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Sample records for high-resolution seismic reflection

  1. High resolution reflection seismic mapping of shallow coal seams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mngadi, SB

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available in acoustic impedance at depths 10 m, 17 m and 21 m. We believe that we were able to map two undulating interfaces, at approximately 12 ms and 21 ms (Figure 4). CONCLUSIONS The shallow reflection seismic technique is a very useful technique...

  2. Pen Branch fault program: Interim report on the High Resolution, Shallow Seismic Reflection surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieve, A.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1991-01-31

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site in 1989 based upon the interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations. A program was initiated at that time to further define the fault in terms of its capability to release seismic energy. The High-Resolution, Shallow Seismic Reflection survey recently completed at SRS was initiated to determine the shallowest extent of the fault and to demonstrate the presence of flat-lying sediments in the top 300 feet of sediments. Conclusions at this time are based upon this shallow seismic survey and the Conoco deep seismic survey (1988--1989). Deformation related to the Pen Branch fault is at least 200 milliseconds beneath the surface in the Conoco data and at least 150 milliseconds in the shallow seismic reflection data. This corresponds to approximately 300 feet below the surface. Sediments at that depth are lower Tertiary (Danian stage) or over 60 million years old. This indicates that the fault is not capable.

  3. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection and Marine Magnetic Data Along the Hosgri Fault Zone--Cayucos to Pismo Beach, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report consists of high-resolution chirp and single-channel mini-sparker seismic-reflection profile data from the offshore San Luis Obispo County, California....

  4. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection and Marine Magnetic Data Along the Hosgri Fault Zone--Cayucos to Pismo Beach, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report consists of high-resolution chirp and single-channel mini-sparker seismic-reflection profile data from the offshore San Luis Obispo County, California....

  5. High resolution seismic reflection, an exploration tool within an underground environment (example from Zimbabwe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutyorauta, J. J.

    Metallurgical grade chromite ore in Zimbabwe is mined from two underground mines, Peak Mine and Railway Block Mine, in Shurugwi. Peak Mine is at present just over 800 m deep. In the search for new chromite ore bodies, such a depth limits the application of the conventional geophysical exploration tools. Exploration diamond drilling is becoming more and more an expensive resort. Alternative and effective geophysical techniques are therefore being actively sought after. The high resolution seismic reflection technique, carried out right within Peak Mine, has the potential to become a useful exploration tool.

  6. Imaging the Black Hills Fault, Clark County, Nevada Utilizing High-Resolution Seismic Reflection and Vibroseis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, S. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Saldana, S. C.; Hirsch, A.; Poche, S.; Taylor, W. J.

    2006-12-01

    Historically, the location, geometries, and seismic potential of southern Nevada faults are poorly constrained. Collection of such data and seismic hazard characterization of the Black Hills fault (BHF) are important steps in better defining one of these faults. The BHF forms the northwestern structural boundary of the Eldorado Valley, which lies ~20 km southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada, between the growing communities of Henderson and Boulder City. Earthquake magnitude estimates based on surface rupture length (SRL) indicate an earthquake potential of Mw 5.7; however, estimates based on displacement values documented in a paleoseismic trench indicate a higher value of Mw 6.4-6.8. This implies that the subsurface rupture length is significantly greater than the length of the scarp. Although previous attempts to image the fault with a hammer source were inconclusive, gravity studies and local geology imply that the fault continues south of the scarp. Therefore, additional high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction data were acquired in SEG2 format along portions of a 1 km profile at 5 m station spacing utilizing a vibroseis source. At each shot point, a stack of four 30-160 Hz vibroseis sweeps of 15 s duration was recorded on a 60-channel system with 40 Hz geophones. A preliminary examination of these data indicates the existence of an eastward dipping structure, potentially confirming that the BHF continues in the subsurface south of the scarp.

  7. High resolution seismic reflection profiles of Holocene volcanic and tectonic features, Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, A. S.; Hart, P. E.; Bursik, M. I.; McClain, J. S.; Moore, J. C.; Boyle, M.; Childs, J. R.; Novick, M.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Roeske, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Inyo-Mono Craters of Long Valley and Mono Basin, California are the youngest eruptive vents of the Great Basin, USA and the second youngest in California. They are one of two seismically active volcanic centers with geothermal power production in the Walker Lane, western Great Basin, the other being the Coso Volcanic Field to the south. High resolution seismic reflection data collected from the northern tip of the Mono Craters eruptive centers in Mono Lake delinates two structural zones proximal to the active volcanic centers in Mono Lake. A growth structure drapped by ~30 m or more of bedded sediment shows increasing deformation and offset of clastic deposits on the northwest margin of the basin. Coherent thin-bedded stratigraphic sections with strong reflectors to 30-100m depth are preserved on the western and northern margins of the basin. The southern and southeastern areas of the lake are generally seismically opaque, due to extensive ash and tephra deposits as well as widespread methane. Thin pockets of well-bedded, poorly consolidated sediment of probable Holocene and last glacial age are present within intrabasin depressions providing some local age constraints on surfaces adjacent to volcanic vents and volcanically modified features.

  8. High resolution, shallow seismic reflection survey of the Pen Branch fault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    The purpose of this project, at the Savannah River River Site (SRS) was to acquire, process, and interpret 28 km (17.4 miles) of high resolution seismic reflection data taken across the trace of the Pen Branch fault and other suspected, intersecting north-south trending faults. The survey was optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata in order to demonstrate the existence of very shallow, flat lying horizons, and to determine the depth of the fault or to sediments deformed by the fault. Field acquisition and processing parameters were selected to define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the Pen Branch fault leading to the definition and the location of the Pen Branch fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. Associated geophysical, borehole, and geologic data were incorporated into the investigation to assist in the determination of optimal parameters and aid in the interpretation.

  9. High-resolution seismic-reflection data from offshore northern California — Bolinas to Sea Ranch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Chin, John L.; Allwardt, Parker; Beeson, Jeffrey; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2016-12-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution seismic-reflection data in September 2009, on survey S-8-09-NC, offshore of northern California between Bolinas and Sea Ranch.The survey area spans about 125 km of California’s coast and extends around Point Reyes. Data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. Cumulatively, ~1,150 km of seismic-reflection data were acquired using a SIG 2mille minisparker. Subbottom acoustic depth of penetration spanned tens to several hundred meters and varied by location and underlying sediments and rock types.This report includes maps and a navigation file of the surveyed transects, utilizing Google Earth™ software, as well as digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y and JPEG formats. The images of bedrock, sediment deposits, and tectonic structure provide geologic information that is essential to hazard assessment, regional sediment management, and coastal and marine spatial planning at Federal, State and local levels. This information is also valuable for future research on the geomorphic, sedimentary, tectonic, and climatic record of central California.

