WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-risk localized prostate

  1. Radical prostatectomy in clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The optimal therapeutic strategy for high-risk localized prostate cancer (PCa) is controversial. Supported by randomized trials, the combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and endocrine therapy (ET) is advocated by many, while radical prostatectomy (RP......) is regarded as primary therapy by others. This study examined the outcome for high-risk localized PCa patients treated with RP. Material and methods. Of 1300 patients who underwent RP, 231 were identified as high-risk. Patients were followed for biochemical recurrence (BCR) (defined as prostate...

  2. Maximum tumor diameter is not an independent prognostic factor in high-risk localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van I.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Kok, D.E.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that maximum tumor diameter (MTD) is a predictor of recurrence in prostate cancer (PC). This study investigates the prognostic value of MTD for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in patients with PC, after radical prostatectomy (RP), with emphasis on high-risk localized prostate

  3. Association of Radical Local Treatment with Mortality in Men with Very High-risk Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stattin, Pär; Sandin, Fredrik; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend androgen deprivation therapy only for men with very high-risk prostate cancer (PCa), but there is little evidence to support this stance. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between radical local treatment and mortality in men with very high-risk PCa...... in men with very high-risk PCa for whom such treatment has been considered ineffective. PATIENT SUMMARY: Men with very high-risk prostate cancer diagnosed and treated in units with the highest exposure to surgery or radiotherapy had a substantially lower mortality.......BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend androgen deprivation therapy only for men with very high-risk prostate cancer (PCa), but there is little evidence to support this stance. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between radical local treatment and mortality in men with very high-risk PCa....... DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Semiecologic study of men aged high-risk PCa (local clinical stage T4 and/or prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level 50-200ng/ml, any N, and M0). Men with locally advanced PCa (local...

  4. Radical prostatectomy in high-risk and locally advanced prostate cancer: Mayo Clinic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Suzanne B; Boorjian, Stephen A

    2015-05-01

    Men diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer represent the cohort of prostate cancer patients at greatest risk for subsequent disease-specific mortality. Unfortunately, however, the classification of high-risk tumors remains imprecise and heterogeneous. There has been a historical reluctance to offer such patients aggressive local treatment, and considerable debate exists regarding the optimal management in this setting. We present here our institutional experience, as well as data from several other centers, with radical prostatectomy for high-risk tumors. We discuss that surgery affords accurate pathological staging, thereby improving the identification of patients for secondary therapies. Moreover, prostatectomy not only provides durable local disease control but in addition numerous contemporary surgical series in high-risk patients have shown radical prostatectomy to be associated with excellent long-term cancer-specific survival. Further, although studies comparing surgical and radiotherapy modalities in high-risk prostate patients have been wrought with methodological challenges, consistently these observational studies have found equivalent to improved oncologic outcomes when surgery is utilized as the primary treatment. Herein, we review the advantages, long-term outcomes, and technique of surgery for high-risk prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Very High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer: Outcomes Following Definitive Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, Amol K.; Gergis, Carol; Robertson, Scott P. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); He, Pei [Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Ram, Ashwin N.; McNutt, Todd R.; Griffith, Emily; DeWeese, Theodore A.; Honig, Stephanie; Singh, Harleen; Song, Danny Y.; Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore L., E-mail: deweese@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Existing definitions of high-risk prostate cancer consist of men who experience significant heterogeneity in outcomes. As such, criteria that identify a subpopulation of National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) high-risk prostate cancer patients who are at very high risk (VHR) for poor survival outcomes following prostatectomy were recently developed at our institution and include the presence of any of the following disease characteristics: multiple NCCN high-risk factors, primary Gleason pattern 5 disease and/or ≥5 biopsy cores with Gleason sums of 8 to 10. Whether these criteria also apply to men undergoing definitive radiation is unclear, as is the optimal treatment regimen in these patients. Methods and Materials: All men consecutively treated with definitive radiation by a single provider from 1993 to 2006 and who fulfilled criteria for NCCN high-risk disease were identified (n=288), including 99 patients (34%) with VHR disease. Multivariate-adjusted competing risk regression models were constructed to assess associations between the VHR definition and biochemical failure (BF), distant metastasis (DM), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM). Multivariate-adjusted Cox regression analysis assessed the association of the VHR definition with overall mortality (OM). Cumulative incidences of failure endpoints were compared between VHR men and other NCCN high-risk men. Results: Men with VHR disease compared to other NCCN high-risk men experienced a higher 10-year incidence of BF (54.0% vs 35.4%, respectively, P<.001), DM (34.9% vs 13.4%, respectively, P<.001), PCSM (18.5% vs 5.9%, respectively, P<.001), and OM (36.4% vs 27.0%, respectively, P=.04). VHR men with a detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration at the end of radiation (EOR) remained at high risk of 10-year PCSM compared to VHR men with an undetectable EOR PSA (31.0% vs 13.7%, respectively, P=.05). Conclusions: NCCN high-risk prostate cancer patients who meet VHR

  6. Maximum tumor diameter is not an independent prognostic factor in high-risk localized prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, I.M. van; Witjes, J.A.M.; Kok, D.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous studies suggest that maximum tumor diameter (MTD) is a predictor of recurrence in prostate cancer (PC). This study investigates the prognostic value of MTD for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in patients with PC, after radical prostatectomy (RP), with emphasis on high-risk

  7. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  8. SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR VERY HIGH-RISK LOCALLY RECURRENT PROSTATE CANCER AFTER RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliyev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Locally recurrent prostate cancer (PC in the bladder neck can substantially worsen quality of life in patients and hinder further treatment when castration-resistant PC develops. The paper describes a clinical case of very high-risk PC in a 55-year-old patient in whom radical cystectomy (RCE with removal of metastases in the bladder neck and the Bricker ileal conduit were performed for a local recurrence after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE. It gives the data of preoperative examination, the technical features of the primary operation RPE, the data of postoperative observation, the technical aspects and outcomes of еру surgery for a local recurrence, as well as the results of a 1.5-year follow-up after RCE. 

  9. SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR VERY HIGH-RISK LOCALLY RECURRENT PROSTATE CANCER AFTER RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliyev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Locally recurrent prostate cancer (PC in the bladder neck can substantially worsen quality of life in patients and hinder further treatment when castration-resistant PC develops. The paper describes a clinical case of very high-risk PC in a 55-year-old patient in whom radical cystectomy (RCE with removal of metastases in the bladder neck and the Bricker ileal conduit were performed for a local recurrence after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE. It gives the data of preoperative examination, the technical features of the primary operation RPE, the data of postoperative observation, the technical aspects and outcomes of еру surgery for a local recurrence, as well as the results of a 1.5-year follow-up after RCE. 

  10. Short Androgen Suppression and Radiation Dose Escalation for Intermediate- and High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer: Results of EORTC Trial 22991

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolla, M.; Maingon, P.; Carrie, C.; Villa, S.; Kitsios, P.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Sundar, S.; Steen-Banasik, E.M. van der; Armstrong, J.; Bosset, J.F.; Herrera, F.G.; Pieters, B.; Slot, A.; Bahl, A.; Ben-Yosef, R.; Boehmer, D.; Scrase, C.; Renard, L.; Shash, E.; Coens, C.; Bergh, A.C. van den; Collette, L.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Up to 30% of patients who undergo radiation for intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer relapse biochemically within 5 years. We assessed if biochemical disease-free survival (DFS) is improved by adding 6 months of androgen suppression (AS; two injections of every-3-months

  11. Outcome According to Elective Pelvic Radiation Therapy in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of the GETUG 12 Phase 3 Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Pierre; Faivre, Laura; Lesaunier, François; Salem, Naji; Mesgouez-Nebout, Nathalie; Deniau-Alexandre, Elisabeth; Rolland, Frédéric; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Houédé, Nadine; Mourey, Loïc; Théodore, Christine; Krakowski, Ivan; Berdah, Jean-François; Baciuchka, Marjorie; Laguerre, Brigitte; Davin, Jean-Louis; Habibian, Muriel; Culine, Stéphane; Laplanche, Agnès; Fizazi, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The role of pelvic elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in the management of prostate cancer is controversial. This study analyzed the role of pelvic radiation therapy (RT) on the outcome in high-risk localized prostate cancer patients included in the Groupe d'Etude des Tumeurs Uro-Genitales (GETUG) 12 trial. Patients with a nonpretreated high-risk localized prostate cancer and a staging lymphadenectomy were randomly assigned to receive either goserelin every 3 months for 3 years and 4 cycles of docetaxel plus estramustine or goserelin alone. Local therapy was administered 3 months after the start of systemic treatment. Performance of pelvic ENI was left to the treating physician. Only patients treated with primary RT were included in this analysis. The primary endpoint was biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS). A total of 413 patients treated from 2002 to 2006 were included, of whom 358 were treated using primary RT. A total of 208 patients received pelvic RT and 150 prostate-only RT. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration, Gleason score, or T stage did not differ according to performance of pelvic RT; pN+ patients more frequently received pelvic RT than pN0 patients (PENI in multivariate analysis (HR: 1.10 [95% CI: 0.78-1.55], P=.60), even when analysis was restricted to pN0 patients (HR: 0.88 [95% CI: 0.59-1.31], P=.53). Pelvic ENI was not associated with increased acute or late patient reported toxicity. This unplanned analysis of a randomized trial failed to demonstrate a benefit of pelvic ENI on bPFS in high-risk localized prostate cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcome According to Elective Pelvic Radiation Therapy in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of the GETUG 12 Phase 3 Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.blanchard@gustaveroussy.fr [Radiation Oncology, Gustave Roussy Cancer Center, Villejuif (France); University of Paris-Sud, Cancer Campus, Villejuif (France); Faivre, Laura [Biostatistics, Gustave Roussy Cancer Center, Villejuif (France); Lesaunier, François [Radiation Oncology, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Salem, Naji [Radiation Oncology, Institut Paoli Calmette, Marseille (France); Mesgouez-Nebout, Nathalie [Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de l' Ouest, Angers (France); Deniau-Alexandre, Elisabeth [Centre Hospitalier La Roche sur Yon, La Roche sur Yon (France); Rolland, Frédéric [Medical Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de l' Ouest, Nantes (France); Ferrero, Jean-Marc [Medical Oncology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Houédé, Nadine [Medical Oncology, Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux (France); Mourey, Loïc [Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Théodore, Christine [Hospital Foch, Suresnes (France); Krakowski, Ivan [Centre Alexis Vautrin, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Berdah, Jean-François [Clinique Sainte Marguerite, Hyeres (France); Baciuchka, Marjorie [Centre Hospitalier de la Timone, Marseille (France); Laguerre, Brigitte [Centre Eugène Marquis, Rennes (France); Davin, Jean-Louis [Clinique Sainte Catherine, Avignon (France); Habibian, Muriel [R& D UNICANCER, Paris (France); UNICANCER, Paris (France); Culine, Stéphane [Department of Medical Oncology, Hopital Saint-Louis, APHP, Paris (France); and others

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The role of pelvic elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in the management of prostate cancer is controversial. This study analyzed the role of pelvic radiation therapy (RT) on the outcome in high-risk localized prostate cancer patients included in the Groupe d'Etude des Tumeurs Uro-Genitales (GETUG) 12 trial. Methods and Materials: Patients with a nonpretreated high-risk localized prostate cancer and a staging lymphadenectomy were randomly assigned to receive either goserelin every 3 months for 3 years and 4 cycles of docetaxel plus estramustine or goserelin alone. Local therapy was administered 3 months after the start of systemic treatment. Performance of pelvic ENI was left to the treating physician. Only patients treated with primary RT were included in this analysis. The primary endpoint was biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS). Results: A total of 413 patients treated from 2002 to 2006 were included, of whom 358 were treated using primary RT. A total of 208 patients received pelvic RT and 150 prostate-only RT. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration, Gleason score, or T stage did not differ according to performance of pelvic RT; pN+ patients more frequently received pelvic RT than pN0 patients (P<.0001). Median follow-up was 8.8 years. In multivariate analysis, bPFS was negatively impacted by pN stage (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.52 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.78-3.54], P<.0001), Gleason score 8 or higher (HR: 1.41 [95% CI: 1.03-1.93], P=.033) and PSA higher than 20 ng/mL (HR: 1.41 [95% CI: 1.02-1.96], P=.038), and positively impacted by the use of chemotherapy (HR: 0.66 [95% CI: 0.48-0.9], P=.009). There was no association between bPFS and use of pelvic ENI in multivariate analysis (HR: 1.10 [95% CI: 0.78-1.55], P=.60), even when analysis was restricted to pN0 patients (HR: 0.88 [95% CI: 0.59-1.31], P=.53). Pelvic ENI was not associated with increased acute or late patient reported toxicity. Conclusions: This unplanned analysis of

  13. Sunitinib Plus Androgen Deprivation and Radiation Therapy for Patients With Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Phase 1 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corn, Paul G., E-mail: pcorn@mdanderson.org [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Song, Danny Y. [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Heath, Elisabeth; Maier, Jordan [Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Meyn, Raymond [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); DePetrillo, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mathew, Paul, E-mail: pmathew@tuftsmedicalcenter.org [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of administering sunitinib in combination with androgen deprivation therapy and external-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (XRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventeen men with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate with cT2c-cT4 or Gleason 8-10 or prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL received initial androgen deprivation (leuprolide 22.5 mg every 12 weeks plus oral bicalutamide 50 mg daily) for 4-8 weeks before oral sunitinib 12.5, 25, or 37.5 mg daily for 4 weeks as lead-in, then concurrently with and 4 weeks after XRT (75.6 Gy in 42 fractions to prostate and seminal vesicles). A 3+3 sequential dose-escalation design was used to assess the frequency of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and establish a maximal tolerated dose of sunitinib. Results: Sunitinib at 12.5- and 25-mg dose levels was well tolerated. The first 4 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg experienced a DLT during lead-in, and a drug interaction between sunitinib and bicalutamide was suspected. The protocol was revised and concurrent bicalutamide omitted. Of the next 3 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg, 2 of 3 receiving concurrent therapy experienced DLTs during radiation: grade 3 diarrhea and grade 3 proctitis, respectively. Only 1 of 7 patients completed sunitinib at 37.5 mg daily, whereas 3 of 3 patients (25 mg as starting dose) and 3 of 4 patients (25 mg as reduced dose) completed therapy. Conclusions: The feasibility of combined vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor therapy, androgen deprivation, and radiation therapy for prostate cancer was established. Using a daily dosing regimen with lead-in, concurrent, and post-XRT therapy, the recommended phase 2 dose of sunitinib is 25 mg daily.

  14. Phase I/II trial of docetaxel and concurrent radiation therapy in localized high risk prostate cancer (AGUSG 03-10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotti, Michael; Doyle, Todd; Kumar, Parvesh; McLeod, Daryl; Badger, William; Prater, Susan; Moran, Michael; Rosenberg, Stuart; Bonatsos, Cora; Kreitner, Carrie; Kiehl, Ralf; Chang, Theodore; Kolodziej, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A Phase I/II trial was conducted to assess the radiosensitizer docetaxel administered weekly (20 mg/m(2)) with concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy (72 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction) in high risk prostate cancer. Patients with high risk prostate cancer (clinical stage > or = T3; Gleason score 8, 9, or 10; Gleason score 7 and PSA > 10) received IMRT (Clinac 600 CD with 6 MV photons and sliding window technique) and concurrent weekly docetaxel (20 mg/m(2)) as a continuous 30 minute infusion for 8 weeks. Patients desirous of concurrent androgen suppression were not excluded. Twenty men (median age: 64 years; range, 50-78 years) were enrolled in the chemoradiation protocol. Three patients experienced treatment interruptions: dehydration requiring inpatient hydration (n = 2); NSAID induced GI bleed (n = 1). An additional patient required outpatient hydration (<24 hours) with no treatment interruption. Overall, the most frequently observed toxicities were grade 2 diarrhea (40%), grade 2 fatigue (40%), grade 2 urinary frequency (35%), taste aversion (20%), grade 2 constipation (20%), and rectal bleeding (15%). No significant hematologic toxicity (grades 2-4) was encountered among the 20 patients. Although the follow-up interval was relatively short, no significant subacute gastrointestinal toxicities have been observed. At a median follow-up duration of 11.7 months, 17 patients were free of biochemical disease recurrence, and all patients are alive. The radiosensitizer docetaxel administered weekly (20 mg/m(2)) with concurrent IMRT is well tolerated with acceptable toxicity. Early oncologic outcomes in this challenging patient cohort are encouraging.

  15. HIFU therapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovov, V. A.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.; Matysh, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Objectives. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) combined with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or ADT alone. The widely accepted definition of high-risk prostate was first proposed by D'Amico based on a pretreatment Gleason score of ≥8, clinical stage T3, PSA level ≥20 ng/mL. There is no trial that compares traditional methods of treatment of such patients with HIFU therapy. Here we explored the effectiveness of the HIFU in multimodal treatment for patients with high risk prostate cancer. Materials & Methods. 701 patients with high risk prostate cancer were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2013. Gleason score were 8-10, stage T3N0M0, age 69 (58-86) years, mean PSA before treatment 43.3 (22.1-92.9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume - 59.3 (38-123) cc. 248 patients were treated by HIFU. We compare this group of patients with patients who undertook EBRT: number 196, and ADT: number 257. Mean follow-up time 58 months (6-72). Results. The 5-year overall survival rates in patients after HIFU were 73.8 %, after EBRT - 63.0 % and after ADT - 18.1%. Conclusions. Our experience showed that HIFU therapy in combined treatment were successful for high risk prostate cancer.

  16. Cryosurgical ablation of the prostate: high risk patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prepelica, Kristofer L; Okeke, Zephaniah; Murphy, Alana; Katz, Aaron E

    2005-04-15

    The authors report their experience with cryosurgical ablation of the prostate in men with high-risk features for prostate carcinoma who were unwilling to undergo radical surgery or radiation therapy. Between January 1998 and April 2002, 65 men underwent primary cryosurgery for prostate carcinoma with high-risk features. All patients had biopsy-proven prostate carcinoma without evidence for metastatic disease on magnetic resonance images, computed tomography scans, or radionuclide images of bones. High-risk parameters were defined as either a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >/= 10 ng/mL, or a Gleason sum score >/= 8, or both. Patients who had undergone prior surgery, radiation therapy, or cryoablation for prostate carcinoma were excluded from the study. Patients were monitored with physical examination and PSA screening every 3 months and with radiologic imaging when indicated. The median patient age was 72 years (range, 41-86 years), and t he median follow-up was 35 months (range, 4-77 months). There were 2 patients (3.1%) with rectal pain and incontinence. Durable PSA biochemical disease-free survival was noted in 83.3% of patients according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) criteria. A 6-year Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed an 81.7% ASTRO survival probability as well as PSA nadir < 4.0 ng/mL and PSA nadir < 1.0 ng/mL projections of 50% and 35%, respectively. One of 8 postcryosurgery biopsies (12.5%) were positive. No patient had progressed at last follow-up, and the overall survival rate was 100%. Cryoablation was a feasible treatment option in patients with organ-confined prostate carcinoma who had high-risk features. Longer follow-up will be necessary to determine the effectiveness of this approach. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society.

  17. Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 Score Does Not Predict for Adverse Pathologic Features at Radical Prostatectomy or for Progression-free Survival in Clinically Localized, Intermediate- and High-risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, John V; Veruttipong, Darlene; Said, Jonathan W; Reiter, Robert E; Steinberg, Michael L; King, Christopher R; Kishan, Amar U

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate whether preoperative urinary prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) scores predict for adverse pathologic features (APFs) or progression-free survival (PFS) in men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). One hundred nine men with intermediate- (n = 52) or high-risk (n = 57) PCa who underwent RP were retrospectively identified. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association of PCA3 score with various APFs (eg, extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, etc.). Among 78 men with ≥1 year of follow-up, the association between PCA3 score and PFS was assessed using Cox regression analysis. At RP, 52% of patients had at least 1 APF, and with median follow-up of 2.3 years, overall 3-year PFS was 70%. PCA3 was not a significant predictor of any APF on multivariate analysis (MVA), whereas canonical predictors (eg, biopsy Gleason score and initial prostate-specific antigen) remained predictive of various APFs. No significant predictors for PFS were found on MVA, although certain canonical predictors (eg, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group) were significant predictors of PFS on univariate analysis (UVA). PCA3 score was not a significant predictor of PFS on either UVA or MVA. Unlike in lower risk cohorts, increasing PCA3 score was not associated with any APF in this higher risk cohort, despite enrichment for APFs, nor was it associated with PFS. Notably, multiple known preoperative predictors for APFs were significant on MVA, and multiple predictors were associated with PFS on UVA. Therefore, PCA3 may not be a useful adjunct predictive marker in men with intermediate- or high-risk PCa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The prognostic value of expression of HIF1α, EGFR and VEGF-A, in localized prostate cancer for intermediate- and high-risk patients treated with radiation therapy with or without androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Damien C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Androgens stimulate the production of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1α and ultimately vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A. Additionally, epithelial growth factor (EGF mediates HIF1α production. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX expression is associated with tumor cell hypoxia in a variety of malignancies. This study assesses the prognostic relation between HIF1α, VEGF-A, EGF Receptor and CAIX expression by immunochemistry in diagnostic samples of patients with intermediate- and high-risk localized prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy, with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Materials and methods Between 1994 and 2004, 103 prostate cancer patients (mean age, 68.7 ± 6.2, with prostate cancer (mean PSA, 13.3 ± 3.7, were treated with radiation therapy (RT, median dose, 74 Gy. Fifty seven (55.3% patients received ADT (median duration, 6 months; range, 0 – 24. Median follow-up was 97.6 months (range, 5.9 – 206.8. Results Higher EGFR expression was significantly (p = 0.04 correlated with higher Gleason scores. On univariate analysis, HIF1α nuclear expression was a significant (p = 0.02 prognostic factor for biological progression-free survival (bPFS. A trend towards significance (p = 0.05 was observed with EGFR expression and bPFS. On multivariate analysis, low HIF1α nuclear (p = 0.01 and high EGFR (p = 0.04 expression remained significant adverse prognostic factors. Conclusions Our study suggests that high nuclear expression of HIF1α and low EGFR expression in diagnostic biopsies of prostate cancer patients treated with RT ± ADT is associated with a good prognosis.

  19. [Radiation therapy of locally advanced prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hegemann, N-S; Li, M; Eze, C; Belka, C; Ganswindt, U

    2017-11-01

    The risk classification for localized prostate cancer is based on the groups "low", "intermediate", and "high-risk" prostate cancer. Following this established risk group definition, locally advanced prostate cancer (cT3/4N0M0) has to be classified as "high-risk" prostate cancer. Radical prostatectomy or high-dose radiotherapy, which is combined with androgen deprivation, are the only curative standard treatments for locally advanced prostate cancer. Particularly adequate radiation doses, modern radiotherapy techniques like IMRT/IGRT, as well as long-term androgen suppression are essential for an optimal treatment outcome. In combination with definitive radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy should be started neoadjuvant/simultaneous to radiotherapy and is recommended to be continued after radiotherapy. Previous data suggest that 2‑year long-term androgen deprivation in this setting may not be inferior to 3‑year long-term androgen deprivation in high-risk patients. An additional radiation therapy of the lymphatic pathways in men with cN0 locally advanced/high-risk prostate cancer is still a matter of research. Ongoing trials may define selected subgroups with a suggested benefit at its best.

  20. Radiation therapy and androgen deprivation in the management of high risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Dal Pra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined use of radiation therapy (RT and androgen deprivation for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer is commonly accepted as the standard treatment among uro-oncologists. Preclinical studies have provided rationale for the use of this combination. Additionally, results of phase 3 studies using conventional doses of RT have supported the combined approach. Other phase 3 studies have also shown a benefit for using higher doses of RT; however, the role of androgen deprivation in this context is not clear. The optimal duration of the androgen deprivation, in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting, is still under investigation. This article critically reviews the data on the use of RT combined with androgen deprivation for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with emphasis on the results of phase 3 trials.

  1. Importance of repeat laterally directed sextant prostate biopsy for detection of prostate cancer in high-risk patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vaičiūnas, Kęstutis; Auškalnis, Stasys; Matjošaitis, Aivaras Jonas; Mickevičius, Antanas; Mickevičius, Ramūnas; Trumbeckas, Darius; Jievaltas, Mindaugas

    2007-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relevance of repeat laterally directed sextant prostate biopsy for detection of prostate cancer in high-risk patients. Material and methods. Our study included 195 men at high risk for prostate cancer (elevated prostatespecific antigen level and/or abnormal prostate detected by digital rectal examination). We consulted the patients in outpatient department of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital during 2003–2007. We performed transrectal ultrasound-guided lat...

  2. [Importance of repeat laterally directed sextant prostate biopsy for detection of prostate cancer in high-risk patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiciūnas, Kestutis; Auskalnis, Stasys; Matjosaitis, Aivaras; Mickevicius, Antanas; Mickevicius, Ramūnas; Trumbeckas, Darius; Jievaltas, Mindaugas

    2007-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relevance of repeat laterally directed sextant prostate biopsy for detection of prostate cancer in high-risk patients. Our study included 195 men at high risk for prostate cancer (elevated prostate-specific antigen level and/or abnormal prostate detected by digital rectal examination). We consulted the patients in outpatient department of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital during 2003-2007. We performed transrectal ultrasound-guided laterally directed sextant prostate biopsy in every patient. For the patients with benign histological findings and increased risk of prostate cancer, laterally directed sextant biopsies were repeated. Prostate cancer was detected in 30.3% of patients (59/195) on the first prostate biopsy, in 13.1% (11/84) on the second prostate biopsy, in 10.3% (4/39) on the third, and in 7.7% (1/13) on the forth biopsy. After all biopsies, prostate cancer was detected in 38.5% (75/195) of patients, and it differed significantly from the percentage of prostate cancer cases detected on the first biopsy (30.3%, P=0.04). We detected 78.7% (59/75) of all prostate cancer cases by the first laterally directed sextant prostate biopsy. The rest 21.3% (16/75) of cases we detected by repeat biopsies. The second laterally directed sextant prostate biopsy revealed additional 14.6% (n=11) of prostate cancer cases and increased the detection of prostate cancer to 93.3% (70/75). At the time of the first prostate biopsy, prostate cancer was diagnosed most frequently when patients had both risk factors: elevated prostate-specific antigen level and abnormal digital prostate examination; prostate cancer was diagnosed in 45.3% of these patients. The odds ratio to detect prostate cancer by the first biopsy in patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen level and abnormal digital prostate examination was 3.7, and odds ratio to detect prostate cancer by repeat biopsies was 4.7. Repeat ultrasound-guided laterally directed sextant

  3. Brachytherapy boost and cancer-specific mortality in favorable high-risk versus other high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Muralidhar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Recent retrospective data suggest that brachytherapy (BT boost may confer a cancer-specific survival benefit in radiation-managed high-risk prostate cancer. We sought to determine whether this survival benefit would extend to the recently defined favorable high-risk subgroup of prostate cancer patients (T1c, Gleason 4 + 4 = 8, PSA 20 ng/ml. Material and methods: We identified 45,078 patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database with cT1c-T3aN0M0 intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer diagnosed 2004-2011 treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT only or EBRT plus BT. We used multivariable competing risks regression to determine differences in the rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM after EBRT + BT or EBRT alone in patients with intermediate-risk, favorable high-risk, or other high-risk disease after adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. Results : EBRT + BT was not associated with an improvement in 5-year PCSM compared to EBRT alone among patients with favorable high-risk disease (1.6% vs. 1.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.21-1.52, p = 0.258, and intermediate-risk disease (0.8% vs. 1.0%, AHR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.59-1.16, p = 0.270. Others with high-risk disease had significantly lower 5-year PCSM when treated with EBRT + BT compared with EBRT alone (3.9% vs. 5.3%; AHR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.55-0.95; p = 0.022. Conclusions : Brachytherapy boost is associated with a decreased rate of PCSM in some men with high-risk prostate cancer but not among patients with favorable high-risk disease. Our results suggest that the recently-defined “favorable high-risk” category may be used to personalize therapy for men with high-risk disease.

  4. High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are present in benign prostate tissues before development of HPV associated prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Wendy K; Ngan, Christopher C; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Swift, Joshua; Lutze-Mann, Louise; Shang, Fei; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2017-01-01

    Although high risk HPVs are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer it is not known if they have a causal role. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential role of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in prostate cancer. The aims are (i) to investigate the presence and confirm the identity of high risk HPVs in benign prostate tissues prior to the development of HPV positive prostate cancer in the same patients, and (ii) to determine if HPVs are biologically active. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify HPVs in specimens from 52 Australian men with benign prostate biopsies who 1 to 10 years later developed prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the expression of HPV E7 oncoproteins, cytokeratin and prostate specific antigen (PSA). We used RNASeq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify possible HPV RNA sequences in prostate cancer. HPV screening using standard PCR was conducted on 28 of the 52 sets of benign and later prostate cancers. HPV L1 genes were identified in 13 (46%) benign and 8 (29%) of 28 later prostate cancers in the same patients. HPV E7 genes were identified in 23 (82%) benign and 19 (68%) of 28 subsequent prostate cancers in the same patients. The same HPV types were present in both the benign and subsequent prostate cancers in 9 sets of specimens. HPV type 16 was identified in 15% of benign and 3% of prostate cancers. HPV type 18 was identified in 26% of benign and 16% of prostate cancers. Small numbers of HPV types 45, 47, 76 and 115 were also identified. High confidence RNA-Seq evidence for high risk HPV types 16 and 18 was identified in 12 (2%) of the 502 TCGA prostate cancer transcriptomes. High risk HPV E7 oncoprotein was positively expressed in 23 (82%) of 28 benign prostate specimens but only in 8 (29%) of 28 of the later prostate cancer specimens. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.001). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was more highly expressed in 26

  5. Endorectal MRI assessment of local relapse after surgery for prostate cancer: A model to define treatment field guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy in patients at high risk for local failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralbell, Raymond; Vees, Hansjörg; Lozano, Joan; Khan, Haleem; Mollà, Meritxell; Hidalgo, Alberto; Linero, Dolors; Rouzaud, Michel

    2007-02-01

    To assess the role of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in defining local relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer to help to reassess the clinical target volume (CTV) for adjuvant postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Sixty patients undergoing an endorectal MRI before salvage radiotherapy were selected. Spatial coordinates of the relapses were assessed using two reference points: the inferior border of the pubic symphysis (point 1) and the urethro-vesical anastomosis (point 2). Every lesion on MRI was delineated on the planning computed tomography and center of mass coordinates were plotted in two separate diagrams (along the x, y, and z axes) with the urethro-vesical anastomosis as the coordinate origin. An "ideal" CTV was constructed, centered at a point defined by the mathematical means of each of the three coordinates with dimensions defined as twice 2 standard deviations in each of the three axes. The dosimetric impact of the new CTV definition was evaluated in six adjuvantly treated patients. The ideal CTV center of mass was located at coordinates 0 (x), -5 (y), and -3 (z) mm with SDs of 6 (x), 6 (y), and 9 (z) mm, respectively. The CTV size was 24 (x) x 24 (y) x 36 (z) mm. Significant rectal sparing was observed with the new CTV. A CTV with an approximately cylindrical shape (approximately 4 x 3 cm) centered 5 mm posterior and 3 mm inferior to the urethro-vesical anastomosis was defined. Such CTV may reduce the irradiation of normal nontarget tissue in the pelvis potentially improving treatment tolerance.

  6. Role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the management of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP in the management of high-risk prostate cancer (PCa, with a focus on oncological, functional and perioperative outcomes. Further, we also aimed to briefly describe our novel modification to conventional RARP that allows immediate organ retrieval and examination for intra-operative surgical margin assessment. A literature search of PubMed was performed for articles on the management of high-risk PCa. Papers written in English and concerning clinical outcomes following RARP for locally advanced and high-risk PCa were selected. Outcomes data from our own center were also included. A total of 10 contemporary series were evaluated. Biopsy Gleason score ≥ 8 was the most common cause for classification of patients into the high-risk PCa group. Biochemical failure rate, in the few series that looked at long-term follow-up, varied from 9% to 26% at 1 year. The positive surgical margin rate varied from 12% to 53.3%. Urinary continence rates varied from 78% to 92% at 1 year. The overall complication rates varied from 2.4% to 30%, with anastomotic leak and lymphocele being the most common complications. Long-term data on oncological control following RARP in high-risk patients is lacking. Short-term oncological outcomes and functional outcomes are equivalent to open radical prostatectomy (RP. Safety outcomes are better in patients undergoing RARP when compared with open RP. Improved tools for predicting the presence of organ-confined disease (OCD are available. High-risk patients with OCD would be ideal candidates for RARP and would benefit most from surgery alone.

  7. Unification of favourable intermediate-, unfavourable intermediate-, and very high-risk stratification criteria for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Zelefsky, Michael J; Woo, Kaitlin M; Spratt, Daniel E; Kollmeier, Marisa A; McBride, Sean; Pei, Xin; Sandler, Howard M; Zhang, Zhigang

    2017-11-01

    To improve on the existing risk-stratification systems for prostate cancer. This was a retrospective investigation including 2 248 patients undergoing dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) at a single institution. We separated National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) intermediate-risk prostate cancer into 'favourable' and 'unfavourable' groups based on primary Gleason pattern, percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPBC), and number of NCCN intermediate-risk factors. Similarly, NCCN high-risk prostate cancer was stratified into 'standard' and 'very high-risk' groups based on primary Gleason pattern, PPBC, number of NCCN high-risk factors, and stage T3b-T4 disease. Patients with unfavourable-intermediate-risk (UIR) prostate cancer had significantly inferior prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS, P prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM, P prostate cancer. Similarly, patients with very high-risk (VHR) prostate cancer had significantly worse PSA-RFS (P prostate cancer. Moreover, patients with FIR and low-risk prostate cancer had similar outcomes, as did patients with UIR and SHR prostate cancer. Consequently, we propose the following risk-stratification system: Group 1, low risk and FIR; Group 2, UIR and SHR; and Group 3, VHR. These groups have markedly different outcomes, with 8-year distant metastasis rates of 3%, 9%, and 29% (P < 0.001) for Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, and 8-year PCSM of 1%, 4%, and 13% (P < 0.001) after EBRT. This modified stratification system was significantly more accurate than the three-tiered NCCN system currently in clinical use for all outcomes. Modifying the NCCN risk-stratification system to group FIR with low-risk patients and UIR with SHR patients, results in modestly improved prediction of outcomes, potentially allowing better personalisation of therapeutic recommendations. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Importance of prostate volume for detection of prostate cancer by first sextant biopsy in high-risk patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vaičiūnas, Kęstutis; Auškalnis, Stasys; Matjošaitis, Aivaras Jonas; Trumbeckas, Darius; Jievaltas, Mindaugas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relevance of prostate gland volume, transitional zone volume, and transitional zone index for the detection of prostate cancer by the first sextant biopsy. Material and methods. A total of 121 men with high risk of prostate cancer were included in our study (prostate-specific antigen level higher than 4 ng/mL and/or pathological digital rectal examination). We consulted the patients in Outpatient Department of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital du...

  9. Predictive factors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy for high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yukiko; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Masumitsu; Yamada, Shigetomo; Hayakawa, Yusuke; Ueda, Kouhei; Momosaki, Seiya; Sakamoto, Naotaka

    2018-01-08

    To identify risk factors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in high-risk patients. A total of 191 high-risk prostate cancer patients according to the D'Amico classification treated with radical prostatectomy at a single institution between April 2000 and December 2013 were enrolled. The pathological evaluation including intraductal carcinoma of prostate was reassessed, and the clinical and pathological risk factors of biochemical recurrence were analyzed. The median follow up after radical prostatectomy was 49 months. The 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival rate after radical prostatectomy in high-risk prostate cancer patients was 41.6%. Initial prostate-specific antigen, pathological Gleason score, seminal vesicle invasion, extraprostatic extension and intraductal carcinoma of the prostate were significantly associated with biochemical recurrence-free survival. The 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival rates in patients with zero, one, two and three of these risk factors were 92.9%, 70.7%, 38.3% and 28.8%, respectively. In patients with four or more factors, the biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was 6.1% after 18 months. In D'Amico high-risk patients treated with radical prostatectomy, risk factors for biochemical recurrence can be identified. Patients with fewer risk factors have longer biochemical recurrence-free survival, even among these high-risk cases. © 2018 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. The role of radical prostatectomy as an initial approach for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaunarena, J H; Villamil, W; Martínez, P F; Gueglio, G; Giudice, C R

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of high-risk prostate cancer requires a multimodal approach to improve control of the disease. There is still no consensus as to the initial strategy of choice. The aim of this study is to review the results of radical prostatectomy as first step in management of patients with high-risk disease. A search was conducted on PubMed of English and Spanish texts. We included those studies that reported the results of radical prostatectomy in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, as well as those that compared radical prostatectomy with other treatment alternatives. The last search was conducted in November 2015. The advantages of radical prostatectomy include a better pathological analysis, more accurate staging, better local control of the disease and better follow-up and adjuvant therapy strategies. When compared with external radiation therapy plus hormonal blockade, the patients who underwent prostatectomy had greater chances of healing and longer cancer-specific survival. The patients who most benefit from this approach are younger, have fewer comorbidities and no evidence of organ metastases. The available scientific evidence to date is not without bias and confounders; however, they appear to favour radical prostatectomy as the initial approach of choice for high-risk prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. [Importance of prostate volume for detection of prostate cancer by first sextant biopsy in high-risk patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiciūnas, Kestutis; Auskalnis, Stasys; Matjosaitis, Aivaras; Trumbeckas, Darius; Jievaltas, Mindaugas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relevance of prostate gland volume, transitional zone volume, and transitional zone index for the detection of prostate cancer by the first sextant biopsy. A total of 121 men with high risk of prostate cancer were included in our study (prostate-specific antigen level higher than 4 ng/mL and/or pathological digital rectal examination). We consulted the patients in Outpatient Department of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital during 2003-2006. Total prostate volume and transition zone volume were measured, and all patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided sextant biopsy of the prostate. According to histological results of prostate biopsy, patients were divided into two groups: benign group (benign prostate hyperplasia and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia) and prostate cancer group. Statistical analysis was made by SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) 12.0.1 for Windows. After histological examination, prostate cancer was detected in 20.7% of patients (n=25). Prostate cancer was found in 24.6% of patients with a total prostate volume of less than 60 cm3 and only in 8.2% of patients with a total prostate volume greater than 60 cm3 (P=0.026). Prostate cancer was found in 27.1% of patients with transition zone volume smaller than 30 cm3 and only in 7.5% of patients with transition zone volume greater than 30 cm3 (P=0.007). A statistically significant difference was found when patients were divided into the groups according to transition zone index: when transition zone index was lower than 0.45, prostate cancer was detected in 37.1% of patients, and when transition zone index was higher than 0.45, prostate cancer was observed in 9.1% of patients (P=0.001). The possibility to detect prostate cancer was 5.9 times higher in patients with transition zone index lower than 0.45. Prostate cancer detection rate by first sextant prostate biopsy in patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen level and

  12. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy in high risk locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sang Hyuk; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyu Bo; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Yang, Han Kwang; Han, Sae Won; Oh, Do Youn; Im, Seok Ah; Bang, Yung Jue; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate treatment outcome of patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer after postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Between May 2003 and May 2012, thirteen patients who underwent postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer with resection margin involvement or adjacent structure invasion were retrospectively analyzed. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in 10 patients. Median dose of radiation was 50.4 Gy (range, 45 to 55.8 Gy). The median follow-up duration for surviving patients was 48 months (range, 5 to 108 months). The 5-year overall survival rate was 42% and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 28%. Major pattern of failure was peritoneal seeding with 46%. Loco-regional recurrence was reported in only one patient. Grade 2 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 54% of the patients. However, there was only one patient with higher than grade 3 toxicity. Despite reported suggested role of adjuvant radiotherapy with combination chemotherapy in gastric cancer, only very small portion of the patients underwent the treatment. Results from this study show that postoperative chemoradiotherapy provided excellent locoregional control with acceptable and manageable treatment related toxicity in patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer. Thus, postoperative chemoradiotherapy may improve treatment result in terms of locoregional control in these high risk patients. However, as these findings are based on small series, validation with larger cohort is suggested.

  13. HDR Brachytherapy in the Management of High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Susan; Persad, Raj; Bahl, Amit

    2012-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is used with increasing frequency for the treatment of prostate cancer. It is a technique which allows delivery of large individual fractions to the prostate without exposing adjacent normal tissues to unacceptable toxicity. This approach is particularly favourable in prostate cancer where tumours are highly sensitive to dose escalation and to increases in radiotherapy fraction size, due to the unique radiobiological behaviour of prostate cancers in contrast with other malignancies. In this paper we discuss the rationale and the increasing body of clinical evidence for the use of this technique in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, where it is combined with external beam radiotherapy. We highlight practical aspects of delivering treatment and discuss toxicity and limitations, with particular reference to current practice in the United Kingdom. PMID:22461791

  14. HDR Brachytherapy in the Management of High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Masson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy is used with increasing frequency for the treatment of prostate cancer. It is a technique which allows delivery of large individual fractions to the prostate without exposing adjacent normal tissues to unacceptable toxicity. This approach is particularly favourable in prostate cancer where tumours are highly sensitive to dose escalation and to increases in radiotherapy fraction size, due to the unique radiobiological behaviour of prostate cancers in contrast with other malignancies. In this paper we discuss the rationale and the increasing body of clinical evidence for the use of this technique in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, where it is combined with external beam radiotherapy. We highlight practical aspects of delivering treatment and discuss toxicity and limitations, with particular reference to current practice in the United Kingdom.

  15. Androgenic alopecia is not useful as an indicator of men at high risk of prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Vermeulen, S.; Heijer, M. den; Oort, I.M. van; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Androgens are assumed to play a central role in the pathophysiology of both prostate cancer (PC) and androgenic alopecia (AA). A correlation between the two phenotypes may be relevant for identification of men at high risk of PC. We evaluated the association between AA at different ages

  16. Estimating high-risk castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Rohini K; Cetin, Karynsa; Pirolli, Melissa; Quigley, Jane; Quach, David; Smith, Paul; Stryker, Scott; Liede, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Canadian guidelines define castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) at high risk of developing metastases using PSA doubling time (PSADT) electronic health records (EHR), covering 129 urology and 64 oncology practices across the US. We estimated the proportion of prostate cancer patients with evidence of CRPC (consecutive rising PSAs) and subsets that may be at high risk (using several PSA and PSADT cut-points). Among 3121 M0 prostate cancer patients actively treated with ADT, 1188 (38%) had evidence of CRPC. Of these, 712 (60%) qualified as high risk in 2011 based on PSADT < 8 months (equivalent to = 8 months in these data). Men = 65 years were more likely to have evidence of CRPC than younger men, although younger men were more likely to have evidence of high-risk disease. CRPC was more common among men receiving ADT in the oncology setting than the urology setting (48% versus 37%). In this large EHR study with patient-level PSA data, 38% of men with M0 prostate cancer treated with ADT had CRPC. Approximately 60% of M0 CRPC patients may experience a PSADT of < 8 months. These findings require validation in a Canadian patient population.

  17. Results of laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy in patients at high risk for nodal metastases from prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kava, B R; Dalbagni, G; Conlon, K C; Russo, P

    1998-03-01

    Laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy (LPLND) can be performed safely and with minimal morbidity in the staging of prostate cancer. Its utility in evaluating patients at high risk for metastatic disease before primarily nonsurgical treatment modalities was evaluated. Twenty-four consecutive patients who underwent LPLND between June 1993 and July 1996 were studied. These patients were considered poor surgical candidates based on several risk factors, as follows: elevation of serum PSA >20 in 19 patients (79%); elevation of serum acid phosphatase in 4 patients (17%); digital rectal examination findings indicative of extraprostatic extension or seminal vesical involvement in 14 patients (58%); and poorly differentiated tumors on prostate biopsy in 19 patients (79%). Nineteen patients (79%) had two or more of these risk factors. Median PSA for the entire series of patients was 35.2 ng/mL (range 7.9 to 133 ng/mL), and median Gleason score was 7 (range 5 to 9). Preoperative CT or MRI was negative for pelvic lymph node metastases in 17 of 23 patients (79%), and bone scan was negative in all 24 patients. Unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 22) LPLND was performed in all patients. Six patients (25%) had lymph node metastases detected laparoscopically. Five of the six patients had palpable extraprostatic extension (T3a/b) or invasion of a seminal vesical (T3c), and in four of these patients the site of the metastatic lymph nodes was ipsilateral to the palpable prostate abnormality. None of the risk factors was independently predictive of lymph node metastases within this series of patients. An average of 10.8 +/- 6.5 lymph nodes was removed at a mean operative time of 174 +/- 10 minutes for patients undergoing bilateral LPLND. Estimated blood loss was minimal for 20 of 22 patients (92%) undergoing LPLND alone, and there were no complications requiring open exploration. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 1.2 +/- 0.5 days for patients undergoing LPLND alone. LPLND can be used

  18. Place of surgery in high-risk tumours of the prostate; Place de la chirurgie dans les tumeurs de la prostate a haut risque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulie, M. [Service d' urologie, d' andrologie et de transplantation renale, hopital de Rangueil, CHU de Toulouse, 31 - Toulouse (France); Universite Paul-Sabatier, 31 - Toulouse (France); Rozet, F. [Service d' urologie, institut Montsouris, 75 - Paris (France); Universite Descartes-Paris 5, 75 - Paris (France); Hennequin, C. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 75 - Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot Paris-7, 75 - Paris (France); Salomon, L. [Service d' urologie, hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France); Universite Paris-Est Creteil Val-de-Marne, 94 - Creteil (France)

    2010-10-15

    Among the different options recommended for high-risk prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy is admitted as radiotherapy, but its role is still controversial in mono-therapy and difficult to evaluate in combined treatments. The results of clinical trials combining an external radiotherapy to a long-term androgen deprivation in locally advanced tumours sustain the principle of a multidisciplinary management in high-risk prostate cancer. The impact of surgery on the risk of progression and local recurrence is important in selected patients with low grade and small tumoral volume. Clinical and histological data associated to the MRI assessment remain essential and enhance the preoperative multidisciplinary decision, especially regarding nodal and distant metastases. Radical prostatectomy with an extended pelvic lymphadenectomy can be considered as a viable alternative to radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in these patients with a long life expectancy but presenting a high risk of local progression and a low risk of metastatic disease. Morbidity of the procedure is similar to radical prostatectomy for organ-confined tumours despite more erectile dysfunction due to non-sparing radical prostatectomy in most of cases. Oncological results from recent compiled series show 10- and 15-year specific survival rates around 85 and 75%, respectively, including adjuvant or salvage treatments with radiotherapy, androgen deprivation or chemotherapy. (authors)

  19. Elevated hardness of peripheral gland on real-time elastography is an independent marker for high-risk prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Yao, Jing; Cai, Yehua; Zhang, Limin; Wu, Yishuo; Xiong, Jingyu; Shi, Jun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yi

    2017-12-01

    To examine the role of quantitative real-time elastography (RTE) features on differentiation between high-risk prostate cancer (PCA) and non-high-risk prostatic diseases in the initial transperineal biopsy setting. We retrospectively included 103 patients with suspicious PCA who underwent both RTE and initial transperineal prostate biopsy. Patients were grouped into high-risk and non-high-risk categories according to the D'Amico's risk stratification. With computer assistance based on MATLAB programming, three features were extracted from RTE, i.e., the median hardness within peripheral gland (PG) (H med ), the ratio of the median hardness within PG to that outside PG (H ratio ), and the ratio of the hard area within PG to the total PG area (H ar ). A multiple regression model incorporating an RTE feature, age, transrectal ultrasound finding, and prostate volume was used to identify markers for high-risk PCA. Forty-seven patients (45.6%) were diagnosed with PCA and 34 (33.0%) were diagnosed with high-risk PCA. Three RTE features were all statistically higher in high-risk PCA than in non-high-risk diseases (p hardness of PG identified high-risk PCA and served as an independent marker of high-risk PCA. As a non-invasive imaging modality, the RTE could be potentially used in routine clinical practice for the detection of high-risk PCA to decrease unnecessary biopsies and reduce overtreatment.

  20. Outcome in intermediate or high risk prostate cancer patients receiving radiation dose and hormone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsdottir, Aasa; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Johannessen, Dag C.; Dahl, Olav (Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)); Wentzel-Larsen, Tore (Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)); Haukaas, Svein Andreas (Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)); Halvorsen, Ole Johan (Department of Pathology, The Gade Institute, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway))

    2009-07-15

    Background. To analyse the impact of radiation dose escalation and hormone treatment in prostate cancer patients according to risk groups. Material and methods. Totally 494 prostate cancer patients received external beam radiation therapy, with or without androgen deprivation, between January 1990 and December 1999. The patients were divided into three risk groups, where the low risk group (stage T1c, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level =10 ng/ml and WHO Grade 1) included 26 patients, the intermediate risk group (either stage T2, PSA 10.1-20 ng/ml or WHO Grade 2) comprised 149 patients whereas the high-risk group (either stage T3, PSA >20 ng/ml or WHO Grade 3) included 319 patients. Results. In the intermediate risk group, the 5-years bNED rate was 92%, 69% and 61% after a radiation dose of 70 Gy, 66 Gy or 64 Gy, respectively (p < 0.001). In the high-risk group, the 5-year bNED rate was 79%, 69% and 34% for the same dose levels (p < 0.001). The 5-years CSS rates were not significantly different between the dose levels in the intermediate risk group while for the high-risk group it was 93%, 92% and 80% for the three dose levels (p < 0.001). Risk group and radiation doses were independent predictors of bNED, CSS and overall survival, for bNED also hormone treatment was independent predictors. Conclusion. Radiation dose is important for the outcome in intermediate and high risk prostate cancer patients. A dose of 70 Gy should be considered the minimal dose for these patients

  1. [Clinical outcomes of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for high risk prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Pengfei; Yin, Changjun; Li, Jie; Li, Pu; Ju, Xiaobing; Lyu, Qiang; Meng, Xiaoxin; Hua, Lixin

    2015-11-01

    To study the technique and clinical outcomes of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for high risk prostate cancer. A total of 65 patients with high risk prostate cancer were treated with surgery in the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University from January 2011 to June 2013. The mean age was 67 years (range 45-75 years). The mean preoperative prostate specific antigen (PSA) level was 26.7 µg/L (range 11.2-65.5 µg/L). The transrectal biopsy revealed Gleason score of 3+3 in 4 patients, Gleason 3+4 in 27 patients, Gleason 4+3 in 11 patients, Gleason 4+4 in 21 patients and Gleason 4+5 in 2 patients. The bone metastasis was excluded by scintigraphy examination. The surgical procedures were performed through transperitoneal approach. Extended pelvic lymph nodes dissection was performed after the removal of the prostate. Adjuvant radiotherapy or hormonal therapy was administrated according to the pathological results. Serum PSA was detected every 1 to 2 month and urinary continence was evaluated every 3 month in the first year, and then serum PSA was detected every 2 to 3 month. The mean operative time was (134±21) minutes and the median blood loss was (300±146) ml. Bladder neck reconstruction was performed in 15 cases. The drainage was removed on postoperative day 4 and the catheter was removed on day 7. Pathologic results demonstrated pT2 in 25 patients, pT3a in 28 patients, pT3b in 9 patients and pT4 in 3 patients. Positive surgical margin was presented in 15 patients. A median of 19 lymph nodes (range 11-24 nodes) were retrieved during lymphadenectomy and 11 patients had lymph nodes metastasis with a total of 19 positive nodes. Forty-three patients recovered continence after the removal of catheter. Eleven patients received adjuvant hormonal therapy and 19 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy. With the median of 20 months follow-up (range 12-30 months), 5 patients got biochemical recurrence. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with extended

  2. Comparison of primary radiation versus robotic surgery plus adjuvant radiation in high-risk prostate cancer: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhsimranjot Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare robotic-prostatectomy plus adjuvant radiation therapy (RPRAT versus primary RT for high-risk prostate cancer (HRPCa. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed for the HRPCa patients treated in our institution between 2000 and 2010. One hundred and twenty-three patients with high-risk disease were identified. The Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact test were used to compare local control and distant failure rates between the two treatment modalities. For prostate-specific antigen comparisons between groups, Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used. Results: The median follow-up was 49 months (range: 3-138 months. Local control, biochemical recurrence rate, distant metastasis, toxicity, and disease-free survival were similar in the two groups. Conclusions: Primary RT is an excellent treatment option in patients with HRPCa, is equally effective and less expensive treatment compared with RPRAT. A prospective randomized study is required to guide treatment for patients with HRPCa.

  3. Whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Young Seok [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-12-15

    To assess the clinical efficacy and toxicity of whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) for high-risk prostate cancer. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated between 2008 and 2013 were reviewed. The study included patients who had undergone WP-IMRT with image guidance using electronic portal imaging devices and/or cone-beam computed tomography. The endorectal balloon was used in 93% of patients. Patients received either 46 Gy to the whole pelvis plus a boost of up to 76 Gy to the prostate in 2 Gy daily fractions, or 44 Gy to the whole pelvis plus a boost of up to 72.6 Gy to the prostate in 2.2 Gy fractions. The study cohort included 70 patients, of whom 55 (78%) had a Gleason score of 8 to 10 and 50 (71%) had a prostate-specific antigen level > 20 ng/mL. The androgen deprivation therapy was combined in 62 patients. The biochemical failure-free survival rate was 86.7% at 2 years. Acute any grade gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates were 47% and 73%, respectively. The actuarial rate of late grade 2 or worse toxicity at 2 years was 12.9% for GI, and 5.7% for GU with no late grade 4 toxicity. WP-IMRT was well tolerated with no severe acute or late toxicities, resulting in at least similar biochemical control to that of the historic control group with a small field. The long-term efficacy and toxicity will be assessed in the future, and a prospective randomized trial is needed to verify these findings.

  4. High biologically effective dose radiation therapy using brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisei Okamoto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with biologically effective dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy of high-dose radiotherapy, using low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Material and methods : From 2005 to 2013, a total of 143 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated by radiotherapy of BED ≥ 220 Gy with a combination of LDR brachytherapy, EBRT, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. The high-risk patients in the present study included both high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer. The number of high-risk features were: 60 patients with 1 high-risk factor (42%, 61 patients with 2 high-risk factors (43%, and 22 patients with 3 high-risk factors (15% including five N1 disease. External beam radiotherapy fields included prostate and seminal vesicles only or whole pelvis depending on the extension of the disease. Biochemical failure was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results : Six patients developed biochemical failure, thus providing a 5-year actual biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS rate of 95.2%. Biochemical failure was observed exclusively in cases with distant metastasis in the present study. All six patients with biochemical relapse had clinical failure due to bone metastasis, thus yielding a 5-year freedom from clinical failure (FFCF rate of 93.0%. None of the cases with N1 disease experienced biochemical failure. We observed four deaths, including one death from prostate cancer, therefore yielding a cause-specific survival (CSS rate of 97.2%, and an overall survival (OS rate of 95.5%. Conclusions : High-dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy radiotherapy by LDR in combination with EBRT has shown an excellent outcome on BFFS in high-risk and very high-risk cancer, although causal relationship between BED and BFFS remain to be explained further.

  5. Intratumoural evolutionary landscape of high-risk prostate cancer: The PROGENY study of genomic and immune parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linch, M.; Goh, G.; Hiley, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intratumoural heterogeneity (ITH) is well recognised in prostate cancer (PC), but its role in high-risk disease is uncertain. A prospective, single-arm, translational study using targeted multiregion prostate biopsies was carried out to study genomic and T-cell ITH in clinically high......-risk PC aiming to identify drivers and potential therapeutic strategies. Patients and methods: Forty-nine men with elevated prostate-specific antigen and multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging detected PC underwent image-guided multiregion transperineal biopsy. Seventy-nine tumour regions from 25....../β-catenin mutations demonstrated a low CD8+/FOXP3+ ratio, a potential surrogate marker of immune evasion. Conclusions: The PROGENY (PROstate cancer GENomic heterogeneitY) study provides a diagnostic platform suitable for studying tumour ITH. Genetic aberrations in clinically high-risk PC are associated with altered...

  6. Detectability of low and intermediate or high risk prostate cancer with combined T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Sung, Deuk Jae; Park, Beom Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Cho, Sung Bum; Oh, Yu Whan [Department of Radiology, Anam Hospital, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young Hwii [College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Anam Hospital, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kyung Sook [College of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    To evaluate the incremental value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in combination with T2-weighted imaging to detect low (Gleason score, {<=} 6) and intermediate or high risk (Gleason score, {>=} 7) prostate cancer. Fifty-one patients who underwent MRI before prostatectomy were evaluated. Two readers independently scored the probability of tumour in eight regions of prostate on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and T2WI combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Data were divided into two groups - low risk and intermediate or high risk prostate cancer - and correlated with histopathological results. Diagnostic performance parameters, areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUCs) and interreader agreement were calculated. For both readers, AUCs of combined T2WI and ADC maps were greater than those of T2WI in intermediate or high risk (reader 1, 0.887 vs. 0.859; reader 2, 0.732 vs 0.662, P < 0.05) prostate cancers, but not in low risk (reader 1, 0.719 vs 0.725; reader 2, 0.685 vs. 0.680, P > 0.05) prostate cancers. Weighted {kappa} value of combined T2WI and ADC maps was 0.689. The addition of DWI to T2-weighted imaging improves the accuracy of detecting intermediate or high risk prostate cancers, but not for low risk prostate cancer detection. (orig.)

  7. No evidence of BRCA2 mutations in chromosome 13q-linked Utah high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen-Brady Kristina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been suggested to account for about 5% of familial prostate cancer; mutations have been reported in 2% of early onset (i.e., ≤ 55 years prostate cancer cases and a segregating founder mutation has been identified in Iceland (999del5. However, the role of BRCA2 in high risk prostate cancer pedigrees remains unclear. Findings We examined the potential involvement of BRCA2 in a set offive high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees in which all prostate cases were no more distantly related than two meioses from another case, and the resulting cluster contained at least four prostate cancer cases. We selected these five pedigrees from a larger dataset of 59 high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees analyzed in a genome-wide linkage screen. Selected pedigrees showed at least nominal linkage evidence to the BRCA2 region on chromosome 13q. We mutation screened all coding regions and intron/exon boundaries of the BRCA2 gene in the youngest prostate cancer case who carried the linked 13q segregating haplotype, as well as in a distantly related haplotype carrier to confirm any segregation. We observed no known protein truncating BRCA2 deleterious mutations. We identified one non-segregating BRCA2 variant of uncertain significance, one non-segregating intronic variant not previously reported, and a number of polymorphisms. Conclusion In this set of high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees with at least nominal linkage evidence to BRCA2, we saw no evidence for segregating BRCA2 protein truncating mutations in heritable prostate cancer.

  8. Updated Results and Patterns of Failure in a Randomized Hypofractionation Trial for High-risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Gomellini, Sara; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Pinnaro, Paola; Pinzi, Valentina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio, E-mail: arcangeli.gio@tiscali.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results and patterns of failure after conventional and hypofractionated radiation therapy in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This randomized phase III trial compared conventional fractionation (80 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 8 weeks) vs hypofractionation (62 Gy at 3.1 Gy per fraction in 5 weeks) in combination with 9-month androgen deprivation therapy in 168 patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from local failure (FFLF), and freedom from distant failure (FFDF) were analyzed. Results: In a median follow-up of 70 months, biochemical failure (BF) occurred in 35 of the 168 patients (21%) in the study. Among these 35 patients, local failure (LF) only was detected in 11 (31%), distant failure (DF) only in 16 (46%), and both LF and DF in 6 (17%). In 2 patients (6%) BF has not yet been clinically detected. The risk reduction by hypofractionation was significant in BF (10.3%) but not in LF and DF. We found that hypofractionation, with respect to conventional fractionation, determined only an insignificant increase in the actuarial FFBF but no difference in FFLF and FFDF, when considering the entire group of patients. However, an increase in the 5-year rates in all 3 endpoints-FFBF, FFLF, and FFDF-was observed in the subgroup of patients with a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) level of 20 ng/mL or less. On multivariate analysis, the type of fractionation, iPSA level, Gleason score of 4+3 or higher, and T stage of 2c or higher have been confirmed as independent prognostic factors for BF. High iPSA levels and Gleason score of 4+3 or higher were also significantly associated with an increased risk of DF, whereas T stage of 2c or higher was the only independent variable for LF. Conclusion: Our results confirm the isoeffectiveness of the 2 fractionation schedules used in this study, although a benefit in favor of hypofractionation cannot be excluded in the subgroup of

  9. Low free and bioavailable testosterone levels may predict pathologically-proven high-risk prostate cancer: a prospective, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayar, Göksel; Şirin, Hakan; Aydın, Mustafa; Özağarı, Ayşim; Tanrıverdi, Orhan; Kadıhasanoğlu, Mustafa; Kendirci, Muammer

    2017-09-01

    To determine the predictive value of free and bioavailable testosterone levels on the detection of high-grade prostate cancer proven by histopathological examination of transrectal prostate biopsy specimens. A total of 405 patients who underwent transrectal prostate biopsy due to high prostatic specific antigen (PSA) (>2.5 ng/mL) and/or abnormal findings at digital rectal examination were included in this study. Blood free and bioavailable testosterone levels were calculated by the formula recommended by International Society for the Study of the Aging Male (ISSAM). The patients were stratified according to the D'Amico classification based on PSA levels and histological outcomes of prostate biopsies as benign, low, intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer. Patients were also divided into five groups according to the percentage of cancerous cores. Prostate cancer was detected in 160 of 405 (39.5%) patients. Total, free and bioavailable testosterone levels did not differ significantly between the patients with benign or malign histology. However, mean free (6.2 vs. 5.2 ng/dL, p=0.02) and bioavailable (151 vs. 125 ng/dL, p=0.001) testosterone levels were found to be significantly different in men with low-intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer. Moreover, a significant correlation was found between free, and bioavailable testosterone levels and percentage of cores with cancer (p=0.002 for free and p=0.016 for bioavailable testosterone, respectively). This prospective clinical study demonstrates that reduced levels of calculated blood free and bioavailable testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer. Based on these findings blood free and bioavailable testosterone levels may be be thought to be an adjunctive factor in the prediction of high-risk prostate cancer.

  10. Robot assisted radical prostatectomy for elderly patients with high risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Craig G; Sammon, Jesse D; Sukumar, Shyam; Diaz, Mireya; Peabody, James; Menon, Mani

    2013-02-01

    The role of robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for high-risk prostate cancer (CaP) is controversial, as is the role of RARP in elderly men. We evaluate outcomes of elderly patients with high-risk CaP who have chosen RARP over radiation or hormonal therapy. Between April 2001 and November 2009, 69 elderly patients (≥70 years) with high-risk CaP underwent RARP at our institution. High-risk CaP was defined using the D'Amico criterion, PSA ≥ 20 ng/ml, biopsy Gleason score 8-10, or clinical stage ≥ cT2C. Outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperative high-risk features were PSA > 20: 11 patients (15.9%), biopsy Gleason score 8-10: 43 (62.3%), or clinical stage ≥ cT2C: 25 (36.2%). Median OR time was 175 minutes (IQR: 136.8-202.5) and median EBL was 150 cc (IQR: 100-200). There were 4 complications (5.8%): urine leak (2) and ileus (2). Median duration of stay was 1 day and no patient had a hospital stay over 3 days. On final pathology, 26 men (37.7%) had organ-confined disease with negative surgical margins and 27 (39.1%) had extracapsular extension with negative margins. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 12 patients (17.4%) at a median follow-up of 37.7 months. There was a single incidence of positive lymph nodes at the time of surgery (1.4%). Actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 91% at 12 months and 86% at 36 months. Functional outcomes assessed by patient administered questionnaire at a median follow-up of 26.2 months showed an improvement in median IPSS score from 8.0 preoperatively to 5.0 postoperatively (P = 0.0004) with 53 (81.5%) of patients using 1 pad per day or less for urine control and 7 patients (33.3%) of the 21 men with preoperative SHIM score > 21 preoperatively achieving erections sufficient for intercourse. Robotic RP is safe and feasible in select elderly patients with high-risk CaP with good intermediate oncologic and functional outcomes. Advanced chronological age should not be an absolute contraindication for

  11. Incremental value of magnetic resonance imaging for clinically high risk prostate cancer in 922 radical prostatectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Gab; Lim, Ju Hyun; You, Dalsan; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Choi, Hyuk Jae; Kim, Jeong Kon; Cho, Kyoung-Sik; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the incremental value of magnetic resonance imaging in addition to clinical variables for predicting pathological outcomes and disease recurrence in patients with clinically high risk prostate cancer. A total of 922 consecutive patients with clinically high risk prostate cancer underwent magnetic resonance imaging before radical prostatectomy. We created multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models with clinical variables only or combined with magnetic resonance imaging data to predict pathological outcomes and biochemical recurrence. The models were compared using ROC curves and the Harrell concordance index. The proportion of patients with pathological extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion and lymph node metastasis was 57.5%, 12.7% and 6.3%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion and lymph node metastasis detection were 43% and 84.2%, 34.9% and 93.8%, and 14.0% and 96.9%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of the model with clinical variable and magnetic resonance imaging data was greater than that of the model with clinical variables alone to predict extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion (0.734 vs 0.697, p=0.001 and 0.750 vs 0.698, pmodel with clinical variables only and with clinical variables plus magnetic resonance imaging data was 0.563 and 0.599, respectively (p=0.003). Magnetic resonance imaging findings have incremental value in addition to clinical variables for predicting pathological outcomes and disease recurrence. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phase 3 clinical trial investigating the effect of selenium supplementation in men at high-risk for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algotar, Amit M; Stratton, M Suzanne; Ahmann, Frederick R; Ranger-Moore, James; Nagle, Raymond B; Thompson, Patricia A; Slate, Elizabeth; Hsu, Chiu H; Dalkin, Bruce L; Sindhwani, Puneet; Holmes, Michael A; Tuckey, John A; Graham, David L; Parnes, Howard L; Clark, Lawrence C; Stratton, Steven P

    2013-02-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of Se supplementation on prostate cancer incidence in men at high risk for prostate cancer. A Phase 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 699 men at high risk for prostate cancer (prostate specific antigen (PSA) >4 ng/ml and/or suspicious digital rectal examination and/or PSA velocity >0.75 ng/ml/year), but with a negative prostate biopsy. Participants were randomized to receive daily oral placebo (N = 232), 200 µg selenium (N = 234), or 400 µg selenium (N = 233) as selenized yeast. They were followed every 6 months for up to 5 years. The time to diagnosis of prostate cancer was compared between treatment groups using the Cox proportional hazards model. Compared to placebo, the hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals] for risk of developing prostate cancer in the selenium 200 µg/day or the selenium 400 µg/day group were 0.94 [0.52, 1.7] and 0.90 [0.48, 1.7], respectively. PSA velocity in the selenium arms was not significantly different from that observed in the placebo group (P = 0.18 and P = 0.17, respectively). Selenium supplementation appeared to have no effect on the incidence of prostate cancer in men at high risk. In conjunction with results of other studies, these data indicate that selenium supplementation may not have a role in prostate cancer chemoprevention. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Establishing the distribution of satellite lesions in intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer: implications for focused radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, J V; Margolis, D J; Wang, P-C; Reiter, R E; Huang, J; Steinberg, M L; Kamrava, M

    2017-06-01

    In focused radiotherapy for prostate cancer (PC), a full dose of radiation is delivered to the index lesion while reduced dose is delivered to the remaining prostate to reduce morbidity. As PC is commonly multifocal, we investigated whether baseline clinical characteristics or multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) may be useful to predict the actual pathologic distribution of PC in men with intermediate- or high-risk PC, which may better inform how to deliver focused radiotherapy. A retrospective single-institutional study was performed on 71 consecutive men with clinically localized, intermediate- or high-risk PC who underwent mpMRI followed by radical prostatectomy (RP) from January 2012 to December 2012. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate preoperative predictors for satellite lesions. Performance characteristics of mpMRI to detect satellite lesions and the extent of prostate disease (one hemi-gland vs both) were also evaluated. In all, 50.7% had satellite lesions on mpMRI. On RP specimen analysis, 66.2% had satellite lesions and 55.3% of these satellite lesions had pathologic Gleason score (pGS)⩾3+4. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy for mpMRI detecting a satellite lesion being present in the RP specimen were 59.6%, 66.7%, 77.8%, 45.7% and 62.0%, respectively. The presence of MRI satellite lesions was the only preoperative predictor significantly associated with finding satellite lesions on final pathology (hazard ratio (HR), 2.95, P=0.040). There was agreement in 76.1% of the entire cohort for unilateral vs bilateral disease when incorporating both biopsy and mpMRI information and comparing with the RP specimen. In intermediate risk or greater PC, only the presence of mpMRI satellite lesions could predict for pathologic satellite lesions. While combining biopsy and mpMRI information may improve preoperative disease localization, the relatively high incidence of

  14. Prostate-specific antigen nadir after high-dose-rate brachytherapy predicts long-term survival outcomes in high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyasu Tsumura

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen nadir (nPSA after high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy in clinically non-metastatic high-risk prostate cancer patients. Material and methods : Data from 216 patients with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer who underwent HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT between 2003 and 2008 were analyzed. The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA level at diagnosis was 24 ng/ml (range: 3-338 ng/ml. The clinical stage was T1c-2a in 55 cases (26%, T2b-2c in 48 (22%, T3a in 75 (35%, and T3b-4 in 38 (17%. The mean dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 Gy/fraction of HDR brachytherapy. After 5 fractions, external beam radiation therapy with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administered. All patients initially underwent neoadjuvant ADT for at least 6 months, and adjuvant ADT was continued for 36 months. The median follow-up was 7 years from the start of radiotherapy. Results : The 7-year PSA relapse-free rate among patients with a post-radiotherapy nPSA level of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was 94%, compared with 23% for patients with higher nPSA values (HR = 28.57; 95% CI: 12.04-66.66; p < 0.001. Multivariate analysis revealed that the nPSA value after radiotherapy was a significant independent predictor of biochemical failure, whereas pretreatment predictive values for worse biochemical control including higher level of initial PSA, Gleason score ≥ 8, positive biopsy core rate ≥ 67%, and T3b-T4, failed to reach independent predictor status. The 7-year cancer-specific survival rate among patients with a post-radiotherapy nPSA level of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was 99%, compared with 82% for patients with higher nPSA values (HR = 32.25; 95% CI: 3.401-333.3; p = 0.002. Conclusions : A post-radiotherapy nPSA value of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was associated with better long-term biochemical tumor control even if patients had pretreatment predictive

  15. Target volume definition in high-risk prostate cancer patients using sentinel node SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vees Hansjörg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the influence of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline (18 F-FCH PET/CT in radiotherapy (RT treatment planning for prostate cancer patients with a high-risk for lymph node (LN involvement. Methods Twenty high-risk prostate cancer patients underwent a pelvic SPECT acquisition following a transrectal ultrasound guided injection of 99mTc-Nanocoll into the prostate. In all patients but one an 18 F-FCH PET/CT for RT treatment planning was performed. SPECT studies were coregistered with the respective abdominal CTs. Pelvic SNs localized on SPECT/CT and LN metastases detected by 18 F-FCH PET/CT were compared to standard pelvic clinical target volumes (CTV. Results A total of 104 pelvic SNs were identified on SPECT/CT (mean 5.2 SNs/patient; range 1–10. Twenty-seven SNs were located outside the standard pelvic CTV, 17 in the proximal common iliac and retroperitoneal regions above S1, 9 in the pararectal fat and 1 in the inguinal region. SPECT/CT succeeded to optimize the definition of the CTV and treatment plans in 6/20 patients due to the presence of pararectal SNs located outside the standard treatment volume. 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified abnormal tracer uptake in the iliac LN region in 2/19 patients. These abnormal LNs were negative on SPECT/CT suggesting a potential blockade of lymphatic drainage by metastatic LNs with a high tumour burden. Conclusions Multimodality imaging which combines SPECT/CT prostate lymphoscintigraphy and 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified SNs outside standard pelvic CTVs or highly suspicious pelvic LNs in 40% of high-risk prostate cancer patients, highlighting the potential impact of this approach in RT treatment planning.

  16. Radiobiological comparison of two schemes of radiotherapy treatment in high-risk prostate; Comparacion radiobiologica de dos esquemas de tratamiento en radioterapia de prostate de alto riesgo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Hernandez, T.; Vicedo Gonzalez, A.; Pastor Peidro, J.; Rosello Ferrando, J.; Granero Cabanero, D.; Brualla Gonzalez, L.; Lopez Torrecilla, J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to compare two techniques of IMRT for treatment of high-risk prostate cancer. One of the techniques involves a sequential treatment in the that are treated in three phases pelvic nodules, vesicles and the prostate, using a conventional fractionation of 2Gy/fraction (SIMRT). Other treatment consists of two phases which are administered various dose levels simultaneously in each phase (SIB IMRT). (Author)

  17. Prostate cancer-specific death in brachytherapy treated high-risk patients stratified by pre-treatment PSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Fiano, Ryan; Adamovich, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate prostate-cancer specific mortality (PCSM) in a cohort of high-risk patients treated with a permanent prostate brachytherapy approach, stratified by pre-treatment PSA. Material and methods 448 high-risk patients (NCCN criteria) underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy. High risk patients were stratified by pre-treatment PSA (≤ 10.0, 10.1-20, and > 20 ng/ml). Biochemical failure (BF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), distant failure (DM), and overall mortality (OM) were assessed as a function of prognostic group. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results The 10-year OM, BF, and PCSM for the entire cohort were 28.5%, 13.3%, and 4.9%, respectively. At 10 years, PCSM was 2.5%, 10.7%, and 4.5% in the PSA ≤ 10, 10.1-20, and > 20 ng/ml groups, respectively. No statistically significant differences in BF or overall survival (OS) were noted when stratified by pre-treatment PSA. DF was the most common in the 10.1-20 ng/ml cohort (8.6% at 10 years). In multivariate analysis, PCSM was most closely related to percent positive biopsies (p = 0.001) and tobacco (p = 0.042). Conclusions High-risk prostate cancer treated with permanent prostate brachytherapy and supplemental external beam radiotherapy resulted in excellent long-term biochemical control and PCSM. Overall, PCSM was low in all cohorts but highest in the intermediate PSA group (10.1-20 ng/ml). PMID:28951747

  18. An audit of referral and treatment patterns of high-risk prostate cancer patients in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Majed; Taggar, Amandeep; Tilley, Derek; Kerba, Marc; Kostaras, Xanthoula; Gotto, Geoffrey; Sia, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the impact of clinical practice guidelines (CPG) on rates of radiation oncologist (RO) referral, androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), radiation therapy (RT), and radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HR-PCa). All men >18 years, diagnosed with PCa in 2005 and 2012 were identified from the Alberta Cancer Registry. Patient age, aggregated clinical risk group (ACRG) score, Gleason score (GS), pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA), RO referral, and treatment received were extracted from electronic medical records. Logistic regression modelling was used to examine associations between RO referral rates and relevant factors. HR-PCa was diagnosed in 261 of 1792 patients in 2005 and 435 of 2148 in 2012. Median age and ACRG scores were similar in both years (p>0.05). The rate of patients with PSA >20 were 67% and 57% in 2005 and 2012, respectively (p=0.004). GS ≤6 was found in 13% vs. 5% of patients, GS 7 in 27% vs. 24%, and GS ≥8 in 59% vs. 71% in 2005 and 2012, respectively (p<0.001). In 2005, RO referral rate was 68% compared to 56% in 2012 (p=0.001), use of RT + ADT was 53% compared to 32% (p<0.001), and RP rate was 9% vs. 17% (p=0.002). On regression analysis, older age, 2012 year of diagnosis and higher PSA were associated with decreased RO referral rates (odds ratios [OR] 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39-0.61; OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.34-0.76; and OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.39-0.61), respectively [p<0.001]). Since CPG creation in 2005, RO referral rates and ADT + RT use declined and RP rates increased, which demonstrates a need to improve adherence to CPG in the HR-PCa population.

  19. Androgenic alopecia is not useful as an indicator of men at high risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Ruben G; Aben, Katja K; Vermeulen, Sita H; den Heijer, Martin; van Oort, Inge M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A

    2010-12-01

    Androgens are assumed to play a central role in the pathophysiology of both prostate cancer (PC) and androgenic alopecia (AA). A correlation between the two phenotypes may be relevant for identification of men at high risk of PC. We evaluated the association between AA at different ages and PC in a large case-control study. The case group comprised 938 PC patients recruited from a population-based cancer registry. The controls (n = 2160) were a random sample of the male general population. All subjects completed a questionnaire on risk factors for cancer, including questions on hair pattern at different ages using an adapted version of the Hamilton-Norwood scale, race and family history of PC. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. Baldness at early age appeared to be associated with a lower risk of PC (baldness at age 20: OR = 0.86; 95% CI 0.69-1.07 and baldness at age 40: OR = 0.81; 95% CI 0.70-0.96). Baldness at completion of the questionnaire was not associated with PC: OR = 1.10; 95% CI 0.89-1.34. An isolated 'frontal baldness' or 'vertex baldness' pattern was not significantly associated with PC at any age. Presence of a combined 'frontal and vertex' baldness pattern at age 40 was associated with a decreased risk of PC (OR = 0.62; 95% CI 0.45-0.86). There were no significant associations between AA and aggressive PC. We did not find consistent positive associations between AA at different ages and PC. Surprisingly, if anything, baldness at early age is inversely related to PC in this study. Androgenic alopecia is not useful as an indicator of men at high risk of PC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Test of linkage between candidate loci and a prostate cancer susceptibility locus in a set of high risk kindreds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon-Albright, L.A.; Neuhausen, S.; Goldgar, D.E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Although no prostate cancer susceptibility locus has yet been mapped, candidate loci have been suggested by a series of allele loss studies in prostate tumors. We have used linkage analysis to investigate each locus previously shown to be lost in at least 30 percent of tumors. Seven high risk cases were screened with 31 markers representing loci on 11 chromosome arms to test for cosegregation of the markers and prostate cancer. Age of cancer onset for prostate cancer cases was not considered for ascertainment. A variety of models were utilized in linkage analysis, as well as model-free methods. A subset of Lod scored at {theta}=.01 are shown for a low penetrance affected-only model which assumed a rare dominant susceptibility and allowed sporadic cases. Multiple markers were run for each locus considered. Positive Lod scores >1.0 in specific kindreds are being investigated further and an exclusion map will be presented.

  1. Robotic radical prostatectomy in high-risk prostate cancer: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2015-01-01

    Around 20%-30% of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) still have high-risk PCa disease (HRPC) that requires aggressive treatment. Treatment of HRPC is controversial, and multimodality therapy combining surgery, radiation therapy, and androgen deprivation therapy have been suggested. There has been a trend toward performing radical prostatectomy (RP) in HRPC and currently, robot-assisted laparoscopic RP (RARP) has become the most common approach. Number of publications related to robotic surgery in HRPC is limited in the literature. Tissue and Tumor characteristics might be different in HRPC patients compared to low-risk group and increased surgical experience for RARP is needed. Due to the current literature, RARP seems to have similar oncologic outcomes including surgical margin positivity, biochemical recurrence and recurrence-free survival rates, additional cancer therapy needs and lymph node (LN) yields with similar complication rates compared to open surgery in HRPC. In addition, decreased blood loss, lower rates of blood transfusion and shorter duration of hospital stay seem to be the advantages of robotic surgery in this particular patient group. RARP in HRPC patients seems to be safe and technically feasible with good intermediate-term oncologic results, acceptable morbidities, excellent short-term surgical and pathological outcomes and satisfactory functional results.

  2. Robotic radical prostatectomy in high-risk prostate cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Erdem Canda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Around 20%-30% of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa still have high-risk PCa disease (HRPC that requires aggressive treatment. Treatment of HRPC is controversial, and multimodality therapy combining surgery, radiation therapy, and androgen deprivation therapy have been suggested. There has been a trend toward performing radical prostatectomy (RP in HRPC and currently, robot-assisted laparoscopic RP (RARP has become the most common approach. Number of publications related to robotic surgery in HRPC is limited in the literature. Tissue and Tumor characteristics might be different in HRPC patients compared to low-risk group and increased surgical experience for RARP is needed. Due to the current literature, RARP seems to have similar oncologic outcomes including surgical margin positivity, biochemical recurrence and recurrence-free survival rates, additional cancer therapy needs and lymph node (LN yields with similar complication rates compared to open surgery in HRPC. In addition, decreased blood loss, lower rates of blood transfusion and shorter duration of hospital stay seem to be the advantages of robotic surgery in this particular patient group. RARP in HRPC patients seems to be safe and technically feasible with good intermediate-term oncologic results, acceptable morbidities, excellent short-term surgical and pathological outcomes and satisfactory functional results.

  3. Salvage prostate cryoablation for recurrent localized prostate cancer after radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Ji-Yuen Siu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Salvage prostate cryoablation (SCA for recurrent localized prostate cancer after radiotherapy has been studied in Western countries for more than a decade. We present our experience of SCA in a Taiwanese medical center. We performed four cases of SCA for recurrent localized prostate cancer after radiotherapy. The data recorded included age, cancer stage, prostate-specific antigen (PSA level, Gleason score, prostate volume and patient outcome. The median follow-up period was 17 months. All cases were biopsy-proven to have residual cancer before cryoablation. After SCA, 25% of the patients reached undetectable PSA levels, 50% showed response but did not reach undetectable levels, and 25% showed no decrease in PSA. The median recurrence-free duration after SCA was 18 months in the patients who experienced a decrease in PSA. ADT was initiated after SCA for the patient who did not show any response, and bone metastasis was later diagnosed in that patient. Most patients experienced obstructive voiding problems after SCA, which improved over time. SCA is a safe salvage option for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence after RT. The preliminary results are encouraging. More extensive imagery to exclude extra-glandular disease is warranted before SCA. A longer follow-up period and larger sample size are necessary to delineate the benefits more conclusively.

  4. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D., E-mail: tendulr@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hunter, Grant K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Mahadevan, Arul [Seacoast Cancer Center New Hampshire, Dover, New Hampshire (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Health System, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (≥74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ≥1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ≥1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not.

  5. Radical prostatectomy for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeratterapillay, R; Goonewardene, S S; Barclay, J; Persad, R; Bach, C

    2017-04-01

    The management of advanced prostate cancer remains challenging. Traditionally, radical prostatectomy was discouraged in patients with locally advanced or node positive disease owing to the increased complication rate and treatment related morbidity. However, technical advances and refinements in surgical techniques have enabled the outcomes for patients with high risk prostate cancer to be improved. More recently, the concept of cytoreductive prostatectomy has been described where surgery (often Combined with an extended lymph node dissection) is performed in the setting of metastatic disease. Indirect evidence suggests an advantage using the cytoreductive approach. Hypothetical explanations for this observed benefit include decreased tumour burden, immune modulation, improved response to secondary treatment and avoidance of secondary complications attributable to local tumour growth. Nevertheless, prospective trials are required to investigate this further.

  6. Prostate Cancer in Patients With High Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels but Otherwise Very-Low-Risk Disease Behaves Like Prostate Cancer in High-Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestaut, Matthew M; Pruszynski, Jessica E; Swanson, Gregory P

    2017-08-01

    Rarely, patients with prostate cancer present with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) scores > 20 ng/mL but with otherwise very-low-risk disease. Oncologists have debated whether the malignancies in these patients behave more comparably to low-risk or high-risk disease. Our objective was to elucidate the behavior of these malignancies. A retrospective review was conducted of prostate cancer patients treated with radiation from 2000 to 2013. The inclusion criteria for very-low-risk disease included stage T1a-T1c, Gleason score ≤ 6, ≤ 3 positive cores, ≤ 50% involvement of any core, and PSA level high-grade, low-volume group consisted of patients with stage T1c-T2a, PSA level high-grade groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival at 5 years was 71.3% for the divergent group, 68.8% for the high-grade group, and 98.3% for the low-risk group. The biochemical failure rate for the divergent group differed significantly from the low-risk group (P = .021), and that for the low-risk group was significantly different from that of the high-grade group (P = .025). However, the divergent group did not appear different from the high-grade group (P = .53). The results of our study have shown that the disease prognosis for the divergent-risk group is worse than that for the very-low-risk disease group and does not appear to be different from that for the low-volume, high-grade disease group. Oncologists should be aware that the outcomes for divergent patients are similarly poor to their low-volume, classically high-risk counterparts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Survival Outcomes of Whole-Pelvic Versus Prostate-Only Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients With Use of the National Cancer Data Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya; Jones, Bernard L.; Yeh, Norman; Rusthoven, Chad G.; Armstrong, Hirotatsu; Kavanagh, Brian D., E-mail: brian.kavanagh@ucdenver.edu

    2015-12-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The addition of whole pelvic (WP) compared with prostate-only (PO) radiation therapy (RT) for clinically node-negative prostate cancer remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the survival benefit of adding WPRT versus PO-RT for high-risk, node-negative prostate cancer, using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated from 2004 to 2006, with available data for RT volume, coded as prostate and pelvis (WPRT) or prostate alone (PO-RT) were included. Multivariate analysis (MVA) and propensity-score matched analysis (PSM) were performed. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) based on overall survival (OS) using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was also conducted. Results: A total of 14,817 patients were included: 7606 (51.3%) received WPRT, and 7211 (48.7%) received PO-RT. The median follow-up time was 81 months (range, 2-122 months). Under MVA, the addition of WPRT for high-risk patients had no OS benefit compared with PO-RT (HR 1.05; P=.100). On subset analysis, patients receiving dose-escalated RT also did not benefit from WPRT (HR 1.01; P=.908). PSM confirmed no survival benefit with the addition of WPRT for high-risk patients (HR 1.05; P=.141). In addition, RPA was unable to demonstrate a survival benefit of WPRT for any subset. Other prognostic factors for inferior OS under MVA included older age (HR 1.25; P<.001), increasing comorbidity scores (HR 1.46; P<.001), higher T stage (HR 1.17; P<.001), PSA (HR 1.81; P<.001), and GS (HR 1.29; P<.001), and decreasing median county household income (HR 1.15; P=.011). Factors improving OS included the addition of androgen deprivation therapy (HR 0.92; P=.033), combination external beam RT plus brachytherapy boost (HR 0.71; P<.001), and treatment at an academic/research institution (HR 0.84; P=.002). Conclusion: In the largest reported analysis of WPRT for patients with

  8. Finasteride to Prevent Prostate Cancer: Should All Men or Only a High-Risk Subgroup Be Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Savage, Caroline J.; Lilja, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Finasteride has been shown to reduce the incidence of prostate cancer. Yet the use of finasteride remains low, likely because of the risk of adverse effects. We sought to determine whether prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels could identify a high-risk subgroup for which the benefits of finasteride treatment outweigh the potential harms. Patients and Methods Raw data from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial were used to model chemopreventive treatment strategies: treat all men, treat no men, or treat a high-risk subgroup based on PSA level. We weighted the benefits (reduction in cancer rate) and harms (treatment rate) of each strategy using numbers-needed-to-treat thresholds—the maximum number of men a clinician would treat with finasteride to prevent one cancer. Results Of 9,058 men, 1,957 were diagnosed with prostate cancer during the 7-year study. For the end point of all cancers, including both for-cause and end-of-study biopsies, the optimal strategy is to treat all or nearly all men. To reduce risk of cancers detected through routine care, treating men with PSA > 1.3 or > 2 ng/mL is optimal. For example, treating only men with PSA > 2 ng/mL reduced the treatment rate by 83% and resulted in a cancer rate only 1.1% higher than treating all men. Conclusion Clinicians wishing to reduce the risk of any biopsy-detectable prostate cancer should recommend finasteride to all men. Clinicians who believe that it is unnecessary to prevent all cancers, but that preventing those readily detectable by screening would be desirable, would be best off recommending finasteride only to a high-risk subgroup. PMID:20124185

  9. American Brachytherapy Society Task Group Report: Combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiation for high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Daniel E; Soni, Payal D; McLaughlin, Patrick W; Merrick, Gregory S; Stock, Richard G; Blasko, John C; Zelefsky, Michael J

    To review outcomes for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy (CMRT) utilizing external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with a brachytherapy boost. The available literature for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy was reviewed and summarized. At this time, the literature suggests that the majority of high-risk cancers are curable with multimodal treatment. Several large retrospective studies and three prospective randomized trials comparing CMRT to dose-escalated EBRT have demonstrated superior biochemical control with CMRT. Longer followup of the randomized trials will be required to determine if this will translate to a benefit in metastasis-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Although greater toxicity has been associated with CMRT compared to EBRT, recent studies suggest that technological advances that allow better definition and sparing of critical adjacent structures as well as increasing experience with brachytherapy have improved implant quality and the toxicity profile of brachytherapy. The role of androgen deprivation therapy is well established in the external beam literature for high-risk disease, but there is controversy regarding the applicability of these data in the setting of dose escalation. At this time, there is not sufficient evidence for the omission of androgen deprivation therapy with dose escalation in this population. Comparisons with surgery remain limited by differences in patient selection, but the evidence would suggest better disease control with CMRT compared to surgery alone. Due to a series of technological advances, modern combination series have demonstrated unparalleled rates of disease control in the high-risk population. Given the evidence from recent randomized trials, combination therapy may become the standard of care for high-risk cancers. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  10. [Transurethral plasmakinetic enucleation of prostate and suprapubic small cut in the treatment of high risk and senior patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia and bladder stones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-xiang; Zhang, Rui-ming; Zhou, Da-qing; Mo, Zeng-nan; Li, Wen-gang; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Bo; Deng, Cheng-hui; Pang, Xiang

    2013-02-26

    To explore the safety and efficiency of transurethral plasmakinetic enucleation of prostate (TUPKEP) and suprapubic small cut in the treatment of high-risk and senior patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and bladder stones. A retrospective review was conducted for 68 high-risk and senior patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and bladder stones. All of them were treated by TUPKEP and suprapubic small cut. Operation was successfully performed in all 68 cases. And there was no instance of transurethral resection syndrome, shock, myocardial infarct, cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage, permanent urinary incontinence or surgical site infection. Seven patients with temporal urinary incontinence recovered at a mean time of (9.48 ± 1.52) days post-operation. The mean operative duration was (48.63 ± 4.14) min and the mean volume of blood loss (50.97 ± 5.33) ml. The changes of maximum flow rate (Qmax), international prostatic symptom score (I-PSS) and quality-of-life (QOL) were statistically significant before and after operation. Qmax increased from (4.56 ± 0.35) to (18.82 ± 1.65) ml/s (P < 0.001), I-PSS decreased form (21.96 ± 1.89) to (11.23 ± 0.86) (P = 0.018) and QOL decreased from (4.94 ± 0.35) to (1.95 ± 0.32) (P = 0.011). The approach of TUPKEP and suprapubic small cut is both safe and effective in the treatment of high-risk and senior patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia and bladder stones and should be widely applied.

  11. Genomic and epigenomic analysis of high-risk prostate cancer reveals changes in hydroxymethylation and TET1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spans, Lien; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Smeets, Elien; Prekovic, Stefan; Thienpont, Bernard; Lambrechts, Diether; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Erho, Nicholas; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Davicioni, Elai; Helsen, Christine; Gevaert, Thomas; Tosco, Lorenzo; Haustermans, Karin; Lerut, Evelyne; Joniau, Steven; Claessens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer (PCa) makes it difficult to identify those patients that could benefit from more aggressive treatments. As a contribution to a better understanding of the genomic changes in the primary tumor that are associated with the development of high-risk disease, we performed exome sequencing and copy number determination of a clinically homogeneous cohort of 47 high-risk PCas. We confirmed recurrent mutations in SPOP, PTEN and TP53 among the 850 point mutations we detected. In seven cases, we discovered genomic aberrations in the TET1 (Ten-Eleven Translocation 1) gene which encodes a DNA hydroxymethylase than can modify methylated cytosines in genomic DNA and thus is linked with gene expression changes. TET1 protein levels were reduced in tumor versus non-tumor prostate tissue in 39 of 40 cases. The clinical relevance of changes in TET1 levels was demonstrated in an independent PCa cohort, in which low TET1 mRNA levels were significantly associated with worse metastases-free survival. We also demonstrate a strong reduction in hydroxymethylated DNA in tumor tissue in 27 of 41 cases. Furthermore, we report the first exploratory (h)MeDIP-Seq analyses of eight high-risk PCa samples. This reveals a large heterogeneity in hydroxymethylation changes in tumor versus non-tumor genomes which can be linked with cell polarity. PMID:27014907

  12. Preferences in the management of high-risk prostate cancer among urologists in Europe: results of a web-based survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surcel, C.I.; Sooriakumaran, P.; Briganti, A.; Visschere, P.J. De; Futterer, J.J.; Ghadjar, P.; Isbarn, H.; Ost, P.; Ploussard, G.; Bergh, R.C. van den; Oort, I.M. van; Yossepowitch, O.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.; Giannarini, G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore preferences in the management of patients with newly diagnosed high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) among urologists in Europe through a web-based survey. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A web-based survey was conducted between 15 August and 15 September 2013 by members of the Prostate

  13. Long-Term Efficacy and Toxicity of Low-Dose-Rate {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy in Low-, Intermediate-, and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Smith, Kristin L.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Tendulkar, Rahul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Campbell, Steven; Stephenson, Andrew; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Wilkinson, D. Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ciezki, Jay P., E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives: To report long-term efficacy and toxicity for a single-institution cohort of patients treated with low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy permanent implant (PI) monotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2007, 1989 patients with low-risk (61.3%), intermediate-risk (29.8%), high-intermediate-risk (4.5%), and high-risk prostate cancer (4.4%) were treated with PI and followed up prospectively in a registry. All patients were treated with {sup 125}I monotherapy to 144 Gy. Late toxicity was coded retrospectively according to a modified Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0 scale. The rates of biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were calculated. We identified factors associated with late grade ≥3 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, bRFS, DMFS, OS, PCSM, and incontinence. Results: The median age of the patients was 67 years, and the median overall and prostate-specific antigen follow-up times were 6.8 years and 5.8 years, respectively. The overall 5-year rates for bRFS, DMFS, OS, and PCSM were 91.9%, 97.8%, 93.7%, and 0.71%, respectively. The 10-year rates were 81.5%, 91.5%, 76.1%, and 2.5%, respectively. The overall rates of late grade ≥3 GU and GI toxicity were 7.6% and 0.8%, respectively. On multivariable analysis, age and prostate length were significantly associated with increased risk of late grade ≥3 GU toxicity. The risk of incontinence was highly correlated with both pre-PI and post-PI transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusions: Prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy is an effective treatment for low-risk and low-intermediate-risk prostate cancer and appears promising as a treatment for high-intermediate-risk and high-risk prostate cancer. Significant long-term toxicities are rare when brachytherapy is performed as monotherapy.

  14. A Putative Nononcogene Addiction Gene Target and Marker for Radiosensitivity in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hydroxyurea, caffeine and ethyl methanesulphonate: implications for roles of RNases H in DNA replication...transcription invasion and growth of prostate cancer cell lines with RNASEH2A. (4) Radio-resistance of prostate cancer cells that over express RNASEH2A. (5...overexpressing RNASEH2A) were injected subcutaneously into SCID mice. As shown in Fig. 3, tumor growth was retarded in cells lacking RNASEH2A and accelerated in

  15. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for high risk prostate cancer based on sentinel node SPECT imaging for target volume definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiadis Aristotelis

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RTOG 94-13 trial has provided evidence that patients with high risk prostate cancer benefit from an additional radiotherapy to the pelvic nodes combined with concomitant hormonal ablation. Since lymphatic drainage of the prostate is highly variable, the optimal target volume definition for the pelvic lymph nodes is problematic. To overcome this limitation, we tested the feasibility of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT protocol, taking under consideration the individual pelvic sentinel node drainage pattern by SPECT functional imaging. Methods Patients with high risk prostate cancer were included. Sentinel nodes (SN were localised 1.5–3 hours after injection of 250 MBq 99mTc-Nanocoll using a double-headed gamma camera with an integrated X-Ray device. All sentinel node localisations were included into the pelvic clinical target volume (CTV. Dose prescriptions were 50.4 Gy (5 × 1.8 Gy / week to the pelvis and 70.0 Gy (5 × 2.0 Gy / week to the prostate including the base of seminal vesicles or whole seminal vesicles. Patients were treated with IMRT. Furthermore a theoretical comparison between IMRT and a three-dimensional conformal technique was performed. Results Since 08/2003 6 patients were treated with this protocol. All patients had detectable sentinel lymph nodes (total 29. 4 of 6 patients showed sentinel node localisations (total 10, that would not have been treated adequately with CT-based planning ('geographical miss' only. The most common localisation for a probable geographical miss was the perirectal area. The comparison between dose-volume-histograms of IMRT- and conventional CT-planning demonstrated clear superiority of IMRT when all sentinel lymph nodes were included. IMRT allowed a significantly better sparing of normal tissue and reduced volumes of small bowel, large bowel and rectum irradiated with critical doses. No gastrointestinal or genitourinary acute toxicity Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG

  16. Methylation of PITX2, HOXD3, RASSF1 and TDRD1 predicts biochemical recurrence in high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovkin, Kirill; Joniau, Steven; Lerut, Evelyne; Laenen, Annouschka; Gevaert, Olivier; Spahn, Martin; Kneitz, Burkhard; Isebaert, Sofie; Haustermans, Karin; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2014-11-01

    To explore differential methylation of HAAO, HOXD3, LGALS3, PITX2, RASSF1 and TDRD1 as a molecular tool to predict biochemical recurrence (BCR) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PCa). A multiplexed nested methylation-specific PCR was applied to quantify promoter methylation of the selected markers in five cell lines, 42 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 71 high-risk PCa tumor samples. Uni- and multivariate Cox regression models were used to assess the importance of the methylation level in predicting BCR. A PCa-specific methylation marker HAAO in combination with HOXD3 and a hypomethylation marker TDRD1 distinguished PCa samples (>90 % of tumor cells each) from BPH with a sensitivity of 0.99 and a specificity of 0.95. High methylation of PITX2, HOXD3 and RASSF1, as well as low methylation of TDRD1, appeared to be significantly associated with a higher risk for BCR (HR 3.96, 3.44, 2.80 and 2.85, correspondingly) after correcting for established risk factors. When DNA methylation was treated as a continuous variable, a two-gene model PITX2 × 0.020677 + HOXD3 × 0.0043132 proved to be the best predictor of BCR (HR 4.85) compared with the individual markers. This finding was confirmed in an independent set of 52 high-risk PCa tumor samples (HR 11.89). Differential promoter methylation of HOXD3, PITX2, RASSF1 and TDRD1 emerges as an independent predictor of BCR in high-risk PCa patients. A two-gene continuous DNA methylation model "PITX2 × 0.020677 + HOXD3 × 0.0043132" is a better predictor of BCR compared with individual markers.

  17. Optimal high b-value for diffusion weighted MRI in diagnosing high risk prostate cancers in the peripheral zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Harsh K; Mertan, Francesca V; Sankineni, Sandeep; Bernardo, Marcelino; Senegas, Julien; Keupp, Jochen; Daar, Dagane; Merino, Maria; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2017-01-01

    To retrospectively determine the optimal b-value(s) of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) associated with intermediate-high risk cancer in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate. Forty-two consecutive patients underwent multi b-value (16 evenly spaced b-values between 0 and 2000 s/mm 2 ) DWI along with multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) of the prostate at 3 Tesla followed by trans-rectal ultrasound/MRI fusion guided targeted biopsy of suspicious lesions detected at MP-MRI. Computed DWI images up to a simulated b-value of 4000 s/mm 2 were also obtained using a pair of b-values (b = 133 and 400 or 667 or 933 s/mm 2 ) from the multi b-value DWI. The contrast ratio of average intensity of the targeted lesions and the background PZ was determined. Receiver operator characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUCs) were obtained for separating patients eligible for active surveillance with low risk prostate cancers from intermediate-high risk prostate cancers as per the cancer of the prostate risk assessment (CAPRA) scoring system. The AUC first increased then decreased with the increase in b-values reaching maximum at b = 1600 s/mm 2 (0.74) with no statistically significant different AUC of DWI with b-values 1067-2000 s/mm 2 . The AUC of computed DWI increased then decreased with the increase in b-values reaching a maximum of 0.75 around b = 2000 s/mm 2 . There was no statistically significant difference between the AUC of optimal acquired DWI and either of optimal computed DWI. The optimal b-value for acquired DWI in differentiating intermediate-high from low risk prostate cancers in the PZ is b = 1600 s/mm 2 . The computed DWI has similar performance as that of acquired DWI with the optimal performance around b = 2000 s/mm 2 . 4 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:125-131. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Active surveillance for localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Berg, Kasper D; Røder, M Andreas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evidence supports active surveillance (AS) as a means to reduce overtreatment of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). The consequences of close and long-standing follow-up with regard to outpatient visits, tests and repeated biopsies are widely unknown. This study investigated the trajectory...... and costs of AS in patients with localized PCa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 317 PCa patients were followed in a prospective, single-arm AS cohort. The primary outcomes were number of patient contacts, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, biopsies, hospital admissions due to biopsy complications...

  19. Active surveillance for localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thostrup, Mathias; Thomsen, Frederik B; Iversen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of active surveillance (AS) is to reduce overtreatment of men with localized prostate cancer (PCa) without compromising survival. The objective of this study was to update a large Scandinavian single-center AS cohort. Furthermore, the use of curative treatment and subsequent...... risk of biochemical recurrence were investigated and compared in men with very low-risk, low-risk and intermediate-risk PCa in the cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 451 men were followed on AS and monitored with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, digital rectal examinations and rebiopsies...

  20. Local Control With 21-Gy Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Dana L; Kushner, Brian H; Cheung, Nai-Kong V; Modak, Shakeel; LaQuaglia, Michael P; Wolden, Suzanne L

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate local control after 21-Gy radiation therapy (RT) to the primary site in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. After receiving dose-intensive chemotherapy and gross total resection (GTR), 246 patients (aged 1.2-17.9 years, median 4.0 years) with high-risk neuroblastoma underwent RT to the primary site at Memorial Sloan Kettering from 2000 to 2014. Radiation therapy consisted of 21 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy each. Local failure (LF) was correlated with biologic prognostic factors and clinical findings at the time of diagnosis and start of RT. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 6.4 years. Cumulative incidence of LF was 7.1% at 2 years after RT and 9.8% at 5 years after RT. The isolated LF rate was 3.0%. Eighty-six percent of all local failures were within the RT field. Local control was worse in patients who required more than 1 surgical resection to achieve GTR (22.4% vs 8.3%, P=.01). There was also a trend toward inferior local control with MYCN-amplified tumors or serum lactate dehydrogenase ≥1500 U/L (P=.09 and P=.06, respectively). After intensive chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking, hyperfractionated RT with 21 Gy in high-risk neuroblastoma results in excellent local control. Given the young patient age, concern for late effects, and local control >90%, dose reduction may be appropriate for patients without MYCN amplification who achieve GTR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Local Control With 21-Gy Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Dana L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Modak, Shakeel [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after 21-Gy radiation therapy (RT) to the primary site in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Methods and Materials: After receiving dose-intensive chemotherapy and gross total resection (GTR), 246 patients (aged 1.2-17.9 years, median 4.0 years) with high-risk neuroblastoma underwent RT to the primary site at Memorial Sloan Kettering from 2000 to 2014. Radiation therapy consisted of 21 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy each. Local failure (LF) was correlated with biologic prognostic factors and clinical findings at the time of diagnosis and start of RT. Results: Median follow-up of surviving patients was 6.4 years. Cumulative incidence of LF was 7.1% at 2 years after RT and 9.8% at 5 years after RT. The isolated LF rate was 3.0%. Eighty-six percent of all local failures were within the RT field. Local control was worse in patients who required more than 1 surgical resection to achieve GTR (22.4% vs 8.3%, P=.01). There was also a trend toward inferior local control with MYCN-amplified tumors or serum lactate dehydrogenase ≥1500 U/L (P=.09 and P=.06, respectively). Conclusion: After intensive chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking, hyperfractionated RT with 21 Gy in high-risk neuroblastoma results in excellent local control. Given the young patient age, concern for late effects, and local control >90%, dose reduction may be appropriate for patients without MYCN amplification who achieve GTR.

  2. The oncologic role of local treatment in primary metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Briganti, Alberto; De Visschere, Peter J L; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Giannarini, Gianluca; Isbarn, Hendrik; Ost, Piet; Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Surcel, Christian I; van den Bergh, Roderick C N; van Oort, Inge M; Yossepowitch, Ofer; Ploussard, Guillaume

    2015-06-01

    To determine the oncologic benefit or otherwise of local treatment of the prostate in patients with primary metastatic prostate cancer. A review of the literature was performed in April 2014 using the Medline/PubMed database. Studies were identified using the search terms "prostate cancer," "metastatic," "metastasis," "high risk," "radiation therapy," "radiotherapy" and "prostatectomy" from 1990 until April, 2014. Articles were also identified through searches of references of these articles. Retrospective series and population-based data suggest that the use of local treatment of the prostate in patients with primary metastatic prostate cancer may improve cancer-specific survival and overall survival compared with treating these patients with androgen deprivation therapy alone. The clinical outcome in metastatic prostate cancer is largely determined by the extent of lymph node involvement and overall metastatic burden. Contemporary data are lacking to recommend one alternative of local therapy (radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy) over the other. The primary limitation of this literature review is the lack of published randomized trial assessing the role of local treatment in addition to systemic therapy. Local treatment appears to improve oncologic outcomes in metastatic prostate cancer patients. Nevertheless, due to the lack of high-quality evidence, its role needs to be confirmed in future prospective trials. The selection of ideal candidates and optimal treatment alternative (radiotherapy, radical prostatectomy or other) warrants further investigation.

  3. [Management of High-Risk Prostate Cancer and Left Ectopic Ureter Inserting into Seminal Vesicle with Ipsilateral Hypoplastic Kidney of a Young Patient : A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Teppei; Koie, Takuya; Soma, Osamu; Kusaka, Ayumu; Hosogoe, Shogo; Hamano, Itsuto; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2016-06-01

    A 44-year-old male patient visited our hospital with a chief complaint of macroscopic hematuria. Prostate biopsies were performed due to prostate specific antigen (PSA) 11.6 ng/ml, and he was diagnosed with Gleason score 5+4 prostate cancer. Computed tomography showed a left hypoplastic kidney. T2- weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed the left ureter stump with ectopic insertion into the dilated left seminal vesicle. He was diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and left ectopic ureter inserting into the seminal vesicle with ipsilateral hypoplastic kidney. Laparoscopic left nephroureterectomy and open radical prostatectomy were performed.

  4. Factors associated with the omission of androgen deprivation therapy in radiation-managed high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Mahal, Brandon A; Nezolosky, Michelle D; Beard, Clair J; Choueiri, Toni K; Hoffman, Karen E; Martin, Neil E; Orio, Peter F; Sweeney, Christopher J; Feng, Felix Y; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been shown to improve survival for men with unfavorable-risk prostate cancer (PCa). We investigated the utilization and factors associated with the omission of ADT in radiation-managed high-risk PCa. We used the National Cancer Database to identify men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk PCa treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without brachytherapy boost from 2004 to 2012. Multivariable logistic regression adjusting for clinical and sociodemographic factors was used to identify independent predictors for ADT use. A total of 57,968 radiation-treated high-risk PCa men were included in our analysis. There were 49,363 patients (85.2%) treated with EBRT alone and 8605 patients (14.8%) treated with EBRT plus brachytherapy boost. Overall, 77% of men received ADT. In multivariable regression analysis, the use of brachytherapy boost was associated with a significantly lower utilization of ADT (70% vs. 78%; adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.62-0.69; p-Value use was seen with higher Gleason scores, PSA, and T-category (all p-Values <0.001). Approximately one in four men with radiation-managed high-risk PCa do not receive ADT, which may reflect concerns about its toxicity profile despite known improvements in overall survival. Practice patterns suggest that some providers believe dose escalation through brachytherapy boost may obviate the need for ADT in some high-risk patients, but this hypothesis requires further testing. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Definition and Validation of “Favorable High-Risk Prostate Cancer”: Implications for Personalizing Treatment of Radiation-Managed Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidhar, Vinayak [Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Reznor, Gally [Center for Surgery and Public Health, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, Illinois (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Martin, Neil E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sweeney, Christopher J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Trinh, Quoc-Dien [Department of Urology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nguyen, Paul L., E-mail: pnguyen@LROC.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To define and validate a classification of favorable high-risk prostate cancer that could be used to personalize therapy, given that consensus guidelines recommend similar treatments for all radiation-managed patients with high-risk disease. Methods and Materials: We studied 3618 patients with cT1-T3aN0M0 high-risk or unfavorable intermediate-risk prostate adenocarcinoma treated with radiation at a single institution between 1997 and 2013. Favorable high-risk was defined as T1c disease with either Gleason 4 + 4 = 8 and prostate-specific antigen <10 ng/mL or Gleason 6 and prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL. Competing risks regression was used to determine differences in the risk of prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) after controlling for baseline factors and treatment. Our results were validated in a cohort of 13,275 patients using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Results: Patients with favorable high-risk disease had significantly better PCSM than other men with high-risk disease (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.18-0.996, P=.049) and similar PCSM as men with unfavorable intermediate-risk disease (AHR 1.17, 95% CI 0.50-2.75, P=.710). We observed very similar results within the SEER-Medicare cohort (favorable high-risk vs other high-risk: AHR 0.21, 95% CI 0.11-0.41, P<.001; favorable high-risk vs unfavorable intermediate-risk: AHR 0.67, 95% CI 0.33-1.36, P=.268). Conclusions: Patients with favorable high-risk prostate cancer have significantly better PCSM than other patients with high-risk disease and similar PCSM as those with unfavorable intermediate-risk disease, who are typically treated with shorter-course androgen deprivation therapy. This new classification system may allow for personalization of treatment within high-risk disease, such as consideration of shorter-course androgen deprivation therapy for favorable high-risk disease.

  6. A prospective phase III randomized trial of hypofractionation versus conventional fractionation in patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Sentinelli, Steno; Marzi, Simona; Landoni, Valeria; Fowler, Jack; Strigari, Lidia

    2010-09-01

    To compare the toxicity and efficacy of hypofractionated (62 Gy/20 fractions/5 weeks, 4 fractions per week) vs. conventional fractionation radiotherapy (80 Gy/40 fractions/8 weeks) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. From January 2003 to December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated or conventional fractionated schedules of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients received a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation (TAD), and radiotherapy started 2 months thereafter. The median (range) follow-up was 32 (8-66) and 35 (7-64) months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. No difference was found for late toxicity between the two treatment groups, with 3-year Grade 2 rates of 17% and 16% for gastrointestinal and 14% and 11% for genitourinary in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively. The 3-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rates were 87% and 79% in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively (p = 0.035). The 3-year FFBF rates in patients at a very high risk (i.e., pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=8, or T >or=2c), were 88% and 76% (p = 0.014) in the former and latter arm, respectively. The multivariate Cox analysis confirmed fractionation, iPSA, and Gleason score as significant prognostic factors. Our findings suggest that late toxicity is equivalent between the two treatment groups and that the hypofractionated schedule used in this trial is superior to the conventional fractionation in terms of FFBF. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Pokharel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study investigated the dosimetric impact of mixing low and high energy treatment plans for prostate cancer treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique in the form of RapidArc.Methods: A cohort of 12 prostate cases involving proximal seminal vesicles and lymph nodes was selected for this retrospective study. For each prostate case, the single-energy plans (SEPs and mixed-energy plans (MEPs were generated.  First, the SEPs were created using 6 mega-voltage (MV energy for both the primary and boost plans. Second, the MEPs were created using 16 MV energy for the primary plan and 6 MV energy for the boost plan. The primary and boost MEPs used identical beam parameters and same dose optimization values as in the primary and boost SEPs for the corresponding case. The dosimetric parameters from the composite plans (SEPs and MEPs were evaluated. Results: The dose to the target volume was slightly higher (on average <1% in the SEPs than in the MEPs. The conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI values between the SEPs and MEPs were comparable. The dose to rectum and bladder was always higher in the SEPs (average difference up to 3.7% for the rectum and up to 8.4% for the bladder than in the MEPs. The mean dose to femoral heads was higher by about 0.8% (on average in the MEPs than in the SEPs. The number of monitor units and integral dose were higher in the SEPs compared to the MEPs by average differences of 9.1% and 5.5%, respectively.Conclusion: The preliminary results from this study suggest that use of mixed-energy VMAT plan for high-risk prostate cancer could potentially reduce the integral dose and minimize the dose to rectum and bladder, but for the higher femoral head dose.-----------------------------------------------Cite this article as:Pokharel S. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:01011.DOI: http

  8. Prevention of bone metastases in patients with high-risk nonmetastatic prostate cancer treated with zoledronic acid: efficacy and safety results of the Zometa European Study (ZEUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Manfred; Tammela, Teuvo; Cicalese, Virgilio; Gomez Veiga, Francisco; Delaere, Karl; Miller, Kurt; Tubaro, Andrea; Schulze, Matthias; Debruyne, Frans; Huland, Hartwig; Patel, Anup; Lecouvet, Frederic; Caris, Christien; Witjes, Wim

    2015-03-01

    Patients with high-risk localised prostate cancer (PCa) are at risk of developing bone metastases (BMs). Zoledronic acid (ZA) significantly reduces the incidence of skeletal complications in castration-resistant metastatic PCa versus placebo. To investigate ZA for the prevention of BMs in high-risk localised PCa. Randomised open-label multinational study with patients having at least one of the following: prostate-specific antigen ≥20 ng/ml, node-positive disease, or Gleason score 8-10. Standard PCa therapy alone or combined with 4mg ZA intravenously every 3 mo for ≤4 yr. BMs were assessed using locally evaluated bone-imaging procedures (BIPs), with subsequent blinded central review. Patients with BMs, time to BMs, overall survival, and adverse events were compared between treatment groups. A total of 1393 of 1433 randomised patients were used for intention-to-treat (ITT) efficacy analyses, with 1040 patients with BIP-BM outcome status at 4±0.5 yr. The local urologist/radiologist diagnosed BIP-BMs in 88 of 515 patients (17.1%) in the ZA group and 89 of 525 patients (17.0%) in the control group (chi-square test: p=0.95), with a difference between proportions of 0.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], -4.4 to 4.7) in favour of the control group. In the ITT population (n=1393), the Kaplan-Meier estimated proportion of BMs after a median follow-up of 4.8 yr was 14.7% in the ZA group versus 13.2% in the control group (log-rank: p=0.65). Low hot spot numbers on bone scans were confirmed as metastases with additional imaging. Central reviews of BIPs were possible only on a subset of patients. ZA administered every 3 mo was demonstrated to be ineffective for the prevention of BMs in high-risk localised PCa patients at 4 yr. Zoledronic acid administered every 3 mo was demonstrated to be ineffective for the prevention of bone metastases in high-risk nonmetastatic PCa patients at 4 yr. The ZEUS trial is registered in the Dutch trial register www.trialregister.nl and the

  9. Quality of Life After Hypofractionated Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quon, Harvey [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cheung, Patrick C.F., E-mail: patrick.cheung@sunnybrook.ca [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Pang, Geordi; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Kiss, Alex; Mamedov, Alexandre; Deabreu, Andrea [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the change in health-related quality of life (QOL) of patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated using hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective Phase I-II study enrolled patients with any of the following: clinical Stage T3 disease, prostate-specific antigen level {>=}20 ng/mL, or Gleason score 8-10. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes with a concomitant 22.5 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost to the prostate, for a total of 67.5 Gy (2.7 Gy per fraction) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Daily image guidance was performed using three gold seed fiducials. Quality of life was measured using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), a validated tool that assesses four primary domains (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal). Results: From 2004 to 2007, 97 patients were treated. Median follow-up was 39 months. Compared with baseline, at 24 months there was no statistically significant change in the mean urinary domain score (p = 0.99), whereas there were decreases in the bowel (p < 0.01), sexual (p < 0.01), and hormonal (p < 0.01) domains. The proportion of patients reporting a clinically significant difference in EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal scores at 24 months was 27%, 31%, 55%, and 60%, respectively. However, moderate and severe distress related to these symptoms was minimal, with increases of only 3% and 5% in the urinary and bowel domains, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy was well tolerated. Although there were modest rates of clinically significant patient-reported urinary and bowel toxicity, most of this caused only mild distress, and moderate and severe effects on QOL were limited. Additional follow-up is ongoing to characterize long-term QOL.

  10. An IGRT margin concept for pelvic lymph nodes in high-risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groher, M.; Kopp, P.; Deutschmann, H.; Sedlmayer, F.; Wolf, Frank [Paracelsus Medical University of Salzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Johanns-Spital, Salzburg (Austria); Drerup, M. [Paracelsus Medical University of Salzburg, Department of Urology, St. Johanns-Spital, Salzburg (Austria)

    2017-09-15

    Gold-marker-based image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of the prostate allows to correct for inter- and intrafraction motion and therefore to safely reduce margins for the prostate planning target volume (PTV). However, pelvic PTVs, when coadministered in a single plan (registered to gold markers [GM]), require reassessment of the margin concept since prostate movement is independent from the pelvic bony anatomy to which the lymphatics are usually referenced to. We have therefore revisited prostate translational movement relative to the bony anatomy to obtain adequate margins for the pelvic PTVs compensating mismatch resulting from referencing pelvic target volumes to GMs in the prostate. Prostate movement was analyzed in a set of 28 patients (25 fractions each, totaling in 684 fractions) and the required margins calculated for the pelvic PTVs according to Van Herk's margin formula M = 2.5 Σ + 1.64 (σ{sup '}-σ{sub p}). The overall mean prostate movement relative to bony anatomy was 0.9 ± 3.1, 0.6 ± 3.4, and 0.0 ± 0.7 mm in anterior/posterior (A/P), inferior/superior (I/S) and left/right (L/R) direction, respectively. Calculated margins to compensate for the resulting mismatch to bony anatomy were 9/9/2 mm in A/P, I/S, and L/R direction and 10/11/6 mm if an additional residual error of 2 mm was assumed. GM-based IGRT for pelvic PTVs is feasible if margins are adapted accordingly. Margins could be reduced further if systematic errors which are introduced during the planning CT were eliminated. (orig.) [German] Eine Goldmarker-(GM-)basierte, bildgefuehrte Radiotherapie der Prostata ermoeglicht inter- und intrafraktionelle Bewegungen auszugleichen und somit Sicherheitsraender der Planungszielvolumina (PTV) zu minimieren. Dies gilt jedoch nicht fuer Zielvolumina des pelvinen Lymphabflusses, wenn diese im Rahmen eines simultan integrierten Boost-Konzepts im selben Plan verabreicht werden. Da Bewegungen der Prostata und des Lymphabflusses unabhaengig

  11. Phase II multi-institutional clinical trial on a new mixed beam RT scheme of IMRT on pelvis combined with a carbon ion boost for high-risk prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvaso, Giulia; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Vischioni, Barbara; Ciardo, Delia; Giandini, Tommaso; Hasegawa, Azusa; Cattani, Federica; Carrara, Mauro; Ciocca, Mario; Bedini, Nice; Villa, Sergio; Morlino, Sara; Russo, Stefania; Zerini, Dario; Colangione, Sarah Pia; Panaino, Costanza Maria Vittoria; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Pignoli, Emanuele; Valvo, Francesca; Valdagni, Riccardo; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2017-05-12

    Definition of the optimal treatment schedule for high-risk prostate cancer is under debate. A combination of photon intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on pelvis with a carbon ion boost might be the optimal treatment scheme to escalate the dose on prostate and deliver curative dose with respect to normal tissue and quality of dose distributions. In fact, carbon ion beams offer the advantage to deliver hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) using a significantly smaller number of fractions compared to conventional RT without increasing risks of late effects. This study is a prospective phase II clinical trial exploring safety and feasibility of a mixed beam scheme of carbon ion prostate boost followed by photon IMRT on pelvis. The study is designed to enroll 65 patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer at 3 different oncologic hospitals: Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, and Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica. The primary endpoint is the evaluation of safety and feasibility with acute toxicity scored up to 1 month after the end of RT. Secondary endpoints are treatment early (3 months after the end of RT) and long-term tolerability, quality of life, and efficacy. The study is not yet recruiting; in silico studies are ongoing and we expect to start recruitment by 2017. The present clinical trial aims at improving the current treatment for high-risk prostate cancer, evaluating safety and feasibility of a new RT mixed-beam scheme including photons and carbon ions. Encouraging results are coming from carbon ion facilities worldwide on the treatment of different tumors including prostate cancers. Carbon ions combine physical properties allowing for high dose conformity and advantageous radiobiological characteristics. The proposed mixed beam treatment has the advantage to combine a photon high conformity standard of care IMRT phase with a hypofractionated carbon ion RT boost delivered in a short overall

  12. Conventional treatments of localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Marc; Zelefsky, Michael J; Higano, Celestia S; Carroll, Peter R

    2008-12-01

    Established therapeutic approaches for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting (active surveillance), radical prostatectomy, and radiotherapy. The risk of progression during surveillance is related to the initial cancer stage and grade; reasonable evidence has supported the safety and feasibility, during a period of 5-10 years, of an active surveillance regimen for men with low-risk prostate cancer. The progression rates at >10 years have not yet been studied in modern trials. Patients with low-risk tumor characteristics can be actively monitored without sacrificing the possibility of cure and without being exposed to an undue risk of disease progression, although some patients will not accept the emotional burden of living with an untreated cancer. Focal ablation might be an attractive alternative to active surveillance for some patients with low-risk cancer, if it proves to have minimal adverse effects on their quality of life. Radical prostatectomy is an effective form of therapy for patients with clinically significant prostate cancer; however, outcomes are highly sensitive to variations in surgical technique. Because of the risks of perioperative complications and urinary and sexual dysfunction, which appear to be as great with robotic-assisted prostatectomy as with any other technique, patients with low-risk cancer, especially those >60 years, might be attracted to more conservative alternatives, including active surveillance, radiotherapy, and focal ablation. External beam radiotherapy is an effective, noninvasive form of therapy, but it carries the long-term risks of troublesome bowel and sexual and urinary dysfunction. It might be too aggressive for many low-risk cancers detected in screened populations. For more aggressive cancers, local recurrence after radiotherapy carries substantial morbidity and low rates of long-term cancer control. Brachytherapy, a convenient, effective form of radiotherapy, is targeted at selected patients

  13. The decreased use of brachytherapy boost for intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer despite evidence supporting its effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, Peter F; Nguyen, Paul L; Buzurovic, Ivan; Cail, Daniel W; Chen, Yu-Wei

    The Canadian Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy (ASCENDE-RT) randomized trial showed that brachytherapy boost reduces recurrence by 50% compared to dose-escalated radiation. We examined how men with identical inclusion criteria to the ASCENDE-RT trial were being treated in the United States. We used the National Cancer Database to identify prostate cancer patients treated with radiation from 2004 through 2012 who met the inclusion criteria of the ASCENDE-RT trial (intermediate-/high-risk prostate cancer, excluding patients with prostate-specific antigen >40 or tumor stage T3b/T4). The Mantel-Haenszel test was used to investigate the trend for type of radiation modality used over the study period. A cohort of 156,411 patients was identified. Of those, 103,188 men (66%) were treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) alone, 31,129 (20%) with brachytherapy alone, and 22,094 (14%) with EBRT plus brachytherapy. EBRT plus a brachytherapy boost demonstrated a significant decrease in utilization from 2004 to 2012 in both academic and nonacademic centers, declining from 15% to 8% in academic centers and from 19% to 11% in nonacademic centers (p-Value for trend brachytherapy boost than nonacademic centers (adjusted odds ratio: 0.68; 95% confidence interval: 0.66-0.70; p-Value: brachytherapy boost from 2004 to 2012, and the lowest utilization was in academic centers. In light of the superior results demonstrated for brachytherapy boost by the ASCENDE-RT trial, it is unclear whether academic centers are prepared to train the next generation of residents in this critical modality. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A polyvalent vaccine for high-risk prostate patients: "are more antigens better?"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slovin, Susan F; Ragupathi, Govind; Fernandez, Celina

    2007-01-01

    We have shown the immunogenicity and safety of synthetic carbohydrate vaccines when conjugated to the carrier keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and given with the adjuvant, QS-21, in patients with biochemically relapsed prostate cancer. To determine whether immune response could be further enhanced...... and mixed with QS-21. Eight vaccinations were administered over 13 months. All 30 patients had significant elevations in antibody titers to at least two of the six antigens; 22 patients had increased reactivity with FACS. These serologic responses were lower than that seen previously in patients treated...... vaccine of synthetic "self" antigens broke immunologic tolerance against two or more antigens in all 30 vaccinated patients, was safe, but antibody titers against several of the antigens were lower than those seen in individual monovalent trials. No impact on PSA slope was detected. We address...

  15. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuky, Jacqueline, E-mail: vukyja@ohsu.edu [Section of Community Hematology/Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Pham, Huong T. [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Warren, Sarah; Douglass, Erika [Benaroya Research Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Badiozamani, Kasra [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Madsen, Berit; Hsi, Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, WA (United States); Song Guobin [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  16. Neoadjuvant hormone therapy following treatment with robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy achieved favorable in high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou CP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cheng-Pang Hou,1,2,* Wei-Chang Lee,1,2,* Yu-Hsiang Lin,1,2 Shao-Ming Chen,3 Chien-Lun Chen,1,2 Phei-Lang Chang,1,2,4 Horng-Heng Juang,4,5 Ke-Hung Tsui1,2,4 1Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Hou-Pin Taipei Hospital, 4Bioinformation Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 5Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Patients with a high risk of prostate carcinoma typically have higher rates of positive surgical margins and biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy and adjuvant hormone therapy. In this study, we assessed the effects of neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT on prostate carcinoma in high-risk patients following robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP. Methods: This retrospective study investigated the medical records of 28 patients who underwent RARP between January 2009 and October 2013. Twenty-two patients underwent NHT prior to RARP. Furthermore, six patients did not undergo NHT prior to RARP. Parameters including age, operating time, blood loss, blood transfusion status, and cancer stage were checked against anatomical correlations. Potential predictors of prolonged operating time and prolonged surgical procedures were assessed using multiple logistic regressions. Results: NHT was shown to be an independent predictor of prolonged total operating time. Tumor stage alterations did not appear to be associated with NHT followed by RARP. The patients who underwent NHT were not more likely to have positive surgical margins, and an increase in patients requiring blood transfusion was not seen. Conclusion: NHT appears to increase

  17. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA as Predicting Marker for Clinical Outcome and Evaluation of Early Toxicity Rate after High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-BT in Combination with Additional External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT for High Risk Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten H. Ecke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT is a common treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa. Seventy-nine male patients (median age 71 years, range 50 to 79 with high-risk PCa underwent HDR-BT following EBRT between December 2009 and January 2016 with a median follow-up of 21 months. HDR-BT was administered in two treatment sessions (one week interval with 9 Gy per fraction using a planning system and the Ir192 treatment unit GammaMed Plus iX. EBRT was performed with CT-based 3D-conformal treatment planning with a total dose administration of 50.4 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction and five fractions per week. Follow-up for all patients was organized one, three, and five years after radiation therapy to evaluate early and late toxicity side effects, metastases, local recurrence, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA value measured in ng/mL. The evaluated data included age, PSA at time of diagnosis, PSA density, BMI (body mass index, Gleason score, D’Amico risk classification for PCa, digital rectal examination (DRE, PSA value after one/three/five year(s follow-up (FU, time of follow-up, TNM classification, prostate volume, and early toxicity rates. Early toxicity rates were 8.86% for gastrointestinal, and 6.33% for genitourinary side effects. Of all treated patients, 84.81% had no side effects. All reported complications in early toxicity were grade 1. PSA density at time of diagnosis (p = 0.009, PSA on date of first HDR-BT (p = 0.033, and PSA on date of first follow-up after one year (p = 0.025 have statistical significance on a higher risk to get a local recurrence during follow-up. HDR-BT in combination with additional EBRT in the presented design for high-risk PCa results in high biochemical control rates with minimal side-effects. PSA is a negative predictive biomarker for local recurrence during follow-up. A longer follow-up is needed to assess long-term outcome and toxicities.

  18. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) as Predicting Marker for Clinical Outcome and Evaluation of Early Toxicity Rate after High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in Combination with Additional External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) for High Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecke, Thorsten H; Huang-Tiel, Hui-Juan; Golka, Klaus; Selinski, Silvia; Geis, Berit Christine; Koswig, Stephan; Bathe, Katrin; Hallmann, Steffen; Gerullis, Holger

    2016-11-10

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is a common treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Seventy-nine male patients (median age 71 years, range 50 to 79) with high-risk PCa underwent HDR-BT following EBRT between December 2009 and January 2016 with a median follow-up of 21 months. HDR-BT was administered in two treatment sessions (one week interval) with 9 Gy per fraction using a planning system and the Ir192 treatment unit GammaMed Plus iX. EBRT was performed with CT-based 3D-conformal treatment planning with a total dose administration of 50.4 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction and five fractions per week. Follow-up for all patients was organized one, three, and five years after radiation therapy to evaluate early and late toxicity side effects, metastases, local recurrence, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured in ng/mL. The evaluated data included age, PSA at time of diagnosis, PSA density, BMI (body mass index), Gleason score, D'Amico risk classification for PCa, digital rectal examination (DRE), PSA value after one/three/five year(s) follow-up (FU), time of follow-up, TNM classification, prostate volume, and early toxicity rates. Early toxicity rates were 8.86% for gastrointestinal, and 6.33% for genitourinary side effects. Of all treated patients, 84.81% had no side effects. All reported complications in early toxicity were grade 1. PSA density at time of diagnosis (p = 0.009), PSA on date of first HDR-BT (p = 0.033), and PSA on date of first follow-up after one year (p = 0.025) have statistical significance on a higher risk to get a local recurrence during follow-up. HDR-BT in combination with additional EBRT in the presented design for high-risk PCa results in high biochemical control rates with minimal side-effects. PSA is a negative predictive biomarker for local recurrence during follow-up. A longer follow-up is needed to assess long-term outcome and toxicities.

  19. Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with locally advanced high-risk cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzelmann, F.; Henke, G.; Grafenstein, M. von; Weidner, N.; Paulsen, F.; Bamberg, M.; Weinmann, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Staebler, A. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Div. of Gynecologic Pathology; Brucker, S. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology

    2012-07-15

    Background and purpose: The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the outcome of patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated by adjuvant radiochemotherapy and to determine risk factors for local and distant relapse. Furthermore, acute and late effects of treatment were recorded. Patients and methods: A total of 72 patients with FIGO stages I-III cervical carcinoma were treated by radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and postoperative radiochemotherapy. Only patients with positive pelvic lymph nodes, parametrial involvement, positive margins, or tumor bulk were eligible. Patients were irradiated with a standard pelvic field (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). The majority of patients received platinum-based chemotherapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 37 months, estimated 1-, 2-, and 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 89%, 80%, 68% and 95%, 88%, 76%, respectively. Nine of the 72 patients had pelvic recurrences including only 1 isolated local failure; 23 of the 72 patients presented with distant relapse. The majority of relapses occurred within the first 3 years after adjuvant treatment. The number of positive pelvic lymph nodes (> 1) was the strongest prognostic factor for DFS. Treatment was well tolerated with transient acute hematologic ({proportional_to}30%) and gastrointestinal ({proportional_to}30%) grade 3 toxicity. Small bowel obstruction ({proportional_to}6%) was the only important late sequelae. Conclusion: Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with advanced cervical cancer and several risk factors is highly effective to prevent local relapse. Future efforts to improve outcome should be placed on improvement of systemic control especially in subgroups with high-risk features for distant relapse. Combined treatment was well tolerated with moderate acute and late toxicity. (orig.)

  20. Gleason Score ≤ 6 Prostate Cancer at Radical Prostatectomy: Does a High-Risk Setting Truly Exist? A Recursive Partitioning Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, John M; Mitchell, Darrion L; Russo, J Kyle; Mott, Sarah L; Tracy, Chad R; Smith, Mark C; Buatti, John M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a "high-risk" subpopulation of low-grade (Gleason score ≤6) prostate cancer defined by lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free survival (bRFS) might be identified within a large population of men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) alone, with mature follow-up. Patients were retrospectively identified for inclusion by cT1-2 prostate cancer managed with RP alone. Exclusion criteria were: Gleason score ≥7 at RP, any pre- or post-RP radiotherapy or hormone therapy, or PSA follow-up Gleason score ≤6 prostate cancer managed using RP alone is associated with high rates of bRFS; however, margin positivity predicts early PSA failure rates in >20% of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Percutaneous prostate cryoablation as treatment for high-risk prostate cancer Crioablação percutânea da próstata no tratamento do câncer de próstata de alto risco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Reda El Hayek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate percutaneous cryotherapy as a primary treatment option for high-risk prostate cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From October 2000 to February 2005, 21 high-risk (Gleason e•8 and/or PSA > 10 and/or stage > T2a prostate cancer patients underwent 24 percutaneous prostate cryoablation procedures. Patients' median age was 70.9, and the average pretreatment PSA was 19.5 ng/dL. The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 60 months (median, 41 months. RESULTS: The PSA failure rate was 39%, 52.9%, and 42.8% at 12, 24, and 60 months of follow-up, respectively. Overall complication rates were low, with 8% of urinary incontinence and no cases of rectal injury; however, 96% of erectile dysfunction occurred. The cryoablation procedure failed in 12 patients (57.2%; 7 (58.3% of these were local failures (positive prostate biopsies. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous cryoablation of the prostate is a safe minimally invasive treatment, but it has poor PSA-free survival outcomes in high-risk prostate cancer patients.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a crioterapia percutânea como tratamento primário para o câncer de próstata de alto risco. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: De outubro de 2000 a fevereiro de 2005, 21 pacientes com câncer de próstata de alto risco foram submetidos a 24 crioablações de próstata como tratamento primário. A mediana de idade dos pacientes foi de 70,9, e a média do PSA pré-tratamento de 19,5 ng/dl. O tempo de seguimento variou de 6 a 60 meses (mediana de 41 meses. RESULTADOS: Os índices de falha do PSA foram de 39% e 52,9% respectivamente aos 12 e 24 meses de seguimento. A sobrevida livre de doença em 5 anos foi de 42,8%. De maneira geral os índices de complicações foram baixos, com 8% de incontinência urinária e nenhum caso de lesão retal. Os índices de impotência foram de 96%. Em doze pacientes (57,2% onde houve falha da crioablação, 7 (58,3% apresentaram recidivas locais (biópsia positiva e os demais recidiva a dist

  2. Association Between Treatment at a High-Volume Facility and Improved Survival for Radiation-Treated Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mahal, Brandon A. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Muralidhar, Vinayak [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nezolosky, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Den, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Martin, Neil E.; Orio, Peter F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nguyen, Paul L., E-mail: pnguyen@LROC.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Although the association between higher hospital volume and improved outcomes has been well-documented in surgery, there is little data about whether this effect exists for radiation-treated patients. We investigated whether treatment at a radiation facility that treats a high volume of prostate cancer patients is associated with improved survival for men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We used the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to identity patients diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2006. The radiation case volume (RCV) of each hospital was based on its number of radiation-treated prostate cancer patients. We used propensity-score based analysis to compare the overall survival (OS) of high-risk prostate cancer patients in high versus low RCV hospitals. Primary endpoint is overall survival. Covariates adjusted for were tumor characteristics, sociodemographic factors, radiation type, and use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Results: A total of 19,565 radiation-treated high-risk patients were identified. Median follow-up was 81.0 months (range: 1-108 months). When RCV was coded as a continuous variable, each increment of 100 radiation-managed patients was associated with improved OS (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95-0.98; P<.0001) after adjusting for known confounders. For illustrative purposes, when RCV was dichotomized at the 80th percentile (43 patients/year), high RCV was associated with improved OS (7-year overall survival 76% vs 74%, log-rank test P=.0005; AHR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86-0.96, P=.0005). This association remained significant when RCV was dichotomized at 75th (37 patients/year), 90th (60 patients/year), and 95th (84 patients/year) percentiles but not the 50th (19 patients/year). Conclusions: Our results suggest that treatment at centers with higher prostate cancer radiation case volume is associated with improved OS for radiation-treated men with high-risk prostate

  3. [Evaluation of 80-W and 120-W GreenLight laser vaporization for benign prostatic hyperplasia in high-risk patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Ya-Chen; Shan, Yu-Xi; Xue, Bo-Xin; Yang, Dong-Rong; Gao, Jie; Sun, Chuan-Yang; Cui, Yong

    2012-05-01

    To investigate and compare the effectiveness and safety of 80-W GreenLight laser vaporization and GreenLight high-performance system (HPS) 120-W laser vaporization for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in high-risk patients. We allocated 290 high-risk patients with BPH to two groups to receive 80-W (n = 220) and HPS 120-W GreenLight laser vaporization (n = 70). We recorded and compared the pre-, intra- and post-operative clinical data of the two groups. The operations were successful in both of the groups. There were statistically significant differences in the prostate volume, IPSS, Qmax and PVR before and after surgery (P 0.05). The operation time, lasing time and energy consumption were (56.5 +/- 22.6) min, (31.2 +/- 10.3) min and (159.8 +/- 29.0) kJ in the 80-W group, as compared with (45.1 +/- 20.4) min, (24.6 +/- 8.3) min and (134.2 +/- 23.3) kJ in the 120 W group, with significant differences between the two (P vaporization of the prostate is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of BPH, and the new HPS 120-W laser therapy, with its advantages of easier operation and shorter surgical time, is an even better minimally invasive option for elderly high-risk patients.

  4. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy of clinical high-risk patients with prostate cancer: a controlled study of operative and short-term postoperative events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennhovd, Bjørn; Axcrona, Karol; Fosså, Sophie D; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Dahl, Alv A

    2013-12-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) has increasingly become a treatment alternative for patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Few papers focus on the prevalence of operative and short-term postoperative (prostate volume and less nerve-sparing than the contrast groups. No between-group differences were observed for reoperation, catheter time, bleeding volume or transfusions. Significantly more Clavien complications were observed in the high-risk than in the low-risk group. A positive adverse effect index score was associated with positive margins, no nerve-sparing surgery and no preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, and negatively associated with the second and third of three 2-year study periods. High-risk patients had a significantly higher risk of some operative and short-term postoperative adverse events than the control groups. This was not the case for the seven-items adverse event index. This study does not support any restricted attitude towards RALP in high-risk patients, except for general surgical contraindications.

  5. The Recidivism Patterns of Previously Deported Aliens Released from a Local Jail: Are They High-Risk Offenders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Laura J.; Suttorp, Marika J.

    2010-01-01

    Previously deported aliens are a group about which numerous claims are made but very few facts are known. Using data on male deportable aliens released from a local jail, the study sought to test the ubiquitous claim that they pose a high risk of recidivism. Using multiple measures of recidivism and propensity score weighting to account for…

  6. Prostate cancer: multiparametric MR imaging for detection, localization, and staging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeks, C.M.A.; Barentsz, J.O.; Hambrock, T.; Yakar, D.; Somford, D.M.; Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Vos, P.C.; Huisman, H.J.; Oort, I.M. van; Witjes, J.A.; Heerschap, A.; Futterer, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    This review presents the current state of the art regarding multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of prostate cancer. Technical requirements and clinical indications for the use of multiparametric MR imaging in detection, localization, characterization, staging, biopsy guidance, and active

  7. Assessing the impact of an alternative biochemical failure definition on radiation dose response for high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Rex; Tucker, Susan L; Lee, Andrew L; Dong, Lei; Kamat, Ashish; Pisters, Louis; Kuban, Deborah A

    2005-01-01

    The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) biochemical failure definition has recently been compared with various alternative definitions. We assessed the effect of using an alternative failure definition on the dose-response characteristics of high-risk prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy alone. This study included 363 high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy alone from 1987 to 1999. These patients have one or more of the following: 1992 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) digital rectal examination (DRE) stage > or = cT3, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/mL, and/or biopsy Gleason score > or = 8. We previously reported the dose response based on the ASTRO definition for these patients. In this study, a biochemical failure is defined as a PSA rise > or = 2 ng/mL above the current nadir PSA (CN + 2). The failure date is defined as the time at which the event occurred (i.e., the call date). Using CN + 2, the tumor control probability (TCP) continues to decrease with time as opposed to reaching a plateau as with the ASTRO definition. At 5 years, TCD50 (95% CI), the dose to achieve 50% tumor control, for high-risk prostate cancer, is 70.4 (68.0-72.9) Gy using CN + 2 [ASTRO: 75.5 (70.7-80.2) Gy]. The relative slope, gamma50 (95% CI) is 1.8 (0.8-2.8) [ASTRO: 1.7 (0.7-2.7)]. Recursive partitioning again identified two subgroups: PSA or = 13 ng/mL (ASTRO: PSA 20 ng/mL). The difference in TCD50 between the two subgroups is about 20 Gy at 5 years (ASTRO: about 15 Gy at 5 years). This analysis using the CN + 2 failure definition continues to show a dose response for the high-risk group of patients. However, the dose-response characteristics differ from those estimated using the ASTRO definition. We observed that the position (TCD50) and steepness (gamma50) of the dose-response curve changed with time as long as the TCP continued to decrease. This suggests that the dose response characteristics

  8. DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein Status in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Correlates With Outcome for Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Corbin; Tumati, Vasu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kapur, Payal [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Yan, Jingsheng [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hong, David; Bhuiyan, Manzerul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pistenmaa, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Yu, Lan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hsieh, Jer-Tsong [Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Saha, Debabrata [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kim, D. W. Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Kim@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This pilot study investigates the role of DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein (DAB2IP) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) as prognostic biomarkers in high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry was performed and scored by an expert genitourinary pathologist. Clinical endpoints evaluated were freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), castration resistance–free survival (CRFS), and distant metastasis–free survival (DMFS). Log-rank test and Cox regression were used to determine significance of biomarker levels with clinical outcome. Results: Fifty-four patients with high-risk prostate cancer (stage ≥T3a, or Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL) treated with radiation therapy from 2005 to 2012 at our institution were evaluated. Nearly all patients expressed EZH2 (98%), whereas 28% of patients revealed DAB2IP reduction and 72% retained DAB2IP. Median follow-up was 34.0 months for DAB2IP-reduced patients, 29.9 months for DAB2IP-retained patients, and 32.6 months in the EZH2 study. Reduction in DAB2IP portended worse outcome compared with DAB2IP-retained patients, including FFBF (4-year: 37% vs 89%, P=.04), CRFS (4-year: 50% vs 90%, P=.02), and DMFS (4-year: 36% vs 97%, P=.05). Stratified EZH2 expression trended toward significance for worse FFBF and CRFS (P=.07). Patients with reduced DAB2IP or highest-intensity EZH2 expression exhibited worse FFBF (4-year: 32% vs 95%, P=.02), CRFS (4-year: 28% vs 100%, P<.01), and DMFS (4-year: 39% vs 100%, P=.04) compared with the control group. Conclusion: Loss of DAB2IP is a potent biomarker that portends worse outcome despite definitive radiation therapy for patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 is expressed in most high-risk tumors and is a less potent discriminator of outcome in this study. The DAB2IP status in combination with degree of EZH2 expression may be useful for

  9. Prostate innervation and local anesthesia in prostate procedures Inervação prostática e anestesia local em procedimentos prostáticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Oliveira Rodrigues

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The nerve supply of the human prostate is very abundant, and knowledge of the anatomy contributes to successful administration of local anesthesia. However, the exact anatomy of extrinsic neuronal cell bodies of the autonomic and sensory innervation of the prostate is not clear, except in other animals. Branches of pelvic ganglia composed of pelvic (parasympathetic and hypogastric (sympathetic nerves innervate the prostate. The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the growth, maturation, and secretory function of this gland. Prostate procedures under local anesthesia, such as transurethral prostatic resections or transrectal ultrasound-guided prostatic biopsy, are safe, simple, and effective. Local anesthesia can be feasible for many special conditions including uncomplicated prostate surgery and may be particularly useful for the high-risk group of patients for whom inhalation or spinal anesthesia is inadvisable.A prostáta, uma das glândulas sexuais acessórias masculinas, possui inervação muito rica. A anatomia detalhada dos corpos neuronais extrínsecos responsáveis pela inervação autonômica e sensorial da próstata não está totalmente esclarecida, exceto em animais. A próstata é inervada pelos nervos pélvico (parassimpático e hipogástrico (simpático, ramos dos gânglios nervosos pélvicos. O sistema nervoso autonômico possui importante papel no crescimento, maturação e na função secretora desta glândula. Alguns procedimentos prostáticos, como resecção transuretral ou biópsia transretal guiada por ultra-sonografia, são simples, eficazes e seguros com o uso de anestesia local. Esta opção pode ser factível frente à várias condições especiais, como cirurgias prostáticas simples, sendo particularmente útil no grupo de pacientes de alto risco cirúrgico, onde a anestesia inalatória ou espinhal não é aconselhável.

  10. Image-guided, whole-pelvic, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy in high-risk prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Sang Jun; Kim, Young Seok; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2018-01-01

    The optimal field size of salvage radiotherapy (SRT) for biochemical recurrence, particularly for patients with high-risk prostate cancer, remains undefined. This retrospective analysis was performed to investigate oncological outcomes as well as treatment-related toxicity following salvage intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to the whole pelvis and to compare the results with other studies implementing a small field size of the prostate bed. The medical records of 170 patients with high-risk prostate cancer who received SRT for biochemical recurrence following prostatectomy were reviewed. Whole-pelvic IMRT was administered with a median dose of 66 Gy in 30 fractions. To improve treatment accuracy, an endorectal balloon device and daily cone-beam computed tomography were utilized. Androgen-deprivation therapy combined with SRT was administered to 97 (57.1%) patients. Eventually, 68 (40.0%) patients showed biochemical progression (BCP) after SRT. With a median follow-up period of 56 months, the 5-year BCP-free survival was 38.6%. The overall and cause-specific survival rates were 90.9% and 96.7%, respectively. Regarding BCP-free survival analysis, pathological T stage, persistent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) elevation after prostatectomy, and preSRT PSA level were significant prognostic factors on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, pathological T stage and preSRT PSA value retained their significance. Acute and late grade-3 genitourinary toxicities were observed in one (0.6%) and five (2.9%) patients, respectively. One patient each developed acute and late grade-3 gastrointestinal toxicity. SRT to whole pelvis using IMRT and image guidance is as safe as SRT to the prostate bed, but its efficacy should be confirmed in ongoing randomized trials. PreSRT PSA was the only controllable prognostic factor, suggesting the benefit of early SRT.

  11. Image-guided, whole-pelvic, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy in high-risk prostate cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Jun Byun

    Full Text Available The optimal field size of salvage radiotherapy (SRT for biochemical recurrence, particularly for patients with high-risk prostate cancer, remains undefined. This retrospective analysis was performed to investigate oncological outcomes as well as treatment-related toxicity following salvage intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT to the whole pelvis and to compare the results with other studies implementing a small field size of the prostate bed.The medical records of 170 patients with high-risk prostate cancer who received SRT for biochemical recurrence following prostatectomy were reviewed. Whole-pelvic IMRT was administered with a median dose of 66 Gy in 30 fractions. To improve treatment accuracy, an endorectal balloon device and daily cone-beam computed tomography were utilized. Androgen-deprivation therapy combined with SRT was administered to 97 (57.1% patients.Eventually, 68 (40.0% patients showed biochemical progression (BCP after SRT. With a median follow-up period of 56 months, the 5-year BCP-free survival was 38.6%. The overall and cause-specific survival rates were 90.9% and 96.7%, respectively. Regarding BCP-free survival analysis, pathological T stage, persistent prostate-specific antigen (PSA elevation after prostatectomy, and preSRT PSA level were significant prognostic factors on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, pathological T stage and preSRT PSA value retained their significance. Acute and late grade-3 genitourinary toxicities were observed in one (0.6% and five (2.9% patients, respectively. One patient each developed acute and late grade-3 gastrointestinal toxicity.SRT to whole pelvis using IMRT and image guidance is as safe as SRT to the prostate bed, but its efficacy should be confirmed in ongoing randomized trials. PreSRT PSA was the only controllable prognostic factor, suggesting the benefit of early SRT.

  12. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Seth A; Hunt, Daniel; Sartor, A Oliver; Pienta, Kenneth J; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Rajan, Raghu; Kerlin, Kevin J; Jones, Christopher U; Dobelbower, Michael; Shipley, William U; Zeitzer, Kenneth; Hamstra, Daniel A; Donavanik, Viroon; Rotman, Marvin; Hartford, Alan C; Michalski, Jeffrey; Seider, Michael; Kim, Harold; Kuban, Deborah A; Moughan, Jennifer; Sandler, Howard

    2015-10-01

    Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥ 7 or clinical stage ≥ T2 and GS ≥ 8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for the feasibility of clinical trial accrual and tolerability using CT for PCa

  13. Travel distance and stereotactic body radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahal, Brandon A; Chen, Yu-Wei; Sethi, Roshan V; Padilla, Oscar A; Yang, David D; Chavez, Janice; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Hu, Jim C; Feng, Felix Y; Hoffman, Karen E; Martin, Neil E; Spratt, Daniel E; Yu, James B; Orio, Peter F; Nguyen, Paul L

    2017-12-12

    Definitive stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) represents an emerging and debated treatment option for patients with prostate cancer, with potential economic savings and reports of short-term efficacy since 2006. The current study sought to define national trends in definitive prostate SBRT use and determine whether patterns vary by travel distance for treatment. The National Cancer Data Base identified 181,544 men with localized prostate cancer who were treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy from 2004 through 2012. Joinpoint regression analyzed definitive prostate SBRT trends over time, whereas multivariable logistic regression defined the odds for its receipt by travel distance for treatment. Definitive prostate SBRT use increased from 1.8% in 2004 to 5.9% in 2012 (P for trend 50 miles were associated with increasing adjusted odds of receipt of definitive prostate SBRT (1.63 [95% confidence interval, 1.51-1.76] and 2.35 [95% confidence interval, 2.14-2.57], respectively; both P < .0001). Definitive prostate SBRT use increased more than 3-fold since 2004, with a significant increase in use coinciding with early reports of short-term efficacy. Long-distance travel for treatment was associated with greater than twice the odds of receipt of definitive prostate SBRT compared with short-distance travel, suggesting that treatment decisions with unknown long-term clinical implications may be strongly driven by sociodemographic factors. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  14. Biphasic {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC-PET/CT in patients with recurrent and high-risk prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahlmann, Carsten-Oliver; Meller, Birgit; Bouter, Caroline; Meller, Johannes [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Goettingen (Germany); Ritter, Christian Oliver; Lotz, Joachim [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Goettingen (Germany); Stroebel, Philipp [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Pathology, Goettingen (Germany); Trojan, Lutz; Hijazi, Sameh [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Urology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Binding of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA) at prostate cancer (PC) cells increases over time. A biphasic protocol may help separating benign from tumor lesions. The aim of this study was the retrospective evaluation of a diagnostic incremental value of a dual-time point (biphasic) {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET/CT in patients with prostate cancer. Retrospective analysis of 35 consecutive patients (49-78 years, median 71) with newly diagnosed PC (12/35) or recurrence of PC (23/35). PET/CT (Gemini TF16, Philips) was acquired 1 h and 3 h p. i. of 140-392 MBq (300 MBq median) {sup 68}Ga-PSMA, followed by a diagnostic contrast CT. PET findings were correlated with histology or unequivocal CT findings. Semiquantitative PET data (SUVmax, SUV mean) were acquired and target-to-background-ratios (T/B-ratio) were calculated for benign and malign lesions for both time points. Size of lymph nodes (LN) on diagnostic CT was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed for assessment of significant changes of semiquantitative PET-parameters over time and for correlation of size and uptake of lymph nodes. One hundred and four lesions were evaluated. Sixty lesions were referenced by histology or unequivocal CT findings, including eight (13.3 %) histopathologically benign lymph nodes, 12 (20 %) histopathologically lymph node metastases, 12 (20 %) primary tumors, three (5 %) local recurrences, and 25 (41.7 %) bone metastases. Forty-four lesions were axillary LN with normal CT-appearance. Benign lesions had significantly lower SUVmax and T/B-ratios compared with malignant findings. Malign lesions showed a significant increase of both parameters over time compared to benign findings. There was no correlation between LN size and SUVmax. The sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PET/CT regarding pelvic LN was 94 %, 99 %, 89 %, and 99.5 %, respectively. In contrast to benign tissues, the uptake of proven tumor lesions increases on {sup 68

  15. Weight change, obesity and risk of prostate cancer progression among men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerman, Barbra A; Ahearn, Thomas U; Giovannucci, Edward; Stampfer, Meir J; Nguyen, Paul L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Wilson, Kathryn M

    2017-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of fatal prostate cancer. We aimed to elucidate the importance and relevant timing of obesity and weight change for prostate cancer progression. We identified 5,158 men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (clinical stage T1/T2) from 1986 to 2012 in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men were followed for biochemical recurrence and lethal prostate cancer (development of distant metastasis or prostate cancer-specific mortality) until 2012. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for body mass index (BMI) at age 21, BMI at diagnosis, "long-term" weight change from age 21 to diagnosis and "short-term" weight change over spans of 4 and 8 years preceding diagnosis. Because weight, weight change and mortality are strongly associated with smoking, we repeated analyses among never smokers only (N = 2,559). Among all patients, neither weight change nor BMI (at age 21 or at diagnosis) was associated with lethal prostate cancer. Among never smokers, long-term weight gain was associated with an increased risk of lethal disease (HR for gaining >30 pounds vs. stable weight [±10 pounds] 1.59, 95% CI, 1.01-2.50, p-trend = 0.06). Associations between weight change, BMI and lethal prostate cancer were stronger for men with BMI ≥ 25 at age 21 compared to those with BMI obesity were not associated with an increased risk of biochemical recurrence. Our findings among never smoker men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer suggest a positive association between long-term weight gain and risk of lethal prostate cancer. Metabolic changes associated with weight gain may promote prostate cancer progression. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Lack of benefit for the addition of androgen deprivation therapy to dose-escalated radiotherapy in the treatment of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krauss, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Assessment of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) benefits for prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1991 to 2004, 1,044 patients with intermediate- (n = 782) or high-risk (n = 262) prostate cancer were treated with dose-escalated RT at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients received external-beam RT (EBRT) alone, brachytherapy (high or low dose rate), or high dose rate brachytherapy plus pelvic EBRT. Intermediate-risk patients had Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10.0-19.9 ng\\/mL, or Stage T2b-T2c. High-risk patients had Gleason score 8-10, PSA >\\/=20, or Stage T3. Patients were additionally divided specifically by Gleason score, presence of palpable disease, and PSA level to further define subgroups benefitting from ADT. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 5 years; 420 patients received ADT + dose-escalated RT, and 624 received dose-escalated RT alone. For all patients, no advantages in any clinical endpoints at 8 years were associated with ADT administration. No differences in any endpoints were associated with ADT administration based on intermediate- vs. high-risk group or RT modality when analyzed separately. Patients with palpable disease plus Gleason >\\/=8 demonstrated improved clinical failure rates and a trend toward improved survival with ADT. Intermediate-risk patients treated with brachytherapy alone had improved biochemical control when ADT was given. CONCLUSION: Benefits of ADT in the setting of dose-escalated RT remain poorly defined. This question must continue to be addressed in prospective study.

  17. Outcomes and predictors of localized or locally-advanced prostate cancer treated by radiotherapy in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wempy Supit

    2013-03-01

    Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment modality for localized or locally-advanced PCa in Indonesian patients, with outcomes and predictors consistent to that reported elsewhere. Predictors of poorer outcomes include high-risk group, higher pretreatment PSA, incidental detection by TUR-P, and lack of adjuvant HT. Adjuvant hormonal therapy significantly improve the survival of high risk patients.

  18. Large institutional variations in use of androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiotherapy in a population-based cohort of men with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Foroudi, Farshad; Evans, Sue; Millar, Jeremy

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the pattern of use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with definitive radiotherapy (RT) in men with prostate cancer (PCa) in a population-based study in Australia. This is a prospective cohort of men with intermediate- and high-risk PCa, captured in the population-based Prostate Cancer Outcome Registry Victoria, who were treated with definitive prostate RT between January 2010 and December 2015. The primary outcome of interest was ADT utilization. Chi-squared test for trend was used to evaluate the temporal trend in the use of ADT over the study period. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to evaluate the effects of patient-, tumour- and treatment-related factors, and treatment institutions (public/ private and metropolitan/ regional) on the likelihood of ADT utilization. A total of 1806 men were included in the study, 199 of whom (11%) had favourable National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) intermediate-risk disease (i.e. only one intermediate-risk feature, primary Gleason grade 3, and use of brachytherapy boost), treatment institution (public and regional) remained independently associated with increased likelihood of ADT utilization. Men with intermediate-risk PCa treated in regional and public institutions were 2.7 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-3.9; P use of ADT with definitive prostate RT. While there was an increasing trend towards use of ADT over time, ADT still appeared to be underutilized in certain groups of patients who may benefit from ADT, with approximately one in five men with high-risk and one in two with unfavourable intermediate-risk PCa not receiving ADT with RT. There was notable variation in the use of ADT between public vs private and metropolitan vs regional institutions. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Survival Outcomes of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiotherapy versus Combined Brachytherapy for Intermediate and High Risk Prostate Cancer Using the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Arya; Jones, Bernard; Jackson, Matthew W; Yeh, Norman; Waxweiler, Timothy V; Maroni, Paul; Kavanagh, Brian D; Raben, David

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated survival outcomes between dose-escalated EBRT (external beam radiotherapy) vs EBRT plus brachytherapy for intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using NCDB (National Cancer Data Base). Patients with cN0M0 prostate cancer treated from 2004 to 2006 were divided into radiotherapy comparison groups, including EBRT alone (75.6 to 81 Gy) and EBRT (40 to 50.4 Gy) plus brachytherapy with EBRT delivered at 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction. Brachytherapy data were limited to yes/no with no information on modality, dose or schedule. Eligible patients were known to have received androgen deprivation therapy. Overall survival was evaluated using multivariate Cox regression and propensity score matched analyses. Of the 20,279 study patients with prostate cancer, including 12,617 at intermediate risk and 7,662 at high risk, 71.3% received EBRT alone and 28.7% received EBRT plus brachytherapy. Median followup was 82 months (range 3 to 120) and median age was 70 years (range 36 to 90). On multivariate analysis compared to EBRT alone (75.6 to 81 Gy) EBRT plus brachytherapy was associated with improved survival (HR 0.75, p <0.001). This significance remained consistent for intermediate and high risk when analyzed separately (HR 0.73 and 0.76, respectively, each p <0.001). However on subset analysis compared to very high dose EBRT alone (79.2 to 81 Gy) in all patients combined EBRT plus brachytherapy was not associated with improved survival (HR 0.91, p = 0.083). Compared to EBRT (75.6 to 81 Gy) we observed an association of EBRT plus brachytherapy with a decreased risk of death in men with intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. However this association was no longer significant when EBRT doses of 79.2 to 81 Gy were used. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT in primary lymph node staging in high-risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oebek, Can; Doganca, Tuenkut [Acibadem Taksim Hospital, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre [Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [Istanbul University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Istanbul (Turkey); Kural, Ali Riza [Acibadem University, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Yildirim, Asif [Istanbul Medeniyet University, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Yuecetas, Ugur [Istanbul Training and Research Hospital, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirdag, Cetin [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Erdogan, Sarper M. [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Public Health, Istanbul (Turkey); Kabasakal, Levent [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Collaboration: Members of Urooncology Association, Turkey

    2017-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET in predicting lymph node (LN) metastases in primary N staging in high-risk and very high-risk nonmetastatic prostate cancer in comparison with morphological imaging. This was a multicentre trial of the Society of Urologic Oncology in Turkey in conjunction with the Nuclear Medicine Department of Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Istanbul University. Patients were accrued from eight centres. Patients with high-risk and very high-risk disease scheduled to undergo surgical treatment with extended LN dissection between July 2014 and October 2015 were included. Either MRI or CT was used for morphological imaging. PSMA PET/CT was performed and evaluated at a single centre. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated for the detection of lymphatic metastases by PSMA PET/CT and morphological imaging. Kappa values were calculated to evaluate the correlation between the numbers of LN metastases detected by PSMA PET/CT and by histopathology. Data on 51 eligible patients are presented. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PSMA PET in detecting LN metastases in the primary setting were 53%, 86% and 76%, and increased to 67%, 88% and 81% in the subgroup with of patients with ≥15 LN removed. Kappa values for the correlation between imaging and pathology were 0.41 for PSMA PET and 0.18 for morphological imaging. PSMA PET/CT is superior to morphological imaging for the detection of metastatic LNs in patients with primary prostate cancer. Surgical dissection remains the gold standard for precise lymphatic staging. (orig.)

  1. Outcomes of Gleason Score ≤ 8 among high risk prostate cancer treated with 125I low dose rate brachytherapy based multimodal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Soo; Gong, In Hyuck; Choi, Don Kyung; Hwang, Jin Ho; Shin, Hyun Soo; Oh, Jong Jin

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the role of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy-based multimodal therapy in high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) and analyze its optimal indications. We reviewed the records of 50 high-risk PCa patients [clinical stage ≥ T2c, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >20 ng/mL, or biopsy Gleason score ≥ 8] who had undergone 125I LDR brachytherapy since April 2007. We excluded those with a follow-up period Gleason score ≥ 9 and Gleason score ≤ 8. The mean initial PSA was 22.1 ng/mL, and mean D90 was 244.3 Gy. During a median follow- up of 39.2 months, biochemical control was obtained in 72% (36/50) of the total patients; The estimated 3-year BCR-free survival was 92% for the patients with biopsy Gleason scores ≤ 8, and 40% for those with Gleason scores ≥ 9 (pGleason score ≥ 9 was observed to be significantly associated with BCR (p=0.021). Acute and late grade ≥ 3 toxicities were observed in 20% (10/50) and 36% (18/50) patients, respectively. Our results showed that 125I LDR brachytherapy-based multimodal therapy in high-risk PCa produced encouraging relatively long-term results among the Asian population, especially in patients with Gleason score ≤ 8. Despite small number of subjects, biopsy Gleason score ≥ 9 was a significant predictor of BCR among high risk PCa patients after brachytherapy.

  2. Pelvic Nodal Dosing With Registration to the Prostate: Implications for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishan, Amar U., E-mail: aukishan@mednet.ucla.edu; Lamb, James M.; Jani, Shyam S.; Kang, Jung J.; Steinberg, Michael L.; King, Christopher R.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance with rigid registration (RR) to intraprostatic markers (IPMs) yields acceptable coverage of the pelvic lymph nodes in the context of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) regimen. Methods and Materials: Four to seven kilovoltage cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) from 12 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were analyzed, allowing approximation of an SBRT regimen. The nodal clinical target volume (CTV{sub N}) and bladder were contoured on all kilovoltage CBCTs. The V{sub 100} CTV{sub N}, expressed as a ratio to the same parameter on the initial plan, and the magnitude of translational shift between RR to the IPMs versus RR to the pelvic bones, were computed. The ability of a multimodality bladder filling protocol to minimize bladder height variation was assessed in a separate cohort of 4 patients. Results: Sixty-five CBCTs were assessed. The average V{sub 100} CTV{sub N} was 92.6%, but for a subset of 3 patients the average was 80.0%, compared with 97.8% for the others (P<.0001). The average overall and superior–inferior axis magnitudes of the bony-to-fiducial translations were significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (8.1 vs 3.9 mm and 5.8 vs 2.4 mm, respectively; P<.0001). Relative bladder height changes were also significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (42.9% vs 18.5%; P<.05). Use of a multimodality bladder-filling protocol minimized bladder height variation (P<.001). Conclusion: A majority of patients had acceptable nodal coverage after RR to IPMs, even when approximating SBRT. However, a subset of patients had suboptimal nodal coverage. These patients had large bony-to-fiducial translations and large variations in bladder height. Nodal coverage should be excellent if the superior–inferior axis bony-to-fiducial translation and the relative bladder height change (both easily measured on CBCT) are kept to a minimum. Implementation of a strict bladder filling

  3. Syndecan-1 expression in locally invasive and metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David; Adenekan, Bosede; Chen, Lu; Vaughan, E Darracott; Gerald, William; Feng, Ziding; Knudsen, Beatrice S

    2004-02-01

    To determine the significance of syndecan-1 expression, a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan in localized and metastatic prostate cancer. We performed a retrospective analysis of 76 men with Gleason sum 6 or 7 prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy and a separate cohort of 75 men with metastatic prostate cancer. Syndecan-1 immunoreactivity was measured in primary prostate specimens or in samples from metastatic sites and correlated with patient outcome. Syndecan-1 was expressed in normal basal and secretory epithelial cells, 26% of radical prostatectomy specimens, and 35% of metastatic disease. No association was found between syndecan-1 positivity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence in the collective cohort of Gleason sum 6 and 7 cancers. However, when stratified by Gleason sum, syndecan-1 immunoreactivity (immunoreactivity score 150 or greater) was associated with a greater recurrence rate in Gleason sum 7 cancers. Expression of syndecan-1 was significantly greater in soft tissue than in bone metastasis (P = 0.048, Fisher's exact test). Consistent with a possible biochemical role for syndecan-1 in prostate cancer progression and metastasis, syndecan-1 expression correlated with serologic recurrence in Gleason sum 7 prostate cancer and was highly expressed in soft-tissue metastases.

  4. Local spread of classical swine fever upon virus introduction into The Netherlands: mapping of areas at high risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boender, Gert Jan; Nodelijk, Gonnie; Hagenaars, Thomas J; Elbers, Armin R W; de Jong, Mart C M

    2008-02-25

    In the recent past, the introduction of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) followed by between-herd spread has given rise to a number of large epidemics in The Netherlands and Belgium. Both these countries are pork-exporting countries. Particularly important in these epidemics has been the occurrence of substantial "neighborhood transmission" from herd to herd in the presence of base-line control measures prescribed by EU legislation. Here we propose a calculation procedure to map out "high-risk areas" for local between-herd spread of CSFV as a tool to support decision making on prevention and control of CSFV outbreaks. In this procedure the identification of such areas is based on an estimated inter-herd distance dependent probability of neighborhood transmission or "local transmission". Using this distance-dependent probability, we derive a threshold value for the local density of herds. In areas with local herd density above threshold, local transmission alone can already lead to epidemic spread, whereas in below-threshold areas this is not the case. The first type of area is termed 'high-risk' for spread of CSFV, while the latter type is termed 'low-risk'. As we show for the case of The Netherlands, once the distance-dependent probability of local transmission has been estimated from CSFV outbreak data, it is possible to produce a map of the country in which areas of high-risk herds and of low-risk herds are identified. We made these maps even more informative by estimating border zones between the two types of areas. In these border zones the risk of local transmission of infection to a nearby high-risk area exceeds a certain level. The risk maps provide an easily understandable visualization of the spatial heterogeneities in transmission risk. They serve as a tool for area-specific designs of control strategies, and possibly also for spatial planning of areas where livestock farming is allowed. Similar risk maps can in principle be constructed for other

  5. Local spread of classical swine fever upon virus introduction into The Netherlands: Mapping of areas at high risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagenaars Thomas J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the recent past, the introduction of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV followed by between-herd spread has given rise to a number of large epidemics in The Netherlands and Belgium. Both these countries are pork-exporting countries. Particularly important in these epidemics has been the occurrence of substantial "neighborhood transmission" from herd to herd in the presence of base-line control measures prescribed by EU legislation. Here we propose a calculation procedure to map out "high-risk areas" for local between-herd spread of CSFV as a tool to support decision making on prevention and control of CSFV outbreaks. In this procedure the identification of such areas is based on an estimated inter-herd distance dependent probability of neighborhood transmission or "local transmission". Using this distance-dependent probability, we derive a threshold value for the local density of herds. In areas with local herd density above threshold, local transmission alone can already lead to epidemic spread, whereas in below-threshold areas this is not the case. The first type of area is termed 'high-risk' for spread of CSFV, while the latter type is termed 'low-risk'. Results As we show for the case of The Netherlands, once the distance-dependent probability of local transmission has been estimated from CSFV outbreak data, it is possible to produce a map of the country in which areas of high-risk herds and of low-risk herds are identified. We made these maps even more informative by estimating border zones between the two types of areas. In these border zones the risk of local transmission of infection to a nearby high-risk area exceeds a certain level. Conclusion The risk maps provide an easily understandable visualization of the spatial heterogeneities in transmission risk. They serve as a tool for area-specific designs of control strategies, and possibly also for spatial planning of areas where livestock farming is allowed. Similar

  6. Salvage therapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, David M; Canter, Daniel J; Jani, Ashesh B; Dobbs, Ryan W; Schuster, David M; Carthon, Bradley C; Rossi, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is widely utilized as primary therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. For patients who develop locally recurrent disease after EBRT, local salvage therapy may be indicated. The primary modalities for local salvage treatment in this setting include radical prostatectomy, cryotherapy, and brachytherapy. To date, there is little data describing outcomes and toxicity associated with each of these salvage modalities. A review of the literature was performed to identify studies of local salvage therapy for patients who had failed primary EBRT for localized prostate cancer. We focused on prospective trials and multi-institutional retrospective series in order to identify the highest level of evidence describing these therapies. The majority of reports describing the use of local salvage treatment for recurrent prostate cancer after EBRT are single-institution, retrospective reports, although small prospective studies are available for salvage cryotherapy and salvage brachytherapy. Clinical outcomes and toxicity for each modality vary widely across studies, which is likely due to the heterogeneity of patient populations, treatment techniques, and definitions of failure. In general, most studies demonstrate that local salvage therapy after EBRT may provide long-term local control in appropriately selected patients, although toxicity is often significant. As there are no randomized trials comparing salvage treatment modalities for localized prostate cancer recurrence after EBRT, the selection of a local treatment modality should be made on a patient-by-patient basis, with careful consideration of each patient's disease characteristics and tolerance for the risks of treatment. Additional data, ideally from prospective randomized trials, is needed to guide decision making for patients with local recurrence after EBRT failure.

  7. Gene-expression analysis of gleason grade 3 tumor glands embedded in low- and high-risk prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Hoogland (Marije); R. Böttcher (René); E.I. Verhoef (Esther); G.W. Jenster (Guido); G.J.H.L. Leenders (Geert)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe Gleason score (GS) of prostate cancer on diagnostic biopsies is an important parameter for therapeutic decision-making. Biopsy GS under-estimates the actual GS at radical prostatectomy in a significant number of patients due to sampling artifact. The aim of this study was to

  8. The application of 120-W high-performance system GreenLight laser vaporization of the prostate in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei; Xue, BoXin; Zang, Yachen; Sun, ChuanYang; Yang, Dongrong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Shan, YuXi

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 120-W potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser vaporization in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) who also had cardiopulmonary diseases who were taking long-term anticoagulants and were at high risk of bleeding complications. The prospective study included 188 patients with severe lower urinary tract symptoms who underwent 120-W KTP laser vaporization of the prostate. All patients were at high cardiopulmonary risk, having presented with an American Society of Anesthesiology score of 3 or greater. Of those, 45 patients were taking oral anticoagulants, and 1 had a severe bleeding disorder. BPH was successfully treated with 120-W KTP laser vaporization in all patients. Mean preoperative prostate volume ± SD was 66 ± 23.1 ml, and mean operative time was 50.8 ± 15.5 min. There were no major complications intraoperatively or postoperatively, and no blood transfusions were required. Postoperatively, only 14 patients (7.4 %) required bladder irrigation. Average catheterization time was 1.9 ± 1.5 days (range, 1-5 days). Three patients required reoperation due to enlarged prostates from residual adenoma. At 3-, 6,- 12-, and 24-month follow-ups, mean urinary peak flow increased from 8.0 ± 3.6 ml/s to 19.1 ± 5.6, 19.2 ± 4.7, 19.1 ± 4.65, and 19.2 ± 4.34 ml/s, respectively. Mean International Prostate Symptom Scores decreased over time, from 25.6 ± 5.1 (3 months) to 9.4 ± 2.8, 7.05 ± 1.46, 6.24 ± 1.36, and 6.20 ± 1.32 (24 months), respectively. 120-W HPS KTP laser vaporization is a safe and effective treatment option in BPH patients at high risk and those on anticoagulation therapy who have severe LUTS secondary to BPH.

  9. Nodal Clearance Rate and Long-Term Efficacy of Individualized Sentinel Node–Based Pelvic Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Arndt-Christian, E-mail: arndt-christian.mueller@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen (Germany); Eckert, Franziska; Paulsen, Frank; Zips, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen (Germany); Stenzl, Arnulf; Schilling, David [Department of Urology, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen (Germany); Alber, Markus [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Bares, Roland [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen (Germany); Martus, Peter [Institute for Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biometry, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen (Germany); Weckermann, Dorothea [Department of Urology, Klinikum Augsburg, Augsburg (Germany); Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of individual sentinel node (SN)-guided pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by determining nodal clearance rate [(n expected nodal involvement − n observed regional recurrences)/n expected nodal involvement] in comparison with surgically staged patients. Methods and Materials: Data on 475 high-risk prostate cancer patients were examined. Sixty-one consecutive patients received pelvic SN-based IMRT (5 × 1.8 Gy/wk to 50.4 Gy [pelvic nodes + individual SN] and an integrated boost with 5 × 2.0 Gy/wk to 70.0 Gy to prostate + [base of] seminal vesicles) and neo-/adjuvant long-term androgen deprivation therapy; 414 patients after SN–pelvic lymph node dissection were used to calculate the expected nodal involvement rate for the radiation therapy sample. Biochemical control and overall survival were estimated for the SN-IMRT patients using the Kaplan-Meier method. The expected frequency of nodal involvement in the radiation therapy group was estimated by imputing frequencies of node-positive patients in the surgical sample to the pattern of Gleason, prostate-specific antigen, and T category in the radiation therapy sample. Results: After a median follow-up of 61 months, 5-year OS after SN-guided IMRT reached 84.4%. Biochemical control according to the Phoenix definition was 73.8%. The nodal clearance rate of SN-IMRT reached 94%. Retrospective follow-up evaluation is the main limitation. Conclusions: Radiation treatment of pelvic nodes individualized by inclusion of SNs is an effective regional treatment modality in high-risk prostate cancer patients. The pattern of relapse indicates that the SN-based target volume concept correctly covers individual pelvic nodes. Thus, this SN-based approach justifies further evaluation, including current dose-escalation strategies to the prostate in a larger prospective series.

  10. Outcomes of Robotic Radical Prostatectomy in High-risk Prostate Cancer Patients: Experience in 60 Patients with Oncological and Functional Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Erdem Canda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this retrospective study, we report outcomes of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP in high-risk prostate cancer (HRPC, classified according to the D’Amico risk criteria and with a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Methods: A total of 60 patients who had at least one preoperative HRPC feature and underwent RARP were included. Mean patient age and preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen level were 66.4±7.5 years and 13.4±11.0 ng/ml, respectively. Preoperatively, 3 (5.0%, 4 (6.7%, 17 (28.3%, 3 (5.0%, and 33 (55.0% patients had prostate biopsy-proven Gleason scores of 5+4, 4+5, 4+4, 3+5, and 2 pads/day. Of the 27 patients with no preoperative erectile dysfunction (ED, 17 (63.0% had no ED at a mean follow-up of 1 year. Trifecta and pentafecta rates were 43.2% and 28.7%, respectively. Conclusion: Based on our experience, RARP in HRPC is a relatively safe procedure with satisfactory oncological and functional outcomes.

  11. Influence of Androgen Deprivation Therapy on All-Cause Mortality in Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer and a History of Congestive Heart Failure or Myocardial Infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Paul L., E-mail: pnguyen@LROC.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Beckman, Joshua A. [Department of Cardiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J.; Martin, Neil E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Hu, Jim C. [Division of Urologic Surgery, Brigham and Women' s/Faulkner Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Salenius, Sharon A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Kantoff, Philip W. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); D' Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ennis, Ronald D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s-Roosevelt and Beth Israel Hospitals, Continuum Cancer Centers of New York, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY (Israel)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: It is unknown whether the excess risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) observed when androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is added to radiation for men with prostate cancer and a history of congestive heart failure (CHF) or myocardial infarction (MI) also applies to those with high-risk disease. Methods and Materials: Of 14,594 men with cT1c-T3aN0M0 prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy-based radiation from 1991 through 2006, 1,378 (9.4%) with a history of CHF or MI comprised the study cohort. Of these, 22.6% received supplemental external beam radiation, and 42.9% received a median of 4 months of neoadjuvant ADT. Median age was 71.8 years. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. Cox multivariable analysis tested for an association between ADT use and ACM within risk groups, after adjusting for treatment factors, prognostic factors, and propensity score for ADT. Results: ADT was associated with significantly increased ACM (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32-2.34; p = 0.0001), with 5-year estimates of 22.71% with ADT and 11.62% without ADT. The impact of ADT on ACM by risk group was as follows: high-risk AHR = 2.57; 95% CI, 1.17-5.67; p = 0.019; intermediate-risk AHR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.13-2.73; p = 0.012; low-risk AHR = 1.52; 95% CI, 0.96-2.43; p = 0.075). Conclusions: Among patients with a history of CHF or MI treated with brachytherapy-based radiation, ADT was associated with increased all-cause mortality, even for patients with high-risk disease. Although ADT has been shown in Phase III studies to improve overall survival in high-risk disease, the small subgroup of high-risk patients with a history of CHF or MI, who represented about 9% of the patients, may be harmed by ADT.

  12. Percutaneous nephrolithotripsy under assisted local anaesthesia for high risk patients: Is it effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.KH. Fathelbab

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that PNL under local anesthesia with narcotics and sedatives seems to be a satisfying solution for the treatment of a selected group of patients with renal pelvic stones and who have high anesthetic risk. However, additional studies with different groups of patients are required to validate our results.

  13. Distant metastases following permanent interstitial brachytherapy for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Al V; Merrick, Gregory S; Galbreath, Robert W; Butler, Wayne M; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E

    2012-02-01

    Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (www.nccn.org) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high-quality brachytherapy for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients. These results compare favorably to alternative treatment modalities. In particular, our MFS and CSS rates for high-risk patients appear superior to those of published radical prostatectomy series. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Prospective Trial of Trimodality Therapy of Weekly Paclitaxel, Radiation, and Androgen Deprivation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer With or Without Prior Prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Arif, E-mail: ahussain@som.umaryland.edu [University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Baltimore VA Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wu, Yin [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Mirmiran, Alireza [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); DiBiase, Steven [Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ (United States); Goloubeva, Olga [University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Bridges, Benjamin [University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Mannuel, Heather [University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Baltimore VA Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Engstrom, Christine [Baltimore VA Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dawson, Nancy [Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C (United States); Amin, Pradip; Kwok, Young [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Weekly paclitaxel, concurrent radiation, and androgen deprivation (ADT) were evaluated in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PC) with or without prior prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: Eligible post-RP patients included: pathological T3 disease, or rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {>=}0.5 ng/mL post-RP. Eligible locally advanced PC (LAPC) patients included: 1) cT2b-4N0N+, M0; 2) Gleason score (GS) 8-10; 3) GS 7 + PSA 10-20 ng/mL; or 4) PSA 20-150 ng/mL. Treatment included ADT (4 or 24 months), weekly paclitaxel (40, 50, or 60 mg/m{sup 2}/wk), and pelvic radiation therapy (total dose: RP = 64.8 Gy; LAPC = 70.2 Gy). Results: Fifty-nine patients were enrolled (LAPC, n = 29; RP, n = 30; ADT 4 months, n = 29; 24 months, n = 30; whites n = 29, African Americans [AA], n = 28). Baseline characteristics (median [range]) were: age 67 (45-86 years), PSA 5.9 (0.1-92.1 ng/mL), GS 8 (6-9). At escalating doses of paclitaxel, 99%, 98%, and 95% of doses were given with radiation and ADT, respectively, with dose modifications required primarily in RP patients. No acute Grade 4 toxicities occurred. Grade 3 toxicities were diarrhea 15%, urinary urgency/incontinence 10%, tenesmus 5%, and leukopenia 3%. Median follow-up was 75.3 months (95% CI: 66.8-82.3). Biochemical progression occurred in 24 (41%) patients and clinical progression in 11 (19%) patients. The 5- and 7-year OS rates were 83% and 67%. There were no differences in OS between RP and LAPC, 4- and 24-month ADT, white and AA patient categories. Conclusions: In addition to LAPC, to our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate concurrent chemoradiation with ADT in high-risk RP patients. With a median follow-up of 75.3 months, this trial also represents the longest follow-up of patients treated with taxane-based chemotherapy with EBRT in high-risk prostate cancer. Concurrent ADT, radiation, and weekly paclitaxel at 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week in RP patients and 60 mg/m{sup 2}/week in LAPC patients is

  15. Focal Therapy in the Management of Prostate Cancer: An Emerging Approach for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Nomura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A widespread screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA has led increased diagnosis of localized prostate cancer along with a reduction in the proportion of advanced-stage disease at diagnosis. Over the past decade, interest in focal therapy as a less morbid option for the treatment of localized low-risk prostate cancer has recently been renewed due to downward stage migration. Focal therapy stands midway between active surveillance and radical treatments, combining minimal morbidity with cancer control. Several techniques of focal therapy have potential for isolated ablation of a tumor focus with sparing of uninvolved surround tissue demonstrating excellent short-term cancer control and a favorable patient’s quality of life. However, to date, tissue ablation has mostly used for near-whole prostate gland ablation without taking advantage of accompanying the technological capabilities. The available ablative technologies include cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, and vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP. Despite the interest in focal therapy, this technology has not yet been a well-established procedure nor provided sufficient data, because of the lack of randomized trial comparing the efficacy and morbidity of the standard treatment options. In this paper we briefly summarize the recent data regarding focal therapy for prostate cancer and these new therapeutic modalities.

  16. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  17. Oxaliplatin and capecitabine concomitant with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and extended to the resting period in high risk locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y.H.; Zeng, Z.F. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, X. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Thoracic Surgery, Guangzhou (China); An, X. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Medical Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Cai, M.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Pathology, Guangzhou (China); Chen, G.; Kong, L.H.; Lin, J.Z.; Wan, D.S.; Pan, Z.Z.; Ding, P.R. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Colorectal Surgery, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-02-15

    Conventional neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is suboptimal for systemic control in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To improve systemic control, we developed an alternative approach in which an intensified oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOX) chemotherapy regimen was administered concomitantly with radiation and extended to the resting period (consolidation chemotherapy) for high-risk LARC. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the short-term efficacy and toxicity of this strategy. Patients with high-risk LARC were treated with CRT. Two cycles of XELOX were administered concomitantly with radiation. Thereafter, an additional cycle of the same regimen was administered during the resting period after completion of CRT. Tumor response, toxicities and surgical complications were recorded. This study includes 36 patients treated with the above strategy. All patients completed the planned concurrent CRT. Because of grade 3 toxicities, 2 patients were unable to complete the additional chemotherapy. Grade 3 toxicities were leucopenia (2.8 %), diarrhea (2.8 %) and radiodermatitis (2.8 %). All patients underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME) and a sphincter-saving procedure was performed in 27 patients (75 %). There was no perioperative mortality. Postoperative complications developed in 7 patients (19.4 %). Pathologic complete regression (pCR),''nearly pCR'' (major regression), and moderate or minimal regression were achieved in 13 (36.1 %), 16 (44.4 %), and 7 patients (19.5 %), respectively. The preliminary results suggest that a XELOX regimen initially administered concomitantly with radiotherapy and then extended to the resting period in high-risk LARC patients is well tolerated. The strategy is highly effective in terms of pCR and nearly pCR rates, and thus warrants further investigation. (orig.)

  18. [Targeted treatment of Aedes aegypti at localities with high risk for dengue transmission, Morelos, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Trejo, Alejandro; Che-Mendoza, Azael; González-Fernández, Mariana; Guillermo-May, Guillermo; González-Bejarano, Hugo; Dzul-Manzanilla, Felipe; Ulloa-García, Armando; Danis-Lozano, Rogelio; Manrique-Saide, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relative importance of Aedes aegyti breeding sites for potential targeted dengue control interventions in Morelos. Cross-sectional entomological surveys were conducted and collection of Ae. aegypti pupae was taken from all water-holding containers in Cuautla, Jojutla and Tlaquiltenango during dry (1,713 households) and rainy (1,677) seasons in 2008. Relative importance of different types of breeding sites was determined by the contribution (%) to total pupae production within each locality. In Cuautla most pupae during the dry season were found in wash basins (48.5%), tanks and buckets/pots (15% each); during the rainy season, diverse small items (21.3%), buckets/pots (19.3%) and plant pots (12.9%) were more productive. In Jojutla and Tlaquiltenango, 97% of all pupae was found in plant pots during the dry season; during the rainy season diverse small items (26.3%), washing/cooking utensils (13.9%), buckets/pots (12.9%) and plant pots (12.7%) were significant. Prevention and control of the dengue vector should be based on this kind of evidence to target the most productive breeding-sites.

  19. Treatment decisions for localized prostate cancer: a concept mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Stephanie L; Mullen, Patricia D; Byrd, Theresa L; Cantor, Scott B; Le, Yen-Chi; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Pettaway, Curtis; Volk, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    Few decision aids emphasize active surveillance (AS) for localized prostate cancer. Concept mapping was used to produce a conceptual framework incorporating AS and treatment. Fifty-four statements about what men need to make a decision for localized prostate cancer were derived from focus groups with African American, Latino and white men previously screened for prostate cancer and partners (n = 80). In the second phase, 89 participants sorted and rated the importance of statements. An eight cluster map was produced for the overall sample. Clusters were labelled Doctor-patient exchange, Big picture comparisons, Weighing the options, Seeking and using information, Spirituality and inner strength, Related to active treatment, Side-effects and Family concerns. A major division was between medical and home-based clusters. Ethnic groups and genders had similar sorting, but some variation in importance. Latinos rated Big picture comparisons as less important. African Americans saw Spirituality and inner strength most important, followed by Latinos, then whites. Ethnic- and gender-specific concept maps were not analysed because of high similarity in their sorting patterns. We identified a conceptual framework for management of early-stage prostate cancer that included coverage of AS. Eliciting the conceptual framework is an important step in constructing decision aids which will address gaps related to AS. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Optimal duration of androgen deprivation therapy following radiation therapy in intermediate- or high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Frederico; Figueiredo, Maximiliano Augusto Novis de; Sasse, Andre Deeke, E-mail: sasse@cevon.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Objectives: to investigate current evidence on the optimal duration of adjuvant hormone deprivation for prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy with curative intent. Materials and Methods: A systematic search was performed in electronic databases. Data from randomized trials comparing different durations of hormone blockade was collected for pooled analysis. Overall survival, disease-free survival, disease-specific survival and toxicity were the outcomes of interest. Meta-analyses were performed using random-effects model. Results: Six studies met the eligibility criteria. For overall survival, the pooled data from the studies demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for longer hormone deprivation (Hazard Ratio 0.84; 95% CI 0.74 - 0.96). A statistically significant benefit was also found for disease-free survival (Hazard Ratio 0.74; 95% CI 0.62 - 0.89), and disease-specific survival (Hazard Ratio 0.73; 95% CI 0.62 - 0.85). Studies with longer blockade duration arm demonstrated greater benefit. Toxicity was low, with no increase in cardiovascular events. Conclusions: Longer duration of androgen deprivation combined to radiotherapy prolongs OS, DFS and DSS in patients with intermediate and high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer. However, this evidence is based on trials using older radiation techniques, and further research of combination of androgen deprivation and new RT technologies may be warranted. (author)

  1. Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Christopher, E-mail: cherbert@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Joffres, Michel [Department of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC (Canada); Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51-176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%-94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%-71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%-100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%-91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. Conclusion: Biochemical control translates into improved overall survival in patients with high or intermediate risk disease and an estimated 10-year overall survival of >90%.

  2. Distant Metastases Following Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology, Mountain View, California (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high

  3. Evolution and outcomes of 3 MHz high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for localized prostate cancer during 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thüroff, Stefan; Chaussy, Christian

    2013-08-01

    We describe the long-term cancer control and morbidity of high intensity focused ultrasound with neoadjuvant transurethral resection of the prostate, the risk of metastatic induction by transurethral prostate resection, and the evolution of high intensity focused ultrasound application and technology with time. A prospective Harlaching high intensity focused ultrasound database was searched for patients with primary localized prostate cancer (T1-2, N0, M0, PSA at first diagnosis less than 50 ng/ml) and followup longer than 15 months. Those patients with previous long-term androgen deprivation therapy, locally advanced prostate cancer or any therapy influencing prostate specific antigen were excluded from study. All patients were treated completely with an Ablatherm® high intensity focused ultrasound device. Evaluation was performed in aggregate, and by stratification according to cohort group, risk group (D'Amico criteria), prostate specific antigen nadir and Gleason score. The Phoenix definition was used for biochemical failure. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using a Cox model. Of 704 study patients 78.5% had intermediate or high risk disease. Mean followup was 5.3 years (range 1.3 to 14). Cancer specific survival was 99%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and 10-year salvage treatment-free rates were 98% in low risk, 72% in intermediate risk and 68% in high risk patients. Prostate specific antigen nadir and Gleason score predicted biochemical failure, and side effects were moderate. The high intensity focused ultrasound re-treatment rate has been 15% since 2005. Long-term followup with high intensity focused ultrasound therapy demonstrated a high overall rate of cancer specific survival and an exceptionally high rate of freedom from salvage therapy requirements in low risk patients. Advances in high intensity focused ultrasound technology and clinical practice as well as

  4. Functional outcomes of clinically high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: a multi-institutional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollah, F; Dalela, D; Sood, A; Sammon, J; Cho, R; Nocera, L; Diaz, M; Jeong, W; Peabody, J O; Fossati, N; Gandaglia, G; Briganti, A; Montorsi, F; Menon, M

    2017-12-01

    To ascertain 3-year urinary continence (UC) and sexual function (SF) recovery following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for clinically high-risk prostate cancer (PCa). Retrospective analyses of a prospectively maintained database for 769 patients with D'Amico high-risk PCa undergoing RARP at two tertiary care centers in the United States and Europe between 2001 and 2014. The association between time since RARP and recovery of UC (defined as 0 pad/one safety liner per day) and SF (defined as sexual health inventory for men (SHIM) score ⩾17) was tested in separate preoperative and post-operative Cox-proportional hazards regression models. Sensitivity analyses were conducted using continence 0 pad per day and erection sufficient for intercourse as end points for UC and SF recovery, respectively. Mean age of the cohort was 62.3 years, and 62.1% harbored ⩾PT3a disease. Nerve sparing (unilateral or bilateral) RARP was performed in 87.7% of patients. Kaplan-Meier estimates of UC recovery at 12, 24 and 36 months after surgery was 85.2%, 89.1% and 91.2%, respectively, while 33.8, 52.3 and 69.0% of preoperatively potent men (preoperative SHIM ⩾17; n=548; 71.3%) recovered SF. Similar results were noted in sensitivity analyses. Patient age and year of surgery were associated with UC and SF recovery; additionally, preoperative SHIM score, degree of nerve sparing, pT3b-T4 disease and surgical margins were associated with SF recovery over the period of observation. Patients with D'Amico high-risk PCa treated with RARP may continue to recover UC and SF beyond 12 months of surgery and show promising outcomes at 3-year follow-up. Appropriate patient selection and counseling may aid in setting realistic expectations for functional recovery post RARP.

  5. The predictive value of endorectal 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension in patients with low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somford, D M; Hamoen, E H; Fütterer, J J; van Basten, J P; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C A; Vreuls, W; van Oort, I M; Vergunst, H; Kiemeney, L A; Barentsz, J O; Witjes, J A

    2013-11-01

    We determined the positive and negative predictive values of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy for different prostate cancer risk groups. We evaluated a cohort of 183 patients who underwent 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, including T2-weighted, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast enhanced sequences, with an endorectal coil before radical prostatectomy. Pathological stage at radical prostatectomy was used as standard reference for extraprostatic extension. The cohort was classified into low, intermediate and high risk groups according to the D'Amico criteria. We recorded prevalence of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy and determined sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension in each group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy. The overall prevalence of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy was 49.7% ranging from 24.7% to 77.1% between low and high risk categories. Overall staging accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension was 73.8%, with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 58.2%, 89.1%, 84.1% and 68.3%, respectively. Positive predictive value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension was best in the high risk cohort with 88.8%. Negative predictive value was highest in the low risk cohort with 87.7%. With an odds ratio of 10.3 multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is by far the best preoperative predictor of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy. For adequate patient counseling, knowledge of predictive values of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension is

  6. Management of locally advanced prostate cancer: a European consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccon-Gibod, L; Bertaccini, A; Bono, A V; Dev Sarmah, B; Höltl, W; Mottet, N; Tunn, U; Zamboglou, N

    2003-04-01

    This report summarises the findings of a European Consensus Group review of current standards of care in locally advanced prostate cancer defined as (a) untreated cancer extending clinically beyond the prostatic capsule in patients with no evidence of lymph node invasion or distant metastases, and (b) residual disease remaining after local treatment with positive surgical margins, seminal vesicle invasion, persistent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and/or secondary PSA relapse. There was no overall consensus as to the standard of care in clinically apparent locally advanced prostate cancer. It was agreed, however, that hormonal therapy (e.g. with a gonadotrophin releasing hormone analogue [GnRHa]) represents a valid treatment in these patients. Treatment practices and regimens vary considerably between European countries, but GnRHa is widely used, either alone or in combination with antiandrogens. Hormonal therapy alone is a valid option, though the optimal modality, timing and duration of treatment remain to be defined. Adjuvant therapy with a GnRHa has been shown to improve survival in patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy. It is a viable option after prostatectomy in patients with persistent or secondary relapsing PSA. It was determined that optimal treatment will be different according to PSA, clinical staging and Gleason score, and the treatment of locally advanced disease should be individually tailored after discussion between physician and patient. In many instances, patients prefer and expect some form of treatment in preference to watchful waiting. Treatment nomograms such as the Kattan nomograms provide precise, comprehensive and invaluable tools for everyday use and may be used to predict outcomes and guide treatment decisions.

  7. The Prevalence of Cardiac Risk Factors in Men with Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Androgen Deprivation Therapy in British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot K. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. While androgen deprivation therapy (ADT reduces the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality in high-risk localized prostate cancer, it adversely affects cardiovascular (CV risk factor profiles in treated men. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 consecutive men with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency for ADT. Data on CV risk factors and disease were collected and Framingham risk scores were calculated. Results. The median age of the study cohort was 73 years. Established cardiovascular disease was present in 25% of patients. Among patients without established CV disease, calculated Framingham risk was high in 65%, intermediate in 33%, and low in 1%. Baseline hypertension was present in 58% of patients, dyslipidemia in 51%, and diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in 24%. Hypertension was more prevalent in the study cohort than in an age- and sex-matched population sample (OR 1.74, P=0.006; diabetes had a similar prevalence (OR 0.93, P=0.8. Conclusions. Patients receiving ADT have a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors and are more likely to be hypertensive than population controls. Low rates of CV risk screening suggest opportunities for improved primary and secondary prevention of CV disease in this population.

  8. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoecht, Stefan [Xcare Gruppe, Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Saarlouis (Germany); Aebersold, Daniel M. [University of Bern, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radio-Onkologie, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Albrecht, Clemens [Universitaetsklinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Strahlentherapie, Klinikum Nuernberg Nord, Nuremberg (Germany); Boehmer, Dirk [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Berlin (Germany); Flentje, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Ganswindt, Ute [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Munich (Germany); Hoelscher, Tobias [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Dresden (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix [Universitaetsklinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Landeskrankenhaus, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Zips, Daniel [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Wiegel, Thomas [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm, Abteilung Strahlentherapie, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    This article gives an overview on the current status of hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer with a special focus on the applicability in routine use. Based on a recently published systematic review the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) expert panel added additional information that has become available since then and assessed the validity of the information on outcome parameters especially with respect to long-term toxicity and long-term disease control. Several large-scale trials on moderate hypofractionation with single doses from 2.4-3.4 Gy have recently finished recruiting or have published first results suggestive of equivalent outcomes although there might be a trend for increased short-term and possibly even long-term toxicity. Large phase 3 trials on extreme hypofractionation with single doses above 4.0 Gy are lacking and only very few prospective trials have follow-up periods covering more than just 2-3 years. Until the results on long-term follow-up of several well-designed phase 3 trials become available, moderate hypofractionation should not be used in routine practice without special precautions and without adherence to the highest quality standards and evidence-based dose fractionation regimens. Extreme hypofractionation should be restricted to prospective clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Diese Uebersichtsarbeit soll den aktuellen Status der hypofraktionierten Radiotherapie des Prostatakarzinoms mit dem Fokus auf die Anwendung in der Routinetherapie darstellen. Basierend auf einem kuerzlich erschienen systematischen Review zur Hypofraktionierung sind durch das DEGRO Expertengremium zusaetzliche, in der Zwischenzeit verfuegbar gewordene Informationen mit beruecksichtigt worden. Die Validitaet der Aussagen zu Ergebnissen wurde speziell im Hinblick auf die Langzeittoxizitaet und -erkrankungskontrolle bewertet. Mehrere grosse Phase-3-Studien zur moderaten Hypofraktionierung mit Dosen von 2,4-3,4 Gy pro Fraktion

  9. [External beam radiotherapy on locally advanced prostate carcinoma following iliac staging lymphadenectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagelata López, A; Ponce Díaz-Reixa, J L; Romero Selas, E; Gómez Veiga, F; Fernández Rosado, E; Gonzalez Martín, M

    2006-10-01

    Locally advanced prostate cancer supposes a high risk condition of post-treatment progression due to the limit situation that represents. Our purpose was to analyze prognoses factors in function of progression probability after using a treatment with external source radiotherapy on patients with this kind of tumors. We retrospectively reviewed a set of 128 patients submitted to pelvic staging limphadenectomy prior to accomplish an external radiotherapeutic treatment. We employed the Kaplan-Meier curves to study the probability of progression, logarithmic ranks test were used for detection of possible statistically significant differences and proportional risks Cox model was employed to study possible risk factors of progression (employing astro criteria). 5 years freedom probability from progression was of 49,93%; in spite of appreciating important differences in the groups stratified by the predictive variables used (total PSA, gleason of pathological biopsy, clinical stage and % of cores affection on biopsy), none of them reached statistical meaning, being the level of total PSA the closest to it. The external radiotherapeuthic treatment represents a valid alternative in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer, with a tolerable index of secondaries. It must be used combined with hormonotherapy. It seems that the use of higher radiation doses, in a safer way thanks to 3D conformed radiotherapy, allows to improve the results. The most powerful clinical predictor of evolution must be the total PSA.

  10. Salvage cryotherapy for local recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvorning Ternov, Klara; Krag Jakobsen, Ane; Bratt, Ola; Ahlgren, Göran

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to present the outcome of patients treated with salvage cryotherapy after radiotherapy for prostate cancer at one institution. Consecutive patients treated between 2007 and 2013 with transperineal cryotherapy for biopsy-verified local recurrence after radiotherapy were investigated. An external reviewer retrieved outcome data retrospectively from medical records. Complications were graded according to the Clavien classification. One patient with less than 1 year of follow-up was excluded from the analysis of side-effects. Thirty patients were included, 29 of whom had a follow-up of at least 1 year. The median follow-up was 2.7 years (range 1-6.5 years). Eleven of the 23 patients without hormonal treatment at the time of cryotherapy reached a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir of less than 0.5 ng/ml. At the end of follow-up five of these 23 patients still had a PSA below 0.5 ng/ml and 10 were free from recurrence according to the Phoenix definition. Clinical recurrence (verified with imaging or biopsies) was detected in 13 patients, six of which were local. One patient died from prostate cancer. Eleven patients had urinary incontinence grade 1-2 and three had grade 3-4, seven had pelvic pain, three had severe but transitory tissue sloughing, three developed a urethral stricture or had prolonged urinary retention, and one developed a urinary fistula 4.5 years after cryotherapy. Salvage cryotherapy should be considered as an alternative to hormonal treatment and surgery for local recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The results compare well to those reported from centres with longer experience.

  11. Selenium supplementation has no effect on serum glucose levels in men at high risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algotar, Amit Mohan; Hsu, Chui-Hseih; Singh, Parminder; Stratton, Steven Paul

    2013-12-01

    Current literature regarding the effect of selenium supplementation on the risk of diabetes is inconclusive. Hence, a longitudinal study was conducted to investigate the effect of selenium supplementation on serum glucose levels in elderly men. Data were obtained from 699 men participating in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled Phase 3 clinical trial investigating the effects of two doses of selenium (200 and 400 μg/day) compared with placebo on the incidence of prostate cancer. Subjects were followed every 6 months for up to 5 years. Serum glucose levels were obtained every 6 months. Mixed-effects regression models were used to assess whether the rate of change of serum glucose levels was significantly different in the selenium-supplemented groups compared with placebo. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of findings and to minimize the possibility of residual bias due to fasting status. Of the total 2893 glucose measurements, 734 were performed when the subject had been fasting for ≥8 h. Changes in serum glucose levels during the course of the trial did not differ significantly between the placebo and selenium 200 μg/day (P = 0.98) and 400 μg/day (P = 0.81) groups. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated comparable results for models using the total population and models restricted to subjects with only fasting glucose data. These results do not support a relationship between selenium supplementation and risk of diabetes. Hence, recommendations regarding selenium supplementation based on increased risk of diabetes seem premature. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Local staging of prostate cancer with transrectal ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T; Nerstrom, H; Iversen, P

    1992-01-01

    A literature review was undertaken to investigate whether transrectal ultrasound can predict the local stage of prostate cancer. Twelve papers were found which correlated ultrasound findings with surgical findings and another paper reported on strategic staging biopsies guided by transrectal...... localized disease defined by digital rectal examination, may be superior as the initial staging tool. We conclude that transrectal ultrasound has too low a specificity to upgrade the diagnostic results of digital rectal examination, but that it may be more useful as the primary staging tool and for guidance...

  13. Salvage cryosurgery for locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Tieshi; Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Ji, Changwei; Yang, Rong; Gan, Weidong; Zhang, Gutian; Li, Xiaogong; Guo, Hongqian

    2015-02-01

    To report our preliminary experience of salvage cryosurgery (SCS) for locally recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) after primary cryotherapy and determine the efficacy of cryoablation of the prostate in the salvage setting. We conducted a retrospective review of the records of all patients who underwent SCS for locally recurrent PCa after primary cryotherapy between February 2008 and March 2012. Patients were assessed after treatment by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, transrectal ultrasonography, radiologic imaging, and biopsy. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix criteria. Data from 12 patients who had undergone SCS were entered. Median age at SCS was 77.5 year. Before SCS, patients had a median PSA level of 2.5 ng/ml and median Gleason sum of 7. Patients underwent SCS at a median of 7.8 months after primary CS. Median PSA nadir after SCS was 1.32 ng/ml. The mean (range) follow-up was 33.5 months. Three patients were started on hormonal therapy for disease progression at a median post-SCS period of 12 months. Two patients underwent repeat cryoablation. Only one patient developed mild incontinence after SCS. Urethral sloughing occurred in one patient. Only two patients suffered from transient impotence. It is feasible for patients with PCa to adopt SCS when primary cryotherapy has failed. The application of SCS also allows hormonal therapy to be deferred for a sufficient period of time.

  14. Distinct microRNA expression profile in prostate cancer patients with early clinical failure and the impact of let-7 as prognostic marker in high-risk prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Schubert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of additional prognostic markers to improve risk stratification and to avoid overtreatment is one of the most urgent clinical needs in prostate cancer (PCa. MicroRNAs, being important regulators of gene expression, are promising biomarkers in various cancer entities, though the impact as prognostic predictors in PCa is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify specific miRNAs as potential prognostic markers in high-risk PCa and to validate their clinical impact. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed miRNA-microarray analysis in a high-risk PCa study group selected by their clinical outcome (clinical progression free survival (CPFS vs. clinical failure (CF. We identified seven candidate miRNAs (let-7a/b/c, miR-515-3p/5p, -181b, -146b, and -361 that showed differential expression between both groups. Further qRT-PCR analysis revealed down-regulation of members of the let-7 family in the majority of a large, well-characterized high-risk PCa cohort (n = 98. Expression of let-7a/b/and -c was correlated to clinical outcome parameters of this group. While let-7a showed no association or correlation with clinical relevant data, let-7b and let-7c were associated with CF in PCa patients and functioned partially as independent prognostic marker. Validation of the data using an independent high-risk study cohort revealed that let-7b, but not let-7c, has impact as an independent prognostic marker for BCR and CF. Furthermore, we identified HMGA1, a non-histone protein, as a new target of let-7b and found correlation of let-7b down-regulation with HMGA1 over-expression in primary PCa samples. CONCLUSION: Our findings define a distinct miRNA expression profile in PCa cases with early CF and identified let-7b as prognostic biomarker in high-risk PCa. This study highlights the importance of let-7b as tumor suppressor miRNA in high-risk PCa and presents a basis to improve individual therapy for high-risk

  15. Dosimetric comparison of axilla and groin radiotherapy techniques for high-risk and locally advanced skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Zhou, Ying; Berry, Sean L.; Barker, Christopher A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation therapy targeting axilla and groin lymph nodes improves regional disease control in locally advanced and high-risk skin cancers. However, trials generally used conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), contributing towards relatively high rates of side effects from treatment. The goal of this study is to determine if three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) may improve radiation delivery to the target while avoiding organs at risk in the clinical context of skin cancer regional nodal irradiation. Twenty patients with locally advanced/high-risk skin cancers underwent computed tomography simulation. The relevant axilla or groin planning target volumes and organs at risk were delineated using standard definitions. Paired t-tests were used to compare the mean values of several dose-volumetric parameters for each of the 4 techniques. In the axilla, the largest improvement for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT was for homogeneity index (13.9 vs. 54.3), at the expense of higher lung V{sub 20} (28.0% vs. 12.6%). In the groin, the largest improvements for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT were for anorectum D{sub max} (13.6 vs. 38.9 Gy), bowel D{sub 200cc} (7.3 vs. 23.1 Gy), femur D{sub 50} (34.6 vs. 57.2 Gy), and genitalia D{sub max} (37.6 vs. 51.1 Gy). IMRT had further improvements compared to 3D-CRT for humerus D{sub mean} (16.9 vs. 22.4 Gy), brachial plexus D{sub 5} (57.4 vs. 61.3 Gy), bladder D{sub 5} (26.8 vs. 36.5 Gy), and femur D{sub 50} (18.7 vs. 34.6 Gy). Fewer differences were observed between IMRT and VMAT. Compared to 2D-RT and 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT had dosimetric advantages in the treatment of nodal regions of skin cancer patients.

  16. High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Gleason Score 8-10 and PSA Level {<=}15 ng/ mL Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, L. Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Murray, Brian C.; Reed, Joshua L. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: With widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, there has been an increase in men diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer defined by a Gleason score (GS) {>=}8 coupled with a relatively low PSA level. The optimal management of these patients has not been defined. Cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in brachytherapy patients with a GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL with or without androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to October 2005, 174 patients with GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Of the patients, 159 (91%) received supplemental external beam radiation, and 113 (64.9%) received ADT. The median follow-up was 6.6 years. The median postimplant Day 0 minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume was 121.1% of prescription dose. Biochemical control was defined as a PSA level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Ten-year outcomes for patients without and with ADT were 95.2% and 92.5%, respectively, for CSS (p = 0.562); 86.5% and 92.6%, respectively, for bPFS (p = 0.204); and 75.2% and 66.0%, respectively, for OS (p = 0.179). The median post-treatment PSA level for biochemically controlled patients was <0.02 ng/mL. Multivariate analysis failed to identify any predictors for CSS, whereas bPFS and OS were most closely related to patient age. Conclusions: Patients with GS {>=}8 and PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL have excellent bPFS and CSS after brachytherapy with supplemental external beam radiotherapy. The use of ADT did not significantly impact bPFS, CSS, or OS.

  17. Molecular markers to complement sentinel node status in predicting survival in patients with high-risk locally invasive melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Casey J; Tang, Fiona; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Rodero, Mathieu P; Malt, Maryrose; Lambie, Duncan; Barbour, Andrew; Hayward, Nicholas K; Smithers, B Mark; Green, Adele C; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2016-08-01

    Sentinel lymph node status is a major prognostic marker in locally invasive cutaneous melanoma. However, this procedure is not always feasible, requires advanced logistics and carries rare but significant morbidity. Previous studies have linked markers of tumour biology to patient survival. In this study, we aimed to combine the predictive value of established biomarkers in addition to clinical parameters as indicators of survival in addition to or instead of sentinel node biopsy in a cohort of high-risk melanoma patients. Patients with locally invasive melanomas undergoing sentinel lymph node biopsy were ascertained and prospectively followed. Information on mortality was validated through the National Death Index. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyse proteins previously reported to be associated with melanoma survival, namely Ki67, p16 and CD163. Evaluation and multivariate analyses according to REMARK criteria were used to generate models to predict disease-free and melanoma-specific survival. A total of 189 patients with available archival material of their primary tumour were analysed. Our study sample was representative of the entire cohort (N = 559). Average Breslow thickness was 2.5 mm. Thirty-two (17%) patients in the study sample died from melanoma during the follow-up period. A prognostic score was developed and was strongly predictive of survival, independent of sentinel node status. The score allowed classification of risk of melanoma death in sentinel node-negative patients. Combining clinicopathological factors and established biomarkers allows prediction of outcome in locally invasive melanoma and might be implemented in addition to or in cases when sentinel node biopsy cannot be performed. © 2016 UICC.

  18. Treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer (Stage T3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiya, Yoshiyasu; Yamada, Yasutaka; Sugiura, Masahiro; Sasaki, Makoto; Shima, Takayuki; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Nakatsu, Hiroomi; Murakami, Shino; Shimazaki, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Formerly, locally advanced prostate cancer exhibited poorly prognosis. In the late 1990s, new surgical and radiation technologies were introduced in combination with androgen deprivation. To evaluate respective strategies, outcomes were examined. Between 2001 and 2010, 224 patients with T3N0M0 (10.9% of all prostate cancer cases) were treated with prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy with/without androgen deprivation or hormone alone. Complete records were obtained by the end of 2015. Operation group first started without adjuvant treatment and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse occurred in 39% of cases. Radiation therapy group was alternatively divided into two subgroups, that received either monotherapy or combination with androgen deprivation, and PSA relapse rates were 65 and 16%, respectively. High rates of PSA relapse in both the operation and radiation therapy groups were observed in patients without adjuvant therapy, but after relapse androgen deprivation proceeded favorable outcomes. In the radiation subgroups, PSA relapse rates were different, but both subsequent survival rates were the same. This may be due to the effect of androgen deprivation after relapse, indicating effect of delayed therapy. PSA relapse rate in the hormone therapy group was 25% and after relapse, patients applied to treatment with other hormonal and anticancer drugs. Overall survival rates were 91, 88 and 67% in the operation, radiation therapy and hormone therapy groups, respectively. Aggressive treatment with short-term androgen deprivation for locally advanced prostate cancer could be beneficial and not harmful when suitable candidates are selected. Delayed androgen deprivation was effective for no adjuvant patients after PSA relapse.

  19. Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ≤18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ≤18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ≤18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ≤18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ≤18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ≤18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation

  20. Estimating Preferences for Treatments in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ávila, Mónica [Health Services Research Unit, IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Becerra, Virginia [Health Services Research Unit, IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona (Spain); Guedea, Ferran [Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Institut Català d' Oncologia, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Suárez, José Francisco [Servicio de Urología, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Fernandez, Pablo [Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Instituto Oncológico de Guipúzcoa, San Sebastián (Spain); Macías, Víctor [Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Institut Oncologic del Valles-Hospital General de Catalunya, Sant Cugat del Vallès (Spain); Mariño, Alfonso [Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Centro Oncológico de Galicia, A Coruña (Spain); and others

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Studies of patients' preferences for localized prostate cancer treatments have assessed radical prostatectomy and external radiation therapy, but none of them has evaluated brachytherapy. The aim of our study was to assess the preferences and willingness to pay of patients with localized prostate cancer who had been treated with radical prostatectomy, external radiation therapy, or brachytherapy, and their related urinary, sexual, and bowel side effects. Methods and Materials: This was an observational, prospective cohort study with follow-up until 5 years after treatment. A total of 704 patients with low or intermediate risk localized prostate cancer were consecutively recruited from 2003 to 2005. The estimation of preferences was conducted using time trade-off, standard gamble, and willingness-to-pay methods. Side effects were measured with the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC), a prostate cancer-specific questionnaire. Tobit models were constructed to assess the impact of treatment and side effects on patients' preferences. Propensity score was applied to adjust for treatment selection bias. Results: Of the 580 patients reporting preferences, 165 were treated with radical prostatectomy, 152 with external radiation therapy, and 263 with brachytherapy. Both time trade-off and standard gamble results indicated that the preferences of patients treated with brachytherapy were 0.06 utilities higher than those treated with radical prostatectomy (P=.01). Similarly, willingness-to-pay responses showed a difference of €57/month (P=.004) between these 2 treatments. Severe urinary incontinence presented an independent impact on the preferences elicited (P<.05), whereas no significant differences were found by bowel and sexual side effects. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that urinary incontinence is the side effect with the highest impact on preferences and that brachytherapy and external radiation therapy are more valued than radical

  1. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis [Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Nord (France); Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); INSERM U 556, Lyon (France); Vitry, Thierry [Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France)

    2010-05-15

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level >0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir+2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future. (orig.)

  2. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvière, Olivier; Vitry, Thierry; Lyonnet, Denis

    2010-05-01

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level > 0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir + 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future.

  3. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilcox SW

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shea W Wilcox,1,4 Noel J Aherne,2,4 Linus C Benjamin,1 Bosco Wu,1 Thomaz de Campos Silva,3 Craig S McLachlan,4 Michael J McKay,3,5 Andrew J Last,1 Thomas P Shakespeare1–4 1North Coast Cancer Institute, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia; 2North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia; 3North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 4The University of New South Wales, Rural Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Purpose: Dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT and ADT. Methods and materials: Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Results: Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2

  4. Role of brachytherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to application of brachytherapy for treating the localized prostate cancer (PC. Statistics for incidence and detectability of this pathology and its dynamics for recent years are represented. Brief analysis of other methods which are conveniently used for treatment of PC, such as radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy, was performed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods have been discussed. Brief history about the development of brachytherapy from first experience to wide-spread use in clinical practice is reported. The detailed review of series of large trials from Russia and other countries for efficiency and safety of brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer for recent 15 years is also represented. Two types of brachytherapy in current clinical oncology i.e. low-dose technique with permanent implantation of microsources and high-dose temporary isotope implantation, specifics of its application in different groups of patients have been described. The procedure of brachytherapy and its three main steps i.e. planning, implantation and control assessment after implantation have been characterized in details. The conclusion about benefits of using of brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer as minimally invasive and efficient method was made. 

  5. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology, Mountain View, CA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  6. ROBO1, a tumor suppressor and critical molecular barrier for localized tumor cells to acquire invasive phenotype: Study in African-American and Caucasian prostate cancer models

    OpenAIRE

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K.; Mishra, Shrawan K.; Rhim, Johng S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Badrinath R Konety; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Saleem, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    High-risk populations exhibit early transformation of localized prostate cancer (CaP) disease to metastasis which results in the mortality of such patients. The paucity of knowledge about the molecular mechanism involved in acquiring of metastatic behavior by primary tumor cells and non-availability of reliable phenotype-discriminating biomarkers are stumbling blocks in the management of CaP disease. Here, we determine the role and translational relevance of ROBO1 (an organogenesis-associated...

  7. Locally advanced prostate cancer: effective treatments, but many adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Locally advanced prostate tumours, i.e. those that extend beyond the prostate gland but are not metastatic, often carry a poor prognosis: between 10% and 40% of patients die within 5 years after diagnosis. Various treatments are proposed to improve their prognosis. Which treatments have a proven survival benefit, and what are their adverse effects? To answer these questions, we reviewed the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. Prostatectomy has not been evaluated in controlled trials versus either watchful waiting or radiation therapy alone. Prostatectomy is mainly proposed to patients who are in good general health. Five years after prostatectomy, mortality from prostate cancer is between 2% and 16%, depending on the study.Three-quarters of patients who have surgery at this stage experience erectile dysfunction, and at least 20% of patients develop urinary incontinence. External beam radiation therapy alone has not been compared with watchful waiting or prostatectomy. External beam radiation therapy has documented benefits in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer treated with gonadorelin agonists, preventing 8 to 10 deaths from all causes after 7 to 10 years of follow-up among 100 treated patients. However, about 60% of patients experience erectile dysfunction, about 15% symptomatic radiation proctitis, and about 5% urinary incontinence. When combined with prostatectomy, radiation therapy did not affect the 5-year survival rate but prolonged survival by about 2 years in a trial with more than 10 years of follow-up. When used without concomitant androgen suppression, antiandrogens have no proven impact on overall survival in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. In the absence of radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy, androgen suppression, by means of orchiectomy or gonadorelin agonist, has a minimal impact on overall survival among patients with locally advanced cancer. In one randomised trial, androgen suppression in

  8. Metastasis-Free Survival Is a Strong Surrogate of Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wanling; Regan, Meredith M; Buyse, Marc; Halabi, Susan; Kantoff, Philip W; Sartor, Oliver; Soule, Howard; Clarke, Noel W; Collette, Laurence; Dignam, James J; Fizazi, Karim; Paruleker, Wendy R; Sandler, Howard M; Sydes, Matthew R; Tombal, Bertrand; Williams, Scott G; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2017-09-20

    Purpose Adjuvant therapy for intermediate-risk and high-risk localized prostate cancer decreases the number of deaths from this disease. Surrogates for overall survival (OS) could expedite the evaluation of new adjuvant therapies. Methods By June 2013, 102 completed or ongoing randomized trials were identified and individual patient data were collected from 28 trials with 28,905 patients. Disease-free survival (DFS) and metastasis-free survival (MFS) were determined for 21,140 patients from 24 trials and 12,712 patients from 19 trials, respectively. We evaluated the surrogacy of DFS and MFS for OS by using a two-stage meta-analytic validation model by determining the correlation of an intermediate clinical end point with OS and the correlation of treatment effects on both the intermediate clinical end point and OS. Results Trials enrolled patients from 1987 to 2011. After a median follow-up of 10 years, 45% of 21,140 men and 45% of 12,712 men experienced a DFS and MFS event, respectively. For DFS and MFS, 61% and 90% of the patients, respectively, were from radiation trials, and 63% and 66%, respectively, had high-risk disease. At the patient level, Kendall's τ correlation with OS was 0.85 and 0.91 for DFS and MFS, respectively. At the trial level, R(2) was 0.86 (95% CI, 0.78 to 0.90) and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.88) from weighted linear regression of 8-year OS rates versus 5-year DFS and MFS rates, respectively. Treatment effects-measured by log hazard ratios-for the surrogates and OS were well correlated ( R(2), 0.73 [95% CI, 0.53 to 0.82] for DFS and 0.92 [95% CI, 0.81 to 0.95] for MFS). Conclusion MFS is a strong surrogate for OS for localized prostate cancer that is associated with a significant risk of death from prostate cancer.

  9. Twelve years' experience with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) using sonablate™ devices for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Nakano, Muyura; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yoshihiro; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2012-10-01

    To report on the long-term results of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Patients with clinical Stage T1c-T3N0M0, biopsy proven, localized prostate cancer, with a serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level of Gleason score were included. All patients underwent HIFU using the Sonablate™ (S) device and were required to have a minimal follow-up of 2 years after the last HIFU session to be included in this analysis. Four different generation HIFU devices, S200, S500, S500 version 4 and S500 TCM, have been used for this study. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir+2ng/ml). Seven hundred and fifty-three men with prostate cancer were included. The patients were divided into two groups: in the Former group, 421 patients were treated with S200 and 500 from 1990 to 2005; in the Latter group, 332 patients were treated with S500 ver. 4 and TCM from 2005 to 2009. The mean age, PSA, Gleason score, operation time, and follow-up period in the Former and Latter groups were 68 and 67 years, 11.3 and 9.7 ng/ml, 6.2 and 6.6, 167 and 101 min, and 49 and 38 months, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rate (BDFR) in the groups at 5 years was, respectively, 67% and 53%, and was 50% at 10 years in the Former group (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the Former group at 5 and 10 years were 68% and 65%, 52% and 48%, and 43% and 40%, respectively (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the Latter group at 5 years were 83%, 76%, and 42% (p<0.0001). The negative prostate biopsy rate in the Former and Latter groups was 81% and 93%, respectively. Postoperative erectile dysfunction was noted in 45%, 38%, and 24% of patients at 6 months, 12 months, and 2 years after HIFU. The results after long-term follow-up have indicated that HIFU is an efficient and safe treatment for patients with localized prostate

  10. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oussama M. eDarwish; Raj, Ganesh V.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR) of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostat...

  11. Prostate cancer localization by novel magnetic resonance dispersion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischi, M; Saidov, T; Kompatsiari, K; Engelbrecht, M R W; Breeuwer, M; Wijkstra, H

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis and focal treatment of prostate cancer, the most prevalent form of cancer in men, is hampered by the limits of current clinical imaging. Angiogenesis imaging is a promising option for detection and localization of prostate cancer. It can be imaged by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, assessing microvascular permeability as an indicator for angiogenesis. However, information on microvascular architecture changes associated with angiogenesis is not available. This paper presents a new model enabling the combined assessment of microvascular permeability and architecture. After the intravenous injection of a gadolinium-chelate bolus, time-concentration curves (TCCs) are measured by DCE-MRI at each voxel. According to the convective dispersion equation, the microvascular architecture is reflected in the dispersion coefficient. A solution of this equation is therefore proposed to represent the intravascular blood plasma compartment in the Tofts model. Fitting the resulting model to TCCs measured at each voxel leads to the simultaneous generation of a dispersion and a permeability map. Measurement of an arterial input function is no longer required. Preliminary validation was performed by spatial comparison with the histological results in seven patients referred for radical prostatectomy. Cancer localization by the obtained dispersion maps provided an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve equal to 0.91. None of the standard DCE-MRI parametric maps could outperform this result, motivating towards an extended validation of the method, also aimed at investigating other forms of cancer with pronounced angiogenic development.

  12. Prostate lesion detection and localization based on locality alignment discriminant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mingquan; Chen, Weifu; Zhao, Mingbo; Gibson, Eli; Bastian-Jordan, Matthew; Cool, Derek W.; Kassam, Zahra; Chow, Tommy W. S.; Ward, Aaron; Chiu, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most commonly occurring cancers among men in the world, and it also the most curable cancer when it is detected early. Multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) combines anatomic and functional prostate imaging techniques, which have been shown to produce high sensitivity and specificity in cancer localization, which is important in planning biopsies and focal therapies. However, in previous investigations, lesion localization was achieved mainly by manual segmentation, which is time-consuming and prone to observer variability. Here, we developed an algorithm based on locality alignment discriminant analysis (LADA) technique, which can be considered as a version of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) localized to patches in the feature space. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy generated by the proposed algorithm in five prostates by LADA were 52.2%, 89.1% and 85.1% respectively, compared to 31.3%, 85.3% and 80.9% generated by LDA. The delineation accuracy attainable by this tool has a potential in increasing the cancer detection rate in biopsies and in minimizing collateral damage of surrounding tissues in focal therapies.

  13. Comparison of (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET-CT with mpMRI for preoperative lymph node staging in patients with intermediate to high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Zang, Shiming; Zhang, Chengwei; Fu, Yao; Lv, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qinglei; Deng, Yongming; Zhang, Chuan; Luo, Rui; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Wang, Wei; Wang, Feng; Guo, Hongqian

    2017-11-07

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET-CT with multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) for lymph node (LN) staging in patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) with pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND). We retrospectively identified 42 consecutive patients with intermediate- to high-risk PCa according to D'Amico and without concomitant cancer. Preoperative (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET-CT, pelvic mpMRI and subsequent robot assisted laparoscopic RP with PLND were performed in all patients. Among 42 patients assessed, the preoperative PSA value, Gleason score, pT stage and intraprostatic PCa volume of patients with LN metastases were all significantly higher than those without metastases (P = 0.029, 0.028, 0.004, respectively). The average maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET-CT positive PCa of patients with or without LN metastases were 13.10 (range 6.12-51.75) and 7.22 (range 5.4-11.2), respectively (P PET-CT and pelvic mpMRI had the ability of succeed on preoperative definite accurate diagnosis and accurate localization of primary PCa in all 42 patients. Fifteen patients (35.71%) had a pN1 stage. 51 positive LN were found. Both (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET-CT and pelvic mpMRI displayed brillient patient-based and region-based sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value. There was no statistical difference for the detection of LNMs according to the diameter of the LNMs between (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET-CT and mpMRI in this study. Both (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET-CT and mpMRI performed great value for LN staging in patients with intermediate- to high-risk PCa undergoing RP with PLND. However, despite excellent performance of (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET-CT, it cannot replace mpMRI that remains excellent for lymph node staging.

  14. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yartsev Slav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. Methods 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. Results When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p dose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p Conclusion dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies.

  15. Management of localized prostate cancer: the pendulum swings (back to the middle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston Vuong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we discuss 18-year follow-up data from the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-4 (SPCG-4 trial, a randomized study comparing observation and radical prostatectomy (RP in patients with localized prostate cancer. The results of this study are contrasted with another study employing a similar randomization, the Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT. We highlight several key differences in study eligibility and enrollment that may account for distinct results, and describe how these datasets impact the complex landscape of therapy for localized prostate cancer.

  16. Is there any association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Gokhan Doluoglu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose We investigated the association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods The data of 440 patients who had undergone prostate biopsies due to high PSA levels and suspicious digital rectal examination findings were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of accompanying NIH IV prostatitis. The exclusion criteria were as follows: Gleason score>6, PSA level>20ng/mL, >2 positive cores, >50% cancerous tissue per biopsy, urinary tract infection, urological interventions at least 1 week previously (cystoscopy, urethral catheterization, or similar procedure, history of prostate biopsy, and history of androgen or 5-alpha reductase use. All patient's age, total PSA and free PSA levels, ratio of free to total PSA, PSA density and prostate volume were recorded. Results In total, 101 patients were included in the study. Histopathological examination revealed only PCa in 78 (77.2% patients and PCa+NIH IV prostatitis in 23 (22.7% patients. The median total PSA level was 7.4 (3.5–20.0 ng/mL in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group and 6.5 (0.6–20.0 ng/mL in the PCa group (p=0.67. The PSA level was≤10ng/mL in 60 (76.9% patients in the PCa group and in 16 (69.6% patients in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group (p=0.32. Conclusions Our study showed no statistically significant difference in PSA levels between patients with and without NIH IV prostatitis accompanying PCa.

  17. Pre- and post-operative nomograms to predict recurrence-free probability in korean men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minyong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Choi, Woo Suk; Park, Yong Hyun; Cho, Sung Yong; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Seung Bae; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Hong, Sung Kyu; Byun, Seok-Soo; Jeong, Hyeon; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Lee, Eunsik; Lee, Sang Eun

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of prostate cancer (PCa) is rapidly increasing in Korea, there are few suitable prediction models for disease recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP). We established pre- and post-operative nomograms estimating biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free probability after RP in Korean men with clinically localized PCa. Our sampling frame included 3,034 consecutive men with clinically localized PCa who underwent RP at our tertiary centers from June 2004 through July 2011. After inappropriate data exclusion, we evaluated 2,867 patients for the development of nomograms. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to develop pre- and post-operative nomograms that predict BCR-free probability. Finally, we resampled from our study cohort 200 times to determine the accuracy of our nomograms on internal validation, which were designated with concordance index (c-index) and further represented by calibration plots. Over a median of 47 months of follow-up, the estimated BCR-free rate was 87.8% (1 year), 83.8% (2 year), and 72.5% (5 year). In the pre-operative model, Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA), the proportion of positive biopsy cores, clinical T3a and biopsy Gleason score (GS) were independent predictive factors for BCR, while all relevant predictive factors (PSA, extra-prostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastasis, surgical margin, and pathologic GS) were associated with BCR in the post-operative model. The c-index representing predictive accuracy was 0.792 (pre-) and 0.821 (post-operative), showing good fit in the calibration plots. In summary, we developed pre- and post-operative nomograms predicting BCR-free probability after RP in a large Korean cohort with clinically localized PCa. These nomograms will be provided as the mobile application-based SNUH Prostate Cancer Calculator. Our nomograms can determine patients at high risk of disease recurrence after RP who will benefit from adjuvant therapy.

  18. MMSC-LIKE LIMBAL CELLS COTRANSPLANTATION PROMOTES LOCAL IMMUNOCORRECTION AND CORNEAL GRAFT TRANSPARENT RETENTION IN HIGH RISK KERATOPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Borzenok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim was to evaluate clinical results of donor corneal graft survival in high-risk recipients in co-transplantation of preserved allogenic limbal grafts. Materials and methods. Two types of penetrative keratoplasties were carried out in patients with corneal graft opacities and high risk of rejection (n = 69. Co-transplantation of donor cornea and allogenic MMSC-like limbal cells in the form of limbal transplants was carried out in the 1st group (n = 36; in the 2nd group (n = 33 only the cornea was transplanted. Results. Observation of the patients during one year after surgery showed that the rate of transparent cornea engraftment increased in the 1st group (86,1 against 69,7% in the 2nd group. The density of endothelial cells was also higher in the 1st group (85,9 against 76,2% in the 2nd group. At the same time, progressive decreasing of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IFNγ, TNFα and increasing of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-1RA, TGFβ along with higher level of HLA-G5 were revealed in the recipients’ tear fluid in the 1st group in comparison to the 2nd group. Conclusion. Simultaneous transplantation of preserved limbal grafts with corneal graft in high-risk keratoplasty favors the transparent cornea engraftment, obviously, this is due to immunoregulatory activity of the MMSC-like limbal cells. 

  19. 18F Fluorocholine Dynamic Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Intermediate- to High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Clinical-Pathologic Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joon Young; Yang, Jaewon; Noworolski, Susan M; Behr, Spencer; Chang, Albert J; Simko, Jeffry P; Nguyen, Hao G; Carroll, Peter R; Kurhanewicz, John; Seo, Youngho

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To investigate the initial clinical value of fluorine 18 (18F) fluorocholine (FCH) dynamic positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging by comparing its parameters with clinical-pathologic findings in patients with newly diagnosed intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) who plan to undergo radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and informed written consent was obtained from all subjects for this HIPAA-compliant study. Twelve men (mean age ± standard deviation, 61.7 years ± 8.4; range, 46-74 years) with untreated intermediate- to high-risk PCa characterized according to Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) underwent preoperative FCH dynamic PET/MR imaging followed by radical prostatectomy between April and November 2015. PET/MR imaging parameters including average and maximum K1 (delivery rate constant) and standardized uptake values (SUVs) and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2 scores were measured and compared with clinical-pathologic characteristics. For statistical analysis, the Spearman rank correlation and Mann-Whitney U tests were performed. Results Of the PET parameters, maximum SUV of primary tumors showed significant correlations with several clinical-pathologic parameters including serum prostate-specific antigen level (ρ = 0.71, P = .01), pathologic stage (ρ = 0.59, P = .043), and postsurgical CAPRA score (ρ = 0.72, P = .008). The overall PI-RADS score showed significant correlations with pathologic tumor volume (ρ = 0.81, P PET/MR imaging show good correlation with clinical-pathologic characteristics, such as postsurgical CAPRA score, which are related to prognosis in patients with newly diagnosed intermediate- to high-risk PCa. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  20. Effect of pretreatment prostate volume on urinary quality of life following intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevli, Connor; Narayanan, Ramkishen; Rambarran, Lisa; Kubicek, Gregory; Chevli, K Kent; Duff, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the effect of pretreatment prostate volume on urinary quality of life after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods A total of 368 men treated with prostate IMRT (77.4–81 Gy) were stratified into three gland volume groups, ie, 60 g (group 3). Post-IMRT urinary function was evaluated by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0 genitourinary guidelines at one year post-IMRT, and surveyed by the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) before treatment, and then at one month and one year post-IMRT. Results Late (one year post-IMRT) CTCAE version 4.0 genitourinary toxicity occurred in 11/368 (3.0%) men, but was not severe (grade ≥ 3); total toxicity was similar between the prostate volume groups (P = 0.86). Continuous prostate volume neither correlated with (P = 0.50) nor predicted late genitourinary toxicity (univariate odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.96–1.02). The total IPSS cohort, group 1 (60 g) had the highest pretreatment IPSS, but uniquely showed a better urinary symptom trend than the smaller volume groups, with similar IPSS from baseline to one month post-IMRT (P = 0.88) and improved post-treatment IPSS from baseline at one year (P = 0.003). Conclusion Pretreatment prostate volume and initial IPSS scores were not associated with increased late genitourinary toxicity after IMRT in our series. Patients with smaller prostates had an initial increase in urinary symptoms, but returned to baseline at one year. Larger prostate glands (>60 g) had comparatively worse pretreatment symptoms, but at one year showed an overall improvement in IPSS versus baseline. PMID:24400232

  1. A Randomized Phase 2 Trial of 177Lu Radiolabeled Anti-PSMA Monoclonal Antibody J591in Patients with High-Risk Castrate, Biochemically Relapsed Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    circulating tumor cells from whole blood of prostate cancer patients using geometrically enhanced differential immuno - capture (GEDI) and a prostate...name of the Principal Investigator, and study title. Thank you. Sincerely, Carla C. Belk, PhD, CIP Sr Research Protocol Analyst Th1s leiter has

  2. Adjuvant hormone therapy in patients undergoing high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Neimark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone leuprorelin with the Atrigel delivery system in doses of 7.5, 22.5, and 45 mg as an adjuvant regimen in high- and moderate-risk cancer patients who have received high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. Moderate- and high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer (PC patients treated with HIFU (n = 28 and HIFU in combination with hormone therapy during 6 months (n = 31 were examined.Results. The investigation has shown that leuprorelin acetate monotherapy used within 6 months after HIFU therapy can achieve the highest reduction in prostate-specific antigen levels and positively affect the symptoms of the disease. HIFU in combination with androgen deprivation substantially diminishes the clinical manifestations of the disease and improves quality of life in HIFU-treated patients with PC, by reducing the degree of infravesical obstruction (according to uroflowmetric findings and IPSS scores, and causes a decrease in prostate volume as compared to those who have undergone HIFU only. Treatment with leuprorelin having the Atrigel delivery system has demonstrated the low incidence of adverse reactions and good tolerability.

  3. Treatment outcomes and morbidity following definitive brachytherapy with or without external beam radiation for the treatment of localized prostate cancer: 20-year experience at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Richard A; Buckstein, Michael; Stone, Nelson N; Stock, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To present our treatment algorithm and 20-year experience in treating prostate cancer with brachytherapy since 1990, with focus on cancer-control outcomes and treatment-related morbidity. We selected patients treated for localized prostate cancer with brachytherapy, combination therapy with external beam radiotherapy, and adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy as prescribed by our Mount Sinai risk stratification and treatment algorithm. Outcomes were analyzed with respect to biochemical failure, distant metastases, prostate cancer-specific survival, and overall survival. Morbidity was assessed with respect to urinary, sexual, and rectal outcomes. In total, 2,495 patients met inclusion criteria. The 12-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failure was 83% (low risk: 90%, intermediate risk: 84%, and high risk: 64%); freedom from distant metastasis was 95%; prostate cancer-specific survival was 95%; and overall survival was 70%. On multivariate analysis, significant associations were found between cancer control and risk group, total biologically effective dose, and androgen deprivation therapy. With regard to morbidity, potency was preserved in 61%, and urinary symptoms improved in 35%. The 12-year actuarial freedom from urinary retention events was 90% and from severe rectal bleed was 93%. Brachytherapy, as administered via the Mount Sinai algorithm, remains an efficacious and benign treatment option for patients with localized prostate cancer of all risk groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosents@sutterhealth.org [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Hunt, Daniel [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sartor, A. Oliver [Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Pienta, Kenneth J. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gomella, Leonard [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Rajan, Raghu [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kerlin, Kevin J. [Community Clinical Oncology Program, Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Inc, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Dobelbower, Michael [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Donavanik, Viroon [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, Wilmington, Delaware (United States); Rotman, Marvin [State University of New York Health Science Center–Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Hartford, Alan C. [Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Michalski, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Seider, Michael [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Kim, Harold [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); and others

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for

  5. Treatment outcome of high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using intra-prostate fiducial markers for localized prostate cancer at a single institute in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeda Ken

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have confirmed the advantages of delivering high doses of external beam radiotherapy to achieve optimal tumor-control outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer. We evaluated the medium-term treatment outcome after high-dose, image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT using intra-prostate fiducial markers for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods In total, 141 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with image-guided IMRT (76 Gy in 13 patients and 80 Gy in 128 patients between 2003 and 2008 were enrolled in this study. The patients were classified according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-defined risk groups. Thirty-six intermediate-risk patients and 105 high-risk patients were included. Androgen-deprivation therapy was performed in 124 patients (88% for a median of 11 months (range: 2–88 months. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA relapse was defined according to the Phoenix-definition (i.e., an absolute nadir plus 2 ng/ml dated at the call. The 5-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival, the 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS, the 5-year overall survival (OS outcomes and the acute and late toxicities were analyzed. The toxicity data were scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The median follow-up was 60 months. Results The 5-year PSA relapse-free survival rates were 100% for the intermediate-risk patients and 82.2% for the high-risk patients; the 5-year actuarial distant metastasis-free survival rates were 100% and 95% for the intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively; the 5-year CSS rates were 100% for both patient subsets; and the 5-year OS rates were 100% and 91.7% for the intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively. The Gleason score ( Conclusions These medium-term results demonstrate a good tolerance of high-dose image-guided IMRT. However, further

  6. Favorable Local Control From Consolidative Radiation Therapy in High-Risk Neuroblastoma Despite Gross Residual Disease, Positive Margins, or Nodal Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, Matthew J., E-mail: mjferri@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Danish, Hasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Deng, Claudia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); George, Bradley A.; Goldsmith, Kelly C.; Wasilewski, Karen J.; Cash, W. Thomas [Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K.; Eaton, Bree R.; Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To report the influence of radiation therapy (RT) dose and surgical pathology variables on disease control and overall survival (OS) in patients treated for high-risk neuroblastoma at a single institution. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective study of 67 high-risk neuroblastoma patients who received RT as part of definitive management from January 2003 until May 2014. Results: At a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 26 patients (38.8%) failed distantly; 4 of these patients also failed locally. One patient progressed locally without distant failure. Local control was 92.5%, and total disease control was 59.5%. No benefit was demonstrated for RT doses over 21.6 Gy with respect to local relapse–free survival (P=.55), disease-free survival (P=.22), or OS (P=.72). With respect to local relapse–free survival, disease-free survival, and OS, no disadvantage was seen for positive lymph nodes on surgical pathology, positive surgical margins, or gross residual disease. Of the patients with gross residual disease, 75% (6 of 8) went on to have no evidence of disease at time of last follow-up, and the 2 patients who failed did so distantly. Conclusions: Patients with high-risk neuroblastoma in this series maintained excellent local control, with no benefit demonstrated for radiation doses over 21.6 Gy, and no disadvantage demonstrated for gross residual disease after surgery, positive surgical margins, or pathologic lymph node positivity. Though the limitations of a retrospective review for an uncommon disease must be kept in mind, with small numbers in some of the subgroups, it seems that dose escalation should be considered only in exceptional circumstances.

  7. Favorable Local Control From Consolidative Radiation Therapy in High-Risk Neuroblastoma Despite Gross Residual Disease, Positive Margins, or Nodal Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Matthew J; Danish, Hasan; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Deng, Claudia; George, Bradley A; Goldsmith, Kelly C; Wasilewski, Karen J; Cash, W Thomas; Khan, Mohammad K; Eaton, Bree R; Esiashvili, Natia

    2017-03-15

    To report the influence of radiation therapy (RT) dose and surgical pathology variables on disease control and overall survival (OS) in patients treated for high-risk neuroblastoma at a single institution. We conducted a retrospective study of 67 high-risk neuroblastoma patients who received RT as part of definitive management from January 2003 until May 2014. At a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 26 patients (38.8%) failed distantly; 4 of these patients also failed locally. One patient progressed locally without distant failure. Local control was 92.5%, and total disease control was 59.5%. No benefit was demonstrated for RT doses over 21.6 Gy with respect to local relapse-free survival (P=.55), disease-free survival (P=.22), or OS (P=.72). With respect to local relapse-free survival, disease-free survival, and OS, no disadvantage was seen for positive lymph nodes on surgical pathology, positive surgical margins, or gross residual disease. Of the patients with gross residual disease, 75% (6 of 8) went on to have no evidence of disease at time of last follow-up, and the 2 patients who failed did so distantly. Patients with high-risk neuroblastoma in this series maintained excellent local control, with no benefit demonstrated for radiation doses over 21.6 Gy, and no disadvantage demonstrated for gross residual disease after surgery, positive surgical margins, or pathologic lymph node positivity. Though the limitations of a retrospective review for an uncommon disease must be kept in mind, with small numbers in some of the subgroups, it seems that dose escalation should be considered only in exceptional circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eunpi [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Mostaghel, Elahe A. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kurland, Brenda F. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Marck, Brett T. [Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Matsumoto, Alvin M. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Dalkin, Bruce L. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Montgomery, R. Bruce, E-mail: rbmontgo@uw.edu [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  9. Effect of pretreatment prostate volume on urinary quality of life following intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chevli C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Connor Chevli,1 Ramkishen Narayanan,1,2 Lisa Rambarran,1 Gregory Kubicek,3 K Kent Chevli,1,2 Michael Duff11Cancer Care of Western New York, Cheektowaga, NY, 2State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, NY, 3University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USABackground: The aim of this study was to describe the effect of pretreatment prostate volume on urinary quality of life after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for clinically localized prostate cancer.Methods: A total of 368 men treated with prostate IMRT (77.4–81 Gy were stratified into three gland volume groups, ie, <30 g (group 1, 30–60 g (group 2, and >60 g (group 3. Post-IMRT urinary function was evaluated by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.0 genitourinary guidelines at one year post-IMRT, and surveyed by the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS before treatment, and then at one month and one year post-IMRT.Results: Late (one year post-IMRT CTCAE version 4.0 genitourinary toxicity occurred in 11/368 (3.0% men, but was not severe (grade ≥ 3; total toxicity was similar between the prostate volume groups (P = 0.86. Continuous prostate volume neither correlated with (P = 0.50 nor predicted late genitourinary toxicity (univariate odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.96–1.02. The total IPSS cohort, group 1 (<30 g and 2 (30–60 g, showed a similar IPSS trend of elevation from pretreatment baseline to one month post-IMRT (each P < 0.01, then a reduction to baseline at one year (each P < 0.01. Group 3 (>60 g had the highest pretreatment IPSS, but uniquely showed a better urinary symptom trend than the smaller volume groups, with similar IPSS from baseline to one month post-IMRT (P = 0.88 and improved post-treatment IPSS from baseline at one year (P = 0.003.Conclusion: Pretreatment prostate volume and initial IPSS scores were not associated with

  10. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Yamada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiotherapy (EBRT is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method.

  11. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Anna Lia, E-mail: alvalentini@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Gui, Benedetta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); D' Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Clementi, Valeria [Clinical Science Development Group, GE Healthcare, Milan (Italy); Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi [OU Clinic Radiobiology, I.F.C.A. Florence (Italy); Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value <0.05 was statistically significant. The patients' outcomes were verified in 2011. Results: MRSI documented MA in 84 of 109 and CM in 25 of 109 cases. LR showed that age, GS, stage, and initial and recent PSA had no significant impact on MRSI results which were significantly related to PSA values at the time of MRSI and to TEFRT. Patients were divided into three groups according to TEFRT: <1 year, 1-2 years, and >2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  12. Surgery for localized prostate cancer after renal transplantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hafron, Jason; Fogarty, James D; Wiesen, Ari; Melman, Arnold

    2005-01-01

    ... encounter more renal transplant recipients with prostate cancer. The incidence of prostate cancer in the renal transplant population is difficult to interpret because most transplant registry data were obtained before the existence of systematic screening. In the last update of the Cincinnati Transplant Tumor Registry and the Australian and New Zeala...

  13. A Biopsy-based 17-gene Genomic Prostate Score as a Predictor of Metastases and Prostate Cancer Death in Surgically Treated Men with Clinically Localized Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Lu, Ruixiao; Zhang, Nan; Quesenberry, Charles P; Shan, Jun; Han, Jeong S; Tsiatis, Athanasios C; Leimpeter, Amethyst D; Lawrence, H Jeffrey; Febbo, Phillip G; Presti, Joseph C

    2017-10-05

    A 17-gene biopsy-based reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay, which provides a Genomic Prostate Score (GPS-scale 0-100), has been validated as an independent predictor of adverse pathology and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP) in men with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PCa). To evaluate GPS as a predictor of PCa metastasis and PCa-specific death (PCD) in a large cohort of men with localized PCa and long-term follow-up. A retrospective study using a stratified cohort sampling design was performed in a cohort of men treated with RP within Kaiser Permanente Northern California. RNA from archival diagnostic biopsies was assayed to generate GPS results. We assessed the association between GPS and time to metastasis and PCD in prespecified uni- and multivariable statistical analyses, based on Cox proportional hazard models accounting for sampling weights. The final study population consisted of 279 men with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa between 1995 and 2010 (median follow-up 9.8 yr), and included 64 PCD and 79 metastases. Valid GPS results were obtained for 259 (93%). In univariable analysis, GPS was strongly associated with time to PCD, hazard ratio (HR)/20 GPS units=3.23 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.84-5.65; passociation between GPS and both end points remained significant after adjusting for National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Urological Association, and Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) risks (pcourse of management of their disease. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Updated results of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Pellizzon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic factors for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR according to the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The charts of 209 patients treated between 1997 and 2005 with localized RT and HDR as a boost at the Department of Radiation Oncology, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil were reviewed. Clinical and treatment parameters i.e.: patient's age, Gleason score, clinical stage, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group (RG for biochemical failure, doses of RT and HDR were evaluated. Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median RT and HDR doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. RESULTS: Disease specific survival (DSS at 3.3 year was 94.2%. Regarding RG, for the LR (low risk, IR (intermediate risk and HR (high risk, the DSS rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis prognostic factors related to DSS were RG (p = 0.040, Gleason score ≤ 6 ng/mL (p = 0.002, total dose of HDR ≥ 20 Gy (p < 0.001 On multivariate analysis the only statistical significant predictive factor for biochemical control (bNED was the RG, p < 0.001 (CI - 1.147-3.561. CONCLUSIONS: Although the radiation dose administered to the prostate is an important factor related to bNED, this could not be established with statistical significance in this group of patients. To date , in our own experience, HDR associated to RT could be considered a successful approach in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  15. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage treatment of local prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Krystyna; Ciezki, Jay; Klein, Eric A

    2011-06-01

    To present our initial experience with brachytherapy used as a salvage procedure for local recurrence of prostate cancer in the prostatic fossa after radical prostatectomy. The patients included 5 consecutive men who underwent brachytherapy as a salvage procedure after radical prostatectomy from December 2006 to March 2008. We used a technique of implanting the local recurrences similar to the American Brachytherapy Society Guidelines for implanting an intact prostate as definitive therapy. Two modifications were made related to the recurrence location: a rare need to manage urethral doses because the recurrence was typically perirectal, and more aggressive management of the dose to the rectum because of this proximity. All patients tolerated the brachytherapy procedure well and showed a decline in the prostate-specific antigen level, with a median nadir of 0.72 ng/mL at a median follow-up of 13 months. The postprocedural symptoms were minor and included limited new-onset urgency. At the last follow-up visit, all patients had prostate-specific antigen doubling times, which have been associated with long median survival times. Salvage brachytherapy for biopsy-proven local recurrence of prostate cancer is a technically feasible alternative to external beam radiotherapy for local control of recurrences in the prostatic fossa in selected patients after radical prostatectomy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the utilization of external radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in Andalusia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito, José; Linares, Isabel; Castillo, Isabel; Martínez, Miguel; Vargas, Pilar; Herruzo, Ismael; Medina, José Antonio; Palacios, Amalia; Bayo, Eloísa; Peracaula, Francisco; Jaén, Javier; Sánchez, José Antonio; Ortiz, María José

    2015-12-30

    Around 27,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed every year in Spain and 5400 die from this disease. Radiotherapy (RT), alone or combined, has proven to be effective as initial treatment in patients with localized disease. Our objective was to evaluate the use of external beam RT (EBRT) in our region, comparing the indication rate and irradiation rate and examining variability in its application among hospitals. We conducted a review of RT guidelines and indication studies for prostate cancer (% expected irradiation). Data were gathered from all twelve public healthcare centers in Andalusia (Spain) on RT-treated prostate cancer patients during 2013 (% actual irradiation) and from nine of the centers on RT discharge reports. Information was classified according to type of hospital, tumor risk category and RT treatment (technique, dosage, volume, toxicity). The estimated RT rate was 67 % (1289/1917), 43 % were aged > 70 years, 44.7 % had ECOG performance status of 0); 44.7 % had high-risk tumors; 57 % underwent RT associated with hormone therapy; 70 % of patients receiving RT were treated with 3D planning (30 % IGRT); and doses were 70-76 Gy in 70 % of cases and >76 Gy in 10.7 %. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were < grade 2 in 79 and 89 % of patients, respectively. An irradiation rate significantly below the mean for the study was found in four provinces. There was a significant difference among provinces in the distribution of risk groups. Underutilization of EBRT was estimated to be around 30 % in prostate cancer patients, with an elevated variability in irradiation rates among hospitals related to differences in available technology and in the distribution of patients with different risk levels. These data should be a matter of concern to regional health managers, given the negative and measurable impact on the survival of patients.

  17. Optimization of Prostate Biopsy: the Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Targeted Biopsy in Detection, Localization and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjurlin, Marc A.; Meng, Xiaosong; Le Nobin, Julien; Wysock, James S.; Lepor, Herbert; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Taneja, Samir S.

    2014-01-01

    significant cancer detection to 50% in low risk and 71% in high risk patients. In low risk men the negative predictive value of a combination of negative magnetic resonance imaging with prostate volume parameters is nearly 98%, suggesting a potential role in avoiding biopsy and reducing over detection/overtreatment. Among men with a previous negative biopsy 72% to 87% of cancers detected by magnetic resonance imaging guidance are clinically significant. Among men with a known low risk cancer, repeat biopsy using magnetic resonance targeting demonstrates a high likelihood of confirming low risk disease in low suspicion score lesions and of upgrading in high suspicion score lesions. Techniques of magnetic resonance imaging targeted biopsy include visual estimation transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy; software co-registered magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound, transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy; and in-bore magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy. Although the improvement in accuracy and efficiency of visual estimation biopsy compared to systematic appears limited, co-registered magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound biopsy as well as in-bore magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy appear to increase cancer detection rates in conjunction with increasing suspicion score. Conclusions Use of magnetic resonance imaging for targeting prostate biopsies has the potential to reduce the sampling error associated with conventional biopsy by providing better disease localization and sampling. More accurate risk stratification through improved cancer sampling may impact therapeutic decision making. Optimal clinical application of magnetic resonance imaging targeted biopsy remains under investigation. PMID:24769030

  18. MR-targeted TRUS prostate biopsy using local reference augmentation: initial experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, W.J.M. van de; Venderink, W.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.; Veltman, J.; Barentsz, J.O.; Futterer, J.J.; Cornel, E.B.; Huisman, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate MR-targeted TRUS prostate biopsy using a novel local reference augmentation method. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Tracker-based MR-TRUS fusion was applied using local reference augmentation. In contrast to conventional whole gland fusion, local reference augmentation focuses the highest

  19. Automatic Organ Localization for Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joshi, Sarang

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this study is adaptive radiation therapy (ART) for prostate cancer, in which the treatment is to be adjusted over time, based on CT images acquired on the treatment table before each daily treatment...

  20. Outcome and patterns of failure after postoperative intensity modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced or high-risk oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geretschläger Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the outcome and patterns of failure in oral cavity cancer (OCC patients after postoperative intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with concomitant systemic therapy. Methods All patients with locally advanced (AJCC stage III/IV or high-risk OCC (AJCC stage II who underwent postoperative IMRT at our institution between December 2006 and July 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The primary endpoint was locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS. Secondary endpoints included distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS, overall survival (OS, acute and late toxicities. Results Overall 53 patients were analyzed. Twenty-three patients (43% underwent concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin, two patients with carboplatin (4% and four patients were treated with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (8%. At a median follow-up of 2.3 (range, 1.1–4.6 years the 3-year LRRFS, DMFS and OS estimates were 79%, 90%, and 73% respectively. Twelve patients experienced a locoregional recurrence. Eight patients, 5 of which had both a flap reconstruction and extracapsular extension (ECE, showed an unusual multifocal pattern of recurrence. Ten locoregional recurrences occurred marginally or outside of the high-risk target volumes. Acute toxicity grades of 2 (27% and 3 (66% and late toxicity grades of 2 (34% and 3 (11% were observed. Conclusion LRRFS after postoperative IMRT is satisfying and toxicity is acceptable. The majority of locoregional recurrences occurred marginally or outside of the high-risk target volumes. Improvement of high-risk target volume definition especially in patients with flap reconstruction and ECE might transfer into better locoregional control.

  1. Bone Marrow Microenvironmental Control of Prostate Cancer Skeletal Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    implicate PTHrP derived from prostate cancer in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer metastasis to bone. This aspect of the project is complete...presented initial findings as an invited speaker at the Cancer Induced Bone Disease meeting in Chicago (abstract appended). There was a statistically...Affiliations: 1 Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, the University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI; 2 Departments of

  2. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, John G

    2010-08-24

    PURPOSE: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng\\/mL, Gleason score >\\/=7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  3. Online updating of context-aware landmark detectors for prostate localization in daily treatment CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiubin [College of Geographic and Biologic Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210015, China and IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Gao, Yaozong [IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In image guided radiation therapy, it is crucial to fast and accurately localize the prostate in the daily treatment images. To this end, the authors propose an online update scheme for landmark-guided prostate segmentation, which can fully exploit valuable patient-specific information contained in the previous treatment images and can achieve improved performance in landmark detection and prostate segmentation. Methods: To localize the prostate in the daily treatment images, the authors first automatically detect six anatomical landmarks on the prostate boundary by adopting a context-aware landmark detection method. Specifically, in this method, a two-layer regression forest is trained as a detector for each target landmark. Once all the newly detected landmarks from new treatment images are reviewed or adjusted (if necessary) by clinicians, they are further included into the training pool as new patient-specific information to update all the two-layer regression forests for the next treatment day. As more and more treatment images of the current patient are acquired, the two-layer regression forests can be continually updated by incorporating the patient-specific information into the training procedure. After all target landmarks are detected, a multiatlas random sample consensus (multiatlas RANSAC) method is used to segment the entire prostate by fusing multiple previously segmented prostates of the current patient after they are aligned to the current treatment image. Subsequently, the segmented prostate of the current treatment image is again reviewed (or even adjusted if needed) by clinicians before including it as a new shape example into the prostate shape dataset for helping localize the entire prostate in the next treatment image. Results: The experimental results on 330 images of 24 patients show the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed online update scheme in improving the accuracies of both landmark detection and prostate segmentation

  4. Prostate motion and isocenter adjustment from ultrasound-based localization during delivery of radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Albert Y C; Enke, Charles A; Ayyangar, Komanduri M; Raman, Natarajan V; Zhen, Weining; Thompson, Robert B; Li, Sicong; Nehru, Ramasamy M; Pillai, Sushakumari

    2005-03-15

    To study prostate motion from 4,154 ultrasound alignment fractions on 130 prostate patients treated with conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Each prostate patient was immobilized in a vacuum cradle. Daily treatment was verified by ultrasound scan after laser setup with skin marks and before radiation delivery by the same physician responsible for anatomic delineation during planning. Directional statistics were employed to test the significance of shift directions. Polar histograms showed the prevalence of prostate motion in superior-posterior directions. The average direction was about 27 degrees from the superior axis. The average changes of prostate position in superior to inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left to right (LR) directions and in radial distance were 0.25, -0.13, 0.03, and 0.92, cm respectively. Our data indicated that prostate motion was not patient specific, and its average magnitude remained virtually unchanged over time. Recommended planning target volume (PTV) margins for use without ultrasound localization were 0.90 cm in SI, 1.02 cm in AP, and 0.80 cm in LR directions. Ultrasound localization revealed a predominance of prostate shift from planning position in the superior-posterior direction, with an average closer to the superior axis. The motion data provides recommended margins for PTV.

  5. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin and Bevacizumab Followed by Concomitant Chemoradiation and Surgical Resection in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with High Risk of Recurrence - A Phase II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; Piringer, Gudrun; DE Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jörg; Samonigg, Hellmut; Sölkner, Lidija; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab followed by concomitant standard chemoradiation and surgical resection in patients with high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined high-risk cT3/4 rectal cancer patients were treated with 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with capecitabine (1,000 mg/m2 twice daily days 1-14, 22-35, 43-56), oxaliplatin (130 mg/sqm on days 1, 22, 43) and bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg on days 1, 22, 43) followed by capecitabine (825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiotherapy days week 1-4) concomitantly with radiotherapy (1.8 Gy daily up to 45 Gy in 5 weeks) and surgical resection by total mesorectal excision. Feasibility, safety, response rate and postoperative morbidity were evaluated. Twenty-five patients were recruited. Median age was 62 years (range=24-78 years) and all patients had Eastern Cooperation Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0. From all patients, 79.2% finished neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty patients underwent surgery. Pathologic complete remission rate, R0 resection and T-downstaging were achieved in 25%, 95% and 54.2% of the "intention to treat" (ITT) patients. The most common grade 3 adverse events (AEs) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy were diarrhea (16.6%) and mucositis (12.5%). In one patient, a grade 4 acute renal failure occurred (4.2%). During chemoradiation, skin reactions (5.3%) were the most common grade 3 AEs. Two major perioperative complications required re-intervention. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with bevacizumab, capecitabine and oxaliplatin followed by concomitant standard chemoradiation is feasible in patients with high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and resulted in complete pathologic remission (pCR) rate of 25% and neoadjuvant chemotherapy completion rate of 80%. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. A comparative study of erectile function and use of erectile aids in high-risk prostate cancer patients after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby-Deglum, Marie; Brennhovd, B.; Axcrona, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Erectile function with and without use of erectile aids was compared in high-, intermediate- and low-risk prostate cancer patients at a mean of 3 years after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Materials and methods. A sample of 982 men who underwent RALP at Oslo Universi...

  7. Rectal Culture-Guided Targeted Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Post-Operative Infectious Complications in Men at High Risk for Infections Submitted to Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Biopsy - Results of a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeri, Luca; Fontana, Matteo; Gallioli, Andrea; Zanetti, Stefano Paolo; Catellani, Michele; Longo, Fabrizio; Mangiarotti, Barbara; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    The role of rectal culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis (TAP) in reducing infectious complications (IC) after transrectal-ultrasound prostate biopsy (TRUSPBx) is conflicting. We assessed the prevalence of IC in a cohort of men at high risk for IC submitted to TRUSPBx and treated with either TAP or empirical prophylaxis (EAP). Data from 53 patients at high risk for IC undergoing TRUSPBx were collected. Patients who did not receive a rectal swab (RS) were treated with EAP with fluoroquinolones (FQs). Of those who received the RS, patients with FQ-susceptible organisms received ciprofloxacin while those with FQ-resistant organisms received TAP. Office visits were scheduled to investigate the rate of complication at day 7 and 30 after TRUSPBx. Comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models detailed the association between clinical parameters and IC rate. Out of 53 men, 17 (32.1%) had RS while 36 (67.9%) did not. All RS cultures were positive for E. Coli and 4 (23.5%) reported FQ-resistant pathogens. Considering risk factors for IC, no difference was found in terms of CCI, rate of diabetes, UTIs or recent antibiotic utilization between groups. Overall, 12 (22.6%) men reported IC, with a greater proportion of them belonging to the group treated with EAP (30.6% vs 5.9%; p = 0.045). Of these, 9 (25.0%) patients, all treated with EAP, developed post biopsy UTIs. E. Coli sustained all UTIs and 7 (77.7%) were FQ resistant. At multivariable analysis, CCI≥1, a history of UTIs/prostatitis and recent antibiotic utilization (all prisk for post TRUSPBx IC. Patients at risk for IC, especially those with recent antibiotic utilization, CCI≥1 and a history of UTIs/prostatitis before biopsy, could benefit from TAP.

  8. Sorafenib or sunitinib as postoperative adjuvant therapy for Chinese patients with locally advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma at high risk for disease recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juping; Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Chongyu; Wang, Xiaojing; He, Hongchao; Wang, Haofei; Wu, Yuxuan; Zhou, Wenlong; Shen, Zhoujun

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of targeted agents (sorafenib and sunitinib) as postoperative adjuvant therapy in Chinese patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CC-RCC) who are at high risk for disease recurrence. Forty-three patients treated at our center between December 2007 and December 2010 with locally advanced CC-RCC who were at a high risk for disease recurrence were enrolled into the study. The criteria for high risk of CC-RCC recurrence postoperatively were defined according to the Mayo Clinic stage, size, grade, and necrosis (SSIGN) score for CC-RCC. After radical nephrectomy, patients received either sorafenib (group A, n = 20) or sunitinib (group B, n = 23) and were followed up for at least 1 year to determine the efficacy and safety of the test products. The duration of maintenance targeted medication treatment was approximately 1 year. Group C consisted of 388 CC-RCC patients treated at our center between 1992 and 2007, who were at high risk for disease recurrence and who received no adjuvant therapy. The demography characteristics were similar among the 3 groups. The overall rate of recurrence in groups A and B was not different (15.0% and 17.4% (P > 0.05), respectively), which was lower than that of group C (38.7%, P Disease-free survival (DFS) was longer in groups A and B (18.9 ± 5.9 months and 16.9 ± 6.1 months [P > 0.05], respectively), compared with group C (13.3 ± 7.2 months, P therapy included hand-foot syndrome, fatigue, diarrhea, taste disturbance, rash, hypertension, alopecia, stomatitis, neutropenia, nausea, pruritus, hypothyroidism in groups A and B. The adverse effects were mild in both groups and the incidence was not significantly different between groups A and B. Targeted adjuvant therapy postoperatively with sorafenib or sunitinib in patients with CC-RCC who are at a high risk for disease recurrence was well tolerated and effective in reducing the rate of CC-RCC recurrence in these patients. This study is an attempt

  9. Prognostic factors in the estimation of HIFU treatment efficiency in patients with localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popkov V.M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: To study the role of prognostic factors in the estimation of risk development of recurrent prostate cancer after treatment by high-intensive focused ultrasound (HIUF. Objects and Research Methods: The research has included 102 patients with morphologically revealed localized prostate cancer by biopsy. They have been on treatment in Clinic of Urology of the Saratov Clinical Hospital n.a. S. R. Mirotvortsev. 102 sessions of initial operative treatment of prostate cancer by the method of HIFU have been performed. The general group of patients (n=102 has been subdivided by the method of casual distribution into two samples: group of patients with absent recurrent tumor and group of patients with the revealed recurrent tumor, by morphological research of biopsy material of residual prostate tissue after HIFU. The computer program has been used to study the signs of outcome of patients with prostate cancer. Results: Risk of development of recurrent prostate cancer has grown with the PSA level raise and its density. The index of positive biopsy columns <0,2 has shown the recurrence of prostate cancer in 17% cases while occurrence of prostate cancer in 59% cases has been determined by the index of 0,5 and higher. The tendency to obvious growth of number of relapses has been revealed by the sum of Glison raise with present perineural invasion. Cases of recurrent prostate cancer have been predominant in patients with lymphovascular invasions. In conclusion it has been worked out that the main signs of recurrent prostate cancer development may include: PSA, PSA density, the sum of Glison, lymphovascular invasion, invasion.

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood, may be administered to determine if a patient is at high risk for cancer. In this case, a biopsy is performed and ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related ...

  11. Thrombalexins: Cell-Localized Inhibition of Thrombin and Its Effects in a Model of High-Risk Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karegli, J; Melchionna, T; Farrar, C A; Greenlaw, R; Smolarek, D; Horsfield, C; Charif, R; McVey, J H; Dorling, A; Sacks, S H; Smith, R A G

    2017-01-01

    Allograft transplantation into sensitized recipients with antidonor antibodies results in accelerated antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), complement activation, and graft thrombosis. We have developed a membrane-localizing technology of wide applicability that enables therapeutic agents, including anticoagulants, to bind to cell surfaces and protect the donor endothelium. We describe here how this technology has been applied to thrombin inhibitors to generate a novel class of drugs termed thrombalexins (TLNs). Using a rat model of hyperacute rejection, we investigated the potential of one such inhibitor (thrombalexin-1 [TLN-1]) to prevent acute antibody-mediated thrombosis in the donor organ. TLN-1 alone was able to reduce intragraft thrombosis and significantly delay rejection. The results confirm a pivotal role for thrombin in AMR in vivo. This approach targets donor organs rather than the recipient and is intended to be directly translatable to clinical use. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  12. Results of low threshold to biopsy following high-intensity focused ultrasound for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Haddad

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: A low threshold to re-biopsy post-HIFU reveals a high local failure rate of 82%. Oncological efficacy is questioned, and using high threshold to biopsy may therefore be overestimating the effectiveness of HIFU as a primary treatment for localized prostate cancer.

  13. Ferromagnetic thermal ablation of locally recurrent prostate cancer: prostate specific antigen results and immediate/intermediate morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Viraj A; Shinohara, Katsuto; Carroll, Peter R

    2004-12-01

    Curative options for locally recurrent prostate cancer following external beam radiotherapy are limited due to the significant morbidity associated with surgical therapy. ThermoRods (Ablation Technologies, San Diego, California) are permanently implantable, 14 mm cobalt-palladium alloy rods that produce heat through oscillation of a magnetic field. The rod is designed to self-regulate the temperature to 70C by a temperature dependent magnetic transition (Curie effect). We determined whether patients with prostate cancer and local failure could be treated with thermal ablation of the prostate using this novel technology. A total of 14 men with an average age of 72 years (range 62 to 81) were enrolled in the study. All had biopsy proven prostate cancer with increasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) (1.0 to 10.3 ng/ml). The seminal vesicles were not routinely biopsied. Metastatic disease was assayed in all men with bone scan and in later patients with abdominopelvic computerized tomography. Patients had ThermoRods placed under transrectal ultrasound guidance, similar to brachytherapy. The pre-plan was rigorously followed to produce a 3-dimensional array with rods separated by 1 cm across the short axis. Patients were treated in a magnetic field for 1 hour. Urethral and rectal temperatures were also monitored and cooled appropriately. Serial PSA measurements and 6 month posttreatment biopsies were obtained after the procedure. Average time since radiation was 4.5 years. PSA nadir values after radiation were between 0.3 and 2.2 ng/ml. Prostatic temperatures were homogeneously increased greater than 50C, while rectal and urethral temperatures did not exceed 44C at any point. The urethral catheter was removed 2 weeks postoperatively in all cases. Six months after the procedure 8 of the 14 men (57%) had a PSA decrease to less than 0.1 ng/ml. Complications included urinary retention as well as incontinence. Incontinence was generally temporary and only 1 patient (7%) had

  14. Single High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Session as a Whole Gland Primary Treatment for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: 10-Year Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Limani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the treatment outcomes of a single session of whole gland high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa. Methods. Response rates were defined using the Stuttgart and Phoenix criteria. Complications were graded according to the Clavien score. Results. At a median follow-up of 94months, 48 (44.4% and 50 (46.3% patients experienced biochemical recurrence for Phoenix and Stuttgart definition, respectively. The 5- and 10-year actuarial biochemical recurrence free survival rates were 57% and 40%, respectively. The 10-year overall survival rate, cancer specific survival rate, and metastasis free survival rate were 72%, 90%, and 70%, respectively. Preoperative high risk category, Gleason score, preoperative PSA, and postoperative nadir PSA were independent predictors of oncological failure. 24.5% of patients had self-resolving LUTS, 18.2% had urinary tract infection, and 18.2% had acute urinary retention. A grade 3b complication occurred in 27 patients. Pad-free continence rate was 87.9% and the erectile dysfunction rate was 30.8%. Conclusion. Single session HIFU can be alternative therapy for patients with low risk PCa. Patients with intermediate risk should be informed about the need of multiple sessions of HIFU and/or adjuvant treatments and HIFU performed very poorly in high risk patients.

  15. Pre- and post-operative nomograms to predict recurrence-free probability in korean men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyong Kang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Although the incidence of prostate cancer (PCa is rapidly increasing in Korea, there are few suitable prediction models for disease recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP. We established pre- and post-operative nomograms estimating biochemical recurrence (BCR-free probability after RP in Korean men with clinically localized PCa. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Our sampling frame included 3,034 consecutive men with clinically localized PCa who underwent RP at our tertiary centers from June 2004 through July 2011. After inappropriate data exclusion, we evaluated 2,867 patients for the development of nomograms. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to develop pre- and post-operative nomograms that predict BCR-free probability. Finally, we resampled from our study cohort 200 times to determine the accuracy of our nomograms on internal validation, which were designated with concordance index (c-index and further represented by calibration plots. RESULTS: Over a median of 47 months of follow-up, the estimated BCR-free rate was 87.8% (1 year, 83.8% (2 year, and 72.5% (5 year. In the pre-operative model, Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA, the proportion of positive biopsy cores, clinical T3a and biopsy Gleason score (GS were independent predictive factors for BCR, while all relevant predictive factors (PSA, extra-prostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastasis, surgical margin, and pathologic GS were associated with BCR in the post-operative model. The c-index representing predictive accuracy was 0.792 (pre- and 0.821 (post-operative, showing good fit in the calibration plots. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, we developed pre- and post-operative nomograms predicting BCR-free probability after RP in a large Korean cohort with clinically localized PCa. These nomograms will be provided as the mobile application-based SNUH Prostate Cancer Calculator. Our nomograms can determine patients at high risk of disease recurrence

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Robot-Guided, Software Based Transperineal MRI/TRUS Fusion Biopsy of the Prostate in a High Risk Population of Previously Biopsy Negative Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Kroenig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In this study, we compared prostate cancer detection rates between MRI-TRUS fusion targeted and systematic biopsies using a robot-guided, software based transperineal approach. Methods and Patients. 52 patients received a MRIT/TRUS fusion followed by a systematic volume adapted biopsy using the same robot-guided transperineal approach. The primary outcome was the detection rate of clinically significant disease (Gleason grade ≥ 4. Secondary outcomes were detection rate of all cancers, sampling efficiency and utility, and serious adverse event rate. Patients received no antibiotic prophylaxis. Results. From 52 patients, 519 targeted biopsies from 135 lesions and 1561 random biopsies were generated (total n=2080. Overall detection rate of clinically significant PCa was 44.2% (23/52 and 50.0% (26/52 for target and random biopsy, respectively. Sampling efficiency as the median number of cores needed to detect clinically significant prostate cancer was 9 for target (IQR: 6–14.0 and 32 (IQR: 24–32 for random biopsy. The utility as the number of additionally detected clinically significant PCa cases by either strategy was 0% (0/52 for target and 3.9% (2/52 for random biopsy. Conclusions. MRI/TRUS fusion based target biopsy did not show an advantage in the overall detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer.

  17. Clinical outcome of interstitial pulsed dose rate brachytherapy in multimodality treatment of locally advanced primary or recurrent rectal and sigmoid cancer with high risk of incomplete microscopic resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Rasmussen, Peter Christian; Tanderup, Kari; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Fokdal, Lars; Laurberg, Søren; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the role of interstitial pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT) in multimodality treatment of locally advanced primary or recurrent rectal and sigmoid cancer with high risk of microscopic incomplete resection (R1). A total of 73 consecutive patients (recurrent/primary: 40/33) were treated with PDR-BT between 2001 and 2010. Patients received preoperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and concomitant chemotherapy. Following resection of the tumor and the involved pelvic organs, a median of four (3-8) catheters were sutured to the tumor bed with a distance of approximately 1 cm between the catheters. A target respecting the catheters with a margin of 5 mm was contoured on computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D) dose planning with a planning aim for BT of D90 > 30 Gy, (0.6 Gy/pulse, 1 pulse/h) was performed. Previously irradiated patients (27%) underwent surgery that was directly followed by PDR-BT. Postoperative EBRT was then applied to the tumor bed 3-5 weeks after PDR-BT. A total of 23 patients (31%) received a radical resection (R0) and 45 patients (62%) received an R1 resection. Five patients (7%) received a macroscopic incomplete resection (R2). The five-year overall survival was 33%. Local control at five years was 67% for patients who received a R0 resection and 32% for patients who received an R1 resection. The five-year actuarial risk of a grade 3-4 BT-related complication was 5%. Meaningful disease control and survival can be obtained at an acceptable rate of late morbidity in selected patients with locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal or sigmoid cancer using (chemo) RT, extensive surgery and PDR-BT when a high risk of an R1 resection is expected.

  18. Economic analysis of active surveillance for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun; Dall'Era, Marc A; Evans, Christopher P

    2012-05-01

    Active surveillance is gaining wider acceptance in the urologic community as an effective treatment option for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. The purpose of this review is to analyze the economics of active surveillance in comparison with other therapies. Evaluating the economics of active surveillance in patients with low-risk prostate cancer is constrained by a prolonged natural history of disease. Recent cost model studies using hypothetical patients with low-risk prostate cancer showed that the estimated direct cost of active surveillance over long term was the lowest compared with direct costs of immediate treatment with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy, primary androgen deprivation therapy or brachytherapy. Active surveillance is associated with more quality-adjusted life years than immediate therapies with similar or lower lifetime costs. Physician reimbursement for active surveillance exceeded that from upfront radical prostatectomy after 3-5 years of follow-up and may be an important driving factor for physicians to practice active surveillance. Active surveillance appears to reduce prostate cancer healthcare expenditure by reducing the number of costly therapies. Results from clinical trials will allow the measurement of the true economic value of active surveillance in the future.

  19. Rectal Culture-Guided Targeted Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Post-Operative Infectious Complications in Men at High Risk for Infections Submitted to Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Biopsy - Results of a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Boeri

    Full Text Available The role of rectal culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis (TAP in reducing infectious complications (IC after transrectal-ultrasound prostate biopsy (TRUSPBx is conflicting. We assessed the prevalence of IC in a cohort of men at high risk for IC submitted to TRUSPBx and treated with either TAP or empirical prophylaxis (EAP. Data from 53 patients at high risk for IC undergoing TRUSPBx were collected. Patients who did not receive a rectal swab (RS were treated with EAP with fluoroquinolones (FQs. Of those who received the RS, patients with FQ-susceptible organisms received ciprofloxacin while those with FQ-resistant organisms received TAP. Office visits were scheduled to investigate the rate of complication at day 7 and 30 after TRUSPBx. Comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models detailed the association between clinical parameters and IC rate. Out of 53 men, 17 (32.1% had RS while 36 (67.9% did not. All RS cultures were positive for E. Coli and 4 (23.5% reported FQ-resistant pathogens. Considering risk factors for IC, no difference was found in terms of CCI, rate of diabetes, UTIs or recent antibiotic utilization between groups. Overall, 12 (22.6% men reported IC, with a greater proportion of them belonging to the group treated with EAP (30.6% vs 5.9%; p = 0.045. Of these, 9 (25.0% patients, all treated with EAP, developed post biopsy UTIs. E. Coli sustained all UTIs and 7 (77.7% were FQ resistant. At multivariable analysis, CCI≥1, a history of UTIs/prostatitis and recent antibiotic utilization (all p<0.04 were the most powerful predictors for ICs. In conclusion, we found that compared to EAP, TAP significantly reduces ICs, in men at high risk for post TRUSPBx IC. Patients at risk for IC, especially those with recent antibiotic utilization, CCI≥1 and a history of UTIs/prostatitis before biopsy, could benefit from TAP.

  20. SU-E-T-73: A Robust Proton Beam Therapy Technique for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Whole Pelvis Irradiation: Bilateral Opposed Single Field Uniform Dose (SFUD) Plan with Lateral Penumbra Gradient Matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, X; Wu, H; Rosen, L [willis knighton medical center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinical feasible and robust proton therapy technique to spare bowel, bladder and rectum for high-risk prostate cancer patients Methods: The study includes 3 high-risk prostate cancer cases treated with bilateral opposed SFUD with lateral penumbra gradient matching technique prescribed to 5400cGyE in 30 fx in our institution. To treat whole pelvic lymph node chain, the complicated ‘H’ shape, using SFUD technique, we divided the target into two sub-targets (LLAT beam treating ‘90 degree T-shape’ and RLAT beam treating ‘: shape’) in Plan A and use lateral penumbra gradient matching at patient’s left side. Vice verse in Plan B. Each plan deliver half of the prescription dose. Beam-specific PTVs were created to take range uncertainty and setup error into account. For daily treatment, patient received four fields from both plan A and B per day. Robustness evaluation were performed in the worst case scenario with 3.5% range uncertainty and 1, 2, 3mm overlap or gap between LLAT and RLAT field matching in Raystation 4.0. All of cases also have a Tomotherapy backup plan approved by physician as a dosimetric comparison. Results: The total treatment time take 15–20mins including IGRT and four fields delivery on ProteusONE, a compact size PBS proton system, compared to 25–30min in traditional Tomotherapy. Robustness analysis shows that this plan technique is insensitive to the range uncertainties. With the lateral gradient matching, 1, 2, 3mm overlap renders only 2.5%, 5.5% and 8% hot or cool spot in the junction areas. Dosimetric comparisons with Tomotherapy show a significant dose reduction in bladder D50%(14.7±9.3Gy), D35%(7.3±5.8Gy); small bowel and rectum average dose(19.6±7.5Gy and 14.5±6.3Gy respectively). Conclusion: The bilateral opposed(SFUD) plan with lateral penumbra gradient matching has been approved to be a safe, robust and efficient treatment option for whole pelvis high-risk prostate cancer patient which

  1. Low Temperature Plasma: A Novel Focal Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Hirst

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable advances in recent years for the focal treatment of localized prostate cancer, high recurrence rates and detrimental side effects are still a cause for concern. In this review, we compare current focal therapies to a potentially novel approach for the treatment of early onset prostate cancer: low temperature plasma. The rapidly evolving plasma technology has the potential to deliver a wide range of promising medical applications via the delivery of plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Studies assessing the effect of low temperature plasma on cell lines and xenografts have demonstrated DNA damage leading to apoptosis and reduction in cell viability. However, there have been no studies on prostate cancer, which is an obvious candidate for this novel therapy. We present here the potential of low temperature plasma as a focal therapy for prostate cancer.

  2. Long-Term Outcomes for Patients with Prostate Cancer Having Intermediate and High-Risk Disease, Treated with Combination External Beam Irradiation and Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Dattoli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Perception remains that brachytherapy-based regimens are inappropriate for patients having increased risk of extracapsular extension (ECE. Methods. 321 consecutive intermediate and high-risk disease patients were treated between 1/92 and 2/97 by one author (M. Dattoli and stratified by NCCN guidelines. 157 had intermediate-risk; 164 had high-risk disease. All were treated using the combination EBRT/brachytherapy ± hormones. Biochemical failure was defined using PSA >0.2 and nadir +2 at last followup. Nonfailing patients followup was median 10.5 years. Both biochemical data and original biopsy slides were independently rereviewed at an outside institution. Results. Overall actuarial freedom from biochemical progression at 16 years was 82% (89% intermediate, 74% high-risk with failure predictors: Gleason score (=.01 and PSA (=.03. Hormonal therapy did not affect failure rates (=.14. Conclusion. This study helps to strengthen the rationale for brachytherapy-based regimens as being both durable and desirable treatment options for such patients. Prospective studies are justified to confirm these positive results.

  3. HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND ABLATION OF PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Shaplygin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study the results of retrospective analysis of treatment of 311 patients in Samara Oncology Center in 2008–2011 with locally advanced prostate cancer are presented. According to the received treatment patients were divided into 3 groups: 103 underwent HIFU, 101 patients had a course of EBRT, 107 patients received only hormone therapy (HT. Overall survival in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after HIFU therapy was 86.2 %, after EBRT and HT – 66.3% and 18.1 %, respectively. These data indicate a high clinical efficacy of ultrasound ablation. 

  4. HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND ABLATION OF PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Shaplygin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the results of retrospective analysis of treatment of 311 patients in Samara Oncology Center in 2008–2011 with locally advanced prostate cancer are presented. According to the received treatment patients were divided into 3 groups: 103 underwent HIFU, 101 patients had a course of EBRT, 107 patients received only hormone therapy (HT. Overall survival in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after HIFU therapy was 86.2 %, after EBRT and HT – 66.3% and 18.1 %, respectively. These data indicate a high clinical efficacy of ultrasound ablation. 

  5. The Personal Patient Profile-Prostate decision support for men with localized prostate cancer: a multi-center randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donna L; Halpenny, Barbara; Hong, Fangxin; Wolpin, Seth; Lober, William B; Russell, Kenneth J; Ellis, William J; Govindarajulu, Usha; Bosco, Jaclyn; Davison, B Joyce; Bennett, Gerald; Terris, Martha K; Barsevick, Andrea; Lin, Daniel W; Yang, Claire C; Swanson, Greg

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this trial was to compare usual patient education plus the Internet-based Personal Patient Profile-Prostate, vs. usual education alone, on conflict associated with decision making, plus explore time-to-treatment, and treatment choice. A randomized, multi-center clinical trial was conducted with measures at baseline, 1-, and 6 months. Men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer (CaP) who sought consultation at urology, radiation oncology, or multi-disciplinary clinics in 4 geographically-distinct American cities were recruited. Intervention group participants used the Personal Patient Profile-Prostate, a decision support system comprised of customized text and video coaching regarding potential outcomes, influential factors, and communication with care providers. The primary outcome, patient-reported decisional conflict, was evaluated over time using generalized estimating equations to fit generalized linear models. Additional outcomes, time-to-treatment, treatment choice, and program acceptability/usefulness, were explored. A total of 494 eligible men were randomized (266 intervention; 228 control). The intervention reduced adjusted decisional conflict over time compared with the control group, for the uncertainty score (estimate -3.61; (confidence interval, -7.01, 0.22), and values clarity (estimate -3.57; confidence interval (-5.85,-1.30). Borderline effect was seen for the total decisional conflict score (estimate -1.75; confidence interval (-3.61,0.11). Time-to-treatment was comparable between groups, while undecided men in the intervention group chose brachytherapy more often than in the control group. Acceptability and usefulness were highly rated. The Personal Patient Profile-Prostate is the first intervention to significantly reduce decisional conflict in a multi-center trial of American men with newly diagnosed localized CaP. Our findings support efficacy of P3P for addressing decision uncertainty and facilitating patient selection of

  6. Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy in flattening filter-free mode for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer patients: Are 2 arcs better than 1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Dominique; Mestrovic, Ante; Alexander, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    In preparation for a phase 2 clinical trial of prostate cancer treatment with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans was investigated to determine the preferred delivery technique. VMAT treatment plans were generated with version 11 of the Eclipse treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator operating with 10-MV x-rays in flattening filter-free mode (FFFM). Plans were designed with pelvic computed tomography scans from 10 patients with prostate cancer with an assumption of low-, intermediate-, and high-risk target volumes. The prescription dose was set to 36.25 Gy to be delivered in 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy each. Dose-volume constraints imposed during optimization to protect organs at risk (OARs) were based on data from published studies and current SABR clinical trials. One-arc and 2-arc plans were compared in terms of dose homogeneity and conformity to the target volumes, dose to the OAR and to the surrounding normal tissue, the total number of monitor units required, and overall treatment time. Clinically acceptable VMAT-FFFM-based SABR regimens were produced for all low-, intermediate-, and high-risk target volumes using both 1-arc and 2-arc deliveries. No significant dosimetric differences in terms of homogeneity, conformity, or dose to the OAR were observed between 1-arc and 2-arc deliveries, but treatment times were twice as long for 2-arc deliveries and consistently required more monitor units. Given the similar dosimetry between 1- and 2-arc plans, single-arc delivery of VMAT-FFFM may be preferable to minimize the risk of intrafraction motion and reduce leakage and scatter radiation to the patient. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Statewide Intervention Improves Appropriate Imaging in Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Patrick; Dhir, Apoorv; Gao, Yuqing; Drabik, Brian; Lim, Kenneth; Curry, Jon; Womble, Paul R; Linsell, Susan M; Brachulis, Andrew; Sexton, Donald W; Ghani, Khurshid R; Denton, Brian T; Miller, David C; Montie, James E

    2017-05-01

    We implemented a statewide intervention to improve imaging utilization for the staging of patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. MUSIC (Michigan Urological Surgery Improvement Collaborative) is a quality improvement collaborative comprising 42 diverse practices representing approximately 85% of the urologists in Michigan. MUSIC has developed imaging appropriateness criteria (prostate specific antigen greater than 20 ng/ml, Gleason score 7 or higher and clinical stage T3 or higher) which minimize unnecessary imaging with bone scan and computerized tomography. After baseline rates of radiographic staging were established in 2012 and 2013, we used multidimensional interventions to deploy these criteria in 2014. Imaging utilization was then remeasured in 2015 to evaluate for changes in practice patterns. A total of 10,554 newly diagnosed patients with prostate cancer were entered into the MUSIC registry from January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2013 and January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015. Of these patients 7,442 (79%) and 7,312 (78%) met our criteria to avoid bone scan and computerized tomography imaging, respectively. The use of bone scan imaging when not indicated decreased from 11.0% at baseline to 6.5% after interventions (p bone scans and computerized tomography among men at low risk for metastases. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antiandrogen monotherapy in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; McLeod, David G; See, William A

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once-daily as immediate hormonal therapy in patients with prostate cancer or as adjuvant to radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once-daily as immediate hormonal therapy in patients with prostate cancer or as adjuvant to radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy....

  9. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oussama M. eDarwish

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA. Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostate cancer but from other causes. Despite this, a vast majority of patients with BCR are empirically treated with non-curable systemic androgen deprivation therapy, with its myriad of real and potential side effects. In this review article, we examined the very definition of BCR after definitive local therapy, the current status of imaging studies in its evaluation, the need for additional therapies and the factors involved in the decision making in the choice of additional therapies. This review aims to help clinicians with the management of patients with BCR. The assessment of prognostic factors including absolute PSA level, time to recurrence, PSA kinetics, multivariable nomograms, imaging, and biopsy of the prostatic bed may help stratify the patients into localized or systemic recurrence. Patients with low risk of systemic disease may be cured by a salvage local therapy, while those with higher risk of systemic disease may be offered the option of androgen deprivation therapy or a clinical trial. An algorithm incorporating these factors is presented.

  10. Analysis of p53 expression and proliferative assessment using PCNA in localized prostate carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite K.R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgical specimens from 51 men submitted to radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer were examined by immunohistochemistry using proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA monoclonal antibody to evaluate the proliferative index (PI. The relationship between PI, biological variables and p53 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. PI was low in invasive localized prostate carcinoma (mean, 12.4% and the incidence of PCNA-positive cells was significantly higher in tumors with p53 expression (P = 0.0226. There was no statistical difference in PCNA values when biological parameters such as Gleason score, tumor volume, extraprostatic involvement, seminal vesicle infiltration or lymph node metastasis were considered. We conclude that proliferative activity is usually low in prostate carcinoma but is correlated with p53 immune staining, indicating that p53 is important in cell cycle control in this neoplasm.

  11. [F(18)]-fluoroethylcholine combined in-line PET-CT scan for detection of lymph-node metastasis in high risk prostate cancer patients prior to radical prostatectomy: Preliminary results from a prospective histology-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuber, T; Schlomm, T; Heinzer, H; Zacharias, M; Ahyai, S; Chun, K F; Haese, A; Klutmann, S; Köllermann, J; Sauter, G; Mester, J; Mikecz, P; Fisch, M; Huland, H; Graefen, M; Salomon, G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/CT using ([F(18)]fluorethylcholine (FEC) for lymph node (LN) staging in high risk prostate cancer (PCa) patients prior to radical prostatectomy (RP). Twenty patients with localised PCa and > or =20% LN risk according to a published nomogram were prospectively enrolled. FEC PET/CT was done minimum 14 d after prostate biopsy. Afterwards, open RP and extended pelvic LN dissection (ePLND) were performed. Clinical stage, Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) and biopsy Gleason Grading were assessed and histopathological evaluation of the RP-specimens and dissected LN has been performed. The results from PET/CT were compared with LN metastasis according to their anatomical site. Overall, 285 LN have been removed with a mean number of 15 nodes per patient (7-26). Of the 20 patients, 9 men were LN positive (45%), which corresponds to 31 positive LN with a mean size of 7 mm (0.8-12 mm). Dissection of the obturator fossa, external iliac artery/vein and internal iliac artery/vein revealed 36%, 48% and 16% of positive LN, respectively. FEC PET/CT did not detect one single positive LN, thus was false-negative in 31 metastasis and true negative in 254 LN. Based on our results which confirmed experience from the previous studies, FEC PET/CT scan did not prove to be useful for LN staging in localised PCa prior to treatment and should thus not be applied if clinically occult metastatic disease is suspected. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prediction of biochemical failure in localized carcinoma of prostate after radical prostatectomy by neuro-fuzzy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Goyal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To predict biochemical failure in localized prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy using preoperative variables. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients of early carcinoma of prostate underwent open retropubic radical prostatectomy from June 2002 to June 2006. Preoperative variables included age, family history, digital rectal examination, serum prostatic specific antigen (S. PSA, prostate biopsy Gleason score, MRI of pelvis variables like periprostatic extension, seminal vesical invasion, weight of gland and pathological stage. With application of neuro-fuzzy, these variables were fed into system as input and output, that is S. PSA at six months (predicted value was calculated. Neuro-fuzzy system is a system to combine fuzzy system with learning techniques derived from neural networks. Here, we applied Takagi Sugeno Kang model (TSK due to its close solution to our aim. All the patients were followed up for a minimum of six months. At six month S. PSA of all patients was done (observed value. Predicted and observed values were compared. Result: Predicted and observed values were plotted on 1:1 slop line. Coefficient of correlation was 0.9935. Conclusion: Coefficient of correlation is close to one. It indicates that the neuro-fuzzy is accurate in predicting biochemical failure in localized carcinoma of prostate after radical prostatectomy.

  13. A framework to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the NADiA ProsVue slope to guide adjuvant radiotherapy among men with high-risk characteristics following prostatectomy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shelby D; Stewart, Suzanne Biehn; Scales, Charles D; Moul, Judd W

    2014-07-01

    The NADiA ProsVue is a prognostic system that measures prostate-specific antigen slope to identify men at lower risk of clinical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. We developed a decision-modeling framework to evaluate its cost-effectiveness to guide the use of adjuvant radiotherapy (ART). We populated the model using patient-level data and external sources. Patients were classified as intermediate risk or high risk on the basis of Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment-Postsurgical (CAPRA-S) nomogram and then stratified by the ProsVue slope (≤2 pg/mL/mo; >2 pg/mL/mo) and receipt of ART. In sensitivity analyses, we varied the effect of the ProsVue slope on the use of ART and other model parameters. The cost-effectiveness of the ProsVue-guided strategy varied widely because of small differences in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) at 10 years. In the intermediate-risk group, when the use of ART decreased from 20% (standard care) to 7.5% among patients with a ProsVue slope value of 2 pg/mL/mo or less, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $25,160/QALY. In the high-risk group, the use of ART would have to decrease from 40% (standard care) to 11.5% among those with a ProsVue slope value of 2 pg/mL/mo or less to obtain a ratio of $50,000/QALY. The cost-effectiveness ratios were sensitive to varying benefits of salvage therapy, quality of life, and costs of ART and ProsVue testing. The effect of the ProsVue system on costs will be dependent on the extent to which ART decreases among men identified as having a low risk of recurrence. Its effect on QALYs will remain conditional on uncertain clinical and quality-of-life benefits associated with ART. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment decision-making by men with localized prostate cancer: the influence of personal factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donna L; Ellis, William J; Woods, Nancy Fugate; Schwien, Christina; Mullen, Kristin H; Yang, Claire

    2003-01-01

    For many men with localized prostate cancer, there is no definite answer or unequivocal choice regarding treatment modality. This high-stakes treatment decision is made in the context of great uncertainty. The purpose of this study is to systematically document meaningful and relevant aspects of treatment decision-making reported by men with localized prostate cancer. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 44 men who were within 6 months of a diagnosis of localized prostate cancer. Using content analysis and grounded theory analytic techniques, major aspects and processes of men's treatment decision making are identified and described. The participants reported their experiences beginning with influential personal history factors, followed by detailed descriptions of information gathering and the important influence of expected treatment outcomes and other individuals' cancer histories and/or shared opinions. Twenty of the 44 (45%) participants relied heavily on the influence of another's opinion or history to finalize a decision, yet only 10 of the 44 (22.7%) reported this individual to be their physician. A common process, "making the best choice for me" was explicated. Clinicians assume that men are making rational treatment decisions based on reliable information, yet this study documents a different reality. Patient education about medical therapies and the patients' own medical factors is not enough. A clinic visit dialogue that brings personal factors to the conversation along with medical factors can guide a man to making his "best choice" for localized prostate cancer.

  15. Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy for Localized Prostate Cancer in Asian Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, J; Hashimoto, Y; Kondo, T; Takagi, T; Inui, M; Nozaki, T; Omoto, K; Shimizu, T; Ishida, H; Tanabe, K

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for localized prostate cancer in renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and to determine the feasibility and efficacy of RARP in these patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 236 patients who underwent RARP for localized prostate cancer at our institution between August 2011 and July 2015 and identified 3 patients who were RTRs. We reviewed the available clinical data of the 3 patients. All patients underwent RARP successfully without any major complications. The mean operation time was 162 minutes (range, 127-195 minutes). The mean estimated blood loss was 52 mL (range, 30-75 mL); therefore, the patients did not need any perioperative blood transfusion. In all cases, graft function, as determined according to the serum creatinine level, was stable during and after the operation. Pathological examination showed negative surgical margins with organ-confined disease in all patients. We reported 3 RTRs with localized prostate cancer who were treated with RARP. RARP might be a feasible and effective minimally invasive technique for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in carefully selected RTRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Three-dimensional needle steering towards a localized target in a prostate phantom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abayazid, Momen; Shahriari, Navid; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-01-01

    Prostate biopsy and brachytherapy are commonly used for surgical interventions. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional (3D) pre-operative target localization algorithm and a real-time closed-loop control algorithm to robotically steer flexible needles with an asymmetric tip towards a real

  17. Consensus and differences in primary radiotherapy for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer in Switzerland. A survey on patterns of practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panje, Cedric M. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Dal Pra, Alan [Inselspital Bern, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bern (Switzerland); Zilli, Thomas [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva (Switzerland); Zwahlen, Daniel R. [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chur (Switzerland); Papachristofilou, Alexandros [Universitaetsspital Basel, Department of Radiation Oncology, Basel (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Matzinger, Oscar [Hopital Riviera-Chablais, Department of Radiation Oncology, Vevey (Switzerland); Plasswilm, Ludwig; Putora, Paul Martin [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT), with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is an established treatment option for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Despite high-level evidence from several randomized trials, risk group stratification and treatment recommendations vary due to contradictory or inconclusive data, particularly with regard to EBRT dose prescription and ADT duration. Our aim was to investigate current patterns of practice in primary EBRT for prostate cancer in Switzerland. Treatment recommendations on EBRT and ADT for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer were collected from 23 Swiss radiation oncology centers. Written recommendations were converted into center-specific decision trees, and analyzed for consensus and differences using a dedicated software tool. Additionally, specific radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques from the participating centers were assessed. The most commonly prescribed radiation dose was 78 Gy (range 70-80 Gy) across all risk groups. ADT was recommended for intermediate-risk patients for 6 months in over 80 % of the centers, and for high-risk patients for 2 or 3 years in over 90 % of centers. For recommendations on combined EBRT and ADT treatment, consensus levels did not exceed 39 % in any clinical scenario. Arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is implemented for routine prostate cancer radiotherapy by 96 % of the centers. Among Swiss radiation oncology centers, considerable ranges of radiotherapy dose and ADT duration are routinely offered for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer. In the vast majority of cases, doses and durations are within the range of those described in current evidence-based guidelines. (orig.) [German] Die Radiotherapie (RT) ist als Monotherapie oder in Kombination mit einer Androgendeprivationstherapie (ADT) eine etablierte Behandlungsoption fuer das lokalisierte und lokal fortgeschrittene Prostatakarzinom. Trotz der guten Evidenzlage durch zahlreiche

  18. Phase II trial of isoflavone in prostate-specific antigen recurrent prostate cancer after previous local therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Wei

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Data exist that demonstrate isoflavones' potent antiproliferative effects on prostate cancer cells. We evaluated the efficacy of isoflavone in patients with PSA recurrent prostate cancer after prior therapy. We postulated that isoflavone therapy would slow the rate of rise of serum PSA. Methods- Twenty patients with rising PSA after prior local therapy were enrolled in this open-labeled, Phase II, nonrandomized trial (Trial registration # NCT00596895. Patients were treated with soy milk containing 47 mg of isoflavonoid per 8 oz serving three times per day for 12 months. Serum PSA, testosterone, lipids, isoflavone levels (genistein, daidzein, and equol, and quality of life (QOL were measured at various time points from 0 to 12 months. PSA outcome was evaluated. Results- Within the mixed regression model, it was estimated that PSA had increased 56% per year before study entry and only increased 20% per year for the 12-month study period (p = 0.05. Specifically, the slope of PSA after study entry was significantly lower than that before study entry in 6 patients and the slope of PSA after study entry was significantly higher than before study entry in 2 patients. For the remaining 12 patients, the change in slope was statistically insignificant. Nearly two thirds of the patients were noted to have significant levels of free equol in their serum while on therapy. Conclusion- Dietary intervention with isoflavone supplementation may have biologic activity in men with biochemical recurrent prostate cancer as shown by a decline in the slope of PSA. This study may lend support to the literature that nutritional supplements have biologic activity in prostate cancer and therefore, further studies with these agents in randomized clinical trials should be encouraged.

  19. Race and Survival Following Brachytherapy-Based Treatment for Men With Localized or Locally Advanced Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkfield, Karen M., E-mail: kwinkfield@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen Minghui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi [21st Century Oncology, Inc., Fort Myers, Florida (United States); D' Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We investigated whether race was associated with risk of death following brachytherapy-based treatment for localized prostate cancer, adjusting for age, cardiovascular comorbidity, treatment, and established prostate cancer prognostic factors. Methods: The study cohort was composed of 5,360 men with clinical stage T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent brachytherapy-based treatment at 20 centers within the 21st Century Oncology consortium. Cox regression multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the risk of death in African-American and Hispanic men compared to that in Caucasian men, adjusting for age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, year and type of treatment, median income, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Results: After a median follow-up of 3 years, there were 673 deaths. African-American and Hispanic races were significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 and 1.79; 95% confidence intervals, 1.3-2.5 and 1.2-2.7; p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Other factors significantly associated with an increased risk of death included age (p < 0.001), Gleason score of 8 to 10 (p = 0.04), year of brachytherapy (p < 0.001), and history of myocardial infarction treated with stent or coronary artery bypass graft (p < 0.001). Conclusions: After adjustment for prostate cancer prognostic factors, age, income level, and revascularized cardiovascular comorbidities, African-American and Hispanic races were associated with higher ACM in men with prostate cancer. Additional causative factors need to be identified.

  20. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy: Safe and Effective Brachytherapy for Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demanes, D. Jeffrey, E-mail: jdemanes@mednet.ucla.edu [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Martinez, Alvaro A.; Ghilezan, Michel [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Hill, Dennis R.; Schour, Lionel; Brandt, David [California Endocurietherapy, Oakland, CA (United States); Gustafson, Gary [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used as the only treatment (monotherapy) for early prostate cancer is consistent with current concepts in prostate radiobiology, and the dose is reliably delivered in a prospectively defined anatomic distribution that meets all the requirements for safe and effective therapy. We report the disease control and toxicity of HDR monotherapy from California Endocurietherapy (CET) and William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: There were 298 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Two biologically equivalent hypofractionation protocols were used. At CET the dose was 42 Gy in six fractions (two implantations 1 week apart) delivered to a computed tomography-defined planning treatment volume. At WBH the dose was 38 Gy in four fractions (one implantation) based on intraoperative transrectal ultrasound real-time treatment planning. The bladder, urethral, and rectal dose constraints were similar. Toxicity was scored with the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.2 years. The median age of the patients was 63 years, and the median value of the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen was 6.0 ng/mL. The 8-year results were 99% local control, 97% biochemical control (nadir +2), 99% distant metastasis-free survival, 99% cause-specific survival, and 95% overall survival. Toxicity was scored per event, meaning that an individual patient with more than one symptom was represented repeatedly in the morbidity data table. Genitourinary toxicity consisted of 10% transient Grade 2 urinary frequency or urgency and 3% Grade 3 episode of urinary retention. Gastrointestinal toxicity was <1%. Conclusions: High disease control rates and low morbidity demonstrate that HDR monotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized prostate cancer.

  1. [Usefulness of urethral endoprosthesis in the management of urinary retention after brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkeni, W; Chahwan, C; Lenormand, C; Dubray, B; Benyoucef, A; Pfister, C

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a possible treatment for localized low risk prostate cancer. Although this option is minimally invasive, some side effects may occur. Acute retention of urine (ARU) has been observed in 5% to 22% of cases and can be prevented in most cases by alpha-blocker treatment. Several alternatives have been reported in the literature for the management of ARU following brachytherapy: prolonged suprapubic catheterization, transurethral resection of the prostate and also intermittent self-catheterization. The authors report an original endoscopic approach, using urethral endoprosthesis, with a satisfactory voiding status. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Prognostic correlation of cell cycle progression score and Ki-67 as a predictor of aggressiveness, biochemical failure, and mortality in men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Iván Henríquez; Parada, David; Gallardo, Pablo; Gascón, Marina; Besora, Arnau; Peña, Karla; Riu, Francesc; Arquez Pianetta, Miquel; Abuchaibe, Oscar; Torres Royò, Laura; Arenas, Meritxell

    2017-01-01

    Ki-67 is a proliferation marker in prostate cancer. A prognostic RNA signature was developed to characterize prostate cancer aggressiveness. The aim was to evaluate prognostic correlation of CCP and Ki-67 with biochemical failure (BF), and survival in high-risk prostate cancer patients (pts) treated with radiation therapy (RT). CCP score and Ki-67 were derived retrospectively from pre-treatment paraffin-embedded prostate cancer tissue of 33 men diagnosed from 2002 to 2006. CCP score was calculated as an average expression of 31 CCP genes. Ki-67 was determined by IHC. Single pathologist evaluated all tissues. Factors associated to failure and survival were analyzed. Median CCP score was 0.9 (-0-1 - 2.6). CCP 0: 1 pt; CCP 1: 19 pts; CCP 2: 13 pts. Median Ki-67 was 8.9. Ki-67 cutpoint was 15.08%. BF and DSM were observed in 21% and 9%. Ki-67 ≥ 15% predicted BF (p = 0.043). With a median follow-up of 8.4 years, 10-year BF, OS, DM and DSM for CCP 1 vs. CCP 2 was 76-71% (p = 0.83), 83-73% (p = 0.86), 89-85% (p = 0.84), and 94-78% (p = 0.66). On univariate, high Ki-67 was correlated with BF (p = 0.013), OS (p = 0.023), DM (p = 0.007), and DSM (p = 0.01). On Cox MVA, high Ki-67 had a BF trend (p = 0.063). High CCP score was not correlated with DSM. High Ki-67 significantly predicted outcome and provided prognostic information. CCP score may improve accuracy stratification. We did not provide prognostic correlation of CCP and DSM. It should be validated in a larger cohort of pts.

  3. Detection and localization of prostate cancer: correlation of (11)C-choline PET/CT with histopathologic step-section analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsad, Mohsen; Schiavina, Riccardo; Castellucci, Paolo; Nanni, Cristina; Corti, Barbara; Martorana, Giuseppe; Canini, Romeo; Grigioni, Walter; Boschi, Stefano; Marengo, Mario; Pettinato, Cinzia; Salizzoni, Eugenio; Monetti, Nino; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano

    2005-10-01

    -choline. Therefore, our data do not support the routine use of PET/CT with (11)C-choline as a first-line screening procedure for prostate cancer in men at high risk.

  4. Ten-year Biochemical Disease-free Survival After High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Four Different Generation Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, T.; Nakano, M.; Shoji, S.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-01

    HIFU has been recognized as a minimally invasive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to assess with a long-term outcome of HIFU for prostate cancer. From January 1999, a total of 657 patients who had HIFU with at least 2 year follow-up were treated with four different types of Sonablate® (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, USA) devices. Thirty-three patients were treated with Sonablate® 200 (S200) from 1999 to 2001, 406 patients with Sonablate® 500 (S500) from 2001 to 2005, 200 patients with Sonablate® 500 version 4 (V4) from 2005-2008 and 19 patients with Sonablate® 500 TCM (TCM) from 2007. Biochemical disease-free survival rate (bDFS) in all patients was 59% in 8 years. bDFS in 8 years in patients with S200 and S500 groups were 55% and 56%, and bDFS in 4 and 2 years in patients with V4 and TCM group were 72% and 84%, respectively. bDFS in low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 75%, 54%, and 43% in S200/S500 and 93%, 72%, and 58% in V4/TCM group. Negative prostate biopsy rate after HIFU was 97% in S200, 79% in S500, 94% in V4 and 100% in TCM group. HIFU as primary therapy for prostate cancer is indicated in patients with low- and intermediate-risk (T1-T2b N0M0 disease, a Gleason score of ⩽7, a PSA level of <20 ng/mL) and a prostate volume of less than 40 mL. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  5. Ten- and 15-yr Prostate Cancer-specific Mortality in Patients with Nonmetastatic Locally Advanced or Aggressive Intermediate Prostate Cancer, Randomized to Lifelong Endocrine Treatment Alone or Combined with Radiotherapy: Final Results of The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosså, Sophie D; Wiklund, Fredrik; Klepp, Olbjørn; Angelsen, Anders; Solberg, Arne; Damber, Jan-Erik; Hoyer, Morten; Widmark, Anders

    2016-10-01

    In high-risk prostate cancer (PCa), no study with observation times beyond 10 yr has demonstrated survival improvement after addition of prostatic radiotherapy (RAD) to endocrine treatment (ET) alone. To compare mortality rates in patients receiving ET alone versus ET + RAD. From 1996 to 2002, 875 Scandinavian patients with high-risk (90%) or intermediate PCa were randomized to ET or ET + RAD (The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7). After 3 mo with total androgen blockade in all patients, all individuals continued lifelong antiandrogen monotherapy. Those randomized to ET + RAD started prostate radiotherapy (70Gy) at 3 mo. PCa-specific 15-yr mortality represented the primary endpoint. Assessment of the combination treatment effect and prognostic factors was performed in competing risk analyses and Cox proportional-hazard models. RAD added to ET. With a median observation time of 12 yr, the 15-yr PCa-specific mortality rates were 34% (95% confidence interval, 29-39%) and 17% (95% confidence interval, 13-22%) in the ET and ET + RAD arms respectively (pprostatic therapy to lifelong antiandrogen therapy halves the absolute risk of death from prostate cancer from 34% to 17% 15 yr after diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. Adherence to the European Association of Urology clinical guidelines in a nationwide population-based study - GESCAP group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Veiga, F; Rodríguez-Antolín, A; Miñana, B; Hernández, C; Suárez, J F; Fernández-Gómez, J M; Unda, M; Burgos, J; Alcaraz, A; Rodríguez, P; Medina, R; Castiñeiras, J; Moreno, C; Pedrosa, E; Cózar, J M

    To assess the adherence to European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines in the management of prostate cancer (PCa) in Spain. Epidemiological, population-based, study including a national representative sample of 3,918 incident patients with histopathological confirmation during 2010; 95% of the patient's sample was followed up for at least one year. Diagnosis along with treatment related variables (for localized PCa -low, intermediate, high and locally-advanced by D'Amico risk stratification) was recorded. Differences between groups were tested with Chi-squared and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Mean (SD) age of PCa patients was 68.48 (8.18). Regarding diagnostic by biopsy procedures, 64.56% of all patients had 8-12 cores in first biopsy and 46.5% of the patients over 75 years, with PSA<10ng/mL were biopsied. Staging by Computer Tomography (CT) or Bone Scan (BS) was used for determining tumor extension in 60.09% of high-risk cases and was applied differentially depending on patients' age; 3,293 (84.05%) patients received a treatment for localized PCa. Radical prostatectomy was done in 1,277 patients and 206 out of these patients also had a lymphadenectomy, being 4.64% low-risk, 22.81% intermediate-risk and 36.00% high-risk patients; 86.08% of 1,082 patients who had radiotherapy were treated with 3D or IMRT and 35.77% received a dose ≥75Gy; 419 patients were treated with brachytherapy (BT): 54.81% were low-risk patients, 22.84% intermediate-risk and 12.98% high-risk. Hormonotherapy (HT, n=521) was applied as single therapy in 9.46% of low-risk and 17.92% of intermediate-risk patients. Additionally, HT was combined with RT in 14.34% of lower-risk patients and 58.26% of high-risk patients, and 67.19% low-intermediate risk with RT and/or BT received neoadjuvant/concomitant/adjuvant HT. Finally, 83.75% of high-risk patients undergoing RT and/or BT also received HT. Although EAU guidelines for PCa management are easily available in Europe, the adherence to their

  7. Patient educational technologies and their use by patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baverstock, Richard J; Crump, R Trafford; Carlson, Kevin V

    2015-09-29

    Two urology practices in Calgary, Canada use patient educational technology (PET) as a core component of their clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine how patients interact with PET designed to inform them about their treatment options for clinically localized prostate cancer. A PET library was developed with 15 unique prostate-related educational modules relating to diagnosis, treatment options, and potential side effects. The PET collected data regarding its use, and those data were used to conduct a retrospective analysis. Descriptive analyses were conducted and comparisons made between patients' utilization of the PET library during first and subsequent access; Pearson's Chi-Square was used to test for statistical significance, where appropriate. Every patient (n = 394) diagnosed with localized prostate cancer was given access to the PET library using a unique identifier. Of those, 123 logged into the library and viewed at least one module and 94 patients logged into the library more than once. The average patient initially viewed modules pertaining to their diagnosis. Viewing behavior significantly changed in subsequent logins, moving towards modules pertaining to treatment options, decision making, and post-surgical information. As observed through the longitudinal utilization of the PET library, information technology offers clinicians an opportunity to provide an interactive platform to meet patients' dynamic educational needs. Understanding these needs will help inform the development of more useful PETs. The informational needs of patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer changed throughout the course of their diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Case selection and outcome of radical perineal prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Holzbeierlein

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy continues to play a central role in the management of localized prostate cancer. The majority of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer will undergo radical prostatectomy. A decrease in the morbidity of this surgical procedure has been accomplished through an improved understanding of pelvic anatomy and a greater understanding of the natural history of prostate cancer. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been applied to radical prostatectomy (laparoscopic prostatectomy in order to further decrease the morbidity of this operation. What remains to be determined is whether this approach confers the same long term surgical outcomes as the open approach. One method which offers known long term outcomes coupled with decreased morbidity is the radical perineal prostatectomy. The purpose of this paper is to review the criteria for patient selection as well as outcomes of the radical perineal prostatectomy.

  9. Hormonal changes after localized prostate cancer treatment. Comparison between external beam radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, J; Celma, A; Placer, J; Maldonado, X; Trilla, E; Salvador, C; Lorente, D; Regis, L; Cuadras, M; Carles, J; Morote, J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on the hypothalamic pituitary axis of 120 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RP or EBRT exclusively. 120 patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. Ninety two patients underwent RP and 28 patients EBRT exclusively. We measured serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (T), free testosterone, and estradiol at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after treatment completion. Patients undergoing RP were younger and presented a higher prostate volume (64.3 vs. 71.1 years, p<0.0001 and 55.1 vs. 36.5 g, p<0.0001; respectively). No differences regarding serum hormonal levels were found at baseline. Luteinizing hormone and FSH levels were significantly higher in those patients treated with EBRT at three months (luteinizing hormone 8,54 vs. 4,76 U/l, FSH 22,96 vs. 8,18 U/l, p<0,0001) while T and free testosterone levels were significantly lower (T 360,3 vs. 414,83ng/dl, p 0,039; free testosterone 5,94 vs. 7,5pg/ml, p 0,018). At 12 months FSH levels remained significantly higher in patients treated with EBRT compared to patients treated with RP (21,01 vs. 8,51 U/l, p<0,001) while T levels remained significantly lower (339,89 vs. 402,39ng/dl, p 0,03). Prostate cancer treatment influences the hypothalamic pituitary axis. This influence seems to be more important when patients with prostate cancer are treated with EBRT rather than RP. More studies are needed to elucidate the role that prostate may play as an endocrine organ. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and hepatitis C virus among injection drug users who use high risk inner-city locales in Miami, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyde B McCoy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infection in hard-to-reach intravenous drug users, 199 subjects from high-risk inner-city locales, the so called "shooting galleries", were consented, interviewed, and tested in Miami, FL, US. Positive HIV-1 status was based on repeatedly reactive ELISA and confirmatory Western Blot. Positive HCV status was based on reactive ELISA and confirmatory polymerase chain reaction techniques. Overall, 50 (25% were not infected with either virus, 61 (31% were HIV-1/HCV co-infected, 17 (8% infected by HIV-1 only, and 71 (36% infected by HCV only. The results of the multivariable analyses showed that more years using heroin was the only significant risk factor for HCV only infection (odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval = 1.07, 1.24 and for HIV-1/HCV co-infection (odds ratio = 1.17; 95% confidence interval = 1.09, 1.26. This paper demonstrates that HIV-1/HCV co-infection is highly prevalent among so called "shooting galleries".

  11. Prospective evaluation of 18F-FACBC PET/CT and PET/MRI versus multiparametric MRI in intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer patients (FLUCIPRO trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambor, Ivan; Kuisma, Anna; Kähkönen, Esa; Kemppainen, Jukka; Merisaari, Harri; Eskola, Olli; Teuho, Jarmo; Perez, Ileana Montoya; Pesola, Marko; Aronen, Hannu J; Boström, Peter J; Taimen, Pekka; Minn, Heikki

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate 18F-FACBC PET/CT, PET/MRI, and multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) in detection of primary prostate cancer (PCa). Twenty-six men with histologically confirmed PCa underwent PET/CT immediately after injection of 369 ± 10 MBq 18F-FACBC (fluciclovine) followed by PET/MRI started 55 ± 7 min from injection. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were measured for both hybrid PET acquisitions. A separate mpMRI was acquired within a week of the PET scans. Logan plots were used to calculate volume of distribution (VT). The presence of PCa was estimated in 12 regions with radical prostatectomy findings as ground truth. For each imaging modality, area under the curve (AUC) for detection of PCa was determined to predict diagnostic performance. The clinical trial registration number is NCT02002455. In the visual analysis, 164/312 (53%) regions contained PCa, and 41 tumor foci were identified. PET/CT demonstrated the highest sensitivity at 87% while its specificity was low at 56%. The AUC of both PET/MRI and mpMRI significantly (p PET/CT while no differences were detected between PET/MRI and mpMRI. SUVmax and VT of Gleason score (GS) >3 + 4 tumors were significantly (p evaluable for staging, and PET/CT and PET/MRI demonstrated true-positive findings in only 1/7 patients with metastatic lymph nodes. Quantitative 18F-FACBC imaging significantly correlated with GS but failed to outperform MRI in lesion detection. 18F-FACBC may assist in targeted biopsies in the setting of hybrid imaging with MRI.

  12. Evaluation of Oxidative Stress Status and Antioxidant Capacity in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aldemir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidative stress status and antioxidant capacity in patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Material and Method: The prospective study consisting 24 men with PCa and 36 men with BPH. PCa or BPH were diagnosed histologically. Blood samples were obtained following an overnight fasting state. We evaluated and compared the total oxidant status (TOS, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, paraoxonase1 (PON1, arylesterase and total thiol levels of patients with PCa and BPH. Results: The mean age of BPH group was 67 ± 12 years and PCa group was 63 ± 8 years (p>0.05. No statistically significant differences were detected between the groups in terms of oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant capacity measured in the serum of patients including PON1, TOS, TAC, arylesterase and thiols levels (p>0.05 for all parameters. Discussion: Our results demonstrated that evaluation of these parameters in the serum of BPH and localized PCa patients may not be used as a marker to discriminate between these diseases.

  13. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yimei, E-mail: yhuang2@hfhs.org; Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 W Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  14. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  15. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months. Dis....... The future role of ultrasonically guided implantation in the management of prostatic cancer is discussed....

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... if a patient is at high risk for cancer. In this case, a biopsy is performed and ...

  17. Survival of men with clinically localized prostate cancer detected in the eighth decade of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, D A; Bahnson, R R

    1994-05-01

    We reviewed our experience with the management of men 70 to 79 years old with clinically localized prostate cancer to determine whether surgical candidates were likely to die of intercurrent disease soon after the disease was diagnosed. Of 101 men in the eighth decade of life who were surgical candidates by all criteria other than patient age 44 underwent radical prostatectomy, whereas 57 were managed by medical therapy including observation, radiation therapy and/or androgen deprivation. Five patients died in the surgical group at a median followup of 59 months, only 1 of whom died of intercurrent disease. Among 15 deaths in the medical group metastatic prostate cancer was the most common cause and all deaths from prostate cancer occurred more than 3 years after diagnosis. Survival for the surgical group was significantly better than that for the medical group during followup (p eighth decade of life did not frequently die of intercurrent disease, and experienced acceptable morbidity and mortality rates. We believe that men with localized prostate cancer should not be denied a radical operation based on age alone.

  18. Salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for prostate cancer local recurrence after external-beam radiation therapy: prognostic value of prostate MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvière, O; Sbihi, L; Gelet, A; Chapelon, J-Y

    2013-07-01

    To assess the prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Forty-six patients who underwent prostate MRI before salvage HIFU for locally recurrent prostate cancer after EBRT were retrospectively studied. HIFU failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value >nadir + 2 ng/ml (Phoenix criteria) or positive follow-up biopsy or initiation of any other salvage therapy. The following prognostic parameters were assessed: neoadjuvant hormone therapy, clinical stage and Gleason score of recurrence, PSA level and velocity at HIFU treatment, and six MRI-derived parameters (prostate volume, tumour volume, extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, tumour extension into the apex or anterior to the urethra). Two factors were significant independent predictors of salvage HIFU failure: the PSA level at HIFU treatment (p HIFU failure for locally recurrent prostate cancer after EBRT. Therefore, MRI may be useful for patient selection before post-EBRT salvage HIFU ablation. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Whole exome sequencing in 75 high-risk families with validation and replication in independent case-control studies identifies TANGO2, OR5H14, and CHAD as new prostate cancer susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyadi, Danielle M; Geybels, Milan S; Karlins, Eric; Decker, Brennan; McIntosh, Laura; Hutchinson, Amy; Kolb, Suzanne; McDonnell, Shannon K; Hicks, Belynda; Middha, Sumit; FitzGerald, Liesel M; DeRycke, Melissa S; Yeager, Meredith; Schaid, Daniel J; Chanock, Stephen J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Berndt, Sonja I; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2017-01-03

    Prostate cancer (PCa) susceptibility is defined by a continuum from rare, high-penetrance to common, low-penetrance alleles. Research to date has concentrated on identification of variants at the ends of that continuum. Taking an alternate approach, we focused on the important but elusive class of low-frequency, moderately penetrant variants by performing disease model-based variant filtering of whole exome sequence data from 75 hereditary PCa families. Analysis of 341 candidate risk variants identified nine variants significantly associated with increased PCa risk in a population-based, case-control study of 2,495 men. In an independent nested case-control study of 7,121 men, there was risk association evidence for TANGO2 p.Ser17Ter and the established HOXB13 p.Gly84Glu variant. Meta-analysis combining the case-control studies identified two additional variants suggestively associated with risk, OR5H14 p.Met59Val and CHAD p.Ala342Asp. The TANGO2 and HOXB13 variants co-occurred in cases more often than expected by chance and never in controls. Finally, TANGO2 p.Ser17Ter was associated with aggressive disease in both case-control studies separately. Our analyses identified three new PCa susceptibility alleles in the TANGO2, OR5H14 and CHAD genes that not only segregate in multiple high-risk families but are also of importance in altering disease risk for men from the general population. This is the first successful study to utilize sequencing in high-risk families for the express purpose of identifying low-frequency, moderately penetrant PCa risk mutations.

  20. PSMA, EpCAM, VEGF and GRPR as Imaging Targets in Locally Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Rybalov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this retrospective pilot study, the expression of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA, the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR in locally recurrent prostate cancer after brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT was investigated, and their adequacy for targeted imaging was analyzed. Prostate cancer specimens were collected of 17 patients who underwent salvage prostatectomy because of locally recurrent prostate cancer after brachytherapy or EBRT. Immunohistochemistry was performed. A pathologist scored the immunoreactivity in prostate cancer and stroma. Staining for PSMA was seen in 100% (17/17, EpCAM in 82.3% (14/17, VEGF in 82.3% (14/17 and GRPR in 100% (17/17 of prostate cancer specimens. Staining for PSMA, EpCAM and VEGF was seen in 0% (0/17 and for GRPR in 100% (17/17 of the specimens’ stromal compartments. In 11.8% (2/17 of cases, the GRPR staining intensity of prostate cancer was higher than stroma, while in 88.2% (15/17, the staining was equal. Based on the absence of stromal staining, PSMA, EpCAM and VEGF show high tumor distinctiveness. Therefore, PSMA, EpCAM and VEGF can be used as targets for the bioimaging of recurrent prostate cancer after EBRT to exclude metastatic disease and/or to plan local salvage therapy.

  1. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciezki, Jay P., E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org [Taussig Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A.; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L. [Taussig Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. Results: The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (P<.0001). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was 4.6% for EBRT, 1.1% for LDR, and 1.0% for RP (P<.0001). Conclusion: HRCaP treated with EBRT, LDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR.

  2. A Comparison Between Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, External Beam Radiation Therapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation, and Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Adjuvant or Salvage Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciezki, Jay P; Weller, Michael; Reddy, Chandana A; Kittel, Jeffrey; Singh, Harguneet; Tendulkar, Rahul; Stephans, Kevin L; Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Klein, Eric A

    2017-04-01

    We compare the efficacy and toxicity among the 3 major modalities available used to treat high-risk prostate cancer (HRCaP). From 1996 to 2012, 2557 HRCaP patients were treated: 734 received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), 515 received low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without ADT, and 1308 received radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without EBRT. Biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) were assessed. Toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The log-rank test compared bRFS and cRFS among the modalities, and Cox regression identified factors associated with bRFS and cRFS. Gray's test compared differences in late toxicity and PSCM among the modalities. Competing risk regression identified factors associated with PCSM. The median follow-up time and age were 63.5 months and 65 years, respectively. The bRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 74% and 53% for EBRT, 74% and 52% for LDR, and 65% and 47% for RP (P=.0001). The cRFS at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 85% and 73% for EBRT, 90% and 76% for LDR, and 89% and 75% for RP (P=.121). The PCSM at 5 and 10 years, respectively, was 5.3% and 11.2% for EBRT, 3.2% and 3.6% for LDR, and 2.8% and 6.8% for RP (P=.0004). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was 8.1% for EBRT, 7.2% for LDR, and 16.4% for RP (P<.0001). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ≥grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity was 4.6% for EBRT, 1.1% for LDR, and 1.0% for RP (P<.0001). HRCaP treated with EBRT, LDR, or RP yields efficacy showing better bRFS for LDR and EBRT relative to RP, equivalence for cRFS, and a PCSM advantage of LDR and RP over EBRT. The toxicity is lowest for LDR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for local prostate cancer recurrence after radical radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodkiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies salvage interstitial radiation therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, launched at the end of the XX century. In recent years, more and more attention is paid to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT as a method of treating local recurrence.The purpose of research – preliminary clinical results of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy applied in cases of suspected local recurrence or of residual tumour after radiotherapy.Preliminary findings indicate the possibility of using HDR-BT, achieving local tumor control with low genitourinary toxicity.

  4. Metrics for Local Community Planning and Evaluation: The Case for Observational Measurement of High Risk Rural Sub-Populations in Occupant Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Davidson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study is to examine the relevance of non-specific safety belt use data for interventions to rural teens and to pilot a data collection project to provide more specific data to traffic safety stakeholders and educators in rural areas.Methods: Twelve high schools in Southeast Georgia were used for observed safety belt data collection over a 16 month period. Observational surveys were conducted at the entrance to student parking lots of the studied schools in the morning or afternoon. Observers were trained and survey methods were standardized to maintain comparability between results.Results: Observational surveys revealed a safety belt usage rate of 38.6% among high schools teens at the studied high schools. Safety belt usage rates ranged from 9.5% to 66.9%. Observed safety belt use for female vehicle occupants was 48.4% compared to 35.6% for males.Conclusion: The observational survey results from this study support research showing that rural teens have lower safety belt usage rates than adults or urban teens. Despite efforts to target rural areas, programs must specifically target sub populations, especially rural male teens, in order to hold any traction. Because of the wide gap between measured safety belt use in rural Georgia (79.9% and the studied rural high schools (38.6%, local program planners must assess actual safety belt usage in their high risk rural teen population in order to use accurate metrics for intervention and education efforts. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(4:380-383.

  5. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer using Sonablate-500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Ohkusa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hideyuki; Nagata, Yoshihiro

    2005-03-01

    We evaluated 181 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for biochemical disease-free rate, safety, morbidity and predictors of biochemical outcome. A total of 181 patients underwent HIFU with the Sonablate-500 and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Biochemical failure was defined according to the criteria recommended by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel. The biochemical disease-free rates at 1, 3 and 5 years in all patients were 84%, 80% and 78%, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rates at 3 years for patients with pretreatment PSA less than 10 ng/ml, 10.01 to 20.0 ng/ml and more than 20.0 ng/ml were 94%, 75% and 35%, respectively (ppatients with localized prostate cancer, especially those with a pretreatment PSA level less than 20 ng/ml.

  6. Activated lymphocyte recruitment into the tumor microenvironment following preoperative sipuleucel-T for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Lawrence; Carroll, Peter; Weinberg, Vivian; Chan, Stephen; Lewis, Jera; Corman, John; Amling, Christopher L; Stephenson, Robert A; Simko, Jeffrey; Sheikh, Nadeem A; Sims, Robert B; Frohlich, Mark W; Small, Eric J

    2014-11-01

    Sipuleucel-T is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved immunotherapy for asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Its mechanism of action is not fully understood. This prospective trial evaluated the direct immune effects of systemically administered sipuleucel-T on prostatic cancer tissue in the preoperative setting. Patients with untreated localized prostate cancer were treated on an open-label Phase II study of sipuleucel-T prior to planned radical prostatectomy (RP). Immune infiltrates in RP specimens (posttreatment) and in paired pretreatment biopsies were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Correlations between circulating immune response and IHC were assessed using Spearman rank order. Of the 42 enrolled patients, 37 were evaluable. Adverse events were primarily transient, mild-to-moderate and infusion related. Patients developed T cell proliferation and interferon-γ responses detectable in the blood following treatment. Furthermore, a greater-than-three-fold increase in infiltrating CD3(+), CD4(+) FOXP3(-), and CD8(+) T cells was observed in the RP tissues compared with the pretreatment biopsy (binomial proportions: all P < .001). This level of T cell infiltration was observed at the tumor interface, and was not seen in a control group consisting of 12 concurrent patients who did not receive any neoadjuvant treatment prior to RP. The majority of infiltrating T cells were PD-1(+) and Ki-67(+), consistent with activated T cells. Importantly, the magnitude of the circulating immune response did not directly correlate with T cell infiltration within the prostate based upon Spearman's rank order correlation. This study is the first to demonstrate a local immune effect from the administration of sipuleucel-T. Neoadjuvant sipuleucel-T elicits both a systemic antigen-specific T cell response and the recruitment of activated effector T cells into the prostate tumor microenvironment. © The Author 2014

  7. Toxicity outcome in patients treated with modulated arc radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengua, Rafael E.; Gonzalez, Maria F.; Barahona, Kaory; Ixquiac, Milton E.; Lucero, Juan F.; Montenegro, Erick; Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Jaén, Javier; Linares, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This study evaluates the acute toxicity outcome in patients treated with RapidArc for localized prostate cancer. Background Modern technologies allow the delivery of high doses to the prostate while lowering the dose to the neighbouring organs at risk. Whether this dosimetric advantage translates into clinical benefit is not well known. Materials and methods Between December 2009 and May 2012, 45 patients with primary prostate adenocarcinoma were treated using RapidArc. All patients received 1.8 Gy per fraction, the median dose to the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, pelvic lymph nodes and surgical bed was 80 Gy (range, 77.4–81 Gy), 50.4 Gy, 50.4 Gy and 77.4 Gy (range, 75.6–79.2 Gy), respectively. Results The time between the last session and the last treatment follow up was a median of 10 months (range, 3–24 months). The incidence of grade 3 acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was 2.2% and 15.5%, respectively. Grade 2 acute GI and GU toxicity occurred in 30% and 27% of patients, respectively. No grade 4 acute GI and GU toxicity were observed. Older patients (>median) or patients with V60 higher than 35% had significantly higher rates of grade ≥2 acute GI toxicity compared with the younger ones. Conclusions RapidArc in the treatment of localized prostate cancer is tolerated well with no Grade >3 GI and GU toxicities. Older patients or patients with higher V60 had significantly higher rates of grade ≥2 acute GI toxicity. Further research is necessary to assess definitive late toxicity and tumour control outcome. PMID:25061516

  8. RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR PATIENTS WITH CLINICALLY LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER: THE REMOTE RESULTS OF TREATEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grygorenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work was to improve the treatment results among patients with clinically local and locally advanced prostate cancer while using neo-and/or adjuvant hormone- and radiotherapy.Materials and methods. Radical prostatectomy results estimation was conducted among 170 patients. An average survey period continued 35,99 ± 1,88 (1–102 months. An average age was 61,66 ± 0,45 (40–75 years. Moreover, after operation 125 (73,5 % patients proved to have clinically local forms of prostate cancer (рТ1а,b,c,2aN0М0 – 99, рТ2b,cN0М0 – 26, 25 (14,7 % patients – locally advanced forms (рТ3a,bN0М0 and 19 (11,2 % – generalized forms of prostate cancer (рТ4N0М0, рТ2а,bN1М0,. Metastases in pelvic lymph nodes developed among 10 (5,9 % patients. 43 (25,3 % patients with ІІ–III stages received neoadjuvant hormone therapy treatment due to maximum androgen blockade scheme. An average neoadjuvant hormone therapy duration: 10,14 ± 1,98 (1–60 months. The typical characteristic of modified radical prostatectomy is accurate ejection of urinary bladder neck and proximal area of prostatic urethra part from prostate gland. Already formed urethra-urethral anastomosis is additionally fixed to lateral part of endopelvic fascia.Results. An average 3-year survival made up 95,5 ± 3,5 %, 5-year – 84,1 ± 4,7 %, 7-year – 71,7 ± 6,8 % respectively. 3- and 5-year relapse-free survival comprised 87,05 ± 3,20 %, 79.64 ± 3,03 % 67,11 ± 3,93 % respectively. 5-year survival among patients with localized prostate cancer made up 97,18 ± 3,27 %. 48 (28,2 % patients proved to have biochemical relapse so that they were prescribed adjuvant hormone- and/or radiotherapy treatment. Gleason index ≥ and initial PSA level ≥ 20 ng/ml, and their combination are considered as significant factors that foresee Т > Т2 category and biochemical relapse. For рN+ category initial PSA ≥ 20 ng/ml level is principle. Frequency of disease relapse

  9. RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR PATIENTS WITH CLINICALLY LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER: THE REMOTE RESULTS OF TREATEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grygorenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work was to improve the treatment results among patients with clinically local and locally advanced prostate cancer while using neo-and/or adjuvant hormone- and radiotherapy.Materials and methods. Radical prostatectomy results estimation was conducted among 170 patients. An average survey period continued 35,99 ± 1,88 (1–102 months. An average age was 61,66 ± 0,45 (40–75 years. Moreover, after operation 125 (73,5 % patients proved to have clinically local forms of prostate cancer (рТ1а,b,c,2aN0М0 – 99, рТ2b,cN0М0 – 26, 25 (14,7 % patients – locally advanced forms (рТ3a,bN0М0 and 19 (11,2 % – generalized forms of prostate cancer (рТ4N0М0, рТ2а,bN1М0,. Metastases in pelvic lymph nodes developed among 10 (5,9 % patients. 43 (25,3 % patients with ІІ–III stages received neoadjuvant hormone therapy treatment due to maximum androgen blockade scheme. An average neoadjuvant hormone therapy duration: 10,14 ± 1,98 (1–60 months. The typical characteristic of modified radical prostatectomy is accurate ejection of urinary bladder neck and proximal area of prostatic urethra part from prostate gland. Already formed urethra-urethral anastomosis is additionally fixed to lateral part of endopelvic fascia.Results. An average 3-year survival made up 95,5 ± 3,5 %, 5-year – 84,1 ± 4,7 %, 7-year – 71,7 ± 6,8 % respectively. 3- and 5-year relapse-free survival comprised 87,05 ± 3,20 %, 79.64 ± 3,03 % 67,11 ± 3,93 % respectively. 5-year survival among patients with localized prostate cancer made up 97,18 ± 3,27 %. 48 (28,2 % patients proved to have biochemical relapse so that they were prescribed adjuvant hormone- and/or radiotherapy treatment. Gleason index ≥ and initial PSA level ≥ 20 ng/ml, and their combination are considered as significant factors that foresee Т > Т2 category and biochemical relapse. For рN+ category initial PSA ≥ 20 ng/ml level is principle. Frequency of disease relapse

  10. Impact of positive surgical margin on biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy in locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavit Ceylan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of surgical margin positivity on biochemical recurrence (BCR in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP. The medical records of all patients with locally advanced PCa that underwent RRP were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, digital rectal examination findings, prostate biopsy Gleason score, prostate volume, pre- and post-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels, definitive pathology Gleason score, surgical margin status, seminal vesicle invasion, perineural invasion, absence or presence of BCR, and the time to BCR were analyzed. The study included 130 patients. The final pathologic examination showed that seven (5.4% patients had T3a disease and 123 (94.6% had T3b disease. In all, 93 (71.5% patients had a positive surgical margin [SM(+], whereas 37 (28.5% patients had a negative surgical margin [SM(−]. Among the seven patients with pT3a disease, four (57.1% had SM(+, whereas 89 (72.4% of the 123 patients with pT3b disease had SM(−. BCR occurred in 11.8% (11 of 93 of patients with SM(+ and in 45.9% (17 of 37 of those with SM(− (p < 0.001. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that SM(+ was the only significant predictor of BCR following RRP (relative risk, 0.163; 95% confidence interval (0.062–0.433; p < 0.001. SM(+ in RRP specimens is not always indicative of BCR in patients with locally advanced PCa. RRP should be considered an effective treatment choice for selected patients with locally advanced PCa, despite the associated high SM(+ rate.

  11. Polyamine metabolism in prostate cancer : studies on localization, cell growth and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Schipper, Raymond Godfried

    2000-01-01

    The involvement of polyamines in cellular growth and differentiation has prompted many studies of their possible role in cellular neoplasia, including prostatic carcinoma and benign hyperplasia, which represent increasingly important pathologies in men. The precise role of the polyamine system in cellular physiology remains to be clarified. Insight in the exact (sub)cellular localization of polyamine metabolic enzymes might greatly contribute to the elucidation of the specific functions of po...

  12. Preclinical evaluation of intraoperative low-energy photon radiotherapy using sphericalapplicators in locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François eBuge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy is standard care for locally advanced prostatecancer (stage pT3R1. Intraoperative low-energy photon radiotherapy offers several advantages overexternal beam radiotherapy, and several systems are now available for its delivery, using sphericalapplicators which require only limited shielding. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibilityof this technique for the prostate bed.Materials & Methods: Applicators were assessed using MRI image data and cadavericdissection. In cadavers, targeted tissues, defined as a urethral section, both neurovascular bundlesections, the bladder neck and the beds of the seminal vesicles, were marked with metallic surgicalclips. Distances between clips and applicator were measured using CT. A dosimetric study of theapplication of 12 Gy at 5mm depth was performed using CT images of prostatectomized cadavers.Results: Using MRI images from 34 prostate cancer patients, we showed that the ideal applicatordiameter ranges from 45 to 70 mm. Using applicators of different sizes to encompass the prostate bedin nine cadavers, we showed that the distance between target tissues and applicator was less than 2mm for all target tissues except the upper extremity of the seminal vesicles (19 mm. Dosimetric studyshowed a good dose distribution in all target tissues in contact with the applicator, with a lowprobability of rectum and bladder complication.Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy of the prostate bed is feasible, with good coverage oftargeted tissues. Clinical study of safety and efficacy is now required.

  13. Dosimetry accuracy as a function of seed localization uncertainty in permanent prostate brachytherapy: increased seed number correlates with less variability in prostate dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Davis, Brian J.; Furutani, Keith M.; Herman, Michael G.; Robb, Richard A.

    2007-06-01

    The variation of permanent prostate brachytherapy dosimetry as a function of seed localization uncertainty was investigated for I-125 implants with seed activities commonly employed in contemporary practice. Post-implant imaging and radiation dosimetry data from nine patients who underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy served as the source of clinical data for this simulation study. Gaussian noise with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 10 mm was applied to the seed coordinates for each patient dataset and 1000 simulations were performed at each noise level. Dose parameters, including D90, were computed for each case and compared with the actual dosimetry data. A total of 81 000 complete sets of post-brachytherapy dose volume statistics were computed. The results demonstrated that less than 5% deviation of prostate D90 can be expected when the seed localization uncertainty is 2 mm, whereas a seed localization uncertainty of 10 mm yielded an average decrease in D90 of 33 Gy. The mean normalized decrement in the prostate V100 was 10% at 5 mm uncertainty. Implants with greater seed number and larger prostate volume correlated with less sensitivity of D90 and V100 to seed localization uncertainty. Estimated target volume dose parameters tended to decrease with increasing seed localization uncertainty. The bladder V100 varied more significantly both in mean and standard deviation as compared to the urethra V100. A larger number of implanted seeds also correlated to less sensitivity of the bladder V100 to seed localization uncertainty. In contrast, the deviation of urethra V100 did not correlate with the number of implanted seeds or prostate volume.

  14. SU-F-J-11: Radiobiologically Optimized Patient Localization During Prostate External Beam Localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y; Gardner, S; Liu, C; Zhao, B; Wen, N; Brown, S; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery with radiobiological response knowledge, and to evaluate its application during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Ten patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions with PTV = prostate + 7 mm margin, except for 5mm in the posterior direction. Five representative pretreatment CBCT images were selected for each patient, and prostate, rectum, and bladder were delineated on all CBCT images. Each CBCT was auto-registered to the corresponding PCT. Starting from this auto-matched position (AM-position), a search for optimal treatment position was performed utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (D98-DTV, NTCP-rectum, and NTCP-bladder) for the daily target volume (DTV), rectum, and bladder. DTV was defined as prostate + 4 mm margin to account for intra-fraction motion as well as contouring variability on CBCT. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The indices, averaged over the 10 patients’ treatment plans, were (mean±SD): 77.7±0.2 Gy (D98-PTV), 12.3±2.7% (NTCP-rectum), and 53.2±11.2% (NTCP-bladder). The corresponding values calculated on all 50 CBCT images at the AM-positions were 72.9±11.3 Gy (D98-DTV), 15.8±6.4% (NTCP-rectum), and 53.0±21.1% (NTCP-bladder), respectively. In comparison, calculated on CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the indices were 77.0±2.1 Gy (D98-DTV), 12.1±5.7% (NTCP-rectum), and 60.7±16.4% (NTCP-bladder). Compared to autoregistration, ROCS-optimization recovered dose coverage to target volume and lowered the risk to rectum. Moreover, NTCPrectum for one patient remained high after ROCS-optimization and therefore could potentially benefit from adaptive planning

  15. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) using Sonablate{trade mark, serif} devices for the treatment of localized prostate cancer: 13-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Tomonaga, Tetsuro; Shoji, Sunao; Kim, Hakushi; Nagata, Yoshihiro

    2012-11-01

    To report on the long-term results of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Eight hundred and eighty-four men with prostate cancer treated with Sonablate® (SB) devices were included. All patients were followed for more than 2 years. The patients were divided into three groups: in the first group, 419 patients were treated with SB200/500 from 1999 to 2006; in the second group, 263 patients were treated with SB 500 ver. 4 from 2005 to 2009: in the third group, 202 patients were treated with SB 500 TCM from 2007 up to present. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2 ng/ml). The mean age, PSA, Gleason score, operation time, and follow-up period in each group were 68, 66 and 67 years, 11.2, 9.7 and 9.3 ng/ml, 6.2, 6.6 and 6.7, 167, 101 and 106 min, and 56, 48 and 36 months, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rate (bDFR) in each group at 5 years was, respectively, 54%, 61% and 84%, and was 50% at 10 years in the SB200/500 group (p<0.0001). The bDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in all patients at 10 years were 72% and 58%, 44%, respectively (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the SB500 TCM group at 5 years were 97%, 83%, and 74% (p=0.0056). The negative prostate biopsy rates in 3 groups were 81%, 92% and 88%, respectively. As post HIFU complications, urethral stricture, acute epididymitis and urinary incontinence were noted in 18.0%, 6.2% and 1.9%, respectively. Rectourethral fistula was occurred in 0.6% in the first HIFU cases, Postoperative erectile dysfunction was noted in 27% of patients at 2 years after HIFU. HIFU therapy appears to be minimally invasive, efficacious, and safe for patients with localized prostate cancer. Technological advances as well as cultural and economic vectors have caused a shift from to minimally invasive techniques.

  16. Long-term Survival and Toxicity in Patients Treated With High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Josh; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term survival and toxicity outcomes with the use of high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 86.4 Gy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between August 1997 and December 2008, 1002 patients were treated to a dose of 86.4 Gy using a 5-7 field IMRT technique. Patients were stratified by prognostic risk group based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk classification criteria. A total of 587 patients (59%) were treated with neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 5.5 years (range, 1-14 years). Results: For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, 7-year biochemical relapse-free survival outcomes were 98.8%, 85.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P<.001), and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 99.4%, 94.1%, and 82.0% (P<.001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, T stage (P<.001), Gleason score (P<.001), and >50% of initial biopsy positive core (P=.001) were predictive for distant mestastases. No prostate cancer-related deaths were observed in the low-risk group. The 7-year prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) rates, using competing risk analysis for intermediate- and high-risk groups, were 3.3% and 8.1%, respectively (P=.008). On multivariate analysis, Gleason score (P=.004), percentage of biopsy core positivity (P=.003), and T-stage (P=.033) were predictive for PCSM. Actuarial 7-year grade 2 or higher late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were 4.4% and 21.1%, respectively. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was experienced by 7 patients (0.7%) and 22 patients (2.2%), respectively. Of the 427 men with full potency at baseline, 317 men (74%) retained sexual function at time of last follow-up. Conclusions: This study represents the largest cohort of patients treated with high-dose radiation to 86.4 Gy, using IMRT for localized prostate cancer, with the longest follow-up to date

  17. Translating a Prognostic DNA Genomic Classifier into the Clinic: Retrospective Validation in 563 Localized Prostate Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Emilie; Alkallas, Rached; Chua, Melvin Lee Kiang; Fraser, Michael; Haider, Syed; Meng, Alice; Zheng, Junyan; Yao, Cindy Q; Picard, Valerie; Orain, Michele; Hovington, Helène; Murgic, Jure; Berlin, Alejandro; Lacombe, Louis; Bergeron, Alain; Fradet, Yves; Têtu, Bernard; Lindberg, Johan; Egevad, Lars; Grönberg, Henrik; Ross-Adams, Helen; Lamb, Alastair D; Halim, Silvia; Dunning, Mark J; Neal, David E; Pintilie, Melania; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C

    2017-07-01

    Localized prostate cancer is clinically heterogeneous, despite clinical risk groups that represent relative prostate cancer-specific mortality. We previously developed a 100-locus DNA classifier capable of substratifying patients at risk of biochemical relapse within clinical risk groups. The 100-locus genomic classifier was refined to 31 functional loci and tested with standard clinical variables for the ability to predict biochemical recurrence (BCR) and metastasis. Four retrospective cohorts of radical prostatectomy specimens from patients with localized disease were pooled, and an additional 102-patient cohort used to measure the 31-locus genomic classifier with the NanoString platform. The genomic classifier scores were tested for their ability to predict BCR (n=563) and metastasis (n=154), and compared with clinical risk stratification schemes. The 31-locus genomic classifier performs similarly to the 100-locus classifier. It identifies patients with elevated BCR rates (hazard ratio=2.73, pNanoString assay. The study is limited to retrospective cohorts. The 100-locus and 31-locus genomic classifiers reliably identify a cohort of men with localized disease who have an elevated risk of failure. The NanoString assay will be useful for selecting patients for treatment deescalation or escalation in prospective clinical trials based on clinico-genomic scores from pretreatment biopsies. It is challenging to determine whether tumors confined to the prostate are aggressive, leading to significant undertreatment and overtreatment. We validated a test based on prostate tumor DNA that improves estimations of relapse risk, and that can help guide treatment planning. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Sedation With Local Anesthesia and Regional Anesthesia in Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Aghamohammadi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP is usually performed under regional or general anesthesia. An alternative to conventional anesthesia is performing of TURP under local anesthetic infiltration with sedation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and complication of sedoanalgesia in TURP. Material & Methods: In a prospective clinical trial from September 2006 to December 2007, 60 patients (30 in each group with prostate hypertrophy, candidate for TURP, were randomly assigned into two groups. In the first group, standard spinal anesthesia was done. In the second group, five minutes before the operation, 25 mgs of diazepam plus 25-50 mgs of pethedine was intravenously administered followed by injection of 10 ml lidocaine 2% gel in the urethra and the skin in the suprapubic area was anesthetized with 2 ml of 1% lidocaine. Using a 22 gauge nephrostomy needle, the suprapubic skin was punctured and the needle was directed toward prostate apex and 10-20ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at the serosal aspect of the rectal wall. For dorsal nerve block, 5-10ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at penopubic junction, and then a standard TURP was performed. Patients were switched to another anesthetic technique if the selected technique failed. Severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale. Results: The average prostate size was 25 grs (range10-50grs in the local anesthetic group (group 1 and 27.5 grs (range 10-50 grs in the spinal group (group2. In the local anesthetic group, 82.3% had no or mild pain while moderate to severe pain was reported in 16, 7% of the patients. In the group with spinal anesthesia, these were 93.1% and 6.9% respectively. Intolerable pain was observed in 23.3% and 13.8% of groups 1 and 2 respectively (p>0.05. Two patients in spinal group and 5 in local anesthetic group (3 due to severe pain and 2 for unsatisfaction required conversion to general anesthesia or receiving

  19. Does increased local bone resorption secondary to breast and prostate cancer result in increased cartilage degradation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, Diana J; Byrjalsen, Inger; Qvist, Per

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast and prostate cancer patients often develop lesions of locally high bone turnover, when the primary tumor metastasizes to the bone causing an abnormal high bone resorption at this site. The objective of the present study was to determine whether local increased bone turnover...... experiments revealed that osteoclasts released CTXI fragments but not CTXII from bone specimens. The same was observed for cathepsin K. CONCLUSION: Data suggest that an uncoupling between bone resorption and cartilage degradation occurs in breast and lung cancer patient....

  20. Minimally Invasive Ablative Therapies for Definitive Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer in the Primary Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene W. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the patient with a new diagnosis of localized prostate cancer faces either radical therapy, in the form of surgery or radiation, or active surveillance. A growing subset of these men may not be willing to accept the psychological burden of active surveillance nor the side effects of extirpative or radiation therapy. Local ablative therapies including cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy have emerged as a means for minimally invasive definitive treatment. These treatments are well tolerated with decreased morbidity in association with improvements in technology; however, long-term oncologic efficacy remains to be determined.

  1. ROBO1, a tumor suppressor and critical molecular barrier for localized tumor cells to acquire invasive phenotype: study in African-American and Caucasian prostate cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K; Mishra, Shrawan K; Rhim, Johng S; Nelson, Heather H; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Konety, Badrinath R; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Saleem, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    High-risk populations exhibit early transformation of localized prostate cancer (CaP) disease to metastasis which results in the mortality of such patients. The paucity of knowledge about the molecular mechanism involved in acquiring of metastatic behavior by primary tumor cells and non-availability of reliable phenotype-discriminating biomarkers are stumbling blocks in the management of CaP disease. Here, we determine the role and translational relevance of ROBO1 (an organogenesis-associated gene) in human CaP. Employing CaP-progression models and prostatic tissues of Caucasian and African-American patients, we show that ROBO1 expression is localized to cell-membrane and significantly lost in primary and metastatic tumors. While Caucasians exhibited similar ROBO1 levels in primary and metastatic phenotype, a significant difference was observed between tumor phenotypes in African-Americans. Epigenetic assays identified promoter methylation of ROBO1 specific to African-American metastatic CaP cells. Using African-American CaP models for further studies, we show that ROBO1 negatively regulates motility and invasiveness of primary CaP cells, and its loss causes these cells to acquire invasive trait. To understand the underlying mechanism, we employed ROBO1-expressing/ROBO1-C2C3-mutant constructs, immunoprecipitation, confocal-microscopy and luciferase-reporter techniques. We show that ROBO1 through its interaction with DOCK1 (at SH3-SH2-domain) controls the Rac-activation. However, loss of ROBO1 results in Rac1-activation which in turn causes E-Cadherin/β-catenin cytoskeleton destabilization and induction of cell migration. We suggest that ROBO1 is a predictive biomarker that has potential to discriminate among CaP types, and could be exploited as a molecular target to inhibit the progression of disease as well as treat metastasis in high-risk populations such as African-Americans. © 2014 UICC.

  2. Validation of High-Risk Computed Tomography Features for Detection of Local Recurrence After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peulen, Heike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mantel, Frederick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Guckenberger, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Belderbos, José [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hope, Andrew; Giuliani, Meredith [Department of Radiation Oncology University of Toronto and Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Grills, Inga [Department of Radiation Oncology Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Fibrotic changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are difficult to distinguish from local recurrences (LR), hampering proper patient selection for salvage therapy. This study validates previously reported high-risk computed tomography (CT) features (HRFs) for detection of LR in an independent patient cohort. Methods and Materials: From a multicenter database, 13 patients with biopsy-proven LR were matched 1:2 to 26 non-LR control patients based on dose, planning target volume (PTV), follow-up time, and lung lobe. Tested HRFs were enlarging opacity, sequential enlarging opacity, enlarging opacity after 12 months, bulging margin, linear margin disappearance, loss of air bronchogram, and craniocaudal growth. Additionally, 2 new features were analyzed: the occurrence of new unilateral pleural effusion, and growth based on relative volume, assessed by manual delineation. Results: All HRFs were significantly associated with LR except for loss of air bronchogram. The best performing HRFs were bulging margin, linear margin disappearance, and craniocaudal growth. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of the number of HRFs to detect LR had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-1.0), which was identical to the performance described in the original report. The best compromise (closest to 100% sensitivity and specificity) was found at ≥4 HRFs, with a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 85%. A model consisting of only 2 HRFs, bulging margin and craniocaudal growth, resulted in a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100%, with an AUC of 0.96 (95% CI 0.9-1.0) (HRFs ≥2). Pleural effusion and relative growth did not significantly improve the model. Conclusion: We successfully validated CT-based HRFs for detection of LR after SBRT for early-stage NSCLC. As an alternative to number of HRFs, we propose a simplified model with the combination of the 2 best HRFs

  3. Significance of Image Guidance to Clinical Outcomes for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuzi Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare toxicity profiles and biochemical tumor control outcomes between patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT and non-IGRT intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods. Between 2009 and 2012, 65 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with IG-IMRT. This group of patients was retrospectively compared with a similar cohort of 62 patients who were treated between 2004 and 2009 with IMRT to the same dose without image guidance. Results. The median follow-up time was 4.8 years. The rectal volume receiving ≥40 and ≥70 Gy was significantly lower in the IG-IMRT group. Grade 2 and higher acute and late GI and GU toxicity rates were lower in IG-IMRT group, but there was no statistical difference. No significant improvement in biochemical control at 5 years was observed in two groups. In a Cox regression analysis identifying predictors for PSA relapse-free survival, only preradiotherapy PSA was significantly associated with biochemical control; IG-IMRT was not a statistically significant indicator. Conclusions. The use of image guidance in the radiation of prostate cancer at our institute did not show significant reduction in the rates of GI and GU toxicity and did not improve the biochemical control compared with IMRT.

  4. Focal cryotherapy of localized prostate cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Taimur Tariq; Ahmed, Hashim; Kanthabalan, Abi; Lau, Benjamin; Ghei, Maneesh; Maraj, Barry; Arya, Manit

    2014-11-01

    Radical/whole gland treatment for prostate cancer has significant side-effects. Therefore focal treatments such as cryotherapy have been used to treat localized lesions whilst aiming to provide adequate cancer control with minimal side-effects. We performed a systematic review of Pubmed/Medline and Cochrane databases' to yield 9 papers for primary focal prostate cryotherapy and 2 papers for focal salvage treatment (radio-recurrent). The results of 1582 primary patients showed biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 months follow-up. Incontinence rates were 0-3.6% and ED 0-42%. Recto-urethral fistula occurred in only 2 patients. Salvage focal cryotherapy had biochemical disease-free survival of 50-68% at 3 years. ED occurred in 60-71%. Focal cryotherapy appears to be an effective treatment for primary localized prostate cancer and compares favorably to radical/whole gland treatments in medium-term oncological outcomes and side-effects. Although more studies are needed it is also effective for radio-recurrent cancer with a low complications rates.

  5. Re-distribution of brachytherapy dose using a differential dose prescription adapted to risk of local failure in low-risk prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, Susanne; Polders, Daniel; Steggerda, Marcel J; Moonen, Luc M; Tanderup, Kari; Van der Heide, Uulke A

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the application of a differential target- and dose prescription concept for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BT), involving a re-distribution of dose according to risk of local failure and treatment-related morbidity. Our study included 15 patients. Multi-parametric MRI was acquired prior to LDR-BT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation. Trans-rectal ultrasound (US) images were acquired during LDR-BT for prostate gland- (CTV(Prostate)) and organs at risk delineation. The GTV contour was transferred to US images after US/MRI registration. An intermediate-risk target volume (CTV(Prostate)) and a high-risk target volume (CTV(HR)=GTV+5 mm margin) were defined. Two virtual dose plans were made: Plan(risk-adapt) consisted of a de-escalated dose of minimum 125 Gy to the CTV(Prostate) and an escalated dose to 145-250 Gy to the CTV(HR); Plan(ref) included the standard clinical dose of minimum 145 Gy to the CTV(Prostate). Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) parameters were expressed in equivalent 2 Gy fractionation doses. The median D(90%) to the GTV and CTV(HR) significantly increased by 44 Gy and 17 Gy, respectively when comparing Plan(risk-adapt) to Plan(ref). The median D(10%) and D(30%) to the urethra significantly decreased by 9 Gy and 11 Gy, respectively and for bladder neck by 18 Gy and 15 Gy, respectively. The median rectal D(2.0cm(3)) had a significant decrease of 4 Gy, while the median rectal D(0.1cm(3)) showed an increase of 1 Gy. Our risk adaptive target- and dose prescription concept of prescribing a lower dose to the whole gland and an escalated dose to the GTV using LDR-BT seed planning was technically feasible and resulted in a significant dose-reduction to urethra and bladder neck. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The relationship between the biochemical control outcomes and the quality of planning of high-dose rate brachytherapy as a boost to external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Salvajoli, João; Novaes, Paulo; Maia, Maria; Fogaroli, Ricardo; Gides, Doglas; Horriot, Rodrigues

    2008-06-04

    To evaluated prognostic factors and impact of the quality of planning of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR-BT. Between 1997 and 2005, 209 patients with biopsy proven prostate adenocarcinoma were treated with localized EBRT and HDR-BT at the Department of Radiation-Oncology, Hospital A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Patient's age, Gleason score (GS), clinical stage (CS), initial PSA (iPSA), risk group for biochemical failure (GR), doses of EBRT and HDR-BT, use of three-dimensional planning for HDR-BT (3DHDR) and the Biological Effective Dose (BED) were evaluated as prognostic factors for biochemical control (bC). Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median EBRT and HDR-BT doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. The crude bC at 3.3 year was 94.2%. For the Low, intermediate and high risk patients the bC rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. Overall survival (OS) and disease specific survival rates at 3.3 years were 97.8% and 98.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis the prognostic factors related bC were GR (p= 0.040), GS or = 20 Gy (p or = 99 Gy(1.5) (p or = 185 (p or = 20 Gy (p=0.008) and 3DHDR (p<0.001). we observed that the bC rates correlates with the generally accepted risk factors described in the literature. Dose escalation, evaluated through the BED, and the quality of planning of HDR-BT are also important predictive factors when treating prostate cancer.

  7. Meanings of prostate-specific antigen testing as narrated by men with localized prostate cancer after primary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedestig, Oliver; Sandman, Per-Olof; Widmark, Anders; Rasmussen, Birgit H

    2008-01-01

    To illuminate the meanings of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing as narrated by men with localized prostate cancer (LPC) after primary treatment. Fifteen men were interviewed in their homes. The narrative interview text was analyzed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur. Life after treatment for LPC means feeling unsafe because of being affected by a life-threatening and unpredictable disease, characterized by a lack of early signs of progression. In this situation, PSA testing is ascribed as providing a sense of control to enable one to achieve a feeling of safety. Thus one meaning of PSA testing is receiving a message about the status of the body; another is a tense waiting related to fear of the results. A low, stable PSA value is interpreted as a sense of being safe based on confidence in the PSA tests and a sense of having control over the LPC via regular PSA testing. A rising value of the PSA blood test is understood as an indication of progression of the disease, but confidence in PSA testing also means that when the PSA value rises there is a sense of catching the cancer in good time. The comprehensive understanding of the meaning of PSA testing can be understood in terms of a lifeline to cling to when wondering whether the cancer is still in progress in the body or whether the treatment has been curative. This lifeline creates a feeling of security in a post-treatment life situation which is experienced as being unsafe.

  8. Personal preferences and discordant prostate cancer treatment choice in an intervention trial of men newly diagnosed with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Jaclyn L F; Halpenny, Barbara; Berry, Donna L

    2012-09-28

    Men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (LPC) can choose from multiple treatment regimens and are faced with a decision in which medical factors and personal preferences are important. The Personal Patient Profile-Prostate (P3P) is a computerized decision aid for men with LPC that focuses on personal preferences. We determined whether the P3P intervention improved the concordance of treatment choice with self-reported influential side-effects compared with a control group. English/Spanish-speaking men diagnosed with LPC (2007-2009) from four US cities were enrolled into a randomized trial and followed through 6-months via mailed or online questionnaire. Men were randomized to receive the P3P intervention or standard education plus links to reputable websites. We classified choice as concordant if men were concerned with (a) sexual function and chose external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy, (b) bowel function and chose prostatectomy, (c) sex, bowel, and/or bladder function and chose active surveillance, or (d) not concerned with any side effect and chose any treatment. Using logistic regression, we calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between the P3P intervention and concordance. Of 448 men, most were multiple physician consultations prior to enrollment, and chose a treatment discordant with concerns about potential side effects. There was no significant difference in concordance between the intervention (45%) and control (50%) group (OR = 0.82; 95%CI = 0.56, 1.2). The P3P intervention did not improve concordance between potential side effects and treatment choice. Information and/or physician consultation immediately after diagnosis was likely to influence decisions despite concerns about side effects. The intervention may be more effective before the first treatment options consultation. NCT00692653 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00692653.

  9. Personal preferences and discordant prostate cancer treatment choice in an intervention trial of men newly diagnosed with localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosco Jaclyn LF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (LPC can choose from multiple treatment regimens and are faced with a decision in which medical factors and personal preferences are important. The Personal Patient Profile-Prostate (P3P is a computerized decision aid for men with LPC that focuses on personal preferences. We determined whether the P3P intervention improved the concordance of treatment choice with self-reported influential side-effects compared with a control group. Methods English/Spanish-speaking men diagnosed with LPC (2007–2009 from four US cities were enrolled into a randomized trial and followed through 6-months via mailed or online questionnaire. Men were randomized to receive the P3P intervention or standard education plus links to reputable websites. We classified choice as concordant if men were concerned with (a sexual function and chose external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy, (b bowel function and chose prostatectomy, (c sex, bowel, and/or bladder function and chose active surveillance, or (d not concerned with any side effect and chose any treatment. Using logistic regression, we calculated odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for the association between the P3P intervention and concordance. Results Of 448 men, most were Conclusions The P3P intervention did not improve concordance between potential side effects and treatment choice. Information and/or physician consultation immediately after diagnosis was likely to influence decisions despite concerns about side effects. The intervention may be more effective before the first treatment options consultation. Trial registration NCT00692653 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00692653

  10. Impact of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer on the quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Calderero, I; López-Fando, L; Ríos-González, E; Maisonobe, P; Hernández-Yuste, E; Sarmiento-Jordán, M

    The aim of this study was to assess the health-related quality of life of patients with prostate cancer in advanced phases to obtain additional information on the patients' health. The growing interest in understanding the patient's perspective and the scarcity of prospective studies of this population motivated this research study. We present an observational study performed on 131 urology consultations, with a sample of 601 patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, assessed during 2 visits: baseline and at 12 months. We collected demographic, clinical, quality-of-life (PROSQoLI and EuroQoL-5D-5L questionnaires) and anxiety/depression (HADS questionnaire) endpoints. The mean age (SD) was 73.8 (8.2) years, and 87.2% of the participants were retired or pensioners. Some 58.7% of the patients presented locally advanced prostate cancer. Urinary symptoms were the most common, decreasing significantly after one year (P<.05). Urinary problems and fatigue were the most affected measures, and pain/discomfort was the dimension present in most patients (65.3%). According to the linear regression model, asthenia and pain were 2 of the factors most closely related to a poorer quality of life. The presence of anxiety/depression was low. Finally, the health condition as assessed by the clinician was more positive than when assessed by the patients. This study broadens the scarce information on the quality of life of the population with advanced prostate cancer, information of use for the clinical management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakami, Shinji; Gonda, Nobuko; Kikuno, Nobuyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-05-01

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  12. Salvage brachytherapy in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy: predicting factors for control and toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate efficacy and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy. Methods and materials Between 1993 and 2007, we retrospectively analyzed 56 consecutively patients (pts) undergoing salvage brachytherapy. After local biopsy-proven recurrence, pts received 145 Gy LDR-BT (37 pts, 66%) or HDR-BT (19 pts, 34%) in different dose levels according to biological equivalent doses (BED2 Gy). By the time of salvage BT, only 15 pts (27%) received ADT. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control and toxicities. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were graded using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCv3.0). Results Median follow-up after salvage BT was 48 months. The 5-year FFbF was 77%. HDR and LDR late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in 21% and 24%. Late grade 3 GI toxicities were observed in 2% (HDR) and 2.7% (LDR). On univariate analysis, pre-salvage prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 10 ng/ml (p = 0.004), interval to relapse after initial treatment < 24 months (p = 0.004) and salvage HDR-BT doses BED2 Gy level < 227 Gy (p = 0.012) were significant in predicting biochemical failure. On Cox multivariate analysis, pre-salvage PSA, and time to relapse were significant in predicting biochemical failure. HDR-BT BED2 Gy (α/β 1.5 Gy) levels ≥ 227 (p = 0.013), and ADT (p = 0.049) were significant in predicting grade ≥ 2 urinary toxicity. Conclusions Prostate BT is an effective salvage modality in some selected prostate local recurrence patients after radiation therapy. Even, we provide some potential predictors of biochemical control and toxicity for prostate salvage BT, further investigation is recommended. PMID:24885287

  13. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Malika Danner; Ming-yang Hung; Yung, Thomas M.; Marilyn Ayoob; Siyuan Lei; Collins, Brian T.; Simeng Suy; Collins, Sean P.

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionUtilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its utility in guiding medical management.MethodsBetween September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated wi...

  14. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, Malika; Hung, Ming-yang; Yung, Thomas M.; Ayoob, Marilyn; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T.; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Utilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its utility in guiding medical management. Methods Between September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated...

  15. Comparison of Two Local Anesthesia Injection Methods During a Transrectal Ultrasonography-guided Prostate Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Song Ee; Oh, Young Taik [Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jang Hwan; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    To compare the effectiveness of 2 injection methods of lidocaine during a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy for pain control and complication rates. We retrospectively evaluated patients who underwent a TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from March 2005 to March 2006. One hundred patients were categorized into two groups based on injection method. For group 1, 10 mL of 1% lidocaine was injected bilaterally at the junction of the seminal vesicle and prostate and for group 2, into Denonvilliers' fascia. Pain scores using a visual analog scale (VAS) as well as immediate and delayed complication rates were evaluated. The mean VAS score showed no significant differences between the groups (group 1, 3.4{+-}1.78: group 2, 2.8{+-}1.3: p = 0.062). The difference in delayed complication rates and incidence of hematuria, hemospermia, and blood via the rectum was not significant between groups. However, two patients in group 1 complained of symptoms immediately after local anesthesia: one of tinnitus and the other of mild dizziness. There were no significant differences between pain control and complication rates between the 2 lidocaine injection methods. However, injection into Denonvilliers' fascia is thought to have less potential risk

  16. Treatment profile and complications associated with cryotherapy for localized prostate cancer: A population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Calpurnyia B.; Jang, Thomas L.; Shao, Yu-Hsuan; Kabadi, Shaum; Moore, Dirk F.; Lu-Yao, Grace L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the treatment patterns and 3 to 12-month complication rates associated with receiving prostate cryotherapy in a population-based study. Men > 65 years diagnosed with incident localized prostate cancer in Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) - Medicare linked database from 2004 to 2005 were identified. A total of 21,344 men were included in the study, of which 380 were treated initially with cryotherapy. Recipients of cryotherapy versus aggressive forms of prostate therapy (i.e. radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy) were more likely to be older, have one co-morbidity, low income, live in the South, and be diagnosed with indolent cancer. Complication rates increased from 3 to 12 months following cryotherapy. By the twelfth month, the rates for urinary incontinence, lower urinary tract obstruction, erectile dysfunction, and bowel bleeding reached 9.8%, 28.7%, 20.1%, and 3.3%, respectively. Diagnoses of hydronephrosis, urinary fistula, or bowel fistula were not evident. The rates of corrective invasive procedures for lower urinary tract obstruction and erectile dysfunction were both <2.9% by the twelfth month. Overall, complications post cryotherapy were modest; however, diagnoses for lower urinary tract obstruction and erectile dysfunction were common. PMID:21519347

  17. Automatic classification of prostate stromal tissue in histological images using Haralick descriptors and Local Binary Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, D. L. L.; Nascimento, M. Z.; Neves, L. A.; Batista, V. R.; Godoy, M. F.; Jacomini, R. S.; Duarte, Y. A. S.; Arruda, P. F. F.; Neto, D. S.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we presente a classification system that uses a combination of texture features from stromal regions: Haralick features and Local Binary Patterns (LBP) in wavelet domain. The system has five steps for classification of the tissues. First, the stromal regions were detected and extracted using segmentation techniques based on thresholding and RGB colour space. Second, the Wavelet decomposition was applied in the extracted regions to obtain the Wavelet coefficients. Third, the Haralick and LBP features were extracted from the coefficients. Fourth, relevant features were selected using the ANOVA statistical method. The classication (fifth step) was performed with Radial Basis Function (RBF) networks. The system was tested in 105 prostate images, which were divided into three groups of 35 images: normal, hyperplastic and cancerous. The system performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve and resulted in 0.98 for normal versus cancer, 0.95 for hyperplasia versus cancer and 0.96 for normal versus hyperplasia. Our results suggest that texture features can be used as discriminators for stromal tissues prostate images. Furthermore, the system was effective to classify prostate images, specially the hyperplastic class which is the most difficult type in diagnosis and prognosis.

  18. Re: Final Report of the Intergroup Randomized Study of Combined AndrogenDeprivation Therapy Plus Radiotherapy Versus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Alone in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm D. Mason

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available No certain treatment recommendations were given for locally advanced or high-risk prostate cancer in the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines (1. In the guidelines, studies supporting surgery or radiotherapy (RT were listed, and the readers were left alone to make their own decisions. In the present study, Mason et al. reported the impact of adding RT to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. One thousand two hundred and five patients with T3- 4, N0/Nx, M0 prostate cancer or T1-2 disease with either PSA more than 40 μg/L or PSA 20 to 40 μg/L plus Gleason score of 8 to 10 were randomized to ADT alone (n=602 or to ADT+RT (n=603. A lower dose radiation 64 to 69 Gy was used for RT. Overall survival (OS risk reduction was 30% for ADT+RT group (P<0.001 at a median follow-up of 8 years. Cancer-specific survival (CSS was significantly improved by the addition of RT to ADT (HR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.61; p<0.001. Patients on ADT+RT reported a higher frequency of adverse events related to bowel toxicity. However, reported frequency of ADT-related toxicities (impotence, hot flushes, urinary frequency, ischemia, and hypertension were similar for both arms. The present study provided results of high-risk patients in a longer median follow-up time than SPCG-7 study (2. Because the study took place between 1995 and 2005, less than 70 Gy was used for RT. Even at lower radiation doses, the authors confirmed that adding RT to ADT improved both OS and cancer-specific survival (CSS with minimal general toxicity. In the modern era, improved RT techniques may help achieve better outcomes with much higher radiation doses without increased morbidity in this group of patients

  19. Low Incidence of Fatigue after Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjeev eDash

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue is a common side-effect of conventional prostate cancer radiation therapy. The increased delivery precision necessitated by the high dose per fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT offers the potential of reduce target volumes and hence the exposure of normal tissues to high radiation doses. Herein, we examine the level of fatigue associated with SBRT treatment.Methods: Forty patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated SBRT, and a minimum of 12 months follow-up were included in this analysis. Self-reported fatigue and other quality of life measures were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-SBRT.Results: Mean levels of fatigue were elevated at 1 month post-SBRT compared to baseline values (p=0.02. Fatigue at the 3-month follow-up and later were higher but not statistically significantly different compared to baseline. African-American patients reported higher fatigue post-SBRT than Caucasian patients. Fatigue was correlated with hormonal symptoms as measured by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC quality of life questionnaire, but not with urinary, bowel, or sexual symptoms. Age, co-morbidities, smoking, prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, testosterone levels, and tumor stage were not associated with fatigue. Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate fatigue as a side-effect of SBRT. In contrast to standard radiation therapy, results suggest SBRT-related fatigue is short-term rather than a long-term side effect of SBRT. These results also suggest post-SBRT fatigue to be a more frequent complication in African-Americans than Caucasians.

  20. [Orgasm after curietherapy with permanent iodine-125 radioimplants for localized prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, B; Delannes, M; Salloum, A; Delavierre, D; Wagner, F; Jonca, F; Thoulouzan, M; Plante, P; Bachaud, J-M; Soulie, M; Huyghe, E

    2011-12-01

    Orgasm is a domain of male sexuality that remains underreported in literature. Our aim was to realize the first detailed analysis of orgasm in patients treated by 125 I permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. In a series of 270 sexually active men treated by prostate brachytherapy (125I permanent implantation), 241 (89%), mean age of 65 (43-80), participated in a mailed survey about sexual function after a mean time of 36 months (9-70). Erectile and ejaculatory functions and orgasm were explored using a mailed questionnaire. Two questions focused on orgasm. The first was about quality of orgasm (fast/intense/late, difficult/weak/absent) and the second about the presence of painful orgasm and its frequency (always/sometimes/often). After prostate brachytherapy, 81.3% of sexually active men conserved ejaculation and 90% orgasm. There was a significant deterioration of the quality of orgasm (P=0.0001). More than 50% of the patients had an altered orgasm (weak, difficult, absent) after brachytherapy, vs 16% before implantation (P=0.001). Men with a diminished ejaculation volume often had a weak/difficult orgasm (P=0.007). Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy did not seem to impact the quality of orgasm or the frequency of painful ejaculation. Patients who had an IIEF-5 score higher than 12 had frequently intense orgasm (26.7% vs 2.7%; Porgasm after treatment. However, most of the patients described a deterioration of the quality of orgasm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Carcinosarcoma of the Tunica Vaginalis Following Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Viers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spermatic cord tumors (SCTs are rare neoplasms with 80% exhibiting benign pathology. Of the malignant SCTs, 90% are sarcomas. To date there has only been one documented case of primary CS of the spermatic cord which occurred in a 40 year old with no reported medical history. A 76-year-old male with a history of biopsy proven Gleason score 7 (3 + 4 prostatic adenocarcinoma underwent external beam radiation therapy (7920 cGy in 44 fractions in 2004. He presented with a 3 year history of an asymptomatic right hydrocele. Several scrotal ultrasounds had been performed confirming a hydrocele, with the most recent revealing a hydrocele measuring 10 × 14 cm and several epididymal cysts. During the hydrocelectomy a firm suspicious mass was noted inside the tunica vaginalis and involving the spermatic cord. Given the intraoperative findings, decision was made to proceed with radical orchiectomy. Final pathologic examination revealed the tumor to have a biphasic pattern composed of spindled cells and also cells with an epithelioid morphology. Five months following orchiectomy he patient presented with a painful, enlarging right upper scrotal mass. A CT scan revealed new soft tissue lesions suspicious for necrotic lymph nodes within the right inguinal canal. Additional metastatic evaluation revealed multiple new pleural and parenchymal lung nodules. CT guided needle biopsy of a left lung nodule demonstrated spindle cells with high cellularity and areas of necrosis which were histomorphologically similar to the previous scrotal CS. Gemcitabine therapy was subsequently started. Four months following the diagnosis of metastatic CS, the patient expired. Dedifferentiation of prostatic adenocarcinoma to prostatic CS should be considered as a treatment outcome after localized radiation therapy to the prostate due to the highly aggressive nature of metastatic CS.

  2. Salvage cryotherapy with third-generation technology for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Huibo; Yang, Rong; Lin, Tingsheng; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Gutian; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-09-01

    To present the intermediate results of the use of third-generation cryotherapy as salvage treatment for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation therapy. From January 2006 to July 2010, 32 patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy underwent salvage cryoablation using third-generation technology. Biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS) was defined as the time period from salvage treatment to the date of biochemical recurrence (Phoenix definition of nadir +2 ng/ml). Complications were classified as grades 1-5 according to the modified Clavien system. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify potential risk factors associated with recurrence after salvage cryotherapy. The median follow-up was 63 months (range 38-92). Mild complications (grades 1 and 2) included mild incontinence (9.4 %), acute rectal pain (31.3 %), hematuria (6.3 %), scrotal edema (9.4 %), urinary tract infection (3.1 %), lower urinary tract symptoms (15.6 %) and erectile dysfunction (57.1 %). Severe events (grade 3) included severe incontinence (3.1 %) and urethral sloughing (3.1 %). The rate of rectourethral fistula and urinary retention was absent. The 5-year overall survival was 92.3 %. The 5-year cancer-specific survival was 100 %. The 5-year BRFS rate using the Phoenix definition was 43.5 %. A multivariate analysis disclosed that PSA at cryoablation was the only predictive factor for biochemical recurrence. Salvage cryotherapy using third-generation technology offers a safe and effective alternative for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation therapy. Additional studies with longer follow-up are necessary to determine the sustained efficacy of this procedure.

  3. Salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia for local recurrence after radiation therapy failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukielka, A.M.; Hetnal, M.; Dabrowski, T.; Walasek, T.; Brandys, P.; Reinfuss, M. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland); Nahajowski, D.; Kudzia, R.; Dybek, D. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Medical Physics, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of the present retrospective study is to evaluate toxicity and early clinical outcomes of interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) combined with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage treatment in patients with biopsy-confirmed local recurrence of prostate cancer after previous external beam radiotherapy. Between September 2008 and March 2013, 25 patients with local recurrence of previously irradiated prostate cancer were treated. The main eligibility criteria for salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia were biopsy confirmed local recurrence and absence of nodal and distant metastases. All patients were treated with a dose of 30 Gy in 3 fractions at 21-day intervals. We performed 62 hyperthermia procedures out of 75 planned (83 %). The aim of the hyperthermia treatment was to heat the prostate to 41-43 C for 60 min. Toxicity for the organs of the genitourinary system and rectum was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, v. 4.03). Determination of subsequent biochemical failure was based on the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/ml). The median age was 71 years (range 62-83 years), the median initial PSA level was 16.3 ng/ml (range 6.37-64 ng/ml), and the median salvage PSA level was 2.8 ng/ml (1.044-25.346 ng/ml). The median follow-up was 13 months (range 4-48 months). The combination of HDR brachytherapy and IHT was well tolerated. The most frequent complications were nocturia, weak urine stream, urinary frequency, hematuria, and urgency. Grade 2 rectal hemorrhage was observed in 1 patient. No grade 3 or higher complications were observed. The 2-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of biochemical control after salvage treatment was 74 %. The PSA in 20 patients decreased below the presalvage level, while 11 patients achieved a PSA nadir < 0.5 ng/ml. All patients are still alive. Of the 7 patients who experienced biochemical failure, bone metastases were found in 2 patients. IHT in combination

  4. Fast Neutron Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Results of an RTOG Randomized Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laramore, George E. [Washington U.; Krall, John M. [Unlisted, PA; Thomas, Frank J. [Unlisted, OH; Griffin, Thomas W. [Washington U.; Maor, Moshe H. [Unlisted, TX; Hendrickson, Frank R. [Fermilab

    1985-01-01

    Between June 1977 and April 1983, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) sponsored a Phase III randomized study investigating fast neutron radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with locally advanced (Stage C and D1) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. Patients were randomized to receive either conventional photon radiation therapy or fast neutron irradiation used in a mixed-beam treatment schedule (neutron/photon). A total of 91 analyzable patients were entered in the study; 78 of them were treated without major protocol deviations. The two treatment groups were balanced in regard to all major prognostic variables. Actuarial curves for "overall" survival, "determinantal" survival and local/regional control are presented both for the entire group of 91 patients and the 78 patients treated within protocol guidelines. The overall local/regional tumor recurrence rate is 7% for the mixed-beam treated group of patients and is 22% for the photon (X ray) treated group of patients. The difference is statistically significant at the p = 0.05 level. For the entire group of 91 evaluable patients, the 5-year "overall" survival rate is 62% for the mixed-beam-treated group and 35% for the photon-treated group. This difference is also statistically significant (p less than 0.05). However, this statistical significance is lost when the smaller number of patients treated strictly within protocol guidelines is considered. The significance is regained (p less than 0.02) when one looks at "determinantal" survival, which uses active cancer at time of death as the failure endpoint. This study demonstrates that a regional treatment modality, in this case mixed-beam irradiation, can influence both local/regional tumor control and survival in patients with locally-advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland.

  5. Morphological analysis of the effects of intraoperative transrectal compression of the prostate during high-intensity focused ultrasound for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Sunao; Hashimoto, Akio; Nakamoto, Masahiko; Fukuda, Norio; Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Endo, Kazuyuki; Tomonaga, Tetsuro; Nakano, Mayura; Terachi, Toshiro; Uchida, Toyoaki

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of transrectal compression of the prostate for intra-operative prostatic swelling and intraprostatic point shift during high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of localized prostate cancer. Patients treated with whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound as primary monotherapy for localized prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. Using the standard and compression method, the volumes of degassed water in the balloon covering the high-intensity focused ultrasound probe were 50 mL and 80-160 mL, respectively. To identify prostatic swelling and shift during high-intensity focused ultrasound and the volume occupied by the non-enhanced area, three-dimensional prostate models were reconstructed using ultrasound and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. In comparison with the standard (n = 40) and compression (n = 48) methods, intraoperative increase in the prostate volume (21% vs 5.3%; P = 0.044), intraprostatic point shift (4 mm vs 2 mm, P = 0.040 in the transition zone; 3 mm vs 0 mm; P = 0.001 in the peripheral zone) and the volume occupied by the non-enhanced area (89% vs 96%; P = 0.001) were significantly suppressed. The biochemical disease-free survival rate in patients treated using the compression method was significantly improved relative to the standard method (92.6% vs 76.5%; P = 0.038). Regarding complications, there was no significant difference in the rate of urethral stricture (P = 0.9), urinary tract infection (P = 0.9), incontinence (P = 0.3), erectile dysfunction (P = 0.9) or recto-urethral fistula between the patients treated using the standard and compression methods. Intraoperative transrectal compression suppresses intraoperative increase in the prostate volume and intraprostatic point shift during high-intensity focused ultrasound, having the potential to achieve precise whole-gland and lesion-targeted focal therapy. © 2015 The Japanese Urological

  6. Assessing the feasibility of volumetric-modulated arc therapy using simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-VMAT): An analysis for complex head-neck, high-risk prostate and rectal cancer cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cilla, Savino, E-mail: savinocilla@gmail.com [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di ricerca e cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Deodato, Francesco; Digesù, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Picardi, Vincenzo; Ferro, Marica [Radiation Oncology Unit, Fondazione di ricerca e cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Sallustio, Giuseppina [Radiology Unit, Fondazione di ricerca e cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); De Spirito, Marco; Piermattei, Angelo [Physics Institute, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Morganti, Alessio G. [Radiation Oncology Unit, Fondazione di ricerca e cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allowed the simultaneous delivery of different doses to different target volumes within a single fraction, an approach called simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). As consequence, the fraction dose to the boost volume can be increased while keeping low doses to the elective volumes, and the number of fractions and overall treatment time will be reduced, translating into better radiobiological effectiveness. In recent years, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been shown to provide similar plan quality with respect to fixed-field IMRT but with large reduction in treatment time and monitor units (MUs) number. However, the feasibility of VMAT when used with SIB strategy has few investigations to date. We explored the potential of VMAT in a SIB strategy for complex cancer sites. A total of 15 patients were selected, including 5 head-and-neck, 5 high-risk prostate, and 5 rectal cancer cases. Both a double-arc VMAT and a 7-field IMRT plan were generated for each case using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system for an Elekta Precise linac. Dosimetric indexes for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared based on dose-volume histograms. Conformity index, homogeneity index, and dose-contrast index were used for target analyses. The equivalent uniform doses and the normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for main OARs. MUs number and treatment time were analyzed to score treatment efficiency. Pretreatment dosimetry was performed using 2-dimensional (2D)-array dosimeter. SIB-VMAT plans showed a high level of fluence modulation needed for SIB treatments, high conformal dose distribution, similar target coverage, and a tendency to improve OARs sparing compared with the benchmark SIB-IMRT plans. The median treatment times reduced from 13 to 20 minutes to approximately 5 minutes for all cases with SIB-VMAT, with a MUs reduction up to 22.5%. The 2D-array ion-chambers' measurements reported an

  7. Evaluating the influence of organ motion during photon vs. proton therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer using biological models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Kia; G Andersen, Andreas; Casares-Magaz, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    beam angles for pelvic irradiation, we aimed to evaluate the influence of organ motion for PT using biological models, and to compare this with contemporary photon-based RT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight locally advanced prostate cancer patients with a planning CT (pCT) and 8-9 repeated CT scans (r......BACKGROUND: Proton therapy (PT) may have a normal tissue sparing potential when co-irradiating pelvic lymph nodes in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, but may also be more sensitive towards organ motion in the pelvis. Building upon a previous study identifying motion-robust proton...

  8. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT IN LOCALLY AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER USING CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachev Sergey Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of androgen deprivation and radiotherapy increase the probability of diseases full regresses and survival rate. Modern technical and technological opportunities of 3D CRT allow to increase total dose to prostate up to 72-76Gy vs. radiotherapy of 66-70Gy. In this study we compare the rates of post radiation toxicity and the efficiency of treatment for the patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and 3D CRT. The use of 3D CRT has not only result to increase of 10-years recurrence free survival rate from 74% (I grope to 86,5% (II grope, р=0,01, but also to increase of 10-years overall survival, 70% versus 78,4% (р=0,04. The proposed version of conformal 3D CRT radiation therapy made ​​it possible compared to conventional 2D RT radiation therapy by increasing SOD radiation to the tumor, accuracy and compliance with the quality assurance of radiation therapy significantly reduce rates of recurrence and significantly increase the performance of 10-year overall and disease-free survival.

  9. Value of SPECT/CT for detection and anatomic localization of sentinel lymph nodes before laparoscopic sentinel node lymphadenectomy in prostate carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeeren, Lenka; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; Meinhardt, Wim; Bex, Axel; van der Poel, Henk G.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Sivro, Ferida; Hoefnagel, Cees A.; Horenblas, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Laparoscopic evaluation of sentinel nodes is useful for staging prostate cancer, but preoperative localization of deep abdominal sentinel nodes with planar lymphoscintigraphy is difficult. We evaluated the value of SPECT/CT for detecting and localizing sentinel nodes in prostate cancer. METHODS:

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Ablation of Prostate Tissue in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Phase 1 Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Joseph L; Billia, Michele; Relle, James; Roethke, Matthias C; Popeneciu, Ionel V; Kuru, Timur H; Hatiboglu, Gencay; Mueller-Wolf, Maya B; Motsch, Johann; Romagnoli, Cesare; Kassam, Zahra; Harle, Christopher C; Hafron, Jason; Nandalur, Kiran R; Chronik, Blaine A; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Pahernik, Sascha

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided transurethral ultrasound ablation (MRI-TULSA) is a novel minimally invasive technology for ablating prostate tissue, potentially offering good disease control of localized cancer and low morbidity. To determine the clinical safety and feasibility of MRI-TULSA for whole-gland prostate ablation in a primary treatment setting of localized prostate cancer (PCa). A single-arm prospective phase 1 study was performed at three tertiary referral centers in Canada, Germany, and the United States. Thirty patients (median age: 69 yr; interquartile range [IQR]: 67-71 yr) with biopsy-proven low-risk (80%) and intermediate-risk (20%) PCa were treated and followed for 12 mo. MRI-TULSA treatment was delivered with the therapeutic intent of conservative whole-gland ablation including 3-mm safety margins and 10% residual viable prostate expected around the capsule. Primary end points were safety (adverse events) and feasibility (technical accuracy and precision of conformal thermal ablation). Exploratory outcomes included quality of life, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and biopsy at 12 mo. Median treatment time was 36min (IQR: 26-44) and prostate volume was 44ml (IQR: 38-48). Spatial control of thermal ablation was ±1.3mm on MRI thermometry. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events included hematuria (43% grade [G] 1; 6.7% G2), urinary tract infections (33% G2), acute urinary retention (10% G1; 17% G2), and epididymitis (3.3% G3). There were no rectal injuries. Median pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Score 8 (IQR: 5-13) returned to 6 (IQR: 4-10) at 3 mo (mean change: -2; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4 to 1). Median pretreatment International Index of Erectile Function 13 (IQR: 6-28) recovered to 13 (IQR: 5-25) at 12 mo (mean change: -1; 95% CI, -5 to 3). Median PSA decreased 87% at 1 mo and was stable at 0.8 ng/ml (IQR: 0.6-1.1) to 12 mo. Positive biopsies showed 61% reduction in total cancer length, clinically significant

  11. Prolaris Cell Cycle Progression Test for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaink, Alexis; Li, Chunmei; Wells, David; Holubowich, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is very common and many localized tumours are non-aggressive. Determining which cancers are aggressive is important for choosing the most appropriate treatment (e.g., surgery, radiation, active surveillance). Current clinical risk stratification is reliable in forecasting the prognosis of groups of men with similar clinical and pathologic characteristics, but there is residual uncertainty at the individual level. The Prolaris cell cycle progression (CCP) test, a genomic test that estimates how fast tumour cells are proliferating, could potentially be used to improve the accuracy of individual risk assessment. This health technology assessment sought to determine the clinical utility, economic impact, and patients' perceptions of the value of the CCP test in low- and intermediate-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the clinical and economic evidence of the CCP test in low-and intermediate-risk, localized prostate cancer. Medical and health economic databases were searched from 2010 to June or July 2016. The critical appraisal of the clinical evidence included risk of bias and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. We also analyzed the potential budget impact of adding the CCP test into current practice, from the perspective the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Finally, we conducted qualitative interviews with men with prostate cancer, on the factors that influenced their treatment decision-making. Results For the review of clinical effectiveness, we screened 3,021 citations, and two before–after studies met our inclusion criteria. In one study, the results of the CCP test appeared to change the treatment plan (from initial to final plan) in 64.9% of cases overall (GRADE rating of the quality of evidence: Very low). In the other study, the CCP test changed the treatment received in nearly half of cases overall, compared

  12. Combination of the transurethral resection and prostate HIFU ablation at treatment of the localized cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popkov V.M.

    2014-09-01

    26 patients were included into HIFU and 74 group in group of the combined treatment (TURP+HIFU. Selection criteria for HIFU ablation were the localized cancer of a prostate concerning which earlier it wasn't carried out treatments, and level of a PSA at the time of statement of the diagnosis 15 ng/ml. All patients corresponding to these by criteria, were considered as candidates for treatment and inclusion in the analysis. The nadir and stability of PSA, the histologic conclusion, IPSS, quality of life and complication were estimated at time of postoperative supervision. Results: Statistically significant influence of a combination TURP+HIFU for the term of transurethral drainage of a bladder (a median of 40 days against 7 days, incontience frequency (15.4% against 6.9%, infections of urinary ways (47.9% against 11.4% and IPSS change during the postoperative period (on the average 8.91 against 3.37 is noted. During the short period of supervision it wasn't observed considerable changes in relation to efficiency: in HIFU group the frequency of repeated sessions made 25%, in TUR/HIFU group 4%. Conclusion: HIFU therapy is modern, minimum invasive method of a cancer therapy of a prostate. The combination of a transurethral resection and HIFU ablation significantly reduces the frequency of the complications connected with treatment. Maintaining the patient after combined TURP and HIFU ablation is comparable with maintaining the patient after usual TURP.

  13. Advanced Imaging for the Early Diagnosis of Local Recurrence Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Panebianco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa after radical prostatectomy (RT is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  14. Interactive 3D segmentation of the prostate in magnetic resonance images using shape and local appearance similarity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahedi, Maysam; Fenster, Aaron; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Ward, Aaron D.

    2013-03-01

    3D segmentation of the prostate in medical images is useful to prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy guidance, but is time-consuming to perform manually. Clinical translation of computer-assisted segmentation algorithms for this purpose requires a comprehensive and complementary set of evaluation metrics that are informative to the clinical end user. We have developed an interactive 3D prostate segmentation method for 1.5T and 3.0T T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2W MRI) acquired using an endorectal coil. We evaluated our method against manual segmentations of 36 3D images using complementary boundary-based (mean absolute distance; MAD), regional overlap (Dice similarity coefficient; DSC) and volume difference (ΔV) metrics. Our technique is based on inter-subject prostate shape and local boundary appearance similarity. In the training phase, we calculated a point distribution model (PDM) and a set of local mean intensity patches centered on the prostate border to capture shape and appearance variability. To segment an unseen image, we defined a set of rays - one corresponding to each of the mean intensity patches computed in training - emanating from the prostate centre. We used a radial-based search strategy and translated each mean intensity patch along its corresponding ray, selecting as a candidate the boundary point with the highest normalized cross correlation along each ray. These boundary points were then regularized using the PDM. For the whole gland, we measured a mean+/-std MAD of 2.5+/-0.7 mm, DSC of 80+/-4%, and ΔV of 1.1+/-8.8 cc. We also provided an anatomic breakdown of these metrics within the prostatic base, mid-gland, and apex.

  15. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: 10-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauswald, Henrik; Kamrava, Mitchell R.; Fallon, Julia M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Park, Sang-June; Van, Thanh; Borja, Lalaine; Steinberg, Michael L.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey, E-mail: JDemanes@mednet.ucla.edu

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was originally used with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to increase the dose to the prostate without injuring the bladder or rectum. Numerous studies have reported HDR brachytherapy is safe and effective. We adapted it for use without EBRT for cases not requiring lymph node treatment. Patients and Methods: We entered the patient demographics, disease characteristics, and treatment parameters into a prospective registry and serially added follow-up data for 448 men with low-risk (n=288) and intermediate-risk (n=160) prostate cancer treated from 1996 to 2009. Their median age was 64 years (range 42-90). The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 6.0 ng/mL (range 0.2-18.2). The Gleason score was ≤6 in 76% and 7 in 24%. The median dose was 43.5 Gy in 6 fractions. The clinical and biochemical disease control and survival rates were calculated. Adverse events were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Events. Results: The median follow-up period was 6.5 years (range 0.3-15.3). The actuarial 6- and 10-year PSA progression-free survival was 98.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 96.9%-99.4%) and 97.8% (95% CI 95.5%-98.9%). Overall survival at 10 years was 76.7% (95% CI 69.9%-82.2%). The local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and cause-specific survival were 99.7% (95% CI 97.9%-99.9%), 98.9% (95% CI 96.3%-99.7%), and 99.1% (95% CI 95.8%-99.8%). T stage, initial PSA level, Gleason score, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group, patient age, and androgen deprivation therapy did not significantly correlate with disease control or survival. No late grade 3 to 4 rectal toxicities developed. Late grade 3 to 4 genitourinary toxicity occurred in 4.9% (grade 3 in 4.7%). Conclusions: HDR monotherapy is a safe and highly effective treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  16. Residual set-up errors and margins in on-line image-guided prostate localization in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Muren, Ludvig; Høyer, Morten

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Image-guided on-line correction of the target position allows radiotherapy of prostate cancer with narrow set-up margins. The present study investigated the residual set-up error after on-line prostate localization and its impact on margins. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prostate...... localization based on two orthogonal X-ray images of gold markers implanted in the prostate was performed with an on-board imager at four treatment sessions for 90 patients. The set-up error in the sagittal plane residual after couch adjustment was evaluated on lateral verification portal images. RESULTS......: The set-up error was less than 3.0mm in 92% of the cases in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction and in 95% of the cases in the cranio-caudal (CC) direction. The set-up error was dominated by internal prostate motion taking place during the set-up procedure. Set-up margins were calculated using two...

  17. Screening for local and regional cancer recurrence in patients curatively treated for laryngeal cancer: definition of a high-risk group and estimation of the lead time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritoe, Savitri C; Verbeek, André L M; Krabbe, Paul F M; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; van den Hoogen, Frank J A; Marres, Henri A M

    2007-05-01

    All patients treated for laryngeal cancer are offered the same follow-up schedule to detect asymptomatic locoregional recurrences. In this study, we evaluated the prognostic profile of patients for cancer recurrence and estimated the lead time. A cohort study was performed between 1990 and 1995. Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the prognostic factors. The effect of altering the follow-up for asymptomatic recurrence detection was determined after estimating the lead time. The variables cT classification, smoking, and histologic grade proved to be prognostic factors. The risk of locoregional failure was 15% in the low-risk group versus 29% in the high-risk group. The estimated lead time was 2 to 4 weeks. Risk profiles for locoregional relapse were defined. Intensifying the follow-up schedule is not advisable because the lead time is very short. An excessively high number of routine visits would have to be performed to increase the detection rate for asymptomatic recurrences. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Prostate MRI can reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Taneja, Samir S

    2015-08-01

    The contemporary management of prostate cancer (PCa) has been criticized as fostering overdetection and overtreatment of indolent disease. In particular, the historical inability to identify those men with an elevated PSA who truly warrant biopsy, and, for those needing biopsy, to localize aggressive tumors within the prostate, has contributed to suboptimal diagnosis and treatment strategies. This article describes how modern multi-parametric MRI of the prostate addresses such challenges and reduces both overdiagnosis and overtreatment. The central role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in contributing to MRI's current impact is described. Prostate MRI incorporating DWI achieves higher sensitivity than standard systematic biopsy for intermediate-to-high risk tumor, while having lower sensitivity for low-grade tumors that are unlikely to impact longevity. Particular applications of prostate MRI that are explored include selection of a subset of men with clinical suspicion of PCa to undergo biopsy as well as reliable confirmation of only low-risk disease in active surveillance patients. Various challenges to redefining the standard of care to incorporate solely MRI-targeted cores, without concomitant standard systematic cores, are identified. These include needs for further technical optimization of current systems for performing MRI-targeted biopsies, enhanced education and expertise in prostate MRI among radiologists, greater standardization in prostate MRI reporting across centers, and recognition of the roles of pre-biopsy MRI and MRI-targeted biopsy by payers. Ultimately, it is hoped that the medical community in the United States will embrace prostate MRI and MRI-targeted biopsy, allowing all patients with known or suspected prostate cancer to benefit from this approach. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel CBCT-based method for derivation of CTV-PTV margins for prostate and pelvic lymph nodes treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Ciara A.; King, Raymond B.; Osman, Sarah O.S.; McMahon, Stephen J.; O?Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Jain, Suneil; McGarry, Conor K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional CTV-PTV margin recipes are not generally applicable in the situation of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) treatments of multiple target volumes with a single isocentre. In this work, we present a novel geometric method of margin derivation based on CBCT-derived anatomical data. Methods Twenty patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer were selected for retrospective review. Individual volumes of interest (prostate, prostate and seminal vesicles and pelvic...

  20. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  1. Loss of masculine identity, marital affection, and sexual bother in men with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaider, Talia; Manne, Sharon; Nelson, Christian; Mulhall, John; Kissane, David

    2012-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most frequent sources of distress after treatment for prostate cancer (PCa), yet evidence suggests that men do not easily adjust to loss of sexual function over time. A hypothesized determinant of men's adaptation to ED is the degree to which they experience a loss of masculine identity in the aftermath of PCa treatment. The aims of this study were (i) to describe the prevalence of concerns related to diminished masculinity among men treated for localized PCa; (ii) to determine whether diminished masculinity is associated with sexual bother, after controlling for sexual functioning status; and (iii) to determine whether men's marital quality moderates the association between diminished masculinity and sexual bother. We analyzed cross-sectional data provided by 75 men with localized PCa who were treated at one of two cancer centers. Data for this study were provided at a baseline assessment as part of their enrollment in a pilot trial of a couple-based intervention. The sexual bother subscale from the Prostate Health-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire and the Masculine Self-Esteem and Marital Affection subscales from Clark et al's PCa-related quality-of-life scale. Approximately one-third of men felt they had lost a dimension of their masculinity following treatment. Diminished masculinity was the only significant, independent predictor of sexual bother, even after accounting for sexual functioning status. The association between diminished masculinity and sexual bother was strongest for men whose spouses perceived low marital affection. Diminished masculinity is a prominent, yet understudied concern for PCa survivors. Regardless of functional status, men who perceive a loss of masculinity following treatment may be more likely to be distressed by their ED. Furthermore, its impact on adjustment in survivorship may rely on the quality of their intimate relationships. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  2. Variation in adherence to external beam radiotherapy quality measures among elderly men with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelman, Justin E; Zelefsky, Michael J; Jang, Thomas L; Basch, Ethan M; Schrag, Deborah

    2007-12-01

    To characterize the variation in adherence to quality measures of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer and its relation to patient and provider characteristics in a population-based, representative sample of U.S. men. We evaluated EBRT quality measures proposed by a RAND expert panel of physicians among men aged >or=65 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 with localized prostate cancer and treated with primary EBRT using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare program. We assessed the adherence to five EBRT quality measures that were amenable to analysis using SEER-Medicare data: (1) use of conformal RT planning; (2) use of high-energy (>10-MV) photons; (3) use of custom immobilization; (4) completion of two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist in the year after therapy; and (5) radiation oncologist board certification. Of the 11,674 patients, 85% had received conformal RT planning, 75% had received high-energy photons, and 97% had received custom immobilization. One-third of patients had completed two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist, although 91% had at least one visit with a urologist or radiation oncologist. Most patients (85%) had been treated by a board-certified radiation oncologist. The overall high adherence to EBRT quality measures masked substantial variation in geography, socioeconomic status in the area of residence, and teaching affiliation of the RT facility. Future research should examine the reasons for the variations in these measures and whether the variation is associated with important clinical outcomes.

  3. Personality, treatment choice and satisfaction in patients with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Craig A; Erickson, Brad; Carney-Doebbling, Caroline; Gordon, Susanna; Fallon, Bernard; Konety, Badrinath R

    2007-11-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP), external beam radiation (XRT) and brachytherapy (BTX) are the most commonly used treatments for localized prostate cancer. We studied whether patient personality influences treatment choice and overall treatment satisfaction. From 1998 to 2002, 219 consecutive patients treated with RP (n = 74), XRT (n = 73), or BTX (n = 72) at our institution who remained free of biochemical recurrence were sent the Big Five Inventory (BFI) and a satisfaction/treatment participation questionnaire. We compared personality, satisfaction and participation scores between the three groups. Correlation between personality and satisfaction was determined. Multivariate regression was used to determine association between personality and satisfaction/participation after controlling for patient- and disease-related factors. Higher mean satisfaction and participation scores were observed within the RP and XRT groups, respectively (P = NS). No significant differences in personality were observed between groups. XRT patients tended to have higher extroversion, openness and agreeability scores, while RP patients tended to be more neurotic and conscientious (all P = NS). After controlling for other factors, a negative correlation was found between openness scores and satisfaction and a positive correlation between conscientiousness scores and satisfaction. Specific personality traits were associated with interest in participation in care for both RP and BTX patients but not for XRT patients. There are mild variations in personality as measured by the BFI between patients undergoing treatment for localized prostate cancer. Certain BFI-measured personality traits may be associated with levels of satisfaction following therapy. Disease concerns and provider recommendations may override the influence of personality in the decision-making process.

  4. [Can CT scanner and MRI predict capsular invasion of local cancer of the prostate? A study of 20 radical prostatectomies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintens, H; Chevallier, D; Michels, J F; Padovani, B; Villers, A; Amiel, J; Toubol, J

    1990-01-01

    Spread beyond the capsule is a poor prognosis factor in clinically localized carcinomas of the prostate; preoperative diagnosis is difficult and clinical evaluation usually underestimates tumor spread. This prospective study was undertaken to confront results of the conventional workup (rectal examination, transrectal ultrasonography and PSA) and of CT scan and MRI findings with findings upon the pathologic study of operative specimens following radical prostatectomy. Results show that the conventional workup remains the diagnostic gold standard and that CT scan yields no additional information. Technically faultless MRI with sections in the three planes is a good means for analyzing the capsule of the prostate.

  5. [Detecting high risk pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doret, Muriel; Gaucherand, Pascal

    2009-12-20

    Antenatal care is aiming to reduce maternal land foetal mortality and morbidity. Maternal and foetal mortality can be due to different causes. Their knowledge allows identifying pregnancy (high risk pregnancy) with factors associated with an increased risk for maternal and/or foetal mortality and serious morbidity. Identification of high risk pregnancies and initiation of appropriate treatment and/or surveillance should improve maternal and/or foetal outcome. New risk factors are continuously described thanks to improvement in antenatal care and development in biology and cytopathology, increasing complexity in identifying high risk pregnancies. Level of risk can change all over the pregnancy. Ideally, it should be evaluated prior to the pregnancy and at each antenatal visit. Clinical examination is able to screen for intra-uterin growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, threatened for preterm labour; ultrasounds help in the diagnosis of foetal morphological anomalies, foetal chromosomal anomalies, placenta praevia and abnormal foetal growth; biological exams are used to screen for pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, trisomy 21 (for which screening method just changed), rhesus immunisation, seroconversion for toxoplasmosis or rubeola, unknown infectious disease (syphilis, hepatitis B, VIH). During pregnancy, most of the preventive strategies have to be initiated during the first trimester or even before conception. Prevention for neural-tube defects, neonatal hypocalcemia and listeriosis should be performed for all women. On the opposite, some measures are concerning only women with risk factors such as prevention for toxoplasmosis, rhesus immunization (which recently changed), tobacco complications and pre-eclampsia and intra-uterine growth factor restriction.

  6. Morbidity in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with non-curative intent. A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Juel, K

    1999-01-01

    To compare the morbidity in patients with newly diagnosed clinically localized prostate cancer managed conservatively with the morbidity in a randomly selected age-matched background population with no history of prostate cancer. Patients younger than 75 y at diagnosis with newly diagnosed......-matched controls by approximately US$88 million, equivalent to an average extra cost per patient of approximately US$18,500. Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed conservatively had a significantly higher morbidity than age-matched controls due to admissions associated with prostate cancer...... clinically localized prostate cancer reported to the Danish Cancer Registry in the period 1977-1992. Morbidity in patients and age-matched controls was extracted from The Danish Hospital Discharge Registry. Admissions were stratified by discharge diagnosis. Overall 4744 patients were hospitalized for 251...

  7. 1.5-T multiparametric MRI using PI-RADS: a region by region analysis to localize the index-tumor of prostate cancer in patients undergoing prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reisaeter, L.A.; Futterer, J.J.; Halvorsen, O.J.; Nygard, Y.; Biermann, M.; Andersen, E.; Gravdal, K.; Haukaas, S.; Monssen, J.A.; Huisman, H.J.; Akslen, L.A.; Beisland, C.; Rorvik, J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to detect and localize prostate cancer has increased in recent years. In 2010, the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) published guidelines for mpMRI and introduced the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) for

  8. Tumor control outcomes of patients treated with trimodality therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Hillary; Bissonette, Eric A; Theodorescu, Dan

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate, in a pilot study, the tumor control outcomes of our approach and define the pretreatment characteristics that predict a response to therapy. Patients with advanced clinically localized prostate cancer have a high likelihood of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure 3 to 5 years after initial treatment. We adopted trimodality therapy (neoadjuvant and adjuvant androgen ablation, external beam radiotherapy [RT], and a brachytherapy boost) to augment biochemical disease-free survival in this patient population. From 1997 to 2000, 93 patients with clinical Stage T2b or greater, or PSA level greater than 10 ng/mL, or Gleason score 7 or greater were treated with external beam RT followed by palladium-103 brachytherapy. Two to three months before external beam RT, an 8 to 9-month regimen of leuprolide and an oral antiandrogen was initiated. Patients were followed up at 3 to 4-month intervals with PSA determination and digital rectal examination. Perineural invasion, the percentage of cancer in biopsy cores, pretreatment PSA level, clinical T stage, and Gleason score were analyzed as prognostic factors for biochemical failure defined by both the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) criteria and PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/mL. The median length of follow-up was 45 months. The overall probability of biochemical failure using a PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/mL at 4 years was 79% (95% confidence interval 69% to 89%). With the ASTRO criteria, the overall failure rate at the same point was 77% (95% confidence interval 68% to 87%). Gleason score (P = 0.07) showed a trend toward predicting biochemical failure using the PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/mL criterion. Trimodality RT offers excellent tumor control in patients with poor prognosis who often relapse early. Longer follow-up will be important to determine whether these results are durable over time.

  9. Long-Term Quality of Life Outcome After Proton Beam Monotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coen, John J., E-mail: jcoen@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Weyman, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Rodrigues, Anita [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Talcott, James A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: High-dose external radiation for localized prostate cancer results in favorable clinical outcomes and low toxicity rates. Here, we report long-term quality of life (QOL) outcome for men treated with conformal protons. Methods: QOL questionnaires were sent at specified intervals to 95 men who received proton radiation. Of these, 87 men reported 3- and/or 12-month outcomes, whereas 73 also reported long-term outcomes (minimum 2 years). Symptom scores were calculated at baseline, 3 months, 12 months, and long-term follow-up. Generalized estimating equation models were constructed to assess longitudinal outcomes while accounting for correlation among repeated measures in an individual patient. Men were stratified into functional groups from their baseline questionnaires (normal, intermediate, or poor function) for each symptom domain. Long-term QOL changes were assessed overall and within functional groups using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Statistically significant changes in all four symptom scores were observed in the longitudinal analysis. For the 73 men reporting long-term outcomes, there were significant change scores for incontinence (ID), bowel (BD) and sexual dysfunction (SD), but not obstructive/irritative voiding dysfunction (OID). When stratified by baseline functional category, only men with normal function had increased scores for ID and BD. For SD, there were significant changes in men with both normal and intermediate function, but not poor function. Conclusions: Patient reported outcomes are sensitive indicators of treatment-related morbidity. These results quantitate the long-term consequences of proton monotherapy for prostate cancer. Analysis by baseline functional category provides an individualized prediction of long-term QOL scores. High dose proton radiation was associated with small increases in bowel dysfunction and incontinence, with more pronounced changes in sexual dysfunction.

  10. Rectal dose-volume constraints in high-dose radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Cozzarini, Cesare; Fellin, Gianni; Foppiano, Franca; Menegotti, Loris; Piazzolla, Anna; Vavassori, Vittorio; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2003-11-15

    To investigate the relationship between rectal bleeding and dosimetric-clinical parameters in patients receiving three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer. In a retrospective national study (AIROPROS01-01, AIRO: Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica), planning/clinical data for 245 consecutive patients with stage T1-4N0-x prostate carcinoma who underwent 3D-CRT to 70-78 Gy (ICRU point) were pooled from four Italian institutions. The correlation between late rectal bleeding and rectal dose-volume data (the percentage of rectum receiving more than 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, and 75 Gy [V(50-70)]) and other dosimetric and clinical parameters were investigated in univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox regression model) analyses. Median follow-up was 2 years. Twenty-three patients were scored as late bleeders according to a modified RTOG definition (Grade 2: 16; Grade 3: 7); the actuarial 2-year rate was 9.2%. Excepting V75, all median and third quartile V(50-70) values were found to be significantly correlated with late bleeding at univariate analysis. The smallest p value was seen for V(50) below/above the third quartile value (66%). The V70 (cut-off value: 30%) was found to be also predictive for late bleeding. In the high-dose subgroup (74-78 Gy), Grade 3 bleeding was highly correlated with this constraint. The predictive value of both V(50) and V(70) was confirmed by multivariate analyses. The present article provides evidence for correlation between rectal DVH parameters and late rectal bleeding in patients treated with curative intent with 3D-CRT. To keep the rate of moderate/severe rectal bleeding below 5-10%, it seems advisable to limit V(50) to 60-65%, V(60) to 45-50%, and V70 to 25-30%.

  11. Pathological Predictors for Site of Local Recurrence After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Supriya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Toi, Ants [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Taback, Nathan [Division of Biostatistics, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Evans, Andrew [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Milosevic, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Morton, Gerard; Vesprini, Danny [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Menard, Cynthia, E-mail: Cynthia.Menard@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Rational design of targeted radiotherapy (RT) in prostate cancer (Pca) hinges on a better understanding of spatial patterns of recurrence. We sought to identify pathological factors predictive for site of local recurrence (LR) after external beam RT. Methods and Materials: Prospective databases were reviewed to identify men with LR after RT from 1997 through 2009. Patients with biochemical failure and biopsy-confirmed Pca more than 2 years after RT were evaluated. Prediction for site of recurrence based on the following pretreatment factors was determined on independent and cluster-sextant basis: presence of malignancy, dominant vs. nondominant percentage core length (PCL) involvement, PCL {>=} or <40%, and Gleason score. Sites of dominant PCL were defined as sextants with peak PCL involvement minus 10%, and >5% for each patient. Results: Forty-one patients with low-intermediate risk Pca constituted the study cohort. Median time to biopsy after RT was 51 months (range, 24-145). Of 246 sextants, 74 were involved with tumor at baseline. When sextants are treated as independent observations the presence of malignancy (77% vs. 22%, p = 0.0001), dominant PCL (90% vs. 46%, p = 0.0001), and PCL {>=}40% (89% vs. 68 %, p = 0.04) were found to be significant predictors for LR, although PCL {>=}40% did not retain statistical significance if sextants were considered correlated. The vast majority of patients (95%) recurred at the original site of dominant PCL or PCL {>=}40%, and 44% also recurred in regions of nondominant PCL <40% (n = 8) and/or benign sampling (n = 14) at baseline. Conclusions: LR after RT predominantly occurs in regions bearing higher histological tumor burden but are not isolated to these sites. Our data highlights the value of spatially resolved baseline pathological sampling and may assist in the design of clinical trials tailoring RT dose prescriptions to subregions of the prostate gland.

  12. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.37±0.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.1±3.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  13. Detection and localization of carcinoma within the prostate using high resolution transrectal gamma imaging (TRGI) of monoclonal antibody directed at prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)—Proof of concept and initial imaging results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franc, Benjamin L., E-mail: francbl@radiological.com [Radiological Associates of Sacramento Medical Group, 1500 Expo Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95815 (United States); Cho, Steve Y. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiological Associates of Sacramento Medical Group, 1500 Expo Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95815 (United States); Cui, Yonggang [Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2 Center Street, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsui, Benjamin [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Vandewalker, Kristen M.N. [Diagnostic Pathology Medical Group, 3301 C. Street, Suite 200E, Sacramento, CA 95816 (United States); Holz, Andrew L.; Poonamallee, Uday [Radiological Associates of Sacramento Medical Group, 1500 Expo Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95815 (United States); Pomper, Martin G. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); James, Ralph B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2 Center Street, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Molecular imaging methods may identify primary prostate cancer foci and potentially guide biopsy and optimal management approaches. In this exploratory study, safety and first human imaging experience of a novel solid state endocavity transrectal gamma-imaging (TRGI) device was evaluated. Methods: Twelve patients received 5 ± 0.5 mCi In-111 capromab pendetide (ProstaScint{sup ®}) intravenously and the prostate of each was imaged 4 days later transrectally using an endoluminal cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based compact gamma camera (ProxiScan™, Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, Inc.). Immediate and 5–7-day post imaging safety assessments were performed. In those patients with a prostate cancer diagnosis (N = 10), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pelvis were also acquired. Images were reviewed and sites of suspected cancer were localized by prostate quadrant by consensus of two nuclear medicine physicians. Pathology from TRUS biopsy, or surgical pathology following prostatectomy (N = 3) when available, served as the gold standard. Results: There were no serious adverse events associated with TRGI. No focal signal was detected in patients without a diagnosis of prostate cancer (N = 2). Of 40 quadrants evaluated in the cancer cohort (N = 10), 22 contained malignancy. In 8 of these 10 patients, the most focal site of uptake on TRGI corresponded to a prostatic quadrant with biopsy-proven malignancy. In 6 cancer-containing quadrants, TRGI was positive where SPECT-CT was negative; MRI showed a detectable abnormality in only 1 of these 6 quadrants. Qualitative image review of the planar TRGI images for prostate cancer localization was severely limited in some cases by scatter artifact within the vicinity of the prostate gland arising from physiologic urine and blood pool activity from nearby structures. Conclusions: TRGI is a safe imaging method that can potentially detect radiopharmaceutical

  14. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Localized and Locally Advanced Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 2,5 Year Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovov, V. A.; Dvoynikov, S. Y.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    Introduction & Objectives: High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be a successful treatment for localised prostate cancer (PC). Here we have explored the effectiveness of the HIFU treatment for hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC). Materials & Methods: 341 patients were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2009; all of them showed treatment failure following hormone ablation. The median time before hormone-resistance was 20 (3-48) months. In the group with localised PC: number of patients 237, Gleason score ≤7, stage T1-2N0M0, age 69 (60-89) years, mean PSA before treatment 40,0 (5,8-92,9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—39,3 (28-92) cc; in the group with locally advanced PC: number of patients 104, Gleason score ≤9, stage T2-3N0M0, age 72 (52-83) years, PSA before treatment 30,3 (20,1-60) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—41,2 (25-198) cc. HIFU was delivered under spinal anesthesia using the Ablatherm HIFU device (EDAP, France). Pre HIFU transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed for all patients. Mean follow-up time 18 months (3-30). Results: The median PSA level 12 months after HIFU treatment was 0,04 (0-2,24) ng/ml—localised PC, and for locally advanced disease—0,05 (0-48,4) ng/ml, at 18 months after HIFU treatment this was 0,2 (0,02-2,0) ng/ml for localised PC, and for locally advanced disease 0,18 (0,04-7,45) ng/ml. Patients with localised PC has 4,5% recurrence, those with locally advanced PC 20%. Kaplan-Meir analyses of the total group indicated that the risk of recurrence after 1 year follow-up was 10%, the risk of recurrence was 19% after 2 years of follow-up. Conclusions: Our initial experience shows that ultrasound ablation is safe, minimally invasive and effective as a treatment for localised and locally advanced hormone-resistant prostate cancer.

  15. Duration of Androgen Deprivation in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Update of NRG Oncology RTOG 9202

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Colleen A.F., E-mail: clawton@mcw.edu [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lin, Xiaolei [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hanks, Gerald E. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lepor, Herbert [New York University, New York, New York (United States); Grignon, David J. [Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Brereton, Harmar D. [Northeast Radiation Oncology Center, Dunmore, Pennsylvania (United States); Bedi, Meena [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Sutter General Hospital, Sacramento, California (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth L. [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Venkatesan, Varagur M. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Horwitz, Eric M. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pisansky, Thomas M. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Kim, Harold [Wayne State University-Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Parliament, Matthew B. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Rabinovitch, Rachel [University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado (United States); Roach, Mack [University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Kwok, Young [University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Dignam, James J. [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Trial RTOG 9202 was a phase 3 randomized trial designed to determine the optimal duration of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) when combined with definitive radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of locally advanced nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Long-term follow-up results of this study now available are relevant to the management of this disease. Methods and Materials: Men (N=1554) with adenocarcinoma of the prostate (cT2c-T4, N0-Nx) with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <150 ng/mL and no evidence of distant metastasis were randomized (June 1992 to April 1995) to short-term ADT (STAD: 4 months of flutamide 250 mg 3 times per day and goserelin 3.6 mg per month) and definitive RT versus long-term ADT (LTAD: STAD with definitive RT plus an additional 24 months of monthly goserelin). Results: Among 1520 protocol-eligible and evaluable patients, the median follow-up time for this analysis was 19.6 years. In analysis adjusted for prognostic covariates, LTAD improved disease-free survival (29% relative reduction in failure rate, P<.0001), local progression (46% relative reduction, P=.02), distant metastases (36% relative reduction, P<.0001), disease-specific survival (30% relative reduction, P=.003), and overall survival (12% relative reduction, P=.03). Other-cause mortality (non–prostate cancer) did not differ (5% relative reduction, P=.48). Conclusions: LTAD and RT is superior to STAD and RT for the treatment of locally advanced nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate and should be considered the standard of care.

  16. Complications and Functional Results of Surgery for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Joniau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of surgery in clinical stage T3 prostate cancer (cT3 PCa is still subject to debate. We reviewed the records of 139 consecutive patients who underwent a radical prostatectomy (RP for cT3 PCa with a mean follow-up of 8 years. All data related to surgical and perioperative complications were collected. Continence and erectile function were assessed at 12 months postoperatively and long-term oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Rectal injury and injury of the obturator nerve occurred both in 0.7% of cases. No serious in-hospital complications were noted and no reintervention was needed. Lymphatic leakage was noted in 2.2% of patients and 1.4% experienced prolonged drainage of urine. In 7.2%, wound-related problems occurred. Anastomotic stricture occurred in 2.9%. These complication rates were not different compared to surgical series of RP in localized PCa. At 12 months, complete continence was 87.8% and erectile function had fully recovered in 6% and 10% of patients who underwent a non-nerve sparing or unilateral nerve-sparing procedure, respectively. 10-year estimated biochemical PFS, clinical PFS, CSS and OS were 51.8%, 85.6%, 94.6% and 85.9%, respectively. In cT3 PCa, RP is technically feasible with morbidity comparable to RP in clinically localized PCa. Long-term oncologic control was excellent.

  17. Obstructive uropathy from locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer: an old problem with new therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Justin I; Duty, Brian D; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur D

    2012-02-01

    Despite stage migration to more organ-confined disease in the era of prostate-specific antigen, the complications of advanced prostate cancer are still relatively common. Urinary tract obstruction in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer can have a varied presentation, because it may occur in multiple anatomic locations at any point in the natural history of the disease. In all cases, management depends on the current stage of disease, technical feasibility of potential therapeutic interventions, and overall prognosis of the patient. This review highlights a practical approach to the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of obstructive uropathy from prostate cancer.

  18. Impact of Dose to the Bladder Trigone on Long-Term Urinary Function After High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Oh, Jung Hun; Hunt, Margie [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kollmeier, Marisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura; Yorke, Ellen; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jackson, Andrew, E-mail: jacksona@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential association between genitourinary (GU) toxicity and planning dose–volume parameters for GU pelvic structures after high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy in localized prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 268 patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy to a prescribed dose of 86.4 Gy in 48 fractions during June 2004-December 2008 were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Dose–volume histograms of the whole bladder, bladder wall, urethra, and bladder trigone were analyzed. The primary endpoint for GU toxicity was an IPSS sum increase ≥10 points over baseline. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 3-7.7 years). Thirty-nine patients experienced an IPSS sum increase ≥10 during follow-up; 84% remained event free at 5 years. After univariate analysis, lower baseline IPSS sum (P=.006), the V90 of the trigone (P=.006), and the maximal dose to the trigone (P=.003) were significantly associated with an IPSS sum increase ≥10. After multivariate analysis, lower baseline IPSS sum (P=.009) and increased maximal dose to the trigone (P=.005) remained significantly associated. Seventy-two patients had both a lower baseline IPSS sum and a higher maximal dose to the trigone and were defined as high risk, and 68 patients had both a higher baseline IPSS sum and a lower maximal dose to the trigone and were defined as low risk for development of an IPSS sum increase ≥10. Twenty-one of 72 high-risk patients (29%) and 5 of 68 low-risk patients (7%) experienced an IPSS sum increase ≥10 (P=.001; odds ratio 5.19). Conclusions: The application of hot spots to the bladder trigone was significantly associated with relevant changes in IPSS during follow-up. Reduction of radiation dose to the lower bladder and specifically the

  19. External Beam Radiotherapy Affects Serum Testosterone in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompe, Raisa S; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Zaffuto, Emanuele; Smith, Ariane; Bandini, Marco; Marchioni, Michele; Tian, Zhe; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Schiffmann, Jonas; Delouya, Guila; Lambert, Carole; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Beauchemin, Marie Claude; Barkati, Maroie; Ménard, Cynthia; Graefen, Markus; Saad, Fred; Tilki, Derya; Taussky, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have examined testosterone levels after external beam radiation (EBRT) monotherapy, but since 2002 only sparse contemporary data have been reported. To examine testosterone kinetics in a large series of contemporary patients after EBRT. The study was conducted in 425 patients who underwent definitive EBRT for localized prostate cancer from 2002 through 2014. Patients were enrolled in several phase II and III trials. Exclusion criteria were neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy or missing data. Testosterone was recorded at baseline and then according to each study protocol (not mandatory in all protocols). Statistical analyses consisted of means and proportions, Kaplan-Meier plots, and logistic and Cox regression analyses. Testosterone kinetics after EBRT monotherapy and their influence on biochemical recurrence. Median follow-up of 248 assessable patients was 72 months. One hundred eighty-six patients (75.0%) showed a decrease in testosterone. Median time to first decrease was 6.4 months. Median percentage of decrease to the nadir was 30% and 112 (45.2%) developed biochemical hypogonadism (serum testosterone testosterone decrease, 117 (62.9%) recovered to at least 90% of baseline levels. Advanced age, increased body mass index, higher baseline testosterone level, and lower nadir level were associated with a lower chance of testosterone recovery. Subgroup analyses of 166 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy confirmed the results recorded for the entire cohort. In survival analyses, neither testosterone decrease nor recovery was predictive for biochemical recurrence. EBRT monotherapy influences testosterone kinetics, and although most patients will recover, approximately 45% will have biochemical hypogonadism. We report on the largest contemporary series of patients treated with EBRT monotherapy in whom testosterone kinetics were ascertained. Limitations are that testosterone follow-up was not uniform and the study

  20. Tolerance of local anesthetic for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: our experience and a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, M.R.E.; Bryant, N.J.; Brown, J.A.; Tiwari, P.; Cooperberg, P.L.; Wong, A.D. [St Paul' s Hospital, Ultrasound Dept., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: twong@providcencehealth.bc.ca

    2006-06-15

    To determine whether local anesthetic injection or gel reduced pain during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies and whether there was significant difference between quadrant and apex-only anesthesia. Between September 2001 and May 2002, 240 male patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen and (or) abnormal digital rectal examination were randomized into 1 of 4 groups: 1) transrectal lidocaine gel, 2) quadrant lidocaine injections, 3) apex-only lidocaine injections, or 4) no local anesthetic. Patients scored their pain on a numerical rating scale where 0 indicated no pain and 10 indicated worst pain. We analyzed mean and standard deviations of scores, using a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc multiple comparisons with Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) studentized range test to determine whether there were significant differences across the groups. There was no significant difference between local anesthetic gel (mean 3.1, SD 1.9) and no anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9) or between quadrant (mean 1.7, SD 1.7) and apex-only (mean 2.0, SD 1.8) local anesthetic injections. There was significant difference between quadrant injections (mean 1.7, SD 1.7) and no local anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9) and between apex-only injections (mean 2.0, SD 1.8) and no local anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9). There was significant pain reduction with local anesthetic injections but not with gel, and since there was no significant difference in efficacy between quadrant and apex-only injections, we recommend apex-only local anesthetic injections for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies because it simplifies the injection procedure. (author)

  1. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Using Sonablate-500 for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer: 6-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yoshihiro

    2006-05-01

    We evaluated 281 patients of localized prostate cancer treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for biochemical disease-free rate, safety, morbidity and predictors of biochemical outcome. A total of 281 patients underwent HIFU with the use of Sonablate-500 and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Biochemical failure was defined according to the criteria recommended by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel. The biochemical disease-free rates at 1, 3 and 5 years in all patients were 78%, 74% and 72%, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rates at 5 years for patients with pretreatment PSA less than 10 ng/ml, 10.01 to 20.0 ng/ml and more than 20.0 ng/ml were 88%, 70% and 17%, respectively (ppatients with localized prostate cancer, especially those with a pretreatment PSA level less than 20 ng/ml.

  2. Artificial neural network for predicting pathological stage of clinically localized prostate cancer in a Taiwanese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Tsao

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: ANN was superior to LR at predicting OCD in prostate cancer. Compared with the validation of current Partin Tables for the Taiwanese population, the ANN model resulted in larger AUCs and more accurate prediction of the pathologic stage of prostate cancer.

  3. Tolerability, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of bicalutamide 300 mg, 450 mg or 600 mg as monotherapy for patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, compared with castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, Chris J; Iversen, Peter; Tammela, Teuvo

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and effect on endocrinology of bicalutamide given as once-daily monotherapy at doses of >150 mg to patients with locally advanced (M0) or metastatic (M1) prostate cancer, with efficacy as a secondary endpoint.......To evaluate the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and effect on endocrinology of bicalutamide given as once-daily monotherapy at doses of >150 mg to patients with locally advanced (M0) or metastatic (M1) prostate cancer, with efficacy as a secondary endpoint....

  4. The impact of social networks and partnership status on treatment choice in men with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamie, Karim; Kwan, Lorna; Connor, Sarah E; Zavala, Mary; Labo, Jessica; Litwin, Mark S

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether martial status and social support impact treatment choice. The decision to pursue radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer is often influenced by factors outside the realm of tumour risk, such as a man's support system at home. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 418 low-income men who were diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer and underwent definitive treatment with either radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy. We performed univariate and multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression analysis, with the dependent variable being treatment type. Confidence intervals (CIs) for the predicted probabilities and relative risks were derived using bias-corrected bootstrapping with 1000 repetitions. Men with two or more members in their support system were more likely to be older, Hispanic, have less than a high school education, earn more than US $1500 monthly, have high-risk disease and be in a significant relationship. In multivariate analysis, partnered men with fewer than two social support members (relative risk, RR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.63) were more likely to undergo surgery, whereas men who were morbidly obese (RR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.09-0.88), high school graduates (RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64-0.99) or had high-risk disease (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.44-0.85) were less likely to undergo surgery than their respective referent groups. Partnered men with two or more social support members were no more likely to undergo surgery than unpartnered men who lacked any social support. In the present study cohort, married men with fewer than two members in their social network were more likely to have undergone surgery. Although marital status is often used as a proxy for social support, we find that the quality of support and partner may impact treatment type more than the extent of the social matrix. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  5. Focal therapy for localized unifocal and multifocal prostate cancer: A prospective development study using real time MR guided focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, A.; Caliolo, G.; Boni, F.; Anzidei, M.; Catalano, C.

    2017-03-01

    To assess safety and feasibility of non-invasive high intensity 3T MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatment of localized prostate cancer in an exploratory designed study. Men aged 45-80 years were eligible for this prospective study if they had low-risk localized prostate cancer (prostate specific antigen [PSA] ≤10 ng/mL, Gleason score ≤ 3 + 3), with no previous androgen deprivation or treatment for prostate cancer, and who could safely undergo multiparametric MRI (Discovery 750, GE; Gd-Bopta, Bracco) and have a spinal anesthetic. Patients underwent focal therapy using real time MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), delivered to all known cancer lesions, with a margin of normal tissue. Primary endpoints were adverse events (serious and otherwise) and urinary symptoms and erectile function assessed using patient questionnaires. 8 men were recruited between June 2011 and June 2012. After treatment, one man was admitted to hospital for acute urinary retention. Another patient had self-resolving, mild, intermittent dysuria (median duration 5.0 days). Urinary tract infection was not reported. Urinary debris occurred in 6 men (75%), with a median duration of 12 days. Median overall International Index of Erectile Function-15 (IIEF-15) scores were similar at baseline and at 6 to 12 months (p=0.060), as were median IIEF-15 scores for intercourse satisfaction (p=0.433), sexual desire (p=0.622), and overall satisfaction (p=0.256). There was an improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms, assessed by International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), between baseline and 6 to 12 months (p=0.026). All 8 men with no baseline urinary incontinence were leak-free and pad-free by 9 months. No histological evidence of cancer was identified in 7 of 8 men biopsied at 6 months (87,5%); overall, the entire population (8 patients) was free of clinically significant cancer and had no evidence of disease on multi-parametric MRI at 6 to 12 months. MR guided Focused

  6. Local relapses after prostatic curie-therapy by permanent implants: radio-resistant prostate cancers or bad quality implant; Rechutes locales apres curietherapie prostatique par implants permanents: cancers de prostate radioresistants ou mauvaise qualite de l'implantation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crehange, G.; Krishnamurthy, D.; Cunha, A. J.; Gros, S.; Pickett, B.; Hsu, I.C.; Gottschalk, A.R.; Pouliot, J.; Roach III, M. [UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco (United States)

    2011-10-15

    The assessment of the quality of a permanent implant of grains for a prostate cancer treatment is based on the dosimetric plan performed before the grain implantation or shortly after. The authors report a study of the correlation between 'under-dosed' areas assessed at the time of relapse, and intra-prostatic relapse sites. The study is based on 24 cases of proved intra-prostatic relapse. The prostatic volume has been divided into 12 areas, and three types of under-dosing have been defined. Parameters are the dose received by 90 per cent of the volume, and the volume receiving 100 per cent of the dose. A correlation appears between positive biopsies and 'under-dosing'. This corresponds to a bad quality implantation of grains for patients in a situation of prostatic relapse after implantation. Short communication

  7. Patient positioning based on a radioactive tracer implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer: a performance and safety evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruijf, Willy J M; Verstraete, Jan; Neustadter, David; Corn, Benjamin W; Hol, Sandra; Venselaar, Jack L M; Davits, Rob J; Wijsman, Bart P; Van den Bergh, Laura; Budiharto, Tom; Oyen, Raymond; Haustermans, Karin; Poortmans, Philip M P

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 ((192)Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tobacco smoking, polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes, and risk of localized and advanced prostate cancer: results from the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Ahva; Corral, Román; Catsburg, Chelsea; Joshi, Amit D; Kim, Andre; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Koo, Jocelyn; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Stern, Mariana C

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between tobacco smoking and prostate cancer (PCa) remains inconclusive. This study examined the association between tobacco smoking and PCa risk taking into account polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes as possible effect modifiers (9 polymorphisms and 1 predicted phenotype from metabolism enzyme genes). The study included cases (n = 761 localized; n = 1199 advanced) and controls (n = 1139) from the multiethnic California Collaborative Case–Control Study of Prostate Cancer. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between tobacco smoking variables and risk of localized and advanced PCa risk. Being a former smoker, regardless of time of quit smoking, was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.6). Among non-Hispanic Whites, ever smoking was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1–2.1), whereas current smoking was associated with risk of advanced PCa (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.0–1.9). However, no associations were observed between smoking intensity, duration or pack-year variables, and advanced PCa. No statistically significant trends were seen among Hispanics or African-Americans. The relationship between smoking status and PCa risk was modified by the CYP1A2 rs7662551 polymorphism (P-interaction = 0.008). In conclusion, tobacco smoking was associated with risk of PCa, primarily localized disease among non-Hispanic Whites. This association was modified by a genetic variant in CYP1A2, thus supporting a role for tobacco carcinogens in PCa risk. PMID:25355624

  9. HIFU therapy for local recurrence of prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy - 5,5 years experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovov, V. A.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.; Matysh, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation (HIFU) for local recurrence of prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and radical prostatectomy (RPE). Materials and Methods: During 2007-2013 years 47 patients with local recurrence of prostate cancer after EBRT and RPE undertook HIFU therapy on the system "Ablaterm» (EDAP, France). Relapse arose after an average of 2 years after EBRT and RPE. Median follow-up after HIFU therapy was 38 (12-60) months. The mean age was 68.5 ± 5.8 years. The median PSA level before HIFU - 15.4 (7-48) ng / mL. Results: In 34 patients (72.3%) at six months after treatment the median PSA was 0.4 (0-3.2) ng / mL, in 48 months - 0.9 (0.4-7.5) ng / mL. In 13 patients (27.7%) at 6 months was observed progression of the disease. In general, after a 5-year follow-up 72.3% of the patients had no data for the progression and recurrence. Conclusion: HIFU therapy in patients with local recurrence of prostate cancer after EBRT and RPE is minimally invasive and effective technology.

  10. Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: AUA/ASTRO/SUO Guideline. Part I: Risk Stratification, Shared Decision Making, and Care Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Martin G; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Kirkby, Erin; Chen, Ronald C; Crispino, Tony; Fontanarosa, Joann; Freedland, Stephen J; Greene, Kirsten; Klotz, Laurence H; Makarov, Danil V; Nelson, Joel B; Rodrigues, George; Sandler, Howard M; Taplin, Mary Ellen; Treadwell, Jonathan R

    2017-12-14

    This guideline is structured to provide a clinical framework stratified by cancer severity to facilitate care decisions and guide the specifics of implementing the selected management options. The summary presented represents Part I of the two-part series dedicated to Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: AUA/ASTRO/SUO Guideline discussing risk stratification and care options by cancer severity. The systematic review utilized in the creation of this guideline was completed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and through additional supplementation by ECRI Institute. This review included articles published between January 2007 and March 2014 with an update search conducted through August 2016. When sufficient evidence existed, the body of evidence for a particular treatment was assigned a strength rating of A (high), B (moderate), or C (low) for support of Strong, Moderate, or Conditional Recommendations. Additional information is provided as Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions (table 2 in supplementary unabridged guideline, http://jurology.com/). The AUA (American Urological Association), ASTRO, and SUO (Society of Urologic Oncology) formulated an evidence-based guideline based on a risk-stratified clinical framework for the management of localized prostate cancer. This guideline attempts to improve a clinician's ability to treat patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, but higher quality evidence in future trials will be essential to improve the level of care for these patients. In all cases, patient preferences should be considered when choosing a management strategy. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eDal Pra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa. The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: I. androgen signaling pathway; II. hypoxic tumor cells and regions; III. DNA damage response (DDR pathway; and IV. abnormal extra/intra-cell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa.

  12. Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer (Cancer Care Ontario Guideline): American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ronald C; Rumble, R Bryan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Finelli, Antonio; Ehdaie, Behfar; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Morgan, Scott C; Tyldesley, Scott; Haluschak, John J; Tan, Winston; Justman, Stewart; Jain, Suneil

    2016-06-20

    To endorse Cancer Care Ontario's guideline on Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations. The Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The ASCO Endorsement Panel then reviewed the content and the recommendations. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline, published in May 2015, are clear, thorough, and based upon the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline with added qualifying statements. The Cancer Care Ontario recommendation regarding 5-alpha reductase inhibitors was not endorsed by the ASCO panel. For most patients with low-risk (Gleason score ≤ 6) localized prostate cancer, active surveillance is the recommended disease management strategy. Factors including younger age, prostate cancer volume, patient preference, and ethnicity should be taken into account when making management decisions. Select patients with low-volume, intermediate-risk (Gleason 3 + 4 = 7) prostate cancer may be offered active surveillance. Active surveillance protocols should include prostate-specific antigen testing, digital rectal examinations, and serial prostate biopsies. Ancillary radiologic and genomic tests are investigational but may have a role in patients with discordant clinical and/or pathologic findings. Patients who are reclassified to a higher-risk category (Gleason score ≥ 7) or who have significant increases in tumor volume on subsequent biopsies should be offered active therapy. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Evaluation of urinary prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG score changes when starting androgen-deprivation therapy with triptorelin 6-month formulation in patients with locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Schalken, Jack A; Cabri, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    . PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Triptocare study was a prospective, open-label, multicentre, single-arm, Phase III study of triptorelin 22.5 mg in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, who were naïve to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). The primary objective was to model the urinary PCA3....... CONCLUSION: These data from the Triptocare study suggest that urinary PCA3 or TMPRSS2-ERG score are not reliable markers of cancer stage in advanced prostate cancer. Urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores do not appear to be useful in assessing response to ADT in advanced prostate cancer, with most patients...

  14. Heterogeneity of miRNA expression in localized prostate cancer with clinicopathological correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hussein Zedan

    Full Text Available In the last decade microRNAs (miRNAs have been widely investigated in prostate cancer (PCa and have shown to be promising biomarkers in diagnostic, prognostic and predictive settings. However, tumor heterogeneity may influence miRNA expression. The aims of this study were to assess the impact of tumor heterogeneity, as demonstrated by a panel of selected miRNAs in PCa, and to correlate miRNA expression with risk profile and patient outcome.Prostatectomy specimens and matched, preoperative needle biopsies from a retrospective cohort of 49 patients, who underwent curatively intended surgery for localized PCa, were investigated with a panel of 6 miRNAs (miRNA-21, miRNA-34a, miRNA-125b, miRNA-126, miRNA-143, and miRNA-145 using tissue micro-array (TMA and in situ hybridization (ISH. Inter- and intra-patient variation was assessed using intra-class correlation (ICC.Four miRNAs (miRNA-21, miRNA-34a, miRNA-125, and miRNA-126 were significantly upregulated in PCa compared to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, and except for miRNA-21 these miRNAs documented a positive correlation between the expression level in PCa cores and their matched BPH cores, (r > 0.72. The ICC varied from 0.451 to 0.764, with miRNA-34a showing an intra-tumoral heterogeneity accounting for less than 50% of the total variation. Regarding clinicopathological outcomes, only miRNA-143 showed potential as a prognostic marker with a higher expression correlating with longer relapse-free survival (p = 0.016.The present study documents significant upregulation of the expression of miRNA-21, miRNA-34a, miRNA-125, and miRNA-126 in PCa compared to BPH and suggests a possible prognostic value associated with the expression of miRNA-143. The results, however, document intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the expression of various miRNAs calling for caution when using these tumor tissue biomarkers in prognostic and predictive settings.

  15. Dietary Phytoestrogens and Prostate Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurzer, Mindy S; Slaton, Joel

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to evaluate the effects of soy phytoestrogens on reproductive hormones and prostate tissue markers of cell proliferation and androgen action in men at high risk of prostate cancer...

  16. A nomogram to predict Gleason sum upgrading of clinically diagnosed localized prostate cancer among Chinese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-You; Zhu, Yao; Wang, Chao-Fu; Zhang, Shi-Lin; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Although several models have been developed to predict the probability of Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens, most of these models are restricted to prostate-specific antigen screening-detected prostate cancer. This study aimed to build a nomogram for the prediction of Gleason sum upgrading in clinically diagnosed prostate cancer. The study cohort comprised 269 Chinese prostate cancer patients who underwent prostate biopsy with a minimum of 10 cores and were subsequently treated with radical prostatectomy. Of all included patients, 220 (81.8%) were referred with clinical symptoms. The prostate-specific antigen level, primary and secondary biopsy Gleason scores, and clinical T category were used in a multivariate logistic regression model to predict the probability of Gleason sum upgrading. The developed nomogram was validated internally. Gleason sum upgrading was observed in 90 (33.5%) patients. Our nomogram showed a bootstrap-corrected concordance index of 0.789 and good calibration using 4 readily available variables. The nomogram also demonstrated satisfactory statistical performance for predicting significant upgrading. External validation of the nomogram published by Chun et al. in our cohort showed a marked discordance between the observed and predicted probabilities of Gleason sum upgrading. In summary, a new nomogram to predict Gleason sum upgrading in clinically diagnosed prostate cancer was developed, and it demonstrated good statistical performance upon internal validation. PMID:24559852

  17. Chronic Infection of the Prostate by Chlamydia muridarum Is Accompanied by Local Inflammation and Pelvic Pain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Leonardo R; Breser, Maria L; Godoy, Gloria J; Salazar, Florencia C; Mackern-Oberti, Juan P; Cuffini, Cecilia; Motrich, Ruben D; Rivero, Virginia E

    2017-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis urogenital infections are the leading cause of sexually transmitted bacterial infections. Although the prevalence of chlamydial infection is similar in men and women, current research is mainly focused on women, neglecting the study of male genital tract infections. We, therefore, investigated Chlamydia infection in the rodent male genital tract. Male NOD and C57BL/6 mice were inoculated in the meatus urethra with C. muridarum. Bacterial DNA, leukocyte infiltration of male genital tract tissues, pelvic pain, and Chlamydia-specific immune responses were analyzed at different time points. The inoculation of C. muridarum in the meatus urethra of male mice resulted in an ascending and widely disseminated infection of the male genital tract. C. muridarum remained longer and with the highest bacterial burdens in the prostate, thus showing a special tropism for this organ. Infection caused leukocyte infiltration, mainly composed by neutrophils, and also induced early pelvic pain development that rapidly dropped and resolved as the infection became chronic. Bacterial load and leukocyte infiltration was observed in all prostate lobes, although dorsolateral prostate was the most affected lobe. Interestingly, immune responses induced by both mice strains were characterized by the production of high levels of IL-10 during early stages of the infection, with highest and sustained levels observed in NOD mice, which showed to be less efficient in clearing the infection. Chronic infection of the prostate accompanied by local inflammation and pelvic pain development described herein have important implications for the improvement of the diagnosis and for the design of new efficient therapies. Prostate 77:517-529, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Comparison of Transperineal Mapping Biopsy Results with Whole-Mount Radical Prostatectomy Pathology in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J. Katz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of transperineal mapping biopsy (TMB by comparing it to the pathology specimen of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP for localized prostate cancer. Methods. From March 2007 to September 2009, 78 men at a single center underwent TMB; 17 of 78 subsequently underwent RP. TMB cores were grouped into four quadrants and matched to data from RP whole-mount slides. Gleason score, tumor location and volume, cross-sectional area, and maximal diameter were measured; sensitivity and specificity were assessed. Results. For the 17 patients who underwent RP, TMB revealed 12 (71% had biopsy Gleason grades ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76% had bilateral disease. RP specimens showed 14 (82% had Gleason scores ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76% had bilateral disease. Sensitivity and specificity of TMB for prostate cancer detection were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72%–94% and 83% (95% CI 62%–95%, respectively. Four quadrants negative for cancer on TMB were positive on prostatectomy, and six positive on TMB were negative on prostatectomy. Conclusion. TMB is a highly invasive procedure that can accurately detect and localize prostate cancer. These findings help establish baseline performance characteristics for TMB and its utility for organ-sparing strategies.

  19. Comparison of transperineal mapping biopsy results with whole-mount radical prostatectomy pathology in patients with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Darren J; Pinochet, Rodrigo; Richards, Kyle A; Godoy, Guilherme; Udo, Kazuma; Nogueira, Lucas; Cronin, Angel M; Fine, Samson W; Scardino, Peter T; Coleman, Jonathon A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of transperineal mapping biopsy (TMB) by comparing it to the pathology specimen of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods. From March 2007 to September 2009, 78 men at a single center underwent TMB; 17 of 78 subsequently underwent RP. TMB cores were grouped into four quadrants and matched to data from RP whole-mount slides. Gleason score, tumor location and volume, cross-sectional area, and maximal diameter were measured; sensitivity and specificity were assessed. Results. For the 17 patients who underwent RP, TMB revealed 12 (71%) had biopsy Gleason grades ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76%) had bilateral disease. RP specimens showed 14 (82%) had Gleason scores ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76%) had bilateral disease. Sensitivity and specificity of TMB for prostate cancer detection were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72%-94%) and 83% (95% CI 62%-95%), respectively. Four quadrants negative for cancer on TMB were positive on prostatectomy, and six positive on TMB were negative on prostatectomy. Conclusion. TMB is a highly invasive procedure that can accurately detect and localize prostate cancer. These findings help establish baseline performance characteristics for TMB and its utility for organ-sparing strategies.

  20. Polyamine metabolism in prostate cancer : studies on localization, cell growth and apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Raymond Godfried

    2000-01-01

    The involvement of polyamines in cellular growth and differentiation has prompted many studies of their possible role in cellular neoplasia, including prostatic carcinoma and benign hyperplasia, which represent increasingly important pathologies in men. The precise role of the

  1. Focal laser ablation for localized prostate cancer: principles, clinical trials, and our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ted; Mendhiratta, Neil; Sperling, Dan; Lepor, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Focal therapy of prostate cancer is an evolving treatment strategy that destroys a predefined region of the prostate gland that harbors clinically significant disease. Although long-term oncologic control has yet to be demonstrated, focal therapy is associated with a marked decrease in treatment-related morbidity. Focal laser ablation is an emerging modality that has several advantages, most notably real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility. This review presents the principles of laser ablation, the role of multiparametric MRI for delineating the site of significant prostate cancer, a summary of published clinical studies, and our initial experience with 23 patients, criteria for selecting candidates for focal prostate ablation, and speculation regarding future directions.

  2. Fast Neutron Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Update of a Past Trial and Future Research Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, John N. [U. Washington, Seattle (main); Krall, John M. [Unlisted, US, PA; Laramore, George E. [U. Washington, Seattle (main); Russell, Kenneth J. [U. Washington, Seattle (main); Thomas, Frank S. [Unlisted, US, OH; Maor, Moshe H. [Unlisted, US, TX; Hendrickson, Frank R. [Fermilab; Griffin, Thomas W. [U. Washington, Seattle (main)

    1987-01-01

    Between June, 1977 and April, 1983 the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) sponsored a Phase III study comparing fast neutron radiotherapy as part of a mixed beam (neutron/photon) regimen with conventional photon (x-ray) radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced (stages C and o1 ) adenocarcinoma of the prostate. A total of 91 analyzable patients were entered into the study with -the two treatment groups being balanced in regard to all major prognostic variables. The current analysis is for a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range 3.4-9.0). Actuarial curves are presented for local/regional control, overall survival and "determinantal" survival. The results are statistically significant in favor of the mixed beam group for all of the above parameters. At 5 years the local control rate is 81% on the mixed beam arm compared to 60% on the photon arm. Histologic evidence of residual prostatic carcinoma was documented in six patients with no clinical evidence of disease on both treatment arms. The actuarial overall survival rate at S years is 70% on the mixed beam compared to 56% on the photon arm. The determinantal survival at 5 years was 82%. on the mixed beam arm compared to 61% on the photon arm. The type of therapy appeared to be the most important predictor of both local tumor control and patient survival in a step-wise Cox analysis. There was no difference in the treatment related morbidity for the two patient groups. Mixed beam therapy may be superior to standard photon radiotherapy for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer.

  3. Fast Neutron Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer. Final Report of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laramore, G. E. [Washington U.; Krall, J. M. [Unlisted, US, PA; Thomas, F. J. [Unlisted, US, OH; Russell, K. J. [Washington U.; Maor, M. H. [Unlisted, US, TX; Hendrickson, F. R. [Fermilab; Martz, K. L. [Unlisted, US, PA; Griffin, T. W. [Washington U.

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1977 and April 1983 the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) sponsored a Phase III randomized trial investigating the use of fast neutron radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced (Stages C and D1) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. Patients were randomized to receive either conventional photon radiation or fast neutron radiation used in a mixed-beam (neutron/photon) treatment schedule. A total of 91 analyzable patients were entered into the study, and the two patient groups were balanced with respect to the major prognostic variables. Actuarial curves are presented for local/regional control and "overall" survival. Ten-year results for clinically assessed local control are 70% for the mixed-beam group versus 58% for the photon group (p = 0.03) and for survival are 46% for the mixed-beam group versus 29% for the photon group (p = 0.04). This study suggests that a regional method of treatment can influence both local tumor control and survival in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland.

  4. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Painting for Localized Prostate Cancer Using {sup 11}C-choline Positron Emission Tomography Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe H. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lim Joon, Daryl [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Lee, Sze Ting [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Gong, Sylvia J. [Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Anderson, Nigel J. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Davis, Ian D. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Clouston, David [Focus Pathology, Victoria (Australia); Bolton, Damien [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Urology, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Hamilton, Christopher S. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Khoo, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.khoo@rmh.nhs.uk [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose painting using {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography PET scans in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was an RT planning study of 8 patients with prostate cancer who had {sup 11}C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy. Two contours were semiautomatically generated on the basis of the PET scans for each patient: 60% and 70% of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub 60%} and SUV{sub 70%}). Three IMRT plans were generated for each patient: PLAN{sub 78}, which consisted of whole-prostate radiation therapy to 78 Gy; PLAN{sub 78-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 78 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy; and PLAN{sub 72-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 72 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy. The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to reach prescription doses while adhering to published dose constraints. Tumor control probabilities based on PET scan-defined volumes (TCP{sub PET}) and on prostatectomy-defined volumes (TCP{sub path}), and rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were compared between the plans. Results: All plans for all patients reached prescription doses while adhering to dose constraints. TCP{sub PET} values for PLAN{sub 78}, PLAN{sub 78-90}, and PLAN{sub 72-90} were 65%, 97%, and 96%, respectively. TCP{sub path} values were 71%, 97%, and 89%, respectively. Both PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} had significantly higher TCP{sub PET} (P=.002 and .001) and TCP{sub path} (P<.001 and .014) values than PLAN{sub 78}. PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} were not significantly different in terms of TCP{sub PET} or TCP{sub path}. There were no significant differences in rectal NTCPs between the 3 plans. Conclusions: IMRT dose painting for

  5. Optimized color decomposition of localized whole slide images and convolutional neural network for intermediate prostate cancer classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Naiyun; Gao, Yi

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a fully automatic approach to grade intermediate prostate malignancy with hematoxylin and eosin-stained whole slide images. Deep learning architectures such as convolutional neural networks have been utilized in the domain of histopathology for automated carcinoma detection and classification. However, few work show its power in discriminating intermediate Gleason patterns, due to sporadic distribution of prostate glands on stained surgical section samples. We propose optimized hematoxylin decomposition on localized images, followed by convolutional neural network to classify Gleason patterns 3+4 and 4+3 without handcrafted features or gland segmentation. Crucial glands morphology and structural relationship of nuclei are extracted twice in different color space by the multi-scale strategy to mimic pathologists' visual examination. Our novel classification scheme evaluated on 169 whole slide images yielded a 70.41% accuracy and corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.7247.

  6. Feasibility and toxicity of a single fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy followed by a course of EBRT for localized prostate cancer, a retrospective study: the Polyclinique Courlancy experience; Faisabilite et toxicite d'une seance unique de curietherapie de haut debit de dose suivie d'une irradiation externe dans le cancer localise de la prostate: etude retrospective de la polyclinique de Courlancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallet, F.; Wdowczyk, D.; Bruna, A.; Joffroy, P.; Pangrazzi, T. [Centre de radiotherapie et d' oncologie, polyclinique Courlancy, Service de radiotherapie, 51 - Reims (France); Villena, P.; Herard, A.; Amory, J.P. [Cabinet d' urologie, polyclinique Courlancy, 51 - Reims (France)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose Evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of radiation dose escalation delivered with a single fraction high-dose-rate (H.D.R.) brachytherapy boost followed by external beam radiotherapy for intermediate and high risk localized prostate cancer - a retrospective study. Patients and methods: Between December 2004 and December 2008, 61 patients with intermediate risk or high-risk localized prostate cancer received a single 10 Gy fraction of interstitial H.D.R. brachytherapy followed by a 64 Gy course of external beam radiation therapy. Dose volume histograms, conformity index and side effects were systematically analyzed. Result; H.D.R. brachytherapy dosimetric criteria were respected. Early side effects (= 3 months after full treatment): 30 % reported grade 2 or grade 3 urinary toxicity and 26 % reported grade 2 or grade 3 bowel toxicity were reported. Late side effects (> 3 months): 12 % reported grade 2 or grade 3 urinary toxicity and 5 % reported grade 2 or grade 3 bowel toxicity were reported. No patients reported any grade 4 late toxicity events. Three months after treatment, 7 % grade 1, 25 % grade 2 and 39 % grade 3 erectile dysfunction were reported. Conclusion. Our mono fractionation protocol is an easy technique to implement logistically. Acute and late toxicities are acceptable and comparable to those published by various teams mostly using multi fractionation protocols. A longer follow-up is required to assess the effect of this dose escalation protocol on long-term biological control. (authors)

  7. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Oglio, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.delloglio@gmail.com [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Boehm, Katharina [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Trudeau, Vincent [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Tian, Zhe [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Larcher, Alessandro [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Shariat, Shahrokh F. [Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital, Vienna (Austria); and others

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  8. Prostate extracellular vesicles in patient plasma as a liquid biopsy platform for prostate cancer using nanoscale flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Ali A.; Pardhan, Siddika; Brett, Sabine I.; Guo, Qiu Q.; Yang, Jun; Wolf, Philipp; Power, Nicholas E.; Durfee, Paul N.; MacMillan, Connor D.; Townson, Jason L.; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Fleshner, Neil E.; Izawa, Jonathan I.; Chambers, Ann F.; Chin, Joseph L.; Leong, Hon S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles released by prostate cancer present in seminal fluid, urine, and blood may represent a non-invasive means to identify and prioritize patients with intermediate risk and high risk of prostate cancer. We hypothesize that enumeration of circulating prostate microparticles (PMPs), a type of extracellular vesicle (EV), can identify patients with Gleason Score≥4+4 prostate cancer (PCa) in a manner independent of PSA. Patients and Methods Plasmas from healthy volunteers, benign prostatic hyperplasia patients, and PCa patients with various Gleason score patterns were analyzed for PMPs. We used nanoscale flow cytometry to enumerate PMPs which were defined as submicron events (100-1000nm) immunoreactive to anti-PSMA mAb when compared to isotype control labeled samples. Levels of PMPs (counts/μL of plasma) were also compared to CellSearch CTC Subclasses in various PCa metastatic disease subtypes (treatment naïve, castration resistant prostate cancer) and in serially collected plasma sets from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Results PMP levels in plasma as enumerated by nanoscale flow cytometry are effective in distinguishing PCa patients with Gleason Score≥8 disease, a high-risk prognostic factor, from patients with Gleason Score≤7 PCa, which carries an intermediate risk of PCa recurrence. PMP levels were independent of PSA and significantly decreased after surgical resection of the prostate, demonstrating its prognostic potential for clinical follow-up. CTC subclasses did not decrease after prostatectomy and were not effective in distinguishing localized PCa patients from metastatic PCa patients. Conclusions PMP enumeration was able to identify patients with Gleason Score ≥8 PCa but not patients with Gleason Score 4+3 PCa, but offers greater confidence than CTC counts in identifying patients with metastatic prostate cancer. CTC Subclass analysis was also not effective for post-prostatectomy follow up and for

  9. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K., E-mail: aklee@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  10. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Wust, Peter, E-mail: peter.wust@charite.de [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1 Degree-Sign displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01 Degree-Sign with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95 Degree-Sign , respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostate rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13 Degree-Sign and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09 Degree-Sign . The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require

  11. Artificial neural network for predicting pathological stage of clinically localized prostate cancer in a Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Chih-Wei; Liu, Ching-Yu; Cha, Tai-Lung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Sun, Guang-Huan; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Chen, Hong-I; Chang, Sun-Yran; Chen, Shih-Chang; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2014-10-01

    We developed an artificial neural network (ANN) model to predict prostate cancer pathological staging in patients prior to when they received radical prostatectomy as this is more effective than logistic regression (LR), or combined use of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), body mass index (BMI), digital rectal examination (DRE), trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS), biopsy Gleason sum, and primary biopsy Gleason grade. Our study evaluated 299 patients undergoing retro-pubic radical prostatectomy or robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy surgical procedures with pelvic lymph node dissection. The results were intended to predict the pathological stage of prostate cancer (T2 or T3) after radical surgery. The predictive ability of ANN was compared with LR and validation of the 2007 Partin Tables was estimated by the areas under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUCs). Of the 299 patients we evaluated, 109 (36.45%) displayed prostate cancer with extra-capsular extension (ECE), and 190 (63.55%) displayed organ-confined disease (OCD). LR analysis showed that only PSA and BMI were statistically significant predictors of prostate cancer with capsule invasion. Overall, ANN outperformed LR significantly (0.795 ± 0.023 versus 0.746 ± 0.025, p = 0.016). Validation using the current Partin Tables for the participants of our study was assessed, and the predictive capacity of AUC for OCD was 0.695. ANN was superior to LR at predicting OCD in prostate cancer. Compared with the validation of current Partin Tables for the Taiwanese population, the ANN model resulted in larger AUCs and more accurate prediction of the pathologic stage of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Inhibition of Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization and Castration-Resistant Prostate Tumor Growth by Pyrroloimidazole-based Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Khalid Z; Xu, Yadong; Dar, Javid A; Eisermann, Kurtis; Pascal, Laura E; Parrinello, Erica; Ai, Junkui; Johnston, Paul A; Nelson, Joel B; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that controls the expression of androgen-responsive genes. A key step in androgen action, which is amplified in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is AR nuclear translocation. Small molecules capable of inhibiting AR nuclear localization could be developed as novel therapeutics for CRPC. We developed a high-throughput screen and identified two structurally-related pyrroloimidazoles that could block AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. We show that these two small molecules, 3-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]imidazole (EPPI) and 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]imidazole (CPPI) can inhibit the nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of AR and reduce the proliferation of AR-positive but not AR-negative prostate cancer cell lines. EPPI and CPPI did not inhibit nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor or the estrogen receptor, suggesting they selectively target AR. In LNCaP tumor xenografts, CPPI inhibited the proliferation of relapsed LNCaP tumors. These findings suggest that EPPI and CPPI could serve as lead structures for the development of therapeutic agents for CRPC. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2120-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Rita; El Amm, Joelle; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2017-10-20

    Chemotherapy in prostate cancer (PCa) has undergone dramatic landscape changes. While earlier studies utilized varying chemotherapy regimens which were found to be largely palliative in nature and hardly resulted in durable or meaningful responses, docetaxel resulted in the first chemotherapy agent that showed improvement in overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). However, combination chemotherapy or any agents added to docetaxel have failed to yield incremental benefits. The improvement in overall survival as well as secondary endpoints of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and time to recurrence when using docetaxel in the metastatic hormone-sensitive state has changed the standard of care for treatment of newly diagnosed de novo metastatic PCa. There are also promising results in locally advanced PCa and high-risk PCa in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. This review summarizes the historical as well as the more contemporary use of chemotherapeutic agents in PCa in varying states and phases of disease.

  14. The AVOCAT study: Bicalutamide monotherapy versus combined bicalutamide plus dutasteride therapy for patients with locally advanced or metastatic carcinoma of the prostate-a long-term follow-up comparison and quality of life analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dijkstra, S; Witjes, W.P.J; Roos, E.P; Vijverberg, P.L; Geboers, A.D; Bruins, J.L; Smits, G.A; Vergunst, H; Mulders, P.F.A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Compare the efficacy and tolerability of dutasteride in combination with bicalutamide to bicalutamide monotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS...

  15. Comparison of the accuracy and precision of prostate localization with 2D-2D and 3D images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logadottir, Ashildur; Korreman, Stine; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2011-01-01

    . The correlation between the two methods was better for translational shifts of the isocenter than for rotational shifts. Conclusions The study shows that the precision of the 2D–2D set-up is equivalent to the precision of the 3D images. It also shows that the soft-tissue based set-up needs 1mm larger set......Background and purpose Positional uncertainties related to the set-up of the prostate, using internal markers and either 2D–2D or 3D images, were studied. Set-up using direct prostate localization on CBCT scans is compared to set-up using internal markers. Material and methods 20 patients...... with prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. After each daily session, a set of 2D–2D and 3D images were acquired. The images isocenter was compared to reference images isocenter. For the set-up error analysis the systematic error, μ, and the set-up uncertainties, Σ and σ, were determined...

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine use, patient-reported outcomes, and treatment satisfaction among men with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott D; Zeliadt, Steven B; Blough, David K; Fedorenko, Catherine R; Fairweather, Megan E; McDermott, Cara L; Penson, David F; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Hamilton, Ann S; Arora, Neeraj K

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the association between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, satisfaction with treatment, and patient-reported outcomes after treatment. The Prostate CAncer Therapy Selection Study prospectively surveyed patients newly diagnosed with localized prostate cancer about their treatment decision-making process and outcomes. The Prostate CAncer Therapy Selection Study recruited patients from 3 geographic areas through hospital-based urology clinics and community urology practices. More than 700 patients completed the baseline and follow-up surveys. More than 50% of respondents reported using CAM; this decreased to 39% if prayer was excluded as a type of CAM. On multivariate analysis, factors related to communication with the treating physician, but not CAM use, were associated with treatment satisfaction. The likelihood of stability or improvement in urinary, bowel, and sexual function at 6 months was related to the choice of primary therapy but was unrelated to CAM use. In the present prospective observational study, CAM use was highly prevalent but unrelated to treatment satisfaction or changes in functional status. The effect of CAM on these endpoints remains to be established in comparative effectiveness studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Decision preparation, satisfaction and regret in a multi-center sample of men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donna L; Wang, Qian; Halpenny, Barbara; Hong, Fangxin

    2012-08-01

    To describe relationships between use of the Personal Patient Profile-Prostate (P3P) decision support system and patient characteristics, and perceived preparation for decision making (PrepDM), satisfaction and decisional regret in the context of prostate cancer treatment choice. 494 men with localized prostate cancer (LPC) were randomized to receive the P3P intervention or usual care and completed pre-treatment, 1-month and 6-month outcome measures. Multivariable linear regression models were fit for each outcome. Physician consult visits prior to enrollment, race/ethnicity, and use of clinic-provided books were significant predictors of perceived PrepDM at 1 month. Prior Internet use and PrepDM significantly predicted 6-month decision satisfaction. Decisional regret was significantly predicted by demographics, anxiety, PrepDM score, and EPIC bowel domain score at 6 months. Use of P3P did not predict any outcome. While the P3P intervention did not significantly affect the outcomes, pre-enrollment information and preparation were strong predictors of the 1- and 6-month outcomes. Decision regret was significantly influenced by personal characteristics and post-treatment symptoms/side effects. Information received and used between biopsy and the treatment options consult visit is likely to make a difference in decision satisfaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prostate cancer transrectal HIFU ablation: detection of local recurrences using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Girouin, Nicolas; Glas, Ludivine; Ben Cheikh, Alexandre [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Gelet, Albert [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Mege-Lechevallier, Florence [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, Lyon (France); Rabilloud, Muriel [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Biostatistics, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, UMR CNRS, Laboratoire Biostatistiques-Sante, Pierre-Benite (France); Chapelon, Jean-Yves [Inserm, U556, Lyon (France)

    2010-01-15

    The objective was to evaluate T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in detecting local cancer recurrences after prostate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Fifty-nine patients with biochemical recurrence after prostate HIFU ablation underwent T2-weighted and DCE MRI before transrectal biopsy. For each patient, biopsies were performed by two operators: operator 1 (blinded to MR results) performed random and colour Doppler-guided biopsies (''routine biopsies''); operator 2 obtained up to three cores per suspicious lesion on MRI (''targeted biopsies''). Seventy-seven suspicious lesions were detected on DCE images (n=52), T2w images (n=2) or both (n=23). Forty patients and 41 MR lesions were positive at biopsy. Of the 36 remaining MR lesions, 20 contained viable benign glands. Targeted biopsy detected more cancers than routine biopsy (36 versus 27 patients, p=0.0523). The mean percentages of positive cores per patient and of tumour invasion of the cores were significantly higher for targeted biopsies (p<0.0001). The odds ratios of the probability of finding viable cancer and viable prostate tissue (benign or malignant) at targeted versus routine biopsy were respectively 3.35 (95% CI 3.05-3.64) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.13-1.63). MRI combining T2-weighted and DCE images is a promising method for guiding post-HIFU biopsy towards areas containing recurrent cancer and viable prostate tissue. (orig.)

  19. Is radical prostatectomy a viable therapeutic option in clinically locally advanced (cT3) prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylinas, Evanguelos; Daché, Arnaud; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2010-12-01

    According to the literature, the current preferred treatment for T3 prostate cancer is a combination of radiotherapy and extended hormone therapy. The preoperative staging based on digital rectal examination results alone now appears obsolete from the investigated series, in which 20% of T3 prostate cancer is over-staged during physical examination. Prostatic magnetic resonance imaging is becoming increasingly necessary to evaluate extraprostatic extension during the preoperative evaluation. European Association of Urology guidelines recommend the use of radical prostatectomy only in selected patients with cT3a who have a PSA cancer control obtained after the implementation of radical prostatectomy is variable from one series to another, with PSA-free survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years ranging from 45 to 62%, 43 to 51% and 15 to 49%, respectively. The specific survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are between 84 and 98%, 84 and 91% and 76 and 84%, respectively. The surgical margins rate varies from 22% to 61% depending on the specific operative technique used and the surgeon's own experience level. Regarding urinary continence, functional outcomes are in line with those of prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Upon consideration of erectile dysfunction, the rates are linked with the type of surgery performed, which can at times be fairly extensive. There is no impact on the overall or specific survival rate of neoadjuvant treatments. One of the problems currently depends on the efficacy of early adjuvant treatment after prostatectomy, especially regarding the use of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy. Radical prostatectomy can be considered in selected cases as a viable alternative to the first-line treatment option. However, patients must be counselled that they may undergo complementary treatments during the postoperative course of the disease. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  20. High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

  1. A Comprehensive Review of Contemporary Role of Local Treatment of the Primary Tumor and/or the Metastases in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Aoun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To provide an overview of the currently available literature regarding local control of primary tumor and oligometastases in metastatic prostate cancer and salvage lymph node dissection of clinical lymph node relapse after curative treatment of prostate cancer. Evidence Acquisition. A systematic literature search was conducted in 2014 to identify abstracts, original articles, review articles, research articles, and editorials relevant to the local control in metastatic prostate cancer. Evidence Synthesis. Local control of primary tumor in metastatic prostate cancer remains experimental with low level of evidence. The concept is supported by a growing body of genetic and molecular research as well as analogy with other cancers. There is only one retrospective observational population based study showing prolonged survival. To eradicate oligometastases, several options exist with excellent local control rates. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe, well tolerated, and efficacious treatment for lymph node and bone lesions. Both biochemical and clinical progression are slowed down with a median time to initiate ADT of 2 years. Salvage lymph node dissection is feasible in patients with clinical lymph node relapse after local curable treatment. Conclusion. Despite encouraging oncologic midterm results, a complete cure remains elusive in metastatic prostate cancer patients. Further advances in imaging are crucial in order to rapidly evolve beyond the proof of concept.

  2. Calcifications are potential surrogates for prostate localization in image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Grace G; McGowan, Tom S; Larsen, Tessa M; Bruce, Lisa M; Moran, Natasha K; Tsao, Jonathan R; MacPherson, Miller S

    2008-11-15

    To investigate the feasibility of using calcifications as surrogates for the prostate position during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image-guided radiotherapy. The twice-weekly CBCT images taken during the treatment course of 4 patients were retrospectively studied for the stability of the calcifications. The geometric center of three fiducial markers was used as the reference. The planning CT images of 131 prostate patients recently treated with external beam radiotherapy at our center were reviewed to estimate the calcification occurrence rate. Analysis was conducted using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Two patients were treated using prostate calcifications as the landmark in on-line registration. Both the Varian standard and the low-dose CBCT modes were used for imaging. The calcifications were found to be stable during the treatment course. At the 95% confidence interval, the difference between the distance from an identified calcification to the fiducial markers on CBCT and the distance on the planning CT scans was 0.2 +/- 2.0 mm, 0.8 +/- 2.2 mm, and 0.4 +/- 2.4 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior direction, respectively. Of the 131 patients, 46 (35%) had well-defined calcifications either inside the prostate or near the borders. Our experience in treating the first 2 patients demonstrated that the calcifications are easily distinguished on low-dose scans and that calcification registration can be precisely performed. The results of our study have shown that calcifications can be reliable markers of prostate position and allow for precise image guidance with a low-imaging dose. With this approach, potentially about one-third of prostate patients could benefit from precise image guidance without the invasive use of markers.

  3. Defining the "Hostile Pelvis" for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: The Impact of Anatomic Variations in Pelvic Dimensions on Dose Delivered to Target Volumes and Organs at Risk in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Whole Pelvic Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yirmibeşoğlu Erkal, Eda; Karabey, Sinan; Karabey, Ayşegül; Hayran, Mutlu; Erkal, Haldun Şükrü

    2015-07-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of variations in pelvic dimensions on the dose delivered to the target volumes and the organs at risk (OARs) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) to be treated with whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) in an attempt to define the hostile pelvis in terms of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In 45 men with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT, the target volumes and the OARs were delineated, the dose constraints for the OARs were defined, and treatment plans were generated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0924 protocol. Six dimensions to reflect the depth, width, and height of the bony pelvis were measured, and 2 indexes were calculated from the planning computed tomographic scans. The minimum dose (Dmin), maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) for the target volumes and OARs and the partial volumes of each of these structures receiving a specified dose (VD) were calculated from the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The data from the DVHs were correlated with the pelvic dimensions and indexes. According to an overall hostility score (OHS) calculation, 25 patients were grouped as having a hospitable pelvis and 20 as having a hostile pelvis. Regarding the OHS grouping, the DVHs for the bladder, bowel bag, left femoral head, and right femoral head differed in favor of the hospitable pelvis group, and the DVHs for the rectum differed for a range of lower doses in favor of the hospitable pelvis group. Pelvimetry might be used as a guide to define the challenging anatomy or the hostile pelvis in terms of treatment planning for IMRT in patients with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Defining the level of evidence for technology adoption in the localized prostate cancer pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Massimo; El-Shater Bosaily, Ahmed; Emberton, Mark; Ahmed, Hashim U

    2014-08-01

    New technologies in prostate cancer are attempting to change the current prostate cancer pathway by aiming to reduce harms while maintaining the benefits associated with screening, diagnosis, and treatment. In this article, we discuss the optimal evaluation that new technologies should undergo to provide level 1 evidence typically required to change the practice. With this in mind, we focus on feasible and pragmatic trials that could be delivered in a timely fashion by many centers while retaining primary outcomes that focus on clinically meaningful outcomes. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Long-term results in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer at moderate dose (66 Gy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldner, G.; Wachter, S.; Wachter-Gerstner, N.; Dieckmann, K.; Poetter, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Univ. of Vienna, Medical School, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: biochemical control (bNED), disease-specific survival (DSS), overall survival (OS), and late gastrointestinal (GI) and urogenital (UG) side effects (EORTC/RTOG) of patients with long-term follow-up were evaluated. Patients and methods: three-dimensional radiotherapy up to 66 Gy with/without additional hormonal therapy was performed in 154 prostate cancer (T1-3 NO MO) patients. According to T-stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and grading, patients were divided into a low-, intermediate-, and high-risk group. The 5-, 8-, and 10-year actuarial rates of bNED, DSS and OS and late side effects were calculated. Results: median follow-up was 80 months. Additional hormonal therapy was given in 57% of patients. Distribution concerning risk groups (low, intermediate, high) showed 15%, 49%, and 36% of patients, respectively. bNED 5-, 8-, and 10-year actuarial rates were 46%, 44%, and 44%. DSS 5-, 8- and 10-year rates amounted to 96%, 90%, and 82%. OS 5-, 8- and 10-year rates were 81%, 64%, and 56%. In uni- and multivariate analysis, only pretreatment PSA (< 10 vs. {>=} 10 ng/ml; p < 0.05) and PSA nadir (< 0.5 vs. {>=} 0.5 ng/ml; p < 0.0001) affected bNED significantly. Age, risk group, T-stage, grading, and hormonal therapy had no significant influence on bNED, DSS, and OS. Rates of late GI and UG side effects grade {>=} 2 at 5 years were 17% and 15%. Conclusion: current dose escalation studies with better bNED rates may be able to further increase long-term clinical outcome. (orig.)

  6. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, C.-Y.; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 825 NE 10th Street, OUPB 1430, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)], E-mail: iali@ouhsc.edu

    2009-09-21

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm{sup 3} on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  7. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  8. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho [The Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy.

  9. The Malthus Programme: developing radiotherapy demand models for breast and prostate cancer at the local, regional and national level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, C; Mee, T; Kirkby, N F; Cooper, T; Williams, M V; Jena, R

    2013-09-01

    The Malthus Programme has delivered a tool for modelling radiotherapy demand in England. The model is capable of simulating demand at the local level. This article investigates the local and regional level variation in predicted demand with respect to Breast and Prostate cancer, the two tumour types responsible for the majority of radiotherapy treatment workload in England. Simulations were performed using the Malthus model, using base population incidence data for the period from 2007-2009. Simulations were carried out at the level of Primary Care Trusts, Cancer Networks, and nationwide, with annual projections for 2012, 2016 and 2020. Benchmarking was undertaken against previously published models from the UK, Canada and Australia. For breast cancer, the fraction burden for 2012 varied from 5537 fractions per million in Tower Hamlets PCT to 18 896 fractions per million in Devon PCT (national mean - 13 592 fractions per million). For prostate cancer, the fraction burden for 2012 varied from 4874 fractions per million in Tower Hamlets PCT to 23 181 fractions per million in Lincolnshire PCT (national mean - 15 087 fractions per million). Predictions of population growth by age cohort for 2016 and 2020 result in the regional differences in radiotherapy demand becoming greater over time. Similar effects were also observed at the level of the cancer network. Our model shows the importance of local population demographics and cancer incidence rates when commissioning radiotherapy services. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Combined Whole Body and Multiparametric Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a 1-Step Approach to the Simultaneous Assessment of Local Recurrence and Metastatic Disease after Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Nicola L; Sala, Evis; Benz, Matthias; Landa, Jonathan; Scardino, Peter; Scher, Howard I; Hricak, Hedvig; Vargas, Hebert A

    2017-07-01

    We report our initial experience with whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging as a single examination to assess local recurrence and metastatic disease in patients with suspected recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. In this institutional review board approved, retrospective, single center study 76 consecutive patients with clinically suspected recurrent prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy underwent combined whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging at a single session from October 2014 to January 2016. Scans were evaluated to detect disease in the prostate bed and regional nodes, and at distant sites. Comparison was made to other imaging tests, and prostate bed, node and bone biopsies performed within 90 days. Whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging was completed successfully in all patients. Median prostate specific antigen was 0.36 ng/ml (range less than 0.05 to 56.12). Whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging identified suspected disease recurrence in 16 of 76 patients (21%), including local recurrence in the radical prostatectomy bed in 6, nodal metastases in 3, osseous metastases in 4 and multifocal metastatic disease in 3. In 43 patients at least 1 standard staging scan was done in addition to whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging. Concordance was demonstrated between the imaging modalities in 36 of 43 cases (84%). All metastatic lesions detected by other imaging tests were detected on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, the magnetic resonance imaging modality detected osseous metastases in 4 patients with false-negative findings on other imaging tests, including 2 bone scans and 3 computerized tomography scans. It also excluded osseous disease in 1 patient with positive 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography and subsequent negative bone biopsy. Combined whole body and dedicated

  11. Targeted prostate biopsy: value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in detection of localized cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jesse D; Huang, Jiaoti; Marks, Leonard S

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men, with 1.1 million new cases worldwide reported by the World Health Organization in one recent year. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guide