effective interaction of the solar wind with Deimos. Possible mechanisms such as remanent magnetization, cometary type interaction caused by heavy ion or charged dust production, and unipolar induction resulting from the finite conductivity of the body are discussed. Although none of the present models is fully satisfactory, neutral gas emission through water loss by Deimos at a rate of about 10(23) molecules per second, combined with a charged dust coma, is favored.

  9. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters.

  10. High speed multiphoton imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxiao; Brustle, Anne; Gautam, Vini; Cockburn, Ian; Gillespie, Cathy; Gaus, Katharina; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to visualize cellular processes in-vivo. Real time processes revealed through live imaging provided many opportunities to capture cellular activities in living animals. The typical parameters that determine the performance of multiphoton microscopy are speed, field of view, 3D imaging and imaging depth; many of these are important to achieving data from in-vivo. Here, we provide a full exposition of the flexible polygon mirror based high speed laser scanning multiphoton imaging system, PCI-6110 card (National Instruments) and high speed analog frame grabber card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), which allows for rapid adjustments between frame rates i.e. 5 Hz to 50 Hz with 512 × 512 pixels. Furthermore, a motion correction algorithm is also used to mitigate motion artifacts. A customized control software called Pscan 1.0 is developed for the system. This is then followed by calibration of the imaging performance of the system and a series of quantitative in-vitro and in-vivo imaging in neuronal tissues and mice.

  11. Magnetic pumping of the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egedal, Jan; Lichko, Emily; Daughton, William

    2015-11-01

    The transport of matter and radiation in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosphere is a complicated problem involving competing processes of charged particles interacting with electric and magnetic fields. Given the rapid expansion of the solar wind, it would be expected that superthermal electrons originating in the corona would cool rapidly as a function of distance to the Sun. However, this is not observed, and various models have been proposed as candidates for heating the solar wind. In the compressional pumping mechanism explored by Fisk and Gloeckler particles are accelerated by random compressions by the interplanetary wave turbulence. This theory explores diffusion due to spatial non-uniformities and provides a mechanism for redistributing particle. For investigation of a related but different heating mechanism, magnetic pumping, in our work we include diffusion of anisotropic features that develops in velocity space. The mechanism allows energy to be transferred to the particles directly from the turbulence. Guided by kinetic simulations a theory is derived for magnetic pumping. At the heart of this work is a generalization of the Parker Equation to capture the role of the pressure anisotropy during the pumping process. Supported by NASA grant NNX15AJ73G.

  12. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  13. A statistical study of the interdependence of solar wind parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shollykutty John; P. J. Kurian

    2009-01-01

    Correlation analysis of solar wind parameters, namely solar wind velocity, pro- ton density, proton temperature and mean interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) from the ACE spacecraft data near Earth, was done. To our best knowledge, this study is a novel one since we consider here only the parameters inside the solar wind, including the mean IMF and, hence, the solar wind is a self consistent system. We have proposed a Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) model for the prediction of the response variable (solar wind velocity) using the parameters proton density, proton temperature and mean IMF mea- sured as dally averages. About 60% of the observed value can be predicted using this model. It is shown that, in general, the correlation between solar wind parameters is sig- nificant. A deviation from the prediction at the solar maximum is interpreted. These results are verified by a graphical method.

  14. Solar wind controls on Mercury's magnetospheric cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Maosheng; Vogt, Joachim; Heyner, Daniel; Zhong, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Mercury's magnetospheric cusp results from the interaction between the planetary intrinsic magnetic field and the solar wind. In this study, we assemble 2848 orbits of MESSENGER data for a comprehensive assessment of solar wind control on Mercury's cusp. We propose and validate an IMF estimation approach for the cusp transit, and construct an index to measure the magnetic disturbance. The index maximizes within the cusp, more intense than in the adjacent magnetosphere by several orders of magnitude. We develop an empirical model of the index as a function of IMFvector and Mercury's solar orbital phase. The model is used to study the cusp activity under different conditions. Comparisons reveal the cusp activity is more intense and extends further in local time, under antisunward IMF (IMFx0), under southward IMF (IMFz0), and when Mercury orbits at its perihelion than at aphelion. Besides, the cusp shifts azimuthally towards dawn when IMF reverses from westward (IMFy0), and when Mercury approaches its perihelion. The IMFx dependence is consistent with existing observations and simulations which are ascribed to the asymmetry of dayside magnetospheric configuration between sunward and anti-sunward IMF conditions. We explain the IMFy and IMFz dependences in terms of component reconnection of the magnetospheric field merging with By-dominant and Bz-dominant IMF, respectively. The control of the Mercury solar orbit phase on the intensity and local time location of the disturbance peak are possibly arising from the modulations of the heliocentric distance on the solar wind ram pressure. The existence of significant IMF dependence suggests the IMF orientation plays a role in the convection configuration at Mercury. The IMFy-dependence at Mercury is opposite to that at Earth, suggesting that component reconnection at the dayside magnetopause is more important in the Hermean system than in the terrestrial one. This also implies that reconnection occurs at lower magnetic shear

  15. Implications of solar wind measurements for solar models and composition

    CERN Document Server

    Serenelli, Aldo; Villante, Francesco L; Vincent, Aaron C; Asplund, Martin; Basu, Sarbani; Grevesse, Nicolas; Pena-Garay, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We critically examine recent claims of a high solar metallicity by von Steiger \\& Zurbuchen (2016; vSZ16) based on in situ measurements of the solar wind, rather than the standard spectroscopically-inferred abundances (Asplund et al. 2009). We test the claim by Vagnozzi et al. (2016) that a composition based on the solar wind enables one to construct a standard solar model in agreement with helioseismological observations and thus solve the decades-old solar modelling problem. We show that, although some helioseismological observables are improved compared to models computed with established abundances, most are in fact worse. The high abundance of refractory elements leads to an overproduction of neutrinos, with a predicted $^8$B flux that is nearly twice its observed value, and $^7$Be and CNO fluxes that are experimentally ruled out at high confidence. A combined likelihood analysis shows that models using the vSZ16 abundances fare much worse than AGSS09 despite a higher metallicity. We also present ast...

  16. Solar wind observations with the ion composition instrument aboard the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.

    1989-01-01

    The principal observations obtained by the Ion Composition Instrument (ICI) flown on the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft, which was in the solar wind from September 1978 to the end of 1982, before being directed to the far magnetotail of the Earth are discussed. Almost continuous observations were made of the abundances of 3He++, 4He++, 06+, 07+, Ne, Si and Fe in various charge states, and of their bulk speeds and temperatures. The results show that there is a strong tendency in the collisionless solar wind for the ionic temperatures to be proportional to the masses. For heavier ions these temperatures exceed typical coronal electron temperatures. 4He++, especially in high speed streams, moves faster than H+, and travels at the same speed as heavier ions. The mechanism leading to this heating and rapid streaming is still not entirely clear.

  17. Solar wind observations with the ion composition instrument aboard the ISEE-3 ICE spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, K.W.; Coplan, M.A.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.

    1989-01-01

    The principal observations obtained by the Ion Composition Instrument (ICI) flown on the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft, which was in the solar wind from September 1978 to the end of 1982, before being directed to the far magnetotail of the Earth are discussed. Almost continuous observations were made of the abundances of 3He++, 4He++, O6+, O7+, Ne, Si and Fe in various charge states, and of their bulk speeds and temperatures. The results show that there is a strong tendency in the collisionless solar wind for the ionic temperatures to be proportional to the masses. For heavier ions these temperatures exceed typical coronal electron temperatures. 4He++, especially in high speed streams, moves faster than H+, and travels at the same speed as heavier ions. The mechanism leading to this heating and rapid streaming is still not entirely clear.

  18. The Most Intense Electron-Scale Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, John J.

    2017-04-01

    Previous analysis of magnetohydrodynamic-scale currents in high-speed solar wind near 1 AU suggests that the most intense current-carrying structures occur at electron scales and are characterized by average current densities on the order of 1 pA/cm2. Here, this prediction is verified by examining the effects of the measurement bandwidth and/or measurement resolution on the analysis of synthetic solar wind signals. Assuming Taylor's hypothesis holds for the energetically dominant fluctuations at kinetic scales, the results show that when νc≫ νb, where νc is the measurement bandwidth and νb ≈ 1/3 Hz is the break frequency, the average scale of the most intense fluctuations in the current density proxy is approximately 1/νc, and the average peak current density is a weakly increasing function that scales approximately like νc^{0.1}.

  19. A large-scale view of Space Technology 5 magnetometer response to solar wind drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Knipp, D J; Gjerloev, J; Redmon, R J; Slavin, J; Le, G

    2016-01-01

    In this data report we discuss reprocessing of the Space Technology 5 (ST5) magnetometer database for inclusion in NASA's Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb) virtual observatory. The mission consisted of three spacecraft flying in elliptical orbits, from 27 March to 27 June 2006. Reprocessing includes (1) transforming the data into the Modified Apex Coordinate System for projection to a common reference altitude of 110km, (2) correcting gain jumps, and (3) validating the results. We display the averaged magnetic perturbations as a keogram, which allows direct comparison of the full-mission data with the solar wind values and geomagnetic indices.With the data referenced to a common altitude, we find the following: (1) Magnetic perturbations that track the passage of corotating interaction regions and high-speed solar wind; (2) unexpectedly strong dayside perturbations during a solstice magnetospheric sawtooth oscillation interval characterized by a radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component that m...

  20. Equatorwards Expansion of Unperturbed, High-Latitude Fast Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Dorrian, Gareth; Fallows, Richard; Bisi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    We use dual-site radio observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) with extremely long baselines (ELB) to examine meridional flow characteristics of the ambient fast solar wind at plane-of-sky heliocentric distances of 24-85 solar radii (R\\odot). Our results demonstrate an equatorwards deviation of 3-4{\\deg} in the bulk fast solar wind flow direction over both northern and southern solar hemispheres during different times in the declining phase of Solar Cycle 23.

  1. About the correlation between solar micro bursts and the change of the solar wind parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; P, Daniel Ricardo Izquierdo

    2005-01-01

    The Sun is the closest star to our planet and it is the most studied, perhaps, there exist too much procesess not-understood. One of the solar processes that have a direct interaction with the earth is the solar wind. The solar wind is defined as the plasma expulsed from the solar atmosphere, this wind was cataloged and is considered that have three components: - Passive solar wind: Is the constant component of the solar wind. - Supersonic and quasistady flux. - Sporadic supersonic flux. We p...

  2. Electric solar wind sail applications overview

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, Pekka; Envall, Jouni; Merikallio, Sini; Montesanti, Giuditta; del Amo, Jose Gonzalez; Kvell, Urmas; Noorma, Mart; Lätt, Silver

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the potential of the electric solar wind sail for solar system space missions. Applications studied include fly-by missions to terrestrial planets (Venus, Mars and Phobos, Mercury) and asteroids, missions based on non-Keplerian orbits (orbits that can be maintained only by applying continuous propulsive force), one-way boosting to outer solar system, off-Lagrange point space weather forecasting and low-cost impactor probes for added science value to other missions. We also discuss the generic idea of data clippers (returning large volumes of high resolution scientific data from distant targets packed in memory chips) and possible exploitation of asteroid resources. Possible orbits were estimated by orbit calculations assuming circular and coplanar orbits for planets. Some particular challenge areas requiring further research work and related to some more ambitious mission scenarios are also identified and discussed.

  3. Topological Origins of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S.

    2008-12-01

    Although the slow solar wind has been studied for decades with both in situ and remote sensing observations, its origin is still a matter of intense debate. In the standard quasi-steady model, the slow wind is postulated to originate near coronal hole boundaries that define topologically well-behaved separatrices between open and closed field regions. In the interchange model, on the other hand, the slow wind is postulated to originate on open flux that is dynamically diffusing throughout the seemingly closed-field corona. We argue in favor of the quasi-steady scenario and propose that the slow wind is due to two effects: First, the open-closed boundary is highly complex due to the complexity of the photospheric flux distribution. Second, this boundary is continuously driven by the transport of magnetic helicity from the closed field region into the open. The implications of this model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and slow wind are discussed, and observational tests of the model are presented. This work has been supported, in part, by the NASA LWS, HTP, and SR&T programs.

  4. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  5. Solar wind rare gas analysis: Trapped solar wind helium and neon in Surveyor 3 material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, F.; Eberhardt, P.; Geiss, J.; Schwarzmueller, J.

    1972-01-01

    The He-4 and Ne-20 contents in sections of the Surveyor 3 support strut samples were determined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and are compared to the results of the Apollo solar wind composition (SWC) experiments. The He-4/Ne-20 ratio in the samples from the sunlit side of the strut was approximately 300; the ratios determined in Apollo 12 lunar fines and SWC foil were below 100. The He-4/He-3 ratios were also determined, and the ratio obtained from Surveyor 3 material is higher than those found with Apollo 11 and 12 SWC experiments. The effects of spallation by cosmic rays or solar protons, stripping by cosmic ray or energetic solar alpha particles, recycling of solar wind He and radiogenic Ne, He from terrestrial atmosphere, mass discrimination near the moon, mass dependence of trapping probability, diffusion, and contamination by lunar dust are considered.

  6. Turbulent Transport in a Three-dimensional Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, D.; Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P.; Telloni, D.; Bruno, R.

    2017-03-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind can play essential roles in the heating of coronal and solar wind plasma and the acceleration of the solar wind and energetic particles. Turbulence sources are not well understood and thought to be partly enhanced by interaction with the large-scale inhomogeneity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field and/or transported from the solar corona. To investigate the interaction with background inhomogeneity and the turbulence sources, we have developed a new 3D MHD model that includes the transport and dissipation of turbulence using the theoretical model of Zank et al. We solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of three moments or variables, the energy in the forward and backward fluctuating modes and the residual energy and their three corresponding correlation lengths. The transport model is coupled to our 3D model of the inhomogeneous solar wind. We present results of the coupled solar wind-turbulence model assuming a simple tilted dipole magnetic configuration that mimics solar minimum conditions, together with several comparative intermediate cases. By considering eight possible solar wind and turbulence source configurations, we show that the large-scale solar wind and IMF inhomogeneity and the strength of the turbulence sources significantly affect the distribution of turbulence in the heliosphere within 6 au. We compare the predicted turbulence distribution results from a complete solar minimum model with in situ measurements made by the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft, finding that the synthetic profiles of the turbulence intensities show reasonable agreement with observations.

  7. Wavelet Analysis on Solar Wind Parameters and Geomagnetic Indices

    CERN Document Server

    Katsavrias, Ch; Moussas, X

    2012-01-01

    The sun as an oscillator produces frequencies which propagate in the heliosphere, via solar wind, to the terrestrial magnetosphere. We searched for those frequencies in the parameters of the near Earth solar plasma and the geomagnetic indices for the past four solar cycles. The solar wind parameters used in this work are the interplanetary magnetic field, plasma beta, Alfven Mach number, solar wind speed, plasma temperature, plasma pressure, plasma density and the geomagnetic indices DST, AE, Ap and Kp. We found out that each parameter of the solar wind exhibit certain periodicities which di?erentiate in each cycle. Our results indicate intermittent periodicities in our data, some of them shared between the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices.

  8. Remote Sensing of the Heliospheric Solar Wind using Radio Astronomy Methods and Numerical Simulations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Ananthakrishnan

    2000-09-01

    The ground-based radio astronomy method of interplanetary scintillations (IPS) and spacecraft observations have shown, in the past 25 years, that while coronal holes give rise to stable, recurring high speed solar wind streams during the minimum of the solar activity cycle, the slow speed wind seen more during the solar maximum activity is better associated with the closed field regions, which also give rise to solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CME's). The latter events increase significantly, as the cycle maximum takes place. We have recently shown that in the case of energetic flares one may be able to track the associated disturbances almost on a one to one basis from a distance of 0.2 to 1 AU using IPS methods. Time dependent 3D MHD models which are constrained by IPS observations are being developed. These models are able to simulate general features of the solar-generated disturbances. Advances in this direction may lead to prediction of heliospheric propagation of these disturbances throughout the solar system.

  9. Genesis Solar Wind Science Canister Components Curated as Potential Solar Wind Collectors and Reference Contamination Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind for 27 months at Earth-Sun L1 on both passive and active collectors carried inside of a Science Canister, which was cleaned and assembled in an ISO Class 4 cleanroom prior to launch. The primary passive collectors, 271 individual hexagons and 30 half-hexagons of semiconductor materials, are described in. Since the hard landing reduced the 301 passive collectors to many thousand smaller fragments, characterization and posting in the online catalog remains a work in progress, with about 19% of the total area characterized to date. Other passive collectors, surfaces of opportunity, have been added to the online catalog. For species needing to be concentrated for precise measurement (e.g. oxygen and nitrogen isotopes) an energy-independent parabolic ion mirror focused ions onto a 6.2 cm diameter target. The target materials, as recovered after landing, are described in. The online catalog of these solar wind collectors, a work in progress, can be found at: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/gencatalog/index.cfm This paper describes the next step, the cataloging of pieces of the Science Canister, which were surfaces exposed to the solar wind or component materials adjacent to solar wind collectors which may have contributed contamination.

  10. Genesis Solar Wind Samples: Update of Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.; Allton, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind atoms for 28 months with a variety of collectors. The array wafer collector availability is displayed in the online catalog. The purpose of this report is to update the community on availability of array wafer samples and to preview other collectors which are in the process of being added to the online catalog. A total of fifteen pure materials were selected based on engineering and science requirements. Most of the materials were semiconductor wafers which were mounted on the arrays.

  11. 侧风风场特征对高速列车气动性能作用的研究%Research on Influence of Characteristics of Cross Wind Field on Aerodynamic Performance of a High-speed Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛军; 郗艳红; 杨国伟

    2011-01-01

    侧风风场特征,如均匀风和大气底层边界速度型对高速列车在侧风环境下运行的安全性评估有直接影响.为了准确地评估侧风对在平原上运行的高速列车的影响,基于三维定常可压缩流动的NS方程,采用SSTk-ω两方程湍流模型和有限体积法,对时速350 km的动车组在均匀风和大气底层边界速度型风场中的流场和气动力特性分别进行了数值模拟计算和分析.结果表明:对在平原上运行的高速列车而言,作用于列车的气动升力、侧向力及倾覆力矩均随侧风风向角的增大而迅速增大;当风场为大气底层边界速度型时,列车顶部与底部及两个侧面的压力差小于风场为均匀风时的压力差,侧向力及倾覆力矩均小于风场为均匀风时的力及力矩,升力则随侧风风向角的增加具有不确定性.采用均匀风场评估高速列车在平原侧风环境中运行的安全性,会高估侧风对列车运行安全影响的风险,使得过低地限制列车的安全行驶速度,从而影响列车的正常运行效率.建议采用大气底层边界速度型风场进行评估.%Characteristics of the cross wind field, such as uniform winds and lower atmospheric boundary layer winds,have directly influence on the operation safety of high-speed trains which run in the cross wind environment. In order to accurately assess the effect of cross winds on trains running on plains,on the basis of the three-dimensional steady compressible flow of NS equations, using the SST k-ω two-equation turbulence model and finite volume method, the flow field and aerodynamic characteristics of the high speed train running at 350 km/h in the cross wind field of uniform winds and lower atmospheric boundary layer winds were simulated numerically and analyzed. The results show as follows:For a high-speed train running under cross winds on a plain, the aerodynamic lift force, lateral force and overturning moment acting on the train

  12. Multifractality and intermittency in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Macek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the complex dynamics of the solar wind's fluctuating plasma parameters, there is a detectable, hidden order described by a chaotic strange attractor which has a multifractal structure. The multifractal spectrum has been investigated using Voyager (magnetic field data in the outer heliosphere and using Helios (plasma data in the inner heliosphere. We have also analyzed the spectrum for the solar wind attractor. The spectrum is found to be consistent with that for the multifractal measure of the self-similar one-scale weighted Cantor set with two parameters describing uniform compression and natural invariant probability measure of the attractor of the system. In order to further quantify the multifractality, we also consider a generalized weighted Cantor set with two different scales describing nonuniform compression. We investigate the resulting multifractal spectrum depending on two scaling parameters and one probability measure parameter, especially for asymmetric scaling. We hope that this generalized model will also be a useful tool for analysis of intermittent turbulence in space plasmas.

  13. The structure of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christina On-Yee

    2010-12-01

    This dissertation is devoted to expanding our understanding of the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere and variations therein with solar activity. Using spacecraft observations and numerical models, the origins of the large-scale structures and long-term trends of the solar wind are explored in order to gain insights on how our Sun determines the space environments of the terrestrial planets. I use long term measurements of the solar wind density, velocity, interplanetary magnetic field, and particles, together with models based on solar magnetic field data, to generate time series of these properties that span one solar rotation (˜27 days). From these time series, I assemble and obtain the synoptic overviews of the solar wind properties. The resulting synoptic overviews show that the solar wind around Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars is a complex co-rotating structure with recurring features and occasional transients. During quiet solar conditions, the heliospheric current sheet, which separates the positive interplanetary magnetic field from the negative, usually has a remarkably steady two- or four-sector structure that persists for many solar rotations. Within the sector boundaries are the slow and fast speed solar wind streams that originate from the open coronal magnetic field sources that map to the ecliptic. At the sector boundaries, compressed high-density and the related high-dynamic pressure ridges form where streams from different coronal source regions interact. High fluxes of energetic particles also occur at the boundaries, and are seen most prominently during the quiet solar period. The existence of these recurring features depends on how long-lived are their source regions. In the last decade, 3D numerical solar wind models have become more widely available. They provide important scientific tools for obtaining a more global view of the inner heliosphere and of the relationships between conditions at Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. When

  14. Characteristics of Solar Wind Density Depletions During Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunchan; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Lee, Jaejin; Sohn, Jongdae

    2017-06-01

    Solar wind density depletions are phenomena that solar wind density is rapidly decreased and keep the state. They are generally believed to be caused by the interplanetary (IP) shocks. However, there are other cases that are hardly associated with IP shocks. We set up a hypothesis for this phenomenon and analyze this study. We have collected the solar wind parameters such as density, speed and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data related to the solar wind density depletion events during the period from 1996 to 2013 that are obtained with the advanced composition explorer (ACE) and the Wind satellite. We also calculate two pressures (magnetic, dynamic) and analyze the relation with density depletion. As a result, we found total 53 events and the most these phenomena’s sources caused by IP shock are interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME). We also found that solar wind density depletions are scarcely related with IP shock’s parameters. The solar wind density is correlated with solar wind dynamic pressure within density depletion. However, the solar wind density has an little anti-correlation with IMF strength during all events of solar wind density depletion, regardless of the presence of IP shocks. Additionally, In 47 events of IP shocks, we find 6 events that show a feature of blast wave. The quantities of IP shocks are weaker than blast wave from the Sun, they are declined in a short time after increasing rapidly. We thus argue that IMF strength or dynamic pressure are an important factor in understanding the nature of solar wind density depletion. Since IMF strength and solar wind speed varies with solar cycle, we will also investigate the characteristics of solar wind density depletion events in different phases of solar cycle as an additional clue to their physical nature.

  15. The effect of the high-speed stream following the corotating interaction region on the geomagnetic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watari

    Full Text Available The high-speed stream following the corotating interaction regions (CIRs was analyzed. As a result of the analysis, it is found that the geomagnetic field is continuously disturbed in the high-speed stream in question. The geomagnetic disturbances with long duration recurred several rotations between December 1993 and June 1994. These disturbances were associated with a large recurrent coronal hole expanding from the south pole of the Sun. High-speed solar wind from this coronal hole was observed by the IMP-8 satellite during this period. However, the observed intensities of the geomagnetic disturbances were different for each recurrent period. This is explained by the seasonal effect. The disturbed geomagnetic condition continued in the high-speed stream after the passage of the CIRs. The long duration of these disturbances can be explained by the continuous energy input into the Earth's magnetosphere from the high-speed regions following the CIRs. This kind of long-duration geomagnetic disturbance in association with coronal holes has been observed in the declining phase of other solar cycles. The relation between the coronal-hole area and the maximum solar-wind velocity is not good for the well-developed large coronal hole analyzed here.

  16. Solar and wind energy potential and utilization in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, I.A. (Balochistan Univ., Quetta (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics); Abro, R.S. (Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Architecture Studies)

    1994-08-01

    This paper identifies the potentials of solar and wind energy. The prime sites for wind are coastal area, arid zone and hill terrains. Solar energy is abundant over most parts of the country, the maximum being received over Quetta valley. (author)

  17. Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2005-12-01

    DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills the requirement under section 812 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  18. Magnetosonic Waveguide Model of Solar Wind Flow Tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. K. Srivastava; B. N. Dwivedi

    2006-06-01

    We consider solar wind flow tubes as a magnetosonic wave-guide. Assuming a symmetric expansion in edges of slab-modelled wave-guide, we study the propagation characteristics of magnetosonic wave in the solar wind flow tubes. We present the preliminary results and discuss their implications.

  19. Selected solar wind parameters at 1 AU through two solar activity cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bruno

    Full Text Available In situ measurements of the solar wind largely cover more than two solar magnetic activity cycles, namely 20 and 21. This is a very appealing opportunity to study the influence of the activity cycle on the behaviour of the solar wind parameters. As a matter of fact, many authors so far have studied this topic comparing the long-term magnetic field and plasma averages. However, when the average values are evaluated on a data sample whose duration is comparable with (or even longer than the solar rotation period we lose information about the contribution due to the fast and the slow solar wind components. Thus, discriminating in velocity plays a key role in understanding solar cycle effects on the solar wind. Based on these considerations, we performed a separate analysis for fast and slow wind, respectively. In particular, we found that: (a fast wind carries a slightly larger momentum flux density at 1 AU, probably due to dynamic stream-stream interaction; (b proton number density in slow wind is more cycle dependent than in fast wind and decreases remarkably across solar maximum; (c fast wind generally carries a magnetic field intensity stronger than that carried by the slow wind; (d we found no evidence for a positive correlation between velocity and field intensity as predicted by some theories of solar wind acceleration; (e our results would support an approximately constant divergence of field lines associated with corotating high-velocity streams.

  20. INTERPRETING MAGNETIC VARIANCE ANISOTROPY MEASUREMENTS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Podesta, J. J., E-mail: jason-tenbarge@uiowa.edu [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-07-10

    The magnetic variance anisotropy (A{sub m}) of the solar wind has been used widely as a method to identify the nature of solar wind turbulent fluctuations; however, a thorough discussion of the meaning and interpretation of the A{sub m} has not appeared in the literature. This paper explores the implications and limitations of using the A{sub m} as a method for constraining the solar wind fluctuation mode composition and presents a more informative method for interpreting spacecraft data. The paper also compares predictions of the A{sub m} from linear theory to nonlinear turbulence simulations and solar wind measurements. In both cases, linear theory compares well and suggests that the solar wind for the interval studied is dominantly Alfvenic in the inertial and dissipation ranges to scales of k{rho}{sub i} {approx_equal} 5.

  1. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Hummon, M.; Florita, A.; Heaney, M.

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West.

  2. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brinkman, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibanez, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Florita, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heaney, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hodge, B. -M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hummon, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, J. [RePPAE; Lefton, S. A. [Intertek-APTECH, Houston, TX (United States); Kumar, N. [Intertek-APTECH, Houston, TX (United States); Agan, D. [Intertek-APTECH, Houston, TX (United States); Jordan, G. [GE Energy, Fairfield, CT (United States); Venkataraman, S. [GE Energy, Fairfield, CT (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West(GE Energy 2010).

  3. Solar Wind Composition: First Results from SOHO and Future Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Coplan, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Hilchenbach, M.; Buergi, A.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Bochsler, P.; Balsiger, H.; Geiss, J.; Kallenbach, R.; Wurz, P.; Gruenwaldt, H.; Axford, W. I.; Livi, S.; Marsch, E.; Wilken, B.; Gliem, F.; Reiche, K.-U.; Lee, M. A.; Moebius, E.; Hsieh, K. C.; Neugebauer, M.; Managadze, G. G.; Verigin, M. I.

    1996-05-01

    The SOHO payload includes three experiments designed to make "in situ" particle measurements of the solar wind and solar energetic particles (CELIAS, D. Hovestadt PI; COSTEP, H. Kunow PI; ERNE, J. Torsti PI). The solar wind measurements that are the focus of this talk are primarily provided by the CELIAS CTOF and MTOF sensors. (CELIAS/STOF and COSTEP-ERNE measure solar and interplanetary suprathermal and energetic particle populations.) CELIAS/CTOF measures solar wind heavy ion elemental and charge state abundances, information which is used (for example) in identifying the type of solar wind flow and the ionization processes in the corona where the solar wind charge states become "frozen-in". CELIAS/MTOF provides heavy ion elemental and isotopic abundances that are important (for example) in the study of fractionation factors in coronal abundances (as in the so-called "FIP-effect") for the rarer elements not resolvable in conventional solar wind composition instruments, and in determining the isotopic make-up of the solar corona. MTOF is, by far, the most powerful solar wind mass spectrometer flown to date, and already has new science to report at the time of this writing. This happenstance is due to a combination of (1) advanced technology in obtaining high mass resolution for ions at solar wind energies, and (2) increased statistics. The excellent counting statistics are largely due to continuous solar wind monitoring (with its position at L1, ``the Sun never sets on SOHO''), and the continuous sampling of the solar wind by the 3-axis stabilized spacecraft further enhanced by MTOF's novel, never previously flown deflection system that encompasses a very large dynamic range. As might be expected, this unique opportunity has allowed MTOF to identify a number of elements for the first time in the solar wind (e.g., P, Ti, Cr and Ni). A rich assortment of solar wind isotopes have been identified for the first time, many of which (e.g., Fe 54 and 56; Ni 58,60,62) have

  4. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  5. Development of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model for solar corona and solar wind simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xingqiu; Trichtchenko, Larisa; Boteler, David

    Propagation of coronal mass ejections from solar surface to the Earth magnetosphere is strongly influenced by the conditions in solar corona and ambient solar wind. Thus, reliable simulation of the background solar wind is the primary task toward the development of numerical model for the transient events. In this paper we introduce a new numerical model which has been specifically designed for numerical study of the solar corona and ambient solar wind. This model is based on our recently developed three-dimensional Spherical Coordinate Adaptive Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) code (SCA-MHD-3D) [Yuan et al., 2009]. Modifications has been done to include the observed magnetic field at the photosphere as inner boundary conditions. The energy source term together with reduced plasma gamma are used in the nonlinear MHD equations in order to simulate the solar wind acceleration from subsonic speed at solar surface to supersonic speed at the inter-heliosphere region, and the absorbing boundary conditions are used at the solar surface. This model has been applied to simulate the background solar wind condition for several different solar rotations, and comparison between the observation and model output have shown that it reproduces many features of solar wind, including open and closed magnetic fields, fast and slow solar wind speed, sector boundaries, etc.

  6. High-speed solar-blind UV photodetectors using high-Al content Al0.64Ga0.36N/Al0.34Ga0.66N multiple quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhtadi, Sakib; Hwang, Seong Mo; Coleman, Antwon L.; Lunev, Alexander; Asif, Fatima; Chava, V. S. N.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.; Khan, Asif

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate high-external quantum efficiency (˜50%) solar-blind AlGaN p-n junction photodetectors with high-Al content multiple quantum wells (MQWs). A peak responsivity of 0.1 A/W at 250 nm, which falls >103 by 280 nm, indicates that the optical absorption is dominated by the MQW structures. At a reverse bias of 0.5 V, the dark current is measured as 0.4 µs, and an achievable detector RC-limited time response of 2 ns is estimated. The devices do not show internal gain, which accounts for their high speed.

  7. Electron velocity distribution functions from the solar wind to the corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, M.; Pierrard, V.; Lemaire, J.; Larson, D.

    1999-06-01

    Typical electron velocity distribution functions observed at 1 AU from the Sun by the instrument 3DP aboard of WIND are used as boundary conditions to determine the electron velocity distribution function at 4 solar radii in the corona. The velocity distribution functions (VDF) at low altitude are obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation, using two different sets of boundary conditions. The first set typically corresponds to a VDF observed in a low speed solar wind flow (i.e., characterized by ``core'' and ``halo'' electrons); the second one corresponds to high speed solar wind (i.e. characterized by ``core,'' ``halo'' and ``strahl'' populations). We use the observed electron VDFs as test particles which are submitted to external forces and Coulomb collisions with a background plasma. Closer to the Sun, the relative density of the core electrons is found to increase compared to the densities of the halo population. Nevertheless, we find that in order to match the observed distributions at 1 AU, suprathermal tails have to be present in the VDF of the test electron at low altitudes in the corona. Note that the present work has been submitted to Journal of Geophysical Research [6]. This is the reason why we present here only an extended summary.

  8. Interaction of CME/ICME with HSS solar wind from coronal holes: case study

    CERN Document Server

    Yermolaev, Yu I; Shugay, Yu S; Slemzin, V A; Veselovsky, I S; Rodkin, D G; Nikolaeva, N S; Borodkova, N L; Yermolaev, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we look for traces of interaction of CME/ICME with high-speed stream (HSS) of solar wind from coronal hole (CH) for two serial Carrington rotations (CRs) during December 2011 - January 2012. We analyze two cases. (1) In CR 2118 instead of predicted arrival of HSS the signatures of ICME with modified back side and compressed slow stream were observed. (2) In CR 2119 the predicted HSS was observed in time, and after arrival of preceding ICME. Our analysis shows that difference of these cases can be explained by different interactions between HSS and CME, which in the first case result in significant deflection of HSS of solar wind from the Sun-Earth line. Thus, the CH passage through the central meridian with simultaneous occurrence of CMEs in the nearby located sources can result in interaction between HSS and CME streams, deflection of the HSS stream aside of the ecliptic and changes in parameters of the solar wind.

  9. Solar wind driving of ionosphere-thermosphere responses during three storms on St. Patrick's Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Tsurutani, B.; Mannucci, A. J.; Komjathy, A.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Paxton, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    We overview solar wind features of three intense CME-driven storms occurring around the same time in March of 2012, 2013 and 2015 (74 - 80 DOY). Differences in solar wind drivers lead to different ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) responses in time, magnitude, and to different pre-conditioning. The purpose of our study is to establish a correspondence between interplanetary transient structures (parts of a CME or a high-speed-stream) and dynamics of IT parameters over the course of a geomagnetic storm. Detailed analysis will be presented for the St. Patrick's Day storm of 2015. We introduce global metrics of daytime and dusktime average ionospheric response of VTEC estimates from over ~2000 GPS ground stations distributed globally. Nitric oxide and carbon dioxide cooling radiation fluxes measured by TIMED/SABER instrument are calculated in several latitudinal bins throughout the storm phases. In addition, GUVI observations of the dynamical response of the thermosphere (NO and O/N2) are compared. SSUSI observations of the equatorial ionosphere, particularly the magnitude and separation of the equatorial arcs are considered. In our analysis, metrics are inter-compared to get better understanding of the self-consistent IT response to solar wind driving.

  10. Innovations in Wind and Solar PV Financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cory, K.; Coughlin, J.; Jenkin, T.; Pater, J.; Swezey, B.

    2008-02-01

    There is growing national interest in renewable energy development based on the economic, environmental, and security benefits that these resources provide. Historically, greater development of our domestic renewable energy resources has faced a number of hurdles, primarily related to cost, regulation, and financing. With the recent sustained increase in the costs and associated volatility of fossil fuels, the economics of renewable energy technologies have become increasingly attractive to investors, both large and small. As a result, new entrants are investing in renewable energy and new business models are emerging. This study surveys some of the current issues related to wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project financing in the electric power industry, and identifies both barriers to and opportunities for increased investment.

  11. Genesis Solar Wind Array Collector Cataloging Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, P.J.; Rodriguez, M.C.; Calaway, M.C.; Allton, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Genesis solar wind array collectors were fractured upon landing hard in Utah in 2004. The fragments were retrieved from the damaged canister, imaged, repackaged and shipped to the Johnson Space Center curatorial facility [1]. As of January 2009, the collection consists of 3460 samples. Of these, 442 are comprised into "multiple" sample groupings, either affixed to adhesive paper (177) or collected in jars (17), culture trays (87), or sets of polystyrene vials (161). A focused characterization task was initiated in May 2008 to document the largest samples in the collection. The task consisted of two goals: to document sapphire based fragments greater than 2 cm in one dimension, and to document silicon based fragments greater than 1 cm in one direction.

  12. The Solar Wind: Our Current Understanding and How We Got Here

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joseph V. Hollweg

    2008-03-01

    In the original theory for the solar wind, the electron pressure gradient was the principal accelerating force. This was soon recognized to be insufficient to drive the high-speed streams. Subsequently, the discovery of Alfvén waves in the solar wind led to a long series of models in which wave pressure provided additional acceleration, but these wave-driven models ultimately failed to explain the rapid acceleration of the fast wind close to the Sun. An alternate viewwas that the pressure of hot protons close to the Sun could explain the rapid acceleration, with the proton heating coming from the cyclotron resonance. SOHO has provided remarkable data which have verified some of the predictions of this view, and given impetus to ongoing studies of the ion-cyclotron resonance in the fast wind. After a historical review, we discuss the basic ideas behind current research, emphasizing the importance of particle kinetics. We conclude with some guesses as to how work might proceed in the future.

  13. Stationarity of extreme bursts in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, N R; Davidsen, J

    2014-05-01

    Recent results have suggested that the statistics of bursts in the solar wind vary with solar cycle. Here, we show that this variation is basically absent if one considers extreme bursts. These are defined as threshold-exceeding events over the range of high thresholds for which their number decays as a power law. In particular, we find that the distribution of duration times and energies of extreme bursts in the solar wind ε parameter and similar observables are independent of the solar cycle and in this sense stationary, and show robust asymptotic power laws with exponents that are independent of the specific threshold. This is consistent with what has been observed for solar flares and, thus, provides evidence in favor of a link between solar flares and extreme bursts in the solar wind.

  14. Solar energetic particle events in different types of solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, S. W. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 (United States); Vourlidas, A., E-mail: stephen.kahler@kirtland.af.mil [Space Sciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We examine statistically some properties of 96 20 MeV gradual solar energetic proton (SEP) events as a function of three different types of solar wind (SW) as classified by Richardson and Cane. Gradual SEP (E > 10 MeV) events are produced in shocks driven by fast (V ≳ 900 km s{sup –1}) and wide (W > 60°) coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We find no differences among the transient, fast, and slow SW streams for SEP 20 MeV proton event timescales. It has recently been found that the peak intensities Ip of these SEP events scale with the ∼2 MeV proton background intensities, which may be a proxy for the near-Sun shock seed particles. Both the intensities Ip and their 2 MeV backgrounds are significantly enhanced in transient SW compared to those of fast and slow SW streams, and the values of Ip normalized to the 2 MeV backgrounds only weakly correlate with CME V for all SW types. This result implies that forecasts of SEP events could be improved by monitoring both the Sun and the local SW stream properties and that the well known power-law size distributions of Ip may differ between transient and long-lived SW streams. We interpret an observed correlation between CME V and the 2 MeV background for SEP events in transient SW as a manifestation of enhanced solar activity.

  15. The Evolution and Motion of Transient Events in The Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vega, Yaireska Marie

    Instabilities in the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction govern the entry of solar wind particles into the Earth's magnetosphere. These particles could ultimately be responsible for serious damage to our current technological systems. I use simulations and observations to investigate two kinds of instabilities that occur during unsteady interaction, magnetopause vortices and bursty reconnection resulting in flux transfer events (FTEs). For the magnetopause vortices analysis, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations were generated. Two cases were run, one for a nominal speed solar wind (360 km/s) and another for a high speed solar wind (700 km/s). Both cases had an abrupt change in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation; 15 minutes being southward, -5 nT, and then turning northward, +5 nT, for two hours. No other parameter was changed in these runs. Using an IDL-based tool, I visualized the 2D and 3D nature of the vortices and compared my results with those obtained previously by Collado-Vega et al. (2007) who studied vortices using simulated MHD data initiated by real solar wind conditions. The characteristics of the vortices formed under dynamic solar wind conditions are consistent with vortices driven by surface waves on the magnetopause, like the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. However, the majority of those developed under steady solar wind conditions suggest otherwise, especially the ones that developed on the dayside which are believed to be formed by the convection pattern created by high latitude reconnection. For the study of FTEs, I focus on Cluster satellite magnetopause encounters. The Cluster satellites orbit in a tetrahedral formation in near-polar orbits. I identified FTEs in Cluster observations from 2002 to 2003, and a total of 109 events were counted in the data set. A comparison of the analytical and global MHD simulation results indicates that most of the events form by component reconnection along a tilted subsolar reconnection

  16. Solar updraft tower - structural optimisation under dynamic wind action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eck, S.; Coenders, J.L.; Doomen, R.

    2015-01-01

    A solar updraft tower is a type of power plant which uses solar irradiation to generate electricity. It consists of three elements: a solar air collector, wind turbines and a chimney. The proposed concepts for this chimney schematise it as a 1-km-tall reinforced concrete shell, which are vulnerable

  17. Energy Deposition in Magnetic Cloud and High Speed Stream Driven Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Turner, N. E.

    2004-12-01

    The solar wind couples a large amount of energy into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system; this energy is released in the form of geomagnetic storms. While the precise mechanism for this coupling and release is yet unclear, it is well established that different solar wind conditions create different responses within the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. We are examining the impact of high speed stream-driven and magnetic cloud-driven storms on the global redistribution of energy throughout the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Data are used from ACE, WIND, and ground magnetometers. We estimate the energy input and output for multiple geomagnetic storms spanning from1995 to 1998. The comparison of storms reveals high speed stream-driven storms deposit less energy per second, but over longer durations. The comparison further reveals magnetic cloud-driven storms have deeper Dst* depressions but with shorter durations. Our results suggest magnetic cloud-driven storms with similar input parameters as high speed stream-driven storms produce an overall lower energy deposition.

  18. COMPOSITION OF THE SOLAR CORONA, SOLAR WIND, AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelz, J. T. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Reames, D. V. [IPST, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Von Steiger, R. [ISSI, Hallerstrasse 6, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Basu, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    Along with temperature and density, the elemental abundance is a basic parameter required by astronomers to understand and model any physical system. The abundances of the solar corona are known to differ from those of the solar photosphere via a mechanism related to the first ionization potential of the element, but the normalization of these values with respect to hydrogen is challenging. Here, we show that the values used by solar physicists for over a decade and currently referred to as the 'coronal abundances' do not agree with the data themselves. As a result, recent analysis and interpretation of solar data involving coronal abundances may need to be revised. We use observations from coronal spectroscopy, the solar wind, and solar energetic particles as well as the latest abundances of the solar photosphere to establish a new set of abundances that reflect our current understanding of the coronal plasma.

  19. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  20. Electrifying Greece with solar and wind energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentis Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring energy security, reducing GHG emissions and boosting the competitiveness of a country’s economy by attracting investments and technical knowhow are of paramount importance considering the targets of “20-20-20” set by the European community. Being the cradle of civilization, Greece appears today as a country caught in a prolonged hard economic and social crisis, the way out of which its citizens are looking forward as well as the entire European Union. Establishment of the leading renewable energy sources like solar and wind in Greece will not only increase the independence of its own electrification but will also provide with a foundation for developing the market of international trade of “green” energy. This paper initially highlights the current status of photovoltaics and wind turbines in Greece. Furthermore, this study evaluates whether a higher penetration of the above mentioned green energy sources would have positive impact in the economy of the country or not and in what extent they could decline the CO2 emissions until 2020, comparing to the corresponding levels in 2010.

  1. The Complete Ultraviolet Spectrum of the Archetypal "Wind-dominated" Quasar Mrk 231: Absorption and Emission from a High-speed Dusty Nuclear Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, S.; Meléndez, M.; Tripp, T. M.; Hamann, F.; Rupke, D. S. N.

    2016-07-01

    New near- and far-ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) Hubble Space Telescope spectra of Mrk 231, the nearest quasar known, are combined with ground-based optical spectra to study the remarkable dichotomy between the FUV and NUV-optical spectral regions in this object. The FUV emission-line features are faint, broad, and highly blueshifted (up to ˜7000 km s-1), with no significant accompanying absorption. In contrast, the profiles of the NUV absorption features resemble those of the optical Na i D, He i, and Ca ii H and K lines, exhibiting broad blueshifted troughs that overlap in velocity space with the FUV emission-line features and indicate a dusty, high-density and patchy broad absorption line (BAL) screen covering ˜90% of the observed continuum source at a distance ≲2-20 pc. The FUV continuum emission does not show the presence of any obvious stellar features and is remarkably flat compared with the steeply declining NUV continuum. The NUV (FUV) features and continuum emission have not varied significantly over the past ˜22 (3) years and are unresolved on scales ˜40 (170) pc. These results favor an active galactic nucleus origin for the NUV-FUV line and continuum emission. The observed FUV line emission is produced in the outflowing BAL cloud system, while the Balmer lines arise primarily from the standard broad line region seen through the dusty BAL screen. Our data are inconsistent with the recently proposed binary black hole model. We argue instead that Mrk 231 is the nearest example of weak-lined “wind-dominated” quasars with high Eddington ratios and geometrically thick (“slim”) accretion disks; these quasars are likely more common in the early universe.

  2. Slow Solar Wind from S-Web Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Aleida K.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. Richard; Wyper, Peter; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2017-08-01

    A long-standing mystery posed by in-situ heliospheric observations is the large angular extent of slow solar wind about the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Measurements of plasma composition strongly imply that much of the slow wind consists of plasma from the closed corona that escapes onto open field lines, presumably by field-line opening or by interchange reconnection. Both of these processes are expected to release closed-field plasma into the solar wind within and immediately adjacent to the HCS. The recently proposed Separatrix-Web (S-Web) Theory postulates that the observations of slow wind far from the HCS can be explained by the dynamical interaction of open and closed flux in regions of complex coronal-hole topology. We present the first high-resolution, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the dynamic S-Web. These simulations suggest that photospheric motions at coronal-hole boundaries are responsible for the release of slow solar wind plasma from the magnetically closed solar corona, specifically through prolific interchange magnetic reconnection. The location of this plasma once it is released into the solar wind depends strongly on the geometry of the coronal-hole flux. We demonstrate how the dynamics at the boundaries of narrow corridors of open flux (coronal hole corridors) can create giant S-Web arcs of slow solar wind at high latitudes in the heliosphere, far from the HCS, accounting for the long-puzzling slow-wind observations.

  3. Comparative Study of MHD Modeling of the Background Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Gressl, C; Temmer, M; Odstrcil, D; Linker, J A; Mikic, Z; Riley, P

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about the background solar wind plays a crucial role in the framework of space weather forecasting. In-situ measurements of the background solar wind are only available for a few points in the heliosphere where spacecraft are located, therefore we have to rely on heliospheric models to derive the distribution of solar wind parameters in interplanetary space. We test the performance of different solar wind models, namely Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithm outside a Sphere/ENLIL (MAS/ENLIL), Wang-Sheeley-Arge/ENLIL (WSA/ENLIL), and MAS/MAS, by comparing model results with in-situ measurements from spacecraft located at 1 AU distance to the Sun (ACE, Wind). To exclude the influence of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), we chose the year 2007 as a time period with low solar activity for our comparison. We found that the general structure of the background solar wind is well reproduced by all models. The best model results were obtained for the parameter solar wind speed. However, the predicted ar...

  4. Charge States of Krypton and Xenon in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsler, Peter; Fludra, Andrzej; Giunta, Alessandra

    2017-09-01

    We calculate charge state distributions of Kr and Xe in a model for two different types of solar wind using the effective ionization and recombination rates provided from the OPEN_ADAS data base. The charge states of heavy elements in the solar wind are essential for estimating the efficiency of Coulomb drag in the inner corona. We find that xenon ions experience particularly low Coulomb drag from protons in the inner corona, comparable to the notoriously weak drag of protons on helium ions. It has been found long ago that helium in the solar wind can be strongly depleted near interplanetary current sheets, whereas coronal mass ejecta are sometimes strongly enriched in helium. We argue that if the extraordinary variability of the helium abundance in the solar wind is due to inefficient Coulomb drag, the xenon abundance must vary strongly. In fact, a secular decrease of the solar wind xenon abundance relative to the other heavier noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) has been postulated based on a comparison of noble gases in recently irradiated and ancient samples of ilmenite in the lunar regolith. We conclude that decreasing solar activity and decreasing frequency of coronal mass ejections over the solar lifetime might be responsible for a secularly decreasing abundance of xenon in the solar wind.

  5. Little or no solar wind enters Venus' atmosphere at solar minimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T L; Delva, M; Baumjohann, W; Auster, H-U; Carr, C; Russell, C T; Barabash, S; Balikhin, M; Kudela, K; Berghofer, G; Biernat, H K; Lammer, H; Lichtenegger, H; Magnes, W; Nakamura, R; Schwingenschuh, K; Volwerk, M; Vörös, Z; Zambelli, W; Fornacon, K-H; Glassmeier, K-H; Richter, I; Balogh, A; Schwarzl, H; Pope, S A; Shi, J K; Wang, C; Motschmann, U; Lebreton, J-P

    2007-11-29

    Venus has no significant internal magnetic field, which allows the solar wind to interact directly with its atmosphere. A field is induced in this interaction, which partially shields the atmosphere, but we have no knowledge of how effective that shield is at solar minimum. (Our current knowledge of the solar wind interaction with Venus is derived from measurements at solar maximum.) The bow shock is close to the planet, meaning that it is possible that some solar wind could be absorbed by the atmosphere and contribute to the evolution of the atmosphere. Here we report magnetic field measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft in the plasma environment surrounding Venus. The bow shock under low solar activity conditions seems to be in the position that would be expected from a complete deflection by a magnetized ionosphere. Therefore little solar wind enters the Venus ionosphere even at solar minimum.

  6. Multifractal properties of solar wind turbulence: theory and observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, A. V.; Avanov, L. A.; Zastenker, G. N.; Zelenyj, L. M.

    1996-10-01

    A fractal model of the solar wind is presented. This model treats fluctuations of the solar wind velocity from the viewpoint of nonlinear processes originating in the convective region and photosphere of the Sun. The multifractal structure of proton velocity fluctuations in a region of heliocentric distances from 0.2 to 0.8 AU is a result of these processes. Continuous measurements of solar wind velocity aboard the ISEE-3 spacecraft during one month were used to compare the theoretical and experimental results. It is shown that fluctuations of proton velocity have a multifractal structure in a frequency range of 10-5 - 10-3Hz.

  7. The Radial Evolution of Solar Wind Speeds (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    the equatorial region, solar wind observed above 600 km/s has rarely been accelerated from slower speeds (see Figure 3), therefore speeds greater...unlimited. ratios. This solar wind rarely has an O7+/O6+ value greater than 0.05, or a C6+/C5+ charge state ratio greater than 0.5. These maximum O7+/O6...structure and coronal sources of the solar wind during May 12th, 1997 CME, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr . Phys., 66, 1295–1309. Hefti, S., H. Grunwaldt, P

  8. Wind loading on solar concentrators: some general considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roschke, E. J.

    1984-05-01

    A survey has been completed to examine the problems and complications arising from wind loading on solar concentrators. Wind loading is site specific and has an important bearing on the design, cost, performance, operation and maintenance, safety, survival, and replacement of solar collecting systems. Emphasis herein is on paraboloidal, two-axis tracking systems. Thermal receiver problems also are discussed. Wind characteristics are discussed from a general point of view; current methods for determining design wind speed are reviewed. Aerodynamic coefficients are defined and illustrative examples are presented. Wind tunnel testing is discussed, and environmental wind tunnels are reviewed; recent results on heliostat arrays are reviewed as well. Aeroelasticity in relation to structural design is discussed briefly. Wind loads, i.e., forces and moments, are proportional to the square of the mean wind velocity. Forces are proportional to the square of concentrator diameter, and moments are proportional to the cube of diameter. Thus, wind loads have an important bearing on size selection from both cost and performance standpoints. It is concluded that sufficient information exists so that reasonably accurate predictions of wind loading are possible for a given paraboloidal concentrator configuration, provided that reliable and relevant wind conditions are specified. Such predictions will be useful to the design engineer and to the systems engineer as well. Information is lacking, however, on wind effects in field arrays of paraboloidal concentrators. Wind tunnel tests have been performed on model heliostat arrays, but there are important aerodynamic differences between heliostats and paraboloidal dishes.

  9. 高速铁路隧道列车风作用下接触网安全性分析%Analysis of catenary's safety under train wind action in high-speed railway tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施成华; 杨伟超; 彭立敏; 王照伟; 雷明锋

    2012-01-01

    采用数值模拟方法,对高速列车在隧道内运行过程中所产生的列车风速度的变化过程进行分析,计算隧道内不同位置在列车运行过程中的最大风速和最大风压,进一步研究隧道内预留滑道槽型和螺栓锚固型接触网在列车反复冲击压力作用下的安全性.研究结果表明:隧道内不同断面的接触网设施只在列车车身运行至该断面的一段时间内才承受负向列车风(与列车运行方向相反);离列车表面越近的位置,列车风的速度越大;对于螺栓锚固型接触网悬挂件,在单线隧道350 km/h行车条件下,隧道衬砌混凝土中的最大拉应力已接近混凝土的疲劳抗拉强度,应采取适当的加强措施;对于滑道槽式接触网悬挂件,在列车风的反复作用下是安全的.%By using the numerical simulation method, the change process of wind speed when high-speed train running in tunnel was studied, the maximum wind speed and wind pressure at different positions in tunnel were calculated, and then the safety of slide-type and anchor-type catenary in tunnel under the repeated impact pressure caused by train running was studied. The calculated results show that at different cross-sections in tunnel, the negative train wind (opposite to train running direction) only occurs in a certain period when the whole train is through this section. The nearer the position is to the train surface, the greater the speed of the train wind. For the anchor-type catenary, the greatest tensile stress in the tunnel lining is close to the fatigue tensile strength of concrete at 350 km/h driving speed in single-track tunnel, and appropriate measures should be taken to strengthen it. For the slide-type catenary, it is safe under repeated action caused by train wind.

  10. Wind environ ment research on the bridge section induced by high speed train under the bridge%桥下高速行驶列车对桥梁主梁位置风环境的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董国朝; 张建仁; 蔡春声; 韩艳

    2015-01-01

    The pressure and velocity fields will change greatly when the high-speed train is running through the bridge,and the intense ambient aerodynamic effects will be produced in areas around,thereby affecting the anti-wind safety of around buildings and structures.Due to the fact that there exist insurmountable technical prob-lems in using wind tunnel test,in this proposed project,the Fluent in CFD software was firstly used as the simu-lation platform with 'dynamic mesh'technology.Secondly,the UDF trains route procedures were programmed to monitor the speed and the pressure distribution through monitoring the bridge sections.Thirdly,the process when the high-speed trains cross through the bridge in different speeds was simulated under the situations of no cross-wind wind,small crosswind and the bridge design crosswind.Finally,the impact loads generated under three kinds of wind to the main section of the bridge were calculated in different crosswind speed.This paper studied the aerodynamic effects in various conditions of wind on the train to the bridge main sections,which provides a valuable reference and recommendation for bridge designers in the bridge design institution.%高速列车行驶时对周围的压力场和速度场产生强烈的变化,激烈的空气动力效应对周围环境产生一定作用,从而影响周围建筑和结构的抗风安全性。由于采用风洞试验测试手段研究此类问题在技术上尚存在难以克服的困难,因此,以计算流体力学Fluent软件为仿真平台,采用“动网格”技术,编写UDF列车行驶路线程序,对无侧风、微小侧风以及桥梁设计侧风速作用下高速列车以不同列车速度通过桥底的数值模拟,并对行车路线方向的桥梁主梁断面进行布点监测,给出高速列车通过桥底区域时的速度和压力空间分布规律,计算各侧风速、不同列车速度情况下列车风对桥梁主梁局部位置的冲击载荷,从而研究各

  11. Multifractal scaling of the kinetic energy flux in solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, E.; Rosenbauer, H.; Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The geometrical and scaling properties of the energy flux of the turbulent kinetic energy in the solar wind have been studied. By present experimental technology in solar wind measurements, we cannot directly measure the real volumetric dissipation rate, epsilon(t), but are constrained to represent it by surrogating the energy flux near the dissipation range at the proton gyro scales. There is evidence for the multifractal nature of the so defined dissipation field epsilon(t), a result derived from the scaling exponents of its statistical q-th order moments. The related generalized dimension D(q) has been determined and reveals that the dissipation field has a multifractal structure. which is not compatible with a scale-invariant cascade. The associated multifractal spectrum f(alpha) has been estimated for the first time for MHD turbulence in the solar wind. Its features resemble those obtained for turbulent fluids and other nonlinear multifractal systems. The generalized dimension D(q) can, for turbulence in high-speed streams, be fitted well by the functional dependence of the p-model with a comparatively large parameter, p = 0.87. indicating a strongly intermittent multifractal energy cascade. The experimental value for D(p)/3, if used in the scaling exponent s(p) of the velocity structure function, gives an exponent that can describe some of the observations. The scaling exponent mu of the auto correlation function of epsilon(t) has also been directly evaluated. It has the value of 0.37. Finally. the mean dissipation rate was determined, which could be used in solar wind heating models.

  12. Solar wind plasma interaction with solar probe plus spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemant, S. [Univ. Paul Sabatier de Toulouse et CNRS, Toulouse (FR). IRAP (Inst. der Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie); ONERA (Office National d' Etudes et Recherches Aerospatiales), Toulouse (France); Genot, V.; Louarn, P. [Univ. Paul Sabatier de Toulouse et CNRS, Toulouse (FR). IRAP (Inst. der Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie); Mateo-Velez, J.C. [ONERA (Office National d' Etudes et Recherches Aerospatiales), Toulouse (France); Ergun, R. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics

    2012-07-01

    3-D PIC (Particle In Cell) simulations of spacecraft-plasma interactions in the solar wind context of the Solar Probe Plus mission are presented. The SPIS software is used to simulate a simplified probe in the near-Sun environment (at a distance of 0.044AU or 9.5 R{sub S} from the Sun surface).We begin this study with a cross comparison of SPIS with another PIC code, aiming at providing the static potential structure surrounding a spacecraft in a high photoelectron environment. This paper presents then a sensitivity study using generic SPIS capabilities, investigating the role of some physical phenomena and numerical models. It confirms that in the near- sun environment, the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft would rather be negatively charged, despite the high yield of photoemission. This negative potential is explained through the dense sheath of photoelectrons and secondary electrons both emitted with low energies (2-3 eV). Due to this low energy of emission, these particles are not ejected at an infinite distance of the spacecraft and would rather surround it. As involved densities of photoelectrons can reach 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} (compared to ambient ions and electrons densities of about 7 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}), those populations affect the surrounding plasma potential generating potential barriers for low energy electrons, leading to high recollection. This charging could interfere with the low energy (up to a few tens of eV) plasma sensors and particle detectors, by biasing the particle distribution functions measured by the instruments. Moreover, if the spacecraft charges to large negative potentials, the problem will be more severe as low energy electrons will not be seen at all. The importance of the modelling requirements in terms of precise prediction of spacecraft potential is also discussed. (orig.)

  13. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of solar wind time-shifting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Taylor; Jackel, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Nine years of solar wind dynamic pressure and geosynchronous magnetic field data are used for a large-scale statistical comparison of uncertainties associated with several different algorithms for propagating solar wind measurements. The MVAB-0 scheme is best overall, performing on average a minute more accurately than a flat time-shift. We also evaluate the accuracy of these time-shifting methods as a function of solar wind magnetic field orientation. We find that all time-shifting algorithms perform significantly worse (>5 min) due to geometric effects when the solar wind magnetic field is radial (parallel or antiparallel to the Earth-Sun line). Finally, we present an empirical scheme that performs almost as well as MVAB-0 on average and slightly better than MVAB-0 for intervals with nonradial B.

  15. Chaos in the solar wind flow near Earth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shollykutty John; P J Kurian

    2009-04-01

    We have done a time series analysis of daily average data of solar wind velocity, density and temperature at 1 AU measured by ACE spacecraft for a period of nine years. We have used the raw data without filtering to give a faithful representation of the nonlinear behaviour of the solar wind flow which is a novel one. The sensitivity of the results on filtering is highlighted. The attractor dimension is estimated for every parameter of the solar wind and it is found that they differ substantially. Hence a chaotic picture for the problem from different angles have been obtained. The calculated Kolmogorov entropies and Lyapunov exponents are positive showing evidences that the complex solar wind near the Earth is most likely a deterministic chaotic system.

  16. Solar wind magnetic turbulence: Inferences from spectral shape

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A; Narita, Y

    2016-01-01

    Some differences between theoretical, numerical and observational determinations of spectral slopes of solar wind turbulence are interpreted in the thermodynamical sense. Confirmations of turbulent Kolmogorov slopes in solar wind magnetic turbulence and magnetohydrodynamic simulations exhibit tiny differences. These are used to infer about entropy generation in the turbulent cascade and to infer about the anomalous turbulent collision frequency in the dissipative range as well as the average energy input in solar wind turbulence. Anomalous turbulent collision frequencies are obtained of the order of v < 200 Hz. The corresponding stationary solar wind magnetic energy input into magnetic turbulence in the Kolmogorov inertial range is obtained to be of the order of 50 eV/s. Its thermal fate is discussed.

  17. Accuracy Dependence of Solar Wind Timeshifting on IMF Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, T. G.; Jackel, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    Nine years of solar wind dynamic pressure and geosynchronous magnetic field data are used for a large-scale statistical comparison of uncertainties associated with several different algorithms for propagating solar wind measurements. The MVAB-0 scheme used in Weimer et al. [2003] is best overall, performing on average a minute more accurately than a flat timeshift. We also evaluate the accuracy of these timeshifting methods as a function of solar wind magnetic field orientation. We find that all timeshifting algorithms perform significantly worse (> 5 minutes) when the solar wind magnetic field is radial (parallel or anti-parallel to the Earth-Sun line). Finally, we present an empirical scheme that performs almost as well as MVAB-0 on average, and slightly better than MVAB-0 for intervals with non-radial B.

  18. Pluto's interaction with the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagenal, F. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (USA)); McNutt, R.L. Jr. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1989-11-01

    If Pluto's atmospheric escape rate is significantly greater than 1.5 x 10{sup 27} molecules s{sup {minus}1} then the interaction with the tenuous solar wind at 30 A.U. will be like that of a comet: there will be extensive ion pick-up upstream and the size of the interaction region will vary directly with variations in the solar wind flux. If the escape flux is much less, then one expects that the solar wind will be deflected around Pluto's ionosphere in a Venus-like interaction. In either case, the weak interplanetary magnetic field at 30 A.U. results in very large gyroradii for the picked up ions and a thick bow shock, necessitating a kinetic treatment of the interaction. Strong variations in the size of the interaction region are expected on time scales of days due to changes in the solar wind.

  19. Solar wind stream structure at large heliocentric distances Pioneer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Time profiles and histograms of plasma data from Pioneers 10 and 11 are examined for the period between 1975 and 1983. During this time, Pioneer 10 traveled between a heliocentric distance of 8.7 and 30.4 AU. The velocity structure of the solar wind at these heliocentric distances is found to have one of two distinct forms: approximately 70 percent of the time the solar wind has a nearly flat velocity profile. Occasionally, this flat velocity profile is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations in density and in thermal speed consistent with the concept that the 'corotating interaction regions' which are produced by the interaction of high- and low-speed streams at intermediate heliocentric distances are replaced by 'pressure regions' in the outer heliosphere. The remaining 30 percent of the time the solar wind is marked by large (50-200 km/s) long-term (30-120 days) shifts in the average solar wind velocity.

  20. Transient flows of the solar wind associated with small-scale solar activity in solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Igor; Kuzin, Sergey; Gburek, Szymon; Ulyanov, Artyom; Kirichenko, Alexey; Shugay, Yulia; Goryaev, Farid

    The data obtained by the modern high sensitive EUV-XUV telescopes and photometers such as CORONAS-Photon/TESIS and SPHINX, STEREO/EUVI, PROBA2/SWAP, SDO/AIA provide good possibilities for studying small-scale solar activity (SSA), which is supposed to play an important role in heating of the corona and producing transient flows of the solar wind. During the recent unusually weak solar minimum, a large number of SSA events, such as week solar flares, small CMEs and CME-like flows were observed and recorded in the databases of flares (STEREO, SWAP, SPHINX) and CMEs (LASCO, CACTUS). On the other hand, the solar wind data obtained in this period by ACE, Wind, STEREO contain signatures of transient ICME-like structures which have shorter duration (<10h), weaker magnetic field strength (<10 nT) and lower proton temperature than usual ICMEs. To verify the assumption that ICME-like transients may be associated with the SSA events we investigated the number of weak flares of C-class and lower detected by SPHINX in 2009 and STEREO/EUVI in 2010. The flares were classified on temperature and emission measure using the diagnostic means of SPHINX and Hinode/EIS and were confronted with the parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density, ion composition and temperature, magnetic field, pitch angle distribution of the suprathermal electrons). The outflows of plasma associated with the flares were identified by their coronal signatures - CMEs (only in few cases) and dimmings. It was found that the mean parameters of the solar wind projected to the source surface for the times of the studied flares were typical for the ICME-like transients. The results support the suggestion that weak flares can be indicators of sources of transient plasma flows contributing to the slow solar wind at solar minimum, although these flows may be too weak to be considered as separate CMEs and ICMEs. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme

  1. Characteristics of Train Wind and Analyses of Personnel Security in High-Speed Railway Double-Line Tunnel%高速铁路双线隧道列车风特性与人员安全性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费瑞振; 彭立敏; 施成华; 杨伟超; 雷明锋

    2013-01-01

    According to the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the standard turbulence model,the 100 double-line tunnel cross-section which is generally used in high-speed railway of China is studied,this paper has made a thorough study on the variation rules and distribution characteristics of train wind,and has calculated the maximum wind speed at different positions on the two evacuation passageways,at the same time the influence that train wind on personnel safety is further discussed.The results show that:Train wind is complex three-dimensional flow which is changed with time and space,person should avoid activities at dangerous time,personnel safety may be threatened by train wind on two train driving conditions:one is that a single train runs through tunnel normally while the other is that another train runs beside a train parked in the tunnel.Corresponding measures should be taken to avoid accidents.%根据三维不可压缩Navier-Stokes方程和标准k-ε湍流模型,以我国高速铁路普遍采用的100m2双线隧道为研究对象,对高速列车在隧道内运行时列车风的变化规律和分布特征进行了深入研究,计算隧道内两侧疏散通道上不同位置在列车运行过程中的最大风速,进一步分析在列车风作用下人员的安全性.研究表明:列车风是随时间和空间而变的复杂三维流动,人员应避免在危险时段活动,单车正常运行和存在列车事故时列车风均有可能对人员造成安全威胁,需采取相关措施避免事故发生.

  2. 高速列车气动噪声Lighthill声类比的有限元分析%Finite Elements Analysis of High - speed Train Wind Noise in Lighthill' s Acoustic Analogy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓宇; 高阳; 程亚军; 刘凤华

    2011-01-01

    With the constant increase of the trains' speed, the aerodynamic noise gradually succeeds the traditional track noise and becomes the main noise source of the high-speed trains. In this paper, a hybrid CFD/CAA wind noise model for the high speed trains based on Lighthill' s analogy is constructed utilizing a professional finite elements acoustic simulator ACTRAN-Aeroacoustics. Numerical results of fluid and acoustic fields are reported and discussed. Some important issues for further development of the simulation model are discussed. The simulation results show that there are three dominant locations for the aerodynamic noise sources which depend on the shape of the train. With the use of this model, the influence of the train's shape on the wind noise can be analyzed, and the optimization for low noise design of the train can be realized.%随列车行驶速度逐年提高,气动噪声源逐渐超越轮轨噪声成为高速列车最主要噪声源.通过ACTRAN -Aeroacoustics建立基于Lighthill声类比理论的高速列车气动噪声CFD/CAA混合数值分析模型.计算并讨论非定常流场与气动声场计算结果,并分析此数值模型可以进一步完善的一些重要方面.目前数值模拟结果表明列车高速行驶状态气动噪声源主要集中在与车身气动外形密切相关的三类位置上,且通过当前模型可以有效剖析列车车身气动外形设计对气动噪声的影响以及相应的高速列车低噪音优化途径.

  3. Analysis of ISEE-3/ICE solar wind data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Under the grant that ended November 11, 1988 work was accomplished in a number of areas, as follows: (1) Analysis of solar wind data; (2) Analysis of Giacobini/Zinner encounter data; (3) Investigation of solar wind and magnetospheric electron velocity distributions; and (4) Experimental investigation of the electronic structure of clusters. Reprints and preprints of publications resulting from this work are included in the appendices.

  4. Solar and Wind Power in Hybird Energy Systems in China

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Qing

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve problems created by traditional energy, reducing the amount of usage of traditional energy and enlarging the range of usage of new energy, particularly some renewable energy should be developed immediately. In the recent years, China has been paying more attention to the utilization of renewable energy resources. Wind energy and solar energy are particularly popular due to lower cost and high economic effectiveness. As the development of wind energy and solar energy, scienti...

  5. On Electron-scale Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Motschmann, U.; Giles, B.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Burch, J. L.; Nariyuki, Y.; Saito, S.; Gary, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    For the first time, the dispersion relation for turbulence magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is determined directly on small scales of the order of the electron inertial length, using four-point magnetometer observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. The data are analyzed using the high-resolution adaptive wave telescope technique. Small-scale solar wind turbulence is primarily composed of highly obliquely propagating waves, with dispersion consistent with that of the whistler mode.

  6. Modulation of the Solar Wind Velocity by Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Nikulin, Igor F

    2013-01-01

    To study the variations in the solar wind velocity during inferior conjunctions of Mercury and Earth, we analyzed 54 events in the period 1995 to 2012 by the superimposed epoch method. We have found a noticeable increase in the velocity both before and after the conjunctions as well as decrease in the velocity within 3-4 days after them, which seems to be associated with Mercury's "shadow". The results obtained might be used to improve a forecast of the solar wind velocity.

  7. Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Kristopher G; Howes, Gregory G.

    2015-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated s...

  8. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  9. Potential for Development of Solar and Wind Resource in Bhutan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P.; Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.

    2009-09-01

    With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced maps and data of the wind and solar resources in Bhutan. The solar resource data show that Bhutan has an adequate resource for flat-plate collectors, with annual average values of global horizontal solar radiation ranging from 4.0 to 5.5 kWh/m2-day (4.0 to 5.5 peak sun hours per day). The information provided in this report may be of use to energy planners in Bhutan involved in developing energy policy or planning wind and solar projects, and to energy analysts around the world interested in gaining an understanding of Bhutan's wind and solar energy potential.

  10. Performance evaluation of high speed compressors for high speed multipliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirlakalla Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes high speed compressors for high speed parallel multipliers like Booth Multiplier, Wallace Tree Multiplier in Digital Signal Processing (DSP. This paper presents 4-3, 5-3, 6-3 and 7-3 compressors for high speed multiplication. These compressors reduce vertical critical path more rapidly than conventional compressors. A 5-3 conventional compressor can take four steps to reduce bits from 5 to 3, but the proposed 5-3 takes only 2 steps. These compressors are simulated with H-Spice at a temperature of 25°C at a supply voltage 2.0V using 90nm MOSIS technology. The Power, Delay, Power Delay Product (PDP and Energy Delay Product (EDP of the compressors are calculated to analyze the total propagation delay and energy consumption. All the compressors are designed with half adder and full Adders only.

  11. Wind loading on solar concentrators: Some general considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschke, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey was completed to examine the problems and complications arising from wind loading on solar concentrators. Wind loading is site specific and has an important bearing on the design, cost, performance, operation and maintenance, safety, survival, and replacement of solar collecting systems. Emphasis herein is on paraboloidal, two-axis tracking systems. Thermal receiver problems also are discussed. Wind characteristics are discussed from a general point of view. Current methods for determining design wind speed are reviewed. Aerodynamic coefficients are defined and illustrative examples are presented. Wind tunnel testing is discussed, and environmental wind tunnels are reviewed. Recent results on heliostat arrays are reviewed as well. Aeroelasticity in relation to structural design is discussed briefly.

  12. On Solar Wind Origin and Acceleration: Measurements from ACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakhiv, Mark; Lepri, Susan T.; Landi, Enrico; Tracy, Patrick; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2016-10-01

    The origin and acceleration of the solar wind are still debated. In this paper, we search for signatures of the source region and acceleration mechanism of the solar wind in the plasma properties measured in situ by the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft. Using the elemental abundances as a proxy for the source region and the differential velocity and ion temperature ratios as a proxy for the acceleration mechanism, we are able to identify signatures pointing toward possible source regions and acceleration mechanisms. We find that the fast solar wind in the ecliptic plane is the same as that observed from the polar regions and is consistent with wave acceleration and coronal-hole origin. We also find that the slow wind is composed of two components: one similar to the fast solar wind (with slower velocity) and the other likely originating from closed magnetic loops. Both components of the slow solar wind show signatures of wave acceleration. From these findings, we draw a scenario that envisions two types of wind, with different source regions and release mechanisms, but the same wave acceleration mechanism.

  13. Sputtering by the Solar Wind: Effects of Variable Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, R. M.; Arrell, W. M.; Sarantos, M.; Delory, G. T.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that there is no increase in the sputtering yield caused by highly charged heavy ions for metallic and for semiconducting surfaces, but the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. Recently measurements of the solar wind composition have become available. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind, fast wind, solar energetic particle (SEP) population, and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. Whereas many previous calculations of sputtering were limited to the effects of proton bombardment. we show that the heavy ion component. especially the He++ component. can greatly enhance the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced. We will discuss sputtering of both neutrals and ions.

  14. Implications of the Deep Minimum for Slow Solar Wind Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Titov, V. S.; Linker, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The origin of the slow solar wind has long been one of the most important problems in solar/heliospheric physics. Two observational constraints make this problem especially challenging. First, the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, unlike the fast wind that originates on open field lines. Second, the slow wind has substantial angular extent, of order 30 degrees, which is much larger than the widths observed for streamer stalks or the widths expected theoretically for a dynamic heliospheric current sheet. We propose that the slow wind originates from an intricate network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that emanate from the polar coronal hole regions. Using topological arguments, we show that these corridors must be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The total solar eclipse in August 2008, near the lowest point of the Deep Minimum, affords an ideal opportunity to test this theory by using the ultra-high resolution Predictive Science's (PSI) eclipse model for the corona and wind. Analysis of the PSI eclipse model demonstrates that the extent and scales of the open-field corridors can account for both the angular width of the slow wind and its closed-field composition. We discuss the implications of our slow wind theory for the structure of the corona and heliosphere at the Deep Minimum and describe further observational and theoretical tests. This work has been supported by the NASA HTP, SR&T, and LWS programs.

  15. Impacts of wind stilling on solar radiation variability in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changgui; Yang, Kun; Huang, Jianping; Tang, Wenjun; Qin, Jun; Niu, Xiaolei; Chen, Yingying; Chen, Deliang; Lu, Ning; Fu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Solar dimming and wind stilling (slowdown) are two outstanding climate changes occurred in China over the last four decades. The wind stilling may have suppressed the dispersion of aerosols and amplified the impact of aerosol emission on solar dimming. However, there is a lack of long-term aerosol monitoring and associated study in China to confirm this hypothesis. Here, long-term meteorological data at weather stations combined with short-term aerosol data were used to assess this hypothesis. It was found that surface solar radiation (SSR) decreased considerably with wind stilling in heavily polluted regions at a daily scale, indicating that wind stilling can considerably amplify the aerosol extinction effect on SSR. A threshold value of 3.5 m/s for wind speed is required to effectively reduce aerosols concentration. From this SSR dependence on wind speed, we further derived proxies to quantify aerosol emission and wind stilling amplification effects on SSR variations at a decadal scale. The results show that aerosol emission accounted for approximately 20% of the typical solar dimming in China, which was amplified by approximately 20% by wind stilling.

  16. Using the fingerprints of solar magnetic reconnection to identify the elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepko, Larry; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Kasper, Justin; Lepri, Sue

    2015-04-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is well understood to be linked to coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained elusive. Many previous studies of the slow solar wind have examined trends in the composition and charge states over long time scales and found strong relationships between the solar wind velocity and these plasma parameters. These relationships have been used to constrain models of solar wind source and acceleration. In this study, we take advantage of high time resolution (12 min) measurements of solar wind composition and charge-state abundances recently reprocessed by the ACE Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) science team to probe the timescales of solar wind variability at relatively small scales. We study an interval of slow solar wind containing quasi-periodic 90 minute structures and show that they are remnants of solar magnetic reconnection. Each 90-minute parcel of slow solar wind, though the speed remains steady, exhibits the complete range of charge state and composition variations expected for the entire range of slow solar wind, which is repeated again in the next 90-minute interval. These observations show that previous statistical results break down on these shorter timescales, and impose new and important constraints on models of slow solar wind creation. We conclude by suggesting these structures were created through interchange magnetic reconnection and form elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind. We also discuss the necessity of decoupling separately the process(es) responsible for the release and acceleration.

  17. Prediction of solar energetic particle event histories using real-time particle and solar wind measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelof, E. C.; Gold, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The comparatively well-ordered magnetic structure in the solar corona during the decline of Solar Cycle 20 revealed a characteristic dependence of solar energetic particle injection upon heliographic longitude. When analyzed using solar wind mapping of the large scale interplanetary magnetic field line connection from the corona to the Earth, particle fluxes display an approximately exponential dependence on heliographic longitude. Since variations in the solar wind velocity (and hence the coronal connection longitude) can severely distort the simple coronal injection profile, the use of real-time solar wind velocity measurements can be of great aid in predicting the decay of solar particle events. Although such exponential injection profiles are commonplace during 1973-1975, they have also been identified earlier in Solar Cycle 20, and hence this structure may be present during the rise and maximum of the cycle, but somewhat obscured by greater temporal variations in particle injection.

  18. Solar Wind ~20-300 keV Superhalo Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Yang, L.; He, J.; Tu, C. Y.; Pei, Z.

    2014-12-01

    High-energy superhalo electrons are present in the interplanetary medium even in absence of any solar activity, carrying important information on the electron acceleration in the solar wind. We present a statistical survey of ~20-300 keV superhalo electrons measured at 1 AU by the WIND 3DP instrument during quiet-time periods from 1995 January through 2013 December. The velocity distribution function of the observed quiet-time superhalo electrons generally fits to a power-law spectrum, f ~ v-γ, with γ ranging from ~4 to ~10. The integrated density of these superhalo electrons at 20-300 keV, nsup, ranges from 10-9 cm-3 to 10-5 cm-3. Both log(nsup) and γ show a good correlation with the sunspot number, with larger density and softer spectrum (γ~ 6-8) at solar maximum, and smaller density and harder spectrum (γ~ 4-5) at solar minimum. The observed power-law spectrum also has no clear association with flares, CMEs, active regions and solar wind core populations, while it shows a weak (~0.3) correlation with in situ solar wind turbulence spectrum. These results suggest that the seed particles of quiet-time superhalo electrons could originate from the Sun, and their acceleration could mainly occur in the interplanetary medium, probably by the electron interaction with solar wind turbulence, or by acceleration at the CIRs.

  19. Twenty-four hour predictions of the solar wind speed peaks by the probability distribution function model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy-Virat, C. D.; Ridley, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Abrupt transitions from slow to fast solar wind represent a concern for the space weather forecasting community. They may cause geomagnetic storms that can eventually affect systems in orbit and on the ground. Therefore, the probability distribution function (PDF) model was improved to predict enhancements in the solar wind speed. New probability distribution functions allow for the prediction of the peak amplitude and the time to the peak while providing an interval of uncertainty on the prediction. It was found that 60% of the positive predictions were correct, while 91% of the negative predictions were correct, and 20% to 33% of the peaks in the speed were found by the model. This represents a considerable improvement upon the first version of the PDF model. A direct comparison with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model shows that the PDF model is quite similar, except that it leads to fewer false positive predictions and misses fewer events, especially when the peak reaches very high speeds.

  20. The efficiency of 'viscous interaction' between the solar wind and the magnetosphere during intense northward IMF events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1995-01-01

    We examined 11 cases when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was intensely northward (greater than 10 nT) for long durations of time (greater than 3 hours), to quantitatively determine an uppler limit on the efficiency of solar wind energy injection into the magnetosphere. We have specifically selected these large B(sub N) events to minimize the effects of magnetic reconnection. Many of these cases occurred during intervals of high-speed streams associated with coronal mass ejections when viscous interaction effects might be at a maximum. It is found that the typical efficiency of solar wind energy injection into the magnetosphere is 1.0 x 10(exp -3) to 4.0 x 10(exp -3), 100 to 30 times less efficient than during periods of intense southward IMFs. Other energy sinks not included in these numbers are discussed. Estimates of their magnitudes are provided.

  1. Multicriteria GIS modeling of wind and solar farms in Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Jason R. [Metropolitan State College of Denver, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, CB 22 P.O. Box 173362-22, Denver, CO 80217-3362 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The majority of electricity and heat in Colorado comes from coal and natural gas; however, renewable energy sources will play an integral role in the state's energy future. Colorado is the 11th windiest state and has more than 250 sunny days per year. The objectives of this research are to: 1) determine which landcover classes are affiliated with high wind and solar potential; and 2) identify areas that are suitable for wind and solar farms using multicriteria GIS modelling techniques. Renewable potential (NREL wind speed measurements at 50 m above the ground and NREL annual insolation data), landcover, population density, federal lands, and distance to roads, transmission lines, and cities were reclassified according to their suitability. Each was assigned weights based on their relative importance to one another. Superb wind classes are located in high alpine areas. Unfortunately, these areas are not suitable for large-scale wind farm development due to their inaccessibility and location within a sensitive ecosystem. Federal lands have low wind potential. According to the GIS model, ideal areas for wind farm development are located in northeastern Colorado. About 41 850 km{sup 2} of the state has model scores that are in the 90-100% range. Although annual solar radiation varies slightly, inter-mountain areas receive the most insolation. As far as federal lands, Indian reservations have the greatest solar input. The GIS model indicates that ideal areas for solar development are located in northwestern Colorado and east of Denver. Only 191 km{sup 2} of the state had model scores that were in the 90-100% range. These results suggest that the variables used in this analysis have more of an effect at eliminating non-suitable areas for large-scale solar farms; a greater area exists for suitable wind farms. However, given the statewide high insolation values with minimal variance, solar projects may be better suited for small-scale residential or commercial

  2. Solar wind ion trends and signatures: STEREO PLASTIC observations approaching solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Galvin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available STEREO has now completed the first two years of its mission, moving from close proximity to Earth in 2006/2007 to more than 50 degrees longitudinal separation from Earth in 2009. During this time, several large-scale structures have been observed in situ. Given the prevailing solar minimum conditions, these structures have been predominantly coronal hole-associated solar wind, slow solar wind, their interfaces, and the occasional transient event. In this paper, we extend earlier solar wind composition studies into the current solar minimum using high-resolution (1-h sampling times for the charge state analysis. We examine 2-year trends for iron charge states and solar wind proton speeds, and present a case study of Carrington Rotation 2064 (December 2007 which includes minor ion (He, Fe, O kinetic and Fe composition parameters in comparison with proton and magnetic field signatures at large-scale structures observed during this interval.

  3. The influence of solar wind on extratropical cyclones – Part 1: Wilcox effect revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rybanský

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A sun-weather correlation, namely the link between solar magnetic sector boundary passage (SBP by the Earth and upper-level tropospheric vorticity area index (VAI, that was found by Wilcox et al. (1974 and shown to be statistically significant by Hines and Halevy (1977 is revisited. A minimum in the VAI one day after SBP followed by an increase a few days later was observed. Using the ECMWF ERA-40 re-analysis dataset for the original period from 1963 to 1973 and extending it to 2002, we have verified what has become known as the "Wilcox effect" for the Northern as well as the Southern Hemisphere winters. The effect persists through years of high and low volcanic aerosol loading except for the Northern Hemisphere at 500 mb, when the VAI minimum is weak during the low aerosol years after 1973, particularly for sector boundaries associated with south-to-north reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF BZ component. The "disappearance" of the Wilcox effect was found previously by Tinsley et al. (1994 who suggested that enhanced stratospheric volcanic aerosols and changes in air-earth current density are necessary conditions for the effect. The present results indicate that the Wilcox effect does not require high aerosol loading to be detected. The results are corroborated by a correlation with coronal holes where the fast solar wind originates. Ground-based measurements of the green coronal emission line (Fe XIV, 530.3 nm are used in the superposed epoch analysis keyed by the times of sector boundary passage to show a one-to-one correspondence between the mean VAI variations and coronal holes. The VAI is modulated by high-speed solar wind streams with a delay of 1–2 days. The Fourier spectra of VAI time series show peaks at periods similar to those found in the solar corona and solar wind time series. In the modulation of VAI by solar wind the IMF BZ seems to control the phase of the Wilcox effect and the depth of the VAI minimum. The

  4. Global solar wind variations over the last four centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M J; Lockwood, M; Riley, P

    2017-01-31

    The most recent "grand minimum" of solar activity, the Maunder minimum (MM, 1650-1710), is of great interest both for understanding the solar dynamo and providing insight into possible future heliospheric conditions. Here, we use nearly 30 years of output from a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona to calibrate heliospheric reconstructions based solely on sunspot observations. Using these empirical relations, we produce the first quantitative estimate of global solar wind variations over the last 400 years. Relative to the modern era, the MM shows a factor 2 reduction in near-Earth heliospheric magnetic field strength and solar wind speed, and up to a factor 4 increase in solar wind Mach number. Thus solar wind energy input into the Earth's magnetosphere was reduced, resulting in a more Jupiter-like system, in agreement with the dearth of auroral reports from the time. The global heliosphere was both smaller and more symmetric under MM conditions, which has implications for the interpretation of cosmogenic radionuclide data and resulting total solar irradiance estimates during grand minima.

  5. Global solar wind variations over the last four centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Riley, P.

    2017-01-01

    The most recent “grand minimum” of solar activity, the Maunder minimum (MM, 1650–1710), is of great interest both for understanding the solar dynamo and providing insight into possible future heliospheric conditions. Here, we use nearly 30 years of output from a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona to calibrate heliospheric reconstructions based solely on sunspot observations. Using these empirical relations, we produce the first quantitative estimate of global solar wind variations over the last 400 years. Relative to the modern era, the MM shows a factor 2 reduction in near-Earth heliospheric magnetic field strength and solar wind speed, and up to a factor 4 increase in solar wind Mach number. Thus solar wind energy input into the Earth’s magnetosphere was reduced, resulting in a more Jupiter-like system, in agreement with the dearth of auroral reports from the time. The global heliosphere was both smaller and more symmetric under MM conditions, which has implications for the interpretation of cosmogenic radionuclide data and resulting total solar irradiance estimates during grand minima.

  6. The solar wind at solar maximum: comparisons of EISCAT IPS and in situ observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Breen

    Full Text Available The solar maximum solar wind is highly structured in latitude, longitude and in time. Coronal measurements show a very high degree of variability, with large variations that are less apparent within in situ spacecraft measurements. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS observations from EISCAT, covering distances from 20 to 100 solar radii (RS, are an ideal source of information on the inner solar wind and can be used, therefore, to cast light on its evolution with distance from the Sun. Earlier comparisons of in situ and IPS measurements under solar minimum conditions showed good large-scale agreement, particularly in the fast wind. In this study we attempt a quantitative comparison of measurements made over solar maximum by EISCAT (20–100 RS and the Wind and Ulysses spacecraft (at 215 RS and 300–1000 RS, respectively. The intervals studied were August–September 1999, May 2000, September 2000 and May 2001, the last-named being the period of the second Ulysses fast latitude scan. Both ballistic and – when possible – MHD/ballistic hybrid models were used to relate the data sets, and we compare the results obtained from these two mapping methods. The results of this study suggest that solar wind velocities measured in situ were less variable than those estimated from IPS measurements closer to the Sun, with the greatest divergence between IPS velocities and in situ measurements occurring in regions where steep longitudinal velocity gradients were seen in situ. We suggest that the interaction between streams of solar wind with different velocities leads to "smoothing" of solar wind velocities between 30–60 RS and 1 AU, and that this process continues at greater distances from the Sun.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (solar wind plasma; sources of the solar wind; instruments and techniques

  7. Folding ion rays in comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) and the connection with the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Degroote, P; Reyniers, M

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of folding ion rays in cometary comae is still not very well understood, so our aim is to gain more insight into the role of the local solar wind in the formation of these structures. Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) was intensively monitored during its closest approach to Earth (January 2005) with the CCD camera Merope mounted on the Flemish 1.2m Mercator telescope, in three different bands (Geneva U and B and Cousins I). Spectacular ion rays, thin ionic structures rapidly folding tailward, were recorded in the U band during one night, January 12th. Data from the SOHO satellite that was extrapolated corotationally to the position of the comet showed that the ion rays were formed during a sudden change in the in-situ solar wind state. We were able to succesfully correlate a high-speed solar wind stream with the appearance of folding ion rays. To our knowledge, this is the first clear observational evidence that folding ion rays in cometary comae are produced by a sudden change in the local solar wind...

  8. An evolving MHD vortex street model for quasi-periodic solar wind fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, Edouard; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation are used to provide a dynamical basis for the 'vortex street' model of the quasi-periodic meridional flow observed by Voyager 2 in the outer heliosphere. Various observations suggest the existence near the current sheet at solar minimum, of a vorticity distribution of two opposite shear layers with an antisymmetric staggered velocity pattern due to structured high-speed wind surrounding low-speed equatorial flow. It is shown that this flow pattern leads to the formation of a highly stable vortex street through the nonlinear interaction of the two shear layers. Spatial profiles of various simulated parameters (velocity, density, meridional flow angle and the location of magnetic sector boundaries) and their relative locations in the quasi-steady vortex street are generally in good agreement with the observations.

  9. Simulation study of solar wind push on a charged wire: basis of solar wind electric sail propulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available One possibility for propellantless propulsion in space is to use the momentum flux of the solar wind. A way to set up a solar wind sail is to have a set of thin long wires which are kept at high positive potential by an onboard electron gun so that the wires repel and deflect incident solar wind protons. The efficiency of this so-called electric sail depends on how large force a given solar wind exerts on a wire segment and how large electron current the wire segment draws from the solar wind plasma when kept at a given potential. We use 1-D and 2-D electrostatic plasma simulations to calculate the force and present a semitheoretical formula which captures the simulation results. We find that under average solar wind conditions at 1 AU the force per unit length is (5±1×10−8 N/m for 15 kV potential and that the electron current is accurately given by the well-known orbital motion limited (OML theory cylindrical Langmuir probe formula. Although the force may appear small, an analysis shows that because of the very low weight of a thin wire per unit length, quite high final speeds (over 50 km/s could be achieved by an electric sailing spacecraft using today's flight-proved components. It is possible that artificial electron heating of the plasma in the interaction region could increase the propulsive effect even further.

  10. A Possible Cause of the Diminished Solar Wind During the Solar Cycle 23 - 24 Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Wu, Chin-Chun

    2016-12-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma density observed at 1 AU during Solar Cycle 23 - 24 (SC-23/24) minimum were significantly smaller than those during its previous solar cycle (SC-22/23) minimum. Because the Earth's orbit is embedded in the slow wind during solar minimum, changes in the geometry and/or content of the slow wind region (SWR) can have a direct influence on the solar wind parameters near the Earth. In this study, we analyze solar wind plasma and magnetic field data of hourly values acquired by Ulysses. It is found that the solar wind, when averaging over the first (1995.6 - 1995.8) and third (2006.9 - 2008.2) Ulysses' perihelion ({˜} 1.4 AU) crossings, was about the same speed, but significantly less dense ({˜} 34 %) and cooler ({˜} 20 %), and the total magnetic field was {˜} 30 % weaker during the third compared to the first crossing. It is also found that the SWR was {˜} 50 % wider in the third ({˜} 68.5^deg; in heliographic latitude) than in the first ({˜} 44.8°) solar orbit. The observed latitudinal increase in the SWR is sufficient to explain the excessive decline in the near-Earth solar wind density during the recent solar minimum without speculating that the total solar output may have been decreasing. The observed SWR inflation is also consistent with a cooler solar wind in the SC-23/24 than in the SC-22/23 minimum. Furthermore, the ratio of the high-to-low latitude photospheric magnetic field (or equatorward magnetic pressure force), as observed by the Mountain Wilson Observatory, is smaller during the third than the first Ulysses' perihelion orbit. These findings suggest that the smaller equatorward magnetic pressure at the Sun may have led to the latitudinally-wider SRW observed by Ulysses in SC-23/24 minimum.

  11. Solar coronal plumes and the fast solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and coronal holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI; Wilhelm et al. 2011) : (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes as well as their interaction with the solar wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the first-ionization potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in polar coron...

  12. Differential kinetic dynamics and heating of ions in the turbulent solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Stabile, S.; Pezzi, O.; Servidio, S.; De Marco, R.; Marcucci, F.; Bruno, R.; Lavraud, B.; De Keyser, J.; Consolini, G.; Brienza, D.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Retinò, A.; Vaivads, A.; Salatti, M.; Veltri, P.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind plasma is a fully ionized and turbulent gas ejected by the outer layers of the solar corona at very high speed, mainly composed by protons and electrons, with a small percentage of helium nuclei and a significantly lower abundance of heavier ions. Since particle collisions are practically negligible, the solar wind is typically not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. Such a complex system must be described through self-consistent and fully nonlinear models, taking into account its multi-species composition and turbulence. We use a kinetic hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical code to reproduce the turbulent energy cascade down to ion kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the uncontaminated solar wind plasma, with the aim of exploring the differential kinetic dynamics of the dominant ion species, namely protons and alpha particles. We show that the response of different species to the fluctuating electromagnetic fields is different. In particular, a significant differential heating of alphas with respect to protons is observed. Interestingly, the preferential heating process occurs in spatial regions nearby the peaks of ion vorticity and where strong deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium are recovered. Moreover, by feeding a simulator of a top-hat ion spectrometer with the output of the kinetic simulations, we show that measurements by such spectrometer planned on board the Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR mission), a candidate for the next M4 space mission of the European Space Agency, can provide detailed three-dimensional ion velocity distributions, highlighting important non-Maxwellian features. These results support the idea that future space missions will allow a deeper understanding of the physics of the interplanetary medium.

  13. High-speed photonics interconnects

    CERN Document Server

    Chrostowski, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Dramatic increases in processing power have rapidly scaled on-chip aggregate bandwidths into the Tb/s range. This necessitates a corresponding increase in the amount of data communicated between chips, so as not to limit overall system performance. To meet the increasing demand for interchip communication bandwidth, researchers are investigating the use of high-speed optical interconnect architectures. Unlike their electrical counterparts, optical interconnects offer high bandwidth and negligible frequency-dependent loss, making possible per-channel data rates of more than 10 Gb/s. High-Speed

  14. High-speed pulse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Coekin, J A

    1975-01-01

    High-Speed Pulse Techniques covers the many aspects of technique in digital electronics and encompass some of the more fundamental factors that apply to all digital systems. The book describes the nature of pulse signals and their deliberate or inadvertent processing in networks, transmission lines and transformers, and then examines the characteristics and transient performance of semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. Some of the problems associated with the assembly of these into viable systems operating at ultra high speed are also looked at. The book examines the transients and w

  15. Scale-free texture of the fast solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Gogoberidze, G; Wicks, R T

    2011-12-01

    The higher-order statistics of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations in the fast quiet solar wind are quantified systematically, scale by scale. We find a single global non-Gaussian scale-free behavior from minutes to over 5 h. This spans the signature of an inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and a ~1/f range in magnetic field components. This global scaling in field magnitude fluctuations is an intrinsic component of the underlying texture of the solar wind and puts a strong constraint on any theory of solar corona and the heliosphere. Intriguingly, the magnetic field and velocity components show scale-dependent dynamic alignment outside of the inertial range.

  16. Modeling Jets in the Corona and Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Torok, T; Titov, V S; Leake, J E; Mikic, Z; Linker, J A; Linton, M G

    2015-01-01

    Coronal jets are transient, collimated eruptions that occur in regions of predominantly open magnetic field in the solar corona. Our understanding of these events has greatly evolved in recent years but several open questions, such as the contribution of coronal jets to the solar wind, remain. Here we present an overview of the observations and numerical modeling of coronal jets, followed by a brief description of "next-generation" simulations that include an advanced description of the energy transfer in the corona ("thermodynamic MHD"), large spherical computational domains, and the solar wind. These new models will allow us to address some of the open questions.

  17. Coronal Streamers and Their Associated Solar Wind Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, M. P.; Landi, E.; Cranmer, S. R.; Cohen, O.; Raymond, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    We use the EUV spectrometers aboard SOHO and Hinode and white-light coronagraphs to characterize the physical properties of coronal streamers during Earth/Ulysses quadrature configurations for the previous two solar minimum periods. In addition, comparisons between coronal observations and in situ measurements of solar wind plasma properties are being used to further characterize the origins of slow wind streams. In order to investigate slow solar wind heating and acceleration, we also compare with predictions from three-dimensional MHD models. We aim to use the empirical measurements to distinguish between different proposed physical processes for slow wind acceleration (e.g., waves/turbulence versus reconnection). This work is supported by NASA grant NNX10AQ58G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  18. Shear flow induced wave couplings in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poedts, S. [KULeuven, Heverlee (Belgium). Centre for Plasma Astrophysics; Rogava, A.D. [Tbilisi State Univ. (Georgia). Dept. of Physics]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    1998-01-01

    A sheared background flow in a plasma induces coupling between different MHD wave modes, resulting in their mutual transformations with corresponding energy redistributing between the modes. In this way, the energy can be transfered from one wave mode to the other, but energy can also be added to or extracted from the background flow. In the present paper it is investigated whether the wave coupling and energy transfer mechanisms can operate under solar wind conditions. It is shown that this is indeed the case. Hence, the long-period waves observed in the solar wind at r > 0.3 AU might be generated by much faster periodic oscillations in the photosphere of the Sun. Other possible consequences for observable beat phenomena in the wind and the acceleration of the solar wind particles are also discussed.

  19. Relationship Between Solar Wind Speed and Coronal Magnetic Field Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiki, Ken'ichi; Iju, Tomoya; Hakamada, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between the solar-wind speed $[V]$ and the coronal magnetic-field properties (a flux expansion factor [$f$] and photospheric magnetic-field strength [$B_{\\mathrm{S}}$]) at all latitudes using data of interplanetary scintillation and solar magnetic field obtained for 24 years from 1986 to 2009. Using a cross-correlation analyses, we verified that $V$ is inversely proportional to $f$ and found that $V$ tends to increase with $B_{\\mathrm{S}}$ if $f$ is the same. As a consequence, we find that $V$ has extremely good linear correlation with $B_{\\mathrm{S}}/f$. However, this linear relation of $V$ and $B_{\\mathrm{S}}/f$ cannot be used for predicting the solar-wind velocity without information on the solar-wind mass flux. We discuss why the inverse relation between $V$ and $f$ has been successfully used for solar-wind velocity prediction, even though it does not explicitly include the mass flux and magnetic-field strength, which are important physical parameters for solar-wind accele...

  20. The magnetosphere under weak solar wind forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere was very strongly disturbed during the passage of the strong shock and the following interacting ejecta on 21–25 October 2001. These disturbances included two intense storms (Dst*≈−250 and −180 nT, respectively. The cessation of this activity at the start of 24 October ushered in a peculiar state of the magnetosphere which lasted for about 28 h and which we discuss in this paper. The interplanetary field was dominated by the sunward component [B=(4.29±0.77, −0.30±0.71, 0.49±0.45 nT]. We analyze global indicators of geomagnetic disturbances, polar cap precipitation, ground magnetometer records, and ionospheric convection as obtained from SuperDARN radars. The state of the magnetosphere is characterized by the following features: (i generally weak and patchy (in time low-latitude dayside reconnection or reconnection poleward of the cusps; (ii absence of substorms; (iii a monotonic recovery from the previous storm activity (Dst corrected for magnetopause currents decreasing from ~−65 to ~−35 nT, giving an unforced decreased of ~1.1 nT/h; (iv the probable absence of viscous-type interaction originating from the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability; (v a cross-polar cap potential of just 20–30 kV; (vi a persistent, polar cap region containing (vii very weak, and sometimes absent, electron precipitation and no systematic inter-hemisphere asymmetry. Whereas we therefore infer the presence of a moderate amount of open flux, the convection is generally weak and patchy, which we ascribe to the lack of solar wind driver. This magnetospheric state approaches that predicted by Cowley and Lockwood (1992 but has never yet been observed.

  1. High Speed SPM of Functional Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huey, Bryan D. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The development and optimization of applications comprising functional materials necessitates a thorough understanding of their static and dynamic properties and performance at the nanoscale. Leveraging High Speed SPM and concepts enabled by it, efficient measurements and maps with nanoscale and nanosecond temporal resolution are uniquely feasible. This includes recent enhancements for topographic, conductivity, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties as originally proposed, as well as newly developed methods or improvements to AFM-based mechanical, friction, thermal, and photoconductivity measurements. The results of this work reveal fundamental mechanisms of operation, and suggest new approaches for improving the ultimate speed and/or efficiency, of data storage systems, magnetic-electric sensors, and solar cells.

  2. High-speed OTDM switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Kim Stokholm; Mikkelsen, Benny; Clausen, Anders

    1998-01-01

    Optical TDM (OTDM) continues to be of interest both for point-point transmission and as a networking technology for both LANs and long-distance fibre transmission. Recent research has demonstrated enabling techniques for OTDM networks at high speeds. In conclusion, OTDM is emerging as an attracti...

  3. Solar Wind Structure Sources and Periodicites of Auroral Electron Power Over the Three Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Watari and Watanabe (2000) reported about half of the magnetic disturbances (mini- mum Dst<-50nT) in the solar minimum years of 1995-1997 were...7a and b. Watari and Watanabe (2000) remarked on the low geomagnetic activity during solstices between 1995 and 1997, with very low values in the...Analysis Software and Systems VI. ASP Conference Series, vol. 125. Watari . S„ Watanabe. T. 2000. High-speed streams from coronal holes and coronal mass

  4. Minimal Magnetic States of the Sun and the Solar Wind: Implications for the Origin of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.; von Steiger, R.

    2017-09-01

    During the last decade it has been proposed that both the Sun and the solar wind have minimum magnetic states, lowest order levels of magnetism that underlie the 11-yr cycle as well as longer-term variability. Here we review the literature on basal magnetic states at the Sun and in the heliosphere and draw a connection between the two based on the recent deep 2008-2009 minimum between cycles 23 and 24. In particular, we consider the implications of the low solar activity during the recent minimum for the origin of the slow solar wind.

  5. Active control system for high speed windmills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  6. Wind-induced vibration experiment on solar wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes wind tunnel experimental results of wind-induced responses of a solar wing system, and investigates its aeroelastic instability using a scaled model. The model comprised 12 solar wing units, each supported by 2 cables. The gaps between units were set constant. Two sag ratios (i.e. sag/span length were adopted. The wind speed was varied from 0 to 16m/s, and 18 different wind speeds were used. From the experiment, when the sag was 2%, a sudden increase in fluctuating displacement was found near a mean wind speed of 10m/s at a wind direction of 40° A sudden increase in fluctuating displacements was also found near a mean wind speed of 1m/s when the wind direction was larger than 60° When the sag increased to 5%, some differences among units in mean displacements were found and complicate vibration in fluctuating displacement at low wind speed was observed.

  7. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-28

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed.

  8. On the properties of energy transfer in solar wind turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Marino, Raffaele; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Wicks, Robert; Nigro, Giuseppina

    2017-04-01

    Spacecraft observations have shown that the solar wind plasma is heated during its expansion in the heliosphere. The necessary energy is made available at small scales by a turbulent cascade, although the nature of the heating processes is still debated. Because of the intermittent nature of turbulence, the small-scale energy is inhomogeneously distributed in space, resulting for example in the formation of highly localized current sheets and eddies. In order to understand the small-scale plasma processes occurring in the solar wind, the global and local properties of such energy distribution must be known. Here we study such properties using a proxy derived from the Von Karman-Howart relation for magnetohydrodynamics. The statistical properties of the energy transfer rate in the fluid range of scales are studied in detail using WIND spacecraft plasma and magnetic field measurements and discussed in the framework of the multifractal turbulent cascade. Dependence of the energy dissipation proxy on the solar wind conditions (speed, type, solar activity...) is analysed, and its evolution during solar wind expansion in the heliosphere is described using Helios II and Ulysses measurements. A comparison with other proxies, such as the PVI, is performed. Finally, the local singularity properties of the energy dissipation proxy are conditionally compared to the corresponding particle velocity distributions. This allows the identification of specific plasma features occurring near turbulent dissipation events, and could be used as enhanced mode trigger in future space missions.

  9. The Importance of Suprathermal Electrons in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    LE CHAT, G.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Pantellini, F. G. E.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.

    2014-12-01

    Non-Gaussian distributions are ubiquitous in systems having long-range interactions, from real-world networks to astrophysical plasmas. The corona and solar wind are no exception. In this review, we concentrate on the corona and solar wind electrons, whose suprathermal tail governs heat transport and plays a crucial role in the temperature structure and wind production, as first suggested thirty years ago by Olbert and confirmed by a large number of subsequent studies. These non-thermal electrons have been measured in both the corona and solar wind, and are a direct consequence of the fast increase with speed of the Coulomb free-path, compared to the pressure scale-height. This situation has four important consequences: (1) the fluid description, on which the vast majority of solar wind models are based is inadequate; (2) the heat flux is NOT given by the classical Spitzer-Härm expression in the corona and solar wind; (3) for most non-thermal distributions (except the convenient and fashionable Kappa distribution), the fraction of supra-thermal electrons increases with altitude in the corona because of velocity filtration; for example, with a sum of Maxwellians, the hotter the population, the larger the increase with altitude of its fractional contribution; (4) ad-hoc heat addition - assumed in most models, is not necessarily required to produce the observed variation in temperature and the wind acceleration. We will shortly review the observed electron velocity distributions together with the theoretical expectations, the major role of the electric field and the consequences on the heat flux, the temperature structure and the wind acceleration.

  10. Dissipation and heating in solar wind turbulence: from the macro to the micro and back again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, Khurom H; Osman, Kareem T; Chapman, Sandra C

    2015-05-13

    The past decade has seen a flurry of research activity focused on discerning the physics of kinetic scale turbulence in high-speed astrophysical plasma flows. By 'kinetic' we mean spatial scales on the order of or, in particular, smaller than the ion inertial length or the ion gyro-radius--the spatial scales at which the ion and electron bulk velocities decouple and considerable change can be seen in the ion distribution functions. The motivation behind most of these studies is to find the ultimate fate of the energy cascade of plasma turbulence, and thereby the channels by which the energy in the system is dissipated. This brief Introduction motivates the case for a themed issue on this topic and introduces the topic of turbulent dissipation and heating in the solar wind. The theme issue covers the full breadth of studies: from theory and models, massive simulations of these models and observational studies from the highly rich and vast amount of data collected from scores of heliospheric space missions since the dawn of the space age. A synopsis of the theme issue is provided, where a brief description of all the contributions is discussed and how they fit together to provide an over-arching picture on the highly topical subject of dissipation and heating in turbulent collisionless plasmas in general and in the solar wind in particular.

  11. Role of Concentrating Solar Power in Integrating Solar and Wind Energy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2015-06-03

    As wind and solar photovoltaics (PV) increase in penetration it is increasingly important to examine enabling technologies that can help integrate these resources at large scale. Concentrating solar power (CSP) when deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) can provide multiple services that can help integrate variable generation (VG) resources such as wind and PV. CSP with TES can provide firm, highly flexible capacity, reducing minimum generation constraints which limit penetration and results in curtailment. By acting as an enabling technology, CSP can complement PV and wind, substantially increasing their penetration in locations with adequate solar resource.

  12. Long-term Trends in the Solar Wind Proton Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Heather A.; McComas, David J.; DeForest, Craig E.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the long-term time evolution (1965-2015) of the relationships between solar wind proton temperature (T p) and speed (V p) and between the proton density (n p) and speed using OMNI solar wind observations taken near Earth. We find a long-term decrease in the proton temperature-speed (T p-V p) slope that lasted from 1972 to 2010, but has been trending upward since 2010. Since the solar wind proton density-speed (n p-V p) relationship is not linear like the T p-V p relationship, we perform power-law fits for n p-V p. The exponent (steepness in the n p-V p relationship) is correlated with the solar cycle. This exponent has a stronger correlation with current sheet tilt angle than with sunspot number because the sunspot number maxima vary considerably from cycle to cycle and the tilt angle maxima do not. To understand this finding, we examined the average n p for different speed ranges, and found that for the slow wind n p is highly correlated with the sunspot number, with a lag of approximately four years. The fast wind n p variation was less, but in phase with the cycle. This phase difference may contribute to the n p-V p exponent correlation with the solar cycle. These long-term trends are important since empirical formulas based on fits to T p and V p data are commonly used to identify interplanetary coronal mass ejections, but these formulas do not include any time dependence. Changes in the solar wind density over a solar cycle will create corresponding changes in the near-Earth space environment and the overall extent of the heliosphere.

  13. Self-similar signature of the active solar corona within the inertial range of solar-wind turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, K; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Nicol, R M

    2007-05-25

    We quantify the scaling of magnetic energy density in the inertial range of solar-wind turbulence seen in situ at 1 AU with respect to solar activity. At solar maximum, when the coronal magnetic field is dynamic and topologically complex, we find self-similar scaling in the solar wind, whereas at solar minimum, when the coronal fields are more ordered, we find multifractality. This quantifies the solar-wind signature that is of direct coronal origin and distinguishes it from that of local MHD turbulence, with quantitative implications for coronal heating of the solar wind.

  14. Enigmatic Solar Wind Disappearance Events – Do We Understand Them?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Janardhan P.

    2006-06-01

    At the Sun–Earth distance of one astronomical unit (1 AU), the solar wind is known to be strongly supersonic and super Alfvénic with Mach and Alfvén numbers being on average 12 and 9 respectively. Also, solar wind densities (average ∼ 10 cm-3) and velocities (average ∼ 450 km s-1) at 1 AU, are known to be inversely correlated with low velocities having higher than average densities and vice versa. However, on May 11 and 12 1999 the Earth was engulfed by an unusually low density (< 0.1 cm-3) and low velocity (< 350 km s-1) solar wind with an Alfvén Mach number significantly less than 1. This was a unique low-velocity, low-density, sub-Alfvénic solar wind flow which spacecraft observations have shown lasted more than 24 hours. One consequence of this extremely tenuous solar wind was a spectacular expansion of the Earth’s magnetosphere and bow shock. The expanding bow shock was observed by several spacecraft and reached record upstream distances of nearly 60 Earth radii, the lunar orbit. The event was so dramatic that it has come to be known as the solar wind disappearance event. Though extensive studies of this event were made by many authors in the past, it has only been recently shown that the unusual solar wind flows characterizing this event originated from a small coronal hole in the vicinity of a large active region on the Sun. These recent results have put to rest speculation that such events are associated with global phenomenon like the periodic solar polar field reversal that occurs at the maximum of each solar cycle. In this paper we revisit the 11 May 1999 event, look at other disappearance events that have ocurred in the past, examine the reasons why speculations about the association of such events with global phenomena like solar polar field reversals were made and also examine the role of transient coronal holes as a possible solar source for such events.

  15. A hybrid reconfigurable solar and wind energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkari, Sagar A.

    We study the feasibility of a novel hybrid solar-wind hybrid system that shares most of its infrastructure and components. During periods of clear sunny days the system will generate electricity from the sun using a parabolic concentrator. The concentrator is formed by individual mirror elements and focuses the light onto high intensity vertical multi-junction (VMJ) cells. During periods of high wind speeds and at night, the same concentrator setup will be reconfigured to channel the wind into a wind turbine which will be used to harness wind energy. In this study we report on the feasibility of this type of solar/wind hybrid energy system. The key mechanisms; optics, cooling mechanism of VMJ cells and air flow through the system were investigated using simulation tools. The results from these simulations, along with a simple economic analysis giving the levelized cost of energy for such a system are presented. An iterative method of design refinement based on the simulation results was used to work towards a prototype design. The levelized cost of the system achieved in the economic analysis shows the system to be a good alternative for a grid isolated site and could be used as a standalone system in regions of lower demand. The new approach to solar wind hybrid system reported herein will pave way for newer generation of hybrid systems that share common infrastructure in addition to the storage and distribution of energy.

  16. Wind loads on solar collector panels and support structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, H L; Norton, D J

    1979-10-01

    A study is reported which addresses the wind load problem for retrofit, roof-mounted solar collector panels and their support structures. The objective was to provide force and moment coefficients which occur for various configurations and wind conditions. Wind tunnel tests were made to investigate geometric variables such as the wind angle, aspect ratio, clearance between the support structure and the roof, inclination of the panels to the flow, and the number of panels in an array. Full-scale tests were conducted to provide measurements which could be compared with wind tunnel tests and investigate loads for a nonuniform wind approaching the structure. The structural analysis investigated the suitability of design techniques and potential problems using current building codes. (LEW)

  17. International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) WIND Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, R.; Sizemore, K. O.

    1991-01-01

    The launch of the WIND spacecraft will place the satellite into a sunside apogee double-lunar swing-by orbit for a period of one year, after which WIND may be transferred to a Sun-Earth L1 Halo orbit. Information is presented in tabular form on the following topics: Deep Space Network support; frequency assignments, telemetry, command, and ranging.

  18. Generalized similarity in finite range solar wind magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S C; Nicol, R M

    2009-12-11

    Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. The ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide in situ observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterizes this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum--with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of approximately 2 in power--provides a test of this invariance.

  19. 横风作用下高速列车安全运行速度限值的研究%Research on the Limited Safe Speed of a High-speed Train under Cross Wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郗艳红; 毛军; 高亮; 杨国伟; 曲文强

    2012-01-01

    横风作用下的列车安全运行速度限值应通过列车气动特性和车辆轨道动力学特性的分析得到.以我国CRH3型高速列车实车为原型,考虑真实受电弓、转向架等列车的细部特征,假定列车在平地上行驶,对列车速度分别为200、250、300、350和380 km/h,横风速度分别为10、15、20、25和30 m/s,风向角为90°的25个工况进行气动特性的数值模拟,并采用国内实测轨道谱和德国轨道谱分别对这25个工况的车辆轨道动力学性能进行仿真计算和对比分析.结合国家标准和技术规范,给出CRH3型列车在平地上运行时,横风风速与列车最大安全运行速度之间的对应关系,为横风作用下的列车运行安全控制提供参考.%The limited safe speed of a high-speed train under crosswind should be obtained by analyzing the aerodynamic and vehicle-track dynamic characteristics. A real high-speed train of Type CRH3 was taken for case study. The train was assumed to run on a plane area under 25 numerically simulated operating conditions when the train speeds were chosen as 200,250,300,350 and 380 km/h,the crosswind velocities as 10,15,20,25 and 30m/s and the wind direction angle as 90° The detailed characteristics of real bogies and pantographs and so on were taken into account. The dynamic vehicle-track charateristics corresponding to the above 25 operating conditions were calculated respectively and compared in line with the domestic measured track spectra and the German track spectra. In accordance with the National standards and technical specifications concerned, the relationship between the crosswind velocity and the maximum safe operating speed of the CRH3 train running on a plane area was found. The results will play a guiding role in control of safe operation of a train under cross-wind.

  20. Solar identification of solar-wind disturbances observed at Ulysses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemen, J. R.; Acton, L. W.; Alexander, D.; Galvin, A. B.; Harvey, K. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, X.; Hudson, H. S.

    1996-07-01

    The Ulysses polar passages are producing a unique set of observations of solar-wind disturbances at high heliographic latitudes. In this paper we use the Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) to locate some of these events, as defined by the Ulysses/SWICS data, in the solar corona. Of 8 events, we identify two with flares, three with front-side large arcade events, two with far-side events, and one was not seen in the Ulysses data. The arcade events generally resemble long-duration flares seen in active regions, but are larger, slower, and cooler. We present Yohkoh images of each of these events. In the large arcade events (see Alexander et al., 1996, for a detailed look at one of them) the magnetic morphology at the location of the Yohkoh arcade is generally consistent with the development of a large system of loops. Some of the identifications are ambiguous, and we summarize the reasons for this. From the SWICS data we have obtained ionization temperatures for several events, and find that they have no obvious pattern in relation to the X-ray temperatures; this may be expected on the basis that the interplanetary plasma cloud is physically distinct from the plasma trapped in the corona. Soft X-ray observations of the solar corona show occasional occurrences of large-scale brightenings in the form of arcades of loops. Such structures have been known since Skylab (e.g., Sturrock, 1980), and have a clear relationship with coronal mass ejections (e.g., Kahler, 1977). We now may study this phenomenon statistically with the much more comprehensive Yohkoh observations; with Yohkoh movies we can also begin to extend our knowledge to the three-dimensional development of the structures. At the same time Ulysses has sampled the latitude dependence of the interplanetary effects. With this paper we introduce this subject and provide a preliminary listing of events from the passage of Ulysses through high heliographic latitudes. The starting point of the present survey is a list

  1. Global geomagnetic responses to the IMF Bz fluctuations during the September/October 2003 high-speed stream intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echer, Ezequiel; Korth, Axel; José Alves Bolzan, Mauricio; Friedel, Reinhard Hans Walter

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we follow the coupling from the solar wind to the Earth's magnetotail, geosynchronous orbit, auroral zone and to the ground, during periods of Alfvénic fluctuations in high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs) and their corotating interaction regions (CIRs). We employ cross-wavelet analysis of magnetic field, particle flux and auroral electrojet (AE) index data for the HSSs of September and October 2003. Our results show a remarkably consistent periodic response among all of these regions and across multiple substorm indicators, indicating a possible driven substorm response of the global magnetosphere to the solar wind interplanetary structures. Across the seven intervals studied we find a range of periodic responses from 1.8 to 3.1 h, which is consistent with the 2.75 h peak of the Borovsky et al. (1993) statistical study of inter-substorm periods.

  2. A large-scale view of Space Technology 5 magnetometer response to solar wind drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipp, D J; Kilcommons, L M; Gjerloev, J; Redmon, R J; Slavin, J; Le, G

    2015-04-01

    In this data report we discuss reprocessing of the Space Technology 5 (ST5) magnetometer database for inclusion in NASA's Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb) virtual observatory. The mission consisted of three spacecraft flying in elliptical orbits, from 27 March to 27 June 2006. Reprocessing includes (1) transforming the data into the Modified Apex Coordinate System for projection to a common reference altitude of 110 km, (2) correcting gain jumps, and (3) validating the results. We display the averaged magnetic perturbations as a keogram, which allows direct comparison of the full-mission data with the solar wind values and geomagnetic indices. With the data referenced to a common altitude, we find the following: (1) Magnetic perturbations that track the passage of corotating interaction regions and high-speed solar wind; (2) unexpectedly strong dayside perturbations during a solstice magnetospheric sawtooth oscillation interval characterized by a radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component that may have enhanced the accompanying modest southward IMF; and (3) intervals of reduced magnetic perturbations or "calms," associated with periods of slow solar wind, interspersed among variable-length episodic enhancements. These calms are most evident when the IMF is northward or projects with a northward component onto the geomagnetic dipole. The reprocessed ST5 data are in very good agreement with magnetic perturbations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, which we also map to 110 km. We briefly discuss the methods used to remap the ST5 data and the means of validating the results against DMSP. Our methods form the basis for future intermission comparisons of space-based magnetometer data.

  3. Low Voltage Ride-through of High Speed Wind Turbine with Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator%高速永磁同步风电机组低电压穿越的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昊; 庄圣贤; 霍连文; 许永衡; 周兰

    2011-01-01

    研究高速永磁同步风电机组的控制策略,提高其低电压穿越能力。在matlab/simulink环境下构建了背靠背双PWM变流器并网的高速永磁同步风电机组仿真模型。模拟了发电机和变流器在电网电压跌落30%(0.6s),60%(2s)时的运行情况。仿真结果表明:高速永磁同步发电机机组功率跟踪良好,在电网电压跌落时对电网提供无功支持,具有较强的低电压穿越能力。%The control strategy for high speed wind turbine with permanent magnet synchronous generator (H-PMSG) was investigated to enhance its capability of low voltage ride through(LVRT).A H-PMSG model comprising of a host AC power grid with two back-to-back PWM voltage source converters was established in the software matlab/simulink. It has simulated two operation conditions generator and converter when grid voltage dip by 30%(0.6 seconds) ,60%(2 seconds).The simulation indicated that H-PMSG power tracked well. It could provide reactive power support when the grid voltage dip. The H-PMSG had a strong low-voltage penetration capability.

  4. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  5. Firehose constraints for the solar wind suprathermal electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Lazar, M; Poedts, S; Štverák, Š

    2016-01-01

    The indefinite increase of temperature predicted by the solar wind expansion in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field is already notorious for not being confirmed by the observations. In hot and dilute plasmas from space particle-particle collisions are not efficient in constraining large deviations from isotropy, but the resulting firehose instability provides in this case plausible limitations for the temperature anisotropy of the thermal (core) populations of both the electron and proton species. The present paper takes into discussion the suprathermal (halo) electrons, which are ubiquitous in the solar wind. Less dense but hotter than the core, suprathermals may be highly anisotropic and susceptible to the firehose instability. The main features of the instability are here derived from a first-order theory for conditions specific to the suprathermal electrons in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetospheres. Unveiled here, new regimes of the electron firehose instability may be exclu...

  6. Solar Wind Turbulence and the Role of Ion Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrova, Olga; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Horbury, Timothy S; Bale, Stuart D

    2013-01-01

    Solar wind is probably the best laboratory to study turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. In addition to the presence of magnetic field, the differences with neutral fluid isotropic turbulence are: weakness of collisional dissipation and presence of several characteristic space and time scales. In this paper we discuss observational properties of solar wind turbulence in a large range from the MHD to the electron scales. At MHD scales, within the inertial range, turbulence cascade of magnetic fluctuations develops mostly in the plane perpendicular to the mean field. Solar wind turbulence is compressible in nature. The spectrum of velocity fluctuations do not follow magnetic field one. Probability distribution functions of different plasma parameters are not Gaussian, indicating presence of intermittency. At the moment there is no global model taking into account all these observed properties of the inertial range. At ion scales, turbulent spectra have a break, compressibility increases and the density fluctuat...

  7. Intermittency and local heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Rappazzo, A F

    2012-06-29

    Evidence for nonuniform heating in the solar wind plasma near current sheets dynamically generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is obtained using measurements from the ACE spacecraft. These coherent structures only constitute 19% of the data, but contribute 50% of the total plasma internal energy. Intermittent heating manifests as elevations in proton temperature near current sheets, resulting in regional heating and temperature enhancements extending over several hours. The number density of non-Gaussian structures is found to be proportional to the mean proton temperature and solar wind speed. These results suggest magnetofluid turbulence drives intermittent dissipation through a hierarchy of coherent structures, which collectively could be a significant source of coronal and solar wind heating.

  8. Mechanism of proton anisotropic velocity distribution in the solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AO; Xianzhi(敖先志); SHEN; Ji(沈迹); TU; Chuanyi(涂传诒)

    2003-01-01

    Although it has been long that spacecraft observed the anisotropy of velocity protons in the solar wind, there is still not a reasonable explanation. In this paper we try to give an explanation from the diffusion plateau of protoncyclotron resonance predicted by the quasi-linear theory for the resonance between the protons and the parallel propagating waves. We consider the effect of dispersion relation on diffusion plateau and notice that the diffusion plateau we have got by using cold plasma dispersion relation accords with the density contours in the velocity phase space detected at 0.3 AU in fast solar wind. For explaining proton distributions obtained in the fast solar wind from 0.7 AU to 1 AU hot plasma dispersion relation should be considered. We also give a theoretical relation of proton thermal anisotropy A and plasma parameter β.

  9. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Solar Wind Driven Magnetospheric Reconfiguration

    CERN Document Server

    Savov, E

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic disturbances are associated with electric currents as it is well checked at laboratory room scales and described by the Maxwell's equations of electromagnetic field. The analysis of spacecraft observations for more than a quarter of a century failed to provide a self-consistent three-dimensional picture of the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo generated magnetospheric and ionospheric current systems. The proposed solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) driven reconfiguration of the earth's magnetosphere directly accounts for the observed magnetic disturbances. So role of the magnetospheric currents in creation of the magnetic disturbances is reconsidered in accordance with some poorly understood observations. A quantitative agreement with observations is demonstrated and a laboratory experiment to test the suggested model of the solar wind/IMF-magnetosphere interaction is described.

  10. Analysis of Ion Charge States in Solar Wind and CMEs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arati Dasgupta; J. M. Laming

    2008-03-01

    We discuss needs in dielectronic recombination data motivated by recent work directed at a quantitative understanding of ion charge states of various elements observed in situ in the solar wind and CMEs. The competing processes of ionization and recombination lead to departures from collision ionization equilibrium. The use of this as a diagnostic of acceleration and heating processes of the solar wind and CMEs is sensitive to the accuracy of the atomic rates in a way that steady state ionization equilibrium plasmas are not. The most pressing need is dielectronic recombination rates for ions Fe8+-12+. These are among the dominant species observed in various regions of the solar wind and CMEs, and in remotely sensed EUV spectra.

  11. Short term fluctuations of wind and solar power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Anvari, M; Wächter, M; Milan, P; Lorenz, E; Heinemann, D; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Wind and solar power are known to be highly influenced by weather events and may ramp up or down abruptly. Such events in the power production influence not only the availability of energy, but also the stability of the entire power grid. By analysing significant amounts of data from several regions around the world with resolutions of seconds to minutes, we provide strong evidence that renewable wind and solar sources exhibit multiple types of variability and nonlinearity in the time scale of {\\it seconds} and characterise their stochastic properties. In contrast to previous findings, we show that only the jumpy characteristic of renewable sources decreases when increasing the spatial size over which the renewable energies are harvested. Otherwise, the strong non-Gaussian, intermittent behaviour in the cumulative power of the total field survives even for a country-wide distribution of the systems. The strong fluctuating behaviour of renewable wind and solar sources can be well characterised by Kolmogorov-li...

  12. PROTON KINETIC EFFECTS IN VLASOV AND SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Osman, K. T.; Chapman, S. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Califano, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Matthaeus, W. H., E-mail: sergio.servidio@fis.unical.it [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Kinetic plasma processes are investigated in the framework of solar wind turbulence, employing hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) simulations. Statistical analysis of spacecraft observation data relates proton temperature anisotropy T /T {sub ∥} and parallel plasma beta β{sub ∥}, where subscripts refer to the ambient magnetic field direction. Here, this relationship is recovered using an ensemble of HVM simulations. By varying plasma parameters, such as plasma beta and fluctuation level, the simulations explore distinct regions of the parameter space given by T /T {sub ∥} and β{sub ∥}, similar to solar wind sub-datasets. Moreover, both simulation and solar wind data suggest that temperature anisotropy is not only associated with magnetic intermittent events, but also with gradient-type structures in the flow and in the density. This connection between non-Maxwellian kinetic effects and various types of intermittency may be a key point for understanding the complex nature of plasma turbulence.

  13. Proton Kinetic Effects in Vlasov and Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Servidio, S; Valentini, F; Perrone, D; Califano, F; Chapman, S; Matthaeus, W H; Veltri, P

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic plasma processes have been investigated in the framework of solar wind turbulence, employing Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) simulations. The dependency of proton temperature anisotropy T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel} on the parallel plasma beta \\beta_{\\parallel}, commonly observed in spacecraft data, has been recovered using an ensemble of HVM simulations. By varying plasma parameters, such as plasma beta and fluctuation level, the simulations explore distinct regions of the parameter space given by T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel} and \\beta_{\\parallel}, similar to solar wind sub-datasets. Moreover, both simulation and solar wind data suggest that temperature anisotropy is not only associated with magnetic intermittent events, but also with gradient-type structures in the flow and in the density. This connection between non-Maxwellian kinetic effects and various types of intermittency may be a key point for understanding the complex nature of plasma turbulence.

  14. The New Horizons Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) Observations of the Solar Wind from 11-33 au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Nicolaou, G.; Weidner, S.; Livadiotis, G.

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on National Aeronautics and Space Administration's New Horizons Pluto mission has collected solar wind observations en route from Earth to Pluto, and these observations continue beyond Pluto. Few missions have explored the solar wind in the outer heliosphere making this dataset a critical addition to the field. We created a forward model of SWAP count rates, which includes a comprehensive instrument response function based on laboratory and flight calibrations. By fitting the count rates with this model, the proton density (n), speed (V), and temperature (T) parameters are determined. Comparisons between SWAP parameters and both propagated 1 au observations and prior Voyager 2 observations indicate consistency in both the range and mean wind values. These comparisons as well as our additional findings confirm that small and midsized solar wind structures are worn down with increasing distance due to dynamic interaction of parcels of wind with different speed. For instance, the T-V relationship steepens, as the range in V is limited more than the range in T with distance. At times the T-V correlation clearly breaks down beyond 20 au, which may indicate wind currently expanding and cooling may have an elevated T reflecting prior heating and compression in the inner heliosphere. The power of wind parameters at shorter periodicities decreases with distance as the longer periodicities strengthen. The solar rotation periodicity is present in temperature beyond 20 au indicating the observed parcel temperature may reflect not only current heating or cooling, but also heating occurring closer to the Sun.

  15. THE NEW HORIZONS SOLAR WIND AROUND PLUTO (SWAP) OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR WIND FROM 11–33 au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.; Livadiotis, G. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Nicolaou, G., E-mail: helliott@swri.edu [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 812, SE-98128, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on National Aeronautics and Space Administration's New Horizons Pluto mission has collected solar wind observations en route from Earth to Pluto, and these observations continue beyond Pluto. Few missions have explored the solar wind in the outer heliosphere making this dataset a critical addition to the field. We created a forward model of SWAP count rates, which includes a comprehensive instrument response function based on laboratory and flight calibrations. By fitting the count rates with this model, the proton density (n), speed (V), and temperature (T) parameters are determined. Comparisons between SWAP parameters and both propagated 1 au observations and prior Voyager 2 observations indicate consistency in both the range and mean wind values. These comparisons as well as our additional findings confirm that small and midsized solar wind structures are worn down with increasing distance due to dynamic interaction of parcels of wind with different speed. For instance, the T–V relationship steepens, as the range in V is limited more than the range in T with distance. At times the T–V correlation clearly breaks down beyond 20 au, which may indicate wind currently expanding and cooling may have an elevated T reflecting prior heating and compression in the inner heliosphere. The power of wind parameters at shorter periodicities decreases with distance as the longer periodicities strengthen. The solar rotation periodicity is present in temperature beyond 20 au indicating the observed parcel temperature may reflect not only current heating or cooling, but also heating occurring closer to the Sun.

  16. What geometrical factors determine the in situ solar wind speed?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong

    2011-01-01

    At present it remains to address why the fast solar wind is fast and the slow wind is slow. Recently we have shown that the field line curvature may substantially influence the wind speed $v$, thereby offering an explanation for the Arge et al. finding that $v$ depends on more than just the flow tube expansion factor. Here we show by extensive numerical examples that the correlation between $v$ and field line curvature is valid for rather general base boundary conditions and for rather general heating functions. Furthermore, the effect of field line curvature is even more pronounced when the proton-alpha particle speed difference is examined. We suggest that any solar wind model has to take into account the field line shape for any quantitative analysis to be made.

  17. High-speed AC motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokinen, T.; Arkkio, A. [Helsinki University of Technology Laboratory of Electromechanics, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The paper deals with various types of highspeed electric motors, and their limiting powers. Standard machines with laminated rotors can be utilised if the speed is moderate. The solid rotor construction makes it possible to reach higher power and speed levels than those of laminated rotors. The development work on high-speed motors done at Helsinki University of Technology is presented, too. (orig.) 12 refs.

  18. Agua Caliente Wind/Solar Project at Whitewater Ranch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooks, Todd [Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, Palm Springs, CA (United States); Stewart, Royce [Red Mountain Energy Partners, Sante Fe, NM (United States)

    2014-12-16

    Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy (DOE) to study the feasibility of a wind and/or solar renewable energy project at the Whitewater Ranch (WWR) property of ACBCI. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was engaged to conduct the study. The ACBCI tribal lands in the Coachella Valley have very rich renewable energy resources. The tribe has undertaken several studies to more fully understand the options available to them if they were to move forward with one or more renewable energy projects. With respect to the resources, the WWR property clearly has excellent wind and solar resources. The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has continued to upgrade and refine their library of resource maps. The newer, more precise maps quantify the resources as among the best in the world. The wind and solar technology available for deployment is also being improved. Both are reducing their costs to the point of being at or below the costs of fossil fuels. Technologies for energy storage and microgrids are also improving quickly and present additional ways to increase the wind and/or solar energy retained for later use with the network management flexibility to provide power to the appropriate locations when needed. As a result, renewable resources continue to gain more market share. The transitioning to renewables as the major resources for power will take some time as the conversion is complex and can have negative impacts if not managed well. While the economics for wind and solar systems continue to improve, the robustness of the WWR site was validated by the repeated queries of developers to place wind and/or solar there. The robust resources and improving technologies portends toward WWR land as a renewable energy site. The business case, however, is not so clear, especially when the potential investment portfolio for ACBCI has several very beneficial and profitable alternatives.

  19. Laboratory Simulations of CME-Solar Wind Interactions Using a Coaxial Gun and Background Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, B. H.; Zhang, Y.; Fisher, D.; Gilmore, M.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and predicting solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is of critical importance for mitigating their disruptive behavior on ground- and space-based technologies. While predictive models of CME propagation and evolution have relied primarily on sparse in-situ data along with ground and satellite images for validation purposes, emerging laboratory efforts have shown that CME-like events can be created with parameters applicable to the solar regime that may likewise aid in predictive modeling. A modified version of the coaxial plasma gun from the Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) [A. G. Lynn, Y. Zhang, S. C. Hsu, H. Li, W. Liu, M. Gilmore, and C. Watts, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 52, 53 (2007)] will be used in conjunction with the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) basic plasma science device in order to observe the magnetic characteristics of CMEs as they propagate through the solar wind. The evolution of these interactions will be analyzed using a multi-tip Langmuir probe array, a 33-position B-dot probe array, and a high speed camera. The results of this investigation will be used alongside the University of Michigan's BATS-R-US 3-D MHD numerical code, which will be used to perform simulations of the coaxial plasma gun experiment. The results of these two approaches will be compared in order to validate the capabilities of the BATS-R-US code as well as to further our understanding of magnetic reconnection and other processes that take place as CMEs propagate through the solar wind. The details of the experimental setup as well as the analytical approach are discussed.

  20. Formation of Heliospheric Arcs of Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, A. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; Devore, C. R.; Wyper, P. F.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge in solar and heliospheric physics is understanding the origin and nature of the so-called slow solar wind. The Sun's atmosphere is divided into magnetically open regions, known as coronal holes, where the plasma streams out freely and fills the solar system, and closed regions, where the plasma is confined to coronal loops. The boundary between these regions extends outward as the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Measurements of plasma composition strongly imply that much of the slow wind consists of plasma from the closed corona that escapes onto open field lines, presumably by field-line opening or by interchange reconnection. Both of these processes are expected to release closed-field plasma into the solar wind within and immediately adjacent to the HCS. Mysteriously, however, slow wind with closed-field plasma composition is often observed in situ far from the HCS. We use high-resolution, three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations to calculate the dynamics of a coronal hole with a geometry that includes a narrow corridor flanked by closed field and is driven by supergranule-like flows at the coronal-hole boundary. These dynamics produce giant arcs of closed-field plasma that originate at the open-closed boundary in the corona, but extend far from the HCS and span tens of degrees in latitude and longitude at Earth. We conclude that such structures can account for the long-puzzling slow-wind observations.

  1. Modulation of Saturn's radio clock by solar wind speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarka, Philippe; Lamy, Laurent; Cecconi, Baptiste; Prangé, Renée; Rucker, Helmut O

    2007-11-08

    The internal rotation rates of the giant planets can be estimated by cloud motions, but such an approach is not very precise because absolute wind speeds are not known a priori and depend on latitude: periodicities in the radio emissions, thought to be tied to the internal planetary magnetic field, are used instead. Saturn, despite an apparently axisymmetric magnetic field, emits kilometre-wavelength (radio) photons from auroral sources. This emission is modulated at a period initially identified as 10 h 39 min 24 +/- 7 s, and this has been adopted as Saturn's rotation period. Subsequent observations, however, revealed that this period varies by +/-6 min on a timescale of several months to years. Here we report that the kilometric radiation period varies systematically by +/-1% with a characteristic timescale of 20-30 days. Here we show that these fluctuations are correlated with solar wind speed at Saturn, meaning that Saturn's radio clock is controlled, at least in part, by conditions external to the planet's magnetosphere. No correlation is found with the solar wind density, dynamic pressure or magnetic field; the solar wind speed therefore has a special function. We also show that the long-term fluctuations are simply an average of the short-term ones, and therefore the long-term variations are probably also driven by changes in the solar wind.

  2. Coherent structure and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the coherent structures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Previously established novel wavelet and higher order statistics are used in this work. We analyze the wavelet power spectrum of various solar wind plasma parameters. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. These results offer a new understanding of various processes in a turbulent regime. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field. Keywords: Wavelet Power Spectrum, Coherent structure and Solar wind plasma

  3. Source reliability in a combined wind-solar-hydro system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traca de Almeida, A.; Martins, A.; Jesus, H.; Climaco, J.

    1983-06-01

    The results of an examination of the feasibility of using coupled wind-solar-hydro power generation systems to provide all of Portugal's electricity by the year 2000 are reported. Portugal used 15.6 TWh of electricity in 1981, of which hydro supplied 10 TWh. Demand is expected to reach 34 TWh in 2000 AD. The full development of hydropower resource would furnish 18 TWh and a storage capacity of 4.5 TWh. The installed hydro system could meet the peak demand of 6 GW, while solar cells and wind turbines must produce 16 TWh annually plus a reserve. The Growian wind turbine, 100 m tall, is considered for its 2.2 MW output. A coastal strip of wind turbines 150 x 20 km, with 1 km spacing between the machines, would be needed to produce 5.4 GW of power. Partially tracking solar cell arrays generating 9.4 GW of electricity would require an area of 100 sq km. Computer simulations of the annual rainfall, combined with projections of the variations in wind-solar output, demonstrates that a reserve margin of 1.20 will be necessary. The costs of installation of the renewable energy converters are estimated at about three times that currently necessary for obtaining the same capacity from fission power plants, although the situation may change due to import and technical considerations.

  4. Magnetic Influences on the Solar Wind (Ph.D. Dissertation)

    CERN Document Server

    Woolsey, Lauren N

    2016-01-01

    The steady, supersonic outflow from the Sun we call the solar wind was first posited in the 1950s and initial theories rightly linked the acceleration of the wind to the existence of the million-degree solar corona. Still today, the wind acceleration mechanisms and the coronal heating processes remain unsolved challenges in solar physics. In this work, I seek to answer a portion of the mystery by focusing on a particular acceleration process: Alfven waves launched by the motion of magnetic field footpoints in the photosphere. The entire corona is threaded with magnetic loops and flux tubes that open up into the heliosphere. I have sought a better understanding of the role these magnetic fields play in determining solar wind properties in open flux tubes. After an introduction of relevant material, I discuss my parameter study of magnetic field profiles and the statistical understanding we can draw from the resulting steady-state wind. In the chapter following, I describe how I extended this work to consider t...

  5. Long-Term Trends In The Solar Wind Proton Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, Heather A; DeForest, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    We examine the long-term time evolution (1965-2015) of the relationships between solar wind proton temperature (Tp) and speed (Vp) and between the proton density (np) and speed using OMNI solar wind observations taken near Earth. We find a long-term decrease in the proton temperature-speed (Tp-Vp) slope that lasted from 1972 to 2010, but has been trending upward since 2010. Since the solar wind proton density-speed (np-Vp) relationship is not linear like the Tp-Vp relationship, we perform power law fits for np-Vp. The exponent (steepness in the np-Vp relationship) is correlated with the solar cycle. This exponent has a stronger correlation with current sheet tilt angle than with sunspot number because the sunspot number maxima vary considerably from cycle to cycle and the tilt angle maxima do not. To understand this finding, we examined the average np for different speed ranges, and found that for the slow wind np is highly correlated with the sunspot number with a lag of ~4 years. The fast wind np variation ...

  6. Wind and solar energy curtailment: A review of international experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori; Lew, Debra; Milligan, Michael; Carlini, E. Maria; Estanqueiro, Ana; Flynn, Damian; Gomez-Lazaro, Emilio; Holttinen, Hannele; Menemenlis, Nickie; Orths, Antje; Eriksen, Peter Børre; Smith, J. Charles; Soder, Lennart; Sorensen, Poul; Altiparmakis, Argyrios; Yasuda, Yoh; Miller, John

    2016-11-01

    Greater penetrations of variable renewable generation on some electric grids have resulted in increased levels of curtailment in recent years. Studies of renewable energy grid integration have found that curtailment levels may grow as the penetration of wind and solar energy generation increases. This paper reviews international experience with curtailment of wind and solar energy on bulk power systems in recent years, with a focus on eleven countries in Europe, North America, and Asia. It examines levels of curtailment, the causes of curtailment, curtailment methods and use of market-based dispatch, as well as operational, institutional, and other changes that are being made to reduce renewable energy curtailment.

  7. Flank solar wind interaction. Annual report, June 1991-July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, S.L.; Greenstadt, E.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of the first 12 months of our program to study the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind on the far flanks of the bow shock. This study employs data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft during its traversals of the Earth's magnetotail and correlative data from spacecraft monitoring the solar wind upstream. Our main effort to date has involved assembling data sets and developing new plotting programs. Two talks were given at the Spring Meeting of the American Geophysical Union describing our initial results from analyzing data from the far flank foreshock and magnetosheath. The following sections summarize our results.

  8. Solar Wind Electric Fields in the Ion Cyclotron Frequency Range

    CERN Document Server

    Kellogg, P J; Mozer, F S; Horbury, T S; Reme, H

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of fluctuations of electric fields in the frequency range from a fraction of one Hz to 12.5 Hz are presented, and corrected for the Lorentz transformation of magnetic fluctuations to give the electric fields in the plasma frame. The electric fields are large enough to provide the dominant force on the ions of the solar wind in the region near the ion cyclotron frequency of protons, larger than the force due to magnetic fluctuations. They provide sufficient velocity space diffusion or heating to counteract conservation of magnetic moment in the expanding solar wind to maintain nearly isotropic velocity distributions.

  9. Modified temperature-anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickeiser, R; Michno, M J; Ibscher, D; Lazar, M; Skoda, T

    2011-11-11

    The proton and electron temperature anisotropies in the solar wind are constrained by the instability thresholds for temperature-anisotropy-driven kinetic plasma instabilities. The modifications to the marginal instability conditions from accounting for the influence of damping connected with the collisional effects in the solar wind plasma are calculated for right- and left-handed polarized parallel propagating Alfvén waves and mirror and firehose fluctuations. These modifications provide tighter threshold constraints compared to the marginal thresholds but do not fully explain the observations at small values of the parallel plasma beta.

  10. Ion kinetic scale in the solar wind observed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdeněk; Přech, Lubomír; Zastenker, Georgy N

    2013-01-11

    This Letter shows the first results from the solar wind monitor onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft which measures plasma moments with a time resolution of 31 ms. This high-time resolution allows us to make direct observations of solar wind turbulence below ion kinetic length scales. We present examples of the frequency spectra of the density, velocity, and thermal velocity. Our study reveals that although these parameters exhibit the same behavior at the magnetohydrodynamic scale, their spectra are remarkably different at the kinetic scale.

  11. Distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples depends on implantation energy, fluence, diffusion, radiation damage and erosion. It is known that at least the lighter rare gases are fractionated after implantation, but the redistribution processes, which mainly drive the losses, are not well understood. Some information about this one can get by looking at the concentration profiles of solar wind implanted He-4 measured by the Gas Ion Probe in single lunar grains. The observed profiles were divided in three groups. These groups are illustrated and briefly discussed.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Magnetized Winds of Solar-Like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vidotto, A A; Jatenco-Pereira, V; Gombosi, T I

    2009-01-01

    We investigate magnetized solar-like stellar winds by means of self-consistent three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) numerical simulations. We analyze winds with different magnetic field intensities and densities as to explore the dependence on the plasma-beta parameter. By solving the fully ideal 3D MHD equations, we show that the plasma-beta parameter is the crucial parameter in the configuration of the steady-state wind. Therefore, there is a group of magnetized flows that would present the same terminal velocity despite of its thermal and magnetic energy densities, as long as the plasma-beta parameter is the same.

  13. Reconstructing the Solar Wind From Its Early History To Current Epoch

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, Vladimir S

    2016-01-01

    Stellar winds from active solar type stars can play a crucial role in removal of stellar angular momentum and erosion of planetary atmospheres. However, major wind properties except for mass loss rates cannot be directly derived from observations. We employed a three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic Alfven wave driven solar wind model, ALF3D, to reconstruct the solar wind parameters including the mass loss rate, terminal velocity and wind temperature at 0.7, 2 and 4.65 Gyr. Our model treats the wind thermal electrons, protons and pickup protons as separate fluids and incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating to properly describe proton and electron temperatures of the solar wind. To study the evolution of the solar wind, we specified three input model parameters, the plasma density, Alfven wave amplitude and the strength of the dipole magnetic field at the wind base for each of three solar wind evolution models that are consistent with observational constra...

  14. GPP Webinar: Market Outlook and Innovations in Wind and Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Power Partnership webinar reviewing the state of the renewable energy industry as a whole, with a focus on wind and solar power and exploring recent marketplace innovations in wind and solar power and renewable energy purchases.

  15. Power generation from wind turbines in a solar chimney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foote, Tudor [Graduate Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States); Agarwal, Ramesh K. [William Palm Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that shrouded wind turbines can generate greater power compared to bare turbines. A solar chimney generates an upward draft of wind inside a tower and a shroud around the wind turbine. There are numerous empty silos on farms in the U.S. that can be converted to solar chimneys with minor modifications at modest cost. The objective of this study is to determine the potential of these silos/chimneys for generating wind power. The study is conducted through analytical/computational approach by employing the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. Computations are performed for five different geometric configurations consisting of a turbine, a cylindrical silo, and/or a venturi and/or a diffuser using the dimensions of typical silos and assuming Class 3 wind velocity. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation and a two equation realizable {kappa}-{epsilon} model are employed in the calculations, and the turbine is modeled as an actuator disk. The power coefficient (Cp) and generated power are calculated for the five cases. Consistent with recent literature, it was found that the silos with diffusers increase the Cp beyond Betz’s limit significantly and thus the generated power. It should be noted that Cp is calculated by normalizing it by the turbine area swept by the wind. This study shows the potential of using abandoned silos in the mid-west and other parts of the country for localized wind power generation.

  16. Power generation from wind turbines in a solar chimney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Foote, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that shrouded wind turbines can generate greater power compared to bare turbines. A solar chimney generates an upward draft of wind inside a tower and a shroud around the wind turbine. There are numerous empty silos on farms in the U.S. that can be converted to solar chimneys with minor modifications at modest cost. The objective of this study is to determine the potential of these silos/chimneys for generating wind power. The study is conducted through analytical/computational approach by employing the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Computations are performed for five different geometric configurations consisting of a turbine, a cylindrical silo, and/or a venturi and/or a diffuser using the dimensions of typical silos and assuming Class 3 wind velocity. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation and a two equation realizable k – ε model are employed in the calculations, and the turbine is modeled as an actuator disk. The power coefficient (Cp and generated power are calculated for the five cases. Consistent with recent literature, it was found that the silos with diffusers increase the Cp beyond Betz’s limit significantly and thus the generated power. It should be noted that Cp is calculated by normalizing it by the turbine area swept by the wind. This study shows the potential of using abandoned silos in the mid-west and other parts of the country for localized wind power generation.

  17. Distribution Strategies for Solar and Wind Renewables in NW Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Andrew; Webb, Ann

    2017-04-01

    Whilst the UNFCCC Paris Agreement Climate change was ratified in November, 2016 saw the highest global temperature anomaly on record at 1.2°C above pre-industrial levels. As such there is urgent need to reduce CO2 emissions by a move away from fossil fuels and towards renewable electricity energy technologies. As the principal renewable technologies of solar PV and wind turbines contribute an increasing fraction to the electricity grid, questions of cumulative intermittency and the large-scale geographic distribution of each technology need to be addressed. In this study our initial emphasis is on a calculation of a relatively high spatial resolution (0.1° × 0.1°) daily gridded dataset of solar irradiance data, over a 10 year period (2006-2015). This is achieved by coupling established sources of satellite data (MODIS SSF level2 instantaneous footprint data) to a well-validated radiative transfer model, here LibRadTran. We utilise both a morning and afternoon field for two cloud layers (optical depth and cloud fraction) interpolated to hourly grids, together with aerosol optical depth, topographic height and solar zenith angle. These input parameters are passed to a 5-D LUT of LibRadTran results to construct hourly estimates of the solar irradiance field, which is then integrated to a daily total. For the daily wind resource we rely on the 6 hourly height-adjusted ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis wind fields, but separated into onshore, offshore and deep water components. From these datasets of the solar and wind resources we construct 22 different distribution strategies for solar PV and wind turbines based on the long-term availability of each resource. Combining these distributions with the original daily gridded datasets enables each distribution strategy to be then assessed in terms of the day-to-day variability, the installed capacity required to maintain a baseline supply, and the relative proportions of each technology. Notably for the NW European area

  18. Wind effects in solar fields with various collector designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, Joachim; Cochard, Steve; Fletcher, David F.; Vassallo, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Parabolic trough power plants are often located in areas that are subjected to high wind speeds, as an open terrain without any obstructions is beneficial for the plant performance. The wind impacts both the structural requirements and the performance of the plant. The aerodynamic loads from the wind impose strong requirements on the support structure of the reflectors, and they also impact the tracking accuracy. On a thermal level the airflow around the glass envelope of the receiver tube cools its outer surface through forced convection, thereby contributing to the heat loss. Based on previous studies at the level of an individual row of collectors, this study analyses the wind effects in a full-scale solar field of different continuous and staggered trough designs. The airflow around several rows of parabolic trough collectors (PTC) is simulated at full scale in steady state simulations in an atmospheric boundary layer flow using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software ANSYSO® CFX 15.0. The effect of the wake of a collector row on the following collectors is analysed, and the aerodynamic loads are compared between the different geometries. The outermost collectors of a solar field experience the highest wind forces, as the rows in the interior of the solar field are protected from high wind speeds. While the aerodynamic forces in the interior of the solar field are almost independent of the collector shape, the deeper troughs (with large rim angles) tested in this study show a lower heat loss due to forced convection on the outer surface of the receiver tube than the shallower ones (with small rim angles) in most of the solar field.

  19. A Model fot the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Mikic, Z.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind also has large angular width, up to approx.60deg, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far from the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spatial resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind, and magnetic field for a time period preceding the 2008 August 1 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results imply that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (which we term an S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere and propose further tests of the model. Key words: solar wind - Sun: corona - Sun: magnetic topology

  20. Weak and strong comets in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Geraint Hughes

    When within the inner solar system, comets possess gaseous atmospheres. The gases therein are ionized, and eventually join the solar wind. This thesis describes an investigation of the interaction of comets with the solar wind. The work begins with an overview of the processes involved in the comet-solar wind interaction region, and the domains and boundaries that exist in the region. A review of remote observations of cometary ions is given. The characteristics of visible plasma features are summarized, together with the theories proposed to explain them. An overview of the Giotto spacecraft and its instruments, and a description of its mission to two comets are presented. Ground-based observations were obtained of the ion features present in Comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The morphologies and motions of the comet's plasma features are described. The formation of tail rays was captured during a high temporal resolution image sequence. A gas production rate estimate is derived from the observations, and a model of ray morphologies is proposed, based partly upon observational evidence. 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova and C/1996 Q1 Tabur were also observed; however, no strong ion features were detected. An analysis of the plasma features of 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup then follows. A description of the solar wind conditions at that comet during the Giotto encounter is given, and an estimate of its production rate is made. Ground-based observations of Grigg-Skjellerup are compared to in-situ Giotto data. Morphological features were detected in ground-based images; it is proposed that they could have been linked to certain solar wind discontinuities. A qualitative description of a model of ion ray formation then follows. The thesis concludes with a summary of the main results.

  1. Investigation on the interference correction of flying wing aircraft rear sting support in high speed wind tunnel test%飞翼布局高速风洞尾支干扰试验修正技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    衣秉立; 曾凯; 王世红

    2016-01-01

    For the test of a flat-after-body flying wing aircraft model in high speed wind tun-nel,the after-body has to be modified to satisfied the attachment of the balance.The deformation and the means of tail support may have some effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of the air-craft,and further affect the cruising efficiency,the trimming angle and the location of the aero-dynamic center.On the other hand,there are no commonly used horizontal tail and vertical tail for a flying wing aircraft in order to reduce RCS,the interference of distorted after-body can not to be neglected compares to weak lateral controllability.With the help of CFD and test tech-nique,the distorted after-body support interference has been obtained,in which rear sting is the main support and ventral strut an auxiliary one.The research indicates that the result of the wind tunnel test is accurate and reliable,the correction method can be adopted for the similar configu-ration model test.The methods of both numerical simulation and wind tunnel tests have been used to correct tail support interference of a flying wing model successfully.%飞翼布局飞行器模型往往具有尾部扁平的结构特点,进行高速风洞尾支测力时,尾部需要局部放大,由此带来尾部畸变和尾支杆的气动干扰,直接影响对巡航效率、焦点位置以及配平迎角的预测;另外,飞翼布局飞机为改善隐身特性,取消了平尾和垂尾,侧力和偏航力矩量级比较小,模型尾部的局部变形必然会对飞机横、航向试验数据带来不利影响。本文针对某飞翼布局模型,采用风洞试验和 CFD 数值模拟相结合的手段,通过腹支撑作为辅助支撑的“两步法”获得了尾部畸变及尾支杆的纵、横向支撑干扰影响。研究结果表明:该飞翼布局模型尾部畸变支撑纵、横向支撑干扰修正结果合理、可靠,精准度较高;所建立的试验与 CFD 相结合的研究方法可以用于

  2. High-Speed TCP Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David E.; Gassman, Holly; Beering, Dave R.; Welch, Arun; Hoder, Douglas J.; Ivancic, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is the underlying protocol used within the Internet for reliable information transfer. As such, there is great interest to have all implementations of TCP efficiently interoperate. This is particularly important for links exhibiting long bandwidth-delay products. The tools exist to perform TCP analysis at low rates and low delays. However, for extremely high-rate and lone-delay links such as 622 Mbps over geosynchronous satellites, new tools and testing techniques are required. This paper describes the tools and techniques used to analyze and debug various TCP implementations over high-speed, long-delay links.

  3. Flexible high-speed CODEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segallis, Greg P.; Wernlund, Jim V.; Corry, Glen

    1993-08-01

    This report is prepared by Harris Government Communication Systems Division for NASA Lewis Research Center under contract NAS3-25087. It is written in accordance with SOW section 4.0 (d) as detailed in section 2.6. The purpose of this document is to provide a summary of the program, performance results and analysis, and a technical assessment. The purpose of this program was to develop a flexible, high-speed CODEC that provides substantial coding gain while maintaining bandwidth efficiency for use in both continuous and bursted data environments for a variety of applications.

  4. Solar and solar-wind composition results from the genesis mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Roger C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Burnett, D. S. [Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA (United States); Hohenberg, C. M. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Meshik, A. [Isotope Geology, Zurich (Switzerland); Heber, V. [Isotope Geology, Zurich (Switzerland); Grimberg, A. [Isotope Geology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wieler, R. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States); Reisenfeld, D. B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2007-02-20

    The Genesis mission returned samples of solar wind to Earth in September, 2004 for ground-based analyses of solar-wind composition, particularly for isotope ratios. Substrates, consisting mostly of high-purity semiconductor materials, were exposed to the solar wind at L1 from December 2001 to April 2004. In addition to a bulk sample of the solar wind, separate samples of coronal hole, interstream, and coronal mass ejection material were obtained. While many of the substrates were broken upon landing due to the failure to deploy the parachute, a number of results have been obtained, and most of the primary science objectives will likely be met. These include noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) isotope ratios in the bulk solar wind and in different solarwind regimes, and the nitrogen and oxygen isotope ( 18O/17O/16O) ratios to high precision. The greatest successes to date have been with the noble gases. Light noble gases from bulk solar wind and separate solar-wind regime samples have been analyzed to date. The regime compositions are so far ambiguous on the occurrence of the type of isotopic fractionation expected from Coulomb drag acceleration. Neon results from closed system stepped etching of bulk metallic glass have revealed the nature of isotopic fractionation as a function of depth, which in lunar samples have for years deceptively suggested the presence of a separate solar component. Isotope ratios of the heavy noble gases, nitrogen, and oxygen are still in the process of being measured.

  5. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Titov, V.; Linker, J.

    2010-05-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates at the open-closed field boundary layer, but it also has large angular width, up to 40 degrees. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We calculate with high numerical resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind and magnetic field for a Carrington rotation centered about the August 1, 2008 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results demonstrate that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere, and propose further tests of the model. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA HTP, TR&T and SR&T programs.

  6. Study on Pyroelectric Harvesters Integrating Solar Radiation with Wind Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ching Hsiao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric harvesters use temperature fluctuations to generate electrical outputs. Solar radiation and waste heat are rich energy sources that can be harvested. Pyroelectric energy converters offer a novel and direct energy-conversion technology by transforming time-dependent temperatures directly into electricity. Moreover, the great challenge for pyroelectric energy harvesting lies in finding promising temperature variations or an alternating thermal loading in real situations. Hence, in this article, a novel pyroelectric harvester integrating solar radiation with wind power by the pyroelectric effect is proposed. Solar radiation is a thermal source, and wind is a dynamic potential. A disk generator is used for harvesting wind power. A mechanism is considered to convert the rotary energy of the disk generator to drive a shutter for generating temperature variations in pyroelectric cells using a planetary gear system. The optimal period of the pyroelectric cells is 35 s to harvest the stored energy, about 70 μJ, while the rotary velocity of the disk generator is about 31 RPM and the wind speed is about 1 m/s. In this state, the stored energy acquired from the pyroelectric harvester is about 75% more than that from the disk generator. Although the generated energy of the proposed pyroelectric harvester is less than that of the disk generator, the pyroelectric harvester plays a complementary role when the disk generator is inactive in situations of low wind speed.

  7. Comparison of algorithms for determination of solar wind regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Marcia; Reisenfeld, Daniel; Richardson, Ian G.

    2016-09-01

    This study compares the designation of different solar wind flow regimes (transient, coronal hole, and streamer belt) according to two algorithms derived from observations by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer, the Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor, and the Magnetometer on the ACE spacecraft, with a similar regime determination performed on board the Genesis spacecraft. The comparison is made for the interval from late 2001 to early 2004 when Genesis was collecting solar wind ions for return to Earth. The agreement between hourly regime assignments from any pair of algorithms was less than two thirds, while the simultaneous agreement between all three algorithms was only 49%. When the results of the algorithms were compared to a catalog of interplanetary coronal mass ejection events, it was found that almost all the events in the catalog were confirmed by the spacecraft algorithms. On the other hand, many short transient events, lasting 1 to 13 h, that were unanimously selected as transient like by the algorithms, were not included in the catalog.

  8. The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere and Heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    The solar wind environment has a large influence on the transport of cosmic rays. This chapter discusses the observations of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field in the outer heliosphere and the heliosheath. In the supersonic solar wind, interaction regions with large magnetic fields form barriers to cosmic ray transport. This effect, the "CR-B" relationship, has been quantified and is shown to be valid everywhere inside the termination shock (TS). In the heliosheath, this relationship breaks down, perhaps because of a change in the nature of the turbulence. Turbulence is compressive in the heliosheath, whereas it was non-compressive in the solar wind. The plasma pressure in the outer heliosphere is dominated by the pickup ions which gain most of the flow energy at the TS. The heliosheath plasma and magnetic field are highly variable on scales as small as ten minutes. The plasma flow turns away from the nose roughly as predicted, but the radial speeds at Voyager 1 are much less than those at Voyager 2, which is not understood. Despite predictions to the contrary, magnetic reconnection is not an important process in the inner heliosheath with only one observed occurrence to date.

  9. Simulation of turbulent magnetic reconnection in the smallscale solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏奉思; 胡强; R.Schwen; 冯学尚

    2000-01-01

    Some observational examples for the possible occurrence of the turbulent magnetic reconnection in the solar wind are found by analysing Helios spacecraft’s high resolution data. The phenom-ena of turbulent magnetic reconnections in small scale solar wind are simulated by introducing a third order accuracy upwind compact difference scheme to the compressible two-dimensional MHD flow. Numerical results verify that the turbulent magnetic reconnection process could occur in small scale in-terplanetary solar wind, which is a basic feature characterizing the magnetic reconnection in high-mag-netie Peynolds number ( RM = 2 000-10 000) solar wind. The configurations of the magnetic reconnection could evolve from a single X-line to a multiple X-line reconnection, exhibiting a complex picture of the formation, merging and evolution of magnetic islands, and finally the magnetic reconnection would evolve into a low-energy state. Its life-span of evolution is about one hour order of magnitude. Various magnetic and f

  10. Source of electrostatic fluctuations in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemons, D.S.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Peter Gray, S.; Gosling, J.T.

    1979-05-01

    Solar wind electron and ion distribution functions measured simultaneously with or close to times of intense electrostatic fluctuations are subjected to a linear Vlasov stability analysis. Although all distributions tested were found to be stable, the analysis suggests that the ion beam instability is the most likely source of the fluctuations.

  11. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Executive Summary, May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwko, R.; Clark, K.; Freeman, L.; Jordan, G.; Miller, N.

    2010-05-01

    This Study investigates the operational impact of up to 35% energy penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PVs), and concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group of utilities in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming.

  12. Air emissions due to wind and solar power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenstein, Warren; Apt, Jay

    2009-01-15

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) encourage large-scale deployment of wind and solar electric power. Their power output varies rapidly, even when several sites are added together. In many locations, natural gas generators are the lowest cost resource available to compensate for this variability, and must ramp up and down quickly to keep the grid stable, affecting their emissions of NOx and CO2. We model a wind or solar photovoltaic plus gas system using measured 1-min time-resolved emissions and heat rate data from two types of natural gas generators, and power data from four wind plants and one solar plant. Over a wide range of renewable penetration, we find CO2 emissions achieve approximately 80% of the emissions reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions. Using steam injection, gas generators achieve only 30-50% of expected NOx emissions reductions, and with dry control NOx emissions increase substantially. We quantify the interaction between state RPSs and NOx constraints, finding that states with substantial RPSs could see significant upward pressure on NOx permit prices, if the gas turbines we modeled are representative of the plants used to mitigate wind and solar power variability.

  13. Solar Wind Simulations Based on Ooty IPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, S. C.; Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2014-12-01

    The solar wind is a constantly-flowing stream of charged particles that expands from the sun's outer atmosphere into interplanetary space. This plasma carries the sun's magnetic field along with it, where it interacts with and causes disruptions in the earth's magnetic field. Our understanding of the solar wind is vital to efforts toward minimizing the impact of these disturbances on both ground and space-based systems. Using interplanetary scintillation data gathered by the ground-based Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) in India, we have constructed boundary maps of solar wind velocities at 1 day intervals. For a simple, first approximation, we use what is called the "P-point" method to crudely estimate the solar wind velocity at the point of closest approach to the Sun along each line of sight. Then we trace the P-point values back to a spherical surface at 0.2 AU where we interpolate them to a structured gird. The resulting boundary maps can serve as the initial input to a time-dependent MHD tomography program being developed at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

  14. Tsallis non-extensive statistics and solar wind plasma complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, G. P.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Zastenker, G. N.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Karakatsanis, L. P.; Riazantseva, M. O.; Xenakis, M. N.; Pavlos, E. G.

    2015-03-01

    This article presents novel results revealing non-equilibrium phase transition processes in the solar wind plasma during a strong shock event, which took place on 26th September 2011. Solar wind plasma is a typical case of stochastic spatiotemporal distribution of physical state variables such as force fields (B → , E →) and matter fields (particle and current densities or bulk plasma distributions). This study shows clearly the non-extensive and non-Gaussian character of the solar wind plasma and the existence of multi-scale strong correlations from the microscopic to the macroscopic level. It also underlines the inefficiency of classical magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) or plasma statistical theories, based on the classical central limit theorem (CLT), to explain the complexity of the solar wind dynamics, since these theories include smooth and differentiable spatial-temporal functions (MHD theory) or Gaussian statistics (Boltzmann-Maxwell statistical mechanics). On the contrary, the results of this study indicate the presence of non-Gaussian non-extensive statistics with heavy tails probability distribution functions, which are related to the q-extension of CLT. Finally, the results of this study can be understood in the framework of modern theoretical concepts such as non-extensive statistical mechanics (Tsallis, 2009), fractal topology (Zelenyi and Milovanov, 2004), turbulence theory (Frisch, 1996), strange dynamics (Zaslavsky, 2002), percolation theory (Milovanov, 1997), anomalous diffusion theory and anomalous transport theory (Milovanov, 2001), fractional dynamics (Tarasov, 2013) and non-equilibrium phase transition theory (Chang, 1992).

  15. A Review of Hybrid Solar PV and Wind Energy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Al Badwawi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that solar and wind power is intermittent and unpredictable in nature, higher penetration of their types in existing power system could cause and create high technical challenges especially to weak grids or stand-alone systems without proper and enough storage capacity. By integrating the two renewable resources into an optimum combination, the impact of the variable nature of solar and wind resources can be partially resolved and the overall system becomes more reliable and economical to run. This paper provides a review of challenges and opportunities / solutions of hybrid solar PV and wind energy integration systems. Voltage and frequency fluctuation, and harmonics are major power quality issues for both grid-connected and stand-alone systems with bigger impact in case of weak grid. This can be resolved to a large extent by having proper design, advanced fast response control facilities, and good optimization of the hybrid systems. The paper gives a review of the main research work reported in the literature with regard to optimal sizing design, power electronics topologies and control. The paper presents a review of the state of the art of both grid-connected and stand-alone hybrid solar and wind systems.

  16. Livestock water pumping with wind and solar power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent developments in pumping technologies have allowed for efficient use of renewable energies like wind and solar to power new pumps for remote water pumping. A helical type, positive displacement pump was developed a few years ago and recently modified to accept input from a variable power sourc...

  17. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-05-01

    This Study investigates the operational impact of up to 35% energy penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PVs), and concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group of utilities in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming.

  18. Magnetosheath control of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Dimmock, A. P.; Lakka, A.; Osmane, A.; Kilpua, E.; Myllys, M.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Viljanen, A.

    2016-09-01

    We examine the role of the magnetosheath in solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms plasma and magnetic field observations in the magnetosheath together with OMNI solar wind data and auroral electrojet recordings from the International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects (IMAGE) magnetometer chain. We demonstrate that the electric field and Poynting flux reaching the magnetopause are not linear functions of the electric field and Poynting flux observed in the solar wind: the electric field and Poynting flux at the magnetopause during higher driving conditions are lower than those predicted from a linear function. We also show that the Poynting flux normal to the magnetopause is linearly correlated with the directly driven part of the auroral electrojets in the ionosphere. This indicates that the energy entering the magnetosphere in the form of the Poynting flux is directly responsible for driving the electrojets. Furthermore, we argue that the polar cap potential saturation discussed in the literature is associated with the way solar wind plasma gets processed during the bow shock crossing and motion within the magnetosheath.

  19. Ion‐driven instabilities in the solar wind: Wind observations of 19 March 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Lan K.; Broiles, Thomas W.; Stevens, Michael L.; Podesta, John J.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intervals of enhanced magnetic fluctuations have been frequently observed in the solar wind. But it remains an open question as to whether these waves are generated at the Sun and then transported outward by the solar wind or generated locally in the interplanetary medium. Magnetic field and plasma measurements from the Wind spacecraft under slow solar wind conditions on 19 March 2005 demonstrate seven events of enhanced magnetic fluctuations at spacecraft‐frame frequencies somewhat above the proton cyclotron frequency and propagation approximately parallel or antiparallel to the background magnetic field B o. The proton velocity distributions during these events are characterized by two components: a more dense, slower core and a less dense, faster beam. Observed plasma parameters are used in a kinetic linear dispersion equation analysis for electromagnetic fluctuations at k x B o = 0; for two events the most unstable mode is the Alfvén‐cyclotron instability driven by a proton component temperature anisotropy T⊥/T|| > 1 (where the subscripts denote directions relative to B o), and for three events the most unstable mode is the right‐hand polarized magnetosonic instability driven primarily by ion component relative flows. Thus, both types of ion anisotropies and both types of instabilities are likely to be local sources of these enhanced fluctuation events in the solar wind.

  20. Solar wind induced magnetic field around the unmagnetized Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Birk, G T; Konz, C

    2004-01-01

    The Earth is a planet with a dipolar magnetic field which is agitated by a magnetized plasma wind streaming from the Sun. The magnetic field shields the Earth's surface from penetrating high energy solar wind particles, as well as interstellar cosmic rays. The magnetic dipole has reversed sign some hundreds of times over the last 400 million years. These polarity reversals correspond to drastic breakdowns of the dynamo action. The question arises what the consequences for the Earth's atmosphere, climate, and, in particular, biosphere are. It is shown by kinematic estimates and three-dimensional plasma-neutral gas simulations that the solar wind can induce very fast a magnetic field in the previously completely unmagnetized Earth's ionosphere that is strong enough to protect Earth from cosmic radiations comparable to the case of an intact magnetic dynamo.

  1. Large Scale Wind and Solar Integration in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Bernhard; Schreirer, Uwe; Berster, Frank; Pease, John; Scholz, Cristian; Erbring, Hans-Peter; Schlunke, Stephan; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2010-02-28

    This report provides key information concerning the German experience with integrating of 25 gigawatts of wind and 7 gigawatts of solar power capacity and mitigating its impacts on the electric power system. The report has been prepared based on information provided by the Amprion GmbH and 50Hertz Transmission GmbH managers and engineers to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory representatives during their visit to Germany in October 2009. The trip and this report have been sponsored by the BPA Technology Innovation office. Learning from the German experience could help the Bonneville Power Administration engineers to compare and evaluate potential new solutions for managing higher penetrations of wind energy resources in their control area. A broader dissemination of this experience will benefit wind and solar resource integration efforts in the United States.

  2. Influence of upstream solar wind on thermospheric flows at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, J N; Guio, P

    2010-01-01

    The coupling of Jupiter's magnetosphere and ionosphere plays a vital role in creating its auroral emissions. The strength of these emissions is dependent on the difference in speed of the rotational flows within Jupiter's high-latitude thermosphere and the planet's magnetodisc. Using an azimuthally symmetric global circulation model, we have simulated how upstream solar wind conditions affect the energy and direction of atmospheric flows. In order to simulate the effect of a varying dynamic pressure in the upstream solar wind, we calculated three magnetic field profiles representing compressed, averaged and expanded `middle' magnetospheres. These profiles were then used to solve for the angular velocity of plasma in the magnetosphere. This angular velocity determines the strength of currents flowing between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. We examine the influence of variability in this current system upon the global winds and energy inputs within the Jovian thermosphere. We find that the power dissipated by...

  3. Magnetic Reconnection and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, K T; Gosling, J T; Greco, A; Servidio, S; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Phan, T D

    2014-01-01

    A statistical relationship between magnetic reconnection, current sheets and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind is reported for the first time using in-situ measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We identify intermittency as non-Gaussian fluctuations in increments of the magnetic field vector, $\\mathbf{B}$, that are spatially and temporally non-uniform. The reconnection events and current sheets are found to be concentrated in intervals of intermittent turbulence, identified using the partial variance of increments method: within the most non-Gaussian 1% of fluctuations in $\\mathbf{B}$, we find 87%-92% of reconnection exhausts and $\\sim$9% of current sheets. Also, the likelihood that an identified current sheet will also correspond to a reconnection exhaust increases dramatically as the least intermittent fluctuations are removed from the dataset. Hence, the turbulent solar wind contains a hierarchy of intermittent magnetic field structures that are increasingly linked to current sheets, which ...

  4. Large Scale Wind and Solar Integration in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Bernhard; Schreirer, Uwe; Berster, Frank; Pease, John; Scholz, Cristian; Erbring, Hans-Peter; Schlunke, Stephan; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2010-02-28

    This report provides key information concerning the German experience with integrating of 25 gigawatts of wind and 7 gigawatts of solar power capacity and mitigating its impacts on the electric power system. The report has been prepared based on information provided by the Amprion GmbH and 50Hertz Transmission GmbH managers and engineers to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory representatives during their visit to Germany in October 2009. The trip and this report have been sponsored by the BPA Technology Innovation office. Learning from the German experience could help the Bonneville Power Administration engineers to compare and evaluate potential new solutions for managing higher penetrations of wind energy resources in their control area. A broader dissemination of this experience will benefit wind and solar resource integration efforts in the United States.

  5. Solar wind turbulence at 0.72 AU and solar minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Munteanu, Costel; Zhang, Tielong; Bruno, Roberto; Kovacs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We investigate Venus Express (VEX) observations of magnetic field fluctuations performed systematically in the solar wind at 0.72 Astronomical Units (AU), between 2007 and 2009, during the deep minimum of the solar cycle 24. The Power Spectral Densities (PSD) of the magnetic field components have been computed for the time intervals that satisfy data integrity criteria and have been grouped according to the type of wind, fast and slow defined for speeds larger and respectively smaller than 450 km/s. The PSDs show higher levels of power for the fast than for the slow wind. The spectral slopes estimated for all PSDs in the frequency range 0.005-0.1 Hz exhibit a normal distribution. The average value of the trace of the spectral matrix is -1.60 for fast solar wind and -1.65 for slow wind. Compared to the corresponding average slopes at 1 AU, the PSDs are shallower at 0.72 AU for slow wind conditions suggesting a steepening of the solar wind spectra between Venus and Earth. No significant time variation trend is ...

  6. Geomagnetic response to IMF and solar wind over different latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, A. M.; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Waheed, Malik Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a study on the response of geomagnetic field characteristics to the solar wind variation during three solar cycles (SC 21, SC 22, SC 23) have been conducted in a long term scale. The difference in the response of two different latitudinal characteristic indices has been investigated. For the purpose we have considered the high latitude index AE and the mid-latitude aa index and both gives the knowledge about the perturbations in the geomagnetic field conditions. Eventually we can infer the idea about the ionospheric current system changes in response to the solar wind conditions. The variation found in the AE and aa indices have been found to follow a 11 year cycle as similar to the sunspot variation. Also the correlation between the annual means of the solar wind parameters velocity V, magnetic filed B and the composite parameters BV and BV ^{2 } have been calculated . A difference was found between the correlations obtained for the AE and aa indices. We could also see that the difference in correlation follows a cyclic pattern i.e. the large difference is found during the solar maxima while a small difference is observed during the minima.

  7. Sustainable business models for wind and solar energy in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichifor Maria Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy has become a crucial element for the business environment as the need for new energy resources and the degree of climate change are increasing. As developed economies strive towards greater progress, sustainable business models are of the essence in order to maintain a balance between the triple bottom line: people, planet and profit. In recent years, European Union countries have installed important capacities of renewable energy, especially wind and solar energy to achieve this purpose. The objective of this article is to make a comparative study between the current sustainable business models implemented in companies that are active in the wind and solar energy sector in Romania. Both sectors underwent tremendous changes in the last two years due to changing support schemes which have had a significant influence on the mechanism of the renewable energy market, as well as on its development. Using the classical Delphi method, based on questionnaires and interviews with experts in the fields of wind and solar energy, this paper offers an overview of the sustainable business models of wind and solar energy companies, both sectors opting for the alternative of selling electricity to trading companies as a main source of revenue until 2013 and as the main future trend until 2020. Furthermore, the participating wind energy companies noted a pessimistic outlook of future investments due to legal instability that made them to reduce their projects in comparison to PV investments, which are expected to continue. The subject of the article is of interest to scientific literature because sustainable business models in wind and photovoltaic energy have been scarcely researched in previous articles and are essential in understanding the activity of the companies in these two fields of renewable energy.

  8. Solar origins of solar wind properties during the cycle 23 solar minimum and rising phase of cycle 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Janet G; Petrie, Gordon; Riley, Pete

    2013-05-01

    The solar wind was originally envisioned using a simple dipolar corona/polar coronal hole sources picture, but modern observations and models, together with the recent unusual solar cycle minimum, have demonstrated the limitations of this picture. The solar surface fields in both polar and low-to-mid-latitude active region zones routinely produce coronal magnetic fields and related solar wind sources much more complex than a dipole. This makes low-to-mid latitude coronal holes and their associated streamer boundaries major contributors to what is observed in the ecliptic and affects the Earth. In this paper we use magnetogram-based coronal field models to describe the conditions that prevailed in the corona from the decline of cycle 23 into the rising phase of cycle 24. The results emphasize the need for adopting new views of what is 'typical' solar wind, even when the Sun is relatively inactive.

  9. Solar origins of solar wind properties during the cycle 23 solar minimum and rising phase of cycle 24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet G. Luhmann

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind was originally envisioned using a simple dipolar corona/polar coronal hole sources picture, but modern observations and models, together with the recent unusual solar cycle minimum, have demonstrated the limitations of this picture. The solar surface fields in both polar and low-to-mid-latitude active region zones routinely produce coronal magnetic fields and related solar wind sources much more complex than a dipole. This makes low-to-mid latitude coronal holes and their associated streamer boundaries major contributors to what is observed in the ecliptic and affects the Earth. In this paper we use magnetogram-based coronal field models to describe the conditions that prevailed in the corona from the decline of cycle 23 into the rising phase of cycle 24. The results emphasize the need for adopting new views of what is ‘typical’ solar wind, even when the Sun is relatively inactive.

  10. Photonic spin control for solar wind electric sail

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, P

    2012-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail (E-sail) is a novel, efficient propellantless propulsion concept which utilises the natural solar wind for spacecraft propulsion with the help of long centrifugally stretched charged tethers. The E-sail requires auxiliary propulsion applied to the tips of the main tethers for creating the initial angular momentum and possibly for modifying the spinrate later during flight to counteract the orbital Coriolis effect and possibly for mission specific reasons. We introduce the possibility of implementing the required auxiliary propulsion by small photonic blades (small radiation pressure solar sails). The blades would be stretched centrifugally. We look into two concepts, one with and one without auxiliary tethers. The use of photonic blades has the benefit of providing sufficient spin modification capability for any E-sail mission while keeping the technology fully propellantless. We conclude that the photonic blades appear to be a feasible and attractive solution to E-sail spinrate c...

  11. Sources of the Slow Solar Wind During the Solar Cycle 23/24 Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Madjarska, M. S.; Karna, N.; Wiegelmann, T.; Farrugia, C.; Yu, W.; Andreeova, K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the characteristics and the sources of the slow ( {global coronal structure, including the frequent presence of low-latitude active regions in 2006 - 2007, long-lived low- and mid-latitude coronal holes in 2006 - mid-2008 and mostly the quiet Sun in 2009. We examined Carrington rotation averages of selected solar plasma, charge state, and compositional parameters and distributions of these parameters related to the quiet Sun, active region Sun, and the coronal hole Sun. While some of the investigated parameters (e.g. speed, the C+6/C+4 and He/H ratios) show clear variations over our study period and with solar wind source type, some (Fe/O) exhibit very little changes. Our results highlight the difficulty of distinguishing between the slow solar wind sources based on the inspection of solar wind conditions.

  12. Solar wind velocity at solar maximum: A search for latitudinal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by Ulysses during its second out-of-ecliptic orbit have shown that near the solar activity maximum the solar wind appears as a highly variable flow at all heliolatitudes. In the present study Ulysses data from polar latitudes are compared to contemporary ACE data in the ecliptic plane to search for the presence of latitudinal effects in the large-scale structure of the solar wind velocity. The investigated period roughly covers the Sun's magnetic polarity reversal. The Ulysses-ACE comparison is performed through a multi-scale statistical analysis of the velocity fluctuations at scales from 1 to 64 days. The results indicate that, from a statistical point of view, the character of the wind velocity structure does not appear to change remarkably with latitude. It is likely that this result is characteristic of the particular phase of the solar magnetic cycle.

  13. Different Responses of Solar Wind and Geomagnetism to Solar Activity during Quiet and Active Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roksoon; Park, J.-Y.; Baek, J.-H.; Kim, B.-G.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that there are good relations of coronal hole (CH) parameters such as the size, location, and magnetic field strength to the solar wind conditions and the geomagnetic storms. Especially in the minimum phase of solar cycle, CHs in mid- or low-latitude are one of major drivers for geomagnetic storms, since they form corotating interaction regions (CIRs). By adopting the method of Vrsnak et al. (2007), the Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) in Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) has done daily forecast of solar wind speed and Dst index from 2010. Through years of experience, we realize that the geomagnetic storms caused by CHs have different characteristics from those by CMEs. Thus, we statistically analyze the characteristics and causality of the geomagnetic storms by the CHs rather than the CMEs with dataset obtained during the solar activity was very low. For this, we examine the CH properties, solar wind parameters as well as geomagnetic storm indices. As the first result, we show the different trends of the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices depending on the degree of solar activity represented by CH (quiet) or sunspot number (SSN) in the active region (active) and then we evaluate our forecasts using CH information and suggest several ideas to improve forecasting capability.

  14. WSA-Enlil Solar Wind Prediction

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — WSA-Enlil is a large-scale, physics-based prediction model of the heliosphere, used by the Space Weather Forecast Office to provide 1-4 day advance warning of solar...

  15. Solar Panel Buffeted by Wind at Phoenix Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Winds were strong enough to cause about a half a centimeter (.19 inch) of motion of a solar panel on NASA's Phoenix Mars lander when the lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this picture on Aug. 31, 2008, during the 96th Martian day since landing. The lander's telltale wind gauge has been indicating wind speeds of about 4 meters per second (9 miles per hour) during late mornings at the site. These conditions were anticipated and the wind is not expected to do any harm to the lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Solar Panel Buffeted by Wind at Phoenix Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Winds were strong enough to cause about a half a centimeter (.19 inch) of motion of a solar panel on NASA's Phoenix Mars lander when the lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this picture on Aug. 31, 2008, during the 96th Martian day since landing. The lander's telltale wind gauge has been indicating wind speeds of about 4 meters per second (9 miles per hour) during late mornings at the site. These conditions were anticipated and the wind is not expected to do any harm to the lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Compressive fluctuations in the solar wind and their polytropic index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic compressive fluctuations of the interplanetary plasma in the region from 0.3 to 1 AU have been characterized in terms of their polytropic index. Following Chandrasekhar's approach to polytropic fluids, this index has been determined through a fit of the observed variations of density and temperature. At least three different classes of fluctuations have been identified: (1 variations at constant thermal pressure, in low-speed solar wind and without a significant dependence on distance, (2 adiabatic variations, mainly close to 1 AU and without a relevant dependence on wind speed, and (3 variations at nearly constant density, in fast wind close to 0.3 AU. Variations at constant thermal pressure are probably a subset of the ensemble of total-pressure balanced structures, corresponding to cases in which the magnetic field magnitude does not vary appreciably throughout the structure. In this case the pressure equilibrium has to be assured by its thermal component only. The variations may be related to small flow-tubes with approximately the same magnetic-field intensity, convected by the wind in conditions of pressure equilibrium. This feature is mainly observed in low-velocity solar wind, in agreement with the magnetic topology (small open flow-tubes emerging through an ensemble of closed structures expected for the source region of slow wind. Variations of adiabatic type may be related to magnetosonic waves excited by pressure imbalances between contiguous flow-tubes. Such imbalances are probably built up by interactions between wind flows with different speeds in the spiral geometry induced by the solar rotation. This may account for the fact that they are mainly found at a large distance from the sun. Temperature variations at almost constant density are mostly found in fast flows close to the sun. These are the solar wind regions with the best examples of incompressible behaviour. They are characterized by very stable

  18. Small Scale High Speed Turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Adam P. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd J. (Inventor); Lehman, Matthew K. (Inventor); Mehra, Amitav (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A small scale, high speed turbomachine is described, as well as a process for manufacturing the turbomachine. The turbomachine is manufactured by diffusion bonding stacked sheets of metal foil, each of which has been pre-formed to correspond to a cross section of the turbomachine structure. The turbomachines include rotating elements as well as static structures. Using this process, turbomachines may be manufactured with rotating elements that have outer diameters of less than four inches in size, and/or blading heights of less than 0.1 inches. The rotating elements of the turbomachines are capable of rotating at speeds in excess of 150 feet per second. In addition, cooling features may be added internally to blading to facilitate cooling in high temperature operations.

  19. Simulation and optimum design of hybrid solar-wind and solar-wind-diesel power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei

    Solar and wind energy systems are considered as promising power generating sources due to its availability and topological advantages in local power generations. However, a drawback, common to solar and wind options, is their unpredictable nature and dependence on weather changes, both of these energy systems would have to be oversized to make them completely reliable. Fortunately, the problems caused by variable nature of these resources can be partially overcome by integrating these two resources in a proper combination to form a hybrid system. However, with the increased complexity in comparison with single energy systems, optimum design of hybrid system becomes more complicated. In order to efficiently and economically utilize the renewable energy resources, one optimal sizing method is necessary. This thesis developed an optimal sizing method to find the global optimum configuration of stand-alone hybrid (both solar-wind and solar-wind-diesel) power generation systems. By using Genetic Algorithm (GA), the optimal sizing method was developed to calculate the system optimum configuration which offers to guarantee the lowest investment with full use of the PV array, wind turbine and battery bank. For the hybrid solar-wind system, the optimal sizing method is developed based on the Loss of Power Supply Probability (LPSP) and the Annualized Cost of System (ACS) concepts. The optimization procedure aims to find the configuration that yields the best compromise between the two considered objectives: LPSP and ACS. The decision variables, which need to be optimized in the optimization process, are the PV module capacity, wind turbine capacity, battery capacity, PV module slope angle and wind turbine installation height. For the hybrid solar-wind-diesel system, minimization of the system cost is achieved not only by selecting an appropriate system configuration, but also by finding a suitable control strategy (starting and stopping point) of the diesel generator. The

  20. An extended structure-function model and its application to the analysis of solar wind intermittency properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Tu

    Full Text Available An extended structure-function model is developed by including the new effect in the p-model of Meneveau and Sreenivasan which shows that the averaged energy cascade rate changes with scale, a situation which has been found to prevail in non-fully-developed turbulence in the inner solar wind. This model is useful for the small-scale fluctuations in the inner heliosphere, where the turbulence is not fully developed and cannot be explained quantitatively by any of the previous intermittency turbulence models. With two model parameters, the intrinsic index of the energy spectrum α, and the fragmentation fraction P1, the model can fit, for the first time, all the observed scaling exponents of the structure functions, which are calculated for time lags ranging from 81 s to 0.7 h from the Helios solar wind data. From the cases we studied we cannot establish for P1 either a clear radial evolution trend, or a solar-wind-speed or stream-structure dependence or a systematic anisotropy for both the flow velocity and magnetic field component fluctuations. Generally, P1 has values between 0.7 and 0.8. However, in some cases in low-speed wind P1 has somewhat higher values for the magnetic components, especially for the radial component. In high-speed wind, the inferred intrinsic spectral indices α of the velocity and magnetic field components are about equal, while the experimental spectral indices derived from the observed power spectra differ. The magnetic index is somewhat larger than the index of the velocity spectrum. For magnetic fluctuations in both high- and low-speed winds, the intrinsic exponent α has values which are near 1.5, while the observed spectral exponent has much higher values. In the solar wind with considerable density fluctuations near the interplanetary current sheet near 1 AU, it is found that P1 has a comparatively high value of 0

  1. Observations of turbulence and fluctuations in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Observational and theoretical studies of turbulent fluctuations in space plasma have been ongoing for many years. There are still many unanswered questions about the origin and evolution of the fluctuations in the heliosphere. This work pursues the subject and uses Voyage 1 and 2, and ISEE-3 measurements to study the evolution of solar-wind plasma and the magnetic field between heliocentric distances of 1 and 20 AU and to more than 25/sup 0/ in latitude above the ecliptic plane. Parker's 1958 solar-wind model is found to be accurate to within 5% in predicting the behavior of long-term (solar rotation) averages in the interplanetary magnetic field when time dependencies in the bulk plasma speed are included. No evidence was found of flux loss in the outer heliosphere as recently reported in the literature. Methods of turbulence analysis and are used to organize the observations and several predictions and expectations of ideal MHD turbulence theory are tested. Spectral indices expected for inertial-range turbulence are present in much of the data analyzed, and this inertial range is found in increasingly larger spatial scales with increasing radial distance from the sun. Evidence for inverse cascade of magnetic helicity is observed in selected intervals, although this was not found to be true in general in the solar wind.

  2. Invited article: Electric solar wind sail: toward test missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janhunen, P; Toivanen, P K; Polkko, J; Merikallio, S; Salminen, P; Haeggström, E; Seppänen, H; Kurppa, R; Ukkonen, J; Kiprich, S; Thornell, G; Kratz, H; Richter, L; Krömer, O; Rosta, R; Noorma, M; Envall, J; Lätt, S; Mengali, G; Quarta, A A; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Kauppinen, J; Nuottajärvi, A; Obraztsov, A

    2010-11-01

    The electric solar wind sail (E-sail) is a space propulsion concept that uses the natural solar wind dynamic pressure for producing spacecraft thrust. In its baseline form, the E-sail consists of a number of long, thin, conducting, and centrifugally stretched tethers, which are kept in a high positive potential by an onboard electron gun. The concept gains its efficiency from the fact that the effective sail area, i.e., the potential structure of the tethers, can be millions of times larger than the physical area of the thin tethers wires, which offsets the fact that the dynamic pressure of the solar wind is very weak. Indeed, according to the most recent published estimates, an E-sail of 1 N thrust and 100 kg mass could be built in the rather near future, providing a revolutionary level of propulsive performance (specific acceleration) for travel in the solar system. Here we give a review of the ongoing technical development work of the E-sail, covering tether construction, overall mechanical design alternatives, guidance and navigation strategies, and dynamical and orbital simulations.

  3. The Spectroscopic Footprint of the Fast Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a large, complex equatorial coronal hole (ECH) and its immediate surroundings with a focus on the roots of the fast solar wind. We start by demonstrating that our ECH is indeed a source of the fast solar wind at 1AU by examining in situ plasma measurements in conjunction with recently developed measures of magnetic conditions of the photosphere, inner heliosphere and the mapping of the solar wind source region. We focus the bulk of our analysis on interpreting the thermal and spatial dependence of the non-thermal line widths in the ECH as measured by SOHO/SUMER by placing the measurements in context with recent studies of ubiquitous Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere and line profile asymmetries (indicative of episodic heating and mass loading of the coronal plasma) that originate in the strong, unipolar magnetic flux concentrations that comprise the supergranular network. The results presented in this paper are consistent with a picture where a significant portion of the energy responsible for t...

  4. CME propagation: Where does the solar wind drag take over?

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Colaninno, Robin; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Sun-Earth dynamics of a set of eight well observed solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using data from the STEREO spacecraft. We seek to quantify the extent to which momentum coupling between these CMEs and the ambient solar wind (i.e., the aerodynamic drag) influences their dynamics. To this end, we use results from a 3D flux rope model fit to the CME data. We find that solar wind aerodynamic drag adequately accounts for the dynamics of the fastest CME in our sample. For the relatively slower CMEs, we find that drag-based models initiated below heliocentric distances ranging from 15 to 50 $R_{\\odot}$ cannot account for the observed CME trajectories. This is at variance with the general perception that the dynamics of slow CMEs are influenced primarily by solar wind drag from a few $R_{\\odot}$ onwards. Several slow CMEs propagate at roughly constant speeds above 15--50 $R_{\\odot}$. Drag-based models initiated above these heights therefore require negligible aerodynamic drag to explain their...

  5. Small solar wind transients: Stereo-A observations in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, W.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C.; Popecki, M. A.; Lugaz, N. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Kilpua, E. K. J. [Dept. of Physics, Division of Geophysics and Astronomy, University of Helsinki (Finland); Moestl, C. [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria and Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Opitz, A.; Sauvaud, J.-A. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (CNRS-UPS), Universite de Toulouse, F-31038, Toulouse (France)

    2013-06-13

    Year 2009 was the last year of a long and pronounced solar activity minimum. In this year the solar wind in the inner heliosphere was for 90% of the time slow (< 450 km s{sup -1}) and with a weaker magnetic field strength compared to the previous solar minimum 1995-1996. We choose this year to present the results of a systematic search for small solar wind transients (STs) observed by the STEREO-Ahead (ST-A) probe. The data are from the PLASTIC and IMPACT instrument suites. By 'small' we mean a duration from {approx}1 to 12 hours. The parameters we search for to identify STs are (i) the total field strength, (ii) the rotation of the magnetic field vector, (iii) its smoothness, (iv) proton temperature, (v) proton beta, and (vi) Alfven Mach number. We find 45 examples. The STs have an average duration of {approx}4 hours. Ensemble averages of key quantities are: (i) maximum B = 7.01 nT; (ii) proton {beta}= 0.18; (iii) proton thermal speed = 20.8 km s{sup -1}; and (iv) Alfven Mach number = 6.13. No distinctive feature is found in the pitch angle distributions of suprathermal electrons. Our statistical results are compared with those of STs observed near Earth by Wind during 2009.

  6. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Hydropower Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acker, T.; Pete, C.

    2012-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) study of 20% Wind Energy by 2030 was conducted to consider the benefits, challenges, and costs associated with sourcing 20% of U.S. energy consumption from wind power by 2030. This study found that with proactive measures, no insurmountable barriers were identified to meet the 20% goal. Following this study, DOE and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted two more studies: the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) covering the eastern portion of the U.S., and the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) covering the western portion of the United States. The WWSIS was conducted by NREL and research partner General Electric (GE) in order to provide insight into the costs, technical or physical barriers, and operational impacts caused by the variability and uncertainty of wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power when employed to serve up to 35% of the load energy in the WestConnect region (Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming). WestConnect is composed of several utility companies working collaboratively to assess stakeholder and market needs to and develop cost-effective improvements to the western wholesale electricity market. Participants include the Arizona Public Service, El Paso Electric Company, NV Energy, Public Service of New Mexico, Salt River Project, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Cooperative, Tucson Electric Power, Xcel Energy and the Western Area Power Administration.

  7. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mikic, Z.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind has large angular width, up to approximately 60 degrees, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far front the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MIDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spatial resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind and magnetic field for a time period preceding the August 1, 2008 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results imply that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (which we term an S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere, and propose further tests of the model.

  8. Sources of The Slow Solar wind During the Solar Cycle 23/24 Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Kilpua, E K J; Karna, N; Wiegelmann, T; Farrugia, C; Yu, W; Andreeova, K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the characteristics and the sources of the slow (< 450 km/s) solar wind during the four years (2006-2009) of low solar activity between Solar Cycles 23 and 24. We use a comprehensive set of in-situ observations in the near-Earth solar wind (Wind and ACE) and remove the periods when large-scale interplanetary coronal mass ejections were present. The investigated period features significant variations in the global coronal structure, including the frequent presence of low-latitude active regions in 2006-2007, long-lived low- and mid-latitude coronal holes in 2006 - mid-2008 and mostly the quiet Sun in 2009. We examine both Carrington Rotation averages of selected solar plasma, charge state and compositional parameters and distributions of these parameters related to Quiet Sun, Active Region Sun and the Coronal Hole Sun. While some of the investigated parameters (e.g., speed, the C^{+6}/C^{+4} and He/H ratio) show clear variations over our study period and with solar wind source type, some (Fe/...

  9. Solar Wind Fluctuations and Their Consequences on the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Lin

    2005-01-01

    Efforts have been made to extract the physical meaning of each term in our prediction model of the Dst index using the solar wind as the only input. The work has been published Journal of Geophysical Research (Temerin and Li, 21002). We found different terms in the model representing different current in the magnetospheric system and each current has different rise and decay times, with the symmetric ring current the slowest, then the partial ring current, then the tail current. We also have been trying to understand the physical meaning of the diffusion coefficient used in our prediction model of relativistic electron fluxes at geostationary orbit. The model reproduced the observations of MeV electron flux variations well, the diffusion coefficient had be assumed only die to local magnetic field fluctuations, leading to its 10th power dependence on the L. We have studied the theoretical derivation of the diffusion coefficient and we believe that the effect electric field fluctuations at smaller L could become more significant. We have expanded our previous radiation belt electron prediction model, which predicted MeV electron geosynchronous orbit based on solar wind measurements, to predict MeV electrons inside geosynchronous orbit. The model results are compared with measurements from Polar/CEPPAD. Prediction efficiencies of 0.56 and 0.54, respectively, at L=6 and L=4, have been achieved over the entire year of 1998. This work wa reported at 2003 Fall AGU and has been accepted for publication in Space Weather (Barker et al., 2005). We also have used simultaneous measurements of the upstream solar wind and of energetic electrons at geosynchronous orbit to analyze the response of electrons over a very wide energy range, 50 keV-6MeV, to solar wind variations. Enhancements of energetic electron fluxes over this whole energy range are modulated by the solar wind speed and the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The solar wind speed seems to be a

  10. Implementation Strategy for a Global Solar and Wind Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    In July 2009, Major Economies Forum leaders met to prepare for the COP 15 Copenhagen Conference that took place later that year. At this occasion the Major Economies Forum Global Partnership f or low carbon and climate-friendly technology was founded and Technology Action Plans (TAPs) for ten key low-carbon technologies were drafted. At that juncture Denmark, Germany and Spain took on the responsibility for drafting TAPs for Solar and Wind Energy Technologies. The TAPs were then consolidated and presented at COP 15 that would later take place in December in Copenhagen. Since then, countries that led the development of the Action Plans have started their implementation. During a first Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) in July 2010 in Washington on the invitation of Steven Chu, US Secretary of Energy, several initiatives were launched. Denmark, Germany and Spain took the lead in the implementation of the TAPs for Solar and Wind Technologies and initiated the Multilateral Working Group on Solar and Wind Energy Technologies (MWGSW). Several countries joined the working group in Washington and afterwards. In two international workshops in Bonn (June 2010) and Madrid (November 2010) and in meetings during the first CEM in Washington (July 2010) and the second CEM in Abu Dhabi (April 2011) the Multilateral Working Group made substantial progress in the two initial fields of action: (1) the Development of a Global Solar and Wind Atlas; and (2) the Development of a Long-term Strategy on Joint Capacity Building. Discussion papers on the respective topics were elaborated involving the Working Group's member countries as well as various international institutions. This led to concrete proposals for several pilot activities in both fields of action. After further specifying key elements of the suggested projects in two expert workshops in spring 2011, the Multilateral Working Group convened for a third international workshop in Copenhagen, Denmark, to discuss the project

  11. Exploring of Chinese High-speed Railways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    liuYoumei

    2004-01-01

    Based ion experiences of high-speed railways in foreign countries,the speed-raise situation of the Chinese railways,the research & development and test of high-speed transportation carries,as well as the prospective of high-speed railway in China are introduced.

  12. Towards high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabak, Femke Chantal

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, two routes towards high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are described. The first possibility for high-speed scanning that is discussed is the use of MEMS (Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems) devices as high-speed add-ons in STM microscopes. The functionality of these devices

  13. The genesis solar-wind sample return mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The compositions of the Earth's crust and mantle, and those of the Moon and Mars, are relatively well known both isotopically and elementally. The same is true of our knowledge of the asteroid belt composition, based on meteorite analyses. Remote measurements of Venus, the Jovian atmosphere, and the outer planet moons, have provided some estimates of their compositions. The Sun constitutes a large majority, > 99%, of all the matter in the solar system. The elemental composition of the photosphere, the visible 'surface' of the Sun, is constrained by absorption lines produced by particles above the surface. Abundances for many elements are reported to the {+-}10 or 20% accuracy level. However, the abundances of other important elements, such as neon, cannot be determined in this way due to a relative lack of atomic states at low excitation energies. Additionally and most importantly, the isotopic composition of the Sun cannot be determined astronomically except for a few species which form molecules above sunspots, and estimates derived from these sources lack the accuracy desired for comparison with meteoritic and planetary surface samples measured on the Earth. The solar wind spreads a sample of solar particles throughout the heliosphere, though the sample is very rarified: collecting a nanogram of oxygen, the third most abundant element, in a square centimeter cross section at the Earth's distance from the Sun takes five years. Nevertheless, foil collectors exposed to the solar wind for periods of hours on the surface of the Moon during the Apollo missions were used to determine the helium and neon solar-wind compositions sufficiently to show that the Earth's atmospheric neon was significantly evolved relative to the Sun. Spacecraft instruments developed subsequently have provided many insights into the composition of the solar wind, mostly in terms of elemental composition. These instruments have the advantage of observing a number of

  14. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at

  15. Fe-rich solar energetic particle events during solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, J. E.; Mason, G. M.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    During the first 10 months of WIND observations, we have detected several time periods with energetic particle abundances that are characteristic of impulsive flares: enrichments in the ³He isotope, and in heavy ions compared to the corona. Using the Supra-Thermal through Energetic Particle sensor on WIND, we find that at ∼100 keV/nucleon these events typically arrive in sequences of multiple events when the spacecraft is magnetically connected to an active region at western solar longitudes, preceding the arrival of a high speed solar wind stream. During recurrent high speed solar wind streams with their associated flux enhancements Fe-rich events are seldom seen: almost all of the events occur on days with solar wind speeds ISEE-3.

  16. The acceleration of the nonspherically symmetric solar wind and the solar probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinganos, K.

    The initial acceleration of the nonspherically symmetric solar wind is discussed according to recent treatments via nonspherically symmetric and nonpolytropic MHD models. These studies give some physical quantities of the plasma outflow which the proposedSolar Probe mission could measure. For example, among the predictions of such two-dimensional models is that as one approaches the sun the spatially extended heating and temperature increase while as the polar axis is approached, the outflow speed increases, although the plasma density and pressure decrease. The sonic transition is closer to the Sun in streamlines closer to the solar rotation axis than it is for streamlines further away and closer to the ecliptic plane. Preliminary observations from the Ulysses spacecraft at several AU suggesting a latitudinal gradient of ~ 3.5 AU, are in agreement with such models. Thus, since most measurements of the solar wind parameters have taken place to this date on the ecliptic plane and at distances larger than >~ 100 r_solar, a comparison of the data of the Solar Probe mission with such theories shall be of considerable interest for a deeper understanding of the initial acceleration of the closer astrophysical outflow of the solar wind with profound implications as well for other more distant and similar cosmic phenomena.

  17. MHD effects of the solar wind flow around planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Biernat

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the interaction of the solar wind with magnetized and unmagnetized planets forms a central topic of space research. Focussing on planetary magnetosheaths, we review some major developments in this field. Magnetosheath structures depend crucially on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field, the solar wind Alfvén Mach number, the shape of the obstacle (axisymmetric/non-axisymmetric, etc., the boundary conditions at the magnetopause (low/high magnetic shear, and the degree of thermal anisotropy of the plasma. We illustrate the cases of Earth, Jupiter and Venus. The terrestrial magnetosphere is axisymmetric and has been probed in-situ by many spacecraft. Jupiter's magnetosphere is highly non-axisymmetric. Furthermore, we study magnetohydrodynamic effects in the Venus magnetosheath.

  18. The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) Instrument Aboard New Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    McComas, D; Bagenal, F; Casey, P; Delamere, P; Demkee, D; Dunn, G; Elliott, H; Hanley, J; Johnson, K; Langle, J; Miller, G; Pope, S; Reno, M; Rodríguez, B; Schwadron, N; Valek, P; Weidner, S

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on New Horizons will measure the interaction between the solar wind and ions created by atmospheric loss from Pluto. These measurements provide a characterization of the total loss rate and allow us to examine the complex plasma interactions at Pluto for the first time. Constrained to fit within minimal resources, SWAP is optimized to make plasma-ion measurements at all rotation angles as the New Horizons spacecraft scans to image Pluto and Charon during the flyby. In order to meet these unique requirements, we combined a cylindrically symmetric retarding potential analyzer (RPA) with small deflectors, a top-hat analyzer, and a redundant/coincidence detection scheme. This configuration allows for highly sensitive measurements and a controllable energy passband at all scan angles of the spacecraft.

  19. A review on solar wind modeling: kinetic and fluid aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Echim, Marius; Lie-Svendsen, Oystein

    2013-01-01

    We review the main advantages and limitations of the kinetic exospheric and fluid models of the solar wind (SW). We discuss the hydrostatic model imagined by Chapman, the first supersonic hydrodynamic models published by Parker and the first generation subsonic kinetic model proposed by Chamberlain. It is shown that a correct estimation of the electric field as in the second generation kinetic exospheric models developed by Lemaire and Scherer, provides a supersonic expansion of the corona, reconciling the hydrodynamic and the kinetic approach. The third generation kinetic exospheric models considers kappa velocity distribution function (VDF) instead of a Maxwellian at the exobase and in addition they treat a non-monotonic variation of the electric potential with the radial distance; the fourth generation exospheric models include Coulomb collisions based on the Fokker--Planck collision term. Multi-fluid models of the solar wind provide a coarse grained description and reproduce with success the spatio-tempor...

  20. Charge Exchange Losses and Stochastic Acceleration in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Kenny, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic acceleration of particles under a pressure balance condition can accommodate the universal $p^{-5}$ spectra observed under many different conditions in the inner heliosphere. In this model, in order to avoid an infinite build up of particle pressure, a relationship between the momentum diffusion of particles and the adiabatic deceleration in the solar wind must exist. This constrains both the spatial and momentum diffusion coefficients and results in the $p^{-5}$ spectrum in the presence of adiabatic losses in the solar wind. However, this theory cannot explain the presence of such spectra beyond the termination shock, where adiabatic deceleration is negligible. To explain this apparent discrepancy, we include the effect of charge exchange losses, resulting in new forms of both the spatial and momentum diffusion coefficients that have not previously been considered. Assuming that the turbulence is of a large-scale compressible nature, we find that a balance between momentum diffusion and losses can...

  1. Wind and solar energy curtailment: A review of international experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, Lori; Lew, Debra; Milligan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Greater penetrations of variable renewable generation on some electric grids have resulted in increased levels of curtailment in recent years. Studies of renewable energy grid integration have found that curtailment levels may grow as the penetration of wind and solar energy generation increases....... This paper reviews international experience with curtailment of wind and solar energy on bulk power systems in recent years, with a focus on eleven countries in Europe, North America, and Asia. It examines levels of curtailment, the causes of curtailment, curtailment methods and use of market based dispatch......, as well as operational, institutional, and other changes that are being made to reduce renewable energy curtailment. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. Solar wind and micrometeorite effects in the lunar regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housley, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Using available data from the literature, an outline is formulated for the major physical and chemical effects expected during solar-wind bombardment of the lunar regolith. In agreement with results of Auger and other analyses of the composition of lunar grain surfaces, this outline predicts that solar-wind sputtering will tend to clean exposed grain surfaces by ejecting material at velocities exceeding lunar escape velocity. Results are also discussed which show that Fe is partially reduced in the outer few 10 nm of grain surfaces and that this reduced Fe forms 10-nm-diameter metal spheres throughout the glass during agglutinate formation by micrometeorite impacts. These metal spheres give the agglutinates their distinctive optical and magnetic properties and are partially responsible for the decreasing albedo of the lunar surface with exposure age.

  3. Scaling of Compressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S.; Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S.

    2016-10-01

    The role of compressible fluctuations in the energy cascade of fast solar wind turbulence is studied using a reduced form of an exact law derived recently for compressible isothermal magnetohydrodynamics and in situ observations from the THEMIS B/ARTEMIS P1 spacecraft. A statistical survey of the data revealed a turbulent energy cascade over a range of two decades of scales that is broader than the previous estimates made from an exact incompressible law. A term-by-term analysis of the compressible model reveals new insight into the role played by the compressible fluctuations in the energy cascade. The compressible fluctuations are shown to amplify by two to four times the turbulent cascade rate with respect to the incompressible model in ∼ 10 % of the analyzed samples. This new estimated cascade rate is shown to provide the adequate energy dissipation required to account for the local heating of the non-adiabatic solar wind.

  4. The global interaction of comets with the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpis, Harry L. F.

    1987-01-01

    The recent in-situ measurements of the plasma-neutral gas environment of comet Halley by the GIOTTO and VEGA spacecraft have confirmed the global theory of the comet-solar wind interaction. The ionopause, cometopause, and bow shock distances are the primary predictions of the model, although various momentum collisional cross-sections can also be estimated. With this greater confidence in the global model, the sharp Sunward intensity decrease in the spatial H2O+ profiles observed for comet Halley between 2.14 AU pre- and post-perihelion are interpreted as the cometopause boundary. This interpretation may then be used to determine the solar wind conditions local to the comet.

  5. Recent observations of MHD fluctuations in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    Full Text Available A short review of recent observations of solar wind fluctuations in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD range of scales is presented. In recent years, the use of high time-resolution data on an extended interval of heliocentric distance has allowed significant advances in our knowledge of MHD fluctuations. We first focus on the origin and evolution of the Alfvénic-type fluctuations. The role of interplanetary sources and the influence of interactions with structures convected by the solar wind are examined. Then compressive fluctuations are investigated, with special attention being given to their nature and origin. Observations are discussed in the light of recent theories and models. Finally, predictions for MHD turbulence in polar regions of the heliosphere are highlighted.

  6. The dissipation of solar wind turbulent fluctuations at electron scales

    CERN Document Server

    Camporeale, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    We present two-dimensional fully-kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of decaying electromagnetic fluctuations. The computational box is such that wavelengths ranging from electron to ion gyroradii are resolved. The parameters used are realistic for the solar wind, and the ion to electron mass ratio is physical. The understanding of the dissipation of turbulent fluctuations at small scales is thought to be a crucial mechanism for solar wind acceleration and coronal heating. The computational results suggest that a power law cascade of magnetic fluctuations could be sustained up to scales of the electron Larmor radius and smaller. We analyse the simulation results in the light of the Vlasov linear theory, and we comment on the particle heating. The dispersion curves of lightly damped modes in this regime suggest that a linear mechanism could be responsible for the observed steepening of power spectra at electron scales, but a straightforward identification of turbulent fluctuations as an ensemble of linear mod...

  7. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  8. Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Kristopher G

    2015-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space, and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the \\Alfvenic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scal...

  9. A desalination plant with solar and wind energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Ye, Z.; Gao, W.

    2013-12-01

    The shortage of freshwater resources has become a worldwide problem. China has a water shortage, although the total amount of water resources is the sixth in the world, the per capita water capacity is the 121th (a quarter of the world's per capita water capacity), and the United Nations considers China one of the poorest 13 countries in the world in terms of water. In order to increase the supply of fresh water, a realistic way is to make full use of China's long and narrow coastline for seawater desalination. This paper discusses a sea water desalination device, the device adopts distillation, uses the greenhouse effect principle and wind power heating principle, and the two-type start is used to solve the problem of vertical axis wind turbine self-starting. Thrust bearings are used to ensure the stability of the device, and to ensure absorbtion of wind energy and solar energy, and to collect evaporation of water to achieve desalination. The device can absorb solar and wind energy instead of input energy, so it can be used in ship, island and many kinds of environment. Due to the comprehensive utilization of wind power and solar power, the efficiency of the device is more than other passive sea water desalting plants, the initial investment and maintenance cost is lower than active sea water desalting plant. The main part of the device cannot only be used in offshore work, but can also be used in deep sea floating work, so the device can utilise deep sea energy. In order to prove the practicability of the device, the author has carried out theory of water production calculations. According to the principle of conservation of energy, the device ais bsorbing solar and wind power, except loose lost part which is used for water temperature rise and phase transition. Assume the inflow water temperature is 20 °C, outflow water temperature is 70 °C, the energy utilization is 60%, we can know that the water production quantity is 8 kg/ m2 per hour. Comparing with the

  10. Long-term Trends in Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength and Solar Wind Structure during the 20th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Lockwood et al have recently reported an approximately 40% increase in the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at Earth between 1964 and 1996. We argue that this increase does not constitute a secular trend but is largely the consequence of lower than average fields during solar cycle 20 (1964-1976) in comparison with surrounding cycles. For times after 1976 the average IMF strength has actually decreased slightly. Examination of the cosmic ray intensity, an indirect measure of the IMF strength, over the last five solar cycles (19-23) also indicates that cycle averages of the IMF strength have been relatively constant since approximately 1954. We also consider the origin of the well-documented increase in the geomagnetic alphaalpha index that occurred primarily during the first half of the twentieth century. We surmise that the coronal mass ejection (CME) rate for recent solar cycles was approximately twice as high as that for solar cycles 100 years ago. However, this change in the CME rate and the accompanying increase in 27-day recurrent storm activity reported by others are unable to account completely for the increase in alphaalpha. Rather, the CMEs and recurrent high-speed streams at the beginning of the twentieth century must have been embedded in a background of slow solar wind that was less geoeffective (having, for example, lower IMF strength and/or flow speed) than its modern counterpart.

  11. OMNI: A Description of Near-Earth Solar Wind Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papitashvili, Natasha; Bilitza, Dieter; King, Joseph

    OMNI is an hourly resolution multi-source data set of near-Earth solar wind's magnetic field and plasma parameters spanning the period from November 1963 (IMP 1 launch) to today, and it is being updated regularly with new data. OMNI is widely used in the heliospheric community as is documented by the large number of acknowledgements in scientific papers. OMNI provides the IMF (magnitude and vector), flow velocity (magnitude and vector), flow pressure, proton density, alpha particle to proton density ratio, and several additional parameters including sunspot and geomagnetic indices and energetic proton fluxes from IMP and GOES. Spacecraft data used for compiling the OMNI solar wind reference include IMP-8, ACE, Wind, ISEE-3, and Geotail. The data from ISEE-3, Wind, and ACE were time-shifted because they are about an hour upstream of the Earth's magnetosphere. Extensive quality control and cross- comparisons of overlapping data sets were made in creating OMNI. This presentation will describe the OMNI data set and highlight its wide use in the space science community. We will also present some of the many capabilities of the OMNIweb interface (http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/ow.html) that provides access to the entire OMNI data set. OMNIWeb allows users to generate plots vs. time, to create scatter plots of any two OMNI parameters, to filter with user-specified parameter range criteria, to list and download OMNI parameters, to generate distributions of OMNI parameter values, and to browse and retrieve a static (but periodically updated) daily-resolution IMF polarity plot covering the entire OMNI time span. The Omni data set represents a thorough description of various characteristics of near-Earth solar wind magnetic field and plasma, which could be used as a basis for that space environment's standard.

  12. (abstract) Ulysses Observations of Magnetic Nulls in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, D.; Murphy, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Erdos, G.

    1993-01-01

    High time resolution magnetic field measurements (1 vector/s) at radial distances out to 5.3 AU and heliographic latitudes from 0(deg) to > 35(deg) S reveal the presence of solitary pulses lasting tens of seconds in which the field magnitude approaches or reaches zero. The properties of these nulls, their spatial distribution and relation to solar wind structures and to similar-apppearing interplanetary and magnetospheric impulses will be discussed.

  13. Scaling of the electron dissipation range of solar wind turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electron scale solar wind turbulence has attracted great interest in recent years. Clear evidences have been given from the Cluster data that turbulence is not fully dissipated near the proton scale but continues cascading down to the electron scales. However, the scaling of the energy spectra as well as the nature of the plasma modes involved at those small scales are still not fully determined. Here we survey 10 years of the Cluster search-coil magnetometer (SCM) waveforms measured in the s...

  14. The solar wind interaction with comets: A post encounter view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The recent spacecraft encounters with comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley have led to an enormous increase in our knowledge of comets, including their dust, neutral gas, plasma, and magnetic field environments. The latter has in turn led to better understanding of the nature of the solar wind interaction with the well developed atmosphere of a comet. The post-encounter understanding of this interaction is reviewed, underscoring the differences with pre-encounter reasoning. The problems outstanding in this area are emphasized.

  15. On the relation between ionospheric winter anomalies and solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Rumi

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available There are two different winter anomalies. A small one that appears in connection with ionization at relatively low latitudes in the bottom of the D-region of the ionosphere. There, the electron densities in the winter happen to be less than should be expected. On the other hand, the classic winter anomaly is present when in the winter the upper D-region, again at relatively low latitudes, has more ionization than should be expected. Both these effects are due to the slant compression of the geomagnetic field produced by the solar wind in the winter season (which is, of course, the summer season when reference is made to events in the other hemisphere. It is shown that the small winter anomaly is a consequence of a hemispheric imbalance in the flux of galactic cosmic rays determined by the obliquely distorted geomagnetic field. It is shown that the standard winter anomaly can be ascribed to the influx of a super solar wind, which penetrates into the Earth’s polar atmosphere down to E-region heights and, duly concentrated through a funneling action at the winter pole of the distorted geomagnetic field, slows down the winter polar vortex. An equatorward motion of the polar air with its content of nitric oxide brings about the excess of ionization in the upper D-region at lower latitudes. The experimentally observed rhythmic recurrence of the upper winter anomaly is correlated to a possible rhythmic recurrence of the super solar wind. The actual detection of the upper winter anomaly could yield some information on the velocity of the basic solar wind. A by-product of the present analysis, the determination of à , the coefficient of collisional detachment of the electrons from the O2 ions, is presented in the Appendix.

  16. Velocity fluctuations in polar solar wind: a comparison between different solar cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The polar solar wind is a fast, tenuous and steady flow that, with the exception of a relatively short phase around the Sun's activity maximum, fills the high-latitude heliosphere. The polar wind properties have been extensively investigated by Ulysses, the first spacecraft able to perform in-situ measurements in the high-latitude heliosphere. The out-of-ecliptic phases of Ulysses cover about seventeen years. This makes possible to study heliospheric properties at high latitudes in different solar cycles. In the present investigation we focus on hourly- to daily-scale fluctuations of the polar wind velocity. Though the polar wind is a quite uniform flow, fluctuations in its velocity do not appear negligible. A simple way to characterize wind velocity variations is that of performing a multi-scale statistical analysis of the wind velocity differences. Our analysis is based on the computation of velocity differences at different time lags and the evaluation of statistical quantities (mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis for the different ensembles. The results clearly show that, though differences exist in the three-dimensional structure of the heliosphere between the investigated solar cycles, the velocity fluctuations in the core of polar coronal holes exhibit essentially unchanged statistical properties.

  17. Space Weathering of the Lunar Surface by Solar Wind Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungsoo S.; Sim, Chaekyung

    2017-08-01

    The lunar regolith is space-weathered to a different degree in response to the different fluxes of incident solar wind particles and micrometeoroids. Crater walls, among other slating surfaces, are good tracers of the space-weathering process because they mature differently depending on the varying incident angles of weathering agents. We divide a crater wall into four quadrants (north, south, east, and west) and analyze the distribution of 950-nm/750-nm reflectance-ratio and 750-nm reflectance values in each wall quadrant, using the topography-corrected images by Multispectral Imager (MI) onboard SELENE (Kaguya). For thousands of impact craters across the Moon, we interpret the spectral distributions in the four wall quadrants in terms of the space weathering by solar wind particles and micrometeoroids and of gardening by meteroids. We take into account the solar-wind shielding by the Earth’s magnetotail to correctly assess the different spectral behaviors between east- and west-facing walls of the craters in the near-side of the Moon.

  18. Influence of solar wind ions on photoemission charging of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouzak, Libor; Richterova, Ivana; Pavlu, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek

    2016-04-01

    The lunar surface covered by a layer of dust grains is exposed to solar wind particles and photons coming from the Sun on the sunlit side. Solar wind ions cause sputtering of dust grains or can be implanted into grains. We suppose that as a consequence of ion implantation, an additional energy is transferred to grains, more valence band electrons are excited, and the photoelectron yield is increased. An increase of the photoelectron current causes the enhanced density of electrons that form a sheet above the illuminated lunar surface. Thus, an influence of solar wind ions on the Debye length and photoelectron sheet formation is expected. We present laboratory estimations of work functions and photoelectron yields of a single micron-sized silica grain before and after ion implantation. The silica grain used as a lunar simulant is caught in the electrodynamic trap. Grain's specific charge is evaluated by an analysis of the grain motion within the trap, while its work function is determined from observations of a time evolution of the charge-to-mass ratio when the grain is irradiated by photons of different emission lines. By comparison of the photoelectron current (from grain) with photon flux (from UV source), we establish the photoelectron yield of the trapped object. The influence of ion implantation is thoroughly analyzed and discussed.

  19. Magnetic discontinuities in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Mason, Joanne; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2012-04-27

    Recent measurements of solar wind turbulence report the presence of intermittent, exponentially distributed angular discontinuities in the magnetic field. In this Letter, we study whether such discontinuities can be produced by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We detect the discontinuities by measuring the fluctuations of the magnetic field direction, Δθ, across fixed spatial increments Δx in direct numerical simulations of MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform guide field B(0). A large region of the probability density function (pdf) for Δθ is found to follow an exponential decay, proportional to exp(-Δθ/θ(*)), with characteristic angle θ(*)≈(14°)(b(rms)/B(0))(0.65) for a broad range of guide-field strengths. We find that discontinuities observed in the solar wind can be reproduced by MHD turbulence with reasonable ratios of b(rms)/B(0). We also observe an excess of small angular discontinuities when Δx becomes small, possibly indicating an increasing statistical significance of dissipation-scale structures. The structure of the pdf in this case closely resembles the two-population pdf seen in the solar wind. We thus propose that strong discontinuities are associated with inertial-range MHD turbulence, while weak discontinuities emerge from dissipation-range turbulence. In addition, we find that the structure functions of the magnetic field direction exhibit anomalous scaling exponents, which indicates the existence of intermittent structures.

  20. Construction of Solar-Wind-Like Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dana Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in the solar wind fields tend to not only have velocities and magnetic fields correlated in the sense consistent with Alfven waves traveling from the Sun, but they also have the magnitude of the magnetic field remarkably constant despite their being broadband. This paper provides, for the first time, a method for constructing fields with nearly constant magnetic field, zero divergence, and with any specified power spectrum for the fluctuations of the components of the field. Every wave vector, k, is associated with two polarizations the relative phases of these can be chosen to minimize the variance of the field magnitude while retaining the\\random character of the fields. The method is applied to a case with one spatial coordinate that demonstrates good agreement with observed time series and power spectra of the magnetic field in the solar wind, as well as with the distribution of the angles of rapid changes (discontinuities), thus showing a deep connection between two seemingly unrelated issues. It is suggested that using this construction will lead to more realistic simulations of solar wind turbulence and of the propagation of energetic particles.

  1. Interaction of the solar wind with comets: a Rosetta perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2017-07-13

    The Rosetta mission provides an unprecedented possibility to study the interaction of comets with the solar wind. As the spacecraft accompanies comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from its very low-activity stage through its perihelion phase, the physics of mass loading is witnessed for various activity levels of the nucleus. While observations at other comets provided snapshots of the interaction region and its various plasma boundaries, Rosetta observations allow a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the innermost cometary magnetosphere. Owing to the short passage time of the solar wind through the interaction region, plasma instabilities such as ring--beam and non-gyrotropic instabilities are of less importance during the early life of the magnetosphere. Large-amplitude ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, the 'singing' of the comet, is probably due to a modified ion Weibel instability. This instability drives a cross-field current of implanted cometary ions unstable. The initial pick-up of these ions causes a major deflection of the solar wind protons. Proton deflection, cross-field current and the instability induce a threefold structure of the innermost interaction region with the characteristic Mach cone and Whistler wings as stationary interaction signatures as well as the ULF waves representing the dynamic aspect of the interaction.This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Short term fluctuations of wind and solar power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, M.; Lohmann, G.; Wächter, M.; Milan, P.; Lorenz, E.; Heinemann, D.; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Wind and solar power are known to be highly influenced by weather events and may ramp up or down abruptly. Such events in the power production influence not only the availability of energy, but also the stability of the entire power grid. By analysing significant amounts of data from several regions around the world with resolutions of seconds to minutes, we provide strong evidence that renewable wind and solar sources exhibit multiple types of variability and nonlinearity in the time scale of seconds and characterise their stochastic properties. In contrast to previous findings, we show that only the jumpy characteristic of renewable sources decreases when increasing the spatial size over which the renewable energies are harvested. Otherwise, the strong non-Gaussian, intermittent behaviour in the cumulative power of the total field survives even for a country-wide distribution of the systems. The strong fluctuating behaviour of renewable wind and solar sources can be well characterised by Kolmogorov-like power spectra and q-exponential probability density functions. Using the estimated potential shape of power time series, we quantify the jumpy or diffusive dynamic of the power. Finally we propose a time delayed feedback technique as a control algorithm to suppress the observed short term non-Gaussian statistics in spatially strong correlated and intermittent renewable sources.

  3. Analysis of the solar/wind resources in Southern Spain for optimal sizing of hybrid solar-wind power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Ruiz, S.; Pozo-Vazquez, D.; Santos-Alamillos, F. J.; Lara-Fanego, V.; Ruiz-Arias, J. A.; Tovar-Pescador, J.

    2010-09-01

    A drawback common to the solar and wind energy systems is their unpredictable nature and dependence on weather and climate on a wide range of time scales. In addition, the variation of the energy output may not match with the time distribution of the load demand. This can partially be solved by the use of batteries for energy storage in stand-alone systems. The problem caused by the variable nature of the solar and wind resources can be partially overcome by the use of energy systems that uses both renewable resources in a combined manner, that is, hybrid wind-solar systems. Since both resources can show complementary characteristics in certain location, the independent use of solar or wind systems results in considerable over sizing of the batteries system compared to the use of hybrid solar-wind systems. Nevertheless, to the day, there is no single recognized method for properly sizing these hybrid wind-solar systems. In this work, we present a method for sizing wind-solar hybrid systems in southern Spain. The method is based on the analysis of the wind and solar resources on daily scale, particularly, its temporal complementary characteristics. The method aims to minimize the size of the energy storage systems, trying to provide the most reliable supply.

  4. A multiple flux-tube solar wind model

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    We present a new model, MULTI-VP, that computes the three-dimensional structure of the solar wind which includes the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona and low heliosphere. MULTI- VP calculates a large ensemble of wind profiles flowing along open magnetic field-lines which sample the whole three-dimensional atmosphere or, alternatively, on a given region of interest. The radial domain starts from the photosphere and extends, typically, to about 30 $R_{sun}$ . The elementary uni-dimensional wind solutions are based on a mature numerical scheme which was adapted in order to accept any flux-tube geometry. We discuss here the first results obtained with this model. We use Potential Field Source-Surface (PFSS) extrapolations of magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) to determine the structure of the background magnetic field. Our results support the hypothesis that the geometry of the magnetic flux-tubes in the lower corona controls the distribution of slow and fast wind flows. The i...

  5. Study of Drag Coefficients in Solar Panel Under Wind Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro López Llanusa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the geographical situation of Cuba the wind plays an important role in the design of the solar panels. The aim of the research is to evaluate the differences that appear in the support reactions of the panel, due to pressures acting, in correspondence with the implementation of the Cuban standard NC-285: 2003 but varying the pressure coefficient by using standards NBR 6123: 1988, CIRSOC 102, CN-285: 2003, Eurocode 1-4: 2005, ASCE 7-10 and AS-1170.2: 2011. These reactions are also calculat-ed from pressure coefficients obtained by wind tunnel testing on a scale model and coefficients proposed by another international work carried out on a wind tunnel on a similar solar panel. The main conclusions are that: among the standards, the use of the pressure coefficients proposed by the Eurocode 1- 4: 2005 leads to higher values of the support reactions and about the studies on wind tunnel testing, it can be concluded that the use of a total value of pressure coefficient it is not a good approximation to the actual behavior of the pressures on the panel.

  6. Anisotropic Solar Wind Sputtering of the Lunar Surface Induced by Crustal Magnetic Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A. R.; Sarantos, M.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Saito, Y.; Nishino, M.

    2014-01-01

    The lunar exosphere is generated by several processes each of which generates neutral distributions with different spatial and temporal variability. Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface is a major process for many regolith-derived species and typically generates neutral distributions with a cosine dependence on solar zenith angle. Complicating this picture are remanent crustal magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, which decelerate and partially reflect the solar wind before it strikes the surface. We use Kaguya maps of solar wind reflection efficiencies, Lunar Prospector maps of crustal field strengths, and published neutral sputtering yields to calculate anisotropic solar wind sputtering maps. We feed these maps to a Monte Carlo neutral exospheric model to explore three-dimensional exospheric anisotropies and find that significant anisotropies should be present in the neutral exosphere depending on selenographic location and solar wind conditions. Better understanding of solar wind/crustal anomaly interactions could potentially improve our results.

  7. Solar-wind and interplanetary electron measurements on the Apollo 15 subsatellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. A.; Chase, L. M.; Lin, R. P.; Mcguire, R. E.; Mccoy, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of high-energy solar-wind electrons have been made from a low orbit around the moon. Solar-wind electrons can be identified up to energies of about 3000 eV, at which an electron population of entirely different characteristics becomes dominant. The solar-wind cavity on the moon's antisolar side shows evidence of being filled by plasma coming from the downstream direction. When the direction of the interplanetary field corresponds to solar ecliptic azimuth angles of about 90 deg, a partial solar-wind cavity extends across most of the eastern sunlit side of the moon within 20 deg of the moon meridian. There are localized increases in the 500-eV electron flux over much of the sunlit hemisphere. These increases are interpreted to be the result of an interaction between the solar wind and the moon that deflects some of the solar-wind flow and results in limb shocks.

  8. Solar Cluster: multipoint magnetic field and plasma parameter measurements in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, L. E.; Echer, E.; dal Lago, A.; Schuch, N. J.

    This paper has the objective to discus the technical-scientific feasibility of a deep space mission to be proposed to the Brazilian Space Agency (AEB). This mission will be proposed to study the interplanetary magnetic field and the plasma structure of the solar wind. It will consist of a set of identical spacecraft flying in formation in the inner heliosphere during the ascending and maximum phase of the solar cycle 24. It is know that the primary cause of magnetic storms are intense, long duration southward interplanetary magnetic field structures which interconnect with the earth's magnetic field and allow solar wind energy transport into the Earth's magnetotail/magnetosphere. During the most active phase of the solar cycle, solar maximum, the sun's activity is dominated by flares and disappearing filaments, and their concomitant Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Coronal Holes are present, but the holes are small and do not extend from the poles to the equator as often happens in the descending phase of the solar cycle. The fast (>500 km/s) CMEs coming from the sun into the interplanetary space are the solar/coronal features that contain high magnetic fields. These intense southward magnetic fields are observed in the sheath, in the ejection itself and in the rear of the ejection. The interaction between CMEs and the background solar wind, fast co rotating streams and other CMEs are also very important sources of intense southward magnetic fields. In order to study the interplanetary origin of intense geomagnetic storms, several studies have analyzed plasma parameters, composition, ionization state and the interplanetary magnetic field measured by instruments on board of spacecraft as ISEE3, IMP8, Helios, Ulysses, Wind, SOHO and ACE. Great advance on the understanding of the CME structure and interaction with the background solar wind have been reached. However, the spatial scale of these structures could be greater than 0.2 AU, and this kind of observation usually

  9. Analysis of off-grid hybrid wind turbine/solar PV water pumping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    While many remote water pumping systems exist (e.g. mechanical windmills, solar photovoltaic , wind-electric, diesel powered), very few combine both the wind and solar energy resources to possibly improve the reliability and the performance of the system. In this paper, off-grid wind turbine (WT) a...

  10. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M; Spence, Harlan E; Schwadron, Nathan A

    2016-10-03

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  11. Solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere observed by Mars Global Surveyor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-S. Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron density profiles in the Martian ionosphere observed by the radio occultation experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor have been analyzed to determine if the densities are influenced by the solar wind. Evidence is presented that the altitude of the maximum ionospheric electron density shows a positive correlation to the energetic proton flux in the solar wind. The solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere can be attributed to heating of the neutral atmosphere by the solar wind energetic proton precipitation. The modulation is observed to be most prominent at high solar zenith angles. It is argued that this is consistent with the proposed modulation mechanism.

  12. Ensemble downscaling in coupled solar wind-magnetosphere modeling for space weather forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M J; Horbury, T S; Wicks, R T; McGregor, S L; Savani, N P; Xiong, M

    2014-06-01

    Advanced forecasting of space weather requires simulation of the whole Sun-to-Earth system, which necessitates driving magnetospheric models with the outputs from solar wind models. This presents a fundamental difficulty, as the magnetosphere is sensitive to both large-scale solar wind structures, which can be captured by solar wind models, and small-scale solar wind "noise," which is far below typical solar wind model resolution and results primarily from stochastic processes. Following similar approaches in terrestrial climate modeling, we propose statistical "downscaling" of solar wind model results prior to their use as input to a magnetospheric model. As magnetospheric response can be highly nonlinear, this is preferable to downscaling the results of magnetospheric modeling. To demonstrate the benefit of this approach, we first approximate solar wind model output by smoothing solar wind observations with an 8 h filter, then add small-scale structure back in through the addition of random noise with the observed spectral characteristics. Here we use a very simple parameterization of noise based upon the observed probability distribution functions of solar wind parameters, but more sophisticated methods will be developed in the future. An ensemble of results from the simple downscaling scheme are tested using a model-independent method and shown to add value to the magnetospheric forecast, both improving the best estimate and quantifying the uncertainty. We suggest a number of features desirable in an operational solar wind downscaling scheme.

  13. The Contribution of Coronal Jets To The Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Lionello, R; Titov, V S; Leake, J E; MikiĆ, Z; Linker, J A; Linton, M G

    2016-01-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the solar corona, commonly known as coronal (or X-ray) jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity. It has been suggested that these events contribute to the mass and energy content of the corona and solar wind, but the extent of these contributions remains uncertain. We have recently modeled the formation and evolution of coronal jets using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with thermodynamics in a large spherical domain that includes the solar wind. Our model is coupled to 3D MHD flux-emergence simulations, i.e, we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. The model includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction, which enables us to simulate the dynamics and plasma properties of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far. Here we employ these simulations to calculate the amount of mass and energy transported by coronal j...

  14. Research on Control System of Spindle Drive for High Speed Spinning Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏建

    2001-01-01

    Through analyzing the principle of spindle drive of winding mechanism for high speed spinning machine,the article not only describes a kind of mode of spindle drive for take-up motion on the basis of control method of constant velocity winding, but also introduces the design technique of software and hardware for the control system of mechatronics of spindle drive mode for take- up motion on the basis of constant velocity winding for high speed spinning machine with single-chip microcomputer. The mathematical model to describe the spindle rotating speed is established. It is an important technology for high speed spinning machine and provides a feasible application way.

  15. Solar Wind Strahl Broadening by Self-Generated Plasma Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, J.; Vinas, A. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.

    2013-01-01

    This Letter reports on the results of numerical simulations which may provide a possible explanation for the strahl broadening during quiet solar conditions. The relevant processes involved in the broadening are due to kinetic quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. Making use of static analytical electron distribution in an inhomogeneous field, it is found that self-generated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency, i.e., Langmuir waves, are capable of scattering the strahl component, resulting in energy and pitch-angle diffusion that broadens its velocity distribution significantly. The present theoretical results provide an alternative or complementary explanation to the usual whistler diffusion scenario, suggesting that self-induced electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency might play a key role in broadening the solar wind strahl during quiet solar conditions.

  16. Cometary X-rays : solar wind charge exchange in cometary atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the planets and the interstellar medium is of key importance for the evolution of our solar system. The interaction with Earth's atmosphere is best known for the northern light. In case of Mars, the interaction with the solar wind might have lead to the erosion

  17. Anisotropic winds from close-in extra-solar planets

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, James M

    2008-01-01

    We present two-dimensional hydrodynamic models of thermally driven winds from highly irradiated, close-in extra-solar planets. We adopt a very simple treatment of the radiative heating processes at the base of the wind, and instead focus on the differences between the properties of outflows in multidimensions in comparison to spherically symmetric models computed with the same methods. For hot (T > 2 x 10^{4} K) or highly ionized gas, we find strong (supersonic) polar flows are formed above the planet surface which produce weak shocks and outflow on the night-side. In comparison to a spherically symmetric wind with the same parameters, the sonic surface on the day-side is much closer to the planet surface in multidimensions, and the total mass loss rate is reduced by almost a factor of four. We also compute the steady-state structure of interacting planetary and stellar winds. Both winds end in a termination shock, with a parabolic contact discontinuity which is draped over the planet separating the two shock...

  18. Estimation of wind and solar resources in Mali

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, J.; Kamissoko, F.; Olander Rasmussen, M.; Larsen, Soeren; Guidon, N.; Boye Hansen, L.; Dewilde, L.; Alhousseini, M.; Noergaard, P.; Nygaard, I.

    2012-11-15

    The wind resource has been estimated for all of Mali at 7.5 km resolution using the KAMM/WAsP numerical wind atlas methodology. Three domains were used to cover entire country and three sets of wind classes used to capture change in large scale forcing over country. The final output includes generalized climate statistics for any location in Mali, giving wind direction and wind speed distribution. The modelled generalized climate statistics can be used directly in the WAsP software. The preliminary results show a wind resource, which is relatively low, but which under certain conditions may be economically feasible, i.e. at favourably exposed sites, giving enhanced winds, and where practical utilization is possible, given consideration to grid connection or replacement or augmentation of diesel-based electricity systems. The solar energy resource for Mali was assessed for the period between July 2008 and June 2011 using a remote sensing based estimate of the down-welling surface shortwave flux. The remote sensing estimates were adjusted on a month-by-month basis to account for seasonal differences between the remote sensing estimates and in situ data. Calibration was found to improve the coefficient of determination as well as decreasing the mean error both for the calibration and validation data. Compared to the results presented in the ''Renewable energy resources in Mali - preliminary mapping''-report that showed a tendency for underestimation compared to data from the NASA PPOWER/SSE database, the presented results show a very good agreement with the in situ data (after calibration) with no significant bias. Unfortunately, the NASA-database only contains data up until 2005, so a similar comparison could not be done for the time period analyzed in this study, although the agreement with the historic NASA data is still useful as reference. (LN)

  19. The influence of solar wind variability on magnetospheric ULF wave power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhotelov, D.; Rae, I.J. [UCL, Dorking (United Kingdom). Mullard Space Science Lab.; Murphy, K.R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Mann, I.R. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    2015-10-01

    Magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) oscillations in the Pc 4-5 frequency range play an important role in the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts, both by enhancing the radial diffusion through incoherent interactions and through the coherent drift-resonant interactions with trapped radiation belt electrons. The statistical distributions of magnetospheric ULF wave power are known to be strongly dependent on solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Statistical characterisation of ULF wave power in the magnetosphere traditionally relies on average solar wind-IMF conditions over a specific time period. In this brief report, we perform an alternative characterisation of the solar wind influence on magnetospheric ULF wave activity through the characterisation of the solar wind driver by its variability using the standard deviation of solar wind parameters rather than a simple time average. We present a statistical study of nearly one solar cycle (1996-2004) of geosynchronous observations of magnetic ULF wave power and find that there is significant variation in ULF wave powers as a function of the dynamic properties of the solar wind. In particular, we find that the variability in IMF vector, rather than variabilities in other parameters (solar wind density, bulk velocity and ion temperature), plays the strongest role in controlling geosynchronous ULF power. We conclude that, although time-averaged bulk properties of the solar wind are a key factor in driving ULF powers in the magnetosphere, the solar wind variability can be an important contributor as well. This highlights the potential importance of including solar wind variability especially in studies of ULF wave dynamics in order to assess the efficiency of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling.

  20. Were Chondrite Parent Bodies Magnetized by the Early Solar Wind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, R.; Weiss, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    Chondrites are traditionally thought to be samples of undifferentiated bodies that never experienced large-scale melting. However, Allende and several other CV carbonaceous chondrites (Carporzen et al. 2011, Gattacceca et al., submitted) and the H chondrite Portales Valley (Bryson et al., this meeting) contain remanent magnetization acquired well after accretion. The strong intensities (tens of micro Tesla), temporal stability (lasting for several My), and late ages ( 10-100 My after solar system formation) of the magnetizations suggest they are a record of dynamos formed by a molten metallic core. This would imply that the parent bodies of these meteorites were partially differentiated, containing both melted regions and a relic chondritic crust (Abraham et al., this meeting). However, it has alternatively been proposed that CV chondrites may have been magnetized by the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) carried by the early solar wind (Tarduno et al. 2016), and which was hypothesized to be amplified at the nose of the body due to solar wind pile-up. Here we demonstrate that this scenario is unlikely, due to four main factors: 1) the magnitude of the IMF is estimated to be only 0.005 - 0.05 micro T at 1 AU for the young Sun, 2) the lack of an ionosphere and the resistivity of the crust would limit the magnetic field pile-up, 3) the time variability of the IMF in both magnitude and direction [Fig. 1A] would cuase only a fraction of the IMF to diffuse into the body [Fig. 1B], and 4) even the weak field that manages to diffuse in changes over timescales much shorter than the My timescale of magnetization acquisition and thus cannot impart a unidirectional magnetization. We demonstrate these effects quantitatively using analytical arguments, numerical simulations and analysis of solar wind in-situ measurements.

  1. Dynamics of large-scale solar-wind streams obtained by the double superposed epoch analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yermolaev, Yu I; Nikolaeva, N S; Yermolaev, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    Using the OMNI data for period 1976-2000 we investigate the temporal profiles of 20 plasma and field parameters in the disturbed large-scale types of solar wind (SW): CIR, ICME (both MC and Ejecta) and Sheath as well as the interplanetary shock (IS). To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: re-scaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide. As the analyzed SW types can interact with each other and change parameters as a result of such interaction, we investigate separately 8 sequences of SW types: (1) CIR, (2) IS/CIR, (3) Ejecta, (4) Sheath/Ejecta, (5) IS/Sheath/Ejecta, (6) MC, (7) Sheath/MC, and (8) IS/Sheath/MC. The main conclusion is that the behavior of parameters in Sheath and in CIR are very similar both qualitatively and quantitatively. Both the high-speed stream (HSS) and the fast ICME play a role of pistons which push the pl...

  2. Effect of uncertainties in solar synoptic magnetic flux maps in modeling of solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Bertello, Luca; MacNeice, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the NSO/SOLIS team developed variance (error) maps that represent uncertainties in magnetic flux synoptic charts. These uncertainties are determined by the spatial variances of the magnetic flux distribution from full disk magnetograms that contribute to each bin in the synoptic chart. Here we present a study of the effects of variances on solar wind parameters (wind speed, density, magnetic field, and temperature) derived using the WSA-ENLIL model and ensemble modeling approach. We compare the results of the modeling with near-Earth solar wind magnetic field and plasma data as extracted from NASA/GSFC's OMNI data set. We show that analysis of uncertainties may be useful for understanding the sensitivity of the model predictions to short-term evolution of magnetic field and noise in the synoptic magnetograms.

  3. Cutting tool materials for high speed machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhanqiang; AI Xing

    2005-01-01

    High speed machining (HSM) is one of the emerging cutting processes, which is machining at a speed significantlyhigher than the speed commonly in use on the shop floor. In the last twenty years, high speed machining has received great attentions as a technological solution for high productivity in manufacturing. This article reviews the developments of tool materials in high speed machining operations, and the properties, applications and prospective developments of tool materials in HSM are also presented.

  4. Wind Tunnel Tests of Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors: March 2001--August 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoya, N.; Peterka, J. A.; Gee, R. C.; Kearney, D.

    2008-05-01

    Conducted extensive wind-tunnel tests on parabolic trough solar collectors to determine practical wind loads applicable to structural design for stress and deformation, and local component design for concentrator reflectors.

  5. High speed imaging - An important industrial tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alton; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    High-speed photography, which is a rapid sequence of photographs that allow an event to be analyzed through the stoppage of motion or the production of slow-motion effects, is examined. In high-speed photography 16, 35, and 70 mm film and framing rates between 64-12,000 frames per second are utilized to measure such factors as angles, velocities, failure points, and deflections. The use of dual timing lamps in high-speed photography and the difficulties encountered with exposure and programming the camera and event are discussed. The application of video cameras to the recording of high-speed events is described.

  6. Comparison of High Speed Congestion Control Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawhar Ben Abed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Congestion control limits the quantity of information input at a rate less important than that of thetransmission one to ensure good performance as well as protect against overload and blocking of thenetwork. Researchers have done a great deal of work on improving congestion control protocols,especially on high speed networks.In this paper, we will be studying the congestion control alongside low and high speed congestion controlprotocols. We will be also simulating, evaluating, and comparing eight of high speed congestion controlprotocols : Bic TCP, Cubic TCP, Hamilton TCP, HighSpeed TCP, Illinois TCP, Scalable TCP,Compound TCP and YeAH TCP, with multiple flows.

  7. High Speed On-Wafer Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the High Speed On-Wafer Characterization Laboratory, researchers characterize and model devices operating at terahertz (THz) and millimeter-wave frequencies. The...

  8. High Speed On-Wafer Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the High Speed On-Wafer Characterization Laboratory, researchers characterize and model devices operating at terahertz (THz) and millimeter-wave frequencies. The...

  9. Multifractal analysis of high resolution solar wind proton density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Leonardis, Ersilia; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdenek

    2017-03-01

    The solar wind is a highly turbulent medium, with a high level of field fluctuations throughout a broad range of scales. These include an inertial range where a turbulent cascade is assumed to be active. The solar wind cascade shows intermittency, which however may depend on the wind conditions. Recent observations have shown that ion-scale magnetic turbulence is almost self-similar, rather than intermittent. A similar result was observed for the high resolution measurements of proton density provided by the spacecraft Spektr-R. Intermittency may be interpreted as the result of the multifractal properties of the turbulent cascade. In this perspective, this paper is devoted to the description of the multifractal properties of the high resolution density measurements. In particular, we have used the standard coarse-graining technique to evaluate the generalized dimensions Dq , and from these the multifractal spectrum f (α) , in two ranges of scale. A fit with the p-model for intermittency provided a quantitative measure of multifractality. Such indicator was then compared with alternative measures: the width of the multifractal spectrum, the peak of the kurtosis, and its scaling exponent. The results indicate that the small-scale fluctuations are multifractal, and suggest that different measures of intermittency are required to fully understand the small scale cascade.

  10. Solar wind influences on atmospheric electricity variables in polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michnowski, Stanisław

    The measurement techniques applied in magnetospheric and ionospheric research enable detection of strong, intrinsic effects of solar wind on ionospheric electrical potential distribution and conductivity of the atmosphere. These manifestations of the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere and ionosphere are especially evident at high latitudes. The possibility of observing there the response of the atmospheric electricity variables to solar wind has been questioned for a long time despite the fact that the atmospheric electric field and current variations at the ground are physically linked with electric potential of the ionosphere and conductivity of the lower atmosphere. The serious doubts were mainly due to the generally accepted opinion that the highly conducting ionosphere is an almost ideal equipotential electric screen that separates the weakly conductive lower atmosphere of the influence from space. This assumption could not be further upheld in view of the new findings. They have been provided for some time by ground-based atmospheric electric field and current measurements (AEMs) with simultaneous upper atmosphere observations and by corresponding balloon measurements. Recent ground-based AEMs in polar regions, i.e., in the near-subauroral, auroral, and polar cap high-latitude regions, have detected considerable influence of solar wind on the lower-atmosphere electric variables. However, the use of atmospheric electric observations in studying solar-terrestrial relations is still limited. The main reason is difficulty in separating various local meteorological effects, anthropogenic effects, and the effects of the global electric current circuit which affect simultaneously the measured quantities. Transmission of the electric signals through the lower atmosphere can also introduce troublesome disturbances. The paper outlines these problems and hints how the difficulties involved might be partly overcome in a feasible way. The needs and possible

  11. Kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation in the solar wind: key observational results and future outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M L; Wicks, R T; Perri, S; Sahraoui, F

    2015-05-13

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in the solar wind. Turbulence causes kinetic and magnetic energy to cascade to small scales where they are eventually dissipated, adding heat to the plasma. The details of how this occurs are not well understood. This article reviews the evidence for turbulent dissipation and examines various diagnostics for identifying solar wind regions where dissipation is occurring. We also discuss how future missions will further enhance our understanding of the importance of turbulence to solar wind dynamics.

  12. Investigating the Correlation Between Wind and Solar Power Forecast Errors in the Western Interconnection: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.; Florita, A.

    2013-05-01

    Wind and solar power generations differ from conventional energy generation because of the variable and uncertain nature of their power output. This variability and uncertainty can have significant impacts on grid operations. Thus, short-term forecasting of wind and solar generation is uniquely helpful for power system operations to balance supply and demand in an electricity system. This paper investigates the correlation between wind and solar power forecasting errors.

  13. High-Speed Ring Bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The high-speed ring bus at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) allows for future growth trends in spacecraft seen with future scientific missions. This innovation constitutes an enhancement of the 1393 bus as documented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1393-1999 standard for a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus. It allows for high-bandwidth and time synchronization of all nodes on the ring. The JPL ring bus allows for interconnection of active units with autonomous operation and increased fault handling at high bandwidths. It minimizes the flight software interface with an intelligent physical layer design that has few states to manage as well as simplified testability. The design will soon be documented in the AS-1393 standard (Serial Hi-Rel Ring Network for Aerospace Applications). The framework is designed for "Class A" spacecraft operation and provides redundant data paths. It is based on "fault containment regions" and "redundant functional regions (RFR)" and has a method for allocating cables that completely supports the redundancy in spacecraft design, allowing for a complete RFR to fail. This design reduces the mass of the bus by incorporating both the Control Unit and the Data Unit in the same hardware. The standard uses ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) packets, standardized by ITU-T, ANSI, ETSI, and the ATM Forum. The IEEE-1393 standard uses the UNI form of the packet and provides no protection for the data portion of the cell. The JPL design adds optional formatting to this data portion. This design extends fault protection beyond that of the interconnect. This includes adding protection to the data portion that is contained within the Bus Interface Units (BIUs) and by adding to the signal interface between the Data Host and the JPL 1393 Ring Bus. Data transfer on the ring bus does not involve a master or initiator. Following bus protocol, any BIU may transmit data on the ring whenever it has data received from its host. There

  14. Observations and Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Alfvénic fluctuations are a ubiquitous component of the solar wind. Evidence from many spacecraft indicates that the fluctuations are convected out of the solar corona with relatively flat power spectra and constitute a source of free energy for a turbulent cascade of magnetic and kinetic energy to high wave numbers. Observations and simulations support the conclusion that the cascade evolves most rapidly in the vicinity of velocity shears and current sheets. Numerical solutions of the magnetohydrodynamic equations have elucidated the role of expansion on the evolution of the turbulence. Such studies are clarifying not only how a turbulent cascade develops, but also the nature of the symmetries of the turbulence. Of particular interest is the origin of the two-component correlation function of magnetic fluctuations that was deduced from ISEE-3 data. A central issue to be resolved is whether the correlation function indicates the existence of a quasi-two- dimensional component of the turbulence, or reflects another origin, such as pressure-balanced structures or small velocity shears. In our efforts to simulate solar wind turbulence we have included a tilted rotating current heliospheric sheet as well as variety of waves (e.g., Alfvénic, quasi-two-dimensional, pressure balance structures) and microstreams. These simulations have replicated many of the observations, but challenges remain.

  15. The Solar Wind as a Magnetofluid Turbulence Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    The solar wind is the Sun's exosphere. As the solar atmosphere expands into interplanetary space, it is accelerated and heated. Data from spacecraft located throughout the heliosphere have revealed that this exosphere has velocities of several hundred kilometers/sec, densities at Earth orbit of about 5 particles/cu cm, and an entrained magnetic field that at Earth orbit that is about 5 10-5 Gauss. A fascinating feature of the solar wind is that the magnetic field fluctuates in a way that is highly reminiscent of "Alfven waves, i.e., the fluctuating magnetic fields are more-or-less aligned with fluctuations in the velocity of the plasma and, with proper normalization, have approximately equal magnitudes. The imperfect (observed) alignment leads to a variety of complex interactions. In many respects, the flow patterns appear to be an example of fully developed magneto fluid turbulence. Recently, the dissipation range of this turbulence has been studied using search coil magnetometer data from the STAFF instrument on the four Cluster spacecraft. I will attempt to give an overview of selected properties of this large-scale and small-scale turbulence.

  16. Slow Solar Wind: Observable Characteristics for Constraining Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Abbo, L.; Antiochos, S. K.; Hansteen, V. H.; Harra, L.; Ko, Y. K.; Lapenta, G.; Li, B.; Riley, P.; Strachan, L.; von Steiger, R.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Slow Solar Wind (SSW) origin is an open issue in the post SOHO era and forms a major objective for planned future missions such as the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.Results from spacecraft data, combined with theoretical modeling, have helped to investigate many aspects of the SSW. Fundamental physical properties of the coronal plasma have been derived from spectroscopic and imaging remote-sensing data and in-situ data, and these results have provided crucial insights for a deeper understanding of the origin and acceleration of the SSW.Advances models of the SSW in coronal streamers and other structures have been developed using 3D MHD and multi-fluid equations.Nevertheless, there are still debated questions such as:What are the source regions of SSW? What are their contributions to the SSW?Which is the role of the magnetic topology in corona for the origin, acceleration and energy deposition of SSW?Which are the possible acceleration and heating mechanisms for the SSW?The aim of this study is to present the insights on the SSW origin and formationarisen during the discussions at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) by the Team entitled ''Slowsolar wind sources and acceleration mechanisms in the corona'' held in Bern (Switzerland) in March2014--2015. The attached figure will be presented to summarize the different hypotheses of the SSW formation.

  17. Critical point of the solar wind by radio sounding data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotova, N. A.; Oraevsky, V. N.; Pisarenko, Ya. V.; Vladimirskii, K. V.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the close-to-Sun plasmas sounding at the transonic region of the solar wind, where the sub-to supersonic flow transition proceeds (at 10 to 40 solar radii from the Sun), are presented. Natural sources of two types were used, water vapour maser sources at 1.35 cm and guasars at 2.9 m wavelength. scattering observations cover the period of 1986 to 1993, Russian Academy of Sciences telescopes RT-22 and DCR-1000 were used, IPS index and scattering angle being the immediate results of observations. Extensive studies of the scintillation index and scattering angle radial profiles reveal a remarkable structural detail, 'transonic region forrunner'-narrow region of diminished scattering close to the internal border of the extended transonic region with its characteristic enhanced scattering. Comparisons of the scattering and plasma velocity profiles let it possible to determine the critical point positions by the comparatively simple scattering observations. This new possibility widely improves the process of the basic data accumulation in the fundamental problem of the solar wind acceleration mechanism.

  18. Solar Wind Sputtering of Lunar Soil Analogs: The Effect of Ionic Charge and Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, H.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Rouleau, C. M.; Barghouty, A. F.; Rickman, D. L.; Hijazi, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution we report sput-tering measurements of anorthite, an analog material representative of the lunar highlands, by singly and multicharged ions representative of the solar wind. The ions investigated include protons, as well as singly and multicharged Ar ions (as proxies for the heavier solar wind constituents), in the charge state range +1 to +9, and had a fixed solar-wind-relevant impact velocity of approximately 310 km/s or 500 eV/ amu. The goal of the measurements was to determine the sputtering contribution of the heavy, multicharged minority solar wind constituents in comparison to that due to the dominant H+ fraction.

  19. Solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field as the main factors controlling Saturn's aurorae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F J; Clarke, J T; Dougherty, M K; Hanlon, P G; Hansen, K C; Steinberg, J T; Barraclough, B L; Coates, A J; Gérard, J-C; Grodent, D; Kurth, W S; Mitchell, D G; Rymer, A M; Young, D T

    2005-02-17

    The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms, but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer planets' magnetospheres is poorly understood. Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics and aurorae are dominated by processes internal to the jovian system, whereas Saturn's magnetosphere has generally been considered to have both internal and solar-wind-driven processes. This hypothesis, however, is tentative because of limited simultaneous solar wind and magnetospheric measurements. Here we report solar wind measurements, immediately upstream of Saturn, over a one-month period. When combined with simultaneous ultraviolet imaging we find that, unlike Jupiter, Saturn's aurorae respond strongly to solar wind conditions. But in contrast to Earth, the main controlling factor appears to be solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field, with the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field playing a much more limited role. Saturn's magnetosphere is, therefore, strongly driven by the solar wind, but the solar wind conditions that drive it differ from those that drive the Earth's magnetosphere.

  20. Wind Solar Hybrid System Rectifier Stage Topology Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup M. Gakare

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents power-control strategies of a grid-connected hybrid generation system with versatile power transfer. The hybrid system allows maximum utilization of freely available renewable sources like wind and photovoltaic energies. This paper presents a new system configuration of the multi input rectifier stage for a hybrid wind and photovoltaic energy system. This configuration allows the two sources to supply the load simultaneously depending on the availability of the energy sources maximum power from the sun when it is available. An adaptive MPPT algorithm with a standard perturbs and observed method will be used for the Photo Voltaic system. The main advantage of the hybrid system is to give continuous power supply to the load. The gating pulses to the inverter switches are implemented with conventional and fuzzy controller. This hybrid wind-photo voltaic system is modeled in MATLAB/ SIMULINK environment. Simulation circuit is analyzed and results are presented for this hybrid wind and solar energy system.

  1. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Antiochos, S K; Titov, V S; Lionello, R; Linker, J A

    2011-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind also has large angular width, up to ~ 60{\\circ}, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far from the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spat...

  2. Standing shocks in the inner slow solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Li, Xing

    2011-01-01

    The slow solar wind, or at least a significant part of it, originates from the region bordering streamer helmets, where the flow tube geometry is distinct from flow tubes rooted in the center of coronal holes. We examine whether this particular tube geometry leads to standing shocks in the inner slow wind in this region. To isolate the influence of tube geometry, a simple isothermal wind model is employed and is solved in terms of the Lambert W function. In addition to a continuous solution, the model may also admit solutions with shocks, readily constructed with a graphical approach. When allowed, the shock solutions appear in pairs, one with a shock located in the streamer stalk, the other with a shock below the cusp along the streamer border. We show that solutions with standing shocks exist in a broad area in the parameter space characterizing the wind temperature and flow tube. In particular, streamers with cusps located at a heliocentric distance $\\gtrsim 3.2 R_\\odot$ can readily support discontinuous s...

  3. Operation of Concentrating Solar Power Plants in the Western Wind and Solar Integration Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Hummon, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) explores various aspects of the challenges and impacts of integrating large amounts of wind and solar energy into the electric power system of the West. The phase 2 study (WWSIS-2) is one of the first to include dispatchable concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) in multiple scenarios of renewable penetration and mix. As a result, it provides unique insights into CSP plant operation, grid benefits, and how CSP operation and configuration may need to change under scenarios of increased renewable penetration. Examination of the WWSIS-2 results indicates that in all scenarios, CSP plants with TES provides firm system capacity, reducing the net demand and the need for conventional thermal capacity. The plants also reduced demand during periods of short-duration, high ramping requirements that often require use of lower efficiency peaking units. Changes in CSP operation are driven largely by the presence of other solar generation, particularly PV. Use of storage by the CSP plants increases in the higher solar scenarios, with operation of the plant often shifted to later in the day. CSP operation also becomes more variable, including more frequent starts. Finally, CSP output is often very low during the day in scenarios with significant PV, which helps decrease overall renewable curtailment (over-generation). However, the configuration studied is likely not optimal for High Solar Scenario implying further analysis of CSP plant configuration is needed to understand its role in enabling high renewable scenarios in the Western United States.

  4. Kinetic Signatures and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, K T; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-01-01

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are non-uniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3--4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  5. Alleviating alpha quenching by solar wind and meridional flow

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Tavakol, Reza; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    We study the ability of magnetic helicity expulsion to alleviate catastrophic $\\alpha$-quenching in mean field dynamos in two--dimensional spherical wedge domains. Motivated by the physical state of the outer regions of the Sun, we consider $\\alpha^2\\Omega$ mean field models with a dynamical $\\alpha$ quenching. We include two mechanisms which have the potential to facilitate helicity expulsion, namely advection by a mean flow (``solar wind'') and meridional circulation. We find that a wind alone can prevent catastrophic quenching, with the field saturating at finite amplitude. In certain parameter ranges, the presence of a large-scale meridional circulation can reinforce this alleviation. However, the saturated field strengths are typically below the equipartition field strength. We discuss possible mechanisms that might increase the saturated field.

  6. Alleviating α quenching by solar wind and meridional flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, D.; Moss, D.; Tavakol, R.; Brandenburg, A.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We study the ability of magnetic helicity expulsion to alleviate catastrophic α-quenching in mean field dynamos in two-dimensional spherical wedge domains. Methods: Motivated by the physical state of the outer regions of the Sun, we consider α^2Ω mean field models with a dynamical α quenching. We include two mechanisms which have the potential to facilitate helicity expulsion, namely advection by a mean flow ("solar wind") and meridional circulation. Results: We find that a wind alone can prevent catastrophic quenching, with the field saturating at finite amplitude. In certain parameter ranges, the presence of a large-scale meridional circulation can reinforce this alleviation. However, the saturated field strengths are typically below the equipartition field strength. We discuss possible mechanisms that might increase the saturated field.

  7. The origins of planar magnetic structures in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugebauer, M.; Clay, D.R. (California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena (United States)); Gosling, J.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The authors report on an assessment of extensive solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data obtained by ISEE-3, between Aug 1978 and Oct 1982, when it was upstream of the earth's bow shock. They looked for events given the name planar magnetic structure (PMS). A PMS event is a series of abrupt changes in the IMF, where the magnetic field is observed to take almost all values in some plane. Numerous possible explanations have been offered for these phenomena, and the authors looked at this data set to see if it would aid in the understanding of the origin of PMS. They observed the PMS events to generally be associated with two events: they tended to occur near the interplanetary current sheet, or; they tended to occur in the sheath of the wind plasma between an interplanetary shock, and the plasma which drove it.

  8. Kinetic signatures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-06-29

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 A.U. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are nonuniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3-4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  9. Reconnection outflow generated turbulence in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös, Z; Semenov, V S; Zaqarashvili, T V; Bruno, R; Khodachenko, M

    2014-01-01

    Petschek-type time-dependent reconnection (TDR) and quasi-stationary reconnection (QSR) models are considered to understand reconnection outflow structures and the features of the associated locally generated turbulence in the solar wind. We show that the outflow structures, such as discontinuites, Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable flux tubes or continuous space filling flows cannot be distinguished from one-point WIND measurements. In both models the reconnection outflows can generate more or less spatially extended turbulent boundary layers (TBDs). The structure of an unique extended reconnection outflow is investigated in detail. The analysis of spectral scalings and break locations show that reconnection outflows can control the local field and plasma conditions which may play in favor of one or another turbulent dissipation mechanisms with their characteristic scales and wavenumbers.

  10. Structure, dynamics, and seasonal variability of the Mars-solar wind interaction: MAVEN Solar Wind Ion Analyzer in-flight performance and science results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Harada, Y.; Collinson, G.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; McFadden, J. P.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Eparvier, F.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the in-flight performance of the Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) and observations of the Mars-solar wind interaction made during the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) prime mission and a portion of its extended mission, covering 0.85 Martian years. We describe the data products returned by SWIA and discuss the proper handling of measurements made with different mechanical attenuator states and telemetry modes, and the effects of penetrating and scattered backgrounds, limited phase space coverage, and multi-ion populations on SWIA observations. SWIA directly measures solar wind protons and alpha particles upstream from Mars. SWIA also provides proxy measurements of solar wind and neutral densities based on products of charge exchange between the solar wind and the hydrogen corona. Together, upstream and proxy observations provide a complete record of the solar wind experienced by Mars, enabling organization of the structure, dynamics, and ion escape from the magnetosphere. We observe an interaction that varies with season and solar wind conditions. Solar wind dynamic pressure, Mach number, and extreme ultraviolet flux all affect the bow shock location. We confirm the occurrence of order-of-magnitude seasonal variations of the hydrogen corona. We find that solar wind Alfvén waves, which provide an additional energy input to Mars, vary over the mission. At most times, only weak mass loading occurs upstream from the bow shock. However, during periods with near-radial interplanetary magnetic fields, structures consistent with Short Large Amplitude Magnetic Structures and their wakes form upstream, dramatically reconfiguring the Martian bow shock and magnetosphere.

  11. Line Ratios for Solar Wind Charge Exchange with Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, P. D.; Cumbee, R. S.; Lyons, D.; Gu, L.; Kaastra, J.; Shelton, R. L.; Stancil, P. C.

    2017-07-01

    Charge exchange (CX) has emerged in X-ray emission modeling as a significant process that must be considered in many astrophysical environments—particularly comets. Comets host an interaction between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals to promote solar wind charge exchange (SWCX). X-ray observatories provide astronomers and astrophysicists with data for many X-ray emitting comets that are impossible to accurately model without reliable CX data. Here, we utilize a streamlined set of computer programs that incorporate the multi-channel Landau-Zener theory and a cascade model for X-ray emission to generate cross sections and X-ray line ratios for a variety of bare and non-bare ion single electron capture (SEC) collisions. Namely, we consider collisions between the solar wind constituent bare and H-like ions of C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, and Si and the cometary neutrals H2O, CO, CO2, OH, and O. To exemplify the application of this data, we model the X-ray emission of Comet C/2000 WM1 (linear) using the CX package in SPEX and find excellent agreement with observations made with the XMM-Newton RGS detector. Our analyses show that the X-ray intensity is dominated by SWCX with H, while H2O plays a secondary role. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that CX cross sections have been implemented into a X-ray spectral fitting package to determine the H to H2O ratio in cometary atmospheres. The CX data sets are incorporated into the modeling packages SPEX and Kronos.

  12. Research on Aerodynamic Noise Reduction for High-Speed Trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A broadband noise source model based on Lighthill’s acoustic theory was used to perform numerical simulations of the aerodynamic noise sources for a high-speed train. The near-field unsteady flow around a high-speed train was analysed based on a delayed detached-eddy simulation (DDES using the finite volume method with high-order difference schemes. The far-field aerodynamic noise from a high-speed train was predicted using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD/Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H acoustic analogy. An analysis of noise reduction methods based on the main noise sources was performed. An aerodynamic noise model for a full-scale high-speed train, including three coaches with six bogies, two inter-coach spacings, two windscreen wipers, and two pantographs, was established. Several low-noise design improvements for the high-speed train were identified, based primarily on the main noise sources; these improvements included the choice of the knuckle-downstream or knuckle-upstream pantograph orientation as well as different pantograph fairing structures, pantograph fairing installation positions, pantograph lifting configurations, inter-coach spacings, and bogie skirt boards. Based on the analysis, we designed a low-noise structure for a full-scale high-speed train with an average sound pressure level (SPL 3.2 dB(A lower than that of the original train. Thus, the noise reduction design goal was achieved. In addition, the accuracy of the aerodynamic noise calculation method was demonstrated via experimental wind tunnel tests.

  13. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  14. On reflection of Alfven waves in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogulec, M.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; Moore, R. L.; Nerney, S. F.

    1993-01-01

    We have revisited the problem of propagation of toroidal and linear Alfven waves formulated by Heinemann and Olbert (1980) to compare WKB and non-WKB waves and their effects on the solar wind. They considered two solar wind models and showed that reflection is important for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one day and longer, and that non-WKB Alfven waves are no more effective in accelerating the solar wind than WKB waves. There are several recently published papers which seem to indicate that Alfven waves with periods of the order of several minutes should be treated as non-WKB waves and that these non-WKB waves exert a stronger acceleration force than WKB waves. The purpose of this paper is to study the origin of these discrepancies by performing parametric studies of the behavior of the waves under a variety of different conditions. In addition, we want to investigate two problems that have not been addressed by Heinemann and Olbert, namely, calculate the efficiency of Alfven wave reflection by using the reflection coefficient and identify the region of strongest wave reflection in different wind models. To achieve these goals, we investigated the influence of temperature, electron density distribution, wind velocity and magnetic field strength on the waves. The obtained results clearly demonstrate that Alfven wave reflection is strongly model dependent and that the strongest reflection can be expected in models with the base temperatures higher than 10(exp 6) K and with the base densities lower than 7 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -3). In these models as well as in the models with lower temperatures and higher densities, Alfven waves with periods as short as several minutes have negligible reflection so that they can be treated as WKB waves; however, for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one hour or longer reflection is significant, requiring a non-WKB treatment. We also show that non-WKB, linear Alfven waves are always less effective in accelerating the

  15. The Nature of Subproton Scale Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Xia, Q; Perez, J C

    2013-01-01

    The nature of subproton scale fluctuations in the solar wind is an open question, partly because two similar types of electromagnetic turbulence can occur: kinetic Alfven turbulence and whistler turbulence. These two possibilities, however, have one key qualitative difference: whistler turbulence, unlike kinetic Alfven turbulence, has negligible power in density fluctuations. In this Letter, we present new observational data, as well as analytical and numerical results, to investigate this difference. The results show, for the first time, that the fluctuations well below the proton scale are predominantly kinetic Alfven turbulence, and, if present at all, the whistler fluctuations make up only a small fraction of the total energy.

  16. Linear magnetosonic waves in solar wind flow tubes

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Nakariakov et al. (1996) investigated the linear magnetosonic waves trapped within solar wind flow tubes, where they accounted for a slab having boundaries at $x = \\pm d$ and extended up to infinity in the $y$ and $z$ directions. Srivastava and Dwivedi (2006) claimed to extend that work by considering a two-dimensional slab. We find that the work of Srivastava and Dwivedi (2006) is not for a two-dimensional slab and has a number of discrepancies. Further, their results for body waves are not ...

  17. Transport of Solar Wind Fluctuations: A Two-Component Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.; Breech, B.; Isenberg, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the transport of solar wind fluctuations which treats them as two interacting incompressible components: quasi-two-dimensional turbulence and a wave-like piece. Quantities solved for include the energy, cross helicity, and characteristic transverse length scale of each component, plus the proton temperature. The development of the model is outlined and numerical solutions are compared with spacecraft observations. Compared to previous single-component models, this new model incorporates a more physically realistic treatment of fluctuations induced by pickup ions and yields improved agreement with observed values of the correlation length, while maintaining good observational accord with the energy, cross helicity, and temperature.

  18. Solar wind driven dust acoustic instability with Lorentzian kappa distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arshad, Kashif [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad and University of Wah, Wah Cantt 47040 (Pakistan); Ehsan, Zahida, E-mail: Ehsan.zahida@gmail.com [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Universita degli Studi del Molise, 86090 Pesche - IS (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Defence Road, Off Raiwind Road, Lahore 86090 (Pakistan); Khan, S. A. [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTEC, PO Box Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15

    In a three species electron-ion-dust plasma following a generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Lorentzian or kappa), it is shown that a kinetic instability of dust-acoustic mode exists. The instability threshold is affected when such (quasineutral) plasma permeates through another static plasma. Such case is of interest when the solar wind is streaming through the cometary plasma in the presence of interstellar dust. In the limits of phase velocity of the waves larger and smaller than the thermal velocity of dust particles, the dispersion properties and growth rate of dust-acoustic mode are investigated analytically with validation via numerical analysis.

  19. Isotropic Scale-Invariant Dissipation of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyani, K H; Khotyaintsev, Yu V; Turner, A; Hnat, B; Sahraoui, F

    2010-01-01

    The anisotropic nature of solar wind magnetic fluctuations is investigated scale-by-scale using high cadence in-situ magnetic field measurements spanning five decades in scales from the inertial to dissipation ranges of plasma turbulence. We find an abrupt transition at ion kinetic scales to a single isotropic stochastic process that characterizes the dissipation range on all observable scales. In contrast to the inertial range, this is accompanied by a successive scale-invariant reduction in the ratio between parallel and transverse power. We suggest a possible phase space mechanism for this, based on nonlinear wave-particle interactions, operating in this scale-invariant isotropic manner.

  20. Assessing temporal complementarity of solar, wind and hydrokinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurasz Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy sources (RES exhibit various characteristics when it comes to their availability in time and space domain. Some are characterised by significant variability and limited predictability. This makes their integration to the power grid a complicated task. Temporal and spatial complementarity of RES is perceived as one of the possible ways to facilitate the process of integration. This paper investigates the concept of temporal complementarity of solar wind and hydrokinetic energy in case of two sites in Poland. Obtained results indicate existence of some beneficial complementarity on inter-annual and annual time scale. Combination of those three RES in one hybrid system makes power source more reliable.

  1. Three Sides Billboard Wind-Solar Hybrid System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the high development of world economy, the demand of energy is increasing all the time, As energy shortage and environment problem are increasing outstanding, Renewable energy has been attracting more and more attention. A kind of three sides billboard supply by wind-Solar hybrid system has been designed in this paper, the overall structure of the system, components, working principle and control strategy has been analyzed from the system perspective. The software and hardware of the system are debugged together and the result is acquired. System function is better and has achieved the expected results.

  2. Multiscale nature of the dissipation range in solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Told, D; TenBarge, J M; Howes, G G; Hammett, G W

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear energy transfer and dissipation in Alfv\\'en wave turbulence are analyzed in the first gyrokinetic simulation spanning all scales from the tail of the MHD range to the electron gyroradius scale. For typical solar wind parameters at 1 AU, about 30% of the nonlinear energy transfer close to the electron gyroradius scale is mediated by modes in the tail of the MHD cascade. Collisional dissipation occurs across the entire kinetic range $k_\\perp\\rho_i\\gtrsim 1$. Both mechanisms thus act on multiple coupled scales, which have to be retained for a comprehensive picture of the dissipation range in Alfv\\'enic turbulence.

  3. Solar Wind Interaction and Impact on the Venus Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Stenberg Wieser, Gabriella; Barabash, Stas; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2017-08-01

    Venus has intrigued planetary scientists for decades because of its huge contrasts to Earth, in spite of its nickname of "Earth's Twin". Its invisible upper atmosphere and space environment are also part of the larger story of Venus and its evolution. In 60s to 70s, several missions (Venera and Mariner series) explored Venus-solar wind interaction regions. They identified the basic structure of the near-Venus space environment, for example, existence of the bow shock, magnetotail, ionosphere, as well as the lack of the intrinsic magnetic field. A huge leap in knowledge about the solar wind interaction with Venus was made possible by the 14-year long mission, Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), launched in 1978. More recently, ESA's probe, Venus Express (VEX), was inserted into orbit in 2006, operated for 8 years. Owing to its different orbit from that of PVO, VEX made unique measurements in the polar and terminator regions, and probed the near-Venus tail for the first time. The near-tail hosts dynamic processes that lead to plasma energization. These processes in turn lead to the loss of ionospheric ions to space, slowly eroding the Venusian atmosphere. VEX carried an ion spectrometer with a moderate mass-separation capability and the observed ratio of the escaping hydrogen and oxygen ions in the wake indicates the stoichiometric loss of water from Venus. The structure and dynamics of the induced magnetosphere depends on the prevailing solar wind conditions. VEX studied the response of the magnetospheric system on different time scales. A plethora of waves was identified by the magnetometer on VEX; some of them were not previously observed by PVO. Proton cyclotron waves were seen far upstream of the bow shock, mirror mode waves were observed in magnetosheath and whistler mode waves, possibly generated by lightning discharges were frequently seen. VEX also encouraged renewed numerical modeling efforts, including fluid-type of models and particle-fluid hybrid type of models

  4. EMMI-Electric solar wind sail facilitated Manned Mars Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janhunen, Pekka; Merikallio, Sini; Paton, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The novel propellantless electric solar wind sail concept promises efficient low thrust transportation in the Solar System outside Earth's magnetosphere. Combined with asteroid mining to provide water and synthetic cryogenic rocket fuel in orbits of Earth and Mars, possibilities for affordable continuous manned presence on Mars open up. Orbital fuel and water enable reusable bidirectional Earth-Mars vehicles for continuous manned presence on Mars and allow smaller fuel fraction of spacecraft than what is achievable by traditional means. Water can also be used as radiation shielding of the manned compartment, thus reducing the launch mass further. In addition, the presence of fuel in the orbit of Mars provides the option for an all-propulsive landing, thus potentially eliminating issues of heavy heat shields and augmenting the capability of pinpoint landing. With this E-sail enabled scheme, the recurrent cost of continuous bidirectional traffic between Earth and Mars might ultimately approach the recurrent cost of running the International Space Station, ISS.

  5. EMMI - Electric Solar Wind Sail Facilitated Manned Mars Initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, Pekka; Paton, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The novel propellantless electric solar wind sail (E-sail) concept promises efficient low thrust transportation in the solar system outside Earth's magnetosphere. Combined with asteroid mining to provide water and synthetic cryogenic rocket fuel in orbits of Earth and Mars, possibilities for affordable continuous manned presence on Mars open up. Orbital fuel and water eliminate the exponential nature of the rocket equation and also enable reusable bidirectional Earth-Mars vehicles for continuous manned presence on Mars. Water can also be used as radiation shielding of the manned compartment, thus reducing the launch mass further. In addition, the presence of fuel in Mars orbit provides the option for an all-propulsive landing, thus potentially eliminating issues of heavy heat shields and augmenting the capability of pinpoint landing. With this E-sail enabled scheme, the recurrent cost of continuous bidirectional traffic between Earth and Mars might ultimately approach the recurrent cost of running the Interna...

  6. A study of density modulation index in the inner heliospheric solar wind during solar cycle 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Janardhan, P. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); Ingale, M.; Subramanian, P. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411021 (India); Ananthakrishnan, S. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K., E-mail: susanta@prl.res.in, E-mail: jerry@prl.res.in, E-mail: i.madhusudan@students.iiserpune.ac.in, E-mail: p.subramanian@iiserpune.ac.in, E-mail: subra.anan@gmail.com, E-mail: tokumaru@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: fujiki@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    The ratio of the rms electron density fluctuations to the background density in the solar wind (density modulation index, ε {sub N} ≡ ΔN/N) is of vital importance for understanding several problems in heliospheric physics related to solar wind turbulence. In this paper, we have investigated the behavior of ε {sub N} in the inner heliosphere from 0.26 to 0.82 AU. The density fluctuations ΔN have been deduced using extensive ground-based observations of interplanetary scintillation at 327 MHz, which probe spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers. The background densities (N) have been derived using near-Earth observations from the Advanced Composition Explorer. Our analysis reveals that 0.001 ≲ ε {sub N} ≲ 0.02 and does not vary appreciably with heliocentric distance. We also find that ε {sub N} declines by 8% from 1998 to 2008. We discuss the impact of these findings on problems ranging from our understanding of Forbush decreases to the behavior of the solar wind dynamic pressure over the recent peculiar solar minimum at the end of cycle 23.

  7. Scale Dependence of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Balogh, Andre; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    We determine the magnetic helicity, along with the magnetic energy, at high latitudes using data from the Ulysses mission. The data set spans the time period from 1993 to 1996. The basic assumption of the analysis is that the solar wind is homogeneous. Because the solar wind speed is high, we follow the approach first pioneered by Matthaeus et al. by which, under the assumption of spatial homogeneity, one can use Fourier transforms of the magnetic field time series to construct one-dimensional spectra of the magnetic energy and magnetic helicity under the assumption that the Taylor frozen-in-flow hypothesis is valid. That is a well-satisfied assumption for the data used in this study. The magnetic helicity derives from the skew-symmetric terms of the three-dimensional magnetic correlation tensor, while the symmetric terms of the tensor are used to determine the magnetic energy spectrum. Our results show a sign change of magnetic helicity at wavenumber k approximately equal to 2AU(sup -1) (or frequency nu approximately equal to 2 microHz) at distances below 2.8AU and at k approximately equal to 30AU(sup -1) (or nu approximately equal to 25 microHz) at larger distances. At small scales the magnetic helicity is positive at northern heliographic latitudes and negative at southern latitudes. The positive magnetic helicity at small scales is argued to be the result of turbulent diffusion reversing the sign relative to what is seen at small scales at the solar surface. Furthermore, the magnetic helicity declines toward solar minimum in 1996. The magnetic helicity flux integrated separately over one hemisphere amounts to about 10(sup 45) Mx(sup 2) cycle(sup -1) at large scales and to a three times lower value at smaller scales.

  8. Coronal Heating and Acceleration of the High/Low-Speed Solar Wind by Fast/Slow MHD Shock Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K

    2004-01-01

    We investigate coronal heating and acceleration of the high- and low-speed solar wind in the open field region by dissipation of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) waves through MHD shocks. Linearly polarized \\Alfven (fast MHD) waves and acoustic (slow MHD) waves travelling upwardly along with a magnetic field line eventually form fast switch-on shock trains and hydrodynamical shock trains (N-waves) respectively to heat and accelerate the plasma. We determine one dimensional structure of the corona from the bottom of the transition region (TR) to 1AU under the steady-state condition by solving evolutionary equations for the shock amplitudes simultaneously with the momentum and proton/electron energy equations. Our model reproduces the overall trend of the high-speed wind from the polar holes and the low-speed wind from the mid- to low-latitude streamer except the observed hot corona in the streamer. The heating from the slow waves is effective in the low corona to increase the density there, and plays ...

  9. A 15N-poor isotopic composition for the solar system as shown by Genesis solar wind samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, B; Chaussidon, M; Wiens, R C; Jurewicz, A J G; Burnett, D S

    2011-06-24

    The Genesis mission sampled solar wind ions to document the elemental and isotopic compositions of the Sun and, by inference, of the protosolar nebula. Nitrogen was a key target element because the extent and origin of its isotopic variations in solar system materials remain unknown. Isotopic analysis of a Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator target material shows that implanted solar wind nitrogen has a (15)N/(14)N ratio of 2.18 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) (that is, ≈40% poorer in (15)N relative to terrestrial atmosphere). The (15)N/(14)N ratio of the protosolar nebula was 2.27 ± 0.03 × 10(-3), which is the lowest (15)N/(14)N ratio known for solar system objects. This result demonstrates the extreme nitrogen isotopic heterogeneity of the nascent solar system and accounts for the (15)N-depleted components observed in solar system reservoirs.

  10. Three-dimensional exploration of the solar wind using observations of interplanetary scintillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The solar wind, a supersonic plasma flow continuously emanating from the Sun, governs the space environment in a vast region extending to the boundary of the heliosphere (∼100 AU). Precise understanding of the solar wind is of importance not only because it will satisfy scientific interest in an enigmatic astrophysical phenomenon, but because it has broad impacts on relevant fields. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of compact radio sources at meter to centimeter wavelengths serves as a useful ground-based method for investigating the solar wind. IPS measurements of the solar wind at a frequency of 327 MHz have been carried out regularly since the 1980s using the multi-station system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) of Nagoya University. This paper reviews new aspects of the solar wind revealed from our IPS observations.

  11. Potential for a Danish power system using wind energy generators, solar cells and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegaa, S.; Christiansen, G.

    1981-10-01

    Performance characteristics of a combined solar/wind power system equipped with storage and an unspecified back-up power source are studied on the basis of meteorological data in Denmark from 1959-1972. A model for annual production and storage from wind/solar installations is presented, assuming 12% efficiency for the solar cells and various power coefficients of the windmills, in addition to long and short-term storage. Noting that no correlation between wind and solar energy availability was found, and a constant ratio of 60% wind/40% solar was determined to be the optimum mix for large scale power production without taking into consideration the variations among years. It is concluded that 80-90% of the total Danish electrical load can be covered by solar/wind systems, and 100% may be possible with the addition of pumped hydroelectric storage.

  12. The Effects of Abrupt Wind Shears in the Solar Wind on the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, J.; Boudouridis, A.; Birn, J.; Denton, M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar wind is filled sudden velocity shears. The shears take the form of vorticity layers co-located with current sheets. The velocity vector makes its change in a few seconds. For shear layers with vector velocity changes greater than 50 km/s, an average of 12 shear layers pass the Earth per day. Global magnetospheric MHD simulations with four different simulation codes have been performed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) to examine the reaction of the Earth to the solar-wind velocity shears. All 4 simulation codes predict comet-like disconnections of the magnetotail, the magnetosheath, and the bow shock on the flanks as a shear layer passes the Earth. The simulation codes also predict sudden changes in the cross-polar-cap potential and ionospheric Joule dissipation as the shear layers pass the Earth. A data-analysis research effort is underway to look for signatures of the Earth's reaction to abrupt wind shear events; preliminary results of that effort will be discussed.

  13. Solar wind implication on dust ion acoustic rogue waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelghany, A. M., E-mail: asmaaallah20@yahoo.com; Abd El-Razek, H. N., E-mail: hosam.abdelrazek@yahoo.com; El-Labany, S. K., E-mail: skellabany@hotmail.com [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Moslem, W. M., E-mail: wmmoslem@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The relevance of the solar wind with the magnetosphere of Jupiter that contains positively charged dust grains is investigated. The perturbation/excitation caused by streaming ions and electron beams from the solar wind could form different nonlinear structures such as rogue waves, depending on the dominant role of the plasma parameters. Using the reductive perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and further modified (KdV) equation. Assuming that the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, these equations are transformed into nonlinear Schrödinger equations with appropriate coefficients. Rational solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation shows that rogue wave envelopes are supported by the present plasma model. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming temperatures for both the ions and electrons. The dependence of the maximum rogue wave envelope amplitude on the system parameters has been investigated.

  14. Value of storage technologies for wind and solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braff, William A.; Mueller, Joshua M.; Trancik, Jessika E.

    2016-10-01

    Wind and solar industries have grown rapidly in recent years but they still supply only a small fraction of global electricity. The continued growth of these industries to levels that significantly contribute to climate change mitigation will depend on whether they can compete against alternatives that provide high-value energy on demand. Energy storage can transform intermittent renewables for this purpose but cost improvement is needed. Evaluating diverse storage technologies on a common scale has proved a major challenge, however, owing to their widely varying performance along the two dimensions of energy and power costs. Here we devise a method to compare storage technologies, and set cost improvement targets. Some storage technologies today are shown to add value to solar and wind energy, but cost reduction is needed to reach widespread profitability. The optimal cost improvement trajectories, balancing energy and power costs to maximize value, are found to be relatively location invariant, and thus can inform broad industry and government technology development strategies.

  15. STEADY-STATE MODEL OF SOLAR WIND ELECTRONS REVISITED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S., E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-20

    In a recent paper, Kim et al. put forth a steady-state model for the solar wind electrons. The model assumed local equilibrium between the halo electrons, characterized by an intermediate energy range, and the whistler-range fluctuations. The basic wave–particle interaction is assumed to be the cyclotron resonance. Similarly, it was assumed that a dynamical steady state is established between the highly energetic superhalo electrons and high-frequency Langmuir fluctuations. Comparisons with the measured solar wind electron velocity distribution function (VDF) during quiet times were also made, and reasonable agreements were obtained. In such a model, however, only the steady-state solution for the Fokker–Planck type of electron particle kinetic equation was considered. The present paper complements the previous analysis by considering both the steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations. It is shown that the model halo and superhalo electron VDFs, as well as the assumed wave intensity spectra for the whistler and Langmuir fluctuations, approximately satisfy the quasi-linear wave kinetic equations in an approximate sense, thus further validating the local equilibrium model constructed in the paper by Kim et al.

  16. STRAHL FORMATION IN THE SOLAR WIND ELECTRONS VIA WHISTLER INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seough, Jungjoon; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Gofuku, Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Yoon, Peter H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Saito, Shinji [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-09-20

    This Letter puts forth a possible explanation for the formation of a solar wind strahl electron distribution function by means of local wave–particle interactions. A solar wind electron consists of a core and the hot “halo” electrons, which possess a net drift speed with respect to the core. According to the present model, pitch angle scattering of the initially isotropic drifting halo occurs when the enhanced whistler waves are excited by mildly anisotropic core electrons. The pitch angle scattering primarily affects the halo moving in the anti-sunward direction, resulting in pitch angle diffusion across the 90° gap through a nonlinear scattering process, and consequently leading to a reduction in the net drift speed of halo electrons. The remaining portion of the anti-sunward moving halo, which is not affected by pitch angle scattering, simply appears to form a field-aligned strahl in the electron velocity distribution. The present scenario of local generation of the strahl is demonstrated by the particle-in-cell simulation.

  17. Validation of Model Forecasts of the Ambient Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneice, P. J.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Independent and automated validation is a vital step in the progression of models from the research community into operational forecasting use. In this paper we describe a program in development at the CCMC to provide just such a comprehensive validation for models of the ambient solar wind in the inner heliosphere. We have built upon previous efforts published in the community, sharpened their definitions, and completed a baseline study. We also provide first results from this program of the comparative performance of the MHD models available at the CCMC against that of the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. An important goal of this effort is to provide a consistent validation to all available models. Clearly exposing the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different models will enable forecasters to craft more reliable ensemble forecasting strategies. Models of the ambient solar wind are developing rapidly as a result of improvements in data supply, numerical techniques, and computing resources. It is anticipated that in the next five to ten years, the MHD based models will supplant semi-empirical potential based models such as the WSA model, as the best available forecast models. We anticipate that this validation effort will track this evolution and so assist policy makers in gauging the value of past and future investment in modeling support.

  18. Mirror Instability in the Solar Wind: The Theory Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, A.

    1995-01-01

    "Magnetic holes", localized depressions in the interplanetary magnetic field, have been identified in Ulysses data over a range of several AU and as far as 23 degrees south in latitude by Winterhalter et al., who concluded that these structures are most likely the remnants of structures caused by occasional mirror-mode instability in the solar wind. However, these authors, like a number of previous investigators, used the mirror stability criterion derived from the kinetic theory under very special assumptions. On the other hand, theoretical investigations using the fully self-consistent kinetic theory (Vlasov-Maxwell equations) have shown that the mirror stability criterion is more complicated when electrons and ions have different anisotropies, as is normally the case in the solar wind. Winterhalter et al used an instability criterion of the form R is greater than 1, where R is a function of the thermal anisotropy; the correct criterion (for bi-Maxwellian distributions) is R R is greater than 1 - x(exp 2), where x is a real quantity that depends on both the proton anisotropy and electron anisotropy. So nonzero x would modify the Winterhalter et al results in the direction of reinforcing their conclusions. We have revisited the instability criterion in its most general form, allowing for (a) non-Maxwellian velocity distributions, (b) multiple ion species, and (c) interparticle streaming. These results should give sound theoretical grounding for future observational studies related to the mirror instability, by Ulysses and other spacecraft.

  19. Scaling of the electron dissipation range of solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sahraoui, F; De Patoul, J; Belmont, G; Goldstein, M L; Retino, A; Robert, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Canu, P

    2013-01-01

    Electron scale solar wind turbulence has attracted great interest in recent years. Clear evidences have been given from the Cluster data that turbulence is not fully dissipated near the proton scale but continues cascading down to the electron scales. However, the scaling of the energy spectra as well as the nature of the plasma modes involved at those small scales are still not fully determined. Here we survey 10 years of the Cluster search-coil magnetometer (SCM) waveforms measured in the solar wind and perform a statistical study of the magnetic energy spectra in the frequency range [$1, 180$]Hz. We show that a large fraction of the spectra exhibit clear breakpoints near the electon gyroscale $\\rho_e$, followed by steeper power-law like spectra. We show that the scaling below the electron breakpoint cannot be determined unambiguously due to instrumental limitations that will be discussed in detail. We compare our results to recent ones reported in other studies and discuss their implication on the physical...

  20. Turbulence and Global Properties of the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    The solar wind shows striking characteristics that suggest that it is a turbulent magnetofluid, but the picture is not altogether simple. From the earliest observations, a strong correlation between magnetic fluctuations and plasma velocity fluctuations was noted. The high corrections suggest that the fluctuations are Alfven waves. In addition, the power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuation showed evidence of an inertial range that resembled that seen in fully-developed fluid turbulence. Alfven waves, however, are exact solutions of the equations of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics. Thus, there was a puzzle: how can a magnetofluid consisting of Alfven waves be turbulent? The answer lay in the role of velocity shears in the solar wind that could drive turbulent evolution. Puzzles remain: for example, the power spectrum of the velocity fluctuations is less steep than the slope of the magnetic fluctuations. The plasma in the magnetic tail of Earth's magnetosphere also shows aspects of turbulence, as does the plasma in the dayside magnetosphere near the poles the dayside cusps. Recently, new analyses of high time resolution magnetic field data from Cluster have offered a glimpse of how turbulence is dissipated, thus heating the ambient plasma.