  10. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Profiling Across the Black Hills Fault, Clark County, Nevada: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, S. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Jernsletten, J. A.; Saldana, S. C.; Hirsch, A.; McEwan, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Black Hills fault (BHF) is located in the central Basin and Range Province of western North America, a region that has undergone significant Cenozoic extension. The BHF is an east-dipping normal fault that forms the northwestern structural boundary of the Eldorado basin and lies ~20 km southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada. A recent trench study indicated that the fault offsets Holocene strata, and is capable of producing Mw 6.4-6.8 earthquakes. These estimates indicate a subsurface rupture length at least 10 km greater than the length of the scarp. This poses a significant hazard to structures such as the nearby Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge, which is being built to withstand a Mw 6.2-7.0 earthquake on local faults. If the BHF does continue in the subsurface, this structure, as well as nearby communities (Las Vegas, Boulder City, and Henderson), may not be as safe as previously expected. Previous attempts to image the fault with shallow seismics (hammer source) were inconclusive. However, gravity studies imply that the fault continues south of the scarp. Therefore, a new experiment utilizing high-resolution seismic reflection was performed to image subsurface geologic structures south of the scarp. At each shot point, a stack of four 30-160 Hz vibroseis sweeps of 15 s duration was recorded on a 60-channel system with 40 Hz geophones. This produced two 300 m reflection profiles, with a maximum depth of 500-600 m. A preliminary look at these data indicates the existence of two faults, potentially confirming that the BHF continues in the subsurface south of the scarp.

  11. Comparison of high-resolution P- and SH-wave reflection seismic data in alluvial and pyroclastic deposits in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyono, Wiyono; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2013-04-01

    Seismic reflection is one of the stable methods to investigate subsurface conditions. However, there are still many unresolved issues, especially for areas with specific and complex geological environments. Here, each location has an own characteristic due to material compounds and the geological structure. We acquired high-resolution, P-and SH-wave seismic reflection profiles at two different locations in Indonesia. The first location was in Semarang (Central Java) and the second one was in Tiris (East Java). The first region is located on an alluvial plain with thick alluvial deposits of more than 100 m estimated thickness, and the second location was located on pyroclastic deposit material. The seismic measurements for both locations were carried out using a 48-channel recording system (14-Hz P-wave, 10-Hz SH-wave geophones) with geophone intervals of 5 m (P-waves) and 1 m (SH-waves), respectively. The seismic source for the P-wave was a ca. 4 kg sledge hammer which generated a seismic signal by by hitting on an aluminum plate of 30x30 cm, whereas the SH-wave source was a mini-vibrator ELVIS (Electrodynamic Vibrator System), version 3. Thirteen seismic profiles at Semarang and eighth profiles at Tiris were acquired. The results of seismic data in Semarang show fair to good seismic records for both P-and SH-waves. The raw data contain high signal-to-noise-ratio. Many clear reflectors can be detected. The P-wave data shows reflectors down to 250 ms two-way time while the SH-wave records show seismic events up to 600 ms two-way time. This result is in strong contrast to the seismic data result from the Tiris region. The P-wave data show very low signal to noise ratio, there is no reflection signal visible, only the surface waves and the ambient noise from the surrounding area are visible. The SH-waves give a fair to good result which enables reflector detection down to 300 ms two-way time. The results from the two seismic campaigns show that SH-wave reflection

  12. First results of a high resolution reflection seismic survey of the Central Northern Venezuelan Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, J.; van Welden, A.; Audemard, F.; de Batist, M.; Beck, C.; Scientific Party, G.

    2008-05-01

    In September - November 2007 the first high resolution marine seismic campaign on the North-Central coast of Venezuela was carried out between Cabo Codera and Golfo Triste. The principal aim of this work was to characterize the active San Sebastian Fault (SSF) and to analyze Cenozoic sedimentation on the Venezuela shelf focusing on: i) effects of active tectonics and ii) coastal landslides/flashflood deposits related to 1999 Vargas catastrophic event or to similar phenomena. Data were acquired onboard R/V GUAIQUERI II from the Oceanographic Institute of the Oriente University. The seismic source was a "CENTIPEDE" sparker (RCGM) operated between 300 and 600 J, 1.3 kHz main frequency. We used a single-channel streamer with 10 hydrophones. In total, 49 seismic profiles were collected, with a cumulative length of 1000 km approximately. In these seismic profiles we identified and separated the deposits into three main units. Unit (U1) comprises low energy reflectors mainly dipping in southward direction (i.e. toward the coast bounded by the San Sebastian Fault). This unit also includes a number of isolated acoustic anomalies, which we tentatively interpret as coral reefs. Its top is defined as Basal Erosional Discontinuity (BED) onto which Unit 2 (U2) deposits are onlapping. U2 is acoustically well-stratified, with strong reflectors. Gradual variations in thickness and a wavy configuration allow us to interpret U2 as probably Quaternary current-related deposits. Last Unit (U3) was defined on the Venezuela shelf and corresponds to prograding sequences probably related to the terrigenous input of the Tuy River. Impact of eustatic fluctuations on these deposits are discussed. The data were also used to construct a simplified bathymetry of the studied area. The lateral transition from the western Cariaco-Tuy pull-apart basin to the (single) SSF was clearly imaged (mostly folds and gravity faults). The survey also displayed prograding sediments bodies in La Tortuga Shelf

  13. High-Resolution Chirp and Mini-Sparker Seismic-Reflection Data From the Southern California Continental Shelf--Gaviota to Mugu Canyon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report consists of high-resolution chirp and single-channel Sparker seismic-reflection- profile data from the Santa Barbara Channel, California. These data were...

  14. High-Resolution Chirp and Mini-Sparker Seismic-Reflection Data From the Southern California Continental Shelf--Gaviota to Mugu Canyon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report consists of high-resolution chirp and single-channel Sparker seismic-reflection- profile data from the Santa Barbara Channel, California. These data were...

  15. A High-resolution Seismic Reflection Survey at the Hanford Nuclear Site Using a Land Streamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, E. R.; Speece, M. A.; Link, C. A.; Repasky, T.; Thompson, M.; Miller, S.; Cummins, G.

    2009-12-01

    From the 1940s through the mid 1990s, radioactively and chemically contaminated effluent waste was released into the ground at the Hanford Nuclear Site. Currently, Hanford is the site of a large-scale and ongoing environmental cleanup effort which includes the remediation of contaminated ground water. Identifying preferential pathways of groundwater contaminant flow is critical for the groundwater cleanup effort. During the summer of 2009, Montana Tech, in collaboration with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, collected a high resolution shallow seismic survey on the Hanford Central Plateau near the Gable Gap area of the Hanford Nuclear site. The goal of the survey was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a land streamer/gimbaled geophone acquisition approach to image the basalt bedrock topography. The survey objective is to improve the understanding of the subsurface water flow by identifying the topography of the basement basalt and possible erosional channels created during the Missoula flood events. Data was collected for a total of eight 2D lines with a combined length of about 11 km with a coverage area of approximately 6 sq.km. The profiles were aligned in north-south and east-west intersecting lines with a total of 5 profile intersections. The survey used a 227 kg accelerated weight drop and a 96-channel land streamer. The land streamer used gimbaled geophones with 2 m spacing. Source spacing was also 2 m for a nominal fold of 48. The rapid deployment land streamer, compared to conventional spiked geophones, significantly increased production in this off-road application. Typically, between 45 and 55 stations could be shot per hour in a pull and shoot approach. Deployment of the land streamer required about 45 minutes and about 30 minutes was required to shut down the survey. The survey successfully imaged the top of the basalt and demonstrated that a land streamer can produce quality seismic data in this area. The basalt bedrock

  16. Feasibility of the Shallow High Resolution Seismic Reflection Technique for Use at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narbutovskih, S.M.

    1993-07-30

    Data obtained during site characterization should be useful to assess the need for remediation, to evaluate and design effective remedial plans, and to allow long-term monitoring to discern remediation effectiveness. A valuable environmental tool that incorporates this data is a model that describes groundwater and vadose zone flow and transport characteristics. Data on geology and hydrology combined with information on contaminant sources are incorporated into these conceptual models that delineate the relative significance of the various fluid migration pathways. Downstream these same models also support risk assessment, remediation design, and long-term assessment of remediation effectiveness. Consequently, the building of coherent, accurate vadose zone and groundwater models is fundamental to a successful remediation. Among the important requirements for these models is accurate knowledge of flow domain boundaries and soil characteristics. At the Hanford Site, this knowledge is obtained primarily from borehole data, which provides information only at a point. In the high energy flood and fluvial deposits found at the Hanford Site, it can, at times, be difficult to correlate lithologic horizons between boreholes. Where there is no borehole control, our understanding of the geometry of hydrogeologic boundaries and thus of fluid migration paths is limited. Surface geophysical techniques are generally used to provide a measure of geologic control between boreholes. In particular, the seismic reflection method has the potential to provide the greatest resolution of the subsurface hydrogeology between and beyond boreholes.

  17. High-resolution reflection seismic investigations of quick-clay and associated formations at a landslide scar in southwest Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Saleem, Muhammad Umar; Bastani, Mehrdad

    2013-05-01

    We present high-resolution reflection seismic data from four lines (total 1.9 km) that cross a quick-clay landslide scar located close to the shore of the Göta River in southwest Sweden, and compare the results with geotechnical data from boreholes. The seismic data allow the imaging of bedrock topography and normally to weakly consolidated sediments to a subsurface depth of about 100 m. Different types of seismic sources, including sledgehammer, accelerated weight-drop and dynamite were utilized and compared with each other. Analysis of their power spectra suggests that weight-drop and dynamite have higher frequency content and energy than the sledgehammer, which makes these two sources suitable also for waveform tomography and surface-wave data analysis. The shallowest non-bedrock reflector is observed at about 10-20 m below the surface, it overlays the bedrock, and is interpreted to originate from the contact between clay formations above and a coarse-grained layer below. The coarse-grained layer appears to be spatially linked to the presence of quick-clays. It is a regional scale formation, laterally heterogeneous, which deepens to the west of the study area and correlates well with the available geotechnical data. Continuity of the coarse-grained layer becomes obscured by the landslide scar. There may be a link between the coarse-grained layer and landslides in the study area, although this possibility requires further hydrogeological and geotechnical investigations. Reflectors from the top of the bedrock suggest a depression zone with its deepest point below the landslide scar and a bowl-shaped structure in the northern portion of one of the seismic lines.

  18. High-resolution SH-wave seismic reflection investigations near a coal mine-related roadway collapse feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Erich D.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Richard C.; Daniels, Jeffrey J.; Lefchik, Thomas

    2003-11-01

    We acquired crossline-crossline (SH-SH) shear-wave reflection data along a heavily trafficked section of Interstate highway 70 in eastern Ohio where the roadway had collapsed into underground coal-mine workings. We acquired these data to determine whether subsurface subsidence processes had continued at the collapse location after remediation, and to identify additional areas of potential collapse along this section of the roadway. A reflection correlating to the overburden and bedrock interface (above the mine workings) was consistently identified in raw field records, and our data processing and imaging targeted this high impedance contrast. Data quality was high enough to permit resolution of vertical offsets of 3-4 ft (0.91-1.2 m) and horizontal disruptions of about 20 ft (6.1 m) in the otherwise continuous bedrock horizon at two locations close to the previous collapse, suggesting a relatively high risk for future roadway failure in these areas. SH-wave data interpretations were supported by exploratory drilling results which confirmed that bedrock had subsided into underlying coal-mine workings at these two locations. Our results show that high-resolution SH-wave seismic reflection surveys can be effective for diagnosing mine-induced subsidence potential beneath heavily traveled roadways.

  19. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2007-06-30

    The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

  20. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 18 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and six monitor surveys clearly imaged changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators.

  1. High resolution reflection seismic profiling over the Tjellefonna fault in the Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lundberg

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex (MTFC is one of the most prominent fault zones of Norway, both onshore and offshore. In spite of its importance, very little is known of the deeper structure of the individual fault segments comprising the fault complex. Most seismic lines have been recorded offshore or focused on deeper structures. This paper presents results from two reflection seismic profiles, located on each side of the Tingvollfjord, acquired over the Tjellefonna fault in the south-eastern part of the MTFC. Possible kilometer scale vertical offsets reflecting, large scale north-west dipping normal faulting separating the high topography to the south-east from lower topography to the north-west have been proposed for the Tjellefonna fault. In this study, however, the Tjellefonna fault is interpreted to dip approximately 50–60° towards the south-east to depths of at least 1.4 km. Travel-time modeling of reflections associated with the fault was used to establish the geometry of the fault structure at depth and detailed analysis of first P-wave arrivals in shot-gathers together with resistivity profiles were used to define the near surface geometry of the fault zone. A continuation of the structure on the north-eastern side of the Tingvollfjord is suggested by correlation of an in strike direction P-S converted reflection (generated by a fracture zone seen on the reflection data from that side of the Tingvollfjord. The reflection seismic data correlate well with resistivity profiles and recently published near surface geophysical data. A highly reflective package forming a gentle antiform structure was also identified on both seismic profiles. The structure may be an important boundary within the gneissic basement rocks of the Western Gneiss Region. The Fold Hinge Line is parallel with the Tjellefonna fault trace while the topographic lineament diverges, following secondary fracture zones towards north-east.

  2. Study of blind thrust faults underlying Tokyo and Osaka urban areas using a combination of high-resolution seismic reflection profiling and continuous coring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Miura

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We acquired high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and continuously cored boreholes to evaluate active flexures produced by major blind thrust fault systems within two densely populated Neogene-Quaternary sedimentary basins in Japan: the Fukaya Fault System near Tokyo in the Kanto Basin and the Uemachi Fault System in the Osaka Basin. The high-resolution seismic reflection survey made clear the length, geometry and growth history of fault-related folds, or flexures formed above the two blind thrusts. Continuously cored boreholes linked with high-resolution seismic profiles enabled us to estimate the uplift rate as defined by shallow stratigraphic horizons and constrain the age of the most recent growth of the flexures during earthquakes on the Fukaya and Uemachi fault systems. Even with the high quality of the data we collected, it is still not possible to exactly constrain the age of the most recent blind thrust earthquake recorded by flexure of these fault-related folds. Data presented in this paper form the basis for future efforts aimed at mechanical and kinematic models for fault growth to evaluate the activity of blind thrusts underlying urban areas.

  3. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection and Refraction Imaging of the Hayward Fault in Fremont, Alameda County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, E. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M. R.; Catchings, R. D.

    2007-12-01

    In July 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey acquired a 60-m-long seismic reflection and refraction profile across the main trace of the Hayward fault in Fremont Central Park, Fremont, California. The profile was designed to determine the geometry, seismic velocities, and possible structural complexities of the fault. The study was along a part of the surface rupture of the 1868 M 7.0 Hayward earthquake. We used single-element, 40-Hz vertical geophones placed at 1-m intervals along the profile with 0.5-m lateral offset from the shot points, also with 1-m intervals. Seismic sources were generated by multiple sledgehammer blows at each shot point. Data were recorded unfiltered in the field on a Geometrics Strataview RX-60 seismograph at a sampling rate of 0.5 ms for 2 s. Geophone locations were measured in 3D using differential GPS. We developed a velocity model using the Hole (1992) code to invert P-wave first arrivals of the refraction data. Seismic P-wave velocities range from about 200 m/s near the surface to approximately 800 m/s at a depth of 13 to 16 m. The velocity model was then applied to the reflection data to develop an unmigrated common depth point (CDP) stack. The reflection data indicate the presence of at least three fault strands in an approximately 20-m-wide zone. We believe the three strands define an upwardly flaring 'flower structure', with the central strand being the main strand of the Hayward fault. The three strands project to merge at a depth of about 150 m; the overall dip of the fault zone in the upper 100 m is to the northeast, at about 88 degrees.

  4. High-resolution seismic reflection imaging of growth folding and shallow faults beneath the Southern Puget Lowland, Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jackson K.; Stephenson, William J.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Marine seismic reflection data from southern Puget Sound, Washington, were collected to investigate the nature of shallow structures associated with the Tacoma fault zone and the Olympia structure. Growth folding and probable Holocene surface deformation were imaged within the Tacoma fault zone beneath Case and Carr Inlets. Shallow faults near potential field anomalies associated with the Olympia structure were imaged beneath Budd and Eld Inlets. Beneath Case Inlet, the Tacoma fault zone includes an ∼350-m wide section of south-dipping strata forming the upper part of a fold (kink band) coincident with the southern edge of an uplifted shoreline terrace. An ∼2 m change in the depth of the water bottom, onlapping postglacial sediments, and increasing stratal dips with increasing depth are consistent with late Pleistocene to Holocene postglacial growth folding above a blind fault. Geologic data across a topographic lineament on nearby land indicate recent uplift of late Holocene age. Profiles acquired in Carr Inlet 10 km to the east of Case Inlet showed late Pleistocene or Holocene faulting at one location with ∼3 to 4 m of vertical displacement, south side up. North of this fault the data show several other disruptions and reflector terminations that could mark faults within the broad Tacoma fault zone. Seismic reflection profiles across part of the Olympia structure beneath southern Puget Sound show two apparent faults about 160 m apart having 1 to 2 m of displacement of subhorizontal bedding. Directly beneath one of these faults, a dipping reflector that may mark the base of a glacial channel shows the opposite sense of throw, suggesting strike-slip motion. Deeper seismic reflection profiles show disrupted strata beneath these faults but little apparent vertical offset, consistent with strike-slip faulting. These faults and folds indicate that the Tacoma fault and Olympia structure include active structures with probable postglacial motion.

  5. Interlobate esker architecture and related hydrogeological features derived from a combination of high-resolution reflection seismics and refraction tomography, Virttaankangas, southwest Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maries, Georgiana; Ahokangas, Elina; Mäkinen, Joni; Pasanen, Antti; Malehmir, Alireza

    2017-05-01

    A novel high-resolution (2-4 m source and receiver spacing) reflection and refraction seismic survey was carried out for aquifer characterization and to confirm the existing depositional model of the interlobate esker of Virttaankangas, which is part of the Säkylänharju-Virttaankangas glaciofluvial esker-chain complex in southwest Finland. The interlobate esker complex hosting the managed aquifer recharge (MAR) plant is the source of the entire water supply for the city of Turku and its surrounding municipalities. An accurate delineation of the aquifer is therefore critical for long-term MAR planning and sustainable use of the esker resources. Moreover, an additional target was to resolve the poorly known stratigraphy of the 70-100-m-thick glacial deposits overlying a zone of fractured bedrock. Bedrock surface as well as fracture zones were confirmed through combined reflection seismic and refraction tomography results and further validated against existing borehole information. The high-resolution seismic data proved successful in accurately delineating the esker cores and revealing complex stratigraphy from fan lobes to kettle holes, providing valuable information for potential new pumping wells. This study illustrates the potential of geophysical methods for fast and cost-effective esker studies, in particular the digital-based landstreamer and its combination with geophone-based wireless recorders, where the cover sediments are reasonably thick.

  6. Interlobate esker architecture and related hydrogeological features derived from a combination of high-resolution reflection seismics and refraction tomography, Virttaankangas, southwest Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maries, Georgiana; Ahokangas, Elina; Mäkinen, Joni; Pasanen, Antti; Malehmir, Alireza

    2016-12-01

    A novel high-resolution (2-4 m source and receiver spacing) reflection and refraction seismic survey was carried out for aquifer characterization and to confirm the existing depositional model of the interlobate esker of Virttaankangas, which is part of the Säkylänharju-Virttaankangas glaciofluvial esker-chain complex in southwest Finland. The interlobate esker complex hosting the managed aquifer recharge (MAR) plant is the source of the entire water supply for the city of Turku and its surrounding municipalities. An accurate delineation of the aquifer is therefore critical for long-term MAR planning and sustainable use of the esker resources. Moreover, an additional target was to resolve the poorly known stratigraphy of the 70-100-m-thick glacial deposits overlying a zone of fractured bedrock. Bedrock surface as well as fracture zones were confirmed through combined reflection seismic and refraction tomography results and further validated against existing borehole information. The high-resolution seismic data proved successful in accurately delineating the esker cores and revealing complex stratigraphy from fan lobes to kettle holes, providing valuable information for potential new pumping wells. This study illustrates the potential of geophysical methods for fast and cost-effective esker studies, in particular the digital-based landstreamer and its combination with geophone-based wireless recorders, where the cover sediments are reasonably thick.

  7. Raw, high-resolution, chirp seismic-reflection data collected in San Pablo Bay (northern California) during field activity 2014-639-FA from 10/06/2014 to 10/10/2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes raw, high-resolution chirp seismic-reflection data collected in 2014 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Pablo Bay, northern California.

  8. Processed, high-resolution, chirp seismic-reflection data collected in San Pablo Bay (northern California) during field activity 2014-639-FA from 10/06/2014 to 10/10/2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes processed, high-resolution chirp seismic-reflection data collected in 2014 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Pablo Bay, northern...

  9. Feasibility of high resolution seismic reflection to improve accuracy of hydrogeologic models in a culturally noisy part of Ventura County, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.; Black, W.; Miele, M.; Morgan, T.; Ivanov, J.; Xia, J.; Peterie, S.

    2011-01-01

    A high-resolution seismic reflection investigation mapped reflectors and identified characteristics potentially influencing the interpretation of the hydrogeology underlying a portion of the Oxnard Plain in Ventura County, California. Design and implementation of this study was heavily influenced by high levels of cultural noise from vehicles, power lines, roads, manufacturing facilities, and underground utilities/vaults. Acquisition and processing flows were tailored to this noisy environment and relatively shallow target interval. Layering within both upper and lower aquifer systems was delineated at a vertical resolution potential of around 2.5 m at 350 m depth. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  10. High-resolution shear-wave seismic reflection as a tool to image near-surface subrosion structures - a case study in Bad Frankenhausen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja H.; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2016-10-01

    Subrosion is the subsurface leaching of soluble rocks that results in the formation of depression and collapse structures. This global phenomenon is a geohazard in urban areas. To study near-surface subrosion structures, four shear-wave seismic reflection profiles, with a total length of ca. 332 m, were carried out around the famous leaning church tower of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany, which shows an inclination of 4.93° from the vertical. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by soluble Permian deposits, and the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault is assumed to be a main pathway for water to leach the evaporite. The seismic profiles were acquired with the horizontal micro-vibrator ELVIS, developed at Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG), and a 72 m long landstreamer equipped with 72 horizontal geophones. The high-resolution seismic sections show subrosion-induced structures to a depth of ca. 100 m and reveal five features associated with the leaching of Permian deposits: (1) lateral and vertical varying reflection patterns caused by strongly heterogeneous strata, (2) discontinuous reflectors, small offsets, and faults, which show the underground is heavily fractured, (3) formation of depression structures in the near-surface, (4) diffractions in the unmigrated seismic sections that indicate increased scattering of the seismic waves, and (5) varying seismic velocities and low-velocity zones that are presumably caused by fractures and upward-migrating cavities. A previously undiscovered southward-dipping listric normal fault was also found, to the north of the church. It probably serves as a pathway for water to leach the Permian formations below the church and causes the tilting of the church tower. This case study shows the potential of horizontal shear-wave seismic reflection to image near-surface subrosion structures in an urban environment with a horizontal resolution of less than 1 m in the uppermost 10

  11. High-resolution seismic profiling on water

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    Herein is presented an overview of high-resolution seismic profiling on water. Included are basic concepts and terminology as well as discussions of types of sources and receivers, field practice, data recording and data processing. Emphasis is on digital single-channel profiling for engineering and environmental purposes.

  12. High-resolution seismic reflection and refraction imaging across the epicentral area of the 2009, Mw 6.1 Aquila (Italy) earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo G.; Villani, Fabio; Improta, Luigi; Castiello, Antonio; Pucci, Stefano; Civico, Riccardo; Pantosti, Stefania

    2017-04-01

    We present for the first time the results of high-resolution seismic reflection profiling aimed at imaging the shallow structure of Paganica and Bazzano Quaternary sub-basins across the shallow segments of the Paganica-S. Demetrio Fault, which has been indicated as the causative fault of the 6th April 2009 (Mw 6.1) L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy). The seismic data were collected along five dense and partly overlapping wide-aperture profiles, which run SW-NE for a total length of 6 km, mostly in the hanging wall of the Paganica-S. Demetrio Fault. To evaluate the optimal seismic reflection imaging strategy, we applied three different processing techniques to the dense, wide-aperture acquired data: a conventional CMP reflection processing; pre-stack depth migration (PSDM); and finally the Common-Reflection-Surface (CRS) stack technique. PSDM has proven capable of overcoming many of the typical drawbacks of CMP processing in the presence of complex subsurface velocity distributions. However, PSDM is highly sensitive to the accuracy of the background velocity model. Despite the use of an acquisition geometry effective for refraction tomography (e.g. dense wide-aperture), we were able to estimate a high-resolution background tomographic model suitable for migration purpose for Bazzano profile, whereas this was not the case for Paganica profile, due to greater structural complexity and a higher level of ambient noise. In these settings, the data-driven and velocity-independent CRS method provided a feasible alternative for seismic imaging in Paganica sub-basin. Integration of reflection seismology with refraction tomography and with new surface, paleoseismological and borehole data during interpretation provides new insights on the shallow architecture of the 2009 Mw 6.1 L'Aquila earthquake fault-system and related basins. Bazzano sub-basin is about 50-100 m deeper than Paganica sub-basin. The latter is offset by a large number of NE and SW-dipping faults affecting

  13. High-resolution seismic reflection/refraction images near the outer margin of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater, York-James Peninsula, southeastern Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Saulter, D.E.; Powars, D.S.; Goldman, M.R.; Dingler, J.A.; Gohn, G.S.; Schindler, J.S.; Johnson, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    faults and fractures in basement are not well determined. To better determine some of the unknowns associated with the CBIC, we conducted a 350-m-long, high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction survey, referred to here as the CBIC-1 seismic survey, on the York-James Peninsula in June 1999. In particular, we attempted to: better define the outer margin of the CBIC, understand lateral variations in the stratigraphic sequence, help assess potential hazards associated with regional seismicity, and determine acquisition parameters needed for shallow-depth seismic imaging in the Chesapeake Bay area.

  14. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  15. High-resolution seismic-reflection and marine-magnetic data from offshore central California--San Gregorio to Point Sur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Watt, Janet T.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Allwardt, Parker; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution seismic-reflection data on four surveys (S-N1-09-MB, S-15-10-NC, S-06-11-MB, and S-04-12-MB) and marine-magnetic data on one survey (S-06-11-MB) between 2009 and 2012, offshore of central California between San Gregorio and Point Sur. This work was supported in part by the California Seafloor Mapping Program. The survey areas span about 120 km of California's coast (including Monterey Bay). Most data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. Cumulatively, approximately 1,410 km of single-channel seismic-reflection data were acquired, mainly using a SIG 2mille minisparker. About 44 km of data were collected simultaneously using an EdgeTech Chirp 512. Subbottom acoustic penetration spanned tens to several hundreds of meters, variable by location. Marine magnetic data were collected on approximately 460 km of track lines (mainly in southern Monterey Bay) using a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. This report includes maps and navigation files of the surveyed transects, linked to Google Earth™ software, as well as digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y and JPEG formats. The images of bedrock, sediment deposits, and tectonic structure provide geologic information that is essential to hazard assessment, regional sediment management, and coastal and marine spatial planning at Federal, State and local levels, as well as to future research on the geomorphic, sedimentary, tectonic, and climatic record of central California.

  16. High-Resolution Chirp and Mini-Sparker Seismic-Reflection Data From the Southern California Continental Shelf - Gaviota to Mugu Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.; Draut, Amy E.; Normark, William R.; Conrad, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection data in September, 2007, and June-July, 2008, from the continental shelf offshore of southern California between Gaviota and Mugu Canyon, in support of the California's State Waters Mapping Program. Data were acquired using SIG 2mille mini-sparker and Edgetech chirp 512 instruments aboard the R/V Zephyr (Sept. 2007) and R/V Parke Snavely (June-July 2008). The survey area spanned approximately 120 km of coastline, and included shore-perpendicular transects spaced 1.0-1.5 km apart that extended offshore to at least the 3-mile limit of State waters, in water depths ranging from 10 m near shore to 300 m near the offshore extent of Mugu and Hueneme submarine canyons. Subbottom acoustic penetration spanned tens to several hundred meters, variable by location. This report includes maps of the surveyed transects, linked to Google Earth software, as well as digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats. The images of sediment deposits, tectonic structure, and natural-gas seeps collected during this study provide geologic information that is essential to coastal zone and resource management at Federal, State and local levels, as well as to future research on the sedimentary, tectonic, and climatic record of southern California.

  17. Structural characteristics of the Lake Van Basin, eastern Turkey, from high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and multibeam echosounder data: geologic and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukur, Deniz; Krastel, Sebastian; Tomonaga, Yama; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Sumita, Mari; Meydan, Ayşegül Feray; Çağatay, M. Namık; Toker, Mustafa; Kim, Seong-Pil; Kong, Gee-Soo; Horozal, Senay

    2017-01-01

    The structural evolution of Lake Van Basin, eastern Turkey, was reconstructed based on seismic reflection profiles through the sedimentary fill as well as from newly acquired multibeam echosounder data. The major sub-basins (Tatvan Basin and Northern Basin) of Lake Van, bound by NE-trending faults with normal components, formed during the past 600 ka probably due to extensional tectonics resulting from lithospheric thinning and mantle upwelling related to the westward escape of Anatolia. Rapid extension and subsidence during early lake formation led to the opening of the two sub-basins. Two major, still active volcanoes (Nemrut and Süphan) grew close to the lake basins approximately synchronously, their explosive deposits making up >20 % of the drilled upper 220 m of the ca. 550-m-thick sedimentary fill. During basin development, extension and subsidence alternated with compressional periods, particularly between 340 and 290 ka and sometime before 14 ka, when normal fault movements reversed and gentle anticlines formed as a result of inversion. The 14 ka event was accompanied by widespread uplift and erosion along the northeastern margin of the lake, and substantial erosion took place on the crests of the folds. A series of closely spaced eruptions of Süphan volcano occurred synchronously suggesting a causal relationship. Compression is still prevalent inside and around Lake Van as evidenced by recent faults offsetting the lake floor and by recent devastating earthquakes along their onshore continuations. New, high-resolution bathymetry data from Lake Van reveal the morphology of the Northern Ridge and provide strong evidence for ongoing transpression on a dextral strike-slip fault as documented by the occurrence of several pop-up structures along the ridge.

  18. Structural characteristics of the Lake Van Basin, eastern Turkey, from high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and multibeam echosounder data: geologic and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukur, Deniz; Krastel, Sebastian; Tomonaga, Yama; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Sumita, Mari; Meydan, Ayşegül Feray; Çağatay, M. Namık; Toker, Mustafa; Kim, Seong-Pil; Kong, Gee-Soo; Horozal, Senay

    2016-03-01

    The structural evolution of Lake Van Basin, eastern Turkey, was reconstructed based on seismic reflection profiles through the sedimentary fill as well as from newly acquired multibeam echosounder data. The major sub-basins (Tatvan Basin and Northern Basin) of Lake Van, bound by NE-trending faults with normal components, formed during the past ~600 ka probably due to extensional tectonics resulting from lithospheric thinning and mantle upwelling related to the westward escape of Anatolia. Rapid extension and subsidence during early lake formation led to the opening of the two sub-basins. Two major, still active volcanoes (Nemrut and Süphan) grew close to the lake basins approximately synchronously, their explosive deposits making up >20 % of the drilled upper 220 m of the ca. 550-m-thick sedimentary fill. During basin development, extension and subsidence alternated with compressional periods, particularly between ~340 and 290 ka and sometime before ~14 ka, when normal fault movements reversed and gentle anticlines formed as a result of inversion. The ~14 ka event was accompanied by widespread uplift and erosion along the northeastern margin of the lake, and substantial erosion took place on the crests of the folds. A series of closely spaced eruptions of Süphan volcano occurred synchronously suggesting a causal relationship. Compression is still prevalent inside and around Lake Van as evidenced by recent faults offsetting the lake floor and by recent devastating earthquakes along their onshore continuations. New, high-resolution bathymetry data from Lake Van reveal the morphology of the Northern Ridge and provide strong evidence for ongoing transpression on a dextral strike-slip fault as documented by the occurrence of several pop-up structures along the ridge.

  19. Neoarchaean tectonic history of the Witwatersrand Basin and Ventersdorp Supergroup: New constraints from high-resolution 3D seismic reflection data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Manzi, MSD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available of thrusts and faults, the gross structural architecture and Neoarchaean tectonic evolution of the West Rand and Bank fault zones, which offset the gold-bearing reefs of the basin. The merging of several 3D seismic surveys made clear the gross strato...

  20. High-resolution seismic reflection/refraction imaging from Interstate 10 to Cherry Valley Boulevard, Cherry Valley, Riverside County, California: implications for water resources and earthquake hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhok, G.; Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Horta, E.; Rymer, M.J.; Martin, P.; Christensen, A.

    1999-01-01

    This report is the second of two reports on seismic imaging investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1997 and 1998 in the Cherry Valley area in California (Figure 1a). In the first report (Catchings et al., 1999), data and interpretations were presented for four seismic imaging profiles (CV-1, CV-2, CV-3, and CV-4) acquired during the summer of 1997 . In this report, we present data and interpretations for three additional profiles (CV-5, CV-6, and CV-7) acquired during the summer of 1998 and the combined seismic images for all seven profiles. This report addresses both groundwater resources and earthquake hazards in the San Gorgonio Pass area because the shallow (upper few hundred meters) subsurface stratigraphy and structure affect both issues. The cities of Cherry Valley and Beaumont are located approximately 130 km (~80 miles) east of Los Angeles, California along the southern alluvial fan of the San Bernardino Mountains (see Figure 1b). These cities are two of several small cities that are located within San Gorgonio Pass, a lower-lying area between the San Bernardino and the San Jacinto Mountains. Cherry Valley and Beaumont are desert cities with summer daytime temperatures often well above 100 o F. High water usage in the arid climate taxes the available groundwater supply in the region, increasing the need for efficient management of the groundwater resources. The USGS and the San Gorgonio Water District (SGWD) work cooperatively to evaluate the quantity and quality of groundwater supply in the San Gorgonio Pass region. To better manage the water supplies within the District during wet and dry periods, the SGWD sought to develop a groundwater recharge program, whereby, excess water would be stored in underground aquifers during wet periods (principally winter months) and retrieved during dry periods (principally summer months). The SGWD preferred a surface recharge approach because it could be less expensive than a

  1. High-resolution seismic wave propagation using local time stepping

    KAUST Repository

    Peter, Daniel

    2017-03-13

    High-resolution seismic wave simulations often require local refinements in numerical meshes to accurately capture e.g. steep topography or complex fault geometry. Together with explicit time schemes, this dramatically reduces the global time step size for ground-motion simulations due to numerical stability conditions. To alleviate this problem, local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time stepping scheme to adapt the time step to the element size, allowing nearoptimal time steps everywhere in the mesh. This can potentially lead to significantly faster simulation runtimes.

  2. Linearized inversion frameworks toward high-resolution seismic imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Seismic exploration utilizes controlled sources, which emit seismic waves that propagate through the earth subsurface and get reflected off subsurface interfaces and scatterers. The reflected and scattered waves are recorded by recording stations installed along the earth surface or down boreholes. Seismic imaging is a powerful tool to map these reflected and scattered energy back to their subsurface scattering or reflection points. Seismic imaging is conventionally based on the single-scattering assumption, where only energy that bounces once off a subsurface scatterer and recorded by a receiver is projected back to its subsurface position. The internally multiply scattered seismic energy is considered as unwanted noise and is usually suppressed or removed from the recorded data. Conventional seismic imaging techniques yield subsurface images that suffer from low spatial resolution, migration artifacts, and acquisition fingerprint due to the limited acquisition aperture, number of sources and receivers, and bandwidth of the source wavelet. Hydrocarbon traps are becoming more challenging and considerable reserves are trapped in stratigraphic and pinch-out traps, which require highly resolved seismic images to delineate them. This thesis focuses on developing and implementing new advanced cost-effective seismic imaging techniques aiming at enhancing the resolution of the migrated images by exploiting the sparseness of the subsurface reflectivity distribution and utilizing the multiples that are usually neglected when imaging seismic data. I first formulate the seismic imaging problem as a Basis pursuit denoise problem, which I solve using an L1-minimization algorithm to obtain the sparsest migrated image corresponding to the recorded data. Imaging multiples may illuminate subsurface zones, which are not easily illuminated by conventional seismic imaging using primary reflections only. I then develop an L2-norm (i.e. least-squares) inversion technique to image

  3. A high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Toni

    2014-05-01

    measurement precision (i.e. earthquake location), while considering this extremely complex boundary condition. To solve this problem I have developed a high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe. The model is based on land-use data derived from satellite imagery by the EU-project CORINE in a resolution of 100x100m. The the CORINE data consists of several land-use classes, which, besides others, contain: industrial areas, mines, urban fabric, agricultural areas, permanent corps, forests and open spaces. Additionally, open GIS data for highways, and major and minor roads and railway lines were included from the OpenStreetMap project (www.openstreetmap.org). This data was divided into three classes that represent good, intermediate and bad ambient conditions of the corresponding land-use class based on expert judgment. To account for noise propagation away from its source a smoothing operator was applied to individual land-use noise-fields. Finally, the noise-fields were stacked to obtain an European map of ambient noise conditions. A calibration of this map with data of existing seismic stations Europe allowed me to estimate the expected noise level in actual ground motion units for the three ambient noise condition classes of the map. The result is a high-resolution ambient seismic noise map, that allows the network designer to make educated predictions on the expected noise level for arbitrary location in Europe. The ambient noise model was successfully tested in several network optimization projects in Switzerland and surrounding countries and will hopefully be a valuable contribution to improving the data quality of microseismic monitoring networks in Europe.

  4. Surficial geology and distribution of post-impoundment sediment of the western part of Lake Mead based on a sidescan sonar and high-resolution seismic-reflection survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twichell, David C.; Cross, VeeAnn A.; Rudin, Mark J.; Parolski, Kenneth F.

    1999-01-01

    Sidescan sonar imagery and high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles were collected in Las Vegas Bay and Boulder Basin of Lake Mead to determine the surficial geology as well as the distribution and thickness of sediment that has accumulated in these areas of the lake since the completion of Hoover Dam in 1935 (Gould, 1951). Results indicate that the accumulation of post-impoundment sediment is restricted to the original Colorado River bed which runs down the axis of Boulder Basin from Boulder Canyon to Hoover Dam, and the old Las Vegas Creek bed that bisects Las Vegas Bay. The sediment cover along the original Colorado River bed is continuous and is typically greater than 10-m thick throughout much of its length with the thickness in some areas exceeding 35 meters. The flat-lying nature of the deposits suggests that they are the result of turbidity currents that flow the length of the lake. The sediment cover in Las Vegas Bay is much thinner (rarely exceeding 2 m in thickness) and more discontinuous. The source for these sediments presumably is Las Vegas Wash and a series of other ephemeral washes that empty into this part of the lake. The presence of sediments along the entire length of the Las Vegas Creek bed suggests that turbidity currents probably are active here as well, and that sediment has been transported from these streams at least 10 km down the axis of this valley to where it enters Boulder Basin. Alluvial deposits and rock outcrops are still exposed on large parts of the lake floor.

  5. Imaging seismic reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Op 't Root, Timotheus Johannes Petrus Maria

    2011-01-01

    The goal of reflection seismic imaging is making images of the Earth subsurface using surface measurements of reflected seismic waves. Besides the position and orientation of subsurface reflecting interfaces it is a challenge to recover the size or amplitude of the discontinuities. We investigate tw

  6. Sands modeling constrained by high-resolution seismic data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the phase of field evaluation, the changing ofinterwell reservoir may be out of control ifthe geological model was built only on well data due to few existing wells. The uncertainty of the interwell reservoir interpolation based only on well data can be decreased by comprehensive utilization of geological, logging and seismic data, especially by using highly relative seismic properties from 3D seismic data adjusted by well point data to restrict interpolation of geological properties. A 3D-geological model which takes the sand body as the direct modeling object was built through stacking the structure, reservoir and water/oil/gas properties together in 3D space.

  7. High resolution seismic survey, Pen Branch Fault, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, E. (Emerald Exploration Consultants, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of the Pen Branch Fault at the Savannah River Site by a series of short, high resolution seismic reflection lines was conducted. The purpose was to acquire, process, and interpret 19.9 miles of data, optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata, in sufficient density such that processing performed in the conventional stepwise approach, followed by detailed interpretation, would define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the fault leading to definition of the location of the fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. The depth of optimization for the last two lines was modified to the 300 ft of geologic strata immediately above basement. Three older seismic surveys, other geophysical data, and associated borehole and geologic data were reviewed. The equipment and the acquisition, processing, and interpretation procedures are discussed in the report. The report includes a detailed line by line description and discussion of the interpretation. Figures include reference maps, contour displays of the stacking and interval velocities, diagrammatic references sketches of the interpreted layering and sedimentary features, index sketches, and specific color prints made on the workstation during the course of the interpretation. A volume of manuals on seismic devices and related equipment is included.

  8. High resolution seismic survey, Pen Branch Fault, Savannah River Site, South Carolina. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, E. [Emerald Exploration Consultants, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of the Pen Branch Fault at the Savannah River Site by a series of short, high resolution seismic reflection lines was conducted. The purpose was to acquire, process, and interpret 19.9 miles of data, optimized for the upper 300 ft of geologic strata, in sufficient density such that processing performed in the conventional stepwise approach, followed by detailed interpretation, would define small scale spatial variability and structural features in the vicinity of the fault leading to definition of the location of the fault, the shallowest extent of the fault, and the quantification of the sense and magnitude of motion. The depth of optimization for the last two lines was modified to the 300 ft of geologic strata immediately above basement. Three older seismic surveys, other geophysical data, and associated borehole and geologic data were reviewed. The equipment and the acquisition, processing, and interpretation procedures are discussed in the report. The report includes a detailed line by line description and discussion of the interpretation. Figures include reference maps, contour displays of the stacking and interval velocities, diagrammatic references sketches of the interpreted layering and sedimentary features, index sketches, and specific color prints made on the workstation during the course of the interpretation. A volume of manuals on seismic devices and related equipment is included.

  9. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  10. A High-Resolution View of Global Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    We present high-precision earthquake relocation results from our global-scale re-analysis of the combined seismic archives of parametric data for the years 1964 to present from the International Seismological Centre (ISC), the USGS's Earthquake Data Report (EDR), and selected waveform data from IRIS. We employed iterative, multistep relocation procedures that initially correct for large location errors present in standard global earthquake catalogs, followed by a simultaneous inversion of delay times formed from regