WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-sensitivity single-molecule fluorescence

  1. High sensitivity fluorescent single particle and single molecule detection apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan; Stryer, Lubert

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus is described for ultrasensitive detection of single fluorescent particles down to the single fluorescent molecule limit in a fluid or on a substrate comprising means for illuminating a predetermined volume of the fluid or area of the substrate whereby to emit light including background light from the fluid and burst of photons from particles residing in the area. The photon burst is detected in real time to generate output representative signal. The signal is received and the burst of energy from the fluorescent particles is distinguished from the background energy to provide an indication of the number, location or concentration of the particles or molecules.

  2. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  3. Fluorescent Biosensors Based on Single-Molecule Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Li, Ying; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2016-09-20

    Biosensors for highly sensitive, selective, and rapid quantification of specific biomolecules make great contributions to biomedical research, especially molecular diagnostics. However, conventional methods for biomolecular assays often suffer from insufficient sensitivity and poor specificity. In some case (e.g., early disease diagnostics), the concentration of target biomolecules is too low to be detected by these routine approaches, and cumbersome procedures are needed to improve the detection sensitivity. Therefore, there is an urgent need for rapid and ultrasensitive analytical tools. In this respect, single-molecule fluorescence approaches may well satisfy the requirement and hold promising potential for the development of ultrasensitive biosensors. Encouragingly, owing to the advances in single-molecule microscopy and spectroscopy over past decades, the detection of single fluorescent molecule comes true, greatly boosting the development of highly sensitive biosensors. By in vitro/in vivo labeling of target biomolecules with proper fluorescent tags, the quantification of certain biomolecule at the single-molecule level is achieved. In comparison with conventional ensemble measurements, single-molecule detection-based analytical methods possess the advantages of ultrahigh sensitivity, good selectivity, rapid analysis time, and low sample consumption. Consequently, single-molecule detection may be potentially employed as an ideal analytical approach to quantify low-abundant biomolecules with rapidity and simplicity. In this Account, we will summarize our efforts for developing a series of ultrasensitive biosensors based on single-molecule counting. Single-molecule counting is a member of single-molecule detection technologies and may be used as a very simple and ultrasensitive method to quantify target molecules by simply counting the individual fluorescent bursts. In the fluorescent sensors, the signals of target biomolecules may be translated to the

  4. A brief introduction to single-molecule fluorescence methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenberg, S.M.J.L.; Prevo, B.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Peterman, EJG; Wuite, GJL

    2011-01-01

    One of the more popular single-molecule approaches in biological science is single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which is the subject of the following section of this volume. Fluorescence methods provide the sensitivity required to study biology on the single-molecule level, but they also allow

  5. A brief introduction to single-molecule fluorescence methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wildenberg, Siet M.J.L.; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J.G.

    2018-01-01

    One of the more popular single-molecule approaches in biological science is single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which will be the subject of the following section of this volume. Fluorescence methods provide the sensitivity required to study biology on the single-molecule level, but they also

  6. A Brief Introduction to Single-Molecule Fluorescence Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wildenberg, Siet M J L; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J G

    2018-01-01

    One of the more popular single-molecule approaches in biological science is single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which will be the subject of the following section of this volume. Fluorescence methods provide the sensitivity required to study biology on the single-molecule level, but they also allow access to useful measurable parameters on time and length scales relevant for the biomolecular world. Before several detailed experimental approaches will be addressed, we will first give a general overview of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We start with discussing the phenomenon of fluorescence in general and the history of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Next, we will review fluorescent probes in more detail and the equipment required to visualize them on the single-molecule level. We will end with a description of parameters measurable with such approaches, ranging from protein counting and tracking, single-molecule localization super-resolution microscopy, to distance measurements with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer and orientation measurements with fluorescence polarization.

  7. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  8. Single-molecule spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  9. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy in living Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Krugten, Jaap; Peterman, Erwin J.G.

    2018-01-01

    Transportation of organelles and biomolecules is vital for many cellular processes. Single-molecule (SM) fluorescence microscopy can expose molecular aspects of the dynamics that remain unresolved in ensemble experiments. For example, trajectories of individual, moving biomolecules can reveal

  10. Single-Molecule Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kudalkar, Emily M.; Davis, Trisha N; Asbury, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has permitted visualization of biological events on an unprecedented scale: the single molecule level. Using TIRF, it is now possible to view complex biological interactions such as cargo transport by a single molecular motor or DNA replication in real-time. TIRF allows for visualization of single molecules by eliminating out-of-focus fluorescence and enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. TIRF has been instrumental for stud...

  11. Simultaneous single molecule atomic force and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Olaf; Koberling, Felix; Walters, Deron; Koenig, Marcelle; Viani, Jacob; Ros, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with single-molecule-sensitive confocal fluorescence microscopy enables a fascinating investigation into the structure, dynamics and interactions of single biomolecules or their assemblies. AFM reveals the structure of macromolecular complexes with nanometer resolution, while fluorescence can facilitate the identification of their constituent parts. In addition, nanophotonic effects, such as fluorescence quenching or enhancement due to the AFM tip, can be used to increase the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit, thus enabling the identification of different fluorescence labels within a macromolecular complex. We present a novel setup consisting of two commercial, state-of-the-art microscopes. A sample scanning atomic force microscope is mounted onto an objective scanning confocal fluorescence lifetime microscope. The ability to move the sample and objective independently allows for precise alignment of AFM probe and laser focus with an accuracy down to a few nanometers. Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) gives us the opportunity to measure single-molecule fluorescence lifetimes. We will be able to study molecular complexes in the vicinity of an AFM probe on a level that has yet to be achieved. With this setup we simultaneously obtained single molecule sensitivity in the AFM topography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of YOYO-1 stained lambda-DNA samples and we showed silicon tip induced single molecule quenching on organic fluorophores.

  12. Visualizing Single-molecule DNA Replication with Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple fluorescence microscopy-based real-time method for observing DNA replication at the single-molecule level. A circular, forked DNA template is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and replicated extensively after introduction of replication proteins and nucleotides. The

  13. Modification of single molecule fluorescence using external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Yun; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Qin, Cheng-Bin; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2017-10-01

    Controlling and manipulating the fluorescence of single fluorophores is of great interest in recent years for its potential uses in improving the performance of molecular photonics and molecular electronics, such as in organic light-emitting devices, single photon sources, organic field-effect transistors, and probes or sensors based on single molecules. This review shows how the fluorescence emission of single organic molecules can be modified using local electromagnetic fields of metallic nanostructures and electric-field-induced electron transfer. Electric-field-induced fluorescence modulation, hysteresis, and the achievement of fluorescence switch are discussed in detail.

  14. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  15. Click strategies for single-molecule protein fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milles, Sigrid; Tyagi, Swati; Banterle, Niccolò; Koehler, Christine; VanDelinder, Virginia; Plass, Tilman; Neal, Adrian P; Lemke, Edward A

    2012-03-21

    Single-molecule methods have matured into central tools for studies in biology. Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, in particular, have been widely applied to study biomolecular structure and dynamics. The major bottleneck for a facile and general application of these studies arises from the need to label biological samples site-specifically with suitable fluorescent dyes. In this work, we present an optimized strategy combining click chemistry and the genetic encoding of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) to overcome this limitation for proteins. We performed a systematic study with a variety of clickable UAAs and explored their potential for high-resolution single-molecule FRET (smFRET). We determined all parameters that are essential for successful single-molecule studies, such as accessibility of the probes, expression yield of proteins, and quantitative labeling. Our multiparameter fluorescence analysis allowed us to gain new insights into the effects and photophysical properties of fluorescent dyes linked to various UAAs for smFRET measurements. This led us to determine that, from the extended tool set that we now present, genetically encoding propargyllysine has major advantages for state-of-the-art measurements compared to other UAAs. Using this optimized system, we present a biocompatible one-step dual-labeling strategy of the regulatory protein RanBP3 with full labeling position freedom. Our technique allowed us then to determine that the region encompassing two FxFG repeat sequences adopts a disordered but collapsed state. RanBP3 serves here as a prototypical protein that, due to its multiple cysteines, size, and partially disordered structure, is not readily accessible to any of the typical structure determination techniques such as smFRET, NMR, and X-ray crystallography.

  16. Addressing the Requirements of High-Sensitivity Single-Molecule Imaging of Low-Copy-Number Proteins in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuson, Hannah H; Aliaj, Alisa; Brandes, Eileen R; Simmons, Lyle A; Biteen, Julie S

    2016-05-18

    Single-molecule fluorescence super-resolution imaging and tracking provide nanometer-scale information about subcellular protein positions and dynamics. These single-molecule imaging experiments can be very powerful, but they are best suited to high-copy number proteins where many measurements can be made sequentially in each cell. We describe artifacts associated with the challenge of imaging a protein expressed in only a few copies per cell. We image live Bacillus subtilis in a fluorescence microscope, and demonstrate that under standard single-molecule imaging conditions, unlabeled B. subtilis cells display punctate red fluorescent spots indistinguishable from the few PAmCherry fluorescent protein single molecules under investigation. All Bacillus species investigated were strongly affected by this artifact, whereas we did not find a significant number of these background sources in two other species we investigated, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. With single-molecule resolution, we characterize the number, spatial distribution, and intensities of these impurity spots. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Exploring single-molecule dynamics with fluorescence nanoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringemann, Christian; Harke, Ben; Von Middendorff, Claas; Medda, Rebecca; Leutenegger, Marcel; Schoenle, Andreas; W Hell, Stefan; Eggeling, Christian [Department of Nanobiophotonics, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Honigmann, Alf; Wagner, Richard [Biophysik, University Osnabrueck, FB Biologie/Chemie, Osnabrueck (Germany)], E-mail: ceggeli@gwdg.de

    2009-10-15

    The study of molecular dynamics at the single-molecule level with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and far-field optics has contributed greatly to the functional understanding of complex systems. Unfortunately, such studies are restricted to length scales of >200 nm because diffraction does not allow further reduction of the measurement volume. This sets an upper limit on the applicable concentration of fluorescently labeled molecules and even more importantly, averages out details of nanoscale dynamics. By combining FCS and fluorescence intensity distribution analysis (FIDA) with sub-diffraction-resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, we remove this restriction and obtain open measurement volumes of nanoscale dimensions which are tunable in size. As a consequence, single-molecule studies can now be extended to nanoscale dynamics and may be applied to much larger, often endogenous concentrations. In solution, low-brightness signal from axial out-of-focus volume shells was taken into account by using both FCS and FIDA in conjunction to analyze the data. In two-dimensional systems, such as lipid membranes, the background is greatly reduced and measurements feature excellent signal-to-noise ratios. Measurement foci of down to 30 nm in diameter directly reveal anomalous diffusion of lipids in the plasma membrane of living cells and allow for the determination of on/off rates of the binding of lipids to other membrane constituents. Such important insight into the prominent biological question of lipid membrane organization or 'lipid rafts' shows that combining fluctuation analysis with STED-engineered ultra-small measurement volumes is a viable and powerful new approach to probing molecular dynamics on the nanoscale.

  18. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Photosynthetic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toru; Chen, Wei Jia; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S

    2017-01-25

    Photosynthesis begins when a network of pigment-protein complexes captures solar energy and transports it to the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. When necessary (under low light conditions), photosynthetic organisms perform this energy transport and charge separation with near unity quantum efficiency. Remarkably, this high efficiency is maintained under physiological conditions, which include thermal fluctuations of the pigment-protein complexes and changing local environments. These conditions introduce multiple types of heterogeneity in the pigment-protein complexes, including structural heterogeneity, energetic heterogeneity, and functional heterogeneity. Understanding how photosynthetic light-harvesting functions in the face of these fluctuations requires understanding this heterogeneity, which, in turn, requires characterization of individual pigment-protein complexes. Single-molecule spectroscopy has the power to probe individual complexes. In this review, we present an overview of the common techniques for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy applied to photosynthetic systems and describe selected experiments on these systems. We discuss how these experiments provide a new understanding of the impact of heterogeneity on light harvesting and thus how these systems are optimized to capture sunlight under physiological conditions.

  19. Developing DNA nanotechnology using single-molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Nir, Eyal

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: An important effort in the DNA nanotechnology field is focused on the rational design and manufacture of molecular structures and dynamic devices made of DNA. As is the case for other technologies that deal with manipulation of matter, rational development requires high quality and informative feedback on the building blocks and final products. For DNA nanotechnology such feedback is typically provided by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analytical tools provide excellent structural information; however, usually they do not provide high-resolution dynamic information. For the development of DNA-made dynamic devices such as machines, motors, robots, and computers this constitutes a major problem. Bulk-fluorescence techniques are capable of providing dynamic information, but because only ensemble averaged information is obtained, the technique may not adequately describe the dynamics in the context of complex DNA devices. The single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) technique offers a unique combination of capabilities that make it an excellent tool for guiding the development of DNA-made devices. The technique has been increasingly used in DNA nanotechnology, especially for the analysis of structure, dynamics, integrity, and operation of DNA-made devices; however, its capabilities are not yet sufficiently familiar to the community. The purpose of this Account is to demonstrate how different SMF tools can be utilized for the development of DNA devices and for structural dynamic investigation of biomolecules in general and DNA molecules in particular. Single-molecule diffusion-based Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation (sm-FRET/ALEX) and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques are briefly described and demonstrated. To illustrate the many applications of SMF to DNA nanotechnology, examples of SMF studies of DNA hairpins and

  20. Single Molecule Fluorescence Measurements of Ribosomal Translocation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskarin; Cabral, Diana; Liu, Hanqing; Wang, Yuhong; Zhang, Haibo; Rosenblum, Gabriel; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2011-01-01

    We employ single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study structural dynamics over the first two elongation cycles of protein synthesis, using ribosomes containing either Cy3-labeled ribosomal protein L11 and A- or P-site Cy5-labeled tRNA or Cy3 and Cy5 labeled tRNAs. Pre-translocation (PRE) complexes demonstrate fluctuations between classical and hybrid forms, with concerted motions of tRNAs away from L11 and from each other when classical complex converts to hybrid complex. EF-G·GTP binding to both hybrid and classical PRE complexes halts these fluctuations prior to catalyzing translocation to form the post-translocation (POST) complex. EF-G dependent translocation from the classical PRE complex proceeds via transient formation of a short-lived hybrid intermediate. A-site binding of either EF-G to the PRE complex or of aminoacyl-tRNA·EF-Tu ternary complex to the POST complex markedly suppresses ribosome conformational lability. PMID:21549313

  1. Single Molecule Spectral Diffusion in a Solid Detected Via Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-15

    NO. NO ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) Single Molecule Spectral Diffusion In A Solid Detected Via Fluorescence Spectroscopy...and identify by block number) FIELD jGROUP SUB-GROUP_ Single molecule spectroscopy Precision detection Spectral diffusion, Pentacene in p-terphenyl 19... Single Molecule Spectral Diffusion ’n A Solid Detected Via Fluorescence Spectroscopy hy W. P. Ambrose, T. Basche, and W. E. Moerner

  2. Towards single molecule biosensors using super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xun; Nicovich, Philip R; Gaus, Katharina; Gooding, J Justin

    2017-07-15

    Conventional immunosensors require many binding events to give a single transducer output which represents the concentration of the analyte in the sample. Because of the requirements to selectively detect species in complex samples, immunosensing interfaces must allow immobilisation of antibodies while repelling nonspecific adsorption of other species. These requirements lead to quite sophisticated interfacial design, often with molecular level control, but we have no tools to characterise how well these interfaces work at the molecular level. The work reported herein is an initial feasibility study to show that antibody-antigen binding events can be monitored at the single molecule level using single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM). The steps to achieve this first requires showing that indium tin oxide surfaces can be used for SMLM, then that these surfaces can be modified with self-assembled monolayers using organophosphonic acid derivatives, that the amount of antigens and antibodies on the surface can be controlled and monitored at the single molecule level and finally antibody binding to antigen modified surfaces can be monitored. The results show the amount of antibody that binds to an antigen modified surface is dependent on both the concentration of antigen on the surface and the concentration of antibody in solution. This study demonstrates the potential of SMLM for characterising biosensing interfaces and as the transducer in a massively parallel, wide field, single molecule detection scheme for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A starting point for fluorescence-based single-molecule measurements in biomolecular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Alexander; Zander, Adrian; Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Schulz, Sarah; Lalkens, Birka; Tinnefeld, Philip; Grohmann, Dina

    2014-09-30

    Single-molecule fluorescence techniques are ideally suited to provide information about the structure-function-dynamics relationship of a biomolecule as static and dynamic heterogeneity can be easily detected. However, what type of single-molecule fluorescence technique is suited for which kind of biological question and what are the obstacles on the way to a successful single-molecule microscopy experiment? In this review, we provide practical insights into fluorescence-based single-molecule experiments aiming for scientists who wish to take their experiments to the single-molecule level. We especially focus on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments as these are a widely employed tool for the investigation of biomolecular mechanisms. We will guide the reader through the most critical steps that determine the success and quality of diffusion-based confocal and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discuss the specific chemical and photophysical requirements that make fluorescent dyes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Most importantly, we review recently emerged photoprotection systems as well as passivation and immobilization strategies that enable the observation of fluorescently labeled molecules under biocompatible conditions. Moreover, we discuss how the optical single-molecule toolkit has been extended in recent years to capture the physiological complexity of a cell making it even more relevant for biological research.

  4. A Starting Point for Fluorescence-Based Single-Molecule Measurements in Biomolecular Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gust

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule fluorescence techniques are ideally suited to provide information about the structure-function-dynamics relationship of a biomolecule as static and dynamic heterogeneity can be easily detected. However, what type of single-molecule fluorescence technique is suited for which kind of biological question and what are the obstacles on the way to a successful single-molecule microscopy experiment? In this review, we provide practical insights into fluorescence-based single-molecule experiments aiming for scientists who wish to take their experiments to the single-molecule level. We especially focus on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments as these are a widely employed tool for the investigation of biomolecular mechanisms. We will guide the reader through the most critical steps that determine the success and quality of diffusion-based confocal and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discuss the specific chemical and photophysical requirements that make fluorescent dyes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Most importantly, we review recently emerged photoprotection systems as well as passivation and immobilization strategies that enable the observation of fluorescently labeled molecules under biocompatible conditions. Moreover, we discuss how the optical single-molecule toolkit has been extended in recent years to capture the physiological complexity of a cell making it even more relevant for biological research.

  5. Solid-phase single molecule biosensing using dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2013-10-01

    The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to the QD560-TBA I substrate. Thus, the presence of the target thrombin can be determined based on fluorescent colocalization measurements of the nanoassemblies, without target amplification or probe separation. The detection limit of this assay reached 0.8 pM. This fluorescent colocalization assay has enabled single molecule recognition in a separation-free detection format, and can serve as a sensitive biosensing platform that greatly suppresses the nonspecific adsorption false-positive signal. This method can be extended to other areas such as multiplexed immunoassay, single cell analysis, and real time biomolecule interaction studies.The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to

  6. Recent Advances in Biological Single-Molecule Applications of Optical Tweezers and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemi Shabestari, M; Meijering, A E C; Roos, W H; Wuite, G J L; Peterman, E J G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, single-molecule techniques have evolved into robust tools to study many fundamental biological processes. The combination of optical tweezers with fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics provides a powerful single-molecule manipulation and visualization technique that

  7. How accurately can a single molecule be localized in three dimensions using a fluorescence microscope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Sripad; Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J

    2005-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy is a relatively novel technique that is used, for example, to study the behavior of individual biomolecules in cells. Since a single molecule can move in all three dimensions in a cellular environment, the three dimensional tracking of single molecules can provide valuable insights into cellular processes. It is therefore of importance to know the accuracy with which the location of a single molecule can be determined with a fluorescence microscope. We study this performance limit of a fluorescence microscope from a statistical point of view by deriving the Fisher information matrix for the estimation problem of the location of the single molecule. In this way we obtain a lower bound on the standard deviation of any reasonable (unbiased) estimation method of the location parameters. This lower bound provides a fundamental limit on the accuracy with which a single molecule can be localized using a fluorescence microscope and is given in terms of such quantities as the photon detection rate of the single molecule, the acquisition time, the numerical aperture of the objective lens etc. We also present results that show how factors such as noise sources, detector size and pixelation deteriorate the fundamental limit of the localization accuracy. The present results can be used to evaluate and optimize experimental setups in order to carry out three dimensional single molecule tracking experiments and provide guidelines for experimental design.

  8. Nanopipette Delivery of Individual Molecules to Cellular Compartments for Single-Molecule Fluorescence Tracking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bruckbauer, Andreas; James, Peter; Zhou, Dejian; Yoon, Ji Won; Excell, David; Korchev, Yuri; Jones, Roy; Klenerman, David

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new method, using a nanopipette, for controlled voltage-driven delivery of individual fluorescently labeled probe molecules to the plasma membrane which we used for single-molecule...

  9. Single molecule fluorescence probes dynamics of barrier crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoi Sung; Eaton, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Kramers developed the theory on how chemical reaction rates are influenced by the viscosity of the medium1,2. At the viscosity of water, the kinetics of unimolecular reactions are described by diffusion of a Brownian particle over a free-energy barrier separating reactants and products. For reactions in solution this famous theory extended Eyring's transition state theory, and is widely applied in physics, chemistry, and biology, including reactions as complex as protein folding3,4. Because the diffusion coefficient of Kramers theory is determined by the dynamics in the sparsely-populated region of the barrier top, its properties have not been directly measured for any molecular system. Here we show that the Kramers diffusion coefficient and free energy barrier can be characterized by measuring the temperature- and viscosity-dependence of the transition path time for protein folding. The transition path is the small fraction of an equilibrium trajectory for a single molecule when the free-energy barrier separating two states is actually crossed (Fig. 1a). Its duration, the transition path time, can now be determined from photon trajectories for single protein molecules undergoing folding/unfolding transitions5. Our finding of a long transition path time with an unusually small solvent viscosity-dependence suggests that internal friction as well as solvent friction determine the Kramers diffusion coefficient for α-helical proteins, as opposed to a breakdown of his theory that occurs for many small-molecule reactions2. It is noteworthy that the new and fundamental information concerning Kramers theory and the dynamics of barrier crossings obtained here come from experiments on a protein rather than a much simpler chemical or physical system. PMID:24153185

  10. Plasmonic band structure controls single-molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langguth, Lutz; Punj, Deep; Wenger, Jérôme; Koenderink, A Femius

    2013-10-22

    Plasmonics and photonic crystals are two complementary approaches to tailor single-emitter fluorescence, using strong local field enhancements near metals on one hand and spatially extended photonic band structure effects on the other hand. Here, we explore the emergence of spontaneous emission control by finite-sized hexagonal arrays of nanoapertures milled in gold film. We demonstrate that already small lattices enable highly directional and enhanced emission from single fluorescent molecules in the central aperture. Even for clusters just four unit cells across, the directionality is set by the plasmonic crystal band structure, as confirmed by full-wave numerical simulations. This realization of plasmonic phase array antennas driven by single quantum emitters opens a flexible toolbox to engineer fluorescence and its detection.

  11. Single Molecule Fluorescence: from Physical Fascination to Biological Relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy is particularly well-known from the beautiful images that have been obtained with this technique from cells. Several cellular components could be nicely visualized simultaneously by staining them with different fluorophores. Not only for ensemble applications but

  12. Fluorescence blinking in MEH-PPV single molecules at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzov, O. [Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 522100 Lund (Sweden); Cichos, F. [Opt.Spectr.and Mol.Phys., Technische University Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Borczyskowski, C. von [Opt.Spectr.and Mol.Phys., Technische University Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Scheblykin, I. [Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 522100 Lund (Sweden)]. E-mail: ivan.scheblykin@chemphys.lu.se

    2005-04-15

    Fluorescence intensity transients of single molecules of the conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy,5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene-vinylene] (MEH-PPV) were studied at 15 K. Fluorescence blinking behavior was observed despite the expected low-temperature suppression of energy migration in such disordered molecular systems. Presence of the fluorescence blinking effect at 15 K indicates that the single molecules possess a collapsed conformation with characteristic size of not more than several nanometers, which corresponds to only a few exciton hops over a polymer chain.

  13. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy review: shedding new light on old problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashkova, Sviatlana; Leake, Mark C

    2017-08-31

    Fluorescence microscopy is an invaluable tool in the biosciences, a genuine workhorse technique offering exceptional contrast in conjunction with high specificity of labelling with relatively minimal perturbation to biological samples compared with many competing biophysical techniques. Improvements in detector and dye technologies coupled to advances in image analysis methods have fuelled recent development towards single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which can utilize light microscopy tools to enable the faithful detection and analysis of single fluorescent molecules used as reporter tags in biological samples. For example, the discovery of GFP, initiating the so-called 'green revolution', has pushed experimental tools in the biosciences to a completely new level of functional imaging of living samples, culminating in single fluorescent protein molecule detection. Today, fluorescence microscopy is an indispensable tool in single-molecule investigations, providing a high signal-to-noise ratio for visualization while still retaining the key features in the physiological context of native biological systems. In this review, we discuss some of the recent discoveries in the life sciences which have been enabled using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, paying particular attention to the so-called 'super-resolution' fluorescence microscopy techniques in live cells, which are at the cutting-edge of these methods. In particular, how these tools can reveal new insights into long-standing puzzles in biology: old problems, which have been impossible to tackle using other more traditional tools until the emergence of new single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  15. Deciphering the Structure and Function of Nuclear Pores Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Siegfried M; Grünwald, David

    2016-05-22

    Due to its central role in macromolecular trafficking and nucleocytoplasmic information transfer, the nuclear pore complex (NPC) has been studied in great detail using a wide spectrum of methods. Consequently, many aspects of its architecture, general function, and role in the life cycle of a cell are well understood. Over the last decade, fluorescence microscopy methods have enabled the real-time visualization of single molecules interacting with and transiting through the NPC, allowing novel questions to be examined with nanometer precision. While initial single-molecule studies focused primarily on import pathways using permeabilized cells, it has recently proven feasible to investigate the export of mRNAs in living cells. Single-molecule assays can address questions that are difficult or impossible to answer by other means, yet the complexity of nucleocytoplasmic transport requires that interpretation be based on a firm genetic, biochemical, and structural foundation. Moreover, conceptually simple single-molecule experiments remain technically challenging, particularly with regard to signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio, and the analysis of noise, stochasticity, and precision. We discuss nuclear transport issues recently addressed by single-molecule microscopy, evaluate the limits of existing assays and data, and identify open questions for future studies. We expect that single-molecule fluorescence approaches will continue to be applied to outstanding nucleocytoplasmic transport questions, and that the approaches developed for NPC studies are extendable to additional complex systems and pathways within cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanopipette Delivery of Individual Molecules to Cellular Compartments for Single-Molecule Fluorescence Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Bruckbauer, Andreas; James, Peter; Zhou, Dejian; Yoon, Ji Won; Excell, David; Korchev, Yuri; Jones, Roy; Klenerman, David

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new method, using a nanopipette, for controlled voltage-driven delivery of individual fluorescently labeled probe molecules to the plasma membrane which we used for single-molecule fluorescence tracking (SMT). The advantages of the method are 1), application of the probe to predefined regions on the membrane; 2), release of only one or a few molecules onto the cell surface; 3), when combined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, very low background due to...

  17. Choosing the right fluorophore for single-molecule fluorescence studies in a lipid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenfu; Yomo, Dan; Gradinaru, Claudiu

    2017-07-01

    Nonspecific interactions between lipids and fluorophores can alter the outcomes of single-molecule spectroscopy of membrane proteins in live cells, liposomes or lipid nanodiscs and of cytosolic proteins encapsulated in liposomes or tethered to supported lipid bilayers. To gain insight into these effects, we examined interactions between 9 dyes that are commonly used as labels for single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) and 6 standard lipids including cationic, zwitterionic and anionic types. The diffusion coefficients of dyes in the absence and presence of set amounts of lipid vesicles were measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The partition coefficients and the free energies of partitioning for different fluorophore-lipid pairs were obtained by global fitting of the titration FCS curves. Lipids with different charges, head groups and degrees of chain saturation were investigated, and interactions with dyes are discussed in terms of hydrophobic, electrostatic and steric contributions. Fluorescence imaging of individual fluorophores adsorbed on supported lipid bilayers provides visualization and additional quantification of the strength of dye-lipid interaction in the context of single-molecule measurements. By dissecting fluorophore-lipid interactions, our study provides new insights into setting up single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy experiments with minimal interference from interactions between fluorescent labels and lipids in the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  19. Fluorescence single-molecule counting assays for protein quantification using epi-fluorescence microscopy with quantum dots labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dafeng; Liu, Chunxia; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2010-03-10

    A single-molecule counting approach for quantifying the antibody affixed to a surface using quantum dots and epi-fluorescence microscopy is presented. Modifying the glass substrates with carboxyl groups provides a hydrophilic surface that reacts with amine groups of an antibody to allow covalent immobilization of the antibody. Nonspecific adsorption of single molecules on the modified surfaces was first investigated. Then, quantum dots were employed to form complexes with surface-immobilized antibody molecules and used as fluorescent probes for single-molecule imaging. Epi-fluorescence microscopy was chosen as the tool for single-molecule fluorescence detection here. The generated fluorescence signals were taken by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device and were found to be proportional to the sample concentrations. Under optimal conditions, a linear response range of 5.0x10(-14)-3.0x10(-12) mol L(-1) was obtained between the number of single molecules and sample concentration via a single-molecule counting approach. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements.

  1. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A.; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25309114

  2. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy on nucleotide excision repair complexes using GFP fusion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.; Rademakers, Suzanne; Vermeulen, Wim; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Greve, Jan; Koenig, Karsten; Tanke, Hans J.; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    Scanning Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy is used for single molecule studies on DNA-protein complexes that occur in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). During DNA-damage elimination by the NER-pathway, complex protein structures assemble over DNA. It is our aim to resolve the architecture of these

  3. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Studies of Membrane Transporters Using Total Internal Reflection Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudsmits, Joris M H; van Oijen, Antoine M; Slotboom, Dirk J

    2017-01-01

    Cells are delineated by a lipid bilayer that physically separates the inside from the outer environment. Most polar, charged, or large molecules require proteins to reduce the energetic barrier for passage across the membrane and to achieve transport rates that are relevant for life. Here, we describe techniques to visualize the functioning of membrane transport proteins with fluorescent probes at the single-molecule level. First, we explain how to produce membrane-reconstituted transporters with fluorescent labels. Next, we detail the construction of a microfluidic flow cell to image immobilized proteoliposomes on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. We conclude by describing the methods that are needed to analyze fluorescence movies and obtain useful single-molecule data. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Studying transcription initiation by RNA polymerase with diffusion-based single-molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadid, Yazan; Chung, SangYoon; Lerner, Eitan; Taatjes, Dylan J; Borukhov, Sergei; Weiss, Shimon

    2017-07-01

    Over the past decade, fluorescence-based single-molecule studies significantly contributed to characterizing the mechanism of RNA polymerase at different steps in transcription, especially in transcription initiation. Transcription by bacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is a multistep process that uses genomic DNA to synthesize complementary RNA molecules. Transcription initiation is a highly regulated step in E. coli, but it has been challenging to study its mechanism because of its stochasticity and complexity. In this review, we describe how single-molecule approaches have contributed to our understanding of transcription and have uncovered mechanistic details that were not observed in conventional assays because of ensemble averaging. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  5. Photophysics of Fluorescent Probes for Single-Molecule Biophysics and Super-Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Taekjip; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-05-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and super-resolution microscopy are important elements of the ongoing technical revolution to reveal biochemical and cellular processes in unprecedented clarity and precision. Demands placed on the photophysical properties of the fluorophores are stringent and drive the choice of appropriate probes. Such fluorophores are not simple light bulbs of a certain color and brightness but instead have their own “personalities” regarding spectroscopic parameters, redox properties, size, water solubility, photostability, and several other factors. Here, we review the photophysics of fluorescent probes, both organic fluorophores and fluorescent proteins, used in applications such as particle tracking, single-molecule FRET, stoichiometry determination, and super-resolution imaging. Of particular interest is the thiol-induced blinking of Cy5, a curse for single-molecule biophysical studies that was later overcome using Trolox through a reducing/oxidizing system but a boon for super-resolution imaging owing to the controllable photoswitching. Understanding photophysics is critical in the design and interpretation of single-molecule experiments.

  6. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A dendritic single-molecule fluorescent probe that is monovalent, photostable and minimally blinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si Kyung; Shi, Xinghua; Park, Seongjin; Ha, Taekjip; Zimmerman, Steven C.

    2013-08-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence techniques have emerged as a powerful approach to understanding complex biological systems. However, a challenge researchers still face is the limited photostability of nearly all organic fluorophores, including the cyanine and Alexa dyes. We report a new, monovalent probe that emits in the far-red region of the visible spectrum with properties desirable for single-molecule optical imaging. This probe is based on a ring-fused boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) core that is conjugated to a polyglycerol dendrimer (PGD). The dendrimer makes the hydrophobic fluorophore water-soluble. This probe exhibits excellent brightness, with an emission maximum of 705 nm. We have observed strikingly long and stable emission from individual PGD-BODIPY probes, even in the absence of anti-fading agents such as Trolox, a combined oxidizing-reducing agent often used in single-molecule studies for improving the photostability of common imaging probes. These interesting properties greatly simplify use of the fluorophore.

  8. Single-molecule fluorescence-based analysis of protein conformation, interaction, and oligomerization in cellular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenji; Hiroshima, Michio; Sako, Yasushi

    2017-12-14

    Single-molecule imaging (SMI) of proteins in operation has a history of intensive investigations over 20 years and is now widely used in various fields of biology and biotechnology. We review the recent advances in SMI of fluorescently-tagged proteins in structural biology, focusing on technical applicability of SMI to the measurements in living cells. Basic technologies and recent applications of SMI in structural biology are introduced. Distinct from other methods in structural biology, SMI directly observes single molecules and single-molecule events one-by-one, thus, explicitly analyzing the distribution of protein structures and the history of protein dynamics. It also allows one to detect single events of protein interaction. One unique feature of SMI is that it is applicable in complicated and heterogeneous environments, including living cells. The numbers, location, movements, interaction, oligomerization, and conformation of single-protein molecules have been determined using SMI in cellular systems.

  9. Ensemble and Single-Molecule Studies on Fluorescence Quenching in Transition Metal Bipyridine-Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brox, Dominik; Kiel, Alexander; Wörner, Svenja Johanna; Pernpointner, Markus; Comba, Peter; Martin, Bodo; Herten, Dirk-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Beyond their use in analytical chemistry fluorescent probes continuously gain importance because of recent applications of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to monitor elementary reaction steps. In this context, we characterized quenching of a fluorescent probe by different metal ions with fluorescence spectroscopy in the bulk and at the single-molecule level. We apply a quantitative model to explain deviations from existing standard models for fluorescence quenching. The model is based on a reversible transition from a bright to a dim state upon binding of the metal ion. We use the model to estimate the stability constants of complexes with different metal ions and the change of the relative quantum yield of different reporter dye labels. We found ensemble data to agree widely with results from single-molecule experiments. Our data indicates a mechanism involving close molecular contact of dye and quenching moiety which we also found in molecular dynamics simulations. We close the manuscript with a discussion of possible mechanisms based on Förster distances and electrochemical potentials which renders photo-induced electron transfer to be more likely than Förster resonance energy transfer. PMID:23483966

  10. Quantifying the Assembly of Multicomponent Molecular Machines by Single-Molecule Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, E M; Subramanyam, S; Ghoneim, M; Washington, M Todd; Spies, M

    2016-01-01

    Large, dynamic macromolecular complexes play essential roles in many cellular processes. Knowing how the components of these complexes associate with one another and undergo structural rearrangements is critical to understanding how they function. Single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful approach for addressing these fundamental issues. In this article, we first discuss single-molecule TIRF microscopes and strategies to immobilize and fluorescently label macromolecules. We then review the use of single-molecule TIRF microscopy to study the formation of binary macromolecular complexes using one-color imaging and inhibitors. We conclude with a discussion of the use of TIRF microscopy to examine the formation of higher-order (i.e., ternary) complexes using multicolor setups. The focus throughout this article is on experimental design, controls, data acquisition, and data analysis. We hope that single-molecule TIRF microscopy, which has largely been the province of specialists, will soon become as common in the tool box of biophysicists and biochemists as structural approaches have become today. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  12. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhy, M. A.; Elshenawy, M. M.; Takahashi, M.; Whitman, B. H.; Walter, N. G.; Hamdan, S. M.

    2011-11-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  13. Fluorescent Labeling of Proteins in Whole Cell Extracts for Single-Molecule Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S R; Rodgers, M L; Hoskins, A A

    2016-01-01

    Cellular machines such as the spliceosome and ribosome can be composed of dozens of individual proteins and nucleic acids. Given this complexity, it is not surprising that many cellular activities have not yet been biochemically reconstituted. Such processes are often studied in vitro in whole cell or fractionated lysates. This presents a challenge for obtaining detailed biochemical information when the components being investigated may be only a minor component of the extract and unrelated processes may interfere with the assay. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy methods allow particular biomolecules to be analyzed even in the complex milieu of a cell extract. This is due to the use of bright fluorophores that emit light at wavelengths at which few cellular components fluoresce, and the development of chemical biology tools for attaching these fluorophores to specific cellular proteins. Here, we describe a protocol for fluorescent labeling of endogenous, SNAP-tagged yeast proteins in whole cell extract. This method allows biochemical reactions to be followed in cell lysates in real time using colocalization single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Labeled complexes can also be isolated from extract and characterized by SNAP tag single-molecule pull-down (SNAP-SiMPull). These approaches have proven useful for studying complex biological machines such as the spliceosome that cannot yet be reconstituted from purified components. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection of mercury ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Michaelis, Monika; Wei, Gang; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio

    2015-08-07

    We have developed a novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) capable of detecting mercury ions (Hg(2+)) with sub-nM sensitivity. The single-strand (ss) DNA aptamer used in this work is rich in thymine (T) and readily forms T-Hg(2+)-T complexes in the presence of Hg(2+). The aptamer was conjugated to an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe, and the adhesion force between the probe and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). The presence of Hg(2+) ions above a concentration threshold corresponding to the affinity constant of the ions for the aptamer (about 5 × 10(9) M(-1)) could be easily detected by a change of the measured adhesion force. With our chosen aptamer, we could reach an Hg(2+) detection limit of 100 pM, which is well below the maximum allowable level of Hg(2+) in drinking water. In addition, this aptasensor presents a very high selectivity for Hg(2+) over other metal cations, such as K(+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Cd(2+). Furthermore, the effects of the ionic strength and loading rate on the Hg(2+) detection were evaluated. Its simplicity, reproducibility, high selectivity and sensitivity make our SMFS-based aptasensor advantageous with respect to other current Hg(2+) sensing methods. It is expected that our strategy can be exploited for monitoring the pollution of water environments and the safety of potentially contaminated food.

  15. Single-Molecule Monitoring of the Structural Switching Dynamics of Nucleic Acids through Controlling Fluorescence Blinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Miyata, Takafumi; Shimada, Naohiko; Ito, Syoji; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2017-11-27

    Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is a powerful tool to investigate the dynamics of biomolecular events in real time. However, it requires two fluorophores and can be applied only to dynamics that accompany large changes in distance between the molecules. Herein, we introduce a method for kinetic analysis based on control of fluorescence blinking (KACB), a general approach to investigate the dynamics of biomolecules by using a single fluorophore. By controlling the kinetics of the redox reaction the blinking kinetics or pattern can be controlled to be affected by microenvironmental changes around a fluorophore (rKACB), thereby enabling real-time single-molecule measurement of the structure-changing dynamics of nucleic acids. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Synthesis and manipulation of multifunctional, fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles for single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Gang; Thakur, Dhananjay; Hawkins, Sean; Winter, Jessica O.

    2010-02-01

    Heterogeneous nanostructures that possess multiple properties as a result of their differing constituent materials have attracted significant interest in the last few years. In particular, fluorescent-magnetic nanostructures have potential applications in imaging, separations, and single molecule tracking as a result of their fluorescent and magnetic properties. Here we report the synthesis of fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites composed of fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots or graphitic carbon nanoparticles and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. We have developed synthetic strategies using either micellular or polymer encapsulation, yielding composites from ~10 - 100s of nms. Composites maintain the fluorescent and magnetic properties of their constituent materials. These composites can be used for in vitro and in vivo imaging using fluorescent or magnetic (e.g., MRI) modalities. Additionally, we describe the manipulation of these composites using magnetic instrumentation. In particular, we have designed a magnetic needle that can be used to manipulate nanocomposites. Particles as small as 30 nm can be manipulated while simultaneous observed through their fluorescent property. Single particle status can be confirmed through quantum dot blinking, demonstrating the potential of these composites for single molecule tracking.

  17. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Ingargiola, A.; Lin, R.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Cheng, A.; Levi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Arisaka, K.; Villa, F.; Guerrieri, F.; Panzeri, F.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Zappa, F.; Ghioni, M.; Cova, S.

    2013-01-01

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level. PMID:23267185

  18. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, X; Colyer, R A; Scalia, G; Ingargiola, A; Lin, R; Millaud, J E; Weiss, S; Siegmund, Oswald H W; Tremsin, Anton S; Vallerga, John V; Cheng, A; Levi, M; Aharoni, D; Arisaka, K; Villa, F; Guerrieri, F; Panzeri, F; Rech, I; Gulinatti, A; Zappa, F; Ghioni, M; Cova, S

    2013-02-05

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level.

  19. What it means to measure a single molecule in a solution by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földes-Papp, Zeno

    2006-06-01

    Traditional methodologies in micro- and nanofluidics measure biological mechanisms as an average of a population of molecules as only their combined effect can be detected. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy methods such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and two-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) are used as alternative experimental approaches in ultrasensitive analytics at the single-molecule level. However, what is the measurement time in which one is able to study just one single molecule in solution without immobilizing it? Existing theories are inadequate since they do not predict the meaningful time as a function of the concentration of other molecules of the same kind in bulk solution. This situation produces considerable concern, and experimental hypotheses differ according to which single-molecule detection methods are thought to have greater validity. This subject is clearly at the forefront of research and should be of great interest to experimental medical scientists. As will be seen in this article, it is worthwhile to obtain a correct form of the meaningful-time relationship through theoretical means. The new ideas are comprehensively presented, and this relationship is a new concept at this time. The meaningful time for studying just one molecule without immobilization specifies the time parameter in the selfsame molecule likelihood estimator. Possible users for this concept are those working in biotechnological applications dealing with gene technology. Furthermore, the concept is of interest for a great number of medical, pharmaceutical and chemical laboratories. It may serve as a foundation for further work in single-cell biology. It is suspected that heterogeneities play a much larger role inside the cell than in free solution--a perfect opportunity for single-molecule studies and, thus, a novel hypothesis regarding structure and dynamics of cellular networks is first presented for the minimal neurotrophin

  20. Single-Molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) of Circular RNA CDR1as.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocks, Christine; Boltengagen, Anastasiya; Piwecka, Monika; Rybak-Wolf, Agnieszka; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2018-01-01

    Individual mRNA molecules can be imaged in fixed cells by hybridization with multiple, singly labeled oligonucleotide probes, followed by computational identification of fluorescent signals. This approach, called single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (smRNA FISH), allows subcellular localization and absolute quantification of RNA molecules in individual cells. Here, we describe a simple smRNA FISH protocol for two-color imaging of a circular RNA, CDR1as, simultaneously with an unrelated messenger RNA. The protocol can be adapted to circRNAs that coexist with overlapping, noncircular mRNA isoforms produced from the same genetic locus.

  1. Studying the structural dynamics of bipedal DNA motors with single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Rula; Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Plavner, Noa; Liber, Miran; Nir, Eyal

    2012-07-24

    We present a test case example of a detailed single-molecule fluorescence study of one of the most sophisticated and complex DNA devices introduced to date, a recently published autonomous bipedal DNA motor. We used the diffusion-based single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer technique, coupled to alternating laser excitation (sm-FRET-ALEX), to monitor the motor assembly and operation. The study included verification of the formation of the correct structures, and of the correct motor operation, determination of the formation and stepping reaction yields, and identification of side products. Finally, the mechanisms of the motor assembly and operation were elucidated by measuring the reaction kinetics profile of track-walker binding and of lifting of the walker's leg upon fuel addition. The profiles revealed a fast phase, in which about half of the reaction was completed, followed by a slow phase which adds somewhat to the yield, reflecting the incomplete motor assembly and operation identified in the equilibrium experiments. Although further study is needed to fully understand the reasons for the incomplete assembly and operation, this work demonstrates that single-molecule fluorescence, based on its ability to provide detailed in situ structural dynamics information, inaccessible for traditional methods, constitutes an excellent tool for chaperoning the development of DNA-based technology.

  2. High-Resolution "Fleezers": Dual-Trap Optical Tweezers Combined with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Kevin D; Comstock, Matthew J; Chemla, Yann R

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in optical tweezers have greatly expanded their measurement capabilities. A new generation of hybrid instrument that combines nanomechanical manipulation with fluorescence detection-fluorescence optical tweezers, or "fleezers"-is providing a powerful approach to study complex macromolecular dynamics. Here, we describe a combined high-resolution optical trap/confocal fluorescence microscope that can simultaneously detect sub-nanometer displacements, sub-piconewton forces, and single-molecule fluorescence signals. The primary technical challenge to these hybrid instruments is how to combine both measurement modalities without sacrificing the sensitivity of either one. We present general design principles to overcome this challenge and provide detailed, step-by-step instructions to implement them in the construction and alignment of the instrument. Lastly, we present a set of protocols to perform a simple, proof-of-principle experiment that highlights the instrument capabilities.

  3. Recent Advances in Biological Single-Molecule Applications of Optical Tweezers and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Shabestari, M; Meijering, A E C; Roos, W H; Wuite, G J L; Peterman, E J G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, single-molecule techniques have evolved into robust tools to study many fundamental biological processes. The combination of optical tweezers with fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics provides a powerful single-molecule manipulation and visualization technique that has found widespread application in biology. In this combined approach, the spatial (~nm) and temporal (~ms) resolution, as well as the force scale (~pN) accessible to optical tweezers is complemented with the power of fluorescence microscopy. Thereby, it provides information on the local presence, identity, spatial dynamics, and conformational dynamics of single biomolecules. Together, these techniques allow comprehensive studies of, among others, molecular motors, protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, biomolecular conformational changes, and mechanotransduction pathways. In this chapter, recent applications of fluorescence microscopy in combination with optical trapping are discussed. After an introductory section, we provide a description of instrumentation together with the current capabilities and limitations of the approaches. Next we summarize recent studies that applied this combination of techniques in biological systems and highlight some representative biological assays to mark the exquisite opportunities that optical tweezers combined with fluorescence microscopy provide. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct quantification of single-molecules of microRNA by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ho-Man; Chan, Lai-Sheung; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun; Li, Hung-Wing

    2010-08-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) express differently in normal and cancerous tissues and thus are regarded as potent cancer biomarkers for early diagnosis. However, the short length and low abundance of miRNAs have brought challenges to the established detection assay in terms of sensitivity and selectivity. In this work, we present a novel miRNA detection assay in single-molecule level with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). It is a solution-based hybridization detection system that does not require pretreatment steps such as sample enrichment or signal amplification. The hsa-miR-21 (miR-21) is chosen as target miRNA for its significant elevated content in a variety of cancers as reported previously. Herein, probes of complementary single-stranded oligonucleotide were hybridized in solution to miR-21 and labeled with fluorescent dye YOYO-1. The fluorescent hybrids were imaged by an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) coupled TIRFM system and quantified by single-molecule counting. This single molecule detection (SMD) assay shows a good correlation between the number of molecules detected and the factual concentration of miRNA. The detection assay is applied to quantify the miR-21 in extracted total RNA samples of cancerous MCF-7 cells, HepG2 cells, and normal HUVEC cells, respectively. The results agreed very well with those from the prevalent real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. This assay is of high potential for applications in miRNA expression profiling and early cancer diagnosis.

  5. Detection of ultra-low oxygen concentration based on the fluorescence blinking dynamics of single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruixiang; Chen, Ruiyun; Zhou, Haitao; Qin, Yaqiang; Zhang, Guofeng; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Gao, Yajun; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2018-01-01

    We present a sensitive method for detection of ultra-low oxygen concentrations based on the fluorescence blinking dynamics of single molecules. The relationship between the oxygen concentration and the fraction of time spent in the off-state, stemming from the population and depopulation of triplet states and radical cationic states, can be fitted with a two-site quenching model in the Stern-Volmer plot. The oxygen sensitivity is up to 43.42 kPa-1 in the oxygen partial pressure region as low as 0.01-0.25 kPa, which is seven times higher than that of the fluorescence intensity indicator. This method avoids the limitation of the sharp and non-ignorable fluctuations that occur during the measurement of fluorescence intensity, providing potential applications in the field of low oxygen-concentration monitoring in life science and industry.

  6. Highly fluorescent semiconducting polymer dots for single-molecule imaging and biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Yu, Jiangbo; Ye, Fangmao; Rong, Yu; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation of semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) and their application for single-molecule imaging and biosensing. The Pdots possessed high fluorescence brightness, with a 16 nm Pdot being ~9 times brighter than 13 nm Quantum Dots (Qdots). The surface of Pdots was successfully conjugated with streptavidin, which made Pdots suitable for specific subcellular labeling and targeting. The interior composition of Pdots was also successfully modified, through which the Pdots obtained additional functionalities. We demonstrated the utility of gold nanoparticle embedded Pdots in dual-modality imaging. We also demonstrated that Rhodamine B embedded Pdots were able to function as ratiometric temperature sensor in live-cell imaging mode.

  7. Enhancement of single-molecule fluorescence using a gold nanoparticle as an optical nanoantenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Sergei; Håkanson, Ulf; Rogobete, Lavinia; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2006-07-07

    We investigate the coupling of a single molecule to a single spherical gold nanoparticle acting as a nanoantenna. Using scanning probe technology, we position the particle in front of the molecule with nanometer accuracy and measure a strong enhancement of more than 20 times in the fluorescence intensity simultaneous to a 20-fold shortening of the excited state lifetime. Comparisons with three-dimensional calculations guide us to decipher the contributions of the excitation enhancement, spontaneous emission modification, and quenching. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence for the role of the particle plasmon resonance in the molecular excitation and emission processes.

  8. Demonstration of Single Barium Ion Sensitivity for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay using Single Molecule Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, A.D.; et al.

    2017-11-13

    A new method to tag the barium daughter in the double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe is reported. Using the technique of single molecule fluorescent imaging (SMFI), individual barium dication (Ba$^{++}$) resolution at a transparent scanning surface has been demonstrated. A single-step photo-bleach confirms the single ion interpretation. Individual ions are localized with super-resolution ($\\sim$2~nm), and detected with a statistical significance of 12.9~$\\sigma$ over backgrounds. This lays the foundation for a new and potentially background-free neutrinoless double beta decay technology, based on SMFI coupled to high pressure xenon gas time projection chambers.

  9. Simultaneous Single-Molecule Force and Fluorescence Sampling of DNA Nanostructure Conformations Using Magnetic Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Swoboda, Marko; Kauert, Dominik J; Grieb, M Svea; Hahn, Steffen; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Seidel, Ralf; Schlierf, Michael

    2016-01-13

    We present a hybrid single-molecule technique combining magnetic tweezers and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Through applying external forces to a paramagnetic sphere, we induce conformational changes in DNA nanostructures, which are detected in two output channels simultaneously. First, by tracking a magnetic bead with high spatial and temporal resolution, we observe overall DNA length changes along the force axis. Second, the measured FRET efficiency between two fluorescent probes monitors local conformational changes. The synchronized orthogonal readout in different observation channels will facilitate deciphering the complex mechanisms of biomolecular machines.

  10. Single-molecule, antibody-free fluorescent visualisation of replication tracts along barcoded DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carli, Francesco; Gaggioli, Vincent; Millot, Gaël A; Hyrien, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    DNA combing is a standard technique to map DNA replication at the single molecule level. Typically, replicating DNA is metabolically labelled with nucleoside or nucleotide analogs, purified, stretched on coverslips and treated with fluorescent antibodies to reveal tracts of newly synthesized DNA. Fibres containing a locus of interest can then be identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA probes. These steps are complex and the throughput is low. Here, we describe a simpler, antibody-free method to reveal replication tracts and identify the locus of origin of combed DNA replication intermediates. DNA was replicated in Xenopus egg extracts in the presence of a fluorescent dUTP. Purified DNA was barcoded by nicking with Nt.BspQI, a site-specific nicking endonuclease (NE), followed by limited nick-translation in the presence of another fluorescent dUTP. DNA was then stained with YOYO-1, a fluorescent DNA intercalator, and combed. Direct epifluorescence revealed the DNA molecules, their replication tracts and their Nt.BspQI sites in three distinct colours. Replication intermediates could thus be aligned to a reference genome map. In addition, replicated DNA segments showed a stronger YOYO-1 fluorescence than unreplicated segments. The entire length, replication tracts, and NE sites of combed DNA molecules can be simultaneously visualized in three distinct colours by standard epifluorescence microscopy, with no need for antibody staining and/or FISH detection. Furthermore, replication bubbles can be detected by quantitative YOYO-1 staining, eliminating the need for metabolic labelling. These results provide a starting point for genome-wide, single-molecule mapping of DNA replication in any organism.

  11. Nanomolar oligomerization and selective co-aggregation of [alpha]-synuclein pathogenic mutants revealed by single-molecule fluorescence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emma Sierecki; Nichole Giles; Quill Bowden; Mark E Polinkovsky; Janina Steinbeck; Nicholas Arrioti; Diya Rahman; Akshay Bhumkar; Philip R Nicovich; Ian Ross; Robert G Parton; Till Böcking; Yann Gambin

    2016-01-01

    ...). To this end, single-molecule fluorescence detection was coupled to cell-free protein expression to measure precisely the oligomerization of proteins without purification, denaturation or labelling steps...

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopy of single molecules at room temperature and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Taekjip [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We performed fluorescence spectroscopy of single and pairs of dye molecules on a surface at room temperature. Near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and far field scanning optical microscope with multi-color excitation/detection capability were built. The instrument is capable of optical imaging with 100nm resolution and has the sensitivity necessary for single molecule detection. A variety of dynamic events which cannot be observed from an ensemble of molecules is revealed when the molecules are probed one at a time. They include (1) spectral jumps correlated with dark states, (2) individually resolved quantum jumps to and from the meta-stable triplet state, (3) rotational jumps due to desorption/readsorption events of single molecules on the surface. For these studies, a computer controlled optical system which automatically and rapidly locates and performs spectroscopic measurements on single molecules was developed. We also studied the interaction between closely spaced pairs of molecules. In particular, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a single resonant pair of donor and acceptor molecules was measured. Photodestruction dynamics of the donor or acceptor were used to determine the presence and efficiency of energy transfer Dual molecule spectroscopy was extended to a non-resonant pair of molecules to obtain high resolution differential distance information. By combining NSOM and dual color scheme, we studied the co-localization of parasite proteins and host proteins on a human red blood cell membrane infected with malaria. These dual-molecule techniques can be used to measure distances, relative orientations, and changes in distances/orientations of biological macromolecules with very good spatial, angular and temporal resolutions, hence opening new capabilities in the study of such systems.

  13. Irving Langmuir Prize Talk: Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging: Nanoscale Emitters with Photoinduced Switching Enable Superresolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E.

    2009-03-01

    In the two decades since the first optical detection and spectroscopy of a single molecule in a solid (Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 2535 (1989)), much has been learned about the ability of single molecules to probe local nanoenvironments and individual behavior in biological and nonbiological materials in the absence of ensemble averaging that can obscure heterogeneity. The early years concentrated on high-resolution spectroscopy in solids, which provided observations of lifetime-limited spectra, optical saturation, spectral diffusion, optical switching, vibrational spectra, and magnetic resonance of a single molecular spin. In the mid-1990's, much of the field moved to room temperature, where a wide variety of biophysical effects were subsequently explored, but it is worth noting that several features from the low-temperature studies have analogs at high temperature. For example, in our first studies of yellow-emitting variants of green fluorescent protein (EYFP) in the water-filled pores of a gel (Nature 388, 355 (1997)), optically induced switching of the emission was observed, a room-temperature analog of the earlier low-temperature behavior. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic imaging of individual fluorophores leads naturally to superlocalization, or determination of the position of the molecule with precision beyond the optical diffraction limit, simply by digitization of the point-spread function from the single emitter. Recent work has allowed measurement of the shape of single filaments in a living cell simply by allowing a single molecule to move through the filament (PNAS 103, 10929 (2006)). The additional use of photoinduced control of single-molecule emission allows imaging beyond the diffraction limit (superresolution) by several novel approaches proposed by different researchers. For example, using photoswitchable EYFP, a novel protein superstructure can now be directly imaged in a living bacterial cell at

  14. Rational design of DNA motors: fuel optimization through single-molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Liber, Miran; Masoud, Rula; Plavner, Noa; Nir, Eyal

    2013-08-14

    While numerous DNA-based molecular machines have been developed in recent years, high operational yield and speed remain a major challenge. To understand the reasons for the limited performance, and to find rational solutions, we applied single-molecule fluorescence techniques and conducted a detailed study of the reactions involved in the operation of a model system comprised of a bipedal DNA walker that strides on a DNA origami track powered by interactions with fuel and antifuel strands. Analysis of the kinetic profiles of the leg-lifting reactions indicates a pseudo-first-order antifuel binding mechanism leading to a rapid and complete leg-lifting, indicating that the fuel-removal reaction is not responsible for the 1% operational yield observed after six steps. Analysis of the leg-placing reactions showed that although increased concentrations of fuel increase the reaction rate, they decrease the yield by consecutively binding the motor and leading to an undesirable trapped state. Recognizing this, we designed asymmetrical hairpin-fuels that by regulating the reaction hierarchy avoid consecutive binding. Motors operating with the improved fuels show 74% yield after 12 consecutive reactions, a dramatic increase over the 1% observed for motors operating with nonhairpin fuels. This work demonstrates that studying the mechanisms of the reactions involved in the operation of DNA-based molecular machines using single-molecule fluorescence can facilitate rationally designed improvements that increase yield and speed and promote the applicability of DNA-based machines.

  15. Fluorescence single-molecule imaging of actin turnover and regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Cells must rapidly remodel the actin filament network to achieve various cellular functions. Actin filament turnover is a dynamic process that plays crucial roles in cell adhesion, locomotion, cytokinesis, endocytosis, phagocytosis, tissue remodeling, etc., and is regulated by cell signaling cascades. Success in elucidating dynamic biological processes such as actin-based motility relies on the means enabling real time monitoring of the process. The invention of live-cell fluorescence single-molecule imaging has opened a window for direct viewing of various actin remodeling processes. In general, assembly and dissociation of actin and its regulators turned out to occur at the faster rates than previously estimated by biochemical and structural analyses. Cells undergo such fast continuous exchange of the components perhaps not only to drive actin remodeling but also to facilitate rapid response in many other cell mechanics and signaling cascades. This chapter describes how epifluorescence single-molecule imaging which visualizes deeper area than the TIRF microscopy is achieved in XTC cells, the currently best platform for this approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-bead, single-molecule, single-cell fluorescence: technologies for drug screening and target validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintersteiner, Martin; Auer, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    According to many current reports, the pharmaceutical business will hit a wall over the next few years. The generic competition is expected to wipe out a double-digit billion-dollar amount from top companies' annual sales between 2007 and 2012 (Wall Street Journal, online, December 6, 2007). The industry's science engine has stalled, new blockbusters are lacking, and patent expirations are a big problem. Also, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is pulling back on approvals, requesting larger safety studies. Among the different approaches taken throughout the industry to improve productivity and to reduce the attrition rate of compounds in the drug discovery process, an extended application of quantitative biology and biophysical methods is ranked very high. Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging represented the main detection technologies for assays and screening methods in recent years. Today, label-free detection methods, such as isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)), light scattering, or interferometry, start to provide viable alternative readouts for physicochemical characterization of leads and hit list triaging. However, the multidimensional nature of fluorescence along with its high sensitivity and single-molecule resolution remains an unparalleled source of molecular parameters to extract all different kinds of information on molecules and ligand-protein complexes in solution. Although fluorescence-based methods are currently applied throughout the different stages of the industrial drug discovery process, they are usually applied in an unconnected way. We have developed a fully integrated hit and lead discovery process combining bead-based synthesis and screening methods with confocal fluorescence microspectroscopy. The primary on-bead screening process provides fluorescent ligands that after a multistep characterization process ultimately leads to fully mechanistically characterized

  17. Homebuilt single-molecule scanning confocal fluorescence microscope studies of single DNA/protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haocheng; Goldner, Lori S; Leuba, Sanford H

    2007-03-01

    Many technical improvements in fluorescence microscopy over the years have focused on decreasing background and increasing the signal to noise ratio (SNR). The scanning confocal fluorescence microscope (SCFM) represented a major improvement in these efforts. The SCFM acquires signal from a thin layer of a thick sample, rejecting light whose origin is not in the focal plane thereby dramatically decreasing the background signal. A second major innovation was the advent of high quantum-yield, low noise, single-photon counting detectors. The superior background rejection of SCFM combined with low-noise, high-yield detectors makes it possible to detect the fluorescence from single-dye molecules. By labeling a DNA molecule or a DNA/protein complex with a donor/acceptor dye pair, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be used to track conformational changes in the molecule/complex itself, on a single molecule/complex basis. In this methods paper, we describe the core concepts of SCFM in the context of a study that uses FRET to reveal conformational fluctuations in individual Holliday junction DNA molecules and nucleosomal particles. We also discuss data processing methods for SCFM.

  18. Detailed study of DNA hairpin dynamics using single-molecule fluorescence assisted by DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Masoud, Rula; Drory, Hagai; Plavner, Noa; Liber, Miran; Nir, Eyal

    2013-10-10

    The dynamics of two DNA hairpins (5'-TCGCCT-A31-AGGCGA-3' and 5'-TCGCCG-A31-CGGCGA-3') were studied using immobilization-based and diffusion-based single-molecule fluorescence techniques. The techniques enabled separated and detailed investigation of the states and of the transition reactions. Only two states, open and closed, were identified from analysis of the FRET histograms; metastable states with lifetimes longer than the technique resolution (0.3 ms) were not observed. The opening and closing reaction rates were determined directly from the FRET time trajectories, and the Gibbs free energies of these states and of the transition state were calculated using the Kramer theory. The rates, which are undoubtedly of transitions between the fully closed and the fully open states and ranged from 2 to 90 s(-1), were lower (∼10-fold) than the rates previously determined from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The heights of the barriers for closing were almost identical for the two hairpins. The barrier for opening the hairpin with the stronger stem was higher (4.3 kJ/mol) than that for the hairpin with the weaker stem, in very good agreement with the difference in stability calculated by the nearest-neighbor method. The barrier for closing the hairpin decreased (∼8 kJ/mol) and the barrier for opening increased (∼4 kJ/mol) with increasing NaCl concentration (10-100 mM), indicating that higher ionic strength stabilizes the folded state with respect to the transition state and stabilizes the transition state relative to the unfolded state. The very good agreements in the dynamics measured for free hairpins, for hairpins anchored to origami, and for hairpins anchored to the coverslip and the very good agreement between the two single-molecule techniques demonstrate that neither the origami nor the coverslip influence the hairpin dynamics, supporting a previous demonstration that origami can serve as a platform for biophysical investigations.

  19. Nanopipette delivery of individual molecules to cellular compartments for single-molecule fluorescence tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckbauer, Andreas; James, Peter; Zhou, Dejian; Yoon, Ji Won; Excell, David; Korchev, Yuri; Jones, Roy; Klenerman, David

    2007-11-01

    We have developed a new method, using a nanopipette, for controlled voltage-driven delivery of individual fluorescently labeled probe molecules to the plasma membrane which we used for single-molecule fluorescence tracking (SMT). The advantages of the method are 1), application of the probe to predefined regions on the membrane; 2), release of only one or a few molecules onto the cell surface; 3), when combined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, very low background due to unbound molecules; and 4), the ability to first optimize the experiment and then repeat it on the same cell. We validated the method by performing an SMT study of the diffusion of individual membrane glycoproteins labeled with Atto 647-wheat germ agglutin in different surface domains of boar spermatozoa. We found little deviation from Brownian diffusion with a mean diffusion coefficient of 0.79 +/- 0.04 microm(2)/s in the acrosomal region and 0.10 +/- 0.02 microm(2)/s in the postacrosomal region; this difference probably reflects different membrane structures. We also showed that we can analyze diffusional properties of different subregions of the cell membrane and probe for the presence of diffusion barriers. It should be straightforward to extend this new method to other probes and cells, and it can be used as a new tool to investigate the cell membrane.

  20. Single molecule fluorescence imaging as a technique for barium tagging in neutrinoless double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. J. P.; McDonald, A. D.; Nygren, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Background rejection is key to success for future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. To achieve sensitivity to effective Majorana lifetimes of ~ 1028 years, backgrounds must be controlled to better than 0.1 count per ton per year, beyond the reach of any present technology. In this paper we propose a new method to identify the birth of the barium daughter ion in the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The method adapts Single Molecule Fluorescent Imaging, a technique from biochemistry research with demonstrated single ion sensitivity. We explore possible SMFI dyes suitable for the problem of barium ion detection in high pressure xenon gas, and develop a fiber-coupled sensing system with which we can detect the presence of bulk Ba++ ions remotely. We show that our sensor produces signal-to-background ratios as high as 85 in response to Ba++ ions when operated in aqueous solution. We then describe the next stage of this R&D program, which will be to demonstrate chelation and fluorescence in xenon gas. If a successful barium ion tag can be developed using SMFI adapted for high pressure xenon gas detectors, the first essentially zero background, ton-scale neutrinoless double beta decay technology could be realized.

  1. Combined Magnetic Tweezers and Micro-mirror Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope for Single-Molecule Manipulation and Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers is a versatile yet simple single-molecule manipulation technique that has been used to study a broad range of nucleic acids and nucleic acid-based molecular motors. In this chapter, we combine micro-mirror-based total internal reflection microscopy with a magnetic tweezers instrument, permitting simultaneous single-molecule visualization and mechanical manipulation. We provide a simple method to calibrate the evanescent wave penetration depth via supercoiling of DNA with a fluorescent nanodiamond-labeled magnetic bead and a complementary method employing a surface-immobilized fluorescent nanodiamond.

  2. Peering into Cells One Molecule at a Time: Single-molecule and plasmon-enhanced fluorescence super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence brings the resolution of optical microscopy down to the nanometer scale, allowing us to unlock the mysteries of how biomolecules work together to achieve the complexity that is a cell. This high-resolution, non-destructive method for examining subcellular events has opened up an exciting new frontier: the study of macromolecular localization and dynamics in living cells. We have developed methods for single-molecule investigations of live bacterial cells, and have used these techniques to investigate thee important prokaryotic systems: membrane-bound transcription activation in Vibrio cholerae, carbohydrate catabolism in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and DNA mismatch repair in Bacillus subtilis. Each system presents unique challenges, and we will discuss the important methods developed for each system. Furthermore, we use the plasmon modes of bio-compatible metal nanoparticles to enhance the emissivity of single-molecule fluorophores. The resolution of single-molecule imaging in cells is generally limited to 20-40 nm, far worse than the 1.5-nm localization accuracies which have been attained in vitro. We use plasmonics to improve the brightness and stability of single-molecule probes, and in particular fluorescent proteins, which are widely used for bio-imaging. We find that gold-coupled fluorophores demonstrate brighter, longer-lived emission, yielding an overall enhancement in total photons detected. Ultimately, this results in increased localization accuracy for single-molecule imaging. Furthermore, since fluorescence intensity is proportional to local electromagnetic field intensity, these changes in decay intensity and rate serve as a nm-scale read-out of the field intensity. Our work indicates that plasmonic substrates are uniquely advantageous for super-resolution imaging, and that plasmon-enhanced imaging is a promising technique for improving live cell single-molecule microscopy.

  3. Aro: a machine learning approach to identifying single molecules and estimating classification error in fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Allison Chia-Yi; Rifkin, Scott A

    2015-03-27

    Recent techniques for tagging and visualizing single molecules in fixed or living organisms and cell lines have been revolutionizing our understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of fundamental biological processes. However, fluorescence microscopy images are often noisy, and it can be difficult to distinguish a fluorescently labeled single molecule from background speckle. We present a computational pipeline to distinguish the true signal of fluorescently labeled molecules from background fluorescence and noise. We test our technique using the challenging case of wide-field, epifluorescence microscope image stacks from single molecule fluorescence in situ experiments on nematode embryos where there can be substantial out-of-focus light and structured noise. The software recognizes and classifies individual mRNA spots by measuring several features of local intensity maxima and classifying them with a supervised random forest classifier. A key innovation of this software is that, by estimating the probability that each local maximum is a true spot in a statistically principled way, it makes it possible to estimate the error introduced by image classification. This can be used to assess the quality of the data and to estimate a confidence interval for the molecule count estimate, all of which are important for quantitative interpretations of the results of single-molecule experiments. The software classifies spots in these images well, with >95% AUROC on realistic artificial data and outperforms other commonly used techniques on challenging real data. Its interval estimates provide a unique measure of the quality of an image and confidence in the classification.

  4. Ultra-stable and versatile widefield cryo-fluorescence microscope for single-molecule localization with sub-nanometer accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weixing; Stein, Simon C; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2015-02-09

    We developed a stand-alone cryostat with optical access to the sample which can be adapted to any epi-fluorescence microscope for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. The cryostat cools the sample to a cryogenic temperature of 89 K, and allows for imaging single molecules using an air objective with a numerical aperture of 0.7. An important property of this system is its excellent thermal and mechanical stability, enabling long-time observations of samples over several hours with negligible drift. Using this system, we performed photo-bleaching studies of Atto647N dye molecules, and find an improvement of the photostability of these molecules by more than two orders of magnitude. The resulting increased photon numbers of several millions allow for single-molecule localization accuracy of sub-nanometer.

  5. Single molecules in soft matter : a study of biomolecular conformation, heterogeneity and plasmon enhanced fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Haifeng

    2013-01-01

    We study the dynamics of single molecules and individual gold nanorods in glycerol at variable temperatures. We demonstrate temperature-cycle microscopy on FRET-labeled polyproline and double-stranded DNA molecules to access micro-second dynamics of single molecules, and reveal the influences of

  6. Single molecule dynamics in a virtual cell: a three-dimensional model that produces simulated fluorescence video-imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanov, Gregory I

    2014-09-06

    The analysis of single molecule imaging experiments is complicated by the stochastic nature of single molecule events, by instrument noise and by the limited information which can be gathered about any individual molecule observed. Consequently, it is important to cross check experimental results using a model simulating single molecule dynamics (e.g. movements and binding events) in a virtual cell-like environment. The output of such a model should match the real data format allowing researchers to compare simulated results with the real experiments. The proposed model exploits the advantages of 'object-oriented' computing. First of all, the ability to create and manipulate a number of classes, each containing an arbitrary number of single molecule objects. These classes may include objects moving within the 'cytoplasm'; objects moving at the 'plasma membrane'; and static objects located inside the 'body'. The objects of a given class can interact with each other and/or with the objects of other classes according to their physical and chemical properties. Each model run generates a sequence of images, each containing summed images of all fluorescent objects emitting light under given illumination conditions with realistic levels of noise and emission fluctuations. The model accurately reproduces reported single molecule experiments and predicts the outcome of future experiments.

  7. Single Molecule 3D Orientation in Time and Space: A 6D Dynamic Study on Fluorescently Labeled Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börner, Richard; Ehrlich, Nicky; Hohlbein, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between single molecules profoundly depend on their mutual three-dimensional orientation. Recently, we demonstrated a technique that allows for orientation determination of single dipole emitters using a polarization-resolved distribution of fluorescence into several detection channels...... interesting in non-isotropic environments such as lipid membranes, which are of great importance in biology. We used giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) labeled with fluorescent dyes down to a single molecule concentration as a model system for both, assessing the robustness of the orientation determination....... As the method is based on the detection of single photons, it additionally allows for performing fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) as well as dynamical anisotropy measurements thereby providing access to fast orientational dynamics down to the nanosecond time scale. The 3D orientation is particularly...

  8. Single molecule spectroscopic characterization of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed) from the Anthozoa coral Heteractis crispa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi; Whitier, Jennifer E.; Werner, James H.; De Schryver, Frans C.; Hofkens, Johan; Goodwin, Peter M.

    2006-02-01

    We report on the photophysical properties of a far-red intrinsic fluorescent protein by means of single molecule and ensemble spectroscopic methods. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria is a popular fluorescent marker with genetically encoded fluorescence and which can be fused to any biological structure without affecting its function. GFP and its variants provide emission colors from blue to yellowish green. Red intrinsic fluorescent proteins from Anthozoa species represent a recent addition to the emission color palette provided by GFPs. Red intrinsic fluorescent markers are on high demand in protein-protein interaction studies based on fluorescence-resonance energy transfer or in multicolor tracking studies or in cellular investigations where autofluorescence possesses a problem. Here we address the photophysical properties of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed), a mutant engineered from a chromoprotein cloned from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa, by using a combination of ensemble and single molecule spectroscopic methods. We show evidence for the presence of HcRed protein as an oligomer and for incomplete maturation of its chromophore. Incomplete maturation results in the presence of an immature (yellow) species absorbing/fluorescing at 490/530-nm. This yellow chromophore is involved in a fast resonance-energy transfer with the mature (purple) chromophore. The mature chromophore of HcRed is found to adopt two conformations, a Transoriented form absorbing and 565-nm and non-fluorescent in solution and a Cis-oriented form absorbing at 590-nm and emitting at 645-nm. These two forms co-exist in solution in thermal equilibrium. Excitation-power dependence fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of HcRed shows evidence for singlet-triplet transitions in the microseconds time scale and for cis-trans isomerization occurring in a time scale of tens of microseconds. Single molecule fluorescence data recorded from immobilized HcRed proteins, all

  9. Highly sensitive immunoassay of protein molecules based on single nanoparticle fluorescence detection in a nanowell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joo; Lakshmana, Sudheendra; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2011-03-01

    A nanoarray based-single molecule detection system was developed for detecting proteins with extremely high sensitivity. The nanoarray was able to effectively trap nanoparticles conjugated with biological sample into nanowells by integrating with an electrophoretic particle entrapment system (EPES). The nanoarray/EPES is superior to other biosensor using immunoassays in terms of saving the amounts of biological solution and enhancing kinetics of antibody binding due to reduced steric hindrance from the neighboring biological molecules. The nanoarray patterned onto a layer of PMMA and LOL on conductive and transparent indium tin oxide (ITO)-glass slide by using e-beam lithography. The suspension of 500 nm-fluorescent (green emission)-carboxylated polystyrene (PS) particles coated with protein-A followed by BDE 47 polyclonal antibody was added to the chip that was connected to the positive voltage. The droplet was covered by another ITO-coated-glass slide and connected to a ground terminal. After trapping the particles into the nanowells, the solution of different concentrations of anti-rabbit- IgG labeled with Alexa 532 was added for an immunoassay. A single molecule detection system could quantify the anti-rabbit IgG down to atto-mole level by counting photons emitted from the fluorescent dye bound to a single nanoparticle in a nanowell.

  10. Anin vitrotag-and-modify protein sample generation method for single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Kambiz M; Howe, Jesse; Jensen, Madeleine K; Wu, Peng; Cate, Jamie H D; Marqusee, Susan

    2017-09-22

    Biomolecular systems exhibit many dynamic and biologically relevant properties, such as conformational fluctuations, multistep catalysis, transient interactions, folding, and allosteric structural transitions. These properties are challenging to detect and engineer using standard ensemble-based techniques. To address this drawback, single-molecule methods offer a way to access conformational distributions, transient states, and asynchronous dynamics inaccessible to these standard techniques. Fluorescence-based single-molecule approaches are parallelizable and compatible with multiplexed detection; to date, however, they have remained limited to serial screens of small protein libraries. This stems from the current absence of methods for generating either individual dual-labeled protein samples at high throughputs or protein libraries compatible with multiplexed screening platforms. Here, we demonstrate that by combining purified and reconstituted in vitro translation, quantitative unnatural amino acid incorporation via AUG codon reassignment, and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, we can overcome these challenges for target proteins that are, or can be, methionine-depleted. We present an in vitro parallelizable approach that does not require laborious target-specific purification to generate dual-labeled proteins and ribosome-nascent chain libraries suitable for single-molecule FRET-based conformational phenotyping. We demonstrate the power of this approach by tracking the effects of mutations, C-terminal extensions, and ribosomal tethering on the structure and stability of three protein model systems: barnase, spectrin, and T4 lysozyme. Importantly, dual-labeled ribosome-nascent chain libraries enable single-molecule co-localization of genotypes with phenotypes, are well suited for multiplexed single-molecule screening of protein libraries, and should enable the in vitro directed evolution of proteins with designer single-molecule conformational

  11. Revealing the Raft Domain Organization in the Plasma Membrane by Single-Molecule Imaging of Fluorescent Ganglioside Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Ando, Hiromune; Komura, Naoko; Konishi, Miku; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2018-01-01

    Gangliosides have been implicated in a variety of physiological processes, particularly in the formation and function of raft domains in the plasma membrane. However, the scarcity of suitable fluorescent ganglioside analogs had long prevented us from determining exactly how gangliosides perform their functions in the live-cell plasma membrane. With the development of new fluorescent ganglioside analogs, as described by Komura et al. (2017), this barrier has been broken. We can now address the dynamic behaviors of gangliosides in the live-cell plasma membrane, using fluorescence microscopy, particularly by single-fluorescent molecule imaging and tracking. Single-molecule tracking of fluorescent GM1 and GM3 revealed that these molecules are transiently and dynamically recruited to monomers (monomer-associated rafts) and homodimer rafts of the raftophilic GPI-anchored protein CD59 in quiescent cells, with exponential residency times of 12 and 40ms, respectively, in a manner dependent on raft-lipid interactions. Upon CD59 stimulation, which induces CD59-cluster signaling rafts, the fluorescent GM1 and GM3 analogs were recruited to the signaling rafts, with a lifetime of 48ms. These results represent the first direct evidence that GPI-anchored receptors and gangliosides interact in a cholesterol-dependent manner. Furthermore, they show that gangliosides continually move in and out of rafts that contain CD59 in an extremely dynamic manner, with much higher frequency than expected previously. Such studies would not have been possible without fluorescent ganglioside probes, which exhibit native-like behavior and single-molecule tracking. In this chapter, we review the methods for single-molecule tracking of fluorescent ganglioside analogs and the results obtained by applying these methods. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The development of a single molecule fluorescence standard and its application in estimating the stoichiometry of the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Hieng Chiong; Madugula, Viswanadh; Lu, Lei

    2016-09-30

    We report here an image-based method to quantify the stoichiometry of diffraction-limited sub-cellular protein complexes in vivo under spinning disk confocal microscopy. A GFP single molecule fluorescence standard was first established by immobilizing His-tagged GFP molecules onto the glass surface via nickel nitrilotriacetic acid functionalized polyethylene glycol. When endogenous nucleoporins were knocked down and replaced by the exogenously expressed and knockdown-resistant GFP-nucleoporins, the stoichiometry of the nucleoporin was estimated by the ratio of its fluorescence intensity to that of the GFP single molecules. Our measured stoichiometry of Nup35, Nup93, Nup133 and Nup88 is 23, 18, 14 and 9 and there are possibly16 copies of Nup107-160 complex per nuclear pore complex. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Combined analysis of the temperature dependences of the fluorescence spectra and images of single molecules in polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikushina, Tatiana; Naumov, Andrei; Kador, Lothar

    2017-10-01

    In this poster talk we discuss a possibility to realize the combined analysis of the temperature dependences of the zero-phonon line widths and fluorescence images of single molecules in thin polymer films. Such analysis is aimed to obtain the local characteristics of low-temperature vibrational dynamics (individual parameters of quasi-localised low-frequency vibrational modes) in relation to the sample structure.

  14. Unraveling the structure of DNA during overstretching by using multicolor, single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mameren, J.; Gross, P.; Farge, G.; Hooijman, P.; Modesti, M.; Falkenberg, M.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Peterman, E.J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation studies have revealed that double-stranded DNA undergoes a structural transition when subjected to tension. At forces that depend on the attachment geometry of the DNA (65 pN or 110 pN), it elongates ≈1.7-fold and its elastic properties change dramatically. The nature of

  15. Quantitative Connection between Ensemble Thermodynamics and Single-Molecule Kinetics: A Case Study Using Cryogenic Electron Microscopy and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Investigations of the Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Colin D Kinz; Sharma, Ajeet K; Frank, Joachim; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2015-08-27

    At equilibrium, thermodynamic and kinetic information can be extracted from biomolecular energy landscapes by many techniques. However, while static, ensemble techniques yield thermodynamic data, often only dynamic, single-molecule techniques can yield the kinetic data that describe transition-state energy barriers. Here we present a generalized framework based upon dwell-time distributions that can be used to connect such static, ensemble techniques with dynamic, single-molecule techniques, and thus characterize energy landscapes to greater resolutions. We demonstrate the utility of this framework by applying it to cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) studies of the bacterial ribosomal pre-translocation complex. Among other benefits, application of this framework to these data explains why two transient, intermediate conformations of the pre-translocation complex, which are observed in a cryo-EM study, may not be observed in several smFRET studies.

  16. Single-molecule fluorescence polarization study of conformational change in archaeal group II chaperonin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Iizuka

    Full Text Available Group II chaperonins found in archaea and in eukaryotic cytosol mediate protein folding without a GroES-like cofactor. The function of the cofactor is substituted by the helical protrusion at the tip of the apical domain, which forms a built-in lid on the central cavity. Although many studies on the change in lid conformation coupled to the binding and hydrolysis of nucleotides have been conducted, the molecular mechanism of lid closure remains poorly understood. Here, we performed a single-molecule polarization modulation to probe the rotation of the helical protrusion of a chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeum, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1. We detected approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion immediately after photorelease of ATP. The result suggests that the conformational change from the open lid to the closed lid state is responsible for the approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion.

  17. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  18. Enhancement of Single Molecule Fluorescence Signals by Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles in Studies of Protein Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharill, Shashank; Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Mandecki, Wlodek; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2011-01-01

    Metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) increased total photon emission of Cy3- and Cy5-labeled ribosomal initiation complexes near 50 nm silver particles 4- and 5.5-fold respectively. Fluorescence intensity fluctuations above shot noise, at 0.1 – 5 Hz, were greater on silver particles. Overall signal to noise ratio was similar or slightly improved near the particles. Proximity to silver particles did not compromise ribosome function, as measured by codon-dependent binding of fluorescent tRNA, dynamics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between adjacent tRNAs in the ribosome, and tRNA translocation induced by elongation factor G. PMID:21158483

  19. [Biophysics of single molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdiuk, I N; Deriusheva, E I

    2011-01-01

    The modern methods of research of biological molecules whose application led to the development of a new field of science, biophysics of single molecules, are reviewed. The measurement of the characteristics of single molecules enables one to reveal their individual features, and it is just for this reason that much more information can be obtained from one molecule than from the entire ensample of molecules. The high sensitivity of the methods considered in detail makes it possible to come close to the solution of the basic problem of practical importance, namely, the determination of the nucleotide sequence of a single DNA molecule.

  20. Complexation of lipofectamine and cholesterol-modified DNA sequences studied by single-molecule fluorescence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margineanu, Anca; De Feyter, Steven; Melnikov, Sergey; Marchand, Damien; van Aerschot, Arthur; Herdewijn, Piet; Habuchi, Satoshi; De Schryver, Frans C; Hofkens, Johan

    2007-11-01

    Lipoplex formation for normal and cholesterol-modified oligonucleotides is investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). To overcome the problems related to the fitting of autocorrelation curves when fluorescence bursts are present, the baseline fluorescence levels and the fluorescence bursts in the same trace were separately analyzed. This approach was not previously used in FCS studies of lipoplexes and allowed a more detailed characterization of this heterogeneous system. From the baseline levels, the number of free/bound DNA molecules and the presence of tens to hundreds of nanometer-sized lipoplexes were estimated using various mathematical models. Analysis of the fluorescent bursts provided an indication about the sizes of the lipoplexes, the number of DNA molecules in these aggregates, and the relative amount of lipids in each aggregate. An explanation for the higher transfection efficiency previously reported for one of the cholesterol-modified oligonucleotide compounds was found in relation to the formation of large size lipoplexes.

  1. Integrated Transmission Electron and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy Correlates Reactivity with Ultrastructure in a Single Catalyst Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Frank C; Mohammadian, Sajjad; Ristanović, Zoran; Kalirai, Sam; Meirer, Florian; Vogt, Eelco T C; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Gerritsen, Hans C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2018-01-02

    Establishing structure-activity relationships in complex, hierarchically structured nanomaterials, such as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts, requires characterization with complementary, correlated analysis techniques. An integrated setup has been developed to perform transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) microscopy on such nanostructured samples. Correlated structure-reactivity information was obtained for 100 nm thin, microtomed sections of a single FCC catalyst particle using this novel SMF-TEM high-resolution combination. High reactivity in a thiophene oligomerization probe reaction correlated well with TEM-derived zeolite locations, while matrix components, such as clay and amorphous binder material, were found not to display activity. Differences in fluorescence intensity were also observed within and between distinct zeolite aggregate domains, indicating that not all zeolite domains are equally active. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. High-Resolution Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging of Zeolite Aggregates within Real-Life Fluid Catalytic Cracking Particles**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristanović, Zoran; Kerssens, Marleen M; Kubarev, Alexey V; Hendriks, Frank C; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a major process in oil refineries to produce gasoline and base chemicals from crude oil fractions. The spatial distribution and acidity of zeolite aggregates embedded within the 50–150 μm-sized FCC spheres heavily influence their catalytic performance. Single-molecule fluorescence-based imaging methods, namely nanometer accuracy by stochastic chemical reactions (NASCA) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) were used to study the catalytic activity of sub-micrometer zeolite ZSM-5 domains within real-life FCC catalyst particles. The formation of fluorescent product molecules taking place at Brønsted acid sites was monitored with single turnover sensitivity and high spatiotemporal resolution, providing detailed insight in dispersion and catalytic activity of zeolite ZSM-5 aggregates. The results point towards substantial differences in turnover frequencies between the zeolite aggregates, revealing significant intraparticle heterogeneities in Brønsted reactivity. PMID:25504139

  3. A redox responsive, fluorescent supramolecular metallohydrogel consists of nanofibers with single-molecule width

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ye

    2013-04-03

    The integration of a tripeptide derivative, which is a versatile self-assembly motif, with a ruthenium(II)tris(bipyridine) complex affords the first supramolecular metallo-hydrogelator that not only self assembles in water to form a hydrogel but also exhibits gel-sol transition upon oxidation of the metal center. Surprisingly, the incorporation of the metal complex in the hydrogelator results in the nanofibers, formed by the self-assembly of the hydrogelator in water, to have the width of a single molecule of the hydrogelator. These results illustrate that metal complexes, besides being able to impart rich optical, electronic, redox, or magnetic properties to supramolecular hydrogels, also offer a unique geometrical control to prearrange the self-assembly motif prior to self-assembling. The use of metal complexes to modulate the dimensionality of intermolecular interactions may also help elucidate the interactions of the molecular nanofibers with other molecules, thus facilitating the development of supramolecular hydrogel materials for a wide range of applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Reveals the Oligomerization and Folding Steps Driving the Prion-like Behavior of ASC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambin, Yann; Giles, Nichole; O'Carroll, Ailís; Polinkovsky, Mark; Hunter, Dominic; Sierecki, Emma

    2018-02-16

    Single-molecule fluorescence has the unique ability to quantify small oligomers and track conformational changes at a single-protein level. Here we tackled one of the most extreme protein behaviors, found recently in an inflammation pathway. Upon danger recognition in the cytosol, NLRP3 recruits its signaling adaptor, ASC. ASC start polymerizing in a prion-like manner and the system goes in "overdrive" by producing a single micron-sized "speck." By precisely controlling protein expression levels in an in vitro translation system, we could trigger the polymerization of ASC and mimic formation of specks in the absence of inflammasome nucleators. We utilized single-molecule spectroscopy to fully characterize prion-like behaviors and self-propagation of ASC fibrils. We next used our controlled system to monitor the conformational changes of ASC upon fibrillation. Indeed, ASC consists of a PYD and CARD domains, separated by a flexible linker. Individually, both domains have been found to form fibrils, but the structure of the polymers formed by the full-length ASC proteins remains elusive. For the first time, using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we studied the relative positions of the CARD and PYD domains of full-length ASC. An unexpectedly large conformational change occurred upon ASC fibrillation, suggesting that the CARD domain folds back onto the PYD domain. However, contradicting current models, the "prion-like" conformer was not initiated by binding of ASC to the NLRP3 platform. Rather, using a new method, hybrid between Photon Counting Histogram and Number and Brightness analysis, we showed that NLRP3 forms hexamers with self-binding affinities around 300nM. Overall our data suggest a new mechanism, where NLRP3 can initiate ASC polymerization simply by increasing the local concentration of ASC above a supercritical level. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. New Fluorescent Chemosensors Based on Bio-Inspired Ligands and Macrocycles: From Single Molecules to Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Elisabete De Jesus Oliveira

    Due to the importance of the development of new fluorescent compounds with multifunctional applications in environmental and analytical sciences, nano-scale technologies and biomedicine, the research summarized in this PhD project was focused on the synthesis of new bio-inspired sensors, containing alanine, trypthophan and cysteine amino acids, provided with benzoxazole chromophores; exploration of its photophysical properties as fluorescence markers and chemosensors, and finally in the synthesis of new gold and silica nanoparticles with emissive properties. At the same time, different macrocyclic compounds bearing anthracene, or furyl, aryl or thienyl moieties linked to an imidazo-aza-crown ether were exploited for the synthesis of solid inorganic complexes and their use as fluorescent chemosensors for metal ions and anions was undertaken. The benzoxazole ring was selected as fluorescence probe for peptide skeleton due to the biological activity, antifungal, antimicrobial and anticancer properties, and also due to the higher emission fluorescence which makes it a good candidate for molecular recognition, biomarkers or biosensors. Several studies on the metal ion association constants and by density functional theory (DFT) were performed. The association of the synthesized compounds to more structured nanoparticles could increase the sensibility of the chemosensor and also its capability for sensing. In our case, incorporation of the cysteine amino acid made them good candidates for linkage to gold surface nanoparticles. However, in same cases due to the energy transfer from the metal core, the emission fluorescence of these decorated nanoparticles was quenched. Taking into account this phenomenon, different commercial light transparent LUDOX(c) silica nanoparticles were prepared and studied, containing the emissive peptides.

  6. Single-molecule fluorescence autocorrelation experiments on pentacene : The dependence of intersystem crossing on isotopic composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.C.J.; Köhler, J.; Oijen, A.M. van; Groenen, E.J.J.; Schmidt, J.

    1999-01-01

    Single pentacene molecules containing 13C or 1H in a pentacene-d14 doped p-terphenyl crystal have been studied by fluorescence autocorrelation. The triplet dynamics has been analyzed and a systematic dependence of the S1→T1 intersystem crossing rate on isotopic composition was found. This variation

  7. Single molecule tracking fluorescence microscopy in mitochondria reveals highly dynamic but confined movement of Tom40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Tankov, Stoyan; English, Brian P; Tarassov, Ivan; Tenson, Tanel; Kamenski, Piotr; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2011-01-01

    Tom40 is an integral protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which as the central component of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex forms a channel for protein import. We characterize the diffusion properties of individual Tom40 molecules fused to the photoconvertable fluorescent protein Dendra2 with millisecond temporal resolution. By imaging individual Tom40 molecules in intact isolated yeast mitochondria using photoactivated localization microscopy with sub-diffraction limited spatial precision, we demonstrate that Tom40 movement in the outer mitochondrial membrane is highly dynamic but confined in nature, suggesting anchoring of the TOM complex as a whole.

  8. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Dragan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To characterize subunits of highly fluorescent protein R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) and check their suitability for single-molecule detection (SMD) and cell imaging, (2) To extend the use of R-PE subunits through design of similar proteins that will be used as probes for microscopy and spectral imaging in a single cell, and (3) To demonstrate a high-throughput spectral imaging method that will rival spectral flow cytometry in the analysis of individual cells. We first demonstrated that R-PE subunits have spectroscopic and structural characteristics that make them suitable for SMD. Subunits were isolated from R-PE by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detected as single molecules by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In addition, R-PE subunits and their enzymatic digests were characterized by several separation and detection methods including HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Favorable absorption and fluorescence of the R-PE subunits and digest peptides originate from phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and phycourobilin (PUB) chromophores that are covalently attached to cysteine residues. High absorption coefficients and strong fluorescence (even under denaturing conditions), broad excitation and emission fluorescence spectra in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum, and relatively low molecular weights make these molecules suitable for use as fluorescence labels of biomolecules and cells. We further designed fluorescent proteins both in vitro and in vivo (in Escherichia coli) based on the highly specific attachment of PEB chromophore to genetically expressed apo-subunits of R-PE. In one example, apo-alpha and apo-beta R-PE subunits were cloned from red algae Polisiphonia boldii (P. boldii), and expressed in E. coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion

  9. High-speed atomic force microscope combined with single-molecule fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Iino, Ryota; Okazaki, Yasutaka; Yoshida, Masato; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Ando, Toshio

    2013-07-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) have mutually complementary capabilities. Here, we report techniques to combine these microscopy systems so that both microscopy capabilities can be simultaneously used in the full extent. To combine the two systems, we have developed a tip-scan type HS-AFM instrument equipped with a device by which the laser beam from the optical lever detector can track the cantilever motion in the X- and Y-directions. This stand-alone HS-AFM system is mounted on an inverted optical microscope stage with a wide-area scanner. The capability of this combined system is demonstrated by simultaneous HS-AFM∕TIRFM imaging of chitinase A moving on a chitin crystalline fiber and myosin V walking on an actin filament.

  10. Single-molecule-sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer in freely-diffusing attoliter droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Ramos, Kieran P.; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S., E-mail: lgoldner@physics.umass.edu [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Milas, Peker [Department of Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2015-05-11

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from individual, dye-labeled RNA molecules confined in freely-diffusing attoliter-volume aqueous droplets is carefully compared to FRET from unconfined RNA in solution. The use of freely-diffusing droplets is a remarkably simple and high-throughput technique that facilitates a substantial increase in signal-to-noise for single-molecular-pair FRET measurements. We show that there can be dramatic differences between FRET in solution and in droplets, which we attribute primarily to an altered pH in the confining environment. We also demonstrate that a sufficient concentration of a non-ionic surfactant mitigates this effect and restores FRET to its neutral-pH solution value. At low surfactant levels, even accounting for pH, we observe differences between the distribution of FRET values in solution and in droplets which remain unexplained. Our results will facilitate the use of nanoemulsion droplets as attoliter volume reactors for use in biophysical and biochemical assays, and also in applications such as protein crystallization or nanoparticle synthesis, where careful attention to the pH of the confined phase is required.

  11. Bulk and single-molecule fluorescence studies of the saturation of the DNA double helix using YOYO-3 intercalator dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Sergio G; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Casares, Salvador; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Orte, Angel

    2012-09-27

    We report a thorough photophysical characterization of the interactions between double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and the trimethine cyanine homodimer dye YOYO-3. The fluorescence emission of this dye is enhanced by intercalation within the DNA double helix. We have explored the saturation of the dsDNA by bound YOYO-3 at the single-molecule level by studying the single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from an energy donor, Alexa Fluor 488, tagged at the 5' end of the double helix and the energy acceptor, YOYO-3, bound to the same DNA molecule. The spontaneous binding of YOYO-3 gives rise to an effective distribution of different FRET efficiencies and, therefore, donor-acceptor (D-A) distances. These distributions reveal the existence of multiple states of YOYO-3. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and circular dichroism confirmed the presence of a DNA-bound aggregate of YOYO-3, conspicuous at high dye/base pair ratios. The spectral features of the aggregate suggest that it may have the structure of a parallel H-aggregate.

  12. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy Reveals Local Diffusion Coefficients in the Pore Network of an Individual Catalyst Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Frank C; Meirer, Florian; Kubarev, Alexey V; Ristanović, Zoran; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Vogt, Eelco T C; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2017-10-04

    We used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to study self-diffusion of a feedstock-like probe molecule with nanometer accuracy in the macropores of a micrometer-sized, real-life fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle. Movies of single fluorescent molecules allowed their movement through the pore network to be reconstructed. The observed tracks were classified into three different states by machine learning and all found to be distributed homogeneously over the particle. Most probe molecules (88%) were immobile, with the molecule most likely being physisorbed or trapped; the remainder was either mobile (8%), with the molecule moving inside the macropores, or showed hybrid behavior (4%). Mobile tracks had an average diffusion coefficient of D = 8 × 10-14 ± 1 × 10-13 m2 s-1, with the standard deviation thought to be related to the large range of pore sizes found in FCC particles. The developed methodology can be used to evaluate, quantify and map heterogeneities in diffusional properties within complex hierarchically porous materials.

  13. High-resolution single-molecule fluorescence imaging of zeolite aggregates within real-life fluid catalytic cracking particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristanović, Zoran; Kerssens, Marleen M; Kubarev, Alexey V; Hendriks, Frank C; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-02-02

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a major process in oil refineries to produce gasoline and base chemicals from crude oil fractions. The spatial distribution and acidity of zeolite aggregates embedded within the 50-150 μm-sized FCC spheres heavily influence their catalytic performance. Single-molecule fluorescence-based imaging methods, namely nanometer accuracy by stochastic chemical reactions (NASCA) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) were used to study the catalytic activity of sub-micrometer zeolite ZSM-5 domains within real-life FCC catalyst particles. The formation of fluorescent product molecules taking place at Brønsted acid sites was monitored with single turnover sensitivity and high spatiotemporal resolution, providing detailed insight in dispersion and catalytic activity of zeolite ZSM-5 aggregates. The results point towards substantial differences in turnover frequencies between the zeolite aggregates, revealing significant intraparticle heterogeneities in Brønsted reactivity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Nanomolar oligomerization and selective co-aggregation of α-synuclein pathogenic mutants revealed by single-molecule fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierecki, Emma; Giles, Nichole; Bowden, Quill; Polinkovsky, Mark E.; Steinbeck, Janina; Arrioti, Nicholas; Rahman, Diya; Bhumkar, Akshay; Nicovich, Philip R.; Ross, Ian; Parton, Robert G.; Böcking, Till; Gambin, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, notably Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies, abnormal aggregates mainly composed of α-synuclein. Moreover, cases of familial Parkinson’s disease have been linked to mutations in α-synuclein. In this study, we compared the behavior of wild-type (WT) α-synuclein and five of its pathological mutants (A30P, E46K, H50Q, G51D and A53T). To this end, single-molecule fluorescence detection was coupled to cell-free protein expression to measure precisely the oligomerization of proteins without purification, denaturation or labelling steps. In these conditions, we could detect the formation of oligomeric and pre-fibrillar species at very short time scale and low micromolar concentrations. The pathogenic mutants surprisingly segregated into two classes: one group forming large aggregates and fibrils while the other tending to form mostly oligomers. Strikingly, co-expression experiments reveal that members from the different groups do not generally interact with each other, both at the fibril and monomer levels. Together, this data paints a completely different picture of α-synuclein aggregation, with two possible pathways leading to the development of fibrils. PMID:27892477

  15. Kinetics of CrPV and HCV IRES-mediated eukaryotic translation using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaud, Olivier; Barbier, Nathalie; Chommy, Hélène; Fiszman, Nicolas; Le Gall, Antoine; Dulin, David; Saguy, Matthieu; Westbrook, Nathalie; Perronet, Karen; Namy, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    Protein synthesis is a complex multistep process involving many factors that need to interact in a coordinated manner to properly translate the messenger RNA. As translating ribosomes cannot be synchronized over many elongation cycles, single-molecule studies have been introduced to bring a deeper understanding of prokaryotic translation dynamics. Extending this approach to eukaryotic translation is very appealing, but initiation and specific labeling of the ribosomes are much more complicated. Here, we use a noncanonical translation initiation based on internal ribosome entry sites (IRES), and we monitor the passage of individual, unmodified mammalian ribosomes at specific fluorescent milestones along mRNA. We explore initiation by two types of IRES, the intergenic IRES of cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) and the hepatitis C (HCV) IRES, and show that they both strongly limit the rate of the first elongation steps compared to the following ones, suggesting that those first elongation cycles do not correspond to a canonical elongation. This new system opens the possibility of studying both IRES-mediated initiation and elongation kinetics of eukaryotic translation and will undoubtedly be a valuable tool to investigate the role of translation machinery modifications in human diseases. © 2017 Bugaud et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Synthetic strategies for controlling inter- and intramolecular interactions: Applications in single-molecule fluorescence imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and palladium catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Nicholas R.

    The field of synthetic organic chemistry has reached such maturity that, with sufficient effort and resources, the synthesis of virtually any small molecule which exhibits reasonable stability at room temperature can be realized. While representing a monumental achievement for the field, the ability to exert precise control over molecular structure is just a means to an end, and it is frequently the responsibility of the synthetic chemist to determine which molecules should actually be synthesized. For better or worse, there exists no competitive free market in academia for new molecules, and as a result, the decision of which compounds should be synthesized is seldom driven by the forces of supply and demand; rather, it is guided by the synthetic chemist's interest in an anticipated structure-function relationship or in the properties of a previously unstudied class of molecules. As a consequence, there exists a pervasive need for chemists with synthetic expertise in fields (e.g., molecular imaging) and subdisciplines of chemistry (e.g., physical chemistry) in which the identification of promising synthetic targets dramatically outpaces the synthetic output in that field or subdiscipline, and ample opportunities are available for synthetic chemists who choose to pursue such cross-disciplinary research. This thesis describes synthetic efforts that leverage these opportunities to realize applications in biological imaging and in palladium catalysis. In Part I, the synthesis and characterization of three novel luminophores and their imaging applications are discussed. The first is a molecular beacon that utilizes a fluorophorefluorophore pair which exhibits H-dimer quenching in the closed conformation. This probe offers several advantages over conventional fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons in the detection of oligonucleotides, both in bulk and at the single-molecule level. Secondly, a fluorescent, Cy3-Cy5 covalent heterodimer is reported, which on account of the

  17. A light-induced photochromic nanoswitch capable of non-destructive readout via fluorescence emission: cluster vs. single-molecule excitation of dihydroindolizines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Thomas; Shrestha, Tej B; Bossmann, Stefan H; Hübner, Christian; Renn, Alois; Dürr, Heinz

    2009-08-01

    We have synthesized a prototype of a photochromic styrylquinolyl-dihydroindolizine (DHI), which forms a highly coloured and fluorescent betaine upon irradiation with lambda<400 nm. Embedding this photochromic DHI in a thin polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) film permits the non-destructive readout via fluorescence at low temperature (77 K). Thus, either a non-destructive photoswitch or an information recording system becomes available. Both possibilities have been explored: image recording and read-out, as well as information storage (at 77 K) have been demonstrated. Cluster- and single molecule-fluorescence upon laser excitation (lambda=355 nm) of the styrylquinolyl-dihydroindolizine in a PMMA matrix, and the effect of fluorescence blinking has been observed.

  18. Aptamer-Functionalized Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Nuo; Hu, Zixi; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jianhong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Yating; Zhu, Jianmeng; Xue, Dabin; Huang, Yingying; Lai, Zongqiang; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A simple, highly sensitive method to detect leukemia cells has been developed based on aptamer-modified fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). In this strategy, the amine-labeled Sgc8 aptamer was conjugated to carboxyl-modified FSNPs via amide coupling between amino and carboxyl groups. Sensitivity and specificity of Sgc8-FSNPs were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results showed that Sgc8-FSNPs detected leukemia cells with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified FSNPs hold promise for sensitive and specific detection of leukemia cells. Changing the aptamer may allow the FSNPs to detect other types of cancer cells.

  19. Single-Molecule Analysis for RISC Assembly and Target Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroshi M; Tadakuma, Hisashi; Tomari, Yukihide

    2018-01-01

    RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is a small RNA-protein complex that mediates silencing of complementary target RNAs. Biochemistry has been successfully used to characterize the molecular mechanism of RISC assembly and function for nearly two decades. However, further dissection of intermediate states during the reactions has been warranted to fill in the gaps in our understanding of RNA silencing mechanisms. Single-molecule analysis with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful imaging-based approach to interrogate complex formation and dynamics at the individual molecule level with high sensitivity. Combining this technique with our recently established in vitro reconstitution system of fly Ago2-RISC, we have developed a single-molecule observation system for RISC assembly. In this chapter, we summarize the detailed protocol for single-molecule analysis of chaperone-assisted assembly of fly Ago2-RISC as well as its target cleavage reaction.

  20. Single-molecule kinetics and super-resolution microscopy by fluorescence imaging of transient binding on DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Ralf; Steinhauer, Christian; Scheible, Max; Kuzyk, Anton; Tinnefeld, Philip; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2010-11-10

    DNA origami is a powerful method for the programmable assembly of nanoscale molecular structures. For applications of these structures as functional biomaterials, the study of reaction kinetics and dynamic processes in real time and with high spatial resolution becomes increasingly important. We present a single-molecule assay for the study of binding and unbinding kinetics on DNA origami. We find that the kinetics of hybridization to single-stranded extensions on DNA origami is similar to isolated substrate-immobilized DNA with a slight position dependence on the origami. On the basis of the knowledge of the kinetics, we exploit reversible specific binding of labeled oligonucleotides to DNA nanostructures for PAINT (points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography) imaging with <30 nm resolution. The method is demonstrated for flat monomeric DNA structures as well as multimeric, ribbon-like DNA structures.

  1. Single molecule fluorescence image patterns linked to dipole orientation and axial position: application to myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivatable fluorescent probes developed specifically for single molecule detection extend advantages of single molecule imaging to high probe density regions of cells and tissues. They perform in the native biomolecule environment and have been used to detect both probe position and orientation.Fluorescence emission from a single photoactivated probe captured in an oil immersion, high numerical aperture objective, produces a spatial pattern on the detector that is a linear combination of 6 independent and distinct spatial basis patterns with weighting coefficients specifying emission dipole orientation. Basis patterns are tabulated for single photoactivated probes labeling myosin cross-bridges in a permeabilized muscle fiber undergoing total internal reflection illumination. Emitter proximity to the glass/aqueous interface at the coverslip implies the dipole near-field and dipole power normalization are significant affecters of the basis patterns. Other characteristics of the basis patterns are contributed by field polarization rotation with transmission through the microscope optics and refraction by the filter set. Pattern recognition utilized the generalized linear model, maximum likelihood fitting, for Poisson distributed uncertainties. This fitting method is more appropriate for treating low signal level photon counting data than χ(2 minimization.Results indicate that emission dipole orientation is measurable from the intensity image except for the ambiguity under dipole inversion. The advantage over an alternative method comparing two measured polarized emission intensities using an analyzing polarizer is that information in the intensity spatial distribution provides more constraints on fitted parameters and a single image provides all the information needed. Axial distance dependence in the emission pattern is also exploited to measure relative probe position near focus. Single molecule images from axial scanning fitted

  2. Highly sensitive determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuki; Morikawa, Mika; Okada, Ryuichi; Miura, Toshiaki; Ito, Etsuro

    2011-01-01

    Because H(2)O(2) is generated by various oxidase-catalyzed reactions, a highly sensitive determination method of H(2)O(2) is applicable to measurements of low levels of various oxidases and their substrates such as glucose, lactate, glutamate, urate, xanthine, choline, cholesterol and NADPH. We propose herein a new, highly sensitive method for the measurement of H(2)O(2) and glucose using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). FCS has the advantage of allowing us to determine the number of fluorescent molecules. FCS measures the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity caused by fluorescent probe movement in a small light cavity with a defined volume generated by confocal illumination. We thus developed a highly sensitive determination system of H(2)O(2) by FCS, where horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes the formation of a covalent bond between fluorescent molecules and proteins in the presence of H(2)O(2). Our developed system gave a linear calibration curve for H(2)O(2) in the range of 28 to 300 nM with the detection limit of 8 nM. In addition, by coupling with glucose oxidase (GOD)-catalyzed reaction, the method allows to measure glucose in the range of 80 nM to 1.5 µM with detection limit of 24 nM. The method was applicable to the assay of glucose in blood plasma. The mean concentration of glucose in normal human blood plasma was determined to be 4.9 mM. In comparison with commercial available methods, the detection limit and the minimum value of determination for glucose are at least 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive in our system. Such a highly sensitive method leads the fact that only a very small amount of plasma (20 nL) is needed for the determination of glucose concentration in blood plasma.

  3. Highly sensitive determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Watabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because H(2O(2 is generated by various oxidase-catalyzed reactions, a highly sensitive determination method of H(2O(2 is applicable to measurements of low levels of various oxidases and their substrates such as glucose, lactate, glutamate, urate, xanthine, choline, cholesterol and NADPH. We propose herein a new, highly sensitive method for the measurement of H(2O(2 and glucose using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: FCS has the advantage of allowing us to determine the number of fluorescent molecules. FCS measures the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity caused by fluorescent probe movement in a small light cavity with a defined volume generated by confocal illumination. We thus developed a highly sensitive determination system of H(2O(2 by FCS, where horseradish peroxidase (HRP catalyzes the formation of a covalent bond between fluorescent molecules and proteins in the presence of H(2O(2. Our developed system gave a linear calibration curve for H(2O(2 in the range of 28 to 300 nM with the detection limit of 8 nM. In addition, by coupling with glucose oxidase (GOD-catalyzed reaction, the method allows to measure glucose in the range of 80 nM to 1.5 µM with detection limit of 24 nM. The method was applicable to the assay of glucose in blood plasma. The mean concentration of glucose in normal human blood plasma was determined to be 4.9 mM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In comparison with commercial available methods, the detection limit and the minimum value of determination for glucose are at least 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive in our system. Such a highly sensitive method leads the fact that only a very small amount of plasma (20 nL is needed for the determination of glucose concentration in blood plasma.

  4. Rational design of highly sensitive fluorescence probes for protease and glycosidase based on precisely controlled spirocyclization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakabe, Masayo; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Iwatate, Ryu J; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Terai, Takuya; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2013-01-09

    We have synthesized and evaluated a series of hydroxymethyl rhodamine derivatives and found an intriguing difference of intramolecular spirocyclization behavior: the acetylated derivative of hydroxymethyl rhodamine green (Ac-HMRG) exists as a closed spirocyclic structure in aqueous solution at physiological pH, whereas HMRG itself takes an open nonspirocyclic structure. Ac-HMRG is colorless and nonfluorescent, whereas HMRG is strongly fluorescent. On the basis of these findings, we have developed a general design strategy to obtain highly sensitive fluorescence probes for proteases and glycosidases, by replacing the acetyl group of Ac-HMRG with a substrate moiety of the target enzyme. Specific cleavage of the substrate moiety in the nonfluorescent probe by the target enzyme generates a strong fluorescence signal. To confirm the validity and flexibility of our strategy, we designed and synthesized fluorescence probes for leucine aminopeptidase (Leu-HMRG), fibroblast activation protein (Ac-GlyPro-HMRG), and β-galactosidase (βGal-HMRG). All of these probes were almost nonfluorescent due to the formation of spirocyclic structure, but were converted efficiently to highly fluorescent HMRG by the target enzymes. We confirmed that the probes can be used in living cells. These probes offer great practical advantages, including high sensitivity and rapid response (due to regulation of fluorescence at a single reactive site), as well as resistance to photobleaching, and are expected to be useful for a range of biological and pathological investigations.

  5. Series of dinuclear and tetranuclear lanthanide clusters encapsulated by salen-type and β-diketionate ligands: single-molecule magnet and fluorescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Bin; Han, Bing-Lu; Lin, Po-Heng; Li, Hong-Feng; Chen, Peng; Tian, Yong-Mei; Murugesu, Muralee; Yan, Peng-Fei

    2013-10-07

    Three dinuclear [Ln2H2OL(1)2(acac)2]·solvent (1, Ln = Gd, solvent = 2CH2Cl2; 2, Ln = Tb, no solvent; 3, Ln = Er, solvent = (C2H5)2O), and two tetranuclear lanthanide clusters [Ln4(μ3-OH)2L(2)2(acac)6]·2(solvent) (4, Ln = Tb, solvent = CH3OH; 5, Ln = Dy, solvent = CH3CN) were characterized in terms of structure, fluorescence and magnetism. The dinuclear lanthanide complexes were constructed by a rigid salen-type ligand H2L(1) = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-o-phenylenediamine and β-diketonate (acac = acetylacetonate) ligands, while the tetranuclear clusters were formed from the flexible ligand H2L(2) = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-ethanediamine. Crystal structure analysis indicates that the rigid ligand favors the double-decker sandwich structure (Ln2L(1)2), in which the two lanthanide ions have different coordination numbers and geometry, while the more flexible ligand (H2L(2)) leads to planar tetranuclear clusters. The relationship between their respective magnetic anisotropy and ligand-field geometries and their fluorescence properties was investigated. The Dy and Tb-containing clusters exhibit typical visible fluorescence properties, and single-molecule magnet behavior is seen in complex 5.

  6. Optimized green fluorescent protein fused to FoF1-ATP synthase for single-molecule FRET using a fast anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienerowitz, Maria; Ilchenko, Mykhailo; Su, Bertram; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele; Mayer, Günter; Henkel, Thomas; Heitkamp, Thomas; Börsch, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Observation times of freely diffusing single molecules in solution are limited by the photophysics of the attached fluorescence markers and by a small observation volume in the femtolitre range that is required for a sufficient signal-to-background ratio. To extend diffusion-limited observation times through a confocal detection volume, A. E. Cohen and W. E. Moerner have invented and built the ABELtrap -- a microfluidic device to actively counteract Brownian motion of single nanoparticles with an electrokinetic trap. Here we present a version of an ABELtrap with a laser focus pattern generated by electro-optical beam deflectors and controlled by a programmable FPGA chip. This ABELtrap holds single fluorescent nanoparticles for more than 100 seconds, increasing the observation time of fluorescent nanoparticles compared to free diffusion by a factor of 10000. To monitor conformational changes of individual membrane proteins in real time, we record sequential distance changes between two specifically attached dyes using Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Fusing the a-subunit of the FoF1-ATP synthase with mNeonGreen results in an improved signal-to-background ratio at lower laser excitation powers. This increases our measured trap duration of proteoliposomes beyond 2 s. Additionally, we observe different smFRET levels attributed to varying distances between the FRET donor (mNeonGreen) and acceptor (Alexa568) fluorophore attached at the a- and c-subunit of the FoF1-ATP synthase respectively.

  7. Ligand binding of a ribosome-displayed protein detected in solution at the single molecule level by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermutus, Lutz; Kolly, Reto; Földes-Papp, Zeno; Hanes, Jozef; Rigler, Rudolf; Plückthun, Andreas

    2002-06-01

    Interaction of a single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) with its cognate antigen while still attached to the ribosome was studied by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In experiments with purified scFv, FCS was capable of resolving the difference in diffusion time between free and antibody-bound labelled antigen. Ribosome-displayed antibody fragments generated by in vitro translation, in which neither the protein nor the mRNA leaves the ribosome owing to the absence of a stop codon and stabilizing buffer conditions, could be shown to specifically bind the antigen. The antibody-antigen interaction was specific, as shown by inhibition or displacement with unlabelled antigen and by control experiments with a non-cognate antibody fragment.

  8. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  9. Single molecule electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyunwook; Reed, Mark A; Lee, Takhee

    2011-04-12

    Single molecule electronic devices in which individual molecules are utilized as active electronic components constitute a promising approach for the ultimate miniaturization and integration of electronic devices in nanotechnology through the bottom-up strategy. Thus, the ability to understand, control, and exploit charge transport at the level of single molecules has become a long-standing desire of scientists and engineers from different disciplines for various potential device applications. Indeed, a study on charge transport through single molecules attached to metallic electrodes is a very challenging task, but rapid advances have been made in recent years. This review article focuses on experimental aspects of electronic devices made with single molecules, with a primary focus on the characterization and manipulation of charge transport in this regime. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Single-molecule detection of protein efflux from microorganisms using fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotube sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Markita Patricia; Ando, Hiroki; Chen, Allen Y.; Cao, Jicong; Kottadiel, Vishal Isaac; Chio, Linda; Yang, Darwin; Dong, Juyao; Lu, Timothy K.; Strano, Michael S.

    2017-05-01

    A distinct advantage of nanosensor arrays is their ability to achieve ultralow detection limits in solution by proximity placement to an analyte. Here, we demonstrate label-free detection of individual proteins from Escherichia coli (bacteria) and Pichia pastoris (yeast) immobilized in a microfluidic chamber, measuring protein efflux from single organisms in real time. The array is fabricated using non-covalent conjugation of an aptamer-anchor polynucleotide sequence to near-infrared emissive single-walled carbon nanotubes, using a variable chemical spacer shown to optimize sensor response. Unlabelled RAP1 GTPase and HIV integrase proteins were selectively detected from various cell lines, via large near-infrared fluorescent turn-on responses. We show that the process of E. coli induction, protein synthesis and protein export is highly stochastic, yielding variability in protein secretion, with E. coli cells undergoing division under starved conditions producing 66% fewer secreted protein products than their non-dividing counterparts. We further demonstrate the detection of a unique protein product resulting from T7 bacteriophage infection of E. coli, illustrating that nanosensor arrays can enable real-time, single-cell analysis of a broad range of protein products from various cell types.

  11. A sensitive and versatile laser scanning confocal optical microscope for single-molecule fluorescence at 77 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, V; Hübner, C G

    2010-11-01

    We developed a cryostat suitable for a laser scanning confocal microscope which allows for a short working distance and thus the usage of an objective with a high numerical aperture ensuring high collection efficiency. The in situ preparation of a thin layer of amorphous water is realized in a part of the cryostat, a Dewar vessel, which is put onto a custom-made, liquid-nitrogen immersed spin-coater. First tests on the setup are performed on a perylenemonoimide/polymethyl methacrylate model system using a standard oil objective and a dry objective at ambient temperature as well as a dry objective at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on doubly labeled, freeze-quenched polyproline chains show the applicability of the new method on biomolecules. The alternating laser excitation (ALEX) is modified to a line-scanning process (slow ALEX) to optimize the sorting of the labeled molecules. Photophysics and photochemistry at liquid nitrogen temperature are investigated.

  12. Nanoplatforms for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of cancer-related proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwang; Udukala, Dinusha N; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Basel, Matthew T; Kalita, Mausam; Abayaweera, Gayani; Manawadu, Harshi; Malalasekera, Aruni; Robinson, Colette; Villanueva, David; Maynez, Pamela; Bossmann, Leonie; Riedy, Elizabeth; Barriga, Jenny; Wang, Ni; Li, Ping; Higgins, Daniel A; Zhu, Gaohong; Troyer, Deryl L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2014-02-01

    Numerous proteases are known to be necessary for cancer development and progression including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins. The goal of this research is to develop an Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticle-based system for clinical diagnostics, which has the potential to measure the activity of cancer-associated proteases in biospecimens. Nanoparticle-based "light switches" for measuring protease activity consist of fluorescent cyanine dyes and porphyrins that are attached to Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles via consensus sequences. These consensus sequences can be cleaved in the presence of the correct protease, thus releasing a fluorescent dye from the Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticle, resulting in highly sensitive (down to 1 × 10(-16) mol l(-1) for 12 proteases), selective, and fast nanoplatforms (required time: 60 min).

  13. A highly sensitive sensor for ethyl acetate by changing fluorescent colour of lanthanide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina

    2017-09-01

    A lanthanide complex, namely, [La 2 (L-DBTA) 3 (CH 3 OH) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ]∙2H2O has been synthesized using a simple reaction of L-O,O´-dibenzoyl tartaric acid with LaCl 3 ∙6H 2 O under ambient temperature. The luminescence spectrum in the solid state at room temperature revealed that the complex exhibited blue-light emission that originated from ligand. In addition, the lanthanide complex is developed as a fluorescent probe for sensing small molecules. Luminescence studies reveal that the lanthanide complex could detect ethyl acetate sensitively through fluorescence colour change from blue to yellow. Furthermore, the complex exhibited appealing features including high sensitivity and an ultrafast response. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Highly sensitive fluorescent and colorimetric pH sensor based on polyethylenimine-capped silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Fei; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2013-01-29

    Silver nanoclusters capped by hyperbranched polyethylenimine (PEI) have been developed as a highly sensitive fluorescent and colorimetric pH sensor. The probe responds rapidly to pH fluctuations and has such absorption characteristics that the color changes from the colorless or a nearly colorless state to a colored state with increasing acidity, so PEI-capped Ag nanoclusters could be used as a color indicator for colorimetric pH detection. Quantitatively, the fluorescence intensity of PEI-capped Ag nanoclusters exhibits a linear fashion over the pH range of 5.02-7.96 and increases by around 10-fold approximately with greater fluorescence at higher pH values. The repulsion development and conformational change of PEI with decreasing pH induce the aggregation of Ag nanoclusters, leading to an obvious color change and fluorescence quenching of Ag nanoclusters at low pH values. As expected, the pH probe is also sensitive to the different buffer solutions, except for those containing some anions that could react with Ag nanoclusters. Besides, the ionic strength of the buffers has a little influence on the pH-responsive behavior. Our pH sensor with nanoscaled physical dimensions would be a promising candidate in the applications in biological, medical, and pharmaceutical fields.

  15. Cryo-electron microscopy and single molecule fluorescent microscopy detect CD4 receptor induced HIV size expansion prior to cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Son; Tabarin, Thibault; Garvey, Megan; Pade, Corinna; Rossy, Jérémie; Monaghan, Paul; Hyatt, Alex; Böcking, Till; Leis, Andrew; Gaus, Katharina; Mak, Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Viruses are often thought to have static structure, and they only remodel after the viruses have entered target cells. Here, we detected a size expansion of virus particles prior to viral entry using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single molecule fluorescence imaging. HIV expanded both under cell-free conditions with soluble receptor CD4 (sCD4) targeting the CD4 binding site on the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) and when HIV binds to receptor on cellular membrane. We have shown that the HIV Env is needed to facilitate receptor induced virus size expansions, showing that the 'lynchpin' for size expansion is highly specific. We demonstrate that the size expansion required maturation of HIV and an internal capsid core with wild type stability, suggesting that different HIV compartments are linked and are involved in remodelling. Our work reveals a previously unknown event in HIV entry, and we propose that this pre-entry priming process enables HIV particles to facilitate the subsequent steps in infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cryo-electron microscopy and single molecule fluorescent microscopy detect CD4 receptor induced HIV size expansion prior to cell entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Son [Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Tabarin, Thibault [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Garvey, Megan; Pade, Corinna [Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Rossy, Jérémie [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Monaghan, Paul; Hyatt, Alex [CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Böcking, Till [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Leis, Andrew [CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Gaus, Katharina, E-mail: k.gaus@unsw.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Mak, Johnson, E-mail: j.mak@deakin.edu.au [Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Viruses are often thought to have static structure, and they only remodel after the viruses have entered target cells. Here, we detected a size expansion of virus particles prior to viral entry using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single molecule fluorescence imaging. HIV expanded both under cell-free conditions with soluble receptor CD4 (sCD4) targeting the CD4 binding site on the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) and when HIV binds to receptor on cellular membrane. We have shown that the HIV Env is needed to facilitate receptor induced virus size expansions, showing that the ‘lynchpin’ for size expansion is highly specific. We demonstrate that the size expansion required maturation of HIV and an internal capsid core with wild type stability, suggesting that different HIV compartments are linked and are involved in remodelling. Our work reveals a previously unknown event in HIV entry, and we propose that this pre-entry priming process enables HIV particles to facilitate the subsequent steps in infection. - Highlights: • Cell free viruses are able to receive external trigger that leads to apparent size expansion. • Virus envelope and CD4 receptor engagement is the lynchpin of virus size expansion. • Internal capsid organisation can influence receptor mediated virus size expansion. • Pre-existing virus-associated lipid membrane in cell free virus can accommodate the receptor mediated virus size expansion.

  17. Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer shows uniformity in TATA binding protein-induced DNA bending and heterogeneity in bending kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Rebecca H; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2012-09-25

    TATA binding protein (TBP) is a key component of the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcription machinery that binds to TATA boxes located in the core promoter regions of many genes. Structural and biochemical studies have shown that when TBP binds DNA, it sharply bends the DNA. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study DNA bending by human TBP on consensus and mutant TATA boxes in the absence and presence of TFIIA. We found that the state of the bent DNA within populations of TBP-DNA complexes is homogeneous; partially bent intermediates were not observed. In contrast to the results of previous ensemble studies, TBP was found to bend a mutant TATA box to the same extent as the consensus TATA box. Moreover, in the presence of TFIIA, the extent of DNA bending was not significantly changed, although TFIIA did increase the fraction of DNA molecules bound by TBP. Analysis of the kinetics of DNA bending and unbending revealed that on the consensus TATA box two kinetically distinct populations of TBP-DNA complexes exist; however, the bent state of the DNA is the same in the two populations. Our smFRET studies reveal that human TBP bends DNA in a largely uniform manner under a variety of different conditions, which was unexpected given previous ensemble biochemical studies. Our new observations led to us to revise the model for the mechanism of DNA binding by TBP and for how DNA bending is affected by TATA sequence and TFIIA.

  18. Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies of the human telomerase RNA pseudoknot: temperature-/urea-dependent folding kinetics and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2014-04-10

    The ribonucleoprotein telomerase is an RNA-dependent DNA polymerase that catalyzes the repetitive addition of a short, species-specific, DNA sequence to the ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes. The single RNA component of telomerase contains both the template sequence for DNA synthesis and a functionally critical pseudoknot motif, which can also exist as a less stable hairpin. Here we use a minimal version of the human telomerase RNA pseudoknot to study this hairpin-pseudoknot structural equilibrium using temperature-controlled single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments. The urea dependence of these experiments aids in determination of the folding kinetics and thermodynamics. The wild-type pseudoknot behavior is compared and contrasted to a mutant pseudoknot sequence implicated in a genetic disorder-dyskeratosis congenita. These findings clearly identify that this 2nt noncomplementary mutation destabilizes the folding of the wild-type pseudoknot by substantially reducing the folding rate constant (≈ 400-fold) while only nominally increasing the unfolding rate constant (≈ 5-fold). Furthermore, the urea dependence of the equilibrium and rate constants is used to develop a free energy landscape for this unimolecular equilibrium and propose details about the structure of the transition state. Finally, the urea-dependent folding experiments provide valuable physical insights into the mechanism for destabilization of RNA pseudoknots by such chemical denaturants.

  19. Magnetic Separation-Assistant Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Inhibition for Highly Sensitive Probing of Nucleolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ran; Liu, Qian; Hong, Zhangyong; Wang, He-Fang

    2015-12-15

    For the widely used "off-on" fluorescence (or phosphorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET or PRET) system, the separation of donors and acceptors species was vital for enhancing the sensitivity. To date, separation of free donors from FRET/PRET inhibition systems was somewhat not convenient, whereas separation of the target-induced far-between acceptors has hardly been reported yet. We presented here a novel magnetic separation-assistant fluorescence resonance energy transfer (MS-FRET) inhibition strategy for highly sensitive detection of nucleolin using Cy5.5-AS1411 as the donor and Fe3O4-polypyrrole core-shell (Fe3O4@PPY) nanoparticles as the NIR quenching acceptor. Due to hydrophobic interaction and π-π stacking of AS1411 and PPY, Cy5.5-AS1411 was bound onto the surface of Fe3O4@PPY, resulting in 90% of fluorescence quenching of Cy5.5-AS1411. Owing to the much stronger specific interaction of AS1411 and nucleolin, the presence of nucleolin could take Cy5.5-AS1411 apart from Fe3O4@PPY and restore the fluorescence of Cy5.5-AS1411. The superparamagnetism of Fe3O4@PPY enabled all separations and fluorescence measurements complete in the same quartz cell, and thus allowed the convenient but accurate comparison of the sensitivity and fluorescence recovery in the cases of separation or nonseparation. Compared to nonseparation FRET inhibition, the separation of free Cy5.5-AS1411 from Cy5.5-AS1411-Fe3O4@PPY solution (the first magnetic separation, MS-1) had as high as 25-fold enhancement of the sensitivity, whereas further separation of the nucleolin-inducing far-between Fe3O4@PPY from the FRET inhibition solution (the second magnetic separation, MS-2) could further enhance the sensitivity to 35-fold. Finally, the MS-FRET inhibition assay displayed the linear range of 0.625-27.5 μg L(-1) (8.1-359 pM) and detection limit of 0.04 μg L(-1) (0.05 pM) of nucleolin. The fluorescence intensity recovery (the percentage ratio of the final restoring fluorescence intensity

  20. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Highly sensitive ratiometric detection of heparin and its oversulfated chondroitin sulfate contaminant by fluorescent peptidyl probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pramod Kumar; Lee, Hyeri; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2017-05-15

    The selective and sensitive detection of heparin, an anticoagulant in clinics as well as its contaminant oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) is of great importance. We first reported a ratiometric sensing method for heparin as well as OSCS contaminants in heparin using a fluorescent peptidyl probe (Pep1, pyrene-GSRKR) and heparin-digestive enzyme. Pep1 exhibited a highly sensitive ratiometric response to nanomolar concentration of heparin in aqueous solution over a wide pH range (2~11) and showed highly selective ratiometric response to heparin among biological competitors such as hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate. Pep1 showed a linear ratiometric response to nanomolar concentrations of heparin in aqueous solutions and in human serum samples. The detection limit for heparin was calculated to be 2.46nM (R2=0.99) in aqueous solutions, 2.98nM (R2=0.98) in 1% serum samples, and 3.43nM (R2=0.99) in 5% serum samples. Pep1 was applied to detect the contaminated OSCS in heparin with heparinase I, II, and III, respectively. The ratiometric sensing method using Pep1 and heparinase II was highly sensitive, fast, and efficient for the detection of OSCS contaminant in heparin. Pep1 with heparinase II could detect as low as 0.0001% (w/w) of OSCS in heparin by a ratiometric response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Medicinal value of asiaticoside for Alzheimer's disease as assessed using single-molecule-detection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, laser-scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and in silico docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Shahdat; Hashimoto, Michio; Katakura, Masanori; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Shido, Osamu

    2015-04-14

    Identifying agents that inhibit amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) aggregation is the ultimate goal for slowing Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression. This study investigated whether the glycoside asiaticoside inhibits Aβ1-42 fibrillation in vitro. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), evaluating the Brownian diffusion times of moving particles in a small confocal volume at the single-molecule level, was used. If asiaticoside inhibits early Aβ1-42 fibrillation steps, more Aβs would remain free and rapidly diffuse in the confocal volume. In contrast, "weaker or no inhibition" permits a greater number of Aβs to polymerize into oligomers, leading to fibers and gives rise to slow diffusion times in the solution. Trace amounts of 5-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)-labeled Aβ1-42 in the presence of excess unlabeled Aβ1-42 (10 μM) was used as a fluorescent probe. Steady-state and kinetic-Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorospectroscopy, laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy (LSM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were also used to monitor fibrillation. Binding of asiaticoside with Aβ1-42 at the atomic level was computationally examined using the Molegro Virtual Docker and PatchDock. With 1 h of incubation time for aggregation, FCS data analysis revealed that the diffusion time of TAMRA-Aβ1-42 was 208 ± 4 μs, which decreased to 164 ± 8.0 μs in the presence of asiaticoside, clearly indicating that asiaticoside inhibited the early stages Aβ1-42 of fibrillation, leaving more free Aβs in the solution and permitting their rapid diffusion in the confocal volume. The inhibitory effects were also evidenced by reduced fiber formation as assessed by steady-state and kinetic ThT fluorospectroscopy, LSM, and TEM. Asiaticoside elongated the lag phase of Aβ1-42 fibrillation, indicating the formation of smaller amyloid species were impaired in the presence of asiaticoside. Molecular docking revealed that asiaticoside binds with amyloid intra- and inter-molecular amino

  3. Gradual disordering of the native state on a slow two-state folding protein monitored by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Luis A; Sadqi, Mourad; Liu, Jianwei; Wang, Xiang; English, Douglas S; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-10-24

    Theory predicts that folding free energy landscapes are intrinsically malleable and as such are expected to respond to perturbations in topographically complex ways. Structural changes upon perturbation have been observed experimentally for unfolded ensembles, folding transition states, and fast downhill folding proteins. However, the native state of proteins that fold in a two-state fashion is conventionally assumed to be structurally invariant during unfolding. Here we investigate how the native and unfolded states of the chicken α-spectrin SH3 domain (a well characterized slow two-state folder) change in response to chemical denaturants and/or temperature. We can resolve the individual properties of the two end-states across the chemical unfolding transition employing single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SM-FRET) and across the thermal unfolding transition by NMR because SH3 folds-unfolds in the slow chemical exchange regime. Our results demonstrate that α-spectrin SH3 unfolds in a canonical way in the sense that it converts between the native state and an unfolded ensemble that expands in response to chemical denaturants. However, as conditions become increasingly destabilizing, the native state also expands gradually, and a large fraction of its native intramolecular hydrogen bonds break up. This gradual disordering of the native state takes place in times shorter than the 100 μs resolution of our SM-FRET experiments. α-Spectrin SH3 thus showcases the extreme plasticity of folding landscapes, which extends to the native state of slow two-state proteins. Our results point to the idea that folding mechanisms under physiological conditions might be quite different from those obtained by linear extrapolation from denaturing conditions. Furthermore, they highlight a pressing need for re-evaluating the conventional procedures for analyzing and interpreting folding experiments, which may be based on too-simplistic assumptions.

  4. Highly Sensitive and Miniaturized Fluorescence Detection System with an Autonomous Capillary Fluid Manipulation Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Fang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel, highly sensitive and ultra-small fluorescent detection system, including an autonomous capillary fluid manipulation chip. The optical detector integrates a LED light source, all necessary optical components, and a photodiode with preamplifier into one package of about 2 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm. Also, the low-cost and simple pumpless microfluidic device works well in sample preparation and manipulation. This chip consists of capillary stop valves and trigger valves which are fabricated by lithography and then bonded with a polydimethylsiloxane-ethylene oxide polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PEO-PDMS cover. The contact angle of the PEO-PDMS can be adjusted by changing the concentration of the PEO. Hence, the fluidic chip can achieve functionalities such as timing features and basic logical functions. The prototype has been tested by fluorescence dye 5-Carboxyfluorescein (5-FAM dissolved into the solvent DMSO (Dimethyl Sulfoxide. The results prove a remarkable sensitivity at a pico-scale molar, around 1.08 pM. The low-cost and miniaturized optical detection system, with a self-control capillary-driven microfluidic chip developed in this work, can be used as the crucial parts in portable biochemical detection applications and point of care testing.

  5. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  6. Single molecule logical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Nicolas; Hliwa, Mohamed; Joachim, Christian

    2012-01-01

    After almost 40 years of development, molecular electronics has given birth to many exciting ideas that range from molecular wires to molecular qubit-based quantum computers. This chapter reviews our efforts to answer a simple question: how smart can a single molecule be? In our case a molecule able to perform a simple Boolean function is a child prodigy. Following the Aviram and Ratner approach, these molecules are inserted between several conducting electrodes. The electronic conduction of the resulting molecular junction is extremely sensitive to the chemical nature of the molecule. Therefore designing this latter correctly allows the implementation of a given function inside the molecular junction. Throughout the chapter different approaches are reviewed, from hybrid devices to quantum molecular logic gates. We particularly stress that one can implement an entire logic circuit in a single molecule, using either classical-like intramolecular connections, or a deformation of the molecular orbitals induced by a conformational change of the molecule. These approaches are radically different from the hybrid-device approach, where several molecules are connected together to build the circuit.

  7. Amplified fluorescent aptasensor through catalytic recycling for highly sensitive detection of ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yin; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Xu; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes a novel approach utilizing nano-graphite-aptamer hybrid and DNase I for the amplified detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) for the first time. Nano-graphite can effectively quench the fluorescence of carboxyfluorescein (FAM) labeled OTA specific aptamer due to their strong π-π; stacking interactions; while upon OTA addition, it will bind with aptamer to fold into an OTA-aptamerG-quadruplex structure, which does not adsorb on the surface of nano-graphite and thus retains the dye fluorescence. Meanwhile, the G-quadruplex structure can be cleaved by DNase I, and in such case OTA is delivered from the complex. The released OTA then binds other FAM-labeled aptamers on the nano-graphite surface, and touches off another target recycling, resulting in the successive release of dye-labeled aptamers from the nano-graphite, which leads to significant amplification of the signal. Under the optimized conditions, the present amplified sensing system exhibits high sensitivity toward OTA with a limit of detection of 20nM (practical measurement), which is about 100-fold higher than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assay. Our developed method also showed high selectivity against other interference molecules and can be applied for the detection of OTA in real red wine samples. The proposed assay is simple, cost-effective, and might open a door for the development of new assays for other biomolecules. This aptasensor is of great practical importance in food safety and could be widely extended to the detection of other toxins by replacing the sequence of the recognition aptamer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  9. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  10. SISGR: Room Temperature Single-Molecule Detection and Imaging by Stimulated Emission Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2017-03-13

    Single-molecule spectroscopy has made considerable impact on many disciplines including chemistry, physics, and biology. To date, most single-molecule spectroscopy work is accomplished by detecting fluorescence. On the other hand, many naturally occurring chromophores, such as retinal, hemoglobin and cytochromes, do not have detectable fluorescence. There is an emerging need for single-molecule spectroscopy techniques that do not require fluorescence. In the last proposal period, we have successfully demonstrated stimulated emission microscopy, single molecule absorption, and stimulated Raman microscopy based on a high-frequency modulation transfer technique. These first-of-a- kind new spectroscopy/microscopy methods tremendously improved our ability to observe molecules that fluorescence weakly, even to the limit of single molecule detection for absorption measurement. All of these methods employ two laser beams: one (pump beam) excites a single molecule to a real or virtual excited state, and the other (probe beam) monitors the absorption/emission property of the single. We extract the intensity change of the probe beam with high sensitivity by implementing a high-frequency phase-sensitive detection scheme, which offers orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity over direct absorption/emission measurement. However, single molecule detection based on fluorescence or absorption is fundamentally limited due to their broad spectral response. It is important to explore other avenues in single molecule detection and imaging which provides higher molecular specificity for studying a wide variety of heterogeneous chemical and biological systems. This proposal aimed to achieve single-molecule detection sensitivity with near resonance stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. SRS microscopy was developed in our lab as a powerful technique for imaging heterogeneous samples based on their intrinsic vibrational contrasts, which provides much higher molecular

  11. Single-Molecule Plasmon Sensing: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Adam B; Zijlstra, Peter

    2017-08-25

    Single-molecule detection has long relied on fluorescent labeling with high quantum-yield fluorophores. Plasmon-enhanced detection circumvents the need for labeling by allowing direct optical detection of weakly emitting and completely nonfluorescent species. This review focuses on recent advances in single molecule detection using plasmonic metal nanostructures as a sensing platform, particularly using a single particle-single molecule approach. In the past decade two mechanisms for plasmon-enhanced single-molecule detection have been demonstrated: (1) by plasmonically enhancing the emission of weakly fluorescent biomolecules, or (2) by monitoring shifts of the plasmon resonance induced by single-molecule interactions. We begin with a motivation regarding the importance of single molecule detection, and advantages plasmonic detection offers. We describe both detection mechanisms and discuss challenges and potential solutions. We finalize by highlighting the exciting possibilities in analytical chemistry and medical diagnostics.

  12. Single-molecule manipulation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyu; Liu, Siyun; Gao, Ying

    2018-01-25

    Compared to conventional ensemble methods, studying macromolecules at single-molecule level can reveal extraordinary clear and even surprising views for a biological reaction. In the past 20 years, single-molecule techniques have been undergoing a very rapid development, and these cutting edge technologies have revolutionized the biological research by facilitating single-molecule manipulation and detection. Here we give a brief review about these advanced techniques, including optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy (AFM), hydrodynamic flow-stretching assay, and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET). We are trying to describe their basic principles and provide a few examples of applications for each technique. This review aims to give a rather introductory survey of single-molecule techniques for audiences with biological or biophysical background. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant{sup ®} DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe: A new approach to study nuclear nanostructure at single molecule resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika [Laboratory of Cell Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Kraków (Poland); Szczurek, Aleksander T. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Prakash, Kirti [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mohana, Giriram K. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lee, Hyun-Keun [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Roignant, Jean-Yves [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Birk, Udo J. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Dobrucki, Jurek W., E-mail: jerzy.dobrucki@uj.edu.pl [Laboratory of Cell Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Kraków (Poland); Cremer, Christoph, E-mail: c.cremer@imb-mainz.de [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Higher order chromatin structure is not only required to compact and spatially arrange long chromatids within a nucleus, but have also important functional roles, including control of gene expression and DNA processing. However, studies of chromatin nanostructures cannot be performed using conventional widefield and confocal microscopy because of the limited optical resolution. Various methods of superresolution microscopy have been described to overcome this difficulty, like structured illumination and single molecule localization microscopy. We report here that the standard DNA dye Vybrant{sup ®} DyeCycle™ Violet can be used to provide single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) images of DNA in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells. This SMLM method enabled optical isolation and localization of large numbers of DNA-bound molecules, usually in excess of 10{sup 6} signals in one cell nucleus. The technique yielded high-quality images of nuclear DNA density, revealing subdiffraction chromatin structures of the size in the order of 100 nm; the interchromatin compartment was visualized at unprecedented optical resolution. The approach offers several advantages over previously described high resolution DNA imaging methods, including high specificity, an ability to record images using a single wavelength excitation, and a higher density of single molecule signals than reported in previous SMLM studies. The method is compatible with DNA/multicolor SMLM imaging which employs simple staining methods suited also for conventional optical microscopy. - Highlights: • Super-resolution imaging of nuclear DNA with Vybrant Violet and blue excitation. • 90nm resolution images of DNA structures in optically thick eukaryotic nuclei. • Enhanced resolution confirms the existence of DNA-free regions inside the nucleus. • Optimized imaging conditions enable multicolor super-resolution imaging.

  14. Highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection of specific DNA sequences with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhai, Kun; Xiang, Wenjun; Wang, Lianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence method of quantitative detection for specific DNA sequence is developed based on molecular beacon (MB) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous fluorescence analysis. It is demonstrated by an oligonucleotide sequence of wild-type HBV (target DNA) as a model system. In this strategy, the fluorophore of MB is designed to be 6-carboxyfluorescein group (FAM), and the maximum excitation wavelength and maximum emission wavelength are both very close to that of SYBR Green I. In the presence of targets DNA, the MBs hybridize with the targets DNA and form double-strand DNA (dsDNA), the fluorophore FAM is separated from the quencher BHQ-1, thus the fluorophore emit fluorescence. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to dsDNA, the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I is significantly enhanced. When targets DNA are detected by synchronous fluorescence analysis, the fluorescence peaks of FAM and SYBR Green I overlap completely, so the fluorescence signal of system will be significantly enhanced. Thus, highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection for DNA can be realized. Under the optimum conditions, the total fluorescence intensity of FAM and SYBR Green I exhibits good linear dependence on concentration of targets DNA in the range from 2×10(-11) to 2.5×10(-9)M. The detection limit of target DNA is estimated to be 9×10(-12)M (3σ). Compared with previously reported methods of detection DNA with MB, the proposed method can significantly enhance the detection sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantum transport through single molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio Oliveros, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes three-terminal transport measurements through single molecules. The interest in this field stems from the dream that single molecules will form the building blocks for future nanoscale electronic devices. The advantages are their small size -nanometers-, and their synthetic

  16. Single molecule electronics and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule.

  17. Single-molecule approaches to characterizing kinetics of biomolecular interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oijen, Antoine M.

    Single-molecule fluorescence techniques have emerged as powerful tools to study biological processes at the molecular level. This review describes the application of these methods to the characterization of the kinetics of interaction between biomolocules. A large number of single-molecule assays

  18. DNA analysis by single molecule stretching in nanofluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abad, E.; Juarros, A.; Retolaza, A.

    2011-01-01

    Imprint Lithography (NIL) technology combined with a conventional anodic bonding of the silicon base and Pyrex cover. Using this chip, we have performed single molecule imaging on a bench-top fluorescent microscope system. Lambda phage DNA was used as a model sample to characterize the chip. Single molecules of λ...

  19. Single-molecule binding experiments on long time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elenko, Mark P.; Szostak, Jack W.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    We describe an approach for performing single-molecule binding experiments on time scales from hours to days, allowing for the observation of slower kinetics than have been previously investigated by single-molecule techniques. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is used to image the

  20. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  1. A fluorescent graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet biosensor for highly sensitive, label-free detection of alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Mei-Hao; Liu, Jin-Wen; Li, Na; Tang, Hao; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2016-02-28

    Graphitic C3N4 (g-C3N4) nanosheets provide an attractive option for bioprobes and bioimaging applications. Utilizing highly fluorescent and water-dispersible ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets, a highly sensitive, selective and label-free biosensor has been developed for ALP detection for the first time. The developed approach utilizes a natural substrate of ALP in biological systems and thus affords very high catalytic efficiency. This novel biosensor is demonstrated to enable quantitative analysis of ALP in a wide range from 0.1 to 1000 U L(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.08 U L(-1), which is among the most sensitive assays for ALP. It is expected that the developed method may provide a low-cost, convenient, rapid and highly sensitive platform for ALP-based clinical diagnostics and biomedical applications.

  2. Understanding Enzyme Activity Using Single Molecule Tracking (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.-S.; Zeng, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M.; Smith S.; Wei, H.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-06-01

    This poster describes single-molecule tracking and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It discusses whether the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) moves on cellulose, how the CBM binds to cellulose, and the mechanism of cellulosome assembly.

  3. Special Issue: Single Molecule Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hans H. Gorris

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances in the detection and manipulation of single molecules have enabled new insights into the function, structure and interactions of biomolecules. This Special Issue was launched to account for the rapid progress in the field of “Single Molecule Techniques”. Four original research articles and seven review articles provide an introduction, as well as an in-depth discussion, of technical developments that are indispensable for the characterization of individual biomolecules....

  4. Simple G-quadruplex-based 2-aminopurine fluorescence probe for highly sensitive and amplified detection of microRNA-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyu; Liu, Chan; Gong, Hang; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming; Cai, Changqun

    2018-02-01

    Based on 2-aminopurine (2-AP) probe in conjunction with a G-quadruplex structure and signal amplification technique, a simple and highly sensitive fluorescence sensor for detecting microRNA (miRNA) is developed for high signal-to-background ratio and wide linear range. The proposed sensor contains two hairpins DNA: H1 and H2. H1 is labeled by 2-AP incorporated into a G-rich sequence. Upon the addition of a target miRNA, H1 is unfolded and forms DNA/RNA complexes that contain a G-quadruplex, thereby significantly enhancing 2-AP fluorescence due to the protection provided by the G-quadruplex. Subsequently, H2 can displace the miRNA from the DNA/RNA complexes and induce signal amplification, resulting in further enhanced fluorescence intensity. Hence, the sensor is highly sensitive and its low limit of detection (L.O.D.) can reach as low as 1.48pM. Furthermore, the proposed sensor is used to detect overexpressed miRNA-21 from human breast cancer cell lysate. The result demonstrates the potential of the proposed sensor to monitor different miRNA biomarkers for the early diagnosis of various cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Highly Sensitive Fluorescence Probe Based on Functional SBA-15 for Selective Detection of Hg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoyu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An inorganic–organic hybrid fluorescence chemosensor (DA/SBA-15 was prepared by covalent immobilization of a dansylamide derivative into the channels of mesoporous silica material SBA-15 via (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES groups. The primary hexagonally ordered mesoporous structure of SBA-15 was preserved after the grafting procedure. Fluorescence characterization shows that the obtained inorganic–organic hybrid composite is highly selective and sensitive to Hg2+ detection, suggesting the possibility for real-time qualitative or quantitative detection of Hg2+ and the convenience for potential application in toxicology and environmental science.

  6. Nanoparticle Aggregate-Based Fluorescence Enhancement for Highly Sensitive and Reproducible Detection of DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annink, C.; Gill, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive detection of DNA at the sub picomolar range is demonstrated using a magnetic bead sandwich hybridization assay coupled with surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF)-based amplification. Unlike enzymatic amplification, the SEF amplification step does not add any additional background to the

  7. Highly Sensitive Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensor for Trinitrotoluene Based on the Inner Filter Effect between Gold Nanoparticles and Fluorescent Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongzhi; Quan, Shuai; Xu, Shoufang

    2017-11-08

    In this work, we developed a simple and sensitive ratiometric fluorescent assay for sensing trinitrotoluene (TNT) based on the inner filter effect (IFE) between gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and ratiometric fluorescent nanoparticles (RFNs), which was designed by hybridizing green emissive carbon dots (CDs) and red emissive quantum dots (QDs) into a silica sphere as a fluorophore pair. AuNPs in their dispersion state can be a powerful absorber to quench CDs, while the aggregated AuNPs can quench QDs in the IFE-based fluorescent assays as a result of complementary overlap between the absorption spectrum of AuNPs and emission spectrum of RFNs. As a result of the fact that TNT can induce the aggregation of AuNPs, with the addition of TNT, the fluorescent of QDs can be quenched, while the fluorescent of CDs would be recovered. Then, ratiometric fluorescent detection of TNT is feasible. The present IFE-based ratiometric fluorescent sensor can detect TNT ranging from 0.1 to 270 nM, with a detection limit of 0.029 nM. In addition, the developed method was successfully applied to investigate TNT in water and soil samples with satisfactory recoveries ranging from 95 to 103%, with precision below 4.5%. The simple sensing approach proposed here could improve the sensitivity of colorimetric analysis by changing the ultraviolet analysis to ratiometric fluorescent analysis and promote the development of a dual-mode detection system.

  8. A theoretical justification for single molecule peptide sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath Swaminathan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The proteomes of cells, tissues, and organisms reflect active cellular processes and change continuously in response to intracellular and extracellular cues. Deep, quantitative profiling of the proteome, especially if combined with mRNA and metabolite measurements, should provide an unprecedented view of cell state, better revealing functions and interactions of cell components. Molecular diagnostics and biomarker discovery should benefit particularly from the accurate quantification of proteomes, since complex diseases like cancer change protein abundances and modifications. Currently, shotgun mass spectrometry is the primary technology for high-throughput protein identification and quantification; while powerful, it lacks high sensitivity and coverage. We draw parallels with next-generation DNA sequencing and propose a strategy, termed fluorosequencing, for sequencing peptides in a complex protein sample at the level of single molecules. In the proposed approach, millions of individual fluorescently labeled peptides are visualized in parallel, monitoring changing patterns of fluorescence intensity as N-terminal amino acids are sequentially removed, and using the resulting fluorescence signatures (fluorosequences to uniquely identify individual peptides. We introduce a theoretical foundation for fluorosequencing and, by using Monte Carlo computer simulations, we explore its feasibility, anticipate the most likely experimental errors, quantify their potential impact, and discuss the broad potential utility offered by a high-throughput peptide sequencing technology.

  9. Highly sensitive fluorescence detection system for microfluidic lab-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Gihan; Huang, Jingsong; Hofmann, Oliver; Walshe, Claire A; Sze, Jasmine Y Y; McClean, Gareth D; Mosley, Alan; Rattle, Simon J; deMello, John C; deMello, Andrew J; Bradley, Donal D C

    2011-05-07

    We demonstrate a compact, low cost and practical fluorescence detection system for lab-on-a-chip applications. The system comprises a commercially available InGaN light emitting diode (501 nm) as light source, an organic or silicon photodiode detector, absorptive dye coated colour filters and linear and reflective polarisers. An injection moulded polystyrene microfluidic chip is used as the platform for fluorescence immunoassays for cardiac markers myoglobin and CK-MB. The optical limit of detection (LOD) is measured using a TransFluoSphere® suspension at 5.6 × 10(4) beads µl(-1) which can be equated to ∼3 nM fluorescein equivalent concentration. The LOD for the human plasma immunoassays is measured as 1.5 ng ml(-1) for both myoglobin and CK-MB. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  10. High sensitivity automated multiplexed immunoassays using photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yafang; Tang, Tiantian; Xu, Haisheng; Zhu, Chenqi; Cunningham, Brian T

    2015-11-15

    We demonstrate a platform that integrates photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) detection of a surface-based microspot fluorescent assay with a microfluidic cartridge to achieve simultaneous goals of high analytic sensitivity (single digit pg/mL), high selectivity, low sample volume, and assay automation. The PC surface, designed to provide optical resonances for the excitation wavelength and emission wavelength of Cyanines 5 (Cy5), was used to amplify the fluorescence signal intensity measured from a multiplexed biomarker microarray. The assay system is comprised of a plastic microfluidic cartridge for holding the PC and an assay automation system that provides a leak-free fluid interface during introduction of a sequence of fluids under computer control. Through the use of the assay automation system and the PC embedded within the microfluidic cartridge, we demonstrate pg/mL-level limits of detection by performing representative biomarker assays for interleukin 3 (IL3) and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α). The results are consistent with limits of detection achieved without the use of the microfluidic device with the exception that coefficients of variability from spot-to-spot are substantially lower than those obtained by performing assays with manual manipulation of assay liquids. The system's capabilities are compatible with the goal of diagnostic instruments for point-of-care settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  12. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanosheets-Based Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Highly Sensitive Detection of H2O2 and Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Wen; Luo, Ying; Wang, Yu-Min; Duan, Lu-Ying; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-12-14

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets, an emerging graphene-like carbon-based nanomaterial with high fluorescence and large specific surface areas, hold great potential for biosensor applications. Current g-C3N4 nanosheets based fluorescent biosensors majorly rely on single fluorescent intensity reading through fluorescence quenching interactions between the nanosheets and metal ions. Here we report for the first time the development of a novel g-C3N4 nanosheets-based ratiometric fluorescence sensing strategy for highly sensitive detection of H2O2 and glucose. With o-phenylenediamine (OPD) oxidized by H2O2 in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the oxidization product can assemble on the g-C3N4 nanosheets through hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking, which effectively quenches the fluorescence of g-C3N4 while delivering a new emission peak. The ratiometric signal variations enable robust and sensitive detection of H2O2. On the basis of the glucose converting into H2O2 through the catalysis of glucose oxidase, the g-C3N4-based ratiometric fluorescence sensing platform is also exploited for glucose assay. The developed strategy is demonstrated to give a detection limit of 50 nM for H2O2 and 0.4 μM for glucose, at the same time, it has been successfully used for glucose levels detection in human serum. This strategy may provide a cost-efficient, robust, and high-throughput platform for detecting various species involving H2O2-generation reactions for biomedical applications.

  13. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  14. Improved Diffuse Fluorescence Flow Cytometer Prototype for High Sensitivity Detection of Rare Circulating Cells In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Noah Benjamin

    Accurate quantification of circulating cell populations is important in many areas of pre-clinical and clinical biomedical research, for example, in the study of cancer metastasis or the immune response following tissue and organ transplants. Normally this is done "ex-vivo" by drawing and purifying a small volume of blood and then analyzing it with flow cytometry, hemocytometry or microfludic devices, but the sensitivity of these techniques are poor and the process of handling samples has been shown to affect cell viability and behavior. More recently "in vivo flow cytometry" (IVFC) techniques have been developed where fluorescently-labeled cells flowing in a small blood vessel in the ear or retina are analyzed, but the sensitivity is generally poor due to the small sampling volume. To address this, our group recently developed a method known as "Diffuse Fluorescence Flow Cytometry" (DFFC) that allows detection and counting of rare circulating cells with diffuse photons, offering extremely high single cell counting sensitivity. In this thesis, an improved DFFC prototype was designed and validated. The chief improvements were three-fold, i) improved optical collection efficiency, ii) improved detection electronics, and iii) development of a method to mitigate motion artifacts during in vivo measurements. In combination, these improvements yielded an overall instrument detection sensitivity better than 1 cell/mL in vivo, which is the most sensitive IVFC system reported to date. Second, development and validation of a low-cost microfluidic device reader for analysis of ocular fluids is described. We demonstrate that this device has equivalent or better sensitivity and accuracy compared a fluorescence microscope, but at an order-of-magnitude reduced cost with simplified operation. Future improvements to both instruments are also discussed.

  15. Threshold-free evaluation of near-surface diffusion and adsorption-dominated motion from single-molecule tracking data of single-stranded DNA through total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Uehara, Satoshi; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Nagai, Takeharu; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2015-12-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy enables the single-molecule observation in liquid near substrate surface. However, the evaluation of the diffusion from their individually-tracked positions entails the difficulty in the treatment of molecular adsorption on the substrate. We propose a novel technique to evaluate them, and two types of near-surface Brownian motion were determined for DNA. One is the diffusion near glass surface, and the other is the adsorption-dominated motion, which is also found to be diffusive rather than anchored to the substrate. Our technique does not require the threshold values for the distinction, and even the transition between them can be captured. Objective distinction of Brownian motion with and without adsorption does not require the adsorption-free sample preparation. It is also useful for the characterization of adsorption/desorption kinetics. Our method is not limited to TIRF but applicable to many other systems involving multiple states of Brownian motion.

  16. Highly sensitive rapid fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, Valeri I [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Bartona, James S [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Richardson, Patricia R [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Jones, Anita C [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    There is a risk of contamination of surgical instruments by infectious protein residues, in particular, prions which are the agents for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in humans. They are exceptionally resistant to conventional sterilization, therefore it is important to detect their presence as contaminants so that alternative cleaning procedures can be applied. We describe the development of an optimized detection system for fluorescently labelled protein, suitable for in-hospital use. We show that under optimum conditions the technique can detect {approx}10 attomole/cm{sup 2} with a scan speed of {approx}3-10 cm{sup 2}/s of the test instrument's surface. A theoretical analysis and experimental measurements will be discussed.

  17. Highly sensitive synchronous fluorescence measurement of danofloxacin in pharmaceutical and milk samples using aluminium (III) enhanced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kuldeep; Saini, Shivender; Singh, Baldev; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2012-09-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence method is developed for the determination of danofloxacin (DAN) in pharmaceutical formulations and its residue in milk based on Al(III) enhanced fluorescence. The synchronous fluorescence intensity of the system is measured at 435 nm using ∆ λ = 80 nm and an excitation wavelength of 280 nm. A good linear relationship between enhanced fluorescence intensity and DAN concentration is obtained in the range of 3-100 ng mL(-1)(r (2) = 0.9991). The limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) of the present method is 0.9 ng mL(-1). The proposed method can be successfully applied to the determination of DAN in pharmaceutical formulations and in milk without serious interferences from common excipients, metal ions and other co-existing substances. The method can be used as a rapid screening to judge whether the DAN residues in milk exceed Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) or not.

  18. Highly sensitive colorimetric and fluorescent sensor for cyanazine based on the inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Hou, Changjun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huanbao; Wu, Huixiang; Shen, Caihong; Huo, Danqun

    2016-06-01

    Cyanazine residue poses a great threat to human health and its derivatives would remain in soils, natural waters, and other environmental domains for a long time. Herein, a simple, rapid, and ultra-sensitive analytical method for the determination of cyanazine (CZ) based on inner filter effect (IFE) of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) is first described in this study. With the presence of citrate-stabilized AuNPs, the fluorescence of GSH-capped CdTe QDs was remarkably quenched by AuNPs via IFE. The fluorescence of the AuNP-CdTe QD system was recovered upon addition of CZ. CZ can adsorb on to the surface of AuNPs due to its cyano group that has good affinity with gold, which could induce the aggregation of AuNPs accompanying color change from red to blue. Thus, the IFE of AuNPs on CdTe QDs was weakened, and the fluorescence intensity of CdTe QDs was recovered accordingly. A good linear correlation for detection of CZ was exhibited from 0.05 to 9 μM, and the detection limit reached 0.1568 μM, which was much lower than the safety limit required by the USA, the UK, and China. In order to probe into the selectivity of AuNPs towards CZ over other pesticides, various frequently used pesticides were mixed with AuNPs. AuNP composite solution shows good selectivity towards CZ among other pesticides. This method was successfully carried out for the assessment of CZ in real samples with satisfactory results, which revealed many advantages such as high sensitivity, low cost, and non-time-consuming compared with traditional methods.

  19. Highly sensitive colorimetric and fluorescent sensor for cyanazine based on the inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liang; Hou, Changjun, E-mail: houcj@cqu.edu.cn; Yang, Mei [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering (China); Fa, Huanbao [Chongqing University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Wu, Huixiang [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering (China); Shen, Caihong [Luzhou Laojiao Group Co.Ltd, National Engineering Research Center of Solid-State Brewing (China); Huo, Danqun, E-mail: huodq@cqu.edu.cn [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering (China)

    2016-06-15

    Cyanazine residue poses a great threat to human health and its derivatives would remain in soils, natural waters, and other environmental domains for a long time. Herein, a simple, rapid, and ultra-sensitive analytical method for the determination of cyanazine (CZ) based on inner filter effect (IFE) of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) is first described in this study. With the presence of citrate-stabilized AuNPs, the fluorescence of GSH-capped CdTe QDs was remarkably quenched by AuNPs via IFE. The fluorescence of the AuNP–CdTe QD system was recovered upon addition of CZ. CZ can adsorb on to the surface of AuNPs due to its cyano group that has good affinity with gold, which could induce the aggregation of AuNPs accompanying color change from red to blue. Thus, the IFE of AuNPs on CdTe QDs was weakened, and the fluorescence intensity of CdTe QDs was recovered accordingly. A good linear correlation for detection of CZ was exhibited from 0.05 to 9 μM, and the detection limit reached 0.1568 μM, which was much lower than the safety limit required by the USA, the UK, and China. In order to probe into the selectivity of AuNPs towards CZ over other pesticides, various frequently used pesticides were mixed with AuNPs. AuNP composite solution shows good selectivity towards CZ among other pesticides. This method was successfully carried out for the assessment of CZ in real samples with satisfactory results, which revealed many advantages such as high sensitivity, low cost, and non-time-consuming compared with traditional methods.

  20. High sensitivity detection of protein molecules picked up on a probe of atomic force microscope based on the fluorescence detection by a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takafumi; Afrin, Rehana; Arakawa, Hideo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2004-07-02

    We developed a method to detect and identify proteins on a probe of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high sensitivity. Due to a low background noise of the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope employed as a detecting system, we were able to achieve a high enough sensitivity to detect zeptomole orders of protein molecules immobilized on the tip. Several different methods to immobilize protein molecules to AFM-probes were tested, meant for a wide range of applications of this method. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different proteins were clearly distinguished by immunofluorescence microscopy on the probe using their specific antibodies.

  1. Highly sensitive analysis of flavonoids by zwitterionic microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography coupled with light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wan; Hu, Shuai-Shuai; Li, Xing-Ying; Pang, Xiao-Qing; Cao, Jun; Ye, Li-Hong; Dai, Han-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Juan; Da, Jian-Hua; Chu, Chu

    2014-09-05

    A rapid zwitterionic microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (ZI-MEEKC) approach coupled with light-emitting-diode-induced fluorescence (LED-IF, 480nm) detection was proposed for the analysis of flavonoids. In the optimization process, we systematically investigated the separation conditions, including the surfactants, cosurfactants, pH, buffers and fluorescence parameters. It was found that the baseline separation of the seven flavonoids was obtained in less than 5min with a running buffer consisting of 92.9% (v/v) 5mM sodium borate, 0.6% (w/v) ZI surfactant, 0.5% (w/v) ethyl acetate and 6.0% (w/v) 1-butanol. High sensitivity was obtained by the application of LED-IF detection. The limits of detection for seven flavonoids were in the range of 3.30×10(-8) to 2.15×10(-6)molL(-1) without derivatization. Ultimately, the detection method was successfully applied to the analysis of flavonoids in hawthorn plant and food products with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Breaking the concentration limit of optical single-molecule detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmeister, Phil; Acuna, Guillermo P; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-02-21

    Over the last decade, single-molecule detection has been successfully utilized in the life sciences and materials science. Yet, single-molecule measurements only yield meaningful results when working in a suitable, narrow concentration range. On the one hand, diffraction limits the minimal size of the observation volume in optical single-molecule measurements and consequently a sample must be adequately diluted so that only one molecule resides within the observation volume. On the other hand, at ultra-low concentrations relevant for sensing, the detection volume has to be increased in order to detect molecules in a reasonable timespan. This in turn results in the loss of an optimal signal-to-noise ratio necessary for single-molecule detection. This review discusses the requirements for effective single-molecule fluorescence applications, reflects on the motivation for the extension of the dynamic concentration range of single-molecule measurements and reviews various approaches that have been introduced recently to solve these issues. For the high-concentration limit, we identify four promising strategies including molecular confinement, optical observation volume reduction, temporal separation of signals and well-conceived experimental designs that specifically circumvent the high concentration limit. The low concentration limit is addressed by increasing the measurement speed, parallelization, signal amplification and preconcentration. The further development of these ideas will expand our possibilities to interrogate research questions with the clarity and precision provided only by the single-molecule approach.

  3. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Single-molecule sorting of DNA helicases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Fletcher E; Wu, Colin G; Spies, Maria

    2016-10-01

    DNA helicases participate in virtually all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism by using ATP-fueled directional translocation along the DNA molecule to unwind DNA duplexes, dismantle nucleoprotein complexes, and remove non-canonical DNA structures. Post-translational modifications and helicase interacting partners are often viewed as determining factors in controlling the switch between bona fide helicase activity and other functions of the enzyme that do not involve duplex separation. The bottleneck in developing a mechanistic understanding of human helicases and their control by post-translational modifications is obtaining sufficient quantities of the modified helicase for traditional structure-functional analyses and biochemical reconstitutions. This limitation can be overcome by single-molecule analysis, where several hundred surface-tethered molecules are sufficient to obtain a complete kinetic and thermodynamic description of the helicase-mediated substrate binding and rearrangement. Synthetic oligonucleotides site-specifically labeled with Cy3 and Cy5 fluorophores can be used to create a variety of DNA substrates that can be used to characterize DNA binding, as well as helicase translocation and duplex unwinding activities. This chapter describes "single-molecule sorting", a robust experimental approach to simultaneously quantify, and distinguish the activities of helicases carrying their native post-translational modifications. Using this technique, a DNA helicase of interest can be produced and biotinylated in human cells to enable surface-tethering for the single-molecule studies by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The pool of helicases extracted from the cells is expected to contain a mixture of post-translationally modified and unmodified enzymes, and the contributions from either population can be monitored separately, but in the same experiment providing a direct route to evaluating the effect of a given modification. Copyright

  5. Extending single-molecule microscopy using optical Fourier processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Adam S; Moerner, W E

    2014-07-17

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules.

  6. Extending Single-Molecule Microscopy Using Optical Fourier Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules. PMID:24745862

  7. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    Tailoring the specific magnetic properties of any material relies on the topological control of the constituent metal ion building blocks. Although this general approach does not seem to be easily applied to traditional inorganic bulk magnets, coordination chemistry offers a unique tool...... to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...... complexes constitutes an elegant and fascinating strategy. This Feature article focuses on the use of building blocks or modules (both terms being used indiscriminately) to direct the structure, and therefore also the magnetic properties, of metal ion complexes exhibiting SMM behaviour. This journal is...

  8. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [University of California - Irvine

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting, solar energy

  9. Alternating-laser excitation : single-molecule FRET and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohlbein, Johannes; Craggs, Timothy D.; Cordes, Thorben

    2014-01-01

    The alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) scheme continues to expand the possibilities of fluorescence-based assays to study biological entities and interactions. Especially the combination of ALEX and single-molecule Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) has been very successful as ALEX enables

  10. Alternating-laser excitation: single-molecule FRET and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohlbein, J.C.; Craggs, T.D.; Cordes, T.

    2014-01-01

    The alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) scheme continues to expand the possibilities of fluorescence-based assays to study biological entities and interactions. Especially the combination of ALEX and single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) has been very successful as ALEX enables

  11. Tuning the Aggregation/Disaggregation Behavior of Graphene Quantum Dots by Structure-Switching Aptamer for High-Sensitivity Fluorescent Ochratoxin A Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Zhang, Yajun; Pang, Guangsheng; Zhang, Yingwei; Guo, Shaojun

    2017-02-07

    The design of graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-aptamer bioconjugates as the new sensing platform is very important for developing high-sensitivity fluorescent biosensors; however, achieving new bioconjugates is still a great challenge. Herein, we report the development of a new high-sensitivity fluorescent aptasensor for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) based on tuning aggregation/disaggregation behavior of GQDs by structure-switching aptamers. The fluorescence sensing process for OTA detection involved two key steps: (1) cDNA-aptamer (cDNA, complementary to part of the OTA aptamer) hybridization induced the aggregation of GQD (fluorescence quenching) after cDNA was added into the GQDs-aptamer bioconjugate solution, and (2) the target of OTA triggered disaggregation of GQD aggregates (fluorescence recovery). Such new fluorescent sensing platform can be used to monitor OTA with a linear range of 0 to 1 ng/mL and very low detection limit of 13 pg/mL, which is among the best in all the developed fluorescent nanoparticles-based sensors. Such sensing strategy is also successful in analyzing OTA in practical red wine sample with 94.4-102.7% of recoveries and relative standard deviation in the range of 2.9-5.8%. The present works open a new way for signaling the target-aptamer binding event by tuning aggregation/disaggregation behavior of GQDs-bioconjugates.

  12. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for single-molecule studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Chen, Danqi; Yue, Hongjun; French, Jarrod B; Rufo, Joseph; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-06-21

    Recent developments on various lab-on-a-chip techniques allow miniaturized and integrated devices to perform on-chip single-molecule studies. Fluidic-based platforms that utilize unique microscale fluidic behavior are capable of conducting single-molecule experiments with high sensitivities and throughputs, while biomolecular systems can be studied on-chip using techniques such as DNA curtains, magnetic tweezers, and solid-state nanopores. The advances of these on-chip single-molecule techniques lead to next-generation lab-on-a-chip devices, such as DNA transistors, and single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology for rapid and low-cost whole genome DNA sequencing. In this Focus article, we will discuss some recent successes in the development of lab-on-a-chip techniques for single-molecule studies and expound our thoughts on the near future of on-chip single-molecule studies.

  13. Single-Molecule Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hayashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR is a well-known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic (random or probabilistic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively transitions from folded to unfolded configurations under the action of an oscillating mechanical force applied with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigate the folding and unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measure several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that a good quantifier of the SR is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance-matching condition. Finally, we carry out experiments on short hairpins that show how SR might be useful for enhancing the detection of conformational molecular transitions of low SNR.

  14. Ultrafast dynamics of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinks, Daan; Hildner, Richard; van Dijk, Erik M H P; Stefani, Fernando D; Nieder, Jana B; Hernando, Jordi; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-04-21

    The detection of individual molecules has found widespread application in molecular biology, photochemistry, polymer chemistry, quantum optics and super-resolution microscopy. Tracking of an individual molecule in time has allowed identifying discrete molecular photodynamic steps, action of molecular motors, protein folding, diffusion, etc. down to the picosecond level. However, methods to study the ultrafast electronic and vibrational molecular dynamics at the level of individual molecules have emerged only recently. In this review we present several examples of femtosecond single molecule spectroscopy. Starting with basic pump-probe spectroscopy in a confocal detection scheme, we move towards deterministic coherent control approaches using pulse shapers and ultra-broad band laser systems. We present the detection of both electronic and vibrational femtosecond dynamics of individual fluorophores at room temperature, showing electronic (de)coherence, vibrational wavepacket interference and quantum control. Finally, two colour phase shaping applied to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes is presented, which allows investigation of the persistent coherence in photosynthetic complexes under physiological conditions at the level of individual complexes.

  15. Deconvolving Single-Molecule Intensity Distributions for Quantitative Microscopy Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Sarah A.; Fujimoto, Bryant S.; Kuyper, Christopher L.; Kuo, Jason S.; Bajjalieh, Sandra M.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, images often contain puncta in which the fluorescent molecules are spatially clustered. This article describes a method that uses single-molecule intensity distributions to deconvolve the number of fluorophores present in fluorescent puncta as a way to “count” protein number. This method requires a determination of the correct statistical relationship between the single-molecule and single-puncta intensity distributions. Once the correct relationship has been determined, basis histograms can be generated from the single-molecule intensity distribution to fit the puncta distribution. Simulated data were used to demonstrate procedures to determine this relationship, and to test the methodology. This method has the advantages of single-molecule measurements, providing both the mean and variation in molecules per puncta. This methodology has been tested with the avidin-biocytin binding system for which the best-fit distribution of biocytins in the sample puncta was in good agreement with a bulk determination of the avidin-biocytin binding ratio. PMID:17259276

  16. Giant Suppression of Photobleaching for Single Molecule Detection via the Purcell Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    Giant Suppression of Photobleaching for Single Molecule Detection via the Purcell Effect Hu Cang,†,‡ Yongmin Liu,†,§,∥ Yuan Wang,† Xiaobo Yin,†,⊥ and...Purcell effect to manipulate photochemical reactions at the subwavelength scale. KEYWORDS: Nano-optics, single - molecule fluorescence spectroscopy...COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Giant Suppression of Photobleaching for Single Molecule Detection via the Purcell Effect

  17. Applications of optical trapping to single molecule DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonek, G.J.; Berns, M.W. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Beckman Laser Inst. and Medical Clinic; Keller, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Chemical Science and Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project focused on the methodologies required to integrate optical trapping with single molecule detection (SMD) so as to demonstrate high speed sequencing through optical micromanipulation of host substrates, nucleotide cleavage, and single molecule detection. As part of this effort, the new technology of optical tweezers was applied to the confinement and manipulation of microsphere handles containing attached DNA fragments. The authors demonstrated substrate optical trapping in rapid flow streams, the fluorescence excitation and detection of fluorescently labeled nucleotides in an optical trapping system, and the epifluorescent imaging of DNA fragments in flow streams. They successfully demonstrated optical trapping in laminar flow streams and completely characterized the trapping process as functions of fluid flow velocity, chamber dimension, trapping depth, incident laser power, and fluorescence measurement geometry.

  18. Developing in vivo biophysics by fishing for single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Wohland, Thorsten; Korzh, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    Single-molecule techniques (SMT) provide the possibility to quantitatively analyze the action of single molecules. SMTs can resolve the distribution of states of an ensemble of molecules, collecting information that is otherwise not accessible by typical ensemble techniques. Until now, the application of SMTs in developmental biology was limited. Several recent studies illustrate the possibility to investigate the behavior of single biological molecules in invertebrates such as Caenorhabditis elegans and transparent embryos of model teleosts. These studies have paved the way for the application of fluorescence-based SMTs, e.g. fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescent energy transfer, or single particle tracking, in developmental biology. This review aims to define SMTs applicable in developmental biology, and discuss properties of an ideal animal model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Highly sensitive ;turn-on; fluorescent chemical sensor for trace analysis of Cr3 + using electro-synthesized poly(N-(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)-L-histidine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Ge; Xu, Jingkun; Wen, Yangping; Ming, Shouli; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Wanchuan

    2018-02-01

    Trivalent chromium (Cr3 +) can cause severely environment pollution, declining quality of edible agro-products in plants and animals, and human diseases. Poly(N-(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)-L-histidine) (PFLH) synthesized by the direct electro-polymerization of its corresponding commercially available monomer in both boron trifluoride diethyl etherate and dichloromethane mixed system. The ;turn-on; type fluorescent sensor based on PFLH displayed high sensitivity and selectivity for Cr3 + detecting. The structure of PFLH was rationally proved by 1H NMR spectra, FT-IR spectra, quantum chemical calculations, and its optical properties were characterized. The electro-synthesized PFLH exhibited a ;turn-on; fluorescent response towards Cr3 +, which was employed as a sensing platform for the ;turn-on; fluorescent analysis of Cr3 + in a wide linear range from 5.1 nM to 25 μM with a low limit of detection as low as 1.7 nM. The possible mechanism of fluorescent ;turn-on; sensor based on PFLH for Cr3 + was proposed. The sensor displayed high sensitivity, good selectivity, satisfactory practicability, suggesting that PFLH has potential fluorescent application for ;turn-on; sensing Cr3 + in agricultural environments and edible agro-products of plants and animals.

  20. Quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukojevic, Vladana; Heidkamp, Marcus; Ming, Yu; Johansson, Björn; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf

    2008-11-25

    A new approach to quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is presented. It relies on fluorescence intensity distribution to analyze the molecular occurrence statistics captured by digital imaging and enables direct determination of the number of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion rates without resorting to temporal or spatial autocorrelation analyses. Digital images of fluorescent molecules were recorded by using fast scanning and avalanche photodiode detectors. In this way the signal-to-background ratio was significantly improved, enabling direct quantitative imaging by CLSM. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using standard solutions of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules, quantum dots, and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein in solution and in live cells. The method was verified by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The relevance for biological applications, in particular, for live cell imaging, is discussed.

  1. "Turn-off" fluorescent sensor for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous recognition of 29 famous green teas based on quantum dots combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Fan, Yao; Fu, Haiyan; Chen, Feng; Ni, Chuang; Wang, Jinxing; Yin, Qiaobo; Mu, Qingling; Yang, Tianming; She, Yuanbin

    2017-04-22

    Fluorescent "turn-off" sensors based on water-soluble quantum dots (QDs) have drawn increasing attention owing to their unique properties such as high fluorescence quantum yields, chemical stability and low toxicity. In this work, a novel method based on the fluorescence "turn-off" model with water-soluble CdTe QDs as the fluorescent probes for differentiation of 29 different famous green teas is established. The fluorescence of the QDs can be quenched in different degrees in light of positions and intensities of the fluorescent peaks for the green teas. Subsequently, with aid of classic partial least square discriminant analysis (PLSDA), all the green teas can be discriminated with high sensitivity, specificity and a satisfactory recognition rate of 100% for training set and 98.3% for prediction set, respectively. Especially, the "turn-off" fluorescence PLSDA model based on second-order derivatives (2nd der) with reduced least complexity (LVs = 3) was the most effective one for modeling. Most importantly, we further demonstrated the established "turn-off" fluorescent sensor mode has several significant advantages and appealing properties over the conventional fluorescent method for large-class-number classification (LCNC) of green teas. This work is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report on the rapid and effective identification of so many kinds of famous green teas based on the "turn-off" model of QDs combined with chemometrics, which also implies other potential applications on complex LCNC classification system with weak fluorescence or even without fluorescence to achieve higher detective response and specificity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Single-molecule imaging studies of protein dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareh, Shannon Kian G.

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for studying biological events. The work of this thesis primarily focuses on single molecule studies of the dynamics of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and other fluorescent-labeled proteins by utilizing Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and imaging. The single molecule experiments of this thesis covered three broad topics. First, the adsorption mechanisms of proteins onto hydrophobic and hydrophilic fused silica surfaces were imaged and reversible and irreversible adsorption mechanisms were observed. The second topic covered a new technique for measuring the diffusion coefficient of Brownian diffusing proteins, in particular GFP, in solution via a single image. The corresponding experiments showed a relationship between the intensity profile width and the diffusion coefficient of the diffusing molecules. The third topic covered an in vivo experiment involving imaging and quantifying prokaryotic cell metabolism protein dynamics inside the Bacillus subtilis bacteria, in which a helical diffusion pattern for the protein was observed. These topics are presented in the chronological order of the experiments conducted.

  3. Resolving Single-Molecule Assembled Patterns with Superresolution Blink-Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, Thorben; Strackharn, Mathias; Stahl, Stefan W.; Summerer, Wolfram; Steinhauer, Christian; Forthmann, Carsten; Puchner, Elias M.; Vogelsang, Jan; Gaub, Hermann E.; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally combine a recently developed AFM-based molecule-by-molecule assembly (single-molecule cut-and-paste, SMCP) with subdiffraction resolution fluorescence imaging. Using “Blink-Microscopy”, which exploits the fluctuating emission of single molecules for the reconstruction

  4. Single-Molecule characterization of oligomerization kinetics and equilibria of the tumor suppressor p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Sridharan; Huang, Fang; Fersht, Alan R

    2011-03-01

    The state of oligomerization of the tumor suppressor p53 is an important factor in its various biological functions. It has a well-defined tetramerization domain, and the protein exists as monomers, dimers and tetramers in equilibrium. The dissociation constants between oligomeric forms are so low that they are at the limits of measurement by conventional methods in vitro. Here, we have used the high sensitivity of single-molecule methods to measure the equilibria and kinetics of oligomerization of full-length p53 and its isolated tetramerization domain, p53tet, at physiological temperature, pH and ionic strength using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in vitro. The dissociation constant at 37 °C for tetramers dissociating into dimers for full-length p53 was 50 ± 7 nM, and the corresponding value for dimers into monomers was 0.55 ± 0.08 nM. The half-lives for the two processes were 20 and 50 min, respectively. The equivalent quantities for p53tet were 150 ± 10 nM, 1.0 ± 0.14 nM, 2.5 ± 0.4 min and 13 ± 2 min. The data suggest that unligated p53 in unstressed cells should be predominantly dimeric. Single-molecule FCS is a useful procedure for measuring dissociation equilibria, kinetics and aggregation at extreme sensitivity.

  5. A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on carboxymethyl chitosan-quantum dots and gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ziping; Liu, Hua; Wang, Lei; Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-08-17

    In this work, we report a novel label-free fluorescence “turn off-on” biosensor for lectin detection. The highly sensitive and selective sensing system is based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-CHIT), CuInS{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs). Firstly, CuInS{sub 2} QDs featuring carboxyl groups were directly synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis method. Then, the carboxyl groups on the CuInS{sub 2} QDs surface were interacted with the amino groups (−NH{sub 2}), carboxyl groups (−COOH) and hydroxyl groups (−OH) within CM-CHIT polymeric chains via electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding to form CM-CHIT-QDs assemblies. Introduction of Au NPs could quench the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs through electron and energy transfer. In the presence of lectin, lectin could bind exclusively with CM-CHIT-QDs by means of specific multivalent carbohydrate-protein interaction. Thus, the electron and energy transfer process between CM-CHIT-QDs and Au NPs was inhibited, and as a result, the fluorescence of CM-CHIT-QDs was effectively “turned on”. Under the optimum conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity ratio I/I{sub 0} (I and I{sub 0} were the fluorescence intensity of CM-CHIT-QDs-Au NPs in the presence and absence of lectin, respectively) and lectin concentration in the range of 0.2–192.5 nmol L{sup −1}, And the detection limit could be down to 0.08 nmol L{sup −1}. Furthermore, the proposed biosensor was employed for the determination of lectin in fetal bovine serum samples with satisfactory results. - Graphical abstract: A label-free fluorescence biosensor for highly sensitive detection of lectin based on the integration of carboxymethyl chitosan, CuInS{sub 2} quantum dots and gold nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A label-free near-infrared fluorescence “turn off-on” biosensor for detection of lectin was established. • The highly sensitive biosensor was based on the

  6. Highly sensitive thermal damage sensors for polymer composites: time temperature indicator based on thermochromic fluorescence turn-on response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivola, Ryan; Howie, Tucker; Yang, Jeffrey; Lai, Po-Ni; Shi, Zhengwei; Jang, Sei-Hum; K-Y Jen, Alex; Flinn, Brian D.

    2017-08-01

    Carbon fiber epoxy composites have become prevalent in a variety of industries, especially in aerospace. The significant non-destructive evaluation (NDE) challenges of composites require new solutions, especially in detecting the onset of thermal damage. This work proposes the use of thermochromic fluorescent molecules dispersed in the composites as sensors for such detection. A molecule has been developed which transitions from a colorless, non-fluorescent state to a colorful, highly fluorescent state when exposed to temperature-time combinations that can cause damage in composites. This molecule dispersed in polymer composites of epoxy and PDMS matrices shows unique activation kinetics that can be used to quantitatively simulate the degradation kinetics of aerospace epoxies. The novel sensor materials based on the thermochromic activation of fluorescence can provide highly efficient and widely applicable NDE materials and techniques for carbon fiber epoxy composites.

  7. A new pyrene based highly sensitive fluorescence probe for copper(II) and fluoride with living cell application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Chakraborty, Shampa; Paul, Sima; Halder, Sandipan; Panja, Sukanya; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti

    2014-05-21

    A new pyrene based fluorescence probe has been synthesized for fluorogenic detection of Cu(2+) in acetonitrile-aqueous media (7 : 3 CH3CN-HEPES buffer, v/v, at pH 7.5) with bioimaging in both prokaryotic (Candida albicans cells) and eukaryotic (Tecoma stans pollen cells) living cells. The anion recognition properties of the sensor have also been studied in acetonitrile by fluorescence methods which show remarkable sensitivity toward fluoride over other anions examined.

  8. A smartphone imaging-based label-free and dual-wavelength fluorescent biosensor with high sensitivity and accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Il; Shrivastava, Sajal; Duy, Le-Thai; Yeong Kim, Bo; Son, Young-Min; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2017-08-15

    The accuracy of a bioassay based on smartphone-integrated fluorescent biosensors has been limited due to the occurrence of false signals from non-specific reactions as well as a high background and low signal-to-noise ratios for complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensors. To overcome this problem, we demonstrate dual-wavelength fluorescent detection of biomolecules with high accuracy. Fluorescent intensity can be quantified using dual wavelengths simultaneously, where one decreases and the other increases, as the target analytes bind to the split capture and detection aptamer probes. To do this, we performed smartphone imaging-based fluorescence microscopy using a microarray platform on a substrate with metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) using Ag film and Al2O3 nano-spacer. The results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the dual-wavelength fluorescent quantitative assay for the target biomolecule 17-β-estradiol in water were significantly increased through the elimination of false signals. The detection limit was 1pg/mL and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the proposed assay (0.922) was comparable to that of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (0.956) from statistical accuracy tests using spiked wastewater samples. This novel method has great potential as an accurate point-of-care testing technology based on mobile platforms for clinical diagnostics and environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A reduced graphene oxide-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for highly sensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Gaina; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescence nanoprobe (reduced nano-graphene oxide [nrGO]/fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peptide [Pep-FITC]) for ultrasensitive detection of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) has been developed by engineering the Pep-FITC comprising the specific MMP2 substrate domain (PLGVR) onto the surface of nrGO particles through non-covalent linkage. The nrGO was obtained by water bathing nano-graphene oxide under 90°C for 4 hours. After mixing the nrGO and Pep-FITC for 30 seconds, the fluorescence from Pep-FITC was almost completely quenched due to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and nrGO. Upon cleavage of the amide bond between Leu and Gly in the Pep-FITC by protease-MMP2, the FITC bound to nrGO was separated from nrGO surface, disrupting the fluorescence resonance energy transfer process and resulting in fluorescence recovery of FITC. Under optimal conditions, the fluorescence recovery of nrGO/Pep-FITC was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of MMP2 within 0.02-0.1 nM. The detection limit of the nrGO/Pep-FITC was determined to be 3 pM, which is approximately tenfold lower than that of the unreduced carboxylated nano-graphene oxide/Pep-FITC probe.

  10. Microfluidic device for single-molecule experiments with enhanced photostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Edward A; Gambin, Yann; Vandelinder, Virginia; Brustad, Eric M; Liu, Hsiao-Wei; Schultz, Peter G; Groisman, Alex; Deniz, Ashok A

    2009-09-30

    A microfluidic device made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) addresses key limitations in single-molecule fluorescence experiments by providing high dye photostability and low sample sticking. Photobleaching is dramatically reduced by deoxygenation via gas diffusion through porous channel walls. Rapid buffer exchange in a laminar sheath flow followed by optical interrogation minimizes surface-sample contacts and allows the in situ addition and combination of other reagents.

  11. Sm-ChIPi: Single-Molecule Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatavosian, Roubina; Ren, Xiaojun

    2018-01-01

    Epigenetic complexes regulate chromatin dynamics via binding to and assembling on chromatin. However, the mechanisms of chromatin binding and assembly of epigenetic complexes within cells remain incompletely understood, partly due to technical challenges. Here, we present a new approach termed single-molecule chromatin immunoprecipitation imaging (Sm-ChIPi) that enables to assess the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin. Sm-ChIPi was developed based on chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy imaging. In this method, an epigenetic complex subunit fused with a gene coding for a fluorescent protein is stably expressed in its corresponding knockout cells. Nucleosomes associated with epigenetic complexes are isolated from cells at native conditions and incubated with biotinylated antibodies. The resulting complexes are immobilized on a quartz slide that had been passivated and functionalized with NeutrAvidin. Image stacks are then acquired by using single-molecule TIRF microscopy. The individual spots imaged by TIRF microscopy represent single protein-nucleosome complexes. The number of copies of the protein complexes on a nucleosome is inferred from the fluorescence photobleaching measurements. Sm-ChIPi is a sensitive and direct method that can quantify the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin.

  12. Optimal Background Estimators in Single-Molecule FRET Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preus, Søren; Hildebrandt, Lasse L; Birkedal, Victoria

    2016-09-20

    Single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy constitutes an umbrella of powerful tools that facilitate direct observation of the biophysical properties, population heterogeneities, and interactions of single biomolecules without the need for ensemble synchronization. Due to the low signal/noise ratio in single-molecule TIRF microscopy experiments, it is important to determine the local background intensity, especially when the fluorescence intensity of the molecule is used quantitatively. Here we compare and evaluate the performance of different aperture-based background estimators used particularly in single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer. We introduce the general concept of multiaperture signatures and use this technique to demonstrate how the choice of background can affect the measured fluorescence signal considerably. A new, to our knowledge, and simple background estimator is proposed, called the local statistical percentile (LSP). We show that the LSP background estimator performs as well as current background estimators at low molecular densities and significantly better in regions of high molecular densities. The LSP background estimator is thus suited for single-particle TIRF microscopy of dense biological samples in which the intensity itself is an observable of the technique. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Single Molecule Studies on Dynamics in Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Täuber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule (SM methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC. Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC.

  14. Magic sized ZnS quantum dots as a highly sensitive and selective fluorescence sensor probe for Ag+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Dandapat, Anirban; De, Goutam

    2012-02-07

    A green and simple chemical synthesis of magic sized water soluble blue-emitting ZnS quantum dots (QDs) has been accomplished by reacting anhydrous Zn acetate, sodium sulfide and thiolactic acid (TLA) at room temperature in aqueous solution. Refluxing of this mixture in open air yielded ZnS clusters of about 3.5 nm in diameter showing very strong and narrow photoluminescence properties with long stability. Refluxing did not cause any noticeable size increment of the clusters. As a result, the QDs obtained after different refluxing conditions showed similar absorption and photoluminescence (PL) features. Use of TLA as a capping agent effectively yielded such stable and magic sized QDs. The as-synthesized and 0.5 h refluxed ZnS QDs were used as a fluorescence sensor for Ag(+) ions. It has been observed that after addition of Ag(+) ions of concentration 0.5-1 μM the strong fluorescence of ZnS QDs was almost quenched. The quenched fluorescence can be recovered by adding ethylenediamine to form a complex with Ag(+) ions. The other metal ions (K(+), Ca(2+), Au(3+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+)) showed little or no effect on the fluorescence of ZnS QDs when tested individually or as a mixture. In the presence of all these ions, Ag(+) responded well and therefore ZnS QDs reported in this work can be used as a Ag(+) ion fluorescence sensor.

  15. A highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probe for hypochlorite in pure water with aggregation induced emission characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can; Ji, Hongyu; Li, Mengshu; Cai, Likun; Wang, Zhipeng; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2017-02-22

    As a reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypochlorite (OCl-) plays a crucial role in oxidative stress and signal transduction, controlling a wide range of physiological functions. In addition, the wide use of OCl- in the treatment of food and water might possibly threaten human health if the residual quantity was out of limits. Currently, sensitive methods employed to selectively monitor OCl- in aqueous samples in situ are still scarce and badly needed. Boron esters or acids are considered to be suitable functional groups for the detection of hydrogen peroxide due to their reliable reactivity. In this work, we try to develop a highly sensitive and selective OCl- probe (TPE2B) based on the mechanism of aggregation induced emission (AIE). Due to the distinct increase in water solubility of TPE2OH, which is generated from the reaction between TPE2B and OCl-, the strong emission of TPE2B is quenched dramatically. The response speed was as fast as 30 seconds with a detection limit as low as 28 nM. Additionally, test papers were also fabricated and exhibited a highly sensitive response to 0.1 mM OCl-.

  16. Single molecule detection, thermal fluctuation and life

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANAGIDA, Toshio; ISHII, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    Single molecule detection has contributed to our understanding of the unique mechanisms of life. Unlike artificial man-made machines, biological molecular machines integrate thermal noises rather than avoid them. For example, single molecule detection has demonstrated that myosin motors undergo biased Brownian motion for stepwise movement and that single protein molecules spontaneously change their conformation, for switching to interactions with other proteins, in response to thermal fluctuation. Thus, molecular machines have flexibility and efficiency not seen in artificial machines. PMID:28190869

  17. Highly sensitive detection of nitroaromatic explosives using an electrospun nanofibrous sensor based on a novel fluorescent conjugated polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haibo; Wang, Huaming; Peng, Zhou; Yang, Yufei; Zhang, Guoqing; Li, Na; Liu, Feng; Pei, Jian

    2012-09-26

    An electrospun nanofibrous explosive sensor was first constructed based on a newly developed fluorescent conjugated polymer P containing heteroatom polycyclic units. Electrospinning by doping polymer P as a fluorescent probe in a polystyrene supporting matrix afforded a fluorescence nanofibrous film with unique porous structures, and effectively avoided the aggregation of polymer P. The novel explosive sensor exhibited stable fluorescence property, satisfactory reversibility with less than 5% loss of signal intensity after four quenching-regeneration cycles, and good reproducibility among three batches with a relative standard deviation of 2.8%. Such fabricated sensor also showed remarkable sensitivity toward a series of trace nitroaromatic explosive vapors, including picric acid (parts-per-trillion level) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene vapor (parts-per-billion level), as well as good selectivity with less than 10% response to typical interferents. Therefore, the present strategy extends the application of different kinds of conjugated polymers for the construction of optical chemosensors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A redox-modulated fluorescent strategy for the highly sensitive detection of metabolites by using graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Li, Xing; Wang, Mengke; Chen, Xueqian; Su, Xingguang

    2017-10-16

    In this paper, a redox-modulated fluorescent strategy based on the transformation of Fe2+/Fe3+ couple and enzymatic reaction for rapid monitoring glucose and uric acid using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as fluorescent probe was developed. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be produced by the enzymatic reaction of a series of metabolites, such as glucose and uric acid. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, Fe2+ can be oxidized and converted to Fe3+, which have a significant quenching difference in the fluorescence of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). Thus, a sensitive and label-free biosensor for the detection of uric acid and glucose was developed. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of uric acid and glucose in the range of 0.1-45 μmolL-1 and 0.1-30 μmolL-1 with a detection limit of 0.026 μmolL-1and 0.021 μmolL-1, respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of uric acid and glucose in human serum samples with satisfactory results, which had potential application to detect metabolites associated with H2O2 release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Highly sensitive label-free fluorescent detection of Hg2+ ions by DNA molecular machine-based Ag nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinjin; He, Xiaoxiao; Jia, Xuekun; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou

    2013-04-21

    We present here a highly selective and sensitive label-free method to detect Hg(2+) ions in aqueous solution by using DNA molecular machine-based fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (AgNCs). This mechanism is based on the Hg(2+) ions triggering machine-like operations of DNA and the "product" of the machine being used to stabilize fluorescent AgNCs. In this method, a tailored DNA, containing a sequence for Hg(2+) ions recognition, a sequence-specific nicking site for Nb BbvC I and a sequence complementary to the DNA as a template for the synthesis of fluorescent AgNCs, was firstly designed. In the presence of Hg(2+) ions, the machine's function operations were triggered. A series of machine-like operations, including replication, scission, and displacement then occurred with the addition of polymerase/dNTPs/Nb BbvC I, which manufactured lots of "product" DNA. The "product" DNA could act as a template for the preparation of fluorescent AgNCs. Thus the fluorescence of the AgNCs could be used as a signal transduction of this DNA machine, which was related to the concentration of the Hg(2+) ions. The repeated synthesis of the "product" and its template effect for AgNCs synthesis led to signal amplification in the assay of Hg(2+) ions. A linear response to the concentration of Hg(2+) ions was observed in the range from 0.08 nM to 20 nM and a detection limit of 0.08 nM was obtained. By contrast, the operation of the machine could not be executed in an Hg(2+) ion-free system. Moreover, the detection was not only label-free but also specific for Hg(2+) ions without being affected by other metal ions.

  20. Volume Labeling with Alexa-Fluor Dyes and Surface Functionalization of Highly Sensitive Fluorescent SiO2 Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [ORNL; Foster, Carmen M [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; Nallathamby, Prakash D [ORNL; Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of <15%. In comparison with conventional surface tagged particles created by post-synthesis modification, this process maintains the physical and surface chemical properties that have the most pronounced effect on colloidal stability and interactions with their surroundings. These volume-labeled nanoparticles have proven to be extremely robust, showing excellent signal strength, negligible photobleaching, and minimal loss of functional organic components. The native or free surface of the volume-labeled particles can be altered to achieve a specific surface functionality without altering fluorescence. Their utility was demonstrated for visualizing the association of surface modified fluorescent particles with cultured macrophages. Differences in particle agglomeration and cell association were clearly associated with differences in observed nanoparticle toxicity. The capacity to maintain particle fluorescence while making significant changes to surface chemistry makes these particles extremely versatile and useful for studies of particle agglomeration, uptake, and transport in environmental and biological systems.

  1. The Single-Molecule Approach to Membrane Protein Stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Michael G; Hallworth, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The advent of techniques for imaging solitary fluorescent molecules has made possible many new kinds of biological experiments. Here, we describe the application of single-molecule imaging to the problem of subunit stoichiometry in membrane proteins. A membrane protein of unknown stoichiometry, prestin, is coupled to the fluorescent enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and synthesized in the human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line. We prepare adherent membrane fragments containing prestin-eGFP by osmotic lysis. The molecules are then exposed to continuous low-level excitation until their fluorescence reaches background levels. Their fluorescence decreases in discrete equal-amplitude steps, consistent with the photobleaching of single fluorophores. We count the number of steps required to photobleach each molecule. The molecular stoichiometry is then deduced using a binomial model.

  2. A highly sensitive turn-on fluorescent chemosensor for recognition of Zn2 + and Hg2 + and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xu; Han, Juan; Wang, Yun; Bao, Xu; Ni, Liang; Wang, Lei; Li, Longhua

    2017-09-01

    A fluorescence probe has been designed and synthesized, and applied with a combined theoretical and experimental study. Research suggests that the probe can be used to sense Zn2 + and Hg2 + through selective turn-on fluorescence responses in the aqueous HEPES buffer (0.05M, pH = 7.4). The limit of detection (LOD) were determined as 1.46 × 10- 7 M (Zn2 +) and 2.50 × 10- 7 M (Hg2 +). Moreover, based on DFT, the geometry optimizations of probe 1, [1-Hg2 +] complex and [1-Zn2 +] complex were carried out using the Gaussian 09 program, in which the B3LYP function was used. The electronic properties of free probe 1 and the metal complexes were studied based on the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analyses. The probe 1 has also been successfully applied to detection of Zn2 + and Hg2 + in living cells.

  3. High sensitivity analysis of water-soluble, cyanine dye labeled proteins by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Xiaoqiang [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Wang Li [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116012 (China); Ma Junfeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Deng Qiliang; Liang Zhen [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang Lihua, E-mail: lihuazhang@dicp.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Peng Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116012 (China); Zhang Yukui [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2009-04-27

    A water-soluble sulfo-3H-indocyanine dye, the active N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 3H-Indolium,1-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl]-2-[3-[1-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl] -1,3-dihydro-3,3-dimethyl-5-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene]-1-propenyl] -3,3-dimethyl-5-sulfo-(9CI) (sb-cy3-NHS), containing two p-carboxybenzyl groups on nitrogen atoms, previously developed by our laboratory, was for the first time used for protein derivatization, followed by HPLC separation and fluorescence detection. With bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein, effects of various experimental conditions, including denaturant concentration, reaction time and temperature, the pH value of buffer, and the molar ratio of fluorescence reagent to protein, on protein derivatization efficiency were systematically investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for derivatized BSA was decreased to 12.8 nM, about 100-fold lower than that by UV and fluorescence detection with commercial fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as labeling reagent. For HPLC analysis, an on-column excess fluorescence reagent depletion technique was developed based on the hydrophilicity of sb-cy3-NHS, which could avoid the interference on the analysis of target compounds. In addition, sb-cy3-NHS was applied for the derivatization of a three-protein mixture and egg white proteins. Compared to the results labeled by FITC, more proteins with low concentrations could be labeled by sb-cy3-NHS, resulting in improved detection sensitivity for protein analysis. All these results demonstrated that sb-cy3-NHS might be promising in detecting low abundance proteins, especially in the quantitative analysis of proteins.

  4. A highly sensitive and selective fluorescent sensor for detection of Al(3+) using a europium(III) quinolinecarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wentao; Zhou, Youfu; Huang, Decai; Su, Mingyi; Wang, Kun; Hong, Maochun

    2014-07-07

    Eu2PQC6 has been developed to detect Al(3+) by monitoring the quenching of the europium-based emission, with the lowest detection limit of ∼32 pM and the quantitative detection range to 150 μM. Eu2PQC6 is the first ever example that the europium(III) complex serves as an Al(3+) fluorescent sensor based on "competition-displacement" mode.

  5. A Conjugated Aptamer-Gold Nanoparticle Fluorescent Probe for Highly Sensitive Detection of rHuEPO-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyang Zhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here a novel conjugated aptamer-gold nanoparticle (Apt-AuNPs fluorescent probe and its application for specific detection of recombinant human erythropoietin-α (rHuEPO-α. In this nanobiosensor, 12 nm AuNPs function as both a nano-scaffold and a nano-quencher (fluorescent energy acceptor, on the surface of which the complementary sequences are linked (as cODN-AuNPs and pre-hybridized with carboxymethylfluorescein (FAM-labeled anti-rHuEPO-α aptamers. Upon target protein binding, the aptamers can be released from the AuNP surface and the fluorescence signal is restored. Key variables such as the length of linker, the hybridization site and length have been designed and optimized. Full performance evaluation including sensitivity, linear range and interference substances are also described. This nanobiosensor provides a promising approach for a simple and direct quantification of rHuEPO-α concentrations as low as 0.92 nM within a few hours.

  6. A highly sensitive, single selective, fluorescent sensor for Al{sup 3+} detection and its application in living cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xing-Pei [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Sun, Shao-bo; Li, Ying-dong [Institute of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, Gansu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhi, Li-hua [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Wu, Wei-na, E-mail: wuwn08@hpu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Wang, Yuan, E-mail: wangyuan08@hpu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A new o-aminophenol-based fluorogenic chemosensor methyl 3,5-bis((E)-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-4-hydroxybenzoate 1 have been synthesized by Schiff base condensation of methyl 3,5-diformyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with o-aminophenol, which exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity toward Al{sup 3+}. Fluorescence titration studies of receptors 1 with different metal cations in CH{sub 3}OH medium showed highly selective and sensitive towards Al{sup 3+} ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting metal ions. The detection limit of Al{sup 3+} ions is at the parts per billion level. Interestingly, the Al(III) complex of 1 offered a large Stokes shift (>120 nm), which can miximize the selfquenching effect. In addition, possible utilization of this receptor as bio-imaging fluorescent probe to detect Al{sup 3+} in human cervical HeLa cancer cell lines was also investigated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. - Highlights: • A new Schiff base chemosensor is reported. • The sensor for Al{sup 3+} offers large Stokes shift. • The detection limit of Al{sup 3+} in CH{sub 3}OH solution is at the parts per billion level. • The utilization of sensor for the monitoring of Al{sup 3+} levels in living cells was examined.

  7. Volume labeling with Alexa Fluor dyes and surface functionalization of highly sensitive fluorescent silica (SiO2) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Foster, Carmen M.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Retterer, Scott T.

    2013-10-01

    A new synthesis approach is described that allows the direct incorporation of fluorescent labels into the volume or body of SiO2 nanoparticles. In this process, fluorescent Alexa Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of Fluor dyes with different emission wavelengths were covalently incorporated into the SiO2 nanoparticles during their formation by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The dye molecules were homogeneously distributed throughout the SiO2 nanoparticles. The quantum yields of the Alexa Fluor volume-labeled SiO2 nanoparticles were much higher than nanoparticles labeled using conventional organic dyes. The size of the resulting nanoparticles was controlled using microemulsion reaction media with sizes in the range of 20-100 nm and a polydispersity of <15%. In comparison with conventional surface tagged particles created by post-synthesis modification, this process maintains the physical and surface chemical properties that have the most pronounced effect on colloidal stability and interactions with their surroundings. These volume-labeled nanoparticles have proven to be extremely robust, showing excellent signal strength, negligible photobleaching, and minimal loss of functional organic components. The native or ``free'' surface of the volume-labeled particles can be altered to achieve a specific surface functionality without altering fluorescence. Their utility was demonstrated for visualizing the association of surface-modified fluorescent particles

  8. Naphthalene diimides as tunable fluorophores suitable for single molecule applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Toby D. M.; Yap, Sheryll; Jani, Chintan; Langford, Steven J.; Hofkens, Johan; De Schryver, Frans; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.

    2007-02-01

    The photophysics of two new substituted aminopropenyl naphthalene diimide (SANDI) dyes are reported. The molecules exhibit many of the photophysical properties required for fluorescence labeling applications including high photostability and high fluorescence quantum yields (> 0.5) in the visible region of the spectrum. Furthermore, the emission is sensitive to the number of substituents attached to the aromatic core, and to the surrounding environment. For example, in toluene as solvent, the mono-allyl SANDI has an emission maximum at 550 nm, whereas the di-allyl SANDI emits at 630 nm. The fluorescence decay times are in the range of ~8 - 12 ns and the Forster critical distance for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the mono- and di-allyl SANDI derivatives is 4.1 nm for a random donor-acceptor orientation. Single molecules of the di-allyl SANDI embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate) films show very low yields of photobleaching and very few fluorescence intermittencies or "blinks". These compounds are ideal candidates for applications at the single molecule level, for example, as FRET labels.

  9. A novel lab-on-chip platform with integrated solid phase PCR and Supercritical Angle Fluorescence (SAF) microlens array for highly sensitive and multiplexed pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tran Quang; Chin, Wai Hoe; Sun, Yi; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong

    2017-04-15

    Solid-phase PCR (SP-PCR) has become increasingly popular for molecular diagnosis and there have been a few attempts to incorporate SP-PCR into lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. However, their applicability for on-line diagnosis is hindered by the lack of sensitive and portable on-chip optical detection technology. In this paper, we addressed this challenge by combining the SP-PCR with super critical angle fluorescence (SAF) microlens array embedded in a microchip. We fabricated miniaturized SAF microlens array as part of a microfluidic chamber in thermoplastic material and performed multiplexed SP-PCR directly on top of the SAF microlens array. Attribute to the high fluorescence collection efficiency of the SAF microlens array, the SP-PCR assay on the LOC platform demonstrated a high sensitivity of 1.6 copies/µL, comparable to off-chip detection using conventional laser scanner. The combination of SP-PCR and SAF microlens array allows for on-chip highly sensitive and multiplexed pathogen detection with low-cost and compact optical components. The LOC platform would be widely used as a high-throughput biosensor to analyze food, clinical and environmental samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High-resolution, single-molecule measurements of biomolecular motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, William J; Woodside, Michael T; Block, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    Many biologically important macromolecules undergo motions that are essential to their function. Biophysical techniques can now resolve the motions of single molecules down to the nanometer scale or even below, providing new insights into the mechanisms that drive molecular movements. This review outlines the principal approaches that have been used for high-resolution measurements of single-molecule motion, including centroid tracking, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and optical traps. For each technique, the principles of operation are outlined, the capabilities and typical applications are examined, and various practical issues for implementation are considered. Extensions to these methods are also discussed, with an eye toward future application to outstanding biological problems.

  11. Continuous-flow single-molecule CE with high detection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiro, Perry G; Kuyper, Christopher L; Chiu, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the use of two-beam line-confocal detection geometry for measuring the total mobility of individual molecules undergoing continuous-flow CE separation. High-sensitivity single-molecule confocal detection is usually performed with a diffraction limited focal spot (approximately 500 nm in diameter), which necessitates the use of nanometer-sized channels to ensure all molecules flow through the detection volume. To allow for the use of larger channels that are a few micrometers in width, we employed cylindrical optics to define a rectangular illumination area that is diffraction-limited (approximately 500 nm) in width, but a few micrometers in length to match the width of the microchannel. We present detailed studies that compare the performance of this line-confocal detection geometry with the more widely used point-confocal geometry. Overall, we found line-confocal detection to provide the highest combination of signal-to-background ratio and spatial detection efficiency when used with micrometer-sized channels. For example, in a 2 microm wide channel we achieved a 94% overall detection efficiency for single Alexa488 dye molecules when a 2 microm x 0.5 microm illumination area was used, but only 34% detection efficiency with a 0.5 microm-diameter detection spot. To carry out continuous-flow CE, we used two-beam fluorescent cross-correlation spectroscopy where the transit time of each molecule is determined by cross-correlating the fluorescence registered by two spatially offset line-confocal detectors. We successfully separated single molecules of FITC, FITC-tagged glutamate, and FITC-tagged glycine.

  12. “Turn-off” fluorescent data array sensor based on double quantum dots coupled with chemometrics for highly sensitive and selective detection of multicomponent pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yao; Liu, Li; Sun, Donglei; Lan, Hanyue [The Modernization Engineering Technology Research Center of Ethnic Minority Medicine of Hubei Province, College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China); Fu, Haiyan, E-mail: fuhaiyan@mail.scuec.edu.cn [The Modernization Engineering Technology Research Center of Ethnic Minority Medicine of Hubei Province, College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang, Tianming, E-mail: tmyang@mail.scuec.edu.cn [The Modernization Engineering Technology Research Center of Ethnic Minority Medicine of Hubei Province, College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China); She, Yuanbin, E-mail: sheyb@zjut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry-Synthesis Technology, College of Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Ni, Chuang [The Modernization Engineering Technology Research Center of Ethnic Minority Medicine of Hubei Province, College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-04-15

    As a popular detection model, the fluorescence “turn-off” sensor based on quantum dots (QDs) has already been successfully employed in the detections of many materials, especially in the researches on the interactions between pesticides. However, the previous studies are mainly focused on simple single track or the comparison based on similar concentration of drugs. In this work, a new detection method based on the fluorescence “turn-off” model with water-soluble ZnCdSe and CdSe QDs simultaneously as the fluorescent probes is established to detect various pesticides. The fluorescence of the two QDs can be quenched by different pesticides with varying degrees, which leads to the differences in positions and intensities of two peaks. By combining with chemometrics methods, all the pesticides can be qualitative and quantitative respectively even in real samples with the limit of detection was 2 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1} and a recognition rate of 100%. This work is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report on the detection of pesticides based on the fluorescence quenching phenomenon of double quantum dots combined with chemometrics methods. What's more, the excellent selectivity of the system has been verified in different mediums such as mixed ion disruption, waste water, tea and water extraction liquid drugs. - Highlights: • A new model based on double QDs is established for pesticide residues detection. • The fluorescent data array sensor is coupled with chmometrics methods. • The sensor can be highly sensitive and selective detection in actual samples.

  13. Single Molecule Biophysics Experiments and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yang, Haw; Silbey, Robert J; Rice, Stuart A; Dinner, Aaron R

    2011-01-01

    Discover the experimental and theoretical developments in optical single-molecule spectroscopy that are changing the ways we think about molecules and atoms The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. This latest volume explores the advent of optical single-molecule spectroscopy, and how atomic force microscopy has empowered novel experiments on individual biomolecules, opening up new frontiers in molecular and cell biology and leading to new theoretical approaches

  14. Single molecule genotyping by TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttinger, Steffen; Lamarre, Baptiste; Knight, Alex E

    2008-09-01

    As part of a programme to develop a metrological framework for single molecule measurements in biology, we have investigated the applications of single molecule imaging to genomics. Specifically, we have developed a technique for measuring the frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in complex or pooled samples of DNA. We believe that this technique has applications to statistical genotyping-the identification of correlations between SNP frequencies and particular phenotypes-and other areas where it is desirable to track the frequencies of SNPs in complex DNA populations.

  15. Aminoquinoline based highly sensitive fluorescent sensor for lead(II) and aluminum(III) and its application in live cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Thangaraj; Sivaraman, Gandhi [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India); Mahesh, Ayyavu, E-mail: mahesh.a06@gmail.com [School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India); Chellappa, Duraisamy, E-mail: dcmku123@gmail.com [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aminoquinoline derivative was synthesized and used to recognize Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+}. • ANQ was high sensitive, selective and turn-on sensor for Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+}. • The Pb{sup 2+} detection limit (2.08 × 10{sup −9} mol L{sup −1}) is reported. • This fluorescence change was further supported by DFT/TD-DFT calculations. • The probe is applied successfully for recognizing intracellular Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+} within living cells. - Abstract: We have synthesized a new probe 5-((anthracen-9-ylmethylene) amino)quinolin-10-ol (ANQ) based on anthracene platform. The probe was tested for its sensing behavior toward heavy metal ions Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, light metal Al{sup 3+} ion, alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal ions by UV–visible and fluorescent techniques in ACN/H{sub 2}O mixture buffered with HEPES (pH 7.4). It shows high selectivity toward sensing Pb{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+} metal ions. Importantly, 10-fold and 5- fold fluorescence enhancement at 429 nm was observed for probe upon complexation with Pb{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions, respectively. This fluorescence enhancement is attributable to the prevention of photoinduced electron transfer. The photonic studies indicate that the probe can be adopted as a sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for Pb{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions.

  16. High-Resolution Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging in Centimeter-Deep Tissue Phantoms with High Signal-To-Noise Ratio and High Sensitivity via Novel Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Pei, Yanbo; D'Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    For many years, investigators have sought after high-resolution fluorescence imaging in centimeter-deep tissue because many interesting in vivo phenomena-such as the presence of immune system cells, tumor angiogenesis, and metastasis-may be located deep in tissue. Previously, we developed a new imaging technique to achieve high spatial resolution in sub-centimeter deep tissue phantoms named continuous-wave ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (CW-USF). The principle is to use a focused ultrasound wave to externally and locally switch on and off the fluorophore emission from a small volume (close to ultrasound focal volume). By making improvements in three aspects of this technique: excellent near-infrared USF contrast agents, a sensitive frequency-domain USF imaging system, and an effective signal processing algorithm, for the first time this study has achieved high spatial resolution (~ 900 μm) in 3-centimeter-deep tissue phantoms with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high sensitivity (3.4 picomoles of fluorophore in a volume of 68 nanoliters can be detected). We have achieved these results in both tissue-mimic phantoms and porcine muscle tissues. We have also demonstrated multi-color USF to image and distinguish two fluorophores with different wavelengths, which might be very useful for simultaneously imaging of multiple targets and observing their interactions in the future. This work has opened the door for future studies of high-resolution centimeter-deep tissue fluorescence imaging.

  17. Single Molecule Analysis Research Tool (SMART: an integrated approach for analyzing single molecule data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Greenfeld

    Full Text Available Single molecule studies have expanded rapidly over the past decade and have the ability to provide an unprecedented level of understanding of biological systems. A common challenge upon introduction of novel, data-rich approaches is the management, processing, and analysis of the complex data sets that are generated. We provide a standardized approach for analyzing these data in the freely available software package SMART: Single Molecule Analysis Research Tool. SMART provides a format for organizing and easily accessing single molecule data, a general hidden Markov modeling algorithm for fitting an array of possible models specified by the user, a standardized data structure and graphical user interfaces to streamline the analysis and visualization of data. This approach guides experimental design, facilitating acquisition of the maximal information from single molecule experiments. SMART also provides a standardized format to allow dissemination of single molecule data and transparency in the analysis of reported data.

  18. Single Molecule Analysis Research Tool (SMART): an integrated approach for analyzing single molecule data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Max; Pavlichin, Dmitri S; Mabuchi, Hideo; Herschlag, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Single molecule studies have expanded rapidly over the past decade and have the ability to provide an unprecedented level of understanding of biological systems. A common challenge upon introduction of novel, data-rich approaches is the management, processing, and analysis of the complex data sets that are generated. We provide a standardized approach for analyzing these data in the freely available software package SMART: Single Molecule Analysis Research Tool. SMART provides a format for organizing and easily accessing single molecule data, a general hidden Markov modeling algorithm for fitting an array of possible models specified by the user, a standardized data structure and graphical user interfaces to streamline the analysis and visualization of data. This approach guides experimental design, facilitating acquisition of the maximal information from single molecule experiments. SMART also provides a standardized format to allow dissemination of single molecule data and transparency in the analysis of reported data.

  19. Lattice diffusion of a single molecule in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Francesca; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2017-12-01

    The ability to trap a single molecule in an electrostatic potential well in solution has opened up new possibilities for the use of molecular electrical charge to study macromolecular conformation and dynamics at the level of the single entity. Here we study the diffusion of a single macromolecule in a two-dimensional lattice of electrostatic traps in solution. We report the ability to measure both the size and effective electrical charge of a macromolecule by observing single-molecule transport trajectories, typically a few seconds in length, using fluorescence microscopy. While, as shown previously, the time spent by the molecule in a trap is a strong function of its effective charge, we demonstrate here that the average travel time between traps in the landscape yields its hydrodynamic radius. Tailoring the pitch of the lattice thus yields two different experimentally measurable time scales that together uniquely determine both the size and charge of the molecule. Since no information is required on the location of the molecule between consecutive departure and arrival events at lattice sites, the technique is ideally suited to measurements on weakly emitting entities such as single molecules.

  20. Viruses and Tetraspanins: Lessons from Single Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmane, Selma; Rubinstein, Eric; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Tetraspanins are four-span membrane proteins that are widely distributed in multi-cellular organisms and involved in several infectious diseases. They have the unique property to form a network of protein-protein interaction within the plasma membrane, due to the lateral associations with one another and with other membrane proteins. Tracking tetraspanins at the single molecule level using fluorescence microscopy has revealed the membrane behavior of the tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 in epithelial cell lines, providing a first dynamic view of this network. Single molecule tracking highlighted that these 2 proteins can freely diffuse within the plasma membrane but can also be trapped, permanently or transiently, in tetraspanin-enriched areas. More recently, a similar strategy has been used to investigate tetraspanin membrane behavior in the context of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this review we summarize the main results emphasizing the relationship in terms of membrane partitioning between tetraspanins, some of their partners such as Claudin-1 and EWI-2, and viral proteins during infection. These results will be analyzed in the context of other membrane microdomains, stressing the difference between raft and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, but also in comparison with virus diffusion at the cell surface. New advanced single molecule techniques that could help to further explore tetraspanin assemblies will be also discussed. PMID:24800676

  1. Lattice diffusion of a single molecule in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Francesca; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2017-12-01

    The ability to trap a single molecule in an electrostatic potential well in solution has opened up new possibilities for the use of molecular electrical charge to study macromolecular conformation and dynamics at the level of the single entity. Here we study the diffusion of a single macromolecule in a two-dimensional lattice of electrostatic traps in solution. We report the ability to measure both the size and effective electrical charge of a macromolecule by observing single-molecule transport trajectories, typically a few seconds in length, using fluorescence microscopy. While, as shown previously, the time spent by the molecule in a trap is a strong function of its effective charge, we demonstrate here that the average travel time between traps in the landscape yields its hydrodynamic radius. Tailoring the pitch of the lattice thus yields two different experimentally measurable time scales that together uniquely determine both the size and charge of the molecule. Since no information is required on the location of the molecule between consecutive departure and arrival events at lattice sites, the technique is ideally suited to measurements on weakly emitting entities such as single molecules.

  2. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-molecule magnets: Iron lines up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Eckhard

    2013-07-01

    For more than a decade, single-molecule magnets have relied on multinuclear transition metal clusters and lanthanide compounds. Now, a mononuclear, two-coordinate iron(I) complex has shown that single transition metals can compete with the lanthanides when certain design principles from magnetochemistry are borne in mind.

  4. Single-molecule analysis using DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Arivazhagan; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-23

    During the last two decades, scientists have developed various methods that allow the detection and manipulation of single molecules, which have also been called "in singulo" approaches. Fundamental understanding of biochemical reactions, folding of biomolecules, and the screening of drugs were achieved by using these methods. Single-molecule analysis was also performed in the field of DNA nanotechnology, mainly by using atomic force microscopy. However, until recently, the approaches used commonly in nanotechnology adopted structures with a dimension of 10-20 nm, which is not suitable for many applications. The recent development of scaffolded DNA origami by Rothemund made it possible for the construction of larger defined assemblies. One of the most salient features of the origami method is the precise addressability of the structures formed: Each staple can serve as an attachment point for different kinds of nanoobjects. Thus, the method is suitable for the precise positioning of various functionalities and for the single-molecule analysis of many chemical and biochemical processes. Here we summarize recent progress in the area of single-molecule analysis using DNA origami and discuss the future directions of this research. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A novel lab-on-chip platform with integrated solid phase PCR and Supercritical Angle Fluorescence (SAF) microlens array for highly sensitive and multiplexed pathogen detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Tran Quang; Chin, Wai Hoe; Sun, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Solid-phase PCR (SP-PCR) has become increasingly popular for molecular diagnosis and there have been a few attempts to incorporate SP-PCR into lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. However, their applicability for on-line diagnosis is hindered by the lack of sensitive and portable on-chip optical detectio......-PCR and SAF microlens array allows for on-chip highly sensitive and multiplexed pathogen detection with low-cost and compact optical components. The LOC platform would be widely used as a high-throughput biosensor to analyze food, clinical and environmental samples.......Solid-phase PCR (SP-PCR) has become increasingly popular for molecular diagnosis and there have been a few attempts to incorporate SP-PCR into lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. However, their applicability for on-line diagnosis is hindered by the lack of sensitive and portable on-chip optical detection......-PCR directly on top of the SAF microlens array. Attribute to the high fluorescence collection efficiency of the SAF microlens array, the SP-PCR assay on the LOC platform demonstrated a high sensitivity of 1.6 copies/µL, comparable to off-chip detection using conventional laser scanner. The combination of SP...

  6. Single-Molecule FRET to Measure Conformational Dynamics of DNA Mismatch Repair Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, J W; LeBlanc, S; Hao, P; Qiu, R; Case, B C; Sakato, M; Hingorani, M M; Erie, D A; Weninger, K R

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule FRET measurements have a unique sensitivity to protein conformational dynamics. The FRET signals can either be interpreted quantitatively to provide estimates of absolute distance in a molecule configuration or can be qualitatively interpreted as distinct states, from which quantitative kinetic schemes for conformational transitions can be deduced. Here we describe methods utilizing single-molecule FRET to reveal the conformational dynamics of the proteins responsible for DNA mismatch repair. Experimental details about the proteins, DNA substrates, fluorescent labeling, and data analysis are included. The complementarity of single molecule and ensemble kinetic methods is discussed as well. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Central dogma at the single-molecule level in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gene-Wei; Xie, X Sunney

    2011-07-20

    Gene expression originates from individual DNA molecules within living cells. Like many single-molecule processes, gene expression and regulation are stochastic, that is, sporadic in time. This leads to heterogeneity in the messenger-RNA and protein copy numbers in a population of cells with identical genomes. With advanced single-cell fluorescence microscopy, it is now possible to quantify transcriptomes and proteomes with single-molecule sensitivity. Dynamic processes such as transcription-factor binding, transcription and translation can be monitored in real time, providing quantitative descriptions of the central dogma of molecular biology and the demonstration that a stochastic single-molecule event can determine the phenotype of a cell.

  8. Single Molecule Spectroscopy on Photosynthetic Pigment-Protein Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Jelezko, F; Schuler, S; Thews, E; Tietz, C; Wechsler, A; Wrachtrup, J

    2001-01-01

    Single molecule spectroscopy was applied to unravel the energy transfer pathway in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes. Detailed analysis of excitation and fluorescence emission spectra has been made for peripheral plant antenna LHC II and Photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Optical transitions of individual pigments were resolved under nonselective excitation of antenna chlorophylls. High-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy of individual plant antenna LHC II indicates that at low temperatures, the excitation energy is localized on the red-most Chl a pool absorbing at 680 nm. More than one pigment molecule is responsible for the fluorescence emission of the LHC II trimer. The spectral lines of single Chl a molecules absorbing at 675 nm are broadened because of the Foerster energy transfer towards the red-most pigments. Low-temperature spectroscopy on single PS I trimers indicates that two subgroups of pigments, which are present in the red antenna pool, differ by the strength of t...

  9. Single Molecule Nanoelectrochemistry in Electrical Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2016-11-15

    It is now possible to reliably measure single molecule conductance in a wide variety of environments including organic liquids, ultrahigh vacuum, water, ionic liquids, and electrolytes. The most commonly used methods deploy scanning probe microscopes, mechanically formed break junctions, or lithographically formed nanogap contacts. Molecules are generally captured between a pair of facing electrodes, and the junction current response is measured as a function of bias voltage. Gating electrodes can also be added so that the electrostatic potential at the molecular bridge can be independently controlled by this third noncontacting electrode. This can also be achieved in an electrolytic environment using a four-electrode bipotentiostatic configuration, which allows independent electrode potential control of the two contacting electrodes. This is commonly realized using an electrochemical STM and enables single molecule electrical characterization as a function of electrode potential and redox state of the molecular bridge. This has emerged as a powerful tool in modern interfacial electrochemistry and nanoelectrochemistry for studying charge transport across single molecules as a function of electrode potential and the electrolytic environments. Such measurements are possible in electrolytes ranging from aqueous buffers to nonaqueous ionic liquids. In this Account, we illustrate a number of examples of single molecule electrical measurements under electrode potential control use a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and demonstrate how these can help in the understanding of charge transport in single molecule junctions. Examples showing charge transport following phase coherent tunneling to incoherent charge hopping across redox active molecular bridges are shown. In the case of bipyridinium (or viologen) molecular wires, it is shown how electrochemical reduction leads to an increase of the single molecule conductance, which is controlled by the liquid electrochemical

  10. Spectrally Resolved and Functional Super-resolution Microscopy via Ultrahigh-Throughput Single-Molecule Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rui; Moon, Seonah; Kenny, Samuel J; Xu, Ke

    2018-02-14

    As an elegant integration of the spatial and temporal dimensions of single-molecule fluorescence, single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) overcomes the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of optical microscopy by localizing single molecules that stochastically switch between fluorescent and dark states over time. While this type of super-resolution microscopy (SRM) technique readily achieves remarkable spatial resolutions of ∼10 nm, it typically provides no spectral information. Meanwhile, current scanning-based single-location approaches for mapping the positions and spectra of single molecules are limited by low throughput and are difficult to apply to densely labeled (bio)samples. In this Account, we summarize the rationale, design, and results of our recent efforts toward the integration of the spectral dimension of single-molecule fluorescence with SMLM to achieve spectrally resolved SMLM (SR-SMLM) and functional SRM (f-SRM). By developing a wide-field scheme for spectral measurement and implementing single-molecule fluorescence on-off switching typical of SMLM, we first showed that in densely labeled (bio)samples it is possible to record the fluorescence spectra and positions of millions of single molecules synchronously within minutes, giving rise to ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy and SR-SMLM. This allowed us to first show statistically that for many dyes, single molecules of the same species exhibit near identical emission in fixed cells. This narrow distribution of emission wavelengths, which contrasts markedly with previous results at solid surfaces, allowed us to unambiguously identify single molecules of spectrally similar dyes. Crosstalk-free, multiplexed SRM was thus achieved for four dyes that were merely 10 nm apart in emission spectrum, with the three-dimensional SRM images of all four dyes being automatically aligned within one image channel. The ability to incorporate single-molecule fluorescence measurement with

  11. Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen the development of a number of novel biophysical methods that allow the manipulation and study of individual biomolecules. The ability to monitor biological processes at this fundamental level of sensitivity has given rise to an improved understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Through the removal of ensemble averaging, distributions and fluctuations of molecular properties can be characterized, transient intermediates identified, and catalytic mechanisms elucidated. By applying forces on biomolecules while monitoring their activity, important information can be obtained on how proteins couple function to structure. The Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics provides an introduction to these techniques and presents an extensive discussion of the new biological insights obtained from them. Coverage includes: Experimental techniques to monitor and manipulate individual biomolecules The use of single-molecule techniques in super-resolution and functional imaging Single-molec...

  12. Single-molecule Studies of Riboswitch Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinov, Andrew; Perez, Christian F.; Block, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    The folding dynamics of riboswitches are central to their ability to modulate gene expression in response to environmental cues. In most cases, a structural competition between the formation of a ligand-binding aptamer and an expression platform (or some other competing off-state) determines the regulatory outcome. Here, we review single-molecule studies of riboswitch folding and function, predominantly carried out using single-molecule FRET or optical trapping approaches. Recent results have supplied new insights into riboswitch folding energy landscapes, the mechanisms of ligand binding, the roles played by divalent ions, the applicability of hierarchical folding models, and kinetic vs. thermodynamic control schemes. We anticipate that future work, based on improved data sets and potentially combining multiple experimental techniques, will enable the development of more complete models for complex RNA folding processes. PMID:24727093

  13. Toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction triggered isothermal DNA amplification for highly sensitive and selective fluorescent detection of single-base mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Ding, Yongshun; Liu, Xingti; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-09-15

    Highly sensitive and selective detection strategy for single-base mutations is essential for risk assessment of malignancy and disease prognosis. In this work, a fluorescent detection method for single-base mutation was proposed based on high selectivity of toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (TSDR) and powerful signal amplification capability of isothermal DNA amplification. A discrimination probe was specially designed with a stem-loop structure and an overhanging toehold domain. Hybridization between the toehold domain and the perfect matched target initiated the TSDR along with the unfolding of the discrimination probe. Subsequently, the target sequence acted as a primer to initiate the polymerization and nicking reactions, which released a great abundant of short sequences. Finally, the released strands were annealed with the reporter probe, launching another polymerization and nicking reaction to produce lots of G-quadruplex DNA, which could bind the N-methyl mesoporphyrin IX to yield an enhanced fluorescence response. However, when there was even a single base mismatch in the target DNA, the TSDR was suppressed and so subsequent isothermal DNA amplification and fluorescence response process could not occur. The proposed approach has been successfully implemented for the identification of the single-base mutant sequences in the human KRAS gene with a detection limit of 1.8 pM. Furthermore, a recovery of 90% was obtained when detecting the target sequence in spiked HeLa cells lysate, demonstrating the feasibility of this detection strategy for single-base mutations in biological samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Single-Molecule Imaging of GPCR Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calebiro, Davide; Sungkaworn, Titiwat

    2018-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and are of great interest as pharmacological targets. Although the occurrence of GPCR signaling nanodomains has long been hypothesized based on indirect evidence, this and other fundamental aspects of GPCR signaling have been difficult to prove. The advent of single-molecule microscopy methods, which allow direct visualization of individual membrane proteins with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution, provides unique opportunities to address several of these open questions. Indeed, recent single-molecule studies have revealed that GPCRs and G proteins transiently interact with each other as well as with structural components of the plasma membrane, leading to the formation of dynamic complexes and 'hot spots' for GPCR signaling. Whereas we are only beginning to understand the implications of this unexpected level of complexity, single-molecule approaches are likely to play a crucial role to further dissect the protein-protein interactions that are at the heart of GPCR signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  16. Two-Color Single-Molecule Tracking in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänselmann, Siegfried; Herten, Dirk-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Measuring the kinetics of protein-protein interactions between molecules in the plasma membrane of live cells provides valuable information for understanding dynamic processes, like cellular signaling, on a molecular scale. Two-color single-molecule tracking is a fluorescence microscopy-based method to detect and quantify specific protein-protein interactions on a single-event level, providing sensitivity to heterogeneities and rare events. Fundamentally, it allows following the movement of single molecules of two different protein species in live cells with a localization precision beyond the diffraction limit of light in real time. It hence provides information about the diffusion behavior of every protein as well as about their dimerization kinetics. Here, we describe all the necessary steps to obtain two-color tracking data of plasma membrane-associated proteins in live cells using SNAP-tag and HaloTag fusion constructs and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Also, we outline the main steps needed for analyzing the recorded data.

  17. Direct spectroscopic observation of quantum jumps of a single molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basché, Th.; Kummer, S.; Bräuchle, C.

    1995-01-01

    BOHR'S notion of quantum jumps between electronic states of an excited atom has now been demonstrated experimentally for single ions confined in radio-frequency traps and interacting with a driving laser field1-3. In these experiments the fluorescence of a strongly allowed transition was shown to cease abruptly when the ion jumped into a metastable state which was coupled to the common electronic ground state by a weak radiative transition. But attempts to monitor quantum jumps of single molecules have been hampered by the fact that the lifetime of the metastable triplet state was too short in relation to the photon detection rate. By using a system with favourable photophysical parameters-terrylene doped into p-terphenyl crystals4-we have now been able to observe directly quantum jumps between electronic states of single terrylene molecules. In contrast to single atoms, here the quantum jumps occur as non-radiative transitions between states of different multiplicity, and are manifested as interruptions of the fluorescence signal. These results demonstrate how single-molecule spectros-copy can reveal truly quantum-mechanical effects in large polyatomic molecules.

  18. An aptamer-based effective method for highly sensitive detection of chloramphenicol residues in animal-sourced food using real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ye; Wang, Lihui; Gao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huishan; Zhang, Hexiao; Li, Hao

    2017-04-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) residues can not only harm human health through entering food chain, but also cause the spreading of drug-resistant bacteria, thereby leading to secondary environmental pollution. Therefore, it is in urgent need of establishing an efficient technology to detect CAP residues in animal-sourced food. In this study, a novel sensitive approach for detection of CAP was designed based on a CAP specific aptamer and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). The CAP specific aptamer was firstly hybridized with a biotin modified complementary probe, and then was immobilized on streptavidin conjugated magnetic beads through biotin. When CAP was added, the aptamer would specifically bind with CAP by forming a hairpin structure and be released from the magnetic beads for CAP detection by qRT-PCR. Factors (i.e., probe strand length, aptamer concentration, NaCl concentration and incubation time) that would influence the determination accuracy of this aptamer-based detection system were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the present detection system exhibited a high sensitivity toward CAP with a limit of detection of 0.1ng/mL (linear range from 0.1 to 20ng/mL). Moreover, this detection system also showed high selectivity against thiamphenicol (TAP) and florfenicol (FF), which are CAP's structure analogs. Eventually, this detection system was applied for detecting CAP in real spiked milk. The recovery rate of CAP from spiked milk samples ranged from 94.0-102.0%. These results indicated this developed detection system a promising high sensitive and specific method of CAP residues detection in animal-sourced food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single-molecule

  20. A Single Molecule Investigation of the Photostability of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Kulatunga, Pasad; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are very attractive probes for multi-color fluorescence applications. We report here however that single QDs that are subject to continuous blue excitation from a 100W mercury arc lamp will undergo a continuous blue-switching of the emission wavelength eventually reaching a per...... is especially detrimental for multi-color single molecule applications, as we regularly observe spectral blue-shifts of 50 nm, or more even after only ten seconds of illumination.......Quantum dots (QDs) are very attractive probes for multi-color fluorescence applications. We report here however that single QDs that are subject to continuous blue excitation from a 100W mercury arc lamp will undergo a continuous blue-switching of the emission wavelength eventually reaching...

  1. DNA Y structure: a versatile, multidimensional single molecule assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, James T; Smith, Benjamin Y; Hall, Michael A; Forties, Robert A; Jin, Jing; Sethna, James P; Wang, Michelle D

    2014-11-12

    Optical trapping is a powerful single molecule technique used to study dynamic biomolecular events, especially those involving DNA and DNA-binding proteins. Current implementations usually involve only one of stretching, unzipping, or twisting DNA along one dimension. To expand the capabilities of optical trapping for more complex measurements would require a multidimensional technique that combines all of these manipulations in a single experiment. Here, we report the development and utilization of such a novel optical trapping assay based on a three-branch DNA construct, termed a "Y structure". This multidimensional assay allows precise, real-time tracking of multiple configurational changes. When the Y structure template is unzipped under both force and torque, the force and extension of all three branches can be determined simultaneously. Moreover, the assay is readily compatible with fluorescence, as demonstrated by unzipping through a fluorescently labeled, paused transcription complex. This novel assay thus allows for the visualization and precision mapping of complex interactions of biomechanical events.

  2. Lipid mobility in supported lipid bilayers by single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohram, Maryam; Shi, Xiaojun; Smith, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Phospholipid bilayers are the main component of cell membranes and their interaction with biomolecules in their immediate environment is critical for cellular functions. These interactions include the binding of polycationic polymers to lipid bilayers which affects many cell membrane events. As an alternative method of studying live cell membranes, we assemble a supported lipid bilayer and investigate its binding with polycationic polymers in vitro by fluorescently labeling the molecules of the supported lipid bilayer and tracking their mobility. In this work, we use single molecule tracking total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to study phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids with and without an adsorbed polycationic polymer, quaternized polyvinylpyridine (QPVP). Individual molecular trajectories are obtained from the experiment, and a Brownian diffusion model is used to determine diffusion coefficients through mean square displacements. Our results indicate a smaller diffusion coefficient for the supported lipid bilayers in the presence of QPVP in comparison to its absence, revealing that their binding causes a decrease in lateral mobility.

  3. Tungsten disulfide nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA glycosylase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jingjin; Ma, Yefei [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources of Education Ministry, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, 541004 (China); Kong, Rongmei [The Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qufu Normal University, Qufu, Shandong 273165 (China); Zhang, Liangliang, E-mail: liangzhang319@163.com [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources of Education Ministry, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, 541004 (China); Yang, Wen; Zhao, Shulin [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources of Education Ministry, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, 541004 (China)

    2015-08-05

    Herein, we introduced a tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanosheet and exonuclease III (Exo III) co-assisted signal amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescent polarization (FP) assay of DNA glycosylase activity. Two DNA glycosylases, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), were tested. A hairpin-structured probe (HP) which contained damaged bases in the stem was used as the substrate. The removal of damaged bases from substrate by DNA glycosylase would lower the melting temperature of HP. The HP was then opened and hybridized with a FAM dye-labeled single strand DNA (DP), generating a duplex with a recessed 3′-terminal of DP. This design facilitated the Exo III-assisted amplification by repeating the hybridization and digestion of DP, liberating numerous FAM fluorophores which could not be adsorbed on WS{sub 2} nanosheet. Thus, the final system exhibited a small FP signal. However, in the absence of DNA glycosylases, no hybridization between DP and HP was occurred, hampering the hydrolysis of DP by Exo III. The intact DP was then adsorbed on the surface of WS{sub 2} nanosheet that greatly amplified the mass of the labeled-FAM fluorophore, resulting in a large FP value. With the co-assisted amplification strategy, the sensitivity was substantially improved. In addition, this method was applied to detect UDG activity in cell extracts. The study of the inhibition of UDG was also performed. Furthermore, this method is simple in design, easy in implementation, and selective, which holds potential applications in the DNA glycosylase related mechanism research and molecular diagnostics. - Highlights: • A fluorescence polarization strategy for DNA glycosylase activity detection was developed. • The present method was based on WS{sub 2} nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted signal amplification. • A high sensitivity and desirable selectivity were achieved. • This method provides a promising universal platform for DNA

  4. High-resolution and high sensitivity mesoscopic fluorescence tomography based on de-scanning EMCCD: System design and thick tissue imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mehmet Saadeddin

    Optical microscopy has been one of the essential tools for biological studies for decades, however, its application areas was limited to superficial investigation due to strong scattering in live tissues. Even though advanced techniques such as confocal or multiphoton methods have been recently developed to penetrate beyond a few hundreds of microns deep in tissues, they still cannot perform in the mesoscopic regime (millimeter scale) without using destructive sample preparation protocols such as clearing techniques. They provide rich cellular information; however, they cannot be readily employed to investigate the biological processes at larger scales. Herein, we will present our effort to establish a novel imaging approach that can quantify molecular expression in intact tissues, well beyond the current microscopy depth limits. Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (MFMT) is an emerging imaging modality that offers unique potential for the non-invasive molecular assessment of thick in-vitro and in-vivo live tissues. This novel imaging modality is based on an optical inverse problem that allows for retrieval of the quantitative spatial distribution of fluorescent tagged bio-markers at millimeter depth. MFMT is well-suited for in-vivo subsurface tissue imaging and thick bio-printed specimens due to its high sensitivity and fast acquisition times, as well as relatively large fields of view. Herein, we will first demonstrate the potential of this technique using our first generation MFMT system applied to multiplexed reporter gene imaging (in-vitro) and determination of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) agent bio-distribution in a mouse model (in-vivo). Second, we will present the design rationale, in silico benchmarking, and experimental validation of a second generation MFMT (2GMFMT) system. We will demonstrate the gain in resolution and sensitivity achieved due to the de-scanned dense detector configuration implemented. The potential of this novel platform will be

  5. Biological Nanopores: Confined Spaces for Electrochemical Single-Molecule Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2018-02-20

    Nanopore sensing is developing into a powerful single-molecule approach to investigate the features of biomolecules that are not accessible by studying ensemble systems. When a target molecule is transported through a nanopore, the ions occupying the pore are excluded, resulting in an electrical signal from the intermittent ionic blockade event. By statistical analysis of the amplitudes, duration, frequencies, and shapes of the blockade events, many properties of the target molecule can be obtained in real time at the single-molecule level, including its size, conformation, structure, charge, geometry, and interactions with other molecules. With the development of the use of α-hemolysin to characterize individual polynucleotides, nanopore technology has attracted a wide range of research interest in the fields of biology, physics, chemistry, and nanoscience. As a powerful single-molecule analytical method, nanopore technology has been applied for the detection of various biomolecules, including oligonucleotides, peptides, oligosaccharides, organic molecules, and disease-related proteins. In this Account, we highlight recent developments of biological nanopores in DNA-based sensing and in studying the conformational structures of DNA and RNA. Furthermore, we introduce the application of biological nanopores to investigate the conformations of peptides affected by charge, length, and dipole moment and to study disease-related proteins' structures and aggregation transitions influenced by an inhibitor, a promoter, or an applied voltage. To improve the sensing ability of biological nanopores and further extend their application to a wider range of molecular sensing, we focus on exploring novel biological nanopores, such as aerolysin and Stable Protein 1. Aerolysin exhibits an especially high sensitivity for the detection of single oligonucleotides both in current separation and duration. Finally, to facilitate the use of nanopore measurements and statistical analysis

  6. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Efficient use of single molecule time traces to resolve kinetic rates, models and uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Sonja; Hugel, Thorsten

    2018-03-01

    Single molecule time traces reveal the time evolution of unsynchronized kinetic systems. Especially single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) provides access to enzymatically important time scales, combined with molecular distance resolution and minimal interference with the sample. Yet the kinetic analysis of smFRET time traces is complicated by experimental shortcomings—such as photo-bleaching and noise. Here we recapitulate the fundamental limits of single molecule fluorescence that render the classic, dwell-time based kinetic analysis unsuitable. In contrast, our Single Molecule Analysis of Complex Kinetic Sequences (SMACKS) considers every data point and combines the information of many short traces in one global kinetic rate model. We demonstrate the potential of SMACKS by resolving the small kinetic effects caused by different ionic strengths in the chaperone protein Hsp90. These results show an unexpected interrelation between conformational dynamics and ATPase activity in Hsp90.

  8. Single-molecule pull-down for investigating protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareh, Mohamed; Loeff, Luuk; Szczepaniak, Malwina; Haagsma, Anna C; Yeom, Kyu-Hyeon; Joo, Chirlmin

    2016-08-01

    The genome and transcriptome are constantly modified by proteins in the cell. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques allow for high spatial and temporal observations of these interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining functional protein complexes, it remains challenging to study the interactions between macromolecular protein complexes and nucleic acids. Here, we combined single-molecule fluorescence with various protein complex pull-down techniques to determine the function and stoichiometry of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Through the use of three examples of protein complexes from eukaryotic cells (Drosha, Dicer, and TUT4 protein complexes), we provide step-by-step guidance for using novel single-molecule techniques. Our single-molecule methods provide sub-second and nanometer resolution and can be applied to other nucleoprotein complexes that are essential for cellular processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  10. Single molecule characterization of DNA binding and strand displacement reactions on lithographic DNA origami microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheible, Max B; Pardatscher, Günther; Kuzyk, Anton; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-03-12

    The combination of molecular self-assembly based on the DNA origami technique with lithographic patterning enables the creation of hierarchically ordered nanosystems, in which single molecules are positioned at precise locations on multiple length scales. Based on a hybrid assembly protocol utilizing DNA self-assembly and electron-beam lithography on transparent glass substrates, we here demonstrate a DNA origami microarray, which is compatible with the requirements of single molecule fluorescence and super-resolution microscopy. The spatial arrangement allows for a simple and reliable identification of single molecule events and facilitates automated read-out and data analysis. As a specific application, we utilize the microarray to characterize the performance of DNA strand displacement reactions localized on the DNA origami structures. We find considerable variability within the array, which results both from structural variations and stochastic reaction dynamics prevalent at the single molecule level.

  11. Electrons, photons, and force: quantitative single-molecule measurements from physics to biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claridge, Shelley A; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Weiss, Paul S

    2011-02-22

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution.

  12. High sensitive and high temporal and spatial resolved image of reactive species in atmospheric pressure surface discharge reactor by laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Feng, Chun-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Ding, Hongbin

    2017-05-01

    The current paucity of spatial and temporal characterization of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) concentration has been a major hurdle to the advancement and clinical translation of low temperature atmospheric plasmas. In this study, an advanced laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to be an effective antibacterial surface discharge reactor for the diagnosis of RONS, where the highest spatial and temporal resolution of the LIF system has been achieved to ˜100 μm scale and ˜20 ns scale, respectively. Measurements on an oxidative OH radical have been carried out as typical RONS for the benchmark of the whole LIF system, where absolute number density calibration has been performed on the basis of the laser Rayleigh scattering method. Requirements for pixel resolved spatial distribution and outer plasma region detection become challenging tasks due to the low RONS concentration (˜ppb level) and strong interference, especially the discharge induced emission and pulsed laser induced stray light. In order to design the highly sensitive LIF system, a self-developed fluorescence telescope, the optimization of high precision synchronization among a tunable pulsed laser, a surface discharge generator, intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera, and an oscilloscope have been performed. Moreover, an image BOXCAR approach has been developed to remarkably improve the sensitivity of the whole LIF system by optimizing spatial and temporal gating functions via both hardware and software, which has been integrated into our automatic control and data acquisition system on the LabVIEW platform. In addition, a reciprocation averaging measurement has been applied to verify the accuracy of the whole LIF detecting system, indicating the relative standard deviation of ˜3%.

  13. Deep learning for single-molecule science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Slabaugh, Gregory; Alonso, Eduardo; Al-Arif, SM Masudur R.

    2017-10-01

    Exploring and making predictions based on single-molecule data can be challenging, not only due to the sheer size of the datasets, but also because a priori knowledge about the signal characteristics is typically limited and poor signal-to-noise ratio. For example, hypothesis-driven data exploration, informed by an expectation of the signal characteristics, can lead to interpretation bias or loss of information. Equally, even when the different data categories are known, e.g., the four bases in DNA sequencing, it is often difficult to know how to make best use of the available information content. The latest developments in machine learning (ML), so-called deep learning (DL) offer interesting, new avenues to address such challenges. In some applications, such as speech and image recognition, DL has been able to outperform conventional ML strategies and even human performance. However, to date DL has not been applied much in single-molecule science, presumably in part because relatively little is known about the ‘internal workings’ of such DL tools within single-molecule science as a field. In this Tutorial, we make an attempt to illustrate in a step-by-step guide how one of those, a convolutional neural network (CNN), may be used for base calling in DNA sequencing applications. We compare it with a SVM as a more conventional ML method, and discuss some of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. In particular, a ‘deep’ neural network has many features of a ‘black box’, which has important implications on how we look at and interpret data.

  14. Tackling the single molecule counting problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressé, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions - that give rise to spatiotemporal organization in the cell - are the basis for most biological information processing and cellular control. Quantitatively understanding these interactions is an essential prerequisite for developing mechanistic models of cell biology. However, there is currently no routine answer to ``how many proteins of type X are in this complex?'' in living cells. Here we discuss methods developed in our group (Geoff Rollins, Kostas Tsekouras) for tackling this ``single molecule counting problem'' starting from photobleaching data and data from a superresolution microscopy technique called PALM (PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy). We gratefully acknowledge the NSF (MCB-1412259)

  15. Transport mirages in single-molecule devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudenzi, R.; Misiorny, M.; Burzurí, E.; Wegewijs, M. R.; van der Zant, H. S. J.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular systems can exhibit a complex, chemically tailorable inner structure which allows for targeting of specific mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. At the single-molecule level, two major complementary ways to explore these properties are molecular quantum-dot structures and scanning probes. This article outlines comprehensive principles of electron-transport spectroscopy relevant to both these approaches and presents a new, high-resolution experiment on a high-spin single-molecule junction exemplifying these principles. Such spectroscopy plays a key role in further advancing our understanding of molecular and atomic systems, in particular, the relaxation of their spin. In this joint experimental and theoretical analysis, particular focus is put on the crossover between the resonant regime [single-electron tunneling] and the off-resonant regime [inelastic electron (co)tunneling spectroscopy (IETS)]. We show that the interplay of these two processes leads to unexpected mirages of resonances not captured by either of the two pictures alone. Although this turns out to be important in a large fraction of the possible regimes of level positions and bias voltages, it has been given little attention in molecular transport studies. Combined with nonequilibrium IETS—four-electron pump-probe excitations—these mirages provide crucial information on the relaxation of spin excitations. Our encompassing physical picture is supported by a master-equation approach that goes beyond weak coupling. The present work encourages the development of a broader connection between the fields of molecular quantum-dot and scanning probe spectroscopy.

  16. Single molecule transcription factor dynamics in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzacq, Xavier

    During early development in the Drosophila embryo, cell fates are determined over the course of just 2 hours with exquisite spatio-temoral precision. One of the key regulators of this process is the transcription factor Bicoid which forms a concentration gradient across the long axis of the embryo. Although Bicoids' primary role is activation at the anterior, where concentrations are highest, it is also known to play a role in the posterior where there are only 100s of molecules per nucleus. Understanding how Bicoid can find its target at such low concentrations has remained intractable, largely due to the inability to perform single molecule imaging in the context of the developing embryo. Here we use lattice light sheet microscopy to overcome the technical barriers of sample thickness and auto-fluorescence to characterize the single molecule dynamics of Bicoid. We find that off-rates do not vary across the embryo and that instead the on-rates are modulated through the formation of clusters that enrich local concentration. This data is contrary to the current concentration dependent model of Bicoid function since local concentration within the nucleus is now a regulated parameter and suggests a previously unknown mechanism for regulation at extremely low concentrations.

  17. Dual-Colored DNA Comb Polymers for Single Molecule Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Danielle; Marciel, Amanda; Schroeder, Charles

    2014-03-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of branched biopolymers for single molecule rheology. In our work, we utilize a hybrid enzymatic-synthetic approach to graft ``short'' DNA branches to ``long'' DNA backbones, thereby producing macromolecular DNA comb polymers. The branches and backbones are synthesized via polymerase chain reaction with chemically modified deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs): ``short'' branches consist of Cy5-labeled dNTPs and a terminal azide group, and ``long'' backbones contain dibenzylcyclooctyne-modified (DBCO) dNTPs. In this way, we utilize strain-promoted, copper-free cycloaddition ``click'' reactions for facile grafting of azide-terminated branches at DBCO sites along backbones. Copper-free click reactions are bio-orthogonal and nearly quantitative when carried out under mild conditions. Moreover, comb polymers can be labeled with an intercalating dye (e.g., YOYO) for dual-color fluorescence imaging. We characterized these materials using gel electrophoresis, HPLC, and optical microscopy, with atomic force microscopy in progress. Overall, DNA combs are suitable for single molecule dynamics, and in this way, our work holds the potential to improve our understanding of topologically complex polymer melts and solutions.

  18. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Albertstrasse 23a, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Domingo, M.P. [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Miguel Luesma 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Pardo, Julian [Grupo Apoptosis, Inmunidad y Cancer, Departamento Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular y Celular, Fac. Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Fundacion Aragon I-D (ARAID), Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain); Immune Effector Cells Group, Aragon Health Research Institute (IIS Aragon), Biomedical Research Centre of Aragon (CIBA) Fundacion Aragon I-D - ARAID, Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain); Graeber, P. [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Albertstrasse 23a, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Galvez, E.M., E-mail: eva@icb.csic.es [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Miguel Luesma 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Immune Effector Cells Group, Aragon Health Research Institute (IIS Aragon), Biomedical Research Centre of Aragon (CIBA) Fundacion Aragon I-D - ARAID, Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is possible to eliminate the blinking effect of a water-soluble QD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a direct method to study protein function and dynamics at the single level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QD, potent tool for single molecule studies of biochemical and biological processes. -- Abstract: Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the 'on'/'off' states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  19. Hydrogel Droplet Microfluidics for High-Throughput Single Molecule/Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2017-01-17

    Heterogeneity among individual molecules and cells has posed significant challenges to traditional bulk assays, due to the assumption of average behavior, which would lose important biological information in heterogeneity and result in a misleading interpretation. Single molecule/cell analysis has become an important and emerging field in biological and biomedical research for insights into heterogeneity between large populations at high resolution. Compared with the ensemble bulk method, single molecule/cell analysis explores the information on time trajectories, conformational states, and interactions of individual molecules/cells, all key factors in the study of chemical and biological reaction pathways. Various powerful techniques have been developed for single molecule/cell analysis, including flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy, optical and magnetic tweezers, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and so forth. However, some of them have the low-throughput issue that has to analyze single molecules/cells one by one. Flow cytometry is a widely used high-throughput technique for single cell analysis but lacks the ability for intercellular interaction study and local environment control. Droplet microfluidics becomes attractive for single molecule/cell manipulation because single molecules/cells can be individually encased in monodisperse microdroplets, allowing high-throughput analysis and manipulation with precise control of the local environment. Moreover, hydrogels, cross-linked polymer networks that swell in the presence of water, have been introduced into droplet microfluidic systems as hydrogel droplet microfluidics. By replacing an aqueous phase with a monomer or polymer solution, hydrogel droplets can be generated on microfluidic chips for encapsulation of single molecules/cells according to the Poisson distribution. The sol-gel transition property endows the hydrogel droplets with new functionalities and diversified applications in single

  20. Imaging Live Cells at the Nanometer-Scale with Single-Molecule Microscopy: Obstacles and Achievements in Experiment Optimization for Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Beth L.; Matson, Jyl S.; DiRita, Victor J.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy enables biological investigations inside living cells to achieve millisecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Although single-molecule-based methods are becoming increasingly accessible to non-experts, optimizing new single-molecule experiments can be challenging, in particular when super-resolution imaging and tracking are applied to live cells. In this review, we summarize common obstacles to live-cell single-molecule microscopy and describe the methods we have developed and applied to overcome these challenges in live bacteria. We examine the choice of fluorophore and labeling scheme, approaches to achieving single-molecule levels of fluorescence, considerations for maintaining cell viability, and strategies for detecting single-molecule signals in the presence of noise and sample drift. We also discuss methods for analyzing single-molecule trajectories and the challenges presented by the finite size of a bacterial cell and the curvature of the bacterial membrane. PMID:25123183

  1. PREFACE: Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Nongjian

    2012-04-01

    This special section of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM) is dedicated to Professor Stuart M Lindsay on the occasion of his 60th birthday and in recognition of his outstanding contributions to multiple research areas, including light scattering spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, biophysics, solid-liquid interfaces and molecular and nanoelectronics. It contains a collection of 14 papers in some of these areas, including a feature article by Lindsay. Each paper was subject to the normal rigorous review process of JPCM. In Lindsay's paper, he discusses the next generations of hybrid chemical-CMOS devices for low cost and personalized medical diagnosis. The discussion leads to several papers on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. Kawaguchi et al report on the detection of single pollen allergen particles using electrode embedded microchannels. Stern et al describe a structural study of three-dimensional DNA-nanoparticle assemblies. Hihath et al measure the conductance of methylated DNA, and discuss the possibility of electrical detection DNA methylation. Portillo et al study the electrostatic effects on the aggregation of prion proteins and peptides with atomic force microscopy. In an effort to understand the interactions between nanostructures and cells, Lamprecht et al report on the mapping of the intracellular distribution of carbon nanotubes with a confocal Raman imaging technique, and Wang et al focus on the intracellular delivery of gold nanoparticles using fluorescence microscopy. Park and Kristic provide theoretical analysis of micro- and nano-traps and their biological applications. This section also features several papers on the fundamentals of electron transport in single atomic wires and molecular junctions. The papers by Xu et al and by Wandlowksi et al describe new methods to measure conductance and forces in single molecule junctions and metallic atomic wires. Scullion et al report on the conductance of molecules with similar

  2. Synthesis and photophysics of core-substituted naphthalene diimides: fluorophores for single molecule applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Toby D M; Yap, Sheryll; Jani, Chintan H; Bhosale, Sheshanath V; Hofkens, Johan; De Schryver, Frans C; Langford, Steven J; Ghiggino, Kenneth P

    2009-10-05

    The synthesis and photophysics of two new aminopropenyl naphthalene diimide (SANDI) dyes are reported. A general and convenient method for the synthesis of the precursor mono-, di-, and tetrabrominated 1,4,5,8-naphthalene tetracarboxylic dianhydrides is described. The two core-substituted SANDIs exhibit many of the photophysical properties required for fluorescence labeling applications including high photostability and high fluorescence quantum yields (>0.5) in the visible region of the spectrum. The emission wavelength is sensitive to the number of substituents on the NDI core, and the fluorescence decay times are in the range of approximately 8-12 ns for both compounds in the solvents investigated. Preliminary fluorescence emission data from single molecules of the compounds embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate) films are also reported and show that single molecules have very low yields of photobleaching, particularly the di-substituted system. Furthermore, only a small proportion (<10 %) of the single molecules studied display fluorescence intermittencies or "blinks" in their photon trajectory. The compounds appear to be excellent candidates for applications at the single molecule level, for example, as FRET labels.

  3. Single-molecule three-color FRET with both negligible spectral overlap and long observation time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghwa Lee

    Full Text Available Full understanding of complex biological interactions frequently requires multi-color detection capability in doing single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments. Existing single-molecule three-color FRET techniques, however, suffer from severe photobleaching of Alexa 488, or its alternative dyes, and have been limitedly used for kinetics studies. In this work, we developed a single-molecule three-color FRET technique based on the Cy3-Cy5-Cy7 dye trio, thus providing enhanced observation time and improved data quality. Because the absorption spectra of three fluorophores are well separated, real-time monitoring of three FRET efficiencies was possible by incorporating the alternating laser excitation (ALEX technique both in confocal microscopy and in total-internal-reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy.

  4. Extracting physics of life at the molecular level: A review of single-molecule data analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomb, Warren; Sarkar, Susanta K

    2015-06-01

    Studying individual biomolecules at the single-molecule level has proved very insightful recently. Single-molecule experiments allow us to probe both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties as well as make quantitative connections with ensemble experiments and equilibrium thermodynamics. However, it is important to be careful about the analysis of single-molecule data because of the noise present and the lack of theoretical framework for processes far away from equilibrium. Biomolecular motion, whether it is free in solution, on a substrate, or under force, involves thermal fluctuations in varying degrees, which makes the motion noisy. In addition, the noise from the experimental setup makes it even more complex. The details of biologically relevant interactions, conformational dynamics, and activities are hidden in the noisy single-molecule data. As such, extracting biological insights from noisy data is still an active area of research. In this review, we will focus on analyzing both fluorescence-based and force-based single-molecule experiments and gaining biological insights at the single-molecule level. Inherently nonequilibrium nature of biological processes will be highlighted. Simulated trajectories of biomolecular diffusion will be used to compare and validate various analysis techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Highly Sensitive FRET-Based Fluorescence Immunoassay for Detecting of Aflatoxin B1 Using Magnetic/Silica Core-Shell as a Signal Intensifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalarestaghi, Alireza; Bayat, Mansour; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal; Razavilar, Vadood

    2015-09-01

    Recently, some new nanobiosensors using different nanoparticles or microarray systems for detection of mycotoxins have been designed . However, rapid, sensitive and early detection of aflatoxicosis would be very helpful to distinguish high-risk persons. We report a highly sensitive competitive immunoassay using magnetic/silica core shell as a signal intensifier for the determination of aflatoxin B1 using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Cd/Te quantum dots (antiaflatoxin B1 antibody immobilized on the surface of Cd/Te quantum dots) to Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123-labeled aflatoxin B1 bound to albumin). The specific immune-reaction between the anti-aflatoxin B1 antibody on the QDs and the labeledaflatoxin B1 brings the Rho 123 fluorophore (acting as the acceptor) and the QDs (acting as the donor) in close spatial proximity and causes FRET to occur upon photo-excitation of the QDs. Using magnetic/silica core shell to intensify the obtained signal is the novelty of this study. Cd/Te QDs were synthesized by the simultaneous reduction of cadmium chloride and tellurium in the presence of sodium borohydride under nitrogen atmosphere. Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized using FeSO4 and FeCl3 (1:2 molar ratio) and ammonia as an oxidizing agent under nitrogen atmosphere. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles shelled by silica using tetraethoxysilane in the presence of ammonia. Nanoparticles synthesis and monodispersity confirmed by TEM. Immobilization of Cd/Te QDs to antibodies and labeling of aflatoxin B1-albumin by Rho 123 were performed by EDC/NHS reaction in reaction mixture buffer, pH 6, at room temperature. By using the magnetic/silica core shell sensitivity of the system changed from 2×10-11 in our previous study to 2×10-12 in this work. The feasibility of the method established by the detection of aflatoxin B1 in spiked human serum. There is a linear relationship between the decreased fluorescence intensity of Rho 123 with increasing concentration of

  6. Single molecule interactions in biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tessmer, I

    2002-01-01

    The interactions of biological molecules are traditionally investigated using ensemble techniques. These provide information on the molecular behaviour based on averaged data resulting from collective ensemble properties. While this has enabled the resolution of structure and function of many proteins and other biomolecules, an understanding of how and why the molecules go about structural changes and modulate inter- and intra-molecular interactions is difficult to gain using these approaches. More recently, single molecule techniques have evolved. These allow us to follow the behaviour of the individual molecules over time and/or under changing conditions. From such data, subtle molecular changes can be resolved without the need to synchronise the system. Further, variations within a biological system can be detected which would be lost using the ensemble techniques, due to the concomitant averaging procedures. This is exploited to help understand the molecular procedures involved. In this thesis, the applic...

  7. Theory of single molecule emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel, Golan, E-mail: bel@bgu.ac.il [Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus 84990 (Israel); Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Brown, Frank L. H., E-mail: flbrown@chem.ucsb.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    A general theory and calculation framework for the prediction of frequency-resolved single molecule photon counting statistics is presented. Expressions for the generating function of photon counts are derived, both for the case of naive “detection” based solely on photon emission from the molecule and also for experimentally realizable detection of emitted photons, and are used to explicitly calculate low-order photon-counting moments. The two cases of naive detection versus physical detection are compared to one another and it is demonstrated that the physical detection scheme resolves certain inconsistencies predicted via the naive detection approach. Applications to two different models for molecular dynamics are considered: a simple two-level system and a two-level absorber subject to spectral diffusion.

  8. Synergizing superresolution optical fluctuation imaging with single molecule localization microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schidorsky, Shachar; Razvag, Yair; Golan, Yonatan; Weiss, Shimon; Sherman, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) techniques enable imaging biological samples well beyond the diffraction limit of light, but they vary significantly in their spatial and temporal resolutions. High-order statistical analysis of temporal fluctuations as in superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) also enable imaging beyond diffraction limit, but usually at a lower resolution as compared to SMLM. Since the same data format is acquired for both methods, their algorithms can be applied to the same data set, and thus may be combined synergistically to improve overall imaging performance. Here, we find that SOFI converges much faster than SMLM, provides additive information to SMLM, and can efficiently reject background. We then show how SOFI-assisted SMLM imaging can improve SMLM image reconstruction by rejecting common sources of background, especially under low signal-to-background conditions. The performance of our approach was evaluated using a realistic simulation of fluorescence imagi...

  9. SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY, 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27-JULY 2, 2010, ITALY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor William Moerner

    2010-07-09

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Single-Molecule Approaches to Biology focuses on cutting-edge research in single-molecule science. Tremendous technical developments have made it possible to detect, identify, track, and manipulate single biomolecules in an ambient environment or even in a live cell. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are addressed, and new knowledge derived from these approaches continues to emerge. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of biomolecular machines: what they do, how they work individually, how they work together, and finally, how they work inside live cells. The burgeoning use of single-molecule methods to elucidate biological problems is a highly multidisciplinary pursuit, involving both force- and fluorescence-based methods, the most up-to-date advances in microscopy, innovative biological and chemical approaches, and nanotechnology tools. This conference seeks to bring together top experts in molecular and cell biology with innovators in the measurement and manipulation of single molecules, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and to exchange ideas with leaders in the field. A number of excellent poster presenters will be selected for short oral talks. Topics as diverse as single-molecule sequencing, DNA/RNA/protein interactions, folding machines, cellular biophysics, synthetic biology and bioengineering, force spectroscopy, new method developments, superresolution imaging in cells, and novel probes for single-molecule imaging will be on the program. Additionally, the collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings in the beauty of the Il Ciocco site in

  10. Next-Generation DNA Curtains for Single-Molecule Studies of Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soniat, Michael M; Myler, Logan R; Schaub, Jeffrey M; Kim, Yoori; Gallardo, Ignacio F; Finkelstein, Ilya J

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a universally conserved DNA double-strand break repair pathway. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging approaches have revealed new mechanistic insights into nearly all aspects of HR. These methods are especially suited for studying protein complexes because multicolor fluorescent imaging can parse out subassemblies and transient intermediates that associate with the DNA substrates on the millisecond to hour timescales. However, acquiring single-molecule datasets remains challenging because most of these approaches are designed to measure one molecular reaction at a time. The DNA curtains platform facilitates high-throughput single-molecule imaging by organizing arrays of DNA molecules on the surface of a microfluidic flowcell. Here, we describe a second-generation UV lithography-based protocol for fabricating flowcells for DNA curtains. This protocol greatly reduces the challenges associated with assembling DNA curtains and paves the way for the rapid acquisition of large datasets from individual single-molecule experiments. Drawing on our recent studies of human HR, we also provide an overview of how DNA curtains can be used for observing facilitated protein diffusion, processive enzyme translocation, and nucleoprotein filament dynamics on single-stranded DNA. Together, these protocols and case studies form a comprehensive introduction for other researchers that may want to adapt DNA curtains for high-throughput single-molecule studies of DNA replication, transcription, and repair. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nobel Lecture: Single-molecule spectroscopy, imaging, and photocontrol: Foundations for super-resolution microscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E. William E.

    2015-10-01

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 1990s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room-temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts as a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and selected current developments are summarized.

  12. Single molecule tools for enzymology, structural biology, systems biology and nanotechnology: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widom, Julia R.; Dhakal, Soma; Heinicke, Laurie A.; Walter, Nils G.

    2015-01-01

    Toxicology is the highly interdisciplinary field studying the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms. It requires sensitive tools to detect such effects. After their initial implementation during the 1990s, single-molecule fluorescence detection tools were quickly recognized for their potential to contribute greatly to many different areas of scientific inquiry. In the intervening time, technical advances in the field have generated ever-improving spatial and temporal resolution, and have enabled the application of single-molecule fluorescence to increasingly complex systems, such as live cells. In this review, we give an overview of the optical components necessary to implement the most common versions of single-molecule fluorescence detection. We then discuss current applications to enzymology and structural studies, systems biology, and nanotechnology, presenting the technical considerations that are unique to each area of study, along with noteworthy recent results. We also highlight future directions that have the potential to revolutionize these areas of study by further exploiting the capabilities of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25212907

  13. A single molecule investigation of the photostability of quantum dots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Christensen Arnspang

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are very attractive probes for multi-color fluorescence imaging in biological applications because of their immense brightness and reported extended photostability. We report here however that single QDs, suitable for biological applications, that are subject to continuous blue excitation from a conventional 100 W mercury arc lamp will undergo a continuous blue-switching of the emission wavelength eventually reaching a permanent dark, photobleached state. We further show that β-mercaptoethanol has a dual stabilizing effect on the fluorescence emission of QDs: 1 by increasing the frequency of time that a QD is in its fluorescent state, and 2 by decreasing the photobleaching rate. The observed QD color spectral switching is especially detrimental for multi-color single molecule applications, as we regularly observe spectral blue-shifts of 50 nm, or more even after only ten seconds of illumination. However, of significant importance for biological applications, we find that even small, biologically compatible, concentrations (25 µM of β-mercaptoethanol has a significant stabilizing effect on the emission color of QDs, but that greater amounts are required to completely abolish the spectral blue shifting or to minimize the emission intermittency of QDs.

  14. Single-Molecule Detection in Nanogap-Embedded Plasmonic Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biyan Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce nanogap-embedded silver plasmonic gratings for single-molecule (SM visualization using an epifluorescence microscope. This silver plasmonic platform was fabricated by a cost-effective nano-imprint lithography technique, using an HD DVD template. DNA/ RNA duplex molecules tagged with Cy3/Cy5 fluorophores were immobilized on SiO 2 -capped silver gratings. Light was coupled to the gratings at particular wavelengths and incident angles to form surface plasmons. The SM fluorescence intensity of the fluorophores at the nanogaps showed approximately a 100-fold mean enhancement with respect to the fluorophores observed on quartz slides using an epifluorescence microscope. This high level of enhancement was due to the concentration of surface plasmons at the nanogaps. When nanogaps imaged with epifluorescence mode were compared to quartz imaged using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy, more than a 30-fold mean enhancement was obtained. Due to the SM fluorescence enhancement of plasmonic gratings and the correspondingly high emission intensity, the required laser power can be reduced, resulting in a prolonged detection time prior to photobleaching. This simple platform was able to perform SM studies with a low-cost epifluorescence apparatus, instead of the more expensive TIRF or confocal microscopes, which would enable SM analysis to take place in most scientific laboratories.

  15. Measuring the Spatial Distribution of Dielectric Constants in Polymers through Quasi-Single Molecule Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Chelsea M.; Riley, Erin A.; Palos-Chávez, Jorge; Reid, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    The variation in dielectric constant is measured for thin films of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) using confocal fluorescence microscopy. Spatial variation in the local dielectric constant of the polymer films on the ~250 nm length scale is measured using the solvochromatic emission from incorporated nile red (NR) at “quasi-single molecule” (10−7 M) and true single molecule (SM) concentrations (10−9 M). Correlation of the NR fluorescence wavelength maxim...

  16. Coherent control of single molecules at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinks, Daan; Hildner, Richard; Stefani, Fernando D; van Hulst, Niek F

    2011-01-01

    The detection of individual molecules allows to unwrap the inhomogeneously broadened ensemble and reveal the spatial disorder and temporal dynamics of single entities. During 20 years of increasing sophistication this approach has provided valuable insights into biomolecular interactions, cellular processes, polymer dynamics, etc. Unfortunately the detection of fluorescence, i.e. incoherent spontaneous emission, has essentially kept the time resolution of the single molecule approach out of the range of ultrafast coherent processes. In parallel coherent control of quantum interferences has developed as a powerful method to study and actively steer ultrafast molecular interactions and energy conversion processes. However the degree of coherent control that can be reached in ensembles is restricted, due to the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the synchronized subset. Clearly the only way to overcome spatio-temporal disorder and achieve key control is by addressing individual units: coherent control of single molecules. Here we report the observation and manipulation of vibrational wave-packet interference in individual molecules at ambient conditions. We show that adapting the time and phase distribution of the optical excitation field to the dynamics of each molecule results in a superior degree of control compared to the ensemble approach. Phase reversal does invert the molecular response, confirming the control of quantum coherence. Time-phase maps show a rich diversity in excited state dynamics between different, yet chemically identical, molecules. The presented approach is promising for single-unit coherent control in multichromophoric systems. Especially the role of coherence in the energy transfer of single antenna complexes under physiological conditions is subject of great attention. Now the role of energy disorder and variation in coupling strength can be explored, beyond the inhomogeneously broadened ensemble.

  17. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The potential of single molecule detection as an analysis tool in biological and medical fields is well recognized today. This fast evolving technique will provide fundamental sensitivity to pick up individual pathogen molecules, and therefore contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for a complete cure. Many studies are being carried out to successfully apply this technique in real screening fields. In this dissertation, several attempts are shown that have been made to test and refine the application of the single molecule technique as a clinical screening method. A basic applicability was tested with a 100% target content sample, using electrophoretic mobility and multiple colors as identification tools. Both electrophoretic and spectral information of individual molecule were collected within a second, while the molecule travels along the flow in a capillary. Insertion of a transmission grating made the recording of the whole spectrum of a dye-stained molecule possible without adding complicated instrumental components. Collecting two kinds of information simultaneously and combining them allowed more thorough identification, up to 98.8% accuracy. Probing mRNA molecules with fluorescently labeled cDNA via hybridization was also carried out. The spectral differences among target, probe, and hybrid were interpreted in terms of dispersion distances after transmission grating, and used for the identification of each molecule. The probes were designed to have the least background when they are free, but have strong fluorescence after hybridization via fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The mRNA-cDNA hybrids were further imaged in whole blood, plasma, and saliva, to test how far a crude preparation can be tolerated. Imaging was possible with up to 50% of clear bio-matrix contents, suggesting a simple lysis and dilution would be sufficient for imaging for some cells. Real pathogen DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-I6 in human genomic DNA

  18. Renewal theory for single-molecule systems with multiple reaction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, A M

    2011-02-21

    Some single-molecule systems share a common feature: the system performs different cycles returning after each cycle to the same state. In such systems we deal with renewal processes. Examples include (1) single-molecule enzymatic reactions, (2) membrane transport through single-occupancy channels, (3) single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and (4) motion of molecular motors. The paper is focused on the analysis of such systems by means of the renewal theory. To be more specific, the theory of renewal processes is used to study multivariate distribution functions of the numbers of different events in a given observation time. Our main results are simple formulas derived for the Laplace transforms of the distribution functions. General results are illustrated by consideration of several examples.

  19. Measuring two at the same time: combining magnetic tweezers with single-molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Marko; Grieb, Maj Svea; Hahn, Steffen; Schlierf, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Molecular machines are the workhorses of the cell that efficiently convert chemical energy into mechanical motion through conformational changes. They can be considered powerful machines, exerting forces and torque on the molecular level of several piconewtons and piconewton-nanometer, respectively. For studying translocation and conformational changes of these machines, fluorescence methods, like FRET, as well as "mechanical" methods, like optical and magnetic tweezers, have proven well suited over the past decades. One of the current challenges in the field of molecular machines is gaining maximal information from single-molecule experiments by simultaneously measuring translocation, conformational changes, and forces exerted by these machines. In this chapter, we describe the combination of magnetic tweezers with single-molecule FRET for orthogonal simultaneous readout to maximize the information gained in single-molecule experiments.

  20. Quantitative single molecule FRET efficiencies using TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Lasse L; Preus, Søren; Birkedal, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy at the single molecule level has the potential to yield information on intra and intermolecular distances within the 2-10 nm range of molecules or molecular complexes that undergo frequent conformation changes. A pre-requirement for obtaining accurate distance information is to determine quantitative instrument independent FRET efficiency values. Here, we applied and evaluated a procedure to determine quantitative FRET efficiencies directly from individual fluorescence time traces of surface immobilized DNA molecules without the need for external calibrants. To probe the robustness of the approach over a wide range of FRET efficiencies we used a set of doubly labelled double stranded DNA samples, where the acceptor position was varied systematically. Interestingly, we found that fluorescence contributions arising from direct acceptor excitation following donor excitation are intrinsically taken into account in these conditions as other correction factors can compensate for inaccurate values of these parameters. We give here guidelines, that can be used through tools within the iSMS software (), for determining quantitative FRET and assess uncertainties linked with the procedure. Our results provide insights into the experimental parameters governing quantitative FRET determination, which is essential for obtaining accurate structural information from a wide range of biomolecules.

  1. Quantum dots and microfluidic single-molecule detection for screening genetic and epigenetic cancer markers in clinical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tza-Huei; Bailey, Vasudev; Liu, Kelvin

    2011-06-01

    Genomic analysis of biomarkers, including genetic markers such as point mutations and epigenetic markers such as DNA methylation, has become a central theme in modern disease diagnosis and prognosis. Recently there is an increasing interest in using single-molecule detection (SMD) for genomic detection. The driving force not only comes from its ultrahigh sensitivity that can allow the detection of low-abundance nucleic acids with reduced or without the need of amplification but also from its potential in achieving high-accuracy quantification of rare targets via singlemolecule sorting. The unique photophysical properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have made them ideal for use as spectral labels and luminescent probes. QDs also make excellent donors to pair with organic dyes in the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process due to the features of narrow emission spectra and small Stokes shift. We have developed highly sensitive, quantitative and clinically relevant technologies for analysis of genomic markers based on the convergence of SMD, microfluidic manipulations, and quantum dot fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology (QD-FRET). Extraordinary performances of these new technologies have been exemplified by analysis of a variety of biomarkers including point mutations, DNA integrity and DNA methylation in clinical samples.

  2. Single-Molecule Sensors: Challenges and Opportunities for Quantitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J Justin; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-09-12

    Measurement science has been converging to smaller and smaller samples, such that it is now possible to detect single molecules. This Review focuses on the next generation of analytical tools that combine single-molecule detection with the ability to measure many single molecules simultaneously and/or process larger and more complex samples. Such single-molecule sensors constitute a new type of quantitative analytical tool, as they perform analysis by molecular counting and thus potentially capture the heterogeneity of the sample. This Review outlines the advantages and potential of these new, quantitative single-molecule sensors, the measurement challenges in making single-molecule devices suitable for analysis, the inspiration biology provides for overcoming these challenges, and some of the solutions currently being explored. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Electrically driven single-photon emission from an isolated single molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yu, Yun-Jie; Chen, Liu-Guo; Luo, Yang; Yang, Ben; Kong, Fan-Fang; Chen, Gong; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Qiang; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jin-Long; Dong, Zhen-Chao; Hou, J G

    2017-09-18

    Electrically driven molecular light emitters are considered to be one of the promising candidates as single-photon sources. However, it is yet to be demonstrated that electrically driven single-photon emission can indeed be generated from an isolated single molecule notwithstanding fluorescence quenching and technical challenges. Here, we report such electrically driven single-photon emission from a well-defined single molecule located inside a precisely controlled nanocavity in a scanning tunneling microscope. The effective quenching suppression and nanocavity plasmonic enhancement allow us to achieve intense and stable single-molecule electroluminescence. Second-order photon correlation measurements reveal an evident photon antibunching dip with the single-photon purity down to g (2) (0) = 0.09, unambiguously confirming the single-photon emission nature of the single-molecule electroluminescence. Furthermore, we demonstrate an ultrahigh-density array of identical single-photon emitters.Molecular emitters offer a promising solution for single-photon generation. Here, by exploiting electronic decoupling by an ultrathin dielectric spacer and emission enhancement by a resonant plasmonic nanocavity, the authors demonstrate electrically driven single-photon emission from a single molecule.

  4. Single Molecule Applications of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Elmelund; Jauffred, Liselotte; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    for tracking single lipids in lipid bilayers, 4) two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of QDs and 5) optical trapping and excitation of single QDs. In all of these applications, the focus is on the single particle sensitivity level of QDs. The high applicability of QDs in live cell imaging...

  5. Quantitative super-resolution single molecule microscopy dataset of YFP-tagged growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeš, Tomáš; Pospíšil, Jakub; Fliegel, Karel; Lasser, Theo; Hagen, Guy M

    2018-01-19

    Super-resolution single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) is a method for achieving resolution beyond the classical limit in optical microscopes (approx. 200 nm laterally). Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) has been used for super-resolution single molecule localization microscopy, but less frequently than other fluorescent probes. Working with YFP in SMLM is a challenge because a lower number of photons are emitted per molecule compared to organic dyes which are more commonly used. Publically available experimental data can facilitate development of new data analysis algorithms. Four complete, freely available single molecule super-resolution microscopy datasets on YFP-tagged growth factor receptors expressed in a human cell line are presented including both raw and analyzed data. We report methods for sample preparation, for data acquisition, and for data analysis, as well as examples of the acquired images. We also analyzed the SMLM data sets using a different method: super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). The two modes of analysis offer complementary information about the sample. A fifth single molecule super-resolution microscopy dataset acquired with the dye Alexa 532 is included for comparison purposes. This dataset has potential for extensive reuse. Complete raw data from SMLM experiments has typically not been published. The YFP data exhibits low signal to noise ratios, making data analysis a challenge. These data sets will be useful to investigators developing their own algorithms for SMLM, SOFI, and related methods. The data will also be useful for researchers investigating growth factor receptors such as ErbB3.

  6. Single molecule microscopy methods for the study of DNA origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkedal, Victoria; Dong, Mingdong; Golas, Monika M; Sander, Bjoern; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager; Besenbacher, Flemming; Kjems, Jørgen

    2011-07-01

    Single molecule microscopy techniques play an important role in the investigation of advanced DNA structures such as those created by the DNA origami method. Three single molecule microscopy techniques are particularly interesting for the investigation of complex self-assembled three-dimensional (3D) DNA nanostructures, namely single molecule fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Here we discuss the strengths of these three techniques and demonstrate how their interplay can yield very important and unique new insights into the structure and conformation of advanced biological nanostructures. The applications of the three single molecule microscopy techniques are illustrated by focusing on a self-assembled DNA origami 3D box nanostructure. Its size and structure were studied by AFM and cryo-EM, while the lid opening, which can be controlled by the addition of oligonucleotide keys, was recorded by Förster/fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    imaging based on endogenous contrast of haemoglobin. For all these applications, sensitivity is orders of magnitude higher than for spontaneous emission or absorption contrast, permitting nonfluorescent reporters for molecular imaging. Although we did not accomplish the original goal of detecting single-molecule by CARS, our quest for high sensitivity of nonlinear optical microscopy paid off in providing the two brand new enabling technologies. Both techniques were greatly benefited from the use of high frequency modulation for microscopy, which led to orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity. Extensive efforts have been made on optics and electronics to accomplish these breakthroughs.

  8. Rotation of a single molecule within a supramolecular bearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimzewski, J.K.; Joachim, C.; Schlittler, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental visualization and verification of a single-molecule rotor operating within a supramolecular bearing is reported. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, single molecules were observed to exist in one of two spatially defined states Laterally separated by 0.26 nanometers. One...

  9. Electrochemical Single-Molecule Transistors with Optimized Gate Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Henrry M.; Catarelli, Samantha; Cea, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical gating at the single molecule level of viologen molecular bridges in ionic liquids is examined. Contrary to previous data recorded in aqueous electrolytes, a clear and sharp peak in the single molecule conductance versus electrochemical potential data is obtained in ionic liquids....

  10. Single-molecule probes in organic field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolet, Aurélien Armel Louis

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to study charge transport phenomena in organic materials. This is done optically by means of single-molecule spectroscopy in a field-effect transistor based on a molecular crystal. We present (in Chapter 2) a fundamental requirement for single-molecule spectroscopy

  11. Multiple color single molecule TIRF imaging and tracking of MAPs and motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer L; Dixit, Ram

    2010-01-01

    Microtubules are part of a complex mechano-chemical network inside cells. In order to understand how the components of these systems work together, careful in vitro experiments must be performed with added complexity. These experiments can ideally image all the interacting species. In order to image these molecules, multiple-color fluorescence imaging can be performed. In this chapter, we describe some methods for performing multiple-color single molecule fluorescence imaging using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We give several specific examples of species of microtubule-associate proteins and motors that can be examined with detailed protocols for labeling, purification, and imaging. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Single-Molecule Spectroscopic Investigations of RNA Structural Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Julie L.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2007-03-01

    To function properly, catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) fold into specific three-dimensional shapes stabilized by multiple tertiary interactions. However, only limited information is available on the contributions of individual tertiary contacts to RNA conformational dynamics. The Tetrahymena ribozymes's P4--P6 domain forms a hinged, ``candy-cane'' structure with parallel helices clamped by two motifs, the GAAA tetraloop-tetraloop receptor and adenosine (A)-rich bulge--P4 helix interactions. Previously, we characterized RNA folding due to a tetraloop-receptor interaction. In this study, we employ time-resolved single-molecule FRET methods to probe A-rich bulge induced structural dynamics. Specifically, fluorescently labeled RNA constructs excited by a pulsed 532 nm laser are detected in the confocal region of an inverted microscope, with each photon sorted by arrival time, color and polarization. We resolve the kinetic dependence of A-rich bulge-P4 helix docking/undocking on cationic environment (e.g. Na^+ and Mg^2+ concentration.) At saturating [Mg^2+], the docked structure appears only weakly stabilized, while only 50% of the molecules exhibit efficient folding.

  13. Real-time single-molecule imaging of quantum interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Milic, Adriana; Müllneritsch, Michael; Asenbaum, Peter; Tsukernik, Alexander; Tüxen, Jens; Mayor, Marcel; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2012-03-25

    The observation of interference patterns in double-slit experiments with massive particles is generally regarded as the ultimate demonstration of the quantum nature of these objects. Such matter-wave interference has been observed for electrons, neutrons, atoms and molecules and, in contrast to classical physics, quantum interference can be observed when single particles arrive at the detector one by one. The build-up of such patterns in experiments with electrons has been described as the "most beautiful experiment in physics". Here, we show how a combination of nanofabrication and nano-imaging allows us to record the full two-dimensional build-up of quantum interference patterns in real time for phthalocyanine molecules and for derivatives of phthalocyanine molecules, which have masses of 514 AMU and 1,298 AMU respectively. A laser-controlled micro-evaporation source was used to produce a beam of molecules with the required intensity and coherence, and the gratings were machined in 10-nm-thick silicon nitride membranes to reduce the effect of van der Waals forces. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy detected the position of each molecule with an accuracy of 10 nm and revealed the build-up of a deterministic ensemble interference pattern from single molecules that arrived stochastically at the detector. In addition to providing this particularly clear demonstration of wave-particle duality, our approach could also be used to study larger molecules and explore the boundary between quantum and classical physics.

  14. Photothermal cantilever actuation for fast single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Stefan W; Puchner, Elias M; Gaub, Hermann E

    2009-07-01

    Photothermal cantilever excitation provides a fast and easy to implement means to control the deflection of standard atomic force microscopy cantilevers. Minute heat pulses yield deflections on the order of several tens of nanometers or when the deflection is kept constant, forces of several hundreds of piconewton can be applied. In our case these pulses resulted in less than 1 K temperature changes at the sample position. Here we present and characterize the implementation of photothermal actuation for single-molecule force-spectroscopy experiments. When molecules are stretched under force-clamp conditions, fast control cycles that re-establish the pulling force after the rupture of molecular domains are essential for detecting the complete unfolding pattern with high precision. By combining the fast response of photothermal cantilever excitation with a conventional piezoactuator, a fast force-clamp with high accuracy and large working distances is reached. Simple feedback mechanisms and standard cantilever geometries lead to step response times of less than 90 micros, which is more than one order of magnitude faster than those of conventional force-clamp systems that are based only on piezo feedback. We demonstrate the fast and accurate performance of the setup by unfolding a protein construct consisting of one green fluorescent protein and eight surrounding immunoglobulin domains at constant force.

  15. Mapping Transcription Factors on Extended DNA: A Single Molecule Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenstein, Yuval; Gassman, Natalie; Weiss, Shimon

    The ability to determine the precise loci and distribution of nucleic acid binding proteins is instrumental to our detailed understanding of cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and chromatin reorganization. Traditional molecular biology approaches and above all Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) based methods have provided a wealth of information regarding protein-DNA interactions. Nevertheless, existing techniques can only provide average properties of these interactions, since they are based on the accumulation of data from numerous protein-DNA complexes analyzed at the ensemble level. We propose a single molecule approach for direct visualization of DNA binding proteins bound specifically to their recognition sites along a long stretch of DNA such as genomic DNA. Fluorescent Quantum dots are used to tag proteins bound to DNA, and the complex is deposited on a glass substrate by extending the DNA to a linear form. The sample is then imaged optically to determine the precise location of the protein binding site. The method is demonstrated by detecting individual, Quantum dot tagged T7-RNA polymerase enzymes on the bacteriophage T7 genomic DNA and assessing the relative occupancy of the different promoters.

  16. Coherent interaction of single molecules and plasmonic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Grotz, Bernhard; Siyushev, Petr; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    Quantum plasmonics opens the option to integrate complex quantum optical circuitry onto chip scale devices. In the past, often external light sources were used and nonclassical light was coupled in and out of plasmonic structures, such as hole arrays or waveguide structures. Another option to launch single plasmonic excitations is the coupling of single emitters in the direct proximity of, e.g., a silver or gold nanostructure. Here, we present our attempts to integrate the research of single emitters with wet-chemically grown silver nanowires. The emitters of choice are single organic dye molecules under cryogenic conditions, which are known to act as high-brightness and extremely narrow-band single photon sources. Another advantage is their high optical nonlinearity, such that they might mediate photon-photon interactions on the nanoscale. We report on the coupling of a single molecule fluorescence emission through the wire over the length of several wavelengths. The transmission of coherently emitted photons is proven by an extinction type experiment. As for influencing the spectral properties of a single emitter, we are able to show a remote change of the line-width of a single terrylene molecule, which is in close proximity to the nanowire.

  17. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  18. A Stochastic Single-Molecule Event Triggers Phenotype Switching of a Bacterial Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sunney; Choi, Paul; Cai, Long

    2009-03-01

    By monitoring fluorescently labeled lactose permease with single-molecule sensitivity, we investigated the molecular mechanism of how an Escherichia coli cell with the lac operon switches from one phenotype to another. At intermediate inducer concentrations, a population of genetically identical cells exhibits two phenotypes: induced cells with highly fluorescent membranes and uninduced cells with a small number of membrane-bound permeases. We found that this basal-level expression results from partial dissociation of the tetrameric lactose repressor from one of its operators on looped DNA. In contrast, infrequent events of complete dissociation of the repressor from DNA result in large bursts of permease expression that trigger induction of the lac operon. Hence, a stochastic single-molecule event determines a cell's phenotype.

  19. madSTORM: a superresolution technique for large-scale multiplexing at single-molecule accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jason; Manna, Asit; Barr, Valarie A.; Hong, Jennifer; Neuman, Keir C.; Samelson, Lawrence E.

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of heterogeneous cellular structures using single-molecule localization microscopy has been limited by poorly defined localization accuracy and inadequate multiplexing capacity. Using fluorescent nanodiamonds as fiducial markers, we define and achieve localization precision required for single-molecule accuracy in dSTORM images. Coupled with this advance, our new multiplexing strategy, madSTORM, allows accurate targeting of multiple molecules using sequential binding and elution of fluorescent antibodies. madSTORM is used on an activated T-cell to localize 25 epitopes, 14 of which are on components of the same multimolecular T-cell receptor complex. We obtain an average localization precision of 2.6 nm, alignment error of 2.0 nm, and molecules within structures. Probing the molecular topology of complex signaling cascades and other heterogeneous networks is feasible with madSTORM. PMID:27708141

  20. Superlocalization of single molecules and nanoparticles in high-fidelity optical imaging microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Sun, Wei; Liu, Chang; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning

    2011-07-01

    Superlocalization of single molecules and nanoparticles with a precision of subnanometer to a few tens of nanometers is crucial for elucidating nanoscale structures and movements in biological and chemical systems. A novel design of ultraflat and ultrathin glass/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) hybrid microdevices is introduced to provide almost uncompromised optical imaging quality for on-chip superlocalization and super-resolution imaging of single molecules and nanoparticles under a variety of microscopy modes. The performance of the high-fidelity (Hi-Fi) optical imaging microfluidic device was validated by precisely mapping micronecklaces made of fluorescent microtubules and 40 nm gold nanoparticles and by demonstrating the activation and excitation cycles of single Alexa Fluor 647 dyes for direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy in PDMS-based microchannels for the first time. Furthermore, the microdevice's feasibility for multimodality microscopy imaging was demonstrated by a vertical scan of live cells in epi-fluorescence and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy modes simultaneously.

  1. Super-Resolution Single-Molecule Localization Microscopy: Tricks of the Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Donna R; Bell, Toby D M

    2015-02-05

    Application of single-molecule fluorescence detection has led to the development of light microscopy techniques that make it possible to study fluorescent samples at spatial resolutions significantly improved upon the diffraction limit of light. The biological and materials science applications of these "super-resolution" microscopy methods are vast, causing current demand for them to be high. However, implementation, execution, and interpretation of these techniques, particularly involving biological samples, require a broad interdisciplinary skillset, not often found in a single laboratory. Those already used to interdisciplinary work as well as navigating communication and collaboration between more pure forms of physics, chemistry, and biology are well-positioned to spearhead such efforts. In this Perspective, we describe various aspects of single-molecule super-resolution imaging, discussing, in particular, the role that physical chemistry has so far played in its development and establishment. We also highlight a selection of some of the remarkable recent research achievements in this vibrant field.

  2. Meeting report: SMART timing--principles of single molecule techniques course at the University of Michigan 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartke, Rebecca M; Cameron, Elizabeth L; Cristie-David, Ajitha S; Custer, Thomas C; Denies, Maxwell S; Daher, May; Dhakal, Soma; Ghosh, Soumi; Heinicke, Laurie A; Hoff, J Damon; Hou, Qian; Kahlscheuer, Matthew L; Karslake, Joshua; Krieger, Adam G; Li, Jieming; Li, Xiang; Lund, Paul E; Vo, Nguyen N; Park, Jun; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Rai, Victoria; Smith, David J; Suddala, Krishna C; Wang, Jiarui; Widom, Julia R; Walter, Nils G

    2015-05-01

    Four days after the announcement of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy" based on single molecule detection, the Single Molecule Analysis in Real-Time (SMART) Center at the University of Michigan hosted a "Principles of Single Molecule Techniques 2014" course. Through a combination of plenary lectures and an Open House at the SMART Center, the course took a snapshot of a technology with an especially broad and rapidly expanding range of applications in the biomedical and materials sciences. Highlighting the continued rapid emergence of technical and scientific advances, the course underscored just how brightly the future of the single molecule field shines. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Aberration-accounting calibration for 3D single-molecule localization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabriel, Clément; Bourg, Nicolas; Dupuis, Guillaume; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine

    2018-01-01

    We propose a straightforward sample-based technique to calibrate the axial detection in 3D single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM). Using microspheres coated with fluorescent molecules, the calibration curves of PSF-shaping- or intensity-based measurements can be obtained for any required depth range from a few hundreds of nanometers to several tens of microns. This experimental method takes into account the effect of the spherical aberration without requiring computational correction.

  4. A highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer aptasensor for staphylococcal enterotoxin B detection based on exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Wang, Hongxin; Wang, Zhouping, E-mail: wangzp@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2013-06-11

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An ultrasensitive FRET aptasensor was developed for staphylococcal enterotoxin B determination. •SEB was recognized by SEB aptamer with high affinity and specificity. •The Mn{sup 2+} doped NaYF{sub 4}:Yb/Er UCNPs used as donor to quencher dye (BHQ{sub 3}) in new FRET. •The fluorescence intensity was prominently amplified using an exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy. -- Abstract: An ultrasensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) bioassay was developed to detect staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), a low molecular exotoxin, using an aptamer-affinity method coupled with upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs)-sensing, and the fluorescence intensity was prominently enhanced using an exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy. To construct this aptasensor, both fluorescence donor probes (complementary DNA{sub 1}–UCNPs) and fluorescence quencher probes (complementary DNA{sub 2}–Black Hole Quencher{sub 3} (BHQ{sub 3})) were hybridized to an SEB aptamer, and double-strand oligonucleotides were fabricated, which quenched the fluorescence of the UCNPs via FRET. The formation of an aptamer–SEB complex in the presence of the SEB analyte resulted in not only the dissociation of aptamer from the double-strand DNA but also both the disruption of the FRET system and the restoration of the UCNPs fluorescence. In addition, the SEB was liberated from the aptamer–SEB complex using exonuclease I, an exonuclease specific to single-stranded DNA, for analyte recycling by selectively digesting a particular DNA (SEB aptamer). Based on this exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy, an amplified fluorescence intensity could be produced using different SEB concentrations. Using optimized experimental conditions produced an ultrasensitive aptasensor for the detection of SEB, with a wide linear range of 0.001–1 ng mL{sup −1} and a lower detection limit (LOD) of 0.3 pg mL{sup −1} SEB (at 3σ). The fabricated

  5. "Turn-off" fluorescent data array sensor based on double quantum dots coupled with chemometrics for highly sensitive and selective detection of multicomponent pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yao; Liu, Li; Sun, Donglei; Lan, Hanyue; Fu, Haiyan; Yang, Tianming; She, Yuanbin; Ni, Chuang

    2016-04-15

    As a popular detection model, the fluorescence "turn-off" sensor based on quantum dots (QDs) has already been successfully employed in the detections of many materials, especially in the researches on the interactions between pesticides. However, the previous studies are mainly focused on simple single track or the comparison based on similar concentration of drugs. In this work, a new detection method based on the fluorescence "turn-off" model with water-soluble ZnCdSe and CdSe QDs simultaneously as the fluorescent probes is established to detect various pesticides. The fluorescence of the two QDs can be quenched by different pesticides with varying degrees, which leads to the differences in positions and intensities of two peaks. By combining with chemometrics methods, all the pesticides can be qualitative and quantitative respectively even in real samples with the limit of detection was 2 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) and a recognition rate of 100%. This work is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report on the detection of pesticides based on the fluorescence quenching phenomenon of double quantum dots combined with chemometrics methods. What's more, the excellent selectivity of the system has been verified in different mediums such as mixed ion disruption, waste water, tea and water extraction liquid drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Single-molecule imaging of cell surfaces using near-field nanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterdorfer, Peter; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2012-03-20

    Living cells use surface molecules such as receptors and sensors to acquire information about and to respond to their environments. The cell surface machinery regulates many essential cellular processes, including cell adhesion, tissue development, cellular communication, inflammation, tumor metastasis, and microbial infection. These events often involve multimolecular interactions occurring on a nanometer scale and at very high molecular concentrations. Therefore, understanding how single-molecules localize, assemble, and interact on the surface of living cells is an important challenge and a difficult one to address because of the lack of high-resolution single-molecule imaging techniques. In this Account, we show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) and near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) provide unprecedented possibilities for mapping the distribution of single molecules on the surfaces of cells with nanometer spatial resolution, thereby shedding new light on their highly sophisticated functions. For single-molecule recognition imaging by AFM, researchers label the tip with specific antibodies or ligands and detect molecular recognition signals on the cell surface using either adhesion force or dynamic recognition force mapping. In single-molecule NSOM, the tip is replaced by an optical fiber with a nanoscale aperture. As a result, topographic and optical images are simultaneously generated, revealing the spatial distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules. Recently, researchers have made remarkable progress in the application of near-field nanoscopy to image the distribution of cell surface molecules. Those results have led to key breakthroughs: deciphering the nanoscale architecture of bacterial cell walls; understanding how cells assemble surface receptors into nanodomains and modulate their functional state; and understanding how different components of the cell membrane (lipids, proteins) assemble and communicate to confer efficient functional

  7. High-sensitivity detection of breast tumors in vivo by use of a pH-sensitive near-infrared fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathejczyk, Julia Eva; Pauli, Jutta; Dullin, Christian; Resch-Genger, Ute; Alves, Frauke; Napp, Joanna

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the potential of the pH-sensitive dye, CypHer5E, conjugated to Herceptin (pH-Her) for the sensitive detection of breast tumors in mice using noninvasive time-domain near-infrared fluorescence imaging and different methods of data analysis. First, the fluorescence properties of pH-Her were analyzed as function of pH and/or dye-to-protein ratio, and binding specificity was confirmed in cell-based assays. Subsequently, the performance of pH-Her in nude mice bearing orthotopic HER2-positive (KPL-4) and HER2-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast carcinoma xenografts was compared to that of an always-on fluorescent conjugate Alexa Fluor 647-Herceptin (Alexa-Her). Subtraction of autofluorescence and lifetime (LT)-gated image analyses were performed for background fluorescence suppression. In mice bearing HER2-positive tumors, autofluorescence subtraction together with the selective fluorescence enhancement of pH-Her solely in the tumor's acidic environment provided high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). This led to an improved sensitivity of tumor detection compared to Alexa-Her. In contrast, LT-gated imaging using LTs determined in model systems did not improve tumor-detection sensitivity in vivo for either probe. In conclusion, pH-Her is suitable for sensitive in vivo monitoring of HER2-expressing breast tumors with imaging in the intensity domain and represents a promising tool for detection of weak fluorescent signals deriving from small tumors or metastases.

  8. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  9. Fast sensitive amplifier for two-probe conductance measurements in single molecule break junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyler K.; Ivie, Jeffrey A.; Jaruvang, Jason; Monti, Oliver L. A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate an amplifier based on the Wheatstone bridge designed specifically for use in single molecule break junctions. This amplifier exhibits superior performance due to its large bandwidth, flat frequency response, and high sensitivity. The amplifier is capable of measuring conductance values from 102 to 10-6G0 (G0 = 2e2/h), while maintaining a bandwidth in excess of 20 kHz, and shows remarkable resolution in the molecular conductance regime of 10-2 to 10-5 G0.

  10. A novel electromagnetic apparatus for rapid multiplex single molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Li, Xiaowei; Sun, Jielin; Hu, Jun; Shao, Zhifeng

    2013-02-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has revolutionized our ability to probe the details of molecular structures and interactions, but the numbers of individual measurements required for achieving a statistically reliable result can sometimes prove daunting. To overcome this problem, a number of instruments have recently been developed that are capable of monitoring the behavior of tens of individual biomolecules simultaneously. In this work, we have constructed a novel electromagnetic apparatus for multiplex single molecule force measurements utilizing magnetic microspheres. In this system, the magnetic field is generated with an electron-lens of an electron microscope mated with a high voltage flash light circuit to rapidly attain a stable magnetic field. We show that this instrument can generate a uniform magnetic force of up to -20 pN within 5 ms, over a region spanning 1 mm. The successful application of this apparatus to the force-dependent extension of dsDNA fully validates this approach. Furthermore, the lens-like design of the pole piece is fully compatible with optical imaging, thus allowing for the integration of single molecule fluorescence capabilities that should make this system a particularly powerful apparatus for multi-dimensional characterization of fast processes within interacting single molecules.

  11. The more the merrier: high-throughput single-molecule techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Flynn R; Monachino, Enrico; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2017-06-15

    The single-molecule approach seeks to understand molecular mechanisms by observing biomolecular processes at the level of individual molecules. These methods have led to a developing understanding that for many processes, a diversity of behaviours will be observed, representing a multitude of pathways. This realisation necessitates that an adequate number of observations are recorded to fully characterise this diversity. The requirement for large numbers of observations to adequately sample distributions, subpopulations, and rare events presents a significant challenge for single-molecule techniques, which by their nature do not typically provide very high throughput. This review will discuss many developing techniques which address this issue by combining nanolithographic approaches, such as zero-mode waveguides and DNA curtains, with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, and by drastically increasing throughput of force-based approaches such as magnetic tweezers and laminar-flow techniques. These methods not only allow the collection of large volumes of single-molecule data in single experiments, but have also made improvements to ease-of-use, accessibility, and automation of data analysis. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Enzymatic oxygen scavenging for photostability without pH drop in single-molecule experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Marko; Henig, Jörg; Cheng, Hsin-Mei; Brugger, Dagmar; Haltrich, Dietmar; Plumeré, Nicolas; Schlierf, Michael

    2012-07-24

    Over the past years, bottom-up bionanotechnology has been developed as a promising tool for future technological applications. Many of these biomolecule-based assemblies are characterized using various single-molecule techniques that require strict anaerobic conditions. The most common oxygen scavengers for single-molecule experiments are glucose oxidase and catalase (GOC) or protocatechuate dioxygenase (PCD). One of the pitfalls of these systems, however, is the production of carboxylic acids. These acids can result in a significant pH drop over the course of experiments and must thus be compensated by an increased buffer strength. Here, we present pyranose oxidase and catalase (POC) as a novel enzymatic system to perform single-molecule experiments in pH-stable conditions at arbitrary buffer strength. We show that POC keeps the pH stable over hours, while GOC and PCD cause an increasing acidity of the buffer system. We further verify in single-molecule fluorescence experiments that POC performs as good as the common oxygen-scavenging systems, but offers long-term pH stability and more freedom in buffer conditions. This enhanced stability allows the observation of bionanotechnological assemblies in aqueous environments under well-defined conditions for an extended time.

  13. Shedding Light on Protein Folding, Structural and Functional Dynamics by Single Molecule Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutika Bavishi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The advent of advanced single molecule measurements unveiled a great wealth of dynamic information revolutionizing our understanding of protein dynamics and behavior in ways unattainable by conventional bulk assays. Equipped with the ability to record distribution of behaviors rather than the mean property of a population, single molecule measurements offer observation and quantification of the abundance, lifetime and function of multiple protein states. They also permit the direct observation of the transient and rarely populated intermediates in the energy landscape that are typically averaged out in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Single molecule studies have thus provided novel insights about how the dynamic sampling of the free energy landscape dictates all aspects of protein behavior; from its folding to function. Here we will survey some of the state of the art contributions in deciphering mechanisms that underlie protein folding, structural and functional dynamics by single molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques. We will discuss a few selected examples highlighting the power of the emerging techniques and finally discuss the future improvements and directions.

  14. Electrostatic melting in a single-molecule field-effect transistor with applications in genomic identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernick, Sefi; Trocchia, Scott M.; Warren, Steven B.; Young, Erik F.; Bouilly, Delphine; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Nuckolls, Colin; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2017-05-01

    The study of biomolecular interactions at the single-molecule level holds great potential for both basic science and biotechnology applications. Single-molecule studies often rely on fluorescence-based reporting, with signal levels limited by photon emission from single optical reporters. The point-functionalized carbon nanotube transistor, known as the single-molecule field-effect transistor, is a bioelectronics alternative based on intrinsic molecular charge that offers significantly higher signal levels for detection. Such devices are effective for characterizing DNA hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics and enabling emerging applications in genomic identification. In this work, we show that hybridization kinetics can be directly controlled by electrostatic bias applied between the device and the surrounding electrolyte. We perform the first single-molecule experiments demonstrating the use of electrostatics to control molecular binding. Using bias as a proxy for temperature, we demonstrate the feasibility of detecting various concentrations of 20-nt target sequences from the Ebolavirus nucleoprotein gene in a constant-temperature environment.

  15. 2012 Gordon Research Conference, Single molecule approaches to biology, July 15-20 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Julio M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2012-04-20

    Single molecule techniques are rapidly occupying a central role in biological research at all levels. This transition was made possible by the availability and dissemination of robust techniques that use fluorescence and force probes to track the conformation of molecules one at a time, in vitro as well as in live cells. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are studied. These novel techniques provide previously unobtainable data on fundamental biochemical processes that are essential for all forms of life. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of the molecular systems that underpin the functioning of living cells. Hence, our conference seeks to disseminate the implementation and use of single molecule techniques in the pursuit of new biological knowledge. Topics covered include: Molecular Motors on the Move; Origin And Fate Of Proteins; Physical Principles Of Life; Molecules and Super-resolution Microscopy; Nanoswitches In Action; Active Motion Or Random Diffusion?; Building Blocks Of Living Cells; From Molecular Mechanics To Physiology; Tug-of-war: Force Spectroscopy Of Single Proteins.

  16. Quantifying and optimizing single-molecule switching nanoscopy at high speeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lin

    Full Text Available Single-molecule switching nanoscopy overcomes the diffraction limit of light by stochastically switching single fluorescent molecules on and off, and then localizing their positions individually. Recent advances in this technique have greatly accelerated the data acquisition speed and improved the temporal resolution of super-resolution imaging. However, it has not been quantified whether this speed increase comes at the cost of compromised image quality. The spatial and temporal resolution depends on many factors, among which laser intensity and camera speed are the two most critical parameters. Here we quantitatively compare the image quality achieved when imaging Alexa Fluor 647-immunolabeled microtubules over an extended range of laser intensities and camera speeds using three criteria - localization precision, density of localized molecules, and resolution of reconstructed images based on Fourier Ring Correlation. We found that, with optimized parameters, single-molecule switching nanoscopy at high speeds can achieve the same image quality as imaging at conventional speeds in a 5-25 times shorter time period. Furthermore, we measured the photoswitching kinetics of Alexa Fluor 647 from single-molecule experiments, and, based on this kinetic data, we developed algorithms to simulate single-molecule switching nanoscopy images. We used this software tool to demonstrate how laser intensity and camera speed affect the density of active fluorophores and influence the achievable resolution. Our study provides guidelines for choosing appropriate laser intensities for imaging Alexa Fluor 647 at different speeds and a quantification protocol for future evaluations of other probes and imaging parameters.

  17. Microwave assisted one-pot synthesis of graphene quantum dots as highly sensitive fluorescent probes for detection of iron ions and pH value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunfang; Cui, Yanyan; Song, Li; Liu, Xiangfeng; Hu, Zhongbo

    2016-04-01

    Recently, carbon nanomaterials have received considerable attention as fluorescent probes owing to their low toxicity, water solubility and stable photochemical properties. However, the development of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) is still on its early stage. In this work, GQDs were successfully synthesized by one-step microwave assisted pyrolysis of aspartic acid (Asp) and NH4HCO3 mixture. The as-prepared GQDs exhibited strongly blue fluorescence with high quantum yield up to 14%. Strong fluorescence quenching effect of Fe(3+) on GQDs can be used for its high selectivity detection among of general metal ions. The probe exhibited a wide linear response concentration range (0-50 μM) to Fe(3+) and the limit of detection (LOD) was calculated to be 0.26 μM. In addition, GQDs are also sensitive to the pH value in the range from 2 to 12 indicating a great potential as optical pH sensors. More importantly, the GQDs possess lower cellular toxicity and high photostability and can be directly used as fluorescent probes for cell imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. OPE3 : A model system for single-molecule transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation, charge-transport through individual organic molecules is investigated. The single molecules are contacted with two-terminal mechanically controllable break junction gold electrodes and their electrical and mechanical behavior studied at room and low temperature.

  19. Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Severin, Jessica

    2016-07-19

    There are provided computer systems for visualizing and annotating single molecule images. Annotation systems in accordance with this disclosure allow a user to mark and annotate single molecules of interest and their restriction enzyme cut sites thereby determining the restriction fragments of single nucleic acid molecules. The markings and annotations may be automatically generated by the system in certain embodiments and they may be overlaid translucently onto the single molecule images. An image caching system may be implemented in the computer annotation systems to reduce image processing time. The annotation systems include one or more connectors connecting to one or more databases capable of storing single molecule data as well as other biomedical data. Such diverse array of data can be retrieved and used to validate the markings and annotations. The annotation systems may be implemented and deployed over a computer network. They may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interactions.

  20. Single Molecule Scanning of DNA Radiation Oxidative Damage Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal will develop an assay to map genomic DNA, at the single molecule level and in a nanodevice, for oxidative DNA damage arising from radiation exposure;...

  1. Single Molecule Spectroscopy in Chemistry, Physics and Biology Nobel Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Gräslund, Astrid; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Written by the leading experts in the field, this book describes the development and current state-of-the-art in single molecule spectroscopy. The application of this technique, which started 1989, in physics, chemistry and biosciences is displayed.

  2. Massively parallel single-molecule manipulation using centrifugal force

    CERN Document Server

    Halvorsen, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Precise manipulation of single molecules has already led to remarkable insights in physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. However, widespread adoption of single-molecule techniques has been impeded by equipment cost and the laborious nature of making measurements one molecule at a time. We have solved these issues with a new approach: massively parallel single-molecule force measurements using centrifugal force. This approach is realized in a novel instrument that we call the Centrifuge Force Microscope (CFM), in which objects in an orbiting sample are subjected to a calibration-free, macroscopically uniform force-field while their micro-to-nanoscopic motions are observed. We demonstrate high-throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy with this technique by performing thousands of rupture experiments in parallel, characterizing force-dependent unbinding kinetics of an antibody-antigen pair in minutes rather than days. Additionally, we verify the force accuracy of the instrument by measuring the well-est...

  3. Single molecule conformational analysis of the biologically relevant DNA G-quadruplex in the promoter of the proto-oncogene c-MYC†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirude, Pravin S.; Ying, Liming; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has been employed to resolve the conformational heterogeneity, hybridization kinetics and study mutational effects on the c-MYC promoter G-quadruplex. PMID:18536803

  4. Single-molecule spectroelectrochemical cross-correlation during redox cycling in recessed dual ring electrode zero-mode waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Donghoon; Crouch, Garrison M; Fu, Kaiyu; Zaino Iii, Lawrence P; Bohn, Paul W

    2017-08-01

    The ability of zero-mode waveguides (ZMW) to guide light into subwavelength-diameter nanoapertures has been exploited for studying electron transfer dynamics in zeptoliter-volume nanopores under single-molecule occupancy conditions. In this work, we report the spectroelectrochemical detection of individual molecules of the redox-active, fluorogenic molecule flavin mononucleotide (FMN) freely diffusing in solution. Our approach is based on an array of nanopore-confined recessed dual ring electrodes, wherein repeated reduction and oxidation of a single molecule at two closely spaced annular working electrodes yields amplified electrochemical signals. We have articulated these structures with an optically transparent bottom, so that the nanopores are bifunctional, exhibiting both nanophotonic and nanoelectrochemical behaviors allowing the coupling between electron transfer and fluorescence dynamics to be studied under redox cycling conditions. We also investigated the electric field intensity in electrochemical ZMWs (E-ZMW) through finite-element simulations, and the amplification of fluorescence by redox cycling agrees well with predictions based on optical confinement effects inside the E-ZMW. Proof-of-principle experiments are conducted showing that electrochemical and fluorescence signals may be correlated to reveal single molecule fluctuations in the array population. Cross-correlation of single molecule fluctuations in amperometric response and single photon emission provides unequivocal evidence of single molecule sensitivity.

  5. Single molecule insights on conformational selection and induced fit mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    of unsynchronized molecules, often masking intrinsic dynamic behavior of proteins and biologically significant transient intermediates. Single molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool for characterizing protein function. They offer the direct observation and quantification of the activity, abundance...... and lifetime of multiple states and transient intermediates in the energy landscape, that are typically averaged out in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Here we survey new insights from single molecule studies that advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying biomolecular recognition....

  6. Electric field controlled magnetic anisotropy in a single molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyazin, Alexander S; van den Berg, Johan W G; Osorio, Edgar A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos P; Leijnse, Martin; Wegewijs, Maarten R; May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter; Danieli, Chiara; Cornia, Andrea

    2010-09-08

    We have measured quantum transport through an individual Fe(4) single-molecule magnet embedded in a three-terminal device geometry. The characteristic zero-field splittings of adjacent charge states and their magnetic field evolution are observed in inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the molecule retains its magnetic properties and, moreover, that the magnetic anisotropy is significantly enhanced by reversible electron addition/subtraction controlled with the gate voltage. Single-molecule magnetism can thus be electrically controlled.

  7. Photon-by-Photon Hidden Markov Model Analysis for Microsecond Single-Molecule FRET Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirchi, Menahem; Tsukanov, Roman; Khamis, Rashid; Tomov, Toma E; Berger, Yaron; Khara, Dinesh C; Volkov, Hadas; Haran, Gilad; Nir, Eyal

    2016-12-29

    The function of biological macromolecules involves large-scale conformational dynamics spanning multiple time scales, from microseconds to seconds. Such conformational motions, which may involve whole domains or subunits of a protein, play a key role in allosteric regulation. There is an urgent need for experimental methods to probe the fastest of these motions. Single-molecule fluorescence experiments can in principle be used for observing such dynamics, but there is a lack of analysis methods that can extract the maximum amount of information from the data, down to the microsecond time scale. To address this issue, we introduce H 2 MM, a maximum likelihood estimation algorithm for photon-by-photon analysis of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments. H 2 MM is based on analytical estimators for model parameters, derived using the Baum-Welch algorithm. An efficient and effective method for the calculation of these estimators is introduced. H 2 MM is shown to accurately retrieve the reaction times from ∼1 s to ∼10 μs and even faster when applied to simulations of freely diffusing molecules. We further apply this algorithm to single-molecule FRET data collected from Holliday junction molecules and show that at low magnesium concentrations their kinetics are as fast as ∼10 4 s -1 . The new algorithm is particularly suitable for experiments on freely diffusing individual molecules and is readily incorporated into existing analysis packages. It paves the way for the broad application of single-molecule fluorescence to study ultrafast functional dynamics of biomolecules.

  8. Highly sensitive and selective aptasensor for detection of adenosine based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer from carbon dots to nano-graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Xu, Guanhong; Wei, Fangdi; Ma, Yunsu; Ma, Yujie; Song, Yueyue; Cen, Yao; Hu, Qin

    2017-12-15

    In this article, a novel aptasensor was fabricated by modifying carbon dots (CDs) with adenosine aptamer (CDs-aptamer) for sensitive, selective and quantitative detection of adenosine (AD). When nano-graphite (NG) as an energy acceptor was added into the CDs-aptamer (energy donor) solution, the fluorescence of CDs-aptamer was quenched due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). When AD was present in the solution of CDs-aptamer/NG, the process of FRET was inhibited because of the specific combination between AD and AD aptamer. As a result, the fluorescence of CDs-aptamer was restored due to the dissociation of CDs-aptamer from NG and its change was proportional to the AD concentration. Under the optimized conditions, a linear range was found to be 2-50nM for the detection of AD with a detection limit of 0.63nM. Furthermore, the application of the proposed approach was demonstrated in real sample with satisfying results and it showed promise in diagnostic purpose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Highly sensitive GQDs-MnO2 based assay with turn-on fluorescence for monitoring cerebrospinal acetylcholinesterase fluctuation: A biomarker for organophosphorus pesticides poisoning and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jingjing; Lu, Dingkun; Zhang, Xiaolei; Shi, Guoyue; Zhou, Tianshu

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we demonstrated an assay with turn-on fluorescence for monitoring cerebrospinal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) fluctuation as a biomarker for organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) poisoning and management based on single layer MnO2 nanosheets with graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as signal readout. Initially, the fluorescence of GQDs was quenched by MnO2 nanosheets mainly due to the inner filter effect (IFE). However, with the presence of reductive thiocholine (TCh), the enzymatic product, hydrolyzed from acetylthiocholine (ATCh) by AChE, the redox reaction between MnO2 and TCh occurred, leading to the destruction of the MnO2 nanosheets, and thereby IFE was diminished gradually. As a consequence, the turn-on fluorescence of GQDs with the changes in the spectrum of the dispersion constituted a new mechanism for sensing of cerebrospinal AChE. With the method developed here, we could monitor cerebrospinal AChE fluctuation of rats exposed to OPs before and after therapy, and could thereby open up the pathway to a new sensing platform for better understanding the mechanism of brain dysfunctions associate with OPs poisoning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient ensemble system based on the copper binding motif for highly sensitive and selective detection of cyanide ions in 100% aqueous solutions by fluorescent and colorimetric changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwan Ho; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2015-09-15

    A peptide-based ensemble for the detection of cyanide ions in 100% aqueous solutions was designed on the basis of the copper binding motif. 7-Nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole-labeled tripeptide (NBD-SSH, NBD-SerSerHis) formed the ensemble with Cu(2+), leading to a change in the color of the solution from yellow to orange and a complete decrease of fluorescence emission. The ensemble (NBD-SSH-Cu(2+)) sensitively and selectively detected a low concentration of cyanide ions in 100% aqueous solutions by a colorimetric change as well as a fluorescent change. The addition of cyanide ions instantly removed Cu(2+) from the ensemble (NBD-SSH-Cu(2+)) in 100% aqueous solutions, resulting in a color change of the solution from orange to yellow and a "turn-on" fluorescent response. The detection limits for cyanide ions were lower than the maximum allowable level of cyanide ions in drinking water set by the World Health Organization. The peptide-based ensemble system is expected to be a potential and practical way for the detection of submicromolar concentrations of cyanide ions in 100% aqueous solutions.

  11. Single-molecule imaging can be achieved in live obligate anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S.; Coupland, Ben R.; Cameron, Elizabeth A.; Martens, Eric C.; Koropatkin, Nicole K.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) permits imaging with nanometer-scale resolution. This technique is particularly useful for cellular imaging as it provides a non-invasive, minimally perturbative means to examine macromolecular localization and dynamics, even in live cells. Here, we demonstrate that nanometer-scale SMF imaging can be extended to a new category of experiments: intracellular imaging of live, obligate anaerobic cells on the benchtop. We investigate the starch-utilization system (Sus) proteins in the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and discuss three different labels that we implemented to detect these proteins: fluorescent proteins, the tetracysteine-based FlAsH tag, and the enzymatic HaloTag.

  12. A highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probe for cyanide based on the dissolution of gold nanoparticles and its application in real samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiaoding; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Jingui; Li, Zhen

    2011-08-22

    We report a simple fluorescence method for detection of cyanide sensitively and selectively based on the dissolution of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles by cyanide. The lowest concentration for quantification of cyanide ions was 3.0×10(-7) M, and other common anions nearly have no influence. Furthermore, several real water samples spiked with cyanide, including local groundwater, tap water, boiled water, and lake water, were analyzed, and the experimental results demonstrated that our sensing system worked well in the above water samples, with a good linear correlation. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Quantification of dye-mediated photodamage during single-molecule DNA imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycon, Michael A; Dial, Catherine F; Faison, Keia; Melvin, Whitney; Fecko, Christopher J

    2012-07-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging of DNA-binding proteins has enabled detailed investigations of their interactions. However, the intercalating dyes used to visually locate DNA molecules have the undesirable effect of photochemically damaging the DNA through radical intermediaries. Unfortunately, this damage occurs as single-strand breaks (SSBs), which are visually undetectable but can heavily influence protein behavior. We investigated the formation of SSBs on DNA molecules by the dye YOYO-1 using complementary single-molecule imaging and gel electrophoresis-based damage assays. The single-molecule assay imaged hydrodynamically elongated lambda DNA, enabling the real-time detection of double-strand breaks (DSBs). The gel assay, which used supercoiled plasmid DNA, was sensitive to both SSBs and DSBs. This enabled the quantification of SSBs that precede DSB formation. Using the parameters determined from the gel damage assay, we applied a model of stochastic DNA damage to the time-resolved DNA breakage data, extracting the rates of single-strand breakage at two dye staining ratios and measuring the damage reduction from the radical scavengers ascorbic acid and β-mercaptoethanol. These results enable the estimation of the number of SSBs that occur during imaging and are scalable over a wide range of laser intensities used in fluorescence microscopy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulsed IR Heating Studies of Single-Molecule DNA Duplex Dissociation Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful technique that makes it possible to observe the conformational dynamics associated with biomolecular processes. The addition of precise temperature control to these experiments can yield valuable thermodynamic information about equilibrium and kinetic rate constants. To accomplish this, we have developed a microscopy technique based on infrared laser overtone/combination band absorption to heat small (≈10−11 liter) volumes of water. Detailed experimental characterization of this technique reveals three major advantages over conventional stage heating methods: 1), a larger range of steady-state temperatures (20–100°C); 2), substantially superior spatial (≤20 μm) control; and 3), substantially superior temporal (≈1 ms) control. The flexibility and breadth of this spatial and temporally resolved laser-heating approach is demonstrated in single-molecule fluorescence assays designed to probe the dissociation of a 21 bp DNA duplex. These studies are used to support a kinetic model based on nucleic acid end fraying that describes dissociation for both short (10 bp) DNA duplexes. These measurements have been extended to explore temperature-dependent kinetics for the 21 bp construct, which permit determination of single-molecule activation enthalpies and entropies for DNA duplex dissociation. PMID:24411254

  15. Single Molecule Visualization of Protein-DNA Complexes: Watching Machines at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    We can now watch individual proteins acting on single molecules of DNA. Such imaging provides unprecedented interrogation of fundamental biophysical processes. Visualization is achieved through the application of two complementary procedures. In one, single DNA molecules are attached to a polystyrene bead and are then captured by an optical trap. The DNA, a worm-like coil, is extended either by the force of solution flow in a micro-fabricated channel, or by capturing the opposite DNA end in a second optical trap. In the second procedure, DNA is attached by one end to a glass surface. The coiled DNA is elongated either by continuous solution flow or by subsequently tethering the opposite end to the surface. Protein action is visualized by fluorescent reporters: fluorescent dyes that bind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), fluorescent biosensors for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), or fluorescently-tagged proteins. Individual molecules are imaged using either epifluorescence microscopy or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Using these approaches, we imaged the search for DNA sequence homology conducted by the RecA-ssDNA filament. The manner by which RecA protein finds a single homologous sequence in the genome had remained undefined for almost 30 years. Single-molecule imaging revealed that the search occurs through a mechanism termed ``intersegmental contact sampling,'' in which the randomly coiled structure of DNA is essential for reiterative sampling of DNA sequence identity: an example of parallel processing. In addition, the assembly of RecA filaments on single molecules of single-stranded DNA was visualized. Filament assembly requires nucleation of a protein dimer on DNA, and subsequent growth occurs via monomer addition. Furthermore, we discovered a class of proteins that catalyzed both nucleation and growth of filaments, revealing how the cell controls assembly of this protein-DNA complex.

  16. Sonochemical synthesis and characterization of a new nano Ce(III) coordination supramolecular compound; highly sensitive direct fluorescent sensor for Cu2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geranmayeh, Shokoofeh; Mohammadnejad, Masoumeh; Mohammadi, Samaneh

    2018-01-01

    Micro and nano-structures of a new Ce(III) Coordination supramolecular compound, [Ce (1,5-NDS)1.5(H2O)5]n,1, (1,5-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid), were prepared using hydrothermal and sonochemical approaches, respectively. These new micro and nano structures were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and powder X-ray diffraction. The X-ray single crystal structure determination of 1 shows that it features a neutral 2D framework based on the [Ce2H20O16S2] clusters as a secondary building unit (SBU) which shows a sql/Shubnikov tetragonal plane net. Moreover by considering the H-bonds, the final structure can be considered as 3D supramolecular network. The influence of ultrasound irradiation time on the morphology and size of the nanostructure 1 was investigated. The results indicated that by increasing the time of ultrasonic radiation, smaller nanostructures form and morphological changes occur. Fluorescent properties of the nanoparticles of 1 were also investigated. Coordination polymer 1 shows high fluorescence intensity and good tendency to copper ion that can be used as an optical sensor for selective and sensitive determination of Cu2+ in aqueous media with detection limit of 3.0μM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  18. Single-molecule diffusion and conformational dynamics by spatial integration of temporal fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2014-10-06

    Single-molecule localization and tracking has been used to translate spatiotemporal information of individual molecules to map their diffusion behaviours. However, accurate analysis of diffusion behaviours and including other parameters, such as the conformation and size of molecules, remain as limitations to the method. Here, we report a method that addresses the limitations of existing single-molecular localization methods. The method is based on temporal tracking of the cumulative area occupied by molecules. These temporal fluctuations are tied to molecular size, rates of diffusion and conformational changes. By analysing fluorescent nanospheres and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths and topological forms, we demonstrate that our cumulative-area method surpasses the conventional single-molecule localization method in terms of the accuracy of determined diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, the cumulative-area method provides conformational relaxation times of structurally flexible chains along with diffusion coefficients, which together are relevant to work in a wide spectrum of scientific fields.

  19. TIRF-Based Single-Molecule Detection of the RecA Presynaptic Filament Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung H

    2018-01-01

    RecA is a key protein in homologous DNA repair process. On a single-stranded (ss) DNA, which appears as an intermediate structure at a double-strand break site, RecA forms a kilobase-long presynaptic filament that mediates homology search and strand exchange reaction. RecA requires adenosine triphosphate as a cofactor that confers dynamic features to the filament such as nucleation, end-dependent growth and disassembly, scaffold shift along the ssDNA, and conformational change. Due to the complexity of the dynamics, detailed molecular mechanisms of functioning presynaptic filament have been characterized only recently after the advent of single-molecule techniques that allowed real-time observation of each kinetic process. In this chapter, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays, which revealed detailed molecular pictures of the presynaptic filament dynamics, will be discussed. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Complex formation dynamics in a single-molecule electronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Huimin; Li, Wengang; Chen, Jiewei; He, Gen; Li, Longhua; Olson, Mark A; Sue, Andrew C-H; Stoddart, J Fraser; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-11-01

    Single-molecule electronic devices offer unique opportunities to investigate the properties of individual molecules that are not accessible in conventional ensemble experiments. However, these investigations remain challenging because they require (i) highly precise device fabrication to incorporate single molecules and (ii) sufficient time resolution to be able to make fast molecular dynamic measurements. We demonstrate a graphene-molecule single-molecule junction that is capable of probing the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of a host-guest complex. By covalently integrating a conjugated molecular wire with a pendent crown ether into graphene point contacts, we can transduce the physical [2]pseudorotaxane (de)formation processes between the electron-rich crown ether and a dicationic guest into real-time electrical signals. The conductance of the single-molecule junction reveals two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on temperature and solvent environments, affording a nondestructive means of quantitatively determining the binding and rate constants, as well as the activation energies, for host-guest complexes. The thermodynamic processes reveal the host-guest binding to be enthalpy-driven and are consistent with conventional 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments. This electronic device opens up a new route to developing single-molecule dynamics investigations with microsecond resolution for a broad range of chemical and biochemical applications.

  1. A reversible single-molecule switch based on activated antiaromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaodong; Zang, Yaping; Zhu, Liangliang; Low, Jonathan Z; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Cui, Jing; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Venkataraman, Latha; Campos, Luis M

    2017-10-01

    Single-molecule electronic devices provide researchers with an unprecedented ability to relate novel physical phenomena to molecular chemical structures. Typically, conjugated aromatic molecular backbones are relied upon to create electronic devices, where the aromaticity of the building blocks is used to enhance conductivity. We capitalize on the classical physical organic chemistry concept of Hückel antiaromaticity by demonstrating a single-molecule switch that exhibits low conductance in the neutral state and, upon electrochemical oxidation, reversibly switches to an antiaromatic high-conducting structure. We form single-molecule devices using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique and observe an on/off ratio of ~70 for a thiophenylidene derivative that switches to an antiaromatic state with 6-4-6-π electrons. Through supporting nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, we show that the doubly oxidized core has antiaromatic character and we use density functional theory calculations to rationalize the origin of the high-conductance state for the oxidized single-molecule junction. Together, our work demonstrates how the concept of antiaromaticity can be exploited to create single-molecule devices that are highly conducting.

  2. Towards physiological complexity with in vitro single-molecule biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzdevich, Daniel; Greene, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule biology has matured in recent years, driven to greater sophistication by the development of increasingly advanced experimental techniques. A progressive appreciation for its unique strengths is attracting research that spans an exceptionally broad swath of physiological phenomena—from the function of nucleosomes to protein diffusion in the cell membrane. Newfound enthusiasm notwithstanding, the single-molecule approach is limited to an intrinsically defined set of biological questions; such limitation applies to all experimental approaches, and an explicit statement of the boundaries delineating each set offers a guide to most fruitfully orienting in vitro single-molecule research in the future. Here, we briefly describe a simple conceptual framework to categorize how submolecular, molecular and intracellular processes are studied. We highlight the domain of single-molecule biology in this scheme, with an emphasis on its ability to probe various forms of heterogeneity inherent to populations of discrete biological macromolecules. We then give a general overview of our high-throughput DNA curtain methodology for studying protein–nucleic acid interactions, and by contextualizing it within this framework, we explore what might be the most enticing avenues of future research. We anticipate that a focus on single-molecule biology's unique strengths will suggest a new generation of experiments with greater complexity and more immediately translatable physiological relevance. PMID:23267187

  3. Single-molecule manipulation experiments to explore friction and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, R.; Kawai, S.; Meier, T.; Glatzel, T.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.

    2017-03-01

    Friction forces, which arise when two bodies that are in contact are moved with respect to one another, are ubiquitous phenomena. Although various measurement tools have been developed to study these phenomena at all length scales, such investigations are highly challenging when tackling the scale of single molecules in motion on a surface. This work reviews the recent advances in single-molecule manipulation experiments performed at low temperature with the aim of understanding the fundamental frictional response of single molecules. Following the advent of ‘nanotribology’ in the field based on the atomic force microscopy technique, we will show the technical requirements to direct those studies at the single-molecule level. We will also discuss the experimental prerequisites needed to obtain and interpret the phenomena, such as the implementation of single-molecule manipulation techniques, the processing of the experimental data or their comparison with appropriate numerical models. Finally, we will report examples of the controlled vertical and lateral manipulation of long polymeric chains, graphene nanoribbons or single porphyrin molecules that systematically reveal friction-like characteristics while sliding over atomically clean surfaces.

  4. Spin blockade effect in single-molecule transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guangpu; Park, Kyungwha

    Recently single-molecule transistors consisting of individual single-molecule magnets trapped between electrodes have been experimentally realized and electron transport properties through individual single-molecule magnets have been measured. For a single-molecule magnet the (2S+1)-fold degeneracy of magnetic levels in a given spin multiplet is lifted even in the absence of external magnetic field, due to the magnetic anisotropy induced by spin-orbit coupling. This anisotropic nature of single-molecule magnets allowed one to discover interesting, unexpected transport properties. A recent theoretical study showed that an Eu-based anisotropic magnetic molecule can switch its magnetic anisotropy between magnetic easy plane and easy axis upon varying the charge state of the molecule. Motivated by this report, we investigate how this switch of magnetic anisotropy influences the electron transport through the molecule, by considering sequential electron tunneling. We calculate current-voltage characteristics by solving the master equation based on the model Hamiltonians. We explore this interesting effect in the absence and presence of external magnetic field. Funding from NSF DMR-1206354.

  5. Highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probes for Hg2+ in Ag(i)/Cu(ii) 3D supramolecular architectures based on noncovalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Fan, Ruiqing; Fan, Jizhuang; Xing, Kai; Du, Xi; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yulin

    2016-10-18

    Three novel metal-organic assemblies (MOAs), namely, [Ag(2,4'-Hpdc)(4,4'-bpy)]n (1), [Ag(2,2'-Hpdc)(4,4'-bpy)0.5]n (2), and [Cu(2,2'-Hpdc)2(1,4-bib)]n (3) [2,4'-H2pdc = 2,4'-biphenyldicarboxylic acid; 2,2'-H2pdc = 2,2'-biphenyldicarboxylic acid; 4,4'-bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine; 1,4-bib = 1,4-bis(1-imidazolyl)benzene] have been hydrothermally synthesized by using mixed ligands and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared (IR), elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The crystal structures of the three compounds indicate that the hydrogen bonding (C-HO and C-Hπ) and ππ stacking interactions play critical roles in the formation of an extended supramolecular array. The combination of C-Hπ and ππ stacking interactions endow 1 with a 3D network. 2 displays a rare 3D structure with a unique 1D structure based on an eight-membered {Ag2C2O4} ring and compound 3 shows a 1D chain structure, which is propagated to form an extended 3D structure only by C-Hπ hydrogen bonding. The two Ag(i)-compounds display blue emissions in the solid state at 298 K and 77 K. More significantly, compound 1 shows excellent selectivity, fast detection time (<5 min), and high sensitivity (detection limit, 9.63 nM) for Hg2+ ions in aqueous solution due to a great enhancement of 1-luminescence, which can be attributed to Hg2+ cation binding by a non-coordinated carboxyl group efficiently. This is a rare example of Hg2+ detection in aqueous solution based on luminescent silver MOAs. In addition, adsorption spectra reveal the semiconductive nature (2.76 eV for 2, but not detected for 1), thus the role of the AgAg interaction in controlling the performance of the semiconductor properties is highlighted.

  6. Single-molecule dataset (SMD): a generalized storage format for raw and processed single-molecule data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Max; van de Meent, Jan-Willem; Pavlichin, Dmitri S; Mabuchi, Hideo; Wiggins, Chris H; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-16

    Single-molecule techniques have emerged as incisive approaches for addressing a wide range of questions arising in contemporary biological research [Trends Biochem Sci 38:30-37, 2013; Nat Rev Genet 14:9-22, 2013; Curr Opin Struct Biol 2014, 28C:112-121; Annu Rev Biophys 43:19-39, 2014]. The analysis and interpretation of raw single-molecule data benefits greatly from the ongoing development of sophisticated statistical analysis tools that enable accurate inference at the low signal-to-noise ratios frequently associated with these measurements. While a number of groups have released analysis toolkits as open source software [J Phys Chem B 114:5386-5403, 2010; Biophys J 79:1915-1927, 2000; Biophys J 91:1941-1951, 2006; Biophys J 79:1928-1944, 2000; Biophys J 86:4015-4029, 2004; Biophys J 97:3196-3205, 2009; PLoS One 7:e30024, 2012; BMC Bioinformatics 288 11(8):S2, 2010; Biophys J 106:1327-1337, 2014; Proc Int Conf Mach Learn 28:361-369, 2013], it remains difficult to compare analysis for experiments performed in different labs due to a lack of standardization. Here we propose a standardized single-molecule dataset (SMD) file format. SMD is designed to accommodate a wide variety of computer programming languages, single-molecule techniques, and analysis strategies. To facilitate adoption of this format we have made two existing data analysis packages that are used for single-molecule analysis compatible with this format. Adoption of a common, standard data file format for sharing raw single-molecule data and analysis outcomes is a critical step for the emerging and powerful single-molecule field, which will benefit both sophisticated users and non-specialists by allowing standardized, transparent, and reproducible analysis practices.

  7. eGFP-pHsens as a highly sensitive fluorophore for cellular pH determination by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Thaa, Bastian; Junghans, Cornelia; Vitali, Marco; Veit, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The determination of pH in the cell cytoplasm or in intracellular organelles is of high relevance in cell biology. Also in plant cells, organelle-specific pH monitoring with high spatial precision is an important issue, since e.g. ΔpH across thylakoid membranes is the driving force for ATP synthesis critically regulating photoprotective mechanisms like non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence or the xanthophyll cycle. In animal cells, pH determination can serve to monitor proton permeation across membranes and, therefore, to assay the efficiency of drugs against proton-selective transporters or ion channels. In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of the pH-sensitive GFP derivative (eGFP-pHsens, originally termed deGFP4 by Hanson et al. [1]) for pH measurements using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with excellent precision. eGFP-pHsens was either expressed in the cytoplasm or targeted to the mitochondria of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells and applied here for monitoring activity of the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus. It is shown that the M2 protein confers high proton permeability of the plasma membrane upon expression in CHO-K1 cells resulting in rapid and strong changes of the intracellular pH upon pH changes of the extracellular medium. These pH changes are abolished in the presence of amantadine, a specific blocker of the M2 proton channel. These results were obtained using a novel multi-parameter FLIM setup that permits the simultaneous imaging of the fluorescence amplitude ratios and lifetimes of eGFP-pHsens enabling the quick and accurate pH determination with spatial resolution of 500 nm in two color channels with time resolution of below 100 ps. With FLIM, we also demonstrate the simultaneous determination of pH in the cytoplasm and mitochondria showing that the pH in the mitochondrial matrix is slightly higher (around 7.8) than that in the cytoplasm (about 7.0). The results obtained for CHO

  8. Single Molecule Study of Photoconversion and Spectral Heterogeneities of Fluorophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Zhiyu

    of conformational changes and dynamics. The photophysical properties of organic dyes directly determine the quality of the experiments. So the better understanding of the photophysical properties of organic dyes, the better we are able to design the experiments and interpret the data, especially in single molecule...... 104 single molecule measurements. A simple and practical method is introduced to study the characteristics of the photoproducts at the ensemble level. Control experiments reveal that the reaction leading to photobleaching is oxygen related, but the composition of the photoproducts remains inconclusive...... stimulate new pathways in engineering and designing photoconvertible fluorophores, based on the reaction with oxygen or other chemicals. Besides, this results show that dyes that convert into other emissive species could give problems when interpreting single molecule FRET systems. The revealed mechanism...

  9. Single-Molecule Studies of Telomeres and Telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Joseph W; Stone, Michael D

    2017-05-22

    Telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that protect chromosome ends from dangerous processing events. In most tissues, telomeres shorten with each round of cell division, placing a finite limit on cell growth. In rapidly dividing cells, including the majority of human cancers, cells bypass this growth limit through telomerase-catalyzed maintenance of telomere length. The dynamic properties of telomeres and telomerase render them difficult to study using ensemble biochemical and structural techniques. This review describes single-molecule approaches to studying how individual components of telomeres and telomerase contribute to function. Single-molecule methods provide a window into the complex nature of telomeres and telomerase by permitting researchers to directly visualize and manipulate the individual protein, DNA, and RNA molecules required for telomere function. The work reviewed in this article highlights how single-molecule techniques have been utilized to investigate the function of telomeres and telomerase.

  10. Communication: Coordinate-dependent diffusivity from single molecule trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2017-11-01

    Single-molecule observations of biomolecular folding are commonly interpreted using the model of one-dimensional diffusion along a reaction coordinate, with a coordinate-independent diffusion coefficient. Recent analysis, however, suggests that more general models are required to account for single-molecule measurements performed with high temporal resolution. Here, we consider one such generalization: a model where the diffusion coefficient can be an arbitrary function of the reaction coordinate. Assuming Brownian dynamics along this coordinate, we derive an exact expression for the coordinate-dependent diffusivity in terms of the splitting probability within an arbitrarily chosen interval and the mean transition path time between the interval boundaries. This formula can be used to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient along a reaction coordinate directly from single-molecule trajectories.

  11. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  12. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule......, and how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong....

  13. Novel approaches for single molecule activation and detection

    CERN Document Server

    Benfenati, Fabio; Torre, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    How can we obtain tools able to process and exchange information at the molecular scale In order to do this, it is necessary to activate and detect single molecules under controlled conditions. This book focuses on the generation of biologically-inspired molecular devices. These devices are based on the developments of new photonic tools able to activate and stimulate single molecule machines. Additionally, new light sensitive molecules can be selectively activated by photonic tools. These technological innovations will provide a way to control activation of single light-sensitive molecules, a

  14. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong.

  15. Interaction of hnRNP A1 with telomere DNA G-quadruplex structures studied at the single molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Asger Christian; Raarup, Merete Krog; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig

    2010-01-01

    the interaction of hnRNP A1 with G-quadruplex DNA structures containing the human telomere repeat (TTAGGG) by gel retardation assays, ensemble fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy, and single molecule FRET microscopy. Our biochemical experiments show that hnRNP A1 binds well to the G......-quadruplex telomeric DNA. Ensemble and single molecule FRET measurements provide further insight into molecular conformation: the telomeric DNA overhang is found to be in a folded state in the absence of hnRNP A1 and to remain predominantly in a compact state when complexed with hnRNP A1. This finding is in contrast...

  16. Application of highly sensitive fluorescent dyes (CyDye DIGE Fluor saturation dyes) to laser microdissection and two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for cancer proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tadashi; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2006-01-01

    Proteome data combined with histopathological information provides important, novel clues for understanding cancer biology and reveals candidates for tumor markers and therapeutic targets. We have established an application of a highly sensitive fluorescent dye (CyDye DIGE Fluor saturation dye), developed for two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), to the labeling of proteins extracted from laser microdissected tissues. The use of the dye dramatically decreases the protein amount and, in turn, the number of cells required for 2D-DIGE; the cells obtained from a 1 mm2 area of an 8-12 microm thick tissue section generate up to 5,000 protein spots in a large-format 2D gel. This protocol allows the execution of large-scale proteomics in a more efficient, accurate and reproducible way. The protocol can be used to examine a single sample in 5 d or to examine hundreds of samples in large-scale proteomics.

  17. Single-Molecule Analysis of Pre-mRNA Splicing with Colocalization Single-Molecule Spectroscopy (CoSMoS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Joerg E; Serebrov, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of single-molecule techniques to study pre-mRNA splicing has provided insights into the dynamic nature of the spliceosome. Colocalization single-molecule spectroscopy (CoSMoS) allows following spliceosome assembly in real time at single-molecule resolution in the full complexity of cellular extracts. A detailed protocol of CoSMoS has been published previously (Anderson and Hoskins, Methods Mol Biol 1126:217-241, 2014). Here, we provide an update on the technical advances since the first CoSMoS studies including slide surface treatment, data processing, and representation. We describe various labeling strategies to generate RNA reporters with multiple dyes (or other moieties) at specific locations.

  18. Techniques for Single-Molecule mRNA Imaging in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplinski, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Typical measurement of macromolecules in a biological sample typically averages the result over all the cells or molecules within the sample, and while these types of measurements provide very useful information, they completely miss heterogeneity among the components within the sample that could be a very important aspect of the sample's function. These techniques are also limited in their ability to examine intracellular spatial orientation of molecular activity, which is often a critical component to the regulation of biological processes, particularly in cells with unique spatial relationships, such as neurons. This makes a strong case for single-cell and single-molecule analysis that allows similar novel insight into complex molecular machinery that would not be possible when pooling heterogeneous molecular states. mRNA has proven to be quite tractable to molecular analysis in single cells. Almost two decades of single-molecule studies of mRNA processing both in situ and in live cells have been facilitated by microscopy of mRNA. This has been made possible by multiplexing fluorophores in situ hybridization probes or fluorescent RNA-tag-binding protein probes. The purpose of this chapter is to describe the approaches that have made single-molecule mRNA imaging accessible, as well as to give an overview of the state of the art for techniques that are available to track mRNA in real time in living cells, highlighting the application to neuroscience.

  19. Fisher information theory for parameter estimation in single molecule microscopy: tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jerry; Ward, E. Sally; Ober, Raimund J.

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of a parameter of interest from image data represents a task that is commonly carried out in single molecule microscopy data analysis. The determination of the positional coordinates of a molecule from its image, for example, forms the basis of standard applications such as single molecule tracking and localization-based superresolution image reconstruction. Assuming that the estimator used recovers, on average, the true value of the parameter, its accuracy, or standard deviation, is then at best equal to the square root of the Cramér-Rao lower bound. The Cramér-Rao lower bound can therefore be used as a benchmark in the evaluation of the accuracy of an estimator. Additionally, as its value can be computed and assessed for different experimental settings, it is useful as an experimental design tool. This tutorial demonstrates a mathematical framework that has been specifically developed to calculate the Cramér-Rao lower bound for estimation problems in single molecule microscopy and, more broadly, fluorescence microscopy. The material includes a presentation of the photon detection process that underlies all image data, various image data models that describe images acquired with different detector types, and Fisher information expressions that are necessary for the calculation of the lower bound. Throughout the tutorial, examples involving concrete estimation problems are used to illustrate the effects of various factors on the accuracy of parameter estimation, and more generally, to demonstrate the flexibility of the mathematical framework. PMID:27409706

  20. Single-molecule chemical reaction reveals molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuwei; Song, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Ruan, Mingbo; Xu, Weilin

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the microscopic elementary process of chemical reactions, especially in condensed phase, is highly desirable for improvement of efficiencies in industrial chemical processes. Here we show an approach to gaining new insights into elementary reactions in condensed phase by combining quantum chemical calculations with a single-molecule analysis. Elementary chemical reactions in liquid-phase, revealed from quantum chemical calculations, are studied by tracking the fluorescence of single dye molecules undergoing a reversible redox process. Statistical analyses of single-molecule trajectories reveal molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics of elementary reactions. The reactivity dynamic fluctuations of single molecules are evidenced and probably arise from either or both of the low-frequency approach of the molecule to the internal surface of the SiO2 nanosphere or the molecule diffusion-induced memory effect. This new approach could be applied to other chemical reactions in liquid phase to gain more insight into their molecular reaction kinetics and the dynamics of elementary steps.

  1. DNA origami-based shape IDs for single-molecule nanomechanical genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honglu; Chao, Jie; Pan, Dun; Liu, Huajie; Qiang, Yu; Liu, Ke; Cui, Chengjun; Chen, Jianhua; Huang, Qing; Hu, Jun; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Shi, Yongyong; Fan, Chunhai

    2017-04-01

    Variations on DNA sequences profoundly affect how we develop diseases and respond to pathogens and drugs. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a nanomechanical imaging approach for genetic analysis with nanometre resolution. However, unlike fluorescence imaging that has wavelength-specific fluorophores, the lack of shape-specific labels largely hampers widespread applications of AFM imaging. Here we report the development of a set of differentially shaped, highly hybridizable self-assembled DNA origami nanostructures serving as shape IDs for magnified nanomechanical imaging of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Using these origami shape IDs, we directly genotype single molecules of human genomic DNA with an ultrahigh resolution of ~10 nm and the multiplexing ability. Further, we determine three types of disease-associated, long-range haplotypes in samples from the Han Chinese population. Single-molecule analysis allows robust haplotyping even for samples with low labelling efficiency. We expect this generic shape ID-based nanomechanical approach to hold great potential in genetic analysis at the single-molecule level.

  2. Single-Molecule Counting of Point Mutations by Transient DNA Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin; Li, Lidan; Wang, Shanshan; Hao, Dandan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Changyuan

    2017-03-01

    High-confidence detection of point mutations is important for disease diagnosis and clinical practice. Hybridization probes are extensively used, but are hindered by their poor single-nucleotide selectivity. Shortening the length of DNA hybridization probes weakens the stability of the probe-target duplex, leading to transient binding between complementary sequences. The kinetics of probe-target binding events are highly dependent on the number of complementary base pairs. Here, we present a single-molecule assay for point mutation detection based on transient DNA binding and use of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Statistical analysis of single-molecule kinetics enabled us to effectively discriminate between wild type DNA sequences and single-nucleotide variants at the single-molecule level. A higher single-nucleotide discrimination is achieved than in our previous work by optimizing the assay conditions, which is guided by statistical modeling of kinetics with a gamma distribution. The KRAS c.34 A mutation can be clearly differentiated from the wild type sequence (KRAS c.34 G) at a relative abundance as low as 0.01% mutant to WT. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method for analysis of clinically relevant biological samples, we used this technology to detect mutations in single-stranded DNA generated from asymmetric RT-PCR of mRNA from two cancer cell lines.

  3. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Shanlin [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  4. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  5. A gate-tunable single-molecule diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrin, M.L.; Galán García, E.; Eelkema, R.; Thijssen, J.M.; Grozema, F.C.; van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2016-01-01

    In the pursuit of down-sizing electronic components, the ultimate limit is the use of single molecules as functional devices. The first theoretical proposal of such a device, predicted more than four decades ago, is the seminal Aviram–Ratner rectifier that exploits the orbital structure of the

  6. BRCA Testing by Single-Molecule Molecular Inversion Probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neveling, K.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Derks, R; Kwint, M.P.; Ouchene, H.; Steehouwer, M.; Lier, L.A. van; Bosgoed, E.A.J.; Rikken, A.; Tychon, M.W.J.; Zafeiropoulou, D.; Castelein, S.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Thung, G.W.; Hofste, T.; Lelieveld, S.H.; Bertens, S.M.; Adan, I.B.; Eijkelenboom, A.; Tops, B.B.J.; Yntema, H.G.; Stokowy, T.; Knappskog, P.M.; Hoberg-Vetti, H.; Steen, V.M.; Boyle, E.; Martin, B.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Shendure, J.; Nelen, M.R.; Hoischen, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in next generation DNA sequencing (NGS), NGS-based single gene tests for diagnostic purposes require improvements in terms of completeness, quality, speed, and cost. Single-molecule molecular inversion probes (smMIPs) are a technology with unrealized potential in the

  7. Computing magnetic anisotropy constants of single molecule magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. We present here a theoretical approach to compute the molecular magnetic anisotropy parameters, DM and EM for single molecule magnets in any given spin eigenstate of exchange spin Hami- ltonian. We first describe a hybrid constant MS-valence bond (VB) technique of solving spin Hamilto- nians employing ...

  8. Computing magnetic anisotropy constants of single molecule magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present here a theoretical approach to compute the molecular magnetic anisotropy parameters, and for single molecule magnets in any given spin eigenstate of exchange spin Hamiltonian. We first describe a hybrid constant -valence bond (VB) technique of solving spin Hamiltonians employing full spatial ...

  9. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...

  10. Single-Molecule Electronic Measurements with Metal Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    A review of concepts like tunneling through a metal-molecule-metal-junction, contrast with electrochemical and optical-charge injection, strong-coupling limit, calculations of tunnel transport, electron transfer through Redox-active molecules is presented. This is followed by a discussion of experimental approaches for single-molecule measurements.

  11. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  12. Large negative differential conductance in single-molecule break junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrin, Mickael L.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Koole, Max; Seldenthuis, Johannes S.; Gil, Jose A. Celis; Valkenier, Hennie; Hummelen, Jan C.; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Thijssen, Joseph M.; Dulic, Diana; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular electronics aims at exploiting the internal structure and electronic orbitals of molecules to construct functional building blocks(1). To date, however, the overwhelming majority of experimentally realized single-molecule junctions can be described as single quantum dots, where transport

  13. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-02-27

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment.

  14. The properties and applications of single-molecule DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule sequencing enables DNA or RNA to be sequenced directly from biological samples, making it well-suited for diagnostic and clinical applications. Here we review the properties and applications of this rapidly evolving and promising technology. PMID:21349208

  15. Dynamics of a GPCR studied with single-molecule microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, Sandra de

    2006-01-01

    The behavior of single G-protein coupled receptor molecules were studied with single-molecule microscopy in the plasmamembrane during Dictyostelium discoideum chemotaxis. The mobility of the receptor was different in the anterior and posterior regions of living cells migrating towards the source of

  16. Electrical and mechanical effects in single-molecule junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldenthuis, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    In single-molecule junctions, the behavior of a device is determined by the properties of an individual molecule. In this thesis we develop several models to describe both electrical and mechanical effects in such devices, which can be used to design molecules with a specific functionality. We show

  17. A single molecule DNA flow stretching microscope for undergraduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Kelly; Grafe, Brendan; Burke, Kathryn M.; Tanner, Nathan; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Loparo, Joseph; Price, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a simple, safe, and inexpensive single molecule flow stretching instrument is presented. The instrument uses a low cost upright microscope coupled to a webcam for imaging single DNA molecules that are tethered in an easy to construct microfluidic flow cell. The system requires no

  18. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilfan, I.D.; Kamping, W.; Van den Hout, M.; Candelli, A.; Hage, S.; Dekker, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNAenzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct.

  19. Visualizing DNA Replication at the Single-Molecule Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule methodology have made it possible to study the dynamic behavior of individual enzymes and their interactions with other proteins in multiprotein complexes. Here, we describe newly developed methods to study the coordination of DNA unwinding, priming, and synthesis

  20. VISUALIZING DNA REPLICATION AT THE SINGLE-MOLECULE LEVEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, NG

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule methodology have made it possible to study the dynamic behavior of individual enzymes and their interactions with other proteins in multiprotein complexes. Here, we describe newly developed methods to study the coordination of DNA unwinding, priming, and synthesis

  1. Single-molecule techniques in biophysics: a review of the progress in methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Shepherd, Jack; Wollman, Adam J M; Leake, Mark C

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule biophysics has transformed our understanding of biology, but also of the physics of life. More exotic than simple soft matter, biomatter lives far from thermal equilibrium, covering multiple lengths from the nanoscale of single molecules to up to several orders of magnitude higher in cells, tissues and organisms. Biomolecules are often characterized by underlying instability: multiple metastable free energy states exist, separated by levels of just a few multiples of the thermal energy scale k B T, where k B is the Boltzmann constant and T absolute temperature, implying complex inter-conversion kinetics in the relatively hot, wet environment of active biological matter. A key benefit of single-molecule biophysics techniques is their ability to probe heterogeneity of free energy states across a molecular population, too challenging in general for conventional ensemble average approaches. Parallel developments in experimental and computational techniques have catalysed the birth of multiplexed, correlative techniques to tackle previously intractable biological questions. Experimentally, progress has been driven by improvements in sensitivity and speed of detectors, and the stability and efficiency of light sources, probes and microfluidics. We discuss the motivation and requirements for these recent experiments, including the underpinning mathematics. These methods are broadly divided into tools which detect molecules and those which manipulate them. For the former we discuss the progress of super-resolution microscopy, transformative for addressing many longstanding questions in the life sciences, and for the latter we include progress in 'force spectroscopy' techniques that mechanically perturb molecules. We also consider in silico progress of single-molecule computational physics, and how simulation and experimentation may be drawn together to give a more complete understanding. Increasingly, combinatorial techniques are now used, including

  2. Single-molecule techniques in biophysics: a review of the progress in methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Shepherd, Jack; Wollman, Adam J. M.; Leake, Mark C.

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule biophysics has transformed our understanding of biology, but also of the physics of life. More exotic than simple soft matter, biomatter lives far from thermal equilibrium, covering multiple lengths from the nanoscale of single molecules to up to several orders of magnitude higher in cells, tissues and organisms. Biomolecules are often characterized by underlying instability: multiple metastable free energy states exist, separated by levels of just a few multiples of the thermal energy scale k B T, where k B is the Boltzmann constant and T absolute temperature, implying complex inter-conversion kinetics in the relatively hot, wet environment of active biological matter. A key benefit of single-molecule biophysics techniques is their ability to probe heterogeneity of free energy states across a molecular population, too challenging in general for conventional ensemble average approaches. Parallel developments in experimental and computational techniques have catalysed the birth of multiplexed, correlative techniques to tackle previously intractable biological questions. Experimentally, progress has been driven by improvements in sensitivity and speed of detectors, and the stability and efficiency of light sources, probes and microfluidics. We discuss the motivation and requirements for these recent experiments, including the underpinning mathematics. These methods are broadly divided into tools which detect molecules and those which manipulate them. For the former we discuss the progress of super-resolution microscopy, transformative for addressing many longstanding questions in the life sciences, and for the latter we include progress in ‘force spectroscopy’ techniques that mechanically perturb molecules. We also consider in silico progress of single-molecule computational physics, and how simulation and experimentation may be drawn together to give a more complete understanding. Increasingly, combinatorial techniques are now used, including

  3. A general approach to break the concentration barrier in single-molecule imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Loveland, Anna B.

    2012-09-09

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is often incompatible with physiological protein concentrations, as fluorescence background overwhelms an individual molecule\\'s signal. We solve this problem with a new imaging approach called PhADE (PhotoActivation, Diffusion and Excitation). A protein of interest is fused to a photoactivatable protein (mKikGR) and introduced to its surface-immobilized substrate. After photoactivation of mKikGR near the surface, rapid diffusion of the unbound mKikGR fusion out of the detection volume eliminates background fluorescence, whereupon the bound molecules are imaged. We labeled the eukaryotic DNA replication protein flap endonuclease 1 with mKikGR and added it to replication-competent Xenopus laevis egg extracts. PhADE imaging of high concentrations of the fusion construct revealed its dynamics and micrometer-scale movements on individual, replicating DNA molecules. Because PhADE imaging is in principle compatible with any photoactivatable fluorophore, it should have broad applicability in revealing single-molecule dynamics and stoichiometry of macromolecular protein complexes at previously inaccessible fluorophore concentrations. © 2012 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous Multicolor Single-Molecule Tracking with Single-Laser Excitation via Spectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Phelps, Carey; Wang, Jing; Lin, Li-Jung; Bittel, Amy; Scott, Zubenelgenubi; Jacques, Steven; Gibbs, Summer L; Gray, Joe W; Nan, Xiaolin

    2018-01-23

    Single-molecule tracking (SMT) offers rich information on the dynamics of underlying biological processes, but multicolor SMT has been challenging due to spectral cross talk and a need for multiple laser excitations. Here, we describe a single-molecule spectral imaging approach for live-cell tracking of multiple fluorescent species at once using a single-laser excitation. Fluorescence signals from all the molecules in the field of view are collected using a single objective and split between positional and spectral channels. Images of the same molecule in the two channels are then combined to determine both the location and the identity of the molecule. The single-objective configuration of our approach allows for flexible sample geometry and the use of a live-cell incubation chamber required for live-cell SMT. Despite a lower photon yield, we achieve excellent spatial (20-40 nm) and spectral (10-15 nm) resolutions comparable to those obtained with dual-objective, spectrally resolved Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy. Furthermore, motions of the fluorescent molecules did not cause loss of spectral resolution owing to the dual-channel spectral calibration. We demonstrate SMT in three (and potentially more) colors using spectrally proximal fluorophores and single-laser excitation, and show that trajectories of each species can be reliably extracted with minimal cross talk. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Single vesicle biochips for ultra-miniaturized nanoscale fluidics and single molecule bioscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Andreas Lauge; Lohr, Christina; Christensen, Sune M.

    2013-01-01

    , their fabrication via controlled self-assembly, and their characterization using fluorescence microscopy. We also highlight their applications in selected fields such as nanofluidics and single molecule bioscience. Despite their great potential for improved biocompatibility, extreme miniaturization and high...... ratio of these devices. Biochips based on immobilized vesicles circumvent this problem by encapsulating biomolecules in the protective environment of a lipid bilayer, thus minimizing interactions with hard surfaces. Here we review the development of biochips based on arrays of single nanoscale vesicles...... throughput, single vesicle biochips are still a niche technology that has yet to establish its commercial relevance....

  6. Multiple states of the Tyr318Leu mutant of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase revealed by single molecule kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, J.; Palfey, B.A.; Dertouzos, J.

    2004-01-01

    of single enzyme molecules through the characteristic on-off fluorescence signal, which corresponds to flavin mononucleotide (FMN) interconverting between the oxidized and reduced states during turnover. Our single-molecule data provide evidence of a distinct static heterogeneity in the enzymatic activity......, with some molecules going through the on-off cycles 5-fold faster than others, however, there is no detectable dynamic disorder in DHOD turnover. When 0.1% reduced Triton X-100, a detergent that more closely simulates the natural membrane environment, is added, our data suggest the degree of static...

  7. Monitoring and Manipulating Motions of Single Molecules/Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang

    -nanometer pores in theory. We then experimentally studied nanoparticles diffusing on membrane filters containing 200 nm polyethyleneglycol- or C18-modified pores. Using STED microscopy, we resolved for the first time how small particles are retained by the pores. Trapping by the pore entrances rather than adsorption is responsible for the retention. Further studies on C18-modified pores showed consistency in Gibbs free energy about the retention process. In addition, in order to understand how nanoparticles interact with the surface when they are forced to be on, or very close to, the surface, we studied nanosecond rotation dynamics of gold nanorods with one end attached on the surface. We found that the nanorod motion is dominated by van der Waals interaction-induced immobilization rather Brownian rotational diffusion as previously thought. The actual rotation, during which the nanorod transits from one immobilized state to the other, slows down by 50 times. The second part of the research is the collaboration with Tour's group in Rice University. The ultimate goal is to use light to drive a motorized nanocar at ambient conditions. To fulfill this goal, we first studied the moving kinetics of adamantane-wheeled nanocars on hydroxylated and PEG-modified surfaces using single molecule fluorescence microscopy. We found that nanocars' diffusion slows down on solid surface over time, which is possibly caused by the increased hydrophobicity of the substrate surface due to the adsorbates from the air. A sticky-spots model was proposed to explain the observed slowing down. To find out whether a light-activatable motor works when it is incorporated into a nanocar, we carefully designed a series of molecules containing a regular motor, a slow motor, a nonunidirectional motor, and no motor. We found that a fast unidirectional rotating motor enhanced the diffusion of the molecule in solution upon UV-illumination. Detailed analysis suggested that the unimolecular submersible nanomachine (USN

  8. Tocopherol quinone content of green algae and higher plants revised by a new high-sensitive fluorescence detection method using HPLC--effects of high light stress and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Jerzy; Szymańska, Renata; Krupinska, Karin

    2008-08-25

    A rapid, sensitive fluorescence method was applied here for detection of oxidized tocopherol quinones in total plant tissue extracts using HPLC, employing a post-column reduction of these compounds by a Zn column. Using this method, we were able to detect both alpha- and gamma-tocopherol quinones in Chlamydomonas reinhardii with a very high degree of sensitivity. The levels of both compounds increased under high light stress in the presence of pyrazolate in parallel to a decrease in the content of the corresponding tocopherols. The formation of tocopherol quinones from tocopherols was apparently due to their oxidation by singlet oxygen, which is formed in photosystem II under high light stress. alpha-Tocopherol quinone was also detected in a variety of higher plants of different age, and its level was found to increase during senescence in leaves grown under natural conditions. In contrast to alpha-tocopherol quinone, gamma-tocopherol quinone was not found in the higher plant species investigated with the exception of young runner bean leaves, where the levels of both compounds increased dramatically during cold and light stress. Taking advantage of native fluorescence of the reduced alpha-tocopherol quinone (alpha-tocopherol quinol), it can be detected in plant tissue extracts with a high sensitivity. In young runner bean leaves, alpha-tocopherol quinol was found at a level similar to alpha-tocopherol.

  9. Electronic transport in benzodifuran single-molecule transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, An; Li, Hui; Chen, Songjie; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin; Liao, Jianhui

    2015-04-01

    Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices.Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The fabrication procedure for BDF single-molecule

  10. Single cell and single molecule techniques for the analysis of the epigenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Christopher Benjamin

    Epigenetic regulation is a critical biological process for the health and development of a cell. Epigenetic regulation is facilitated by covalent modifications to the underlying DNA and chromatin proteins. A fundamental understanding of these epigenetic modifications and their associated interactions at the molecular scale is necessary to explain phenomena including cellular identity, stem cell plasticity, and neoplastic transformation. It is widely known that abnormal epigenetic profiles have been linked to many diseases, most notably cancer. While the field of epigenetics has progressed rapidly with conventional techniques, significant advances remain to be made with respect to combinatoric analysis of epigenetic marks and single cell epigenetics. Therefore, in this dissertation, I will discuss our development of devices and methodologies to address these pertinent issues. First, we designed a preparatory polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microdevice for the extraction, purification, and stretching of human chromosomal DNA and chromatin from small cell populations down to a single cell. The valveless device captures cells by size exclusion within the micropillars, entraps the DNA or chromatin in the micropillars after cell lysis, purifies away the cellular debris, and fluorescently labels the DNA and/or chromatin all within a single reaction chamber. With the device, we achieve nearly 100% extraction efficiency of the DNA. The device is also used for in-channel immunostaining of chromatin followed by downstream single molecule chromatin analysis in nanochannels (SCAN). Second, using multi-color, time-correlated single molecule measurements in nanochannels, simultaneous coincidence detection of 2 epigenetic marks is demonstrated. Coincidence detection of 3 epigenetic marks is also established using a pulsed interleaved excitation scheme. With these two promising results, genome-wide quantification of epigenetic marks was pursued. Unfortunately, quantitative SCAN never

  11. Gate-controlled Kondo effect in a single-molecule transistor with elliptical ferromagnetic leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, G. D.; Hu, T.-C.

    2017-10-01

    We present low-temperature transport measurements of C60-based single-molecule transistors fabricated using ferromagnetic break junction devices with planar elliptical leads, revealing a gate-modulated single-channel spin-1/2 Kondo effect. The shape anisotropy and dipole interaction of the source and drain electrodes allows for the relative alignment of their respective magnetic moments to be switched between a parallel and an antiparallel configuration. Both the ferromagnetism of the electrodes and the manipulation of their magnetization are shown to impact the magnetotransport in the Kondo regime in a manner consistent with analytical results, but with a magnitude highly sensitive to the precise electrode-molecule geometry and associated coupling asymmetry.

  12. Single molecule dynamics of polyproline by using AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamushi, Hironori; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2017-04-01

    Polyproline forms a unique structure, called polyproline helix. It takes polyproline II helix in water and Polyproline I helix in n-propanol. PP II is known to be a rigid molecule in spite of no hydrogen bonds between backbone atoms, and to play an important role in biological functions such as formation of collagen structure and in the cell-adhesion. In this study, we carried out single molecule force spectroscopy of polyproline with AFM(Atomic Force Microscope) and covalent immobilization of polyproline molecule on gold substrate to evaluate the rigidity of PP II at single molecule level. We found that the force-extension curve of polyproline shows a linear increase, which is unusual and not seen with others homo-polypeptide molecules. These results indicate that the high rigidity of polyproline II helix can be explained by "enthalpic", not "entropic" driven elasticity.

  13. Directly measuring single molecule heterogeneity using force spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intriguing results of single molecule experiments on proteins and nucleic acids is the discovery of functional heterogeneity: the observation that complex cellular machines exhibit multiple, biologically active conformations. The structural differences between these conformations may be subtle, but each distinct state can be remarkably long-lived, with random interconversions between states occurring only at macroscopic timescales, fractions of a second or longer. Though we now have proof of functional heterogeneity in a handful of systems---enzymes, motors, adhesion complexes---identifying and measuring it remains a formidable challenge. Here we show that evidence of this phenomenon is more widespread than previously known, encoded in data collected from some of the most well-established single molecule techniques: AFM or optical tweezer pulling experiments. We present a theoretical procedure for analyzing distributions of rupture/unfolding forces recorded at different pulling speeds. This re...

  14. Single Molecule Detection in Solution: Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Christoph; Enderlein, Jorg; Keller, Richard A.

    2002-07-01

    The detection of single molecules opens up new horizons in analytical chemistry, biology and medicine. This discipline, which belongs to the expanding field of nanoscience, has been rapidly emerging over the last ten years. This handbook provides a thorough overview of the field. It begins with basics of single molecule detection in solution, describes methods and devices (fluorescense correlation spectroscopy, surface enhanced Raman scattering, sensors, especially dyes, screening techniques, especially confocal laser scanning microscopy). In the second part, various applications in life sciences and medicine provide the latest research results. This modern handbook is a highly accessible reference for a broad community from advanced researchers, specialists and company professionals in physics, spectroscopy, biotechnology, analytical chemistry, and medicine. Written by leading authorities in the field, it is timely and fills a gap - up to now there exists no handbook concerning this theme.

  15. Electronic Single Molecule Identification of Carbohydrate Isomers by Recognition Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Im, JongOne; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Yanan; Sen, Suman; Biswas, Sudipta; Ashcroft, Brian; Borges, Chad; Wang, Xu; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2016-01-01

    Glycans play a central role as mediators in most biological processes, but their structures are complicated by isomerism. Epimers and anomers, regioisomers, and branched sequences contribute to a structural variability that dwarfs those of nucleic acids and proteins, challenging even the most sophisticated analytical tools, such as NMR and mass spectrometry. Here, we introduce an electron tunneling technique that is label-free and can identify carbohydrates at the single-molecule level, offering significant benefits over existing technology. It is capable of analyzing sub-picomole quantities of sample, counting the number of individual molecules in each subset in a population of coexisting isomers, and is quantitative over more than four orders of magnitude of concentration. It resolves epimers not well separated by ion-mobility and can be implemented on a silicon chip. It also provides a readout mechanism for direct single-molecule sequencing of linear oligosaccharides.

  16. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  17. Quantification of receptor targeting aptamer binding characteristics using single-molecule spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Brittany; Chen, Jiji; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-05-01

    This experimental design presents a single molecule approach based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) for the quantification of outer membrane proteins which are receptors to an aptamer specifically designed to target the surface receptors of live Salmonella typhimurium. By using correlation analysis, we also show that it is possible to determine the associated binding kinetics of these aptamers on live single cells. Aptamers are specific oligonucleotides designed to recognize conserved sequences that bind to receptors with high affinity, and therefore can be integrated into selective biosensor platforms. In our experiments, aptamers were constructed to bind to outer membrane proteins of S. typhimurium and were assessed for specificity against Escherichia coli. By fluorescently labeling aptamer probes and applying FCS, we were able to study the diffusion dynamics of bound and unbound aptamers and compare them to determine the dissociation constants and receptor densities of the bacteria for each aptamer at single molecule sensitivity. The dissociation constants for these aptamer probes calculated from autocorrelation data were 0.1285 and 0.3772 nM and the respective receptor densities were 42.27 receptors per µm(2) and 49.82 receptors per µm(2). This study provides ample evidence that the number of surface receptors is sufficient for binding and that both aptamers have a high-binding affinity and can therefore be used in detection processes. The methods developed here are unique and can be generalized to examine surface binding kinetics and receptor quantification in live bacteria at single molecule sensitivity levels. The impact of this study is broad because our approach can provide a methodology for biosensor construction and calculation of live single cell receptor-ligand kinetics in a variety of environmental and biological applications. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dysprosium Acetylacetonato Single-Molecule Magnet Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Nakanishi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dy single-molecule magnets (SMMs, which have several potential uses in a variety of applications, such as quantum computing, were encapsulated in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using a capillary method. Encapsulation was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In alternating current magnetic measurements, the magnetic susceptibilities of the Dy acetylacetonato complexes showed clear frequency dependence even inside the MWCNTs, meaning that this hybrid can be used as magnetic materials in devices.

  19. Single Molecule Studies on Dynamics in Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Täuber; Christian von Borczyskowski

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule (SM) methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC). Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization...

  20. Heterometallic 3d-4f single molecule magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Rosado Piquer, Lidia; Sañudo Zotes, Eva Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The promising potential applications, such as information processing and storage or molecular spintronics, of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have spurred on the research of new, better SMMs. In this context, lanthanide ions have been seen as ideal candidates for new heterometallic transition metal-lanthanide SMMs. This perspective reviews 3d-4f SMMs up to 2014 and highlights the most significant advances and challenges of the field.

  1. Connectivity dependence of Fano resonances in single molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Grace, Ali K. Ismael Iain; Lambert, Colin J.

    2017-01-01

    Using a first principles approach combined with analysis of heuristic tight-binding models, we examine the connectivity dependence of two forms of quantum interference in single molecules. Based on general arguments, Fano resonances are shown to be insensitive to connectivity, while Mach-Zehnder-type interference features are shown to be connectivity dependent. This behaviour is found to occur in molecular wires containing anthraquinone units, in which the pendant carbonyl groups create Fano ...

  2. Charge transport through single molecules, quantum dots and quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andergassen, S; Meden, V; Schoeller, H; Splettstoesser, J; Wegewijs, M R

    2010-07-09

    We review recent progress in the theoretical description of correlation and quantum fluctuation phenomena in charge transport through single molecules, quantum dots and quantum wires. Various physical phenomena are addressed, relating to cotunneling, pair-tunneling, adiabatic quantum pumping, charge and spin fluctuations, and inhomogeneous Luttinger liquids. We review theoretical many-body methods to treat correlation effects, quantum fluctuations, non-equilibrium physics, and the time evolution into the stationary state of complex nanoelectronic systems.

  3. Excitonic Coupling in Linear and Trefoil Trimer Perylenediimide Molecules Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Yoo, Hyejin

    2012-10-25

    Perylenediimide (PDI) molecules are promising building blocks for photophysical studies of electronic interactions within multichromophore arrays. Such PDI arrays are important materials for fabrication of molecular nanodevices such as organic light-emitting diodes, organic semiconductors, and biosensors because of their high photostability, chemical and physical inertness, electron affinity, and high tinctorial strength over the entire visible spectrum. In this work, PDIs have been organized into linear (L3) and trefoil (T3) trimer molecules and investigated by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to probe the relationship between molecular structures and interchromophoric electronic interactions. We found a broad distribution of coupling strengths in both L3 and T3 and hence strong/weak coupling between PDI units by monitoring spectral peak shifts in single-molecule fluorescence spectra upon sequential photobleaching of each constituent chromophore. In addition, we used a wide-field defocused imaging technique to resolve heterogeneities in molecular structures of L3 and T3 embedded in a PMMA polymer matrix. A systematic comparison between the two sets of experimental results allowed us to infer the correlation between intermolecular interactions and molecular structures. Our results show control of the PDI intermolecular interactions using suitable multichromophoric structures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Evaluation of fluorophores to label SNAP-tag fused proteins for multicolor single-molecule tracking microscopy in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Peter J; Corrêa, Ivan R; Sonntag, Michael H; Ibach, Jenny; Brunsveld, Luc; Kanger, Johannes S; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-08-19

    Single-molecule tracking has become a widely used technique for studying protein dynamics and their organization in the complex environment of the cell. In particular, the spatiotemporal distribution of membrane receptors is an active field of study due to its putative role in the regulation of signal transduction. The SNAP-tag is an intrinsically monovalent and highly specific genetic tag for attaching a fluorescent label to a protein of interest. Little information is currently available on the choice of optimal fluorescent dyes for single-molecule microscopy utilizing the SNAP-tag labeling system. We surveyed 6 green and 16 red excitable dyes for their suitability in single-molecule microscopy of SNAP-tag fusion proteins in live cells. We determined the nonspecific binding levels and photostability of these dye conjugates when bound to a SNAP-tag fused membrane protein in live cells. We found that only a limited subset of the dyes tested is suitable for single-molecule tracking microscopy. The results show that a careful choice of the dye to conjugate to the SNAP-substrate to label SNAP-tag fusion proteins is very important, as many dyes suffer from either rapid photobleaching or high nonspecific staining. These characteristics appear to be unpredictable, which motivated the need to perform the systematic survey presented here. We have developed a protocol for evaluating the best dyes, and for the conditions that we evaluated, we find that Dy 549 and CF 640 are the best choices tested for single-molecule tracking. Using an optimal dye pair, we also demonstrate the possibility of dual-color single-molecule imaging of SNAP-tag fusion proteins. This survey provides an overview of the photophysical and imaging properties of a range of SNAP-tag fluorescent substrates, enabling the selection of optimal dyes and conditions for single-molecule imaging of SNAP-tagged fusion proteins in eukaryotic cell lines. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier

  5. Single molecule methods for the study of catalysis: from enzymes to heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Kris P F; De Cremer, Gert; Neely, Robert K; Kubarev, Alexey V; Van Loon, Jordi; Martens, Johan A; De Vos, Dirk E; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Hofkens, Johan

    2014-02-21

    Structural and temporal inhomogeneities can have a marked influence on the performance of inorganic and biocatalytic systems alike. While these subtle variations are hardly ever accessible through bulk or ensemble averaged activity screening, insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying these diverse phenomena are absolutely critical for the development of optimized or novel catalytic systems and processes. Fortunately, state-of-the-art fluorescence microscopy methods have allowed experimental access to this intriguing world at the nanoscale. In this tutorial review we will first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the application of single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to (bio)catalysis research. In the second part topics specific to both bio and heterogeneous catalysis will be reviewed in more detail.

  6. Biomolecular applications of single-molecule measurements: kinetics and dynamics of a single-enzyme reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Matt; Fromm, David P.; Moerner, William E.

    2002-03-01

    In this work we describe preliminary experiments in which we have used ultra-sensitive fluorescence microscopy to observe the dynamics of individual enzyme molecules acting upon a substrate. The enzyme, (beta) -galactosidase from E.coli, is specifically immobilized onto a glass substrate while maintaining its functionality. The immobilized protein degrades a fluorogenic substrate to produce a fluorescent product, whose generation can be observed in real time. Individual copies of (beta) -galactosidase can be observed for many minutes, allowing the measurement of a large number of successive substrate turnover events. A rudimentary analysis of these turnovers using autocorrelation functions is presented, and a strong heterogeneity in reaction rates between different molecules is observed. In addition, the challenges inherent in successful surface immobilization of proteins for single-molecule experiments are discussed.

  7. Single-molecule super-resolution microscopy reveals how light couples to a plasmonic nanoantenna on the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Esther; Isaacoff, Benjamin P; Flynn, Jessica D; Biteen, Julie S

    2015-04-08

    The greatly enhanced fields near metal nanoparticles have demonstrated remarkable optical properties and are promising for applications from solar energy to biosensing. However, direct experimental study of these light-matter interactions at the nanoscale has remained difficult due to the limitations of optical microscopy. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to probe how a plasmonic nanoantenna modifies the fluorescence emission from a dipole emitter. We show that the apparent fluorophore emission position is strongly shifted upon coupling to an antenna and that the emission of dyes located up to 90 nm away is affected by this coupling. To predict this long-ranged effect, we present a framework based on a distance-dependent partial coupling of the dye emission to the antenna. Our direct interpretation of these light-matter interactions will enable more predictably optimized, designed, and controlled plasmonic devices and will permit reliable plasmon-enhanced single-molecule nanoscopy.

  8. Analysis of the steps in single-molecule photobleaching traces by using the hidden markov model and maximum-likelihood clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinghe; He, Kangmin; Cheng, Ming; Yu, Jianqiang; Fang, Xiaohong

    2014-08-01

    The step analysis of single-molecule photobleaching data offers a new approach for studying protein stoichiometry under physiological conditions. As such, it is important to develop suitable algorithms that can accurately extract the step events from the noisy single-molecule data. Herein, we report a HMM method that combines maximum-likelihood clustering for initializing the emission-probability distribution of the HMMs with an extended silhouette clustering criterion for estimating the state number of single molecules. In this way, the limitations of standard HMM in terms of processing typical single-molecule data with a short sequence are overcome. By using this method, the number and time points of the step events are automatically determined, without the introduction of any subjectivity. Simulation experiments on the experimental photobleaching data indicate that our method is very effective and robust in the analysis of single-molecule fluorescence photobleaching curves if the signal/noise ratio is larger than 2:1. This method was employed for processing photobleaching data that were obtained from single-molecule fluorescence imaging of transforming growth factor typeII receptors on a cell surface. This method is also expected to be applicable to the analysis of other stepwise events. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  10. Single Molecule Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Wang, Yang; Kneipp, Harald; Perelman, Lev T.; Itzkan, Irving; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    1997-03-01

    By exploiting the extremely large effective cross sections ( 10-17-10-16 cm2/molecule) available from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), we achieved the first observation of single molecule Raman scattering. Measured spectra of a single crystal violet molecule in aqueous colloidal silver solution using one second collection time and about 2×105 W/cm2 nonresonant near-infrared excitation show a clear ``fingerprint'' of its Raman features between 700 and 1700 cm-1. Spectra observed in a time sequence for an average of 0.6 dye molecule in the probed volume exhibited the expected Poisson distribution for actually measuring 0, 1, 2, or 3 molecules.

  11. Electrochemical proton relay at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Medvedev, I. G.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    A scheme for the experimental study of single-proton transfer events, based on proton-coupled two-electron transfer between a proton donor and a proton acceptor molecule confined in the tunneling gap between two metal leads in electrolyte solution is suggested. Expressions for the electric current...... are derived and compared with formalism for electron tunneling through redox molecules. The scheme allows studying the kinetics of proton and hydrogen atom transfer as well as kinetic isotope effects at the single-molecule level under electrochemical potential control....

  12. Single-molecule denaturation mapping of DNA in nanofluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, Walter; Larsen, Niels Bent; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2010-01-01

    . Consequently, the technique is sensitive to sequence variation without requiring enzymatic labeling or a restriction step. This technique may serve as the basis for a new mapping technology ideally suited for investigating the long-range structure of entire genomes extracted from single cells.......Here we explore the potential power of denaturation mapping as a single-molecule technique. By partially denaturing YOYO (R)-1-labeled DNA in nanofluidic channels with a combination of formamide and local heating, we obtain a sequence-dependent "barcode" corresponding to a series of local dips...

  13. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  14. Connectivity dependence of Fano resonances in single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Ali K; Grace, Iain; Lambert, Colin J

    2017-03-01

    Using a first principles approach combined with analysis of heuristic tight-binding models, we examine the connectivity dependence of two forms of quantum interference in single molecules. Based on general arguments, Fano resonances are shown to be insensitive to connectivity, while Mach-Zehnder-type interference features are shown to be connectivity dependent. This behaviour is found to occur in molecular wires containing anthraquinone units, in which the pendant carbonyl groups create Fano resonances, which coexist with multiple-path quantum interference features.

  15. Electrochemical single-molecule conductivity of duplex and quadruplex DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Photoinduced and electrochemical charge transport in DNA (oligonucleotides, OGNs) and the notions “hopping”, superexchange, polaron, and vibrationally gated charge transport have been in focus over more than two decades. In recent years mapping of electrochemical charge transport of pure and redox......-molecule electrochemical conductivity of pure and redox marked duplex OGNs, and address next electrochemistry and electrochemical conductivity in the few reported monolayer and single-molecule G-quadruplex studies. Facile electrochemical electron transfer of iron protoporphyrin IX stacked onto three-quartet 12-guanine...

  16. Single molecule probing of SNARE proteins by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in force spectroscopy mode has recently emerged as a technique of choice for studying mechanical interactions between the proteins of the core Soluble N-ethylmalmeimide-sensitive fusion protein Attachment protein REceptor (SNARE) complex. In these experiments, the rupture force, extension, spontaneous dissociation times and interaction energy for SNARE protein-protein interactions can be obtained at the single molecule level. These measurements, which are complementary to results and conclusions drawn from other techniques, improve our understanding of the role of the SNARE complex in exocytosis. PMID:19161382

  17. Advances in magnetic tweezers for single molecule and cell biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Devrim; Lee, Gil U

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MTW) enable highly accurate forces to be transduced to molecules to study mechanotransduction at the molecular or cellular level. We review recent MTW studies in single molecule and cell biophysics that demonstrate the flexibility of this technique. We also discuss technical advances in the method on several fronts, i.e., from novel approaches for the measurement of torque to multiplexed biophysical assays. Finally, we describe multi-component nanorods with enhanced optical and magnetic properties and discuss their potential as future MTW probes.

  18. An introduction to infinite HMMs for single molecule data analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sgouralis, Ioannis; Presse, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The hidden Markov model (HMM) has been a workhorse of single molecule data analysis and is now commonly used as a standalone tool in time series analysis or in conjunction with other analyses methods such as tracking. Here we provide a conceptual introduction to an important generalization of the HMM which is poised to have a deep impact across Biophysics: the infinite hidden Markov model (iHMM). As a modeling tool, iHMMs can analyze sequential data without a priori setting a specific number ...

  19. Assembly of membrane-bound protein complexes: detection and analysis by single molecule diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Knight, Jefferson D; Falke, Joseph J

    2012-02-28

    Protein complexes assembled on membrane surfaces regulate a wide array of signaling pathways and cell processes. Thus, a molecular understanding of the membrane surface diffusion and regulatory events leading to the assembly of active membrane complexes is crucial to signaling biology and medicine. Here we present a novel single molecule diffusion analysis designed to detect complex formation on supported lipid bilayers. The usefulness of the method is illustrated by detection of an engineered, heterodimeric complex in which two membrane-bound pleckstrin homology (PH) domains associate stably, but reversibly, upon Ca(2+)-triggered binding of calmodulin (CaM) to a target peptide from myosin light chain kinase (MLCKp). Specifically, when a monomeric, fluorescent PH-CaM domain fusion protein diffusing on a supported bilayer binds a dark MLCKp-PH domain fusion protein, the heterodimeric complex is observed to diffuse nearly 2-fold more slowly than the monomer because both of its twin PH domains can simultaneously bind to the viscous bilayer. In a mixed population of monomers and heterodimers, the single molecule diffusion analysis resolves, identifies and quantitates the rapidly diffusing monomers and slowly diffusing heterodimers. The affinity of the CaM-MLCKp interaction is measured by titrating dark MLCKp-PH construct into the system, while monitoring the changing ratio of monomers and heterodimers, yielding a saturating binding curve. Strikingly, the apparent affinity of the CaM-MLCKp complex is ~10(2)-fold greater in the membrane system than in solution, apparently due to both faster complex association and slower complex dissociation on the membrane surface. More broadly, the present findings suggest that single molecule diffusion measurements on supported bilayers will provide an important tool for analyzing the 2D diffusion and assembly reactions governing the formation of diverse membrane-bound complexes, including key complexes from critical signaling

  20. Utilizing Biotinylated Proteins Expressed in Yeast to Visualize DNA–Protein Interactions at the Single-Molecule Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijun Xue

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Much of our knowledge in conventional biochemistry has derived from bulk assays. However, many stochastic processes and transient intermediates are hidden when averaged over the ensemble. The powerful technique of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy has made great contributions to the understanding of life processes that are inaccessible when using traditional approaches. In single-molecule studies, quantum dots (Qdots have several unique advantages over other fluorescent probes, such as high brightness, extremely high photostability, and large Stokes shift, thus allowing long-time observation and improved signal-to-noise ratios. So far, however, there is no convenient way to label proteins purified from budding yeast with Qdots. Based on BirA–Avi and biotin–streptavidin systems, we have established a simple method to acquire a Qdot-labeled protein and visualize its interaction with DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. For proof-of-concept, we chose replication protein A (RPA and origin recognition complex (ORC as the proteins of interest. Proteins were purified from budding yeast with high biotinylation efficiency and rapidly labeled with streptavidin-coated Qdots. Interactions between proteins and DNA were observed successfully at the single-molecule level.

  1. Probing Protein Multidimensional Conformational Fluctuations by Single-Molecule Multiparameter Photon Stamping Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Conformational motions of proteins are highly dynamic and intrinsically complex. To capture the temporal and spatial complexity of conformational motions and further to understand their roles in protein functions, an attempt is made to probe multidimensional conformational dynamics of proteins besides the typical one-dimensional FRET coordinate or the projected conformational motions on the one-dimensional FRET coordinate. T4 lysozyme hinge-bending motions between two domains along α-helix have been probed by single-molecule FRET. Nevertheless, the domain motions of T4 lysozyme are rather complex involving multiple coupled nuclear coordinates and most likely contain motions besides hinge-bending. It is highly likely that the multiple dimensional protein conformational motions beyond the typical enzymatic hinged-bending motions have profound impact on overall enzymatic functions. In this report, we have developed a single-molecule multiparameter photon stamping spectroscopy integrating fluorescence anisotropy, FRET, and fluorescence lifetime. This spectroscopic approach enables simultaneous observations of both FRET-related site-to-site conformational dynamics and molecular rotational (or orientational) motions of individual Cy3-Cy5 labeled T4 lysozyme molecules. We have further observed wide-distributed rotational flexibility along orientation coordinates by recording fluorescence anisotropy and simultaneously identified multiple intermediate conformational states along FRET coordinate by monitoring time-dependent donor lifetime, presenting a whole picture of multidimensional conformational dynamics in the process of T4 lysozyme open-close hinge-bending enzymatic turnover motions under enzymatic reaction conditions. By analyzing the autocorrelation functions of both lifetime and anisotropy trajectories, we have also observed the dynamic and static inhomogeneity of T4 lysozyme multidimensional conformational fluctuation dynamics, providing a fundamental

  2. Photon-counting single-molecule spectroscopy for studying conformational dynamics and macromolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Ted Alfred [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Single-molecule methods have the potential to provide information about conformational dynamics and molecular interactions that cannot be obtained by other methods. Removal of ensemble averaging provides several benefits, including the ability to detect heterogeneous populations and the ability to observe asynchronous reactions. Single-molecule diffusion methodologies using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are developed to monitor conformational dynamics while minimizing perturbations introduced by interactions between molecules and surfaces. These methods are used to perform studies of the folding of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2, a small, single-domain protein, and of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers. Confocal microscopy is used in combination with sensitive detectors to detect bursts of photons from fluorescently labeled biomolecules as they diffuse through the focal volume. These bursts are analyzed to extract fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. Advances in data acquisition and analysis techniques that are providing a more complete picture of the accessible molecular information are discussed. Photon Arrival-time Interval Distribution (PAID) analysis is a new method for monitoring macromolecular interactions by fluorescence detection with simultaneous determination of coincidence, brightness, diffusion time, and occupancy (proportional to concentration) of fluorescently-labeled molecules undergoing diffusion in a confocal detection volume. This method is based on recording the time of arrival of all detected photons, and then plotting the two-dimensional histogram of photon pairs, where one axis is the time interval between each pair of photons 1 and 2, and the second axis is the number of other photons detected in the time interval between photons 1 and 2. PAID is related to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by a collapse of this histogram onto the time interval axis. PAID extends auto- and cross-correlation FCS

  3. Studying the Nucleated Mammalian Cell Membrane by Single Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Jiazhen; Gao, Jing; Liu, Shuheng; Jiang, Junguang; Jiang, Shibo; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    The cell membrane plays a key role in compartmentalization, nutrient transportation and signal transduction, while the pattern of protein distribution at both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic sides of the cell membrane remains elusive. Using a combination of single-molecule techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), to study the structure of nucleated cell membranes, we found that (1) proteins at the ectoplasmic side of the cell membrane form a dense protein layer (4 nm) on top of a lipid bilayer; (2) proteins aggregate to form islands evenly dispersed at the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane with a height of about 10–12 nm; (3) cholesterol-enriched domains exist within the cell membrane; (4) carbohydrates stay in microdomains at the ectoplasmic side; and (5) exposed amino groups are asymmetrically distributed on both sides. Based on these observations, we proposed a Protein Layer-Lipid-Protein Island (PLLPI) model, to provide a better understanding of cell membrane structure, membrane trafficking and viral fusion mechanisms. PMID:24806512

  4. New Antifouling Platform Characterized by Single-Molecule Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm2 which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm2 adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm2). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others. PMID:24503420

  5. Nanogap Electrodes towards Solid State Single-Molecule Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ajuan; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2015-12-01

    With the establishment of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-based integrated circuit technology, it has become more difficult to follow Moore's law to further downscale the size of electronic components. Devices based on various nanostructures were constructed to continue the trend in the minimization of electronics, and molecular devices are among the most promising candidates. Compared with other candidates, molecular devices show unique superiorities, and intensive studies on molecular devices have been carried out both experimentally and theoretically at the present time. Compared to two-terminal molecular devices, three-terminal devices, namely single-molecule transistors, show unique advantages both in fundamental research and application and are considered to be an essential part of integrated circuits based on molecular devices. However, it is very difficult to construct them using the traditional microfabrication techniques directly, thus new fabrication strategies are developed. This review aims to provide an exclusive way of manufacturing solid state gated nanogap electrodes, the foundation of constructing transistors of single or a few molecules. Such single-molecule transistors have the potential to be used to build integrated circuits. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Multiplexed single-molecule force proteolysis measurements using magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Arjun S; Chai, Jack; Dunn, Alexander R

    2012-07-25

    The generation and detection of mechanical forces is a ubiquitous aspect of cell physiology, with direct relevance to cancer metastasis(1), atherogenesis(2) and wound healing(3). In each of these examples, cells both exert force on their surroundings and simultaneously enzymatically remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). The effect of forces on ECM has thus become an area of considerable interest due to its likely biological and medical importance(4-7). Single molecule techniques such as optical trapping(8), atomic force microscopy(9), and magnetic tweezers(10,11) allow researchers to probe the function of enzymes at a molecular level by exerting forces on individual proteins. Of these techniques, magnetic tweezers (MT) are notable for their low cost and high throughput. MT exert forces in the range of ~1-100 pN and can provide millisecond temporal resolution, qualities that are well matched to the study of enzyme mechanism at the single-molecule level(12). Here we report a highly parallelizable MT assay to study the effect of force on the proteolysis of single protein molecules. We present the specific example of the proteolysis of a trimeric collagen peptide by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1); however, this assay can be easily adapted to study other substrates and proteases.

  7. Single-molecule study on polymer diffusion in a melt state: Effect of chain topology

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2013-08-06

    We report a new methodology for studying diffusion of individual polymer chains in a melt state, with special emphasis on the effect of chain topology. A perylene diimide fluorophore was incorporated into the linear and cyclic poly(THF)s, and real-time diffusion behavior of individual chains in a melt of linear poly(THF) was measured by means of a single-molecule fluorescence imaging technique. The combination of mean squared displacement (MSD) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) analysis demonstrated the broad distribution of diffusion coefficient of both the linear and cyclic polymer chains in the melt state. This indicates the presence of spatiotemporal heterogeneity of the polymer diffusion which occurs at much larger time and length scales than those expected from the current polymer physics theory. We further demonstrated that the cyclic chains showed marginally slower diffusion in comparison with the linear counterparts, to suggest the effective suppression of the translocation through the threading-entanglement with the linear matrix chains. This coincides with the higher activation energy for the diffusion of the cyclic chains than of the linear chains. These results suggest that the single-molecule imaging technique provides a powerful tool to analyze complicated polymer dynamics and contributes to the molecular level understanding of the chain interaction. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Single Molecule Bioelectronics and Their Application to Amplification-Free Measurement of DNA Lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, O Tolga; Pugliese, Kaitlin M; Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick C; Pan, Deng; Rajapakse, Arith J; Weiss, Gregory A; Collins, Philip G

    2016-06-24

    As biosensing devices shrink smaller and smaller, they approach a scale in which single molecule electronic sensing becomes possible. Here, we review the operation of single-enzyme transistors made using single-walled carbon nanotubes. These novel hybrid devices transduce the motions and catalytic activity of a single protein into an electronic signal for real-time monitoring of the protein's activity. Analysis of these electronic signals reveals new insights into enzyme function and proves the electronic technique to be complementary to other single-molecule methods based on fluorescence. As one example of the nanocircuit technique, we have studied the Klenow Fragment (KF) of DNA polymerase I as it catalytically processes single-stranded DNA templates. The fidelity of DNA polymerases makes them a key component in many DNA sequencing techniques, and here we demonstrate that KF nanocircuits readily resolve DNA polymerization with single-base sensitivity. Consequently, template lengths can be directly counted from electronic recordings of KF's base-by-base activity. After measuring as few as 20 copies, the template length can be determined with <1 base pair resolution, and different template lengths can be identified and enumerated in solutions containing template mixtures.

  9. Single Molecule Bioelectronics and Their Application to Amplification-Free Measurement of DNA Lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Tolga Gül

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As biosensing devices shrink smaller and smaller, they approach a scale in which single molecule electronic sensing becomes possible. Here, we review the operation of single-enzyme transistors made using single-walled carbon nanotubes. These novel hybrid devices transduce the motions and catalytic activity of a single protein into an electronic signal for real-time monitoring of the protein’s activity. Analysis of these electronic signals reveals new insights into enzyme function and proves the electronic technique to be complementary to other single-molecule methods based on fluorescence. As one example of the nanocircuit technique, we have studied the Klenow Fragment (KF of DNA polymerase I as it catalytically processes single-stranded DNA templates. The fidelity of DNA polymerases makes them a key component in many DNA sequencing techniques, and here we demonstrate that KF nanocircuits readily resolve DNA polymerization with single-base sensitivity. Consequently, template lengths can be directly counted from electronic recordings of KF’s base-by-base activity. After measuring as few as 20 copies, the template length can be determined with <1 base pair resolution, and different template lengths can be identified and enumerated in solutions containing template mixtures.

  10. Max Delbruck Prize in Biological Physics Lecture: Single-molecule protein folding and transition paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William

    2012-02-01

    The transition path is the tiny fraction of an equilibrium molecular trajectory when a transition occurs by crossing the free energy barrier between two states. It is a uniquely single-molecule property, and has not yet been observed experimentally for any system in the condensed phase. The importance of the transition path in protein folding is that it contains all of the mechanistic information on how a protein folds. As a major step toward observing transition paths, we have determined the average transition-path time for a fast and a slow-folding protein from a photon-by-photon analysis of fluorescence trajectories in single-molecule FRET experiments. While the folding rate coefficients differ by 10,000-fold, surprisingly, the transition-path times differ by less than 5-fold, showing that a successful barrier crossing event takes almost the same time for a fast- and a slow-folding protein, i.e. almost the same time to fold when it actually happens.

  11. Single-molecule resolution of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kim C; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C

    2016-01-01

    The organization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher-order oligomers has provided a potential mechanistic system in defining complex GPCR responses. Despite being studied for nearly 20 years it has, and still is, been an area of controversy. Although technology has developed to quantitatively measure these associations in real time, identify the structural interfaces and even systems to understand the physiological significance of di/oligomerization, key questions remain outstanding including the role of each individual complex from the monomer to the higher-order oligomer, in their native system. Recently, single-molecule microscopy approaches have provided the tools to directly visualize individual GPCRs in dimers and oligomers, though as with any technological development each have their advantages and limitations. This chapter will describe these recent developments in single-molecule fluorescent microscopy, focusing on our recent application of super-resolution imaging of the GPCR for the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin to quantify GPCR monomers and formation of protomers in to dimers and distinct oligomeric forms. We present our approach, considerations, strategy, and challenges to visualize this receptor beyond the light diffraction limit via photoactivated localization microscopy with photoactivatable dyes. The addition of super-resolution approaches to the GPCR "nano-tool kit" will pave the way for novel avenues to answer outstanding questions regarding the existence and significance of these complexes to GPCR signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Single molecule approaches for quantifying transcription and degradation rates in intact mammalian tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2016-04-01

    A key challenge in mammalian biology is to understand how rates of transcription and mRNA degradation jointly shape cellular gene expression. Powerful techniques have been developed for measuring these rates either genome-wide or at the single-molecule level, however these techniques are not applicable to assessment of cells within their native tissue microenvironment. Here we describe a technique based on single molecule Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization (smFISH) to measure transcription and degradation rates in intact mammalian tissues. The technique is based on dual-color libraries targeting the introns and exons of the genes of interest, enabling visualization and quantification of both nascent and mature mRNA. We present a software, TransQuant, that facilitates quantifying these rates from smFISH images. Our approach enables assessment of both transcription and degradation rates of any gene of interest while controlling for the inherent heterogeneity of intact tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Single Molecule Cluster Analysis Identifies Signature Dynamic Conformations along the Splicing Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Mario R.; Martin, Joshua S.; Kahlscheuer, Matthew L.; Krishnan, Ramya; Abelson, John; Laederach, Alain; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    The spliceosome is the dynamic RNA-protein machine responsible for faithfully splicing introns from precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs). Many of the dynamic processes required for the proper assembly, catalytic activation, and disassembly of the spliceosome as it acts on its pre-mRNA substrate remain poorly understood, a challenge that persists for many biomolecular machines. Here, we developed a fluorescence-based Single Molecule Cluster Analysis (SiMCAn) tool to dissect the manifold conformational dynamics of a pre-mRNA through the splicing cycle. By clustering common dynamic behaviors derived from selectively blocked splicing reactions, SiMCAn was able to identify signature conformations and dynamic behaviors of multiple ATP-dependent intermediates. In addition, it identified a conformation adopted late in splicing by a 3′ splice site mutant, invoking a mechanism for substrate proofreading. SiMCAn presents a novel framework for interpreting complex single molecule behaviors that should prove widely useful for the comprehensive analysis of a plethora of dynamic cellular machines. PMID:26414013

  14. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals Topology Dependent Mutual Relaxation of Polymer Chains

    KAUST Repository

    Abadi, Maram

    2015-08-24

    The motion and relaxation of linear and cyclic polymers under entangled conditions are investigated by means of a newly developed single-molecule tracking technique, cumulative-area (CA) tracking. CA tracking enables simultaneous quantitative characterization of the diffusion mode, diffusion rate, and relaxation time that have been impossible with a widely used conventional single-molecule localization and tracking method, by analyzing cumulative areas occupied by the moving molecule. Using the novel approach, we investigate the motion and relaxation of entangled cyclic polymers, which have been an important but poorly understood question. Fluorescently labeled 42 kbp linear or cyclic tracer dsDNAs in concentrated solutions of unlabeled linear or cyclic DNAs are used as model systems. We show that CA tracking can explicitly distinguish topology-dependent diffusion mode, rate, and relaxation time, demonstrating that the method provides an invaluable tool for characterizing topological interaction between the entangled chains. We further demonstrate that the current models proposed for the entanglement between cyclic polymers which are based on cyclic chains moving through an array of fixed obstacles cannot correctly describe the motion of the cyclic chain under the entangled conditions. Our results rather suggest the mutual relaxation of the cyclic chains, which underscore the necessity of developing a new model to describe the motion of cyclic polymer under the entangled conditions based on the mutual interaction of the chains.

  15. Single-Molecule FRET States, Conformational Interchange, and Conformational Selection by Dye Labels in Calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Matthew S; Braimah, Adebayo; Benson, David R; Johnson, Carey K

    2016-05-19

    We investigate the roles of measurement time scale and the nature of the fluorophores in the FRET states measured for calmodulin, a calcium signaling protein known to undergo pronounced conformational changes. The measured FRET distributions depend markedly on the measurement time scale (nanosecond or microsecond). Comparison of FRET distributions measured by donor fluorescence decay with FRET distributions recovered from single-molecule burst measurements binned over time scales of 90 μs to 1 ms reveals conformational averaging over the intervening time regimes. We find further that, particularly in the presence of saturating Ca(2+), the nature of the measured single-molecule FRET distribution depends markedly on the identity of the FRET pair. The results suggest interchange between conformational states on time scales of hundreds of microseconds or less. Interaction with a fluorophore such as the dye Texas Red alters both the nature of the measured FRET distributions and the dynamics of conformational interchange. The results further suggest that the fluorophore may not be merely a benign reporter of protein conformations in FRET studies, but may in fact alter the conformational landscape.

  16. Simultaneous measurement of orientational and spectral dynamics of single molecules in nanostructured host-guest materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christophe; Hellriegel, Christian; Platschek, Barbara; Wöhrle, Dieter; Bein, Thomas; Michaelis, Jens; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2007-05-02

    Nanostructured host-guest materials are important for various applications in nanoscience, and therefore, a thorough understanding of the dynamics of the guest molecules within the host matrix is needed. To this aim we used single-molecule fluorescence techniques to simultaneously examine the spectral and the orientational behavior of single molecules in nanostructured porous host materials. Two types of host-guest systems have been investigated. First, oxazine-1 dye molecules were fixed rigidly in the channels of microporous AlPO4-5 crystals. Second, it was shown that terrylenediimide (TDI) dye molecules move in the mesoporous network of an uncalcined M41S thin film. In the first sample both spectral fluctuations ( approximately 5 nm) and rare spectral jumps (>10 nm) of the emission maximum were observed. However, the orientation of the emission dipole of the dye molecules remained constant. In contrast, the second system showed orientational dynamics as well as substantially more spectral dynamics. In this system the molecules were found to move between different regions in the host. The typical motion of the TDI molecules in the pores of M41S was not continuous but characterized by jumps between specific sites. Moreover, the spectral and orientational dynamics were correlated and arose directly from the different environments that were being explored by the mobile molecule.

  17. Studying plus-end tracking at single molecule resolution using TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Ram; Ross, Jennifer L

    2010-01-01

    The highly dynamic microtubule plus-ends are key sites of regulation that impact the organization and function of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Much of this regulation is performed by the microtubule plus-end tracking (+TIP) family of proteins. +TIPs are a structurally diverse group of proteins that bind to and track with growing microtubule plus-ends in cells. +TIPs regulate microtubule dynamics as well as mediate interactions between microtubule tips and other cellular structures. Most +TIPs can directly bind to microtubules in vitro; however, the mechanisms for their plus-end specificity are not fully understood. Cellular studies of +TIP activity are complicated by the fact that members of the +TIP family of proteins interact with each other to form higher-order protein assemblies. Development of an in vitro system, using minimal components, to study +TIP activity is therefore critical to unequivocally understand the behavior of individual +TIP proteins. Coupled with single molecule imaging, this system provides a powerful tool to study the molecular properties that are important for +TIP function. In this chapter, we describe a detailed protocol for in vitro reconstitution of +TIP activity at single molecule resolution using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Single-Molecule Imaging of DNAs with Sticky Ends at Water/Fused Silica Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Slavica [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) was used to study intermolecular interactions of DNAs with unpaired (sticky) ends of different lengths at water/fused silica interface at the single-molecule level. Evanescent field residence time, linear velocity and adsorption/desorption frequency were measured in a microchannel for individual DNA molecules from T7, Lambda, and PSP3 phages at various pH values. The longest residence times and the highest adsorption/desorption frequencies at the constant flow at pH 5.5 were found for PSP3 DNA, followed by lower values for Lambda DNA, and the lowest values for T7 DNA. Since T7, Lambda, and PSP3 DNA molecules contain none, twelve and nineteen unpaired bases, respectively, it was concluded that the affinity of DNAs for the surface increases with the length of the sticky ends. This confirms that hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between sticky ends and fused-silica surface are driving forces for DNA adsorption at the fused-silica surface. Described single-molecule methodology and results therein can be valuable for investigation of interactions in liquid chromatography, as well as for design of DNA hybridization sensors and drug delivery systems.

  19. Applications of a single-molecule detection in early disease diagnosis and enzymatic reaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Various single-molecule techniques were utilized for ultra-sensitive early diagnosis of viral DNA and antigen and basic mechanism study of enzymatic reactions. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV) served as the screening target in a flow system. Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532) labeled single-stranded DNA probes were hybridized to the target HPV-16 DNA in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell and had a linear dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was employed to achieve zero false-positive count. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the system. A surface-based method was used to improve the throughput of the flow system. HPV-16 DNA was hybridized to probes on a glass surface and detected with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. In the single-probe mode, the whole genome and target DNA were fluorescently labeled before hybridization, and the detection limit is similar to the flow system. In the dual-probe mode, a second probe was introduced. The linear dynamic range covers 1.44-7000 copies/cell, which is typical of early infection to near-cancer stages. The dual-probe method was tested with a crudely prepared sample. Even with reduced hybridization efficiency caused by the interference of cellular materials, we were still able to differentiate infected cells from healthy cells. Detection and quantification of viral antigen with a novel single-molecule immunosorbent assay (SMISA) was achieved. Antigen from human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) was chosen to be the target in this study. The target was sandwiched between a monoclonal capture antibody and a

  20. Single molecule analysis of bacterial polymerase chain reaction products in submicrometer fluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavis, Samuel M; Corgié, Stéphane C; Cipriany, Benjamin R; Craighead, Harold G; Walker, Larry P

    2007-09-20

    Laser induced fluorescence in submicrometer fluidic channels was used to characterize the synthesis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from a model bacterial system in order to explore the advantages and limitations of on chip real time single molecule PCR analysis. Single oligonucleotide universal bacterial primers and PCR amplicons from the 16S rDNA of Thermobifida fusca (325 bp) were directly detected at all phases of the reaction with low sample consumption and without post-amplification purification or size screening. Primers were fluorescently labeled with single Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorophores, resulting in double labeled, two color amplicons. PCR products were driven electrokinetically through a fused silica channel with a 250 nm by 500 nm rectangular cross section. Lasers with 488 nm and 568 nm wavelengths were focused and overlapped on the channel for fluorescence excitation. All molecules entering the channel were rapidly and uniformly analyzed. Photon burst analysis was used to detect and identify individual primers and amplicons, and fluorescence correlation and cross-correlation spectroscopy were used to account for analyte flow speed. Conventional gel and capillary electrophoresis were also used to characterize the PCR amplification, and the results of differences in detection sensitivity and analyte discrimination were examined. Limits were imposed by the purity and labeling efficiency of the PCR reagents, which must be improved in parallel with increases in detection sensitivity.

  1. Tracking of single molecules as a powerful method to characterize diffusivity of organic species in mesoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellriegel, Christian; Kirstein, Johanna; Braeuchle, Christoph [Dept. Chemie und Biochemie and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen Butenandtstr. 11, D-81377 Munich (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion of individual fluorescent molecules can be observed by single-molecule tracking techniques and characterized by the analysis of their diffusional trajectory. Heterogeneities in the diffusivity that would pass undetected by conventional ensemble methods or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy are resolved by this method. This is demonstrated using four different examples in which we analyse the diffusion of single organic dye molecules in mesoporous materials. We show that this method can be used to obtain structural information from the inner structure of nanoporous materials with a resolution better than the optical diffraction limit.

  2. 8TH International Meeting on Hole Burning Single Molecule and Related Spectroscopies: Science and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The 8th International Meeting on Hole Burning, Single Molecule , and Related Spectroscopies: Science and Applications (HBSM 2003) was held in Bozeman...fundamental science and applications of site-selective spectroscopies, spectral hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy, photon echoes, and related... Single molecule detection and spectroscopy, Laser frequency stabilization to SHB references, Optical storage and signal processing, Dephasing and spectral

  3. Single-molecule denaturation mapping of DNA in nanofluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Walter; Larsen, Niels B; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Kristensen, Anders; Tommerup, Niels; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-07-27

    Here we explore the potential power of denaturation mapping as a single-molecule technique. By partially denaturing YOYO-1-labeled DNA in nanofluidic channels with a combination of formamide and local heating, we obtain a sequence-dependent "barcode" corresponding to a series of local dips and peaks in the intensity trace along the extended molecule. We demonstrate that this structure arises from the physics of local denaturation: statistical mechanical calculations of sequence-dependent melting probability can predict the barcode to be observed experimentally for a given sequence. Consequently, the technique is sensitive to sequence variation without requiring enzymatic labeling or a restriction step. This technique may serve as the basis for a new mapping technology ideally suited for investigating the long-range structure of entire genomes extracted from single cells.

  4. Single Molecule Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneipp, K.; Wang, Y.; Kneipp, H.; Perelman, L.T.; Itzkan, I.; Dasari, R.R.; Feld, M.S. [George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Technical University of Berlin, D 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    By exploiting the extremely large effective cross sections (10{sup -17}{endash}10{sup -16}cm{sup 2}/molecule) available from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), we achieved the first observation of single molecule Raman scattering. Measured spectra of a single crystal violet molecule in aqueous colloidal silver solution using one second collection time and about 2{times}10{sup 5}W/cm{sup 2} nonresonant near-infrared excitation show a clear {open_quotes}fingerprint{close_quotes} of its Raman features between 700 and 1700cm{sup -1}. Spectra observed in a time sequence for an average of 0.6 dye molecule in the probed volume exhibited the expected Poisson distribution for actually measuring 0, 1, 2, or 3 molecules. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Single-Molecule Electrochemical Gating in Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, Nicola J.; Higgins, Simon J.; Jeppesen, Jan O.

    2012-01-01

    The single-molecular conductance of a redox active molecular bridge has been studied in an electrochemical single-molecule transistor configuration in a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). The redox active pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene (pTTF) moiety was attached to gold contacts at both ends through...... −(CH2)6S– groups, and gating of the redox state was achieved with the electrochemical potential. The water-free, room-temperature, ionic liquid environment enabled both the monocationic and the previously inaccessible dicationic redox states of the pTTF moiety to be studied in the in situ scanning...... relaxation. Using this view, reorganization energies of ∼1.2 eV have been estimated for both the first and second redox transitions for the pTTF bridge in the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BMIOTf) ionic liquid environment. By contrast, in aqueous environments, a much smaller...

  6. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    Enkephalin, an endogeneous substance in the human brain showing morphine-like biological functions, has been detected at the single molecule level based on the surface-enhanced Raman signal of the ring breathing mode of phenylalanine, which is one building block of the molecule. For enhancing...... the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  7. Mechanisms of Cellular Proteostasis: Insights from Single-Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Carlos J.; Kaiser, Christian M.; Maillard, Rodrigo A.; Goldman, Daniel H.; Wilson, Christian A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells employ a variety of strategies to maintain proteome homeostasis. Beginning during protein biogenesis, the translation machinery and a number of molecular chaperones promote correct de novo folding of nascent proteins even before synthesis is complete. Another set of molecular chaperones helps to maintain proteins in their functional, native state. Polypeptides that are no longer needed or pose a threat to the cell, such as misfolded proteins and aggregates, are removed in an efficient and timely fashion by ATP-dependent proteases. In this review, we describe how applications of single-molecule manipulation methods, in particular optical tweezers, are shedding new light on the molecular mechanisms of quality control during the life cycles of proteins. PMID:24895851

  8. Enhancing Single Molecule Imaging in Optofluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas E. Vasdekis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated photonic structures that increase the signal emitted by single chromophores and minimize the excitation volume. Turning then to microfluidics, we review the compatible functionalization strategies that reduce noise stemming from non-specific interactions and architectures that minimize bleaching and blinking.

  9. Single-molecule chemical reactions on DNA origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    as templates for building materials with new functional properties. Relatively large nanocomponents such as nanoparticles and biomolecules can also be integrated into DNA nanostructures and imaged. Here, we show that chemical reactions with single molecules can be performed and imaged at a local position...... on a DNA origami scaffold by atomic force microscopy. The high yields and chemoselectivities of successive cleavage and bond-forming reactions observed in these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of post-assembly chemical modification of DNA nanostructures and their potential use as locally......DNA nanotechnology and particularly DNA origami, in which long, single-stranded DNA molecules are folded into predetermined shapes, can be used to form complex self-assembled nanostructures. Although DNA itself has limited chemical, optical or electronic functionality, DNA nanostructures can serve...

  10. Spin thermoelectric effects in organic single-molecule devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Wang, M.X.; Qian, C.; Hong, X.K.; Zhang, D.B.; Liu, Y.S.; Yang, X.F., E-mail: xfyang@cslg.edu.cn

    2017-05-25

    Highlights: • A stronger spin thermoelectric performance in a polyacetylene device is observed. • For the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, a transport gap is opened. Thus the thermoelectric effects are largely enhanced. - Abstract: The spin thermoelectric performance of a polyacetylene chain bridging two zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) is investigated based on first principles method. Two different edge spin arrangements in ZGNRs are considered. For ferromagnetic (FM) ordering, transmission eigenstates with different spin indices distributed below and above Fermi level are observed, leading directly to a strong spin thermoelectric effect in a wide temperature range. With the edge spins arranged in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, an obvious transport gap appears in the system, which greatly enhances the thermoelectric effects. The presence of a small spin splitting also induces a spin thermoelectric effect greater than the charge thermoelectric effect in certain temperature range. In general, the single-molecule junction exhibits the potential to be used for the design of perfect thermospin devices.

  11. Nonlinear coherent spectroscopy in the single molecule limit (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potma, Eric O.

    2015-10-01

    Detecting coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals from signal molecules is a longstanding experimental challenge. Driving the vibrational CARS response with surface plasmon fields has proven notoriously difficult due to strong background contributions, unfavorable heat dissipation and the phase dispersion of the plasmon modes in the ensemble. In this work we overcome previous experimental limitations and demonstrate time-resolved, vibrational CARS from molecules in the low copy number limit, down to the single molecule level. Our measurements, which are performed under ambient and non-electronic resonance conditions, establish that the coherent response from vibrational modes of individual molecules can be studied experimentally, opening up a new realm of molecular spectroscopic investigations.

  12. A Single-Molecule Hershey-Chase Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Van Valen, David; Chen, Yi-Ju; Tuson, Hannah; Wiggins, Paul; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Ever since Hershey and Chase used phages to establish DNA as the carrier of genetic information in 1952, the precise mechanisms of phage DNA translocation have been a mystery. While bulk measurements have set a time scale for in vivo DNA translocation during bacteriophage infection, measurements of DNA ejection by single bacteriophages have only been made in vitro. Here, we present direct visualization of single bacteriophages infecting individual Escherichia coli cells. For bacteriophage lambda, we establish a mean ejection time of roughly 5 minutes with significant cell-to-cell variability, including pausing events. In contrast, corresponding in vitro single-molecule ejections take only 10 seconds to reach completion and do not exhibit significant variability. Our data reveal that the velocity of ejection for two different genome lengths collapses onto a single curve. This suggests that in vivo ejections are controlled by the amount of DNA ejected, in contrast with in vitro DNA ejections, which are governed...

  13. Understanding disordered and unfolded proteins using single-molecule FRET and polymer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Hagen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding protein folding and the functional properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) requires detailed knowledge of the forces that act in polypeptide chains. These forces determine the dimensions and dynamics of unfolded and disordered proteins and have been suggested to impact processes such as the coupled binding and folding of IDPs, or the rate of protein folding reactions. Much of the progress in understanding the physical and chemical properties of unfolded and intrinsically disordered polypeptide chains has been made possible by the recent developments in single-molecule fluorescence techniques. However, the interpretation of the experimental results requires concepts from polymer physics in order to be understood. Here, I review some of the theories used to describe the dimensions of unfolded polypeptide chains under varying solvent conditions together with their more recent application to experimental data.

  14. Single vesicle biochips for ultra-miniaturized nanoscale fluidics and single molecule bioscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Andreas L; Lohr, Christina; Christensen, Sune M; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2013-09-21

    One of the major bottlenecks in the development of biochips is maintaining the structure and function of biomolecules when interfacing them with hard matter (glass, plastics, metals, etc.), a challenge that is exacerbated during miniaturization that inevitably increases the interface to volume ratio of these devices. Biochips based on immobilized vesicles circumvent this problem by encapsulating biomolecules in the protective environment of a lipid bilayer, thus minimizing interactions with hard surfaces. Here we review the development of biochips based on arrays of single nanoscale vesicles, their fabrication via controlled self-assembly, and their characterization using fluorescence microscopy. We also highlight their applications in selected fields such as nanofluidics and single molecule bioscience. Despite their great potential for improved biocompatibility, extreme miniaturization and high throughput, single vesicle biochips are still a niche technology that has yet to establish its commercial relevance.

  15. Hierarchically-coupled hidden Markov models for learning kinetic rates from single-molecule data

    CERN Document Server

    van de Meent, Jan-Willem; Wood, Frank; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Wiggins, Chris H

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of analyzing sets of noisy time-varying signals that all report on the same process but confound straightforward analyses due to complex inter-signal heterogeneities and measurement artifacts. In particular we consider single-molecule experiments which indirectly measure the distinct steps in a biomolecular process via observations of noisy time-dependent signals such as a fluorescence intensity or bead position. Straightforward hidden Markov model (HMM) analyses attempt to characterize such processes in terms of a set of conformational states, the transitions that can occur between these states, and the associated rates at which those transitions occur; but require ad-hoc post-processing steps to combine multiple signals. Here we develop a hierarchically coupled HMM that allows experimentalists to deal with inter-signal variability in a principled and automatic way. Our approach is a generalized expectation maximization hyperparameter point estimation procedure with variational Bayes a...

  16. The Dynamics of mRNA Turnover Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvathova, Ivana; Voigt, Franka; Kotrys, Anna V; Zhan, Yinxiu; Artus-Revel, Caroline G; Eglinger, Jan; Stadler, Michael B; Giorgetti, Luca; Chao, Jeffrey A

    2017-11-02

    RNA degradation plays a fundamental role in regulating gene expression. In order to characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics of RNA turnover in single cells, we developed a fluorescent biosensor based on dual-color, single-molecule RNA imaging that allows intact transcripts to be distinguished from stabilized degradation intermediates. Using this method, we measured mRNA decay in single cells and found that individual degradation events occur independently within the cytosol and are not enriched within processing bodies. We show that slicing of an mRNA targeted for endonucleolytic cleavage by the RNA-induced silencing complex can be observed in real time in living cells. This methodology provides a framework for investigating the entire life history of individual mRNAs from birth to death in single cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rocket launcher mechanism of collaborative actin assembly defined by single-molecule imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsprecher, Dennis; Jaiswal, Richa; Bombardier, Jeffrey P.; Gould, Christopher J.; Gelles, Jeff; Goode, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    Interacting sets of actin assembly factors work together in cells, but the underlying mechanisms have remained obscure. We used triple-color single molecule fluorescence microscopy to image the tumor-suppressor Adenomateous polyposis coli (APC) and the formin mDia1 during filament assembly. Complexes consisting of APC, mDia1, and actin monomers intiated actin filament formation, overcoming inhibition by capping protein and profilin. Upon filament polymerization, the complexes separated, with mDia1 moving processively on growing barbed ends while APC remained at the site of nucleation. Thus, the two assembly factors directly interact to initiate filament assembly, and then separate but retain independent associations with either end of the growing filament. PMID:22654058

  18. Strong field line shapes and photon statistics from a single molecule under anomalous noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Frantisek

    2009-10-01

    We revisit the line-shape theory of a single molecule with anomalous stochastic spectral diffusion. Waiting time profiles for bath induced spectral jumps in the ground and excited states become different when a molecule, probed by continuous-wave laser field, reaches the steady state. This effect is studied for the stationary dichotomic continuous-time-random-walk spectral diffusion of a single two-level chromophore with power-law distributions of waiting times. Correlated waiting time distributions, line shapes, two-point fluorescence correlation function, and Mandel Q parameter are calculated for arbitrary magnitude of laser field. We extended previous weak field results and examined the breakdown of the central limit theorem in photon statistics, indicated by asymptotic power-law growth of Mandel Q parameter. Frequency profile of the Mandel Q parameter identifies the peaks of spectrum, which are related to anomalous spectral diffusion dynamics.

  19. Biophysics of DNA-Protein Interactions From Single Molecules to Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Mark C

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a concise overview of current research on the biophysics of DNA-protein interactions. A wide range of new and classical methods are presented by authors investigating physical mechanisms by which proteins interact with DNA. For example, several chapters address the mechanisms by which proteins search for and recognize specific binding sites on DNA, a process critical for cellular function. Single molecule methods such as force spectroscopy as well as fluorescence imaging and tracking are described in these chapters as well as other parts of the book that address the dynamics of protein-DNA interactions. Other important topics include the mechanisms by which proteins engage DNA sequences and/or alter DNA structure. These simple but important model interactions are then placed in the broader biological context with discussion of larger protein-DNA complexes . Topics include replication forks, recombination complexes, DNA repair interactions, and ultimately, methods to understand the chromatin...

  20. Dwell time analysis of a single-molecule mechanochemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoszkiewicz, Robert; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti; Wiita, Arun P; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Fernandez, Julio M

    2008-02-19

    Force-clamp spectroscopy is a novel technique for studying mechanochemistry at the single-bond level. Single disulfide bond reduction events are accurately detected as stepwise increases in the length of polyproteins that contain disulfide bonds and that are stretched at a constant force with the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The kinetics of this reaction has been measured from single-exponential fits to ensemble averages of the reduction events. However, exponential fits are notoriously ambiguous to use in cases of kinetic data showing multiple reaction pathways. Here we introduce a dwell time analysis technique, of widespread use in the single ion channel field, that we apply to the examination of the kinetics of reduction of disulfide bonds measured from single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy traces. In this technique, exponentially distributed dwell time data is plotted as a histogram with a logarithmic time scale and a square root ordinate. The advantage of logarithmic histograms is that exponentially distributed dwell times appear as well-defined peaks in the distribution, greatly enhancing our ability to detect multiple kinetic pathways. We apply this technique to examine the distribution of dwell times of 4488 single disulfide bond reduction events measured in the presence of two very different kinds of reducing agents: tris-(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP) and the enzyme thioredoxin (TRX). A different clamping force is used for each reducing agent to obtain distributions of dwell times on a similar time scale. In the case of TCEP, the logarithmic histogram of dwell times showed a single peak, corresponding to a single reaction mechanism. By contrast, similar experiments done with TRX showed two well-separated peaks, marking two distinct modes of chemical reduction operating simultaneously. These experiments demonstrate that dwell time analysis techniques are a powerful approach to studying chemical reactions at the single-molecule

  1. Kinetic measurements on single-molecule disulfide bond cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jian; Fernández, Julio M

    2011-03-16

    We use single-molecule force clamp spectroscopy (SMFCS) to explore the reactivity of tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP), 1, 4-dl-dithiothreitol (DTT) and hydrosulfide anion (HS(-)) on disulfide bonds within a mechanically stretched polypeptide. The single-bond level bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (S(N)2) events are recorded at a series of precisely controlled temperatures so that the Arrhenius kinetic parameters, that is, the height of the activation energy barrier (E(a)) and the attempting frequency (A) of the chemical reactions, can be determined. The values of A are typically at the order of 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), which is far lower than that predicted by the transition-state theory, in which A is given by k(B)T/h and around 10(12) M(-1) s(-1) at room temperature. Furthermore, E(a) is derived to be 30-40 kJ/mol, which can be lowered by ∼6-8% with every 100 pN mechanical force applied. The correlation of the A and E(a) with the molecular structures reveals that the relative magnitude of these two parameters cannot be simply judged from the size of the molecule or the nucleophilicity of the attacking atom. The comparison of the influences on the reaction rate induced by force and temperature indicates an equivalent accelerating effect by every 50 pN or 10 K increment, giving for the first time the relationship between mechanical and thermal effects on a single-molecule S(N)2 chemical reaction.

  2. Theory of single-molecule controlled rotation experiments, predictions, tests, and comparison with stalling experiments in F1-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkán-Kacsó, Sándor; Marcus, Rudolph A

    2016-10-25

    A recently proposed chemomechanical group transfer theory of rotary biomolecular motors is applied to treat single-molecule controlled rotation experiments. In these experiments, single-molecule fluorescence is used to measure the binding and release rate constants of nucleotides by monitoring the occupancy of binding sites. It is shown how missed events of nucleotide binding and release in these experiments can be corrected using theory, with F 1 -ATP synthase as an example. The missed events are significant when the reverse rate is very fast. Using the theory the actual rate constants in the controlled rotation experiments and the corrections are predicted from independent data, including other single-molecule rotation and ensemble biochemical experiments. The effective torsional elastic constant is found to depend on the binding/releasing nucleotide, and it is smaller for ADP than for ATP. There is a good agreement, with no adjustable parameters, between the theoretical and experimental results of controlled rotation experiments and stalling experiments, for the range of angles where the data overlap. This agreement is perhaps all the more surprising because it occurs even though the binding and release of fluorescent nucleotides is monitored at single-site occupancy concentrations, whereas the stalling and free rotation experiments have multiple-site occupancy.

  3. Integration of biological ion channels onto optically addressable micro-fluidic electrode arrays for single molecule characterization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozik, Susan Marie; Frink, Laura J. Douglas; Bachand, George David; Keller, David J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Patrick, Elizabeth L.; Marshall, Jason A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ortiz, Theodore P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Meyer, Lauren A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Ryan W. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, James A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Flemming, Jeb Hunter

    2004-12-01

    The challenge of modeling the organization and function of biological membranes on a solid support has received considerable attention in recent years, primarily driven by potential applications in biosensor design. Affinity-based biosensors show great promise for extremely sensitive detection of BW agents and toxins. Receptor molecules have been successfully incorporated into phospholipid bilayers supported on sensing platforms. However, a collective body of data detailing a mechanistic understanding of membrane processes involved in receptor-substrate interactions and the competition between localized perturbations and delocalized responses resulting in reorganization of transmembrane protein structure, has yet to be produced. This report describes a systematic procedure to develop detailed correlation between (recognition-induced) protein restructuring and function of a ligand gated ion channel by combining single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and single channel current recordings. This document is divided into three sections: (1) reported are the thermodynamics and diffusion properties of gramicidin using single molecule fluorescence imaging and (2) preliminary work on the 5HT{sub 3} serotonin receptor. Thirdly, we describe the design and fabrication of a miniaturized platform using the concepts of these two technologies (spectroscopic and single channel electrochemical techniques) for single molecule analysis, with a longer term goal of using the physical and electronic changes caused by a specific molecular recognition event as a transduction pathway in affinity based biosensors for biotoxin detection.

  4. Single-molecule detection and radiation control in solutions at high concentrations via a heterogeneous optical slot antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenglong; Liu, Yongmin; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jiasen

    2014-08-07

    We designed a heterogeneous optical slot antenna (OSA) that is capable of detecting single molecules in solutions at high concentrations, where most biological processes occur. A heterogeneous OSA consists of a rectangular nanoslot fabricated on heterogeneous metallic films formed by sequential deposition of gold and aluminum on a glass substrate. The rectangular nanoslot gives rise to large field and fluorescence enhancement for single molecules. The near-field intensity inside a heterogeneous OSA is 170 times larger than that inside an aluminum zero-mode waveguide (ZMW), and the fluorescence emission rate of a molecule inside the heterogeneous OSA is about 70 times higher than that of the molecule in free space. Our proposed heterogeneous optical antenna enables excellent balance between performance and cost. The design takes into account the practical experimental conditions so that the parameters chosen in the simulation are well within the reach of current nano-fabrication technologies. Our results can be used as a direct guidance for designing high-performance, low-cost plasmonic nanodevices for the study of bio-molecule and enzyme dynamics at the single-molecule level.

  5. Excited-state annihilation reduces power dependence of single-molecule FRET experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettels, Daniel; Haenni, Dominik; Maillot, Sacha; Gueye, Moussa; Barth, Anders; Hirschfeld, Verena; Hübner, Christian G; Léonard, Jérémie; Schuler, Benjamin

    2015-12-28

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments are an important method for probing biomolecular structure and dynamics. The results from such experiments appear to be surprisingly independent of the excitation power used, in contradiction to the simple photophysical mechanism usually invoked for FRET. Here we show that excited-state annihilation processes are an essential cause of this behavior. Singlet-singlet annihilation (SSA) is a mechanism of fluorescence quenching induced by Förster-type energy transfer between two fluorophores while they are both in their first excited singlet states (S1S1), which is usually neglected in the interpretation of FRET experiments. However, this approximation is only justified in the limit of low excitation rates. We demonstrate that SSA is evident in fluorescence correlation measurements for the commonly used FRET pair Alexa 488/Alexa 594, with a rate comparable to the rate of energy transfer between the donor excited state and the acceptor ground state (S1S0) that is exploited in FRET experiments. Transient absorption spectroscopy shows that SSA occurs exclusively via energy transfer from Alexa 488 to Alexa 594. Excitation-power dependent microsecond correlation experiments support the conclusion based on previously reported absorption spectra of triplet states that singlet-triplet annihilation (STA) analogously mediates energy transfer if the acceptor is in the triplet state. The results indicate that both SSA and STA have a pronounced effect on the overall FRET process and reduce the power dependence of the observed FRET efficiencies. The existence of annihilation processes thus seems to be essential for using FRET as a reliable spectroscopic ruler at the high excitation rates commonly employed in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  6. Nanometer resolved single-molecule colocalization of nuclear factors by two-color super resolution microscopy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Mariya; Cattoni, Diego I; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Mutin, Thibaut; Chamousset, Delphine; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    In order to study the detailed assembly and regulation mechanisms of complex structures and machineries in the cell, simultaneous in situ observation of all the individual interacting components should be achieved. Multi-color Single-Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) is ideally suited for these quantifications. Here, we build on previous developments and thoroughly discuss a protocol for two-color SMLM combining PALM and STORM, including sample preparation details, image acquisition and data postprocessing analysis. We implement and evaluate a recently proposed colocalization analysis method (aCBC) that allows single-molecule colocalization quantification with the potential of revealing fine, nanometer-scaled, structural details of multicomponent complexes. Finally, using a doubly-labeled nuclear factor (Beaf-32) in Drosophila S2 cells we experimentally validate the colocalization quantification algorithm, highlight its advantages and discuss how using high molecular weight fluorescently labeled tags compromises colocalization precision in two-color SMLM experiments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Single-molecule packaging initiation in real time by a viral DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafabakhsh, Reza; Kondabagil, Kiran; Earnest, Tyler; Lee, Kyung Suk; Zhang, Zhihong; Dai, Li; Dahmen, Karin A.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-01-01

    Viral DNA packaging motors are among the most powerful molecular motors known. A variety of structural, biochemical, and single-molecule biophysical approaches have been used to understand their mechanochemistry. However, packaging initiation has been difficult to analyze because of its transient and highly dynamic nature. Here, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence assay that allowed visualization of packaging initiation and reinitiation in real time and quantification of motor assembly and initiation kinetics. We observed that a single bacteriophage T4 packaging machine can package multiple DNA molecules in bursts of activity separated by long pauses, suggesting that it switches between active and quiescent states. Multiple initiation pathways were discovered including, unexpectedly, direct DNA binding to the capsid portal followed by recruitment of motor subunits. Rapid succession of ATP hydrolysis was essential for efficient initiation. These observations have implications for the evolution of icosahedral viruses and regulation of virus assembly. PMID:25288726

  8. From nanofabrication to self-fabrication--tailored chemistry for control of single molecule electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Single molecule electronics is a field of research focused on the use of single molecules as electronics components. During the past 15 years the field has concentrated on development of test beds for measurements on single molecules. Bottom-up approaches to single molecule devices are emerging...... the electronic properties of a single molecule by chemical design....... as alternatives to the dominant top-down nanofabrication techniques. One example is solution-based self-assembly of a molecule enclosed by two gold nanorod electrodes. This article will discuss recent attempts to control the self-assembly process by the use of supramolecular chemistry and how to tailor...

  9. Biomimetic Nanoarchitectures for the Study of T Cell Activation with Single-Molecule Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Haogang

    Physical factors in the environment of a cell affect its function and behavior in a variety of ways. There is increasing evidence that, among these factors, the geometric arrangement of receptor ligands plays an important role in setting the conditions for critical cellular processes. The goal of this thesis is to develop new techniques for probing the role of extracellular ligand geometry, with a focus on T cell activation. In this work, top-down molecular-scale nanofabrication and bottom-up selective self-assembly were combined in order to present functional nanomaterials (primarily biomolecules) on a surface with precise spatial control and single-molecule resolution. Such biomolecule nanoarrays are becoming an increasingly important tool in surface-based in vitro assays for biosensing, molecular and cellular studies. The nanoarrays consist of metallic nanodots patterned on glass coverslips using electron beam and nanoimprint lithography, combined with self-aligned pattern transfer. The nanodots were then used as anchors for the immobilization of biological ligands, and backfilled with a protein-repellent passivation layer of polyethylene glycol. The passivation efficiency was improved to minimize nonspecific adsorption. In order to ensure true single-molecule control, we developed an on-chip protocol to measure the molecular occupancy of nanodot arrays based on fluorescence photobleaching, while accounting for quenching effects by plasmonic absorption. We found that the molecular occupancy can be interpreted as a packing problem, with the solution depending on the nanodot size and the concentration of self-assembly reagents, where the latter can be easily adjusted to control the molecular occupancy according to the dot size. The optimized nanoarrays were used as biomimetic architectures for the study of T cell activation with single-molecule control. T cell activation involves an elaborate arrangement of signaling, adhesion, and costimulatory molecules

  10. Investigating Single Molecule Physics with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Calvin Jay

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has given the scientific community a method to view, characterize, and manipulate the world at the atomic scale. Thirty years after the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for its invention, the remarkable instrument is still being used to deepen our understanding of physical and chemical processes. Tantamount to this has been the development of new techniques to expand its capabilities allowing STMs to answer increasingly more difficult scientific questions. This dissertation describes three technological thrusts in expanding the STMs capabilities in studying physics at the single molecule level. First, I have helped developed a new technique called the RF-STM which has the potential to snapshot femtosecond and picosecond processes by locking into the high frequency tunneling component generated from the 80MHz laser pulse train. This technique solves the problem of low frequency thermal oscillations when choppers are used in the beam line and if only tunneling signal is monitored, sub-angstrom spatial resolution should be simultaneously possible. Second, I have helped develop the itProbe technique by increasing its ability to map out the interaction potential energy surface (iPES) between a tip-CO molecule and a surface adsorbed molecule. I present a study conducted on the bridge-like 1,4 phenylene diisocyanide molecule where the iPES is probed at different heights and different energies. The result is an ability to 3-dimensionally map out the iPES and provide reliable insight into developing itProbe simulations. Third, I have developed a new technique called Energy Resolved Laser Action STM (ERLA-STM) where we can observe the change in molecular dynamics as a function of the illumination wavelength. In our pyrrolidine study, we demonstrated the kinetic changes that occur when an overtone of the CH stretch mode is excited by a near-IR laser pulse. By sweeping the excitation energy, we can characterize and control single molecule

  11. Single-Molecule Imaging of Proteoglycans in the Pericellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimgeour, Jan; McLane, Louis T; Chang, Patrick S; Curtis, Jennifer E

    2017-12-05

    The pericellular matrix is a robust, hyaluronan-rich polymer brush-like structure that controls access to the cell surface, and plays an important role in cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. We report the observation of single bottlebrush proteoglycan dynamics in the pericellular matrix of living chondrocytes. Our investigations show that the pericellular matrix undergoes gross extension on the addition of exogenous aggrecan, and that this extension is significantly in excess of that observed in traditional particle exclusion assays. The mean-square displacement of single, bound proteoglycans increases with distance to cell surface, indicating reduced confinement by neighboring hyaluronan-aggrecan complexes. This is consistent with published data from quantitative particle exclusion assays that show openings in the pericellular matrix microstructure ranging from ∼150 nm near the cell surface to ∼400 nm near the cell edge. In addition, the mobility of tethered aggrecan drops significantly when the cell coat is enriched with bottlebrush proteoglycans. Single-molecule imaging in this thick polysaccharide matrix on living cells has significant promise in the drive to elucidate the role of the pericellular coat in human health. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Developing Single-Molecule Technique with Microsecond Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhterov, Maxim V.

    Molecular machines like proteins are responsible for many regulatory and catalytic functions. Specifically, molecular motions of proteins and their flexibility determine conformational states required for enzyme catalysis, signal transduction, and protein-protein interactions. However, the mechanisms for protein transitions between conformational states are often poorly understood, especially in the milli- to microsecond ranges where conventional optical techniques and computational modeling are most limited. This work describes development of an electronic single-molecule technique for monitoring microsecond motions of biological molecules. Dynamic changes of conductance through a transistor made of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT-FET) report conformational changes of a protein molecule tethered to the SWNT sidewall. In principle, the high operating speed of SWNT-FETs could allow this technique to resolve molecular events with nanosecond resolution. This project focused on improving the technique to a 200 kHz effective bandwidth in order to resolve microsecond-scale dynamics. The improvement was achieved with a home-built electrochemical flow cell. By minimizing parasitic capacitance due to liquid coupling to electrodes and eliminating noise pickup, the flow cell enabled low-noise, high bandwidth measurement of molecular events as short as 2 mus. The apparatus was used to observe closing and opening motions of lysozyme. Preliminary results suggest that lysozyme has a distribution of possible velocities with the most probable speed approaching our experimental resolution of 2 mus.

  13. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Su

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments, microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  14. Gold plasmonic effects on charge transport through single molecule junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Olgun; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-03-01

    We study the impact of surface plasmon polaritons, the coupling of electromagnetic waves to collective electron oscillations on metal surfaces, on the conductance of single-molecule junctions. We use a scanning-tunneling microscope based break junction setup that is built into an optical microscope to form molecular junctions. Coherent 685nm light is used to illuminate the molecular junctions formed with 4,4'-bipyridine with diffraction limited focusing performance. We employ a lock-in type technique to measure currents induced by light. Furthermore, the thermal expansion due to laser heating is mimicked by mechanically modulating inter-electrode separation. For each junction studied, we measure current, and use AC techniques to determine molecular junction resonance levels and coupling strengths. We use a cross correlations analysis technique to analyze and compare the effect of light to that of the mechanical modulation. Our results show that junction transmission characteristics are not altered under illumination, within the resolution of our instrument. We argue that photo-currents measured with lock-in techniques in these kinds of structures are due to thermal effects. This work was funded by the Center for Re-Defining Photovoltaic Efficiency through Molecule Scale Control, an EFRC funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DESC0001085.

  15. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten

    2015-04-16

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  17. Selectively Sized Graphene-Based Nanopores for in Situ Single Molecule Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Colin R; Sze, Jasmine Y Y; Rosillo-Lopez, Martin; Salzmann, Christoph G; Edel, Joshua B

    2015-08-19

    The use of nanopore biosensors is set to be extremely important in developing precise single molecule detectors and providing highly sensitive advanced analysis of biological molecules. The precise tailoring of nanopore size is a significant step toward achieving this, as it would allow for a nanopore to be tuned to a corresponding analyte. The work presented here details a methodology for selectively opening nanopores in real-time. The tunable nanopores on a quartz nanopipette platform are fabricated using the electroetching of a graphene-based membrane constructed from individual graphene nanoflakes (ø ∼30 nm). The device design allows for in situ opening of the graphene membrane, from fully closed to fully opened (ø ∼25 nm), a feature that has yet to be reported in the literature. The translocation of DNA is studied as the pore size is varied, allowing for subfeatures of DNA to be detected with slower DNA translocations at smaller pore sizes, and the ability to observe trends as the pore is opened. This approach opens the door to creating a device that can be target to detect specific analytes.

  18. Single-Molecule High-Resolution Imaging with Photobleaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthew P. Gordon; Taekjip Ha; Paul R. Selvin; Gordon A. Baym

    2004-01-01

    ... of 1.5 nm with subsecond time resolution. Here we locate the position of two dyes and determine their separation with 5-nm precision, using the quantal photobleaching behavior of single fluorescent dye molecules...

  19. A Single-Molecule Barcoding System using Nanoslits for DNA Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Kyubong; Schramm, Timothy M.; Schwartz, David C.

    Single DNA molecule approaches are playing an increasingly central role in the analytical genomic sciences because single molecule techniques intrinsically provide individualized measurements of selected molecules, free from the constraints of bulk techniques, which blindly average noise and mask the presence of minor analyte components. Accordingly, a principal challenge that must be addressed by all single molecule approaches aimed at genome analysis is how to immobilize and manipulate DNA molecules for measurements that foster construction of large, biologically relevant data sets. For meeting this challenge, this chapter discusses an integrated approach for microfabricated and nanofabricated devices for the manipulation of elongated DNA molecules within nanoscale geometries. Ideally, large DNA coils stretch via nanoconfinement when channel dimensions are within tens of nanometers. Importantly, stretched, often immobilized, DNA molecules spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs are required by all analytical platforms working with large genomic substrates because imaging techniques acquire sequence information from molecules that normally exist in free solution as unrevealing random coils resembling floppy balls of yarn. However, nanoscale devices fabricated with sufficiently small dimensions fostering molecular stretching make these devices impractical because of the requirement of exotic fabrication technologies, costly materials, and poor operational efficiencies. In this chapter, such problems are addressed by discussion of a new approach to DNA presentation and analysis that establishes scaleable nanoconfinement conditions through reduction of ionic strength; stiffening DNA molecules thus enabling their arraying for analysis using easily fabricated devices that can also be mass produced. This new approach to DNA nanoconfinement is complemented by the development of a novel labeling scheme for reliable marking of individual molecules with fluorochrome labels

  20. Structural Information from Single-molecule FRET Experiments Using the Fast Nano-positioning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörfler, Thilo; Eilert, Tobias; Röcker, Carlheinz; Nagy, Julia; Michaelis, Jens

    2017-02-09

    Single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) can be used to obtain structural information on biomolecular complexes in real-time. Thereby, multiple smFRET measurements are used to localize an unknown dye position inside a protein complex by means of trilateration. In order to obtain quantitative information, the Nano-Positioning System (NPS) uses probabilistic data analysis to combine structural information from X-ray crystallography with single-molecule fluorescence data to calculate not only the most probable position but the complete three-dimensional probability distribution, termed posterior, which indicates the experimental uncertainty. The concept was generalized for the analysis of smFRET networks containing numerous dye molecules. The latest version of NPS, Fast-NPS, features a new algorithm using Bayesian parameter estimation based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling and parallel tempering that allows for the analysis of large smFRET networks in a comparably short time. Moreover, Fast-NPS allows the calculation of the posterior by choosing one of five different models for each dye, that account for the different spatial and orientational behavior exhibited by the dye molecules due to their local environment. Here we present a detailed protocol for obtaining smFRET data and applying the Fast-NPS. We provide detailed instructions for the acquisition of the three input parameters of Fast-NPS: the smFRET values, as well as the quantum yield and anisotropy of the dye molecules. Recently, the NPS has been used to elucidate the architecture of an archaeal open promotor complex. This data is used to demonstrate the influence of the five different dye models on the posterior distribution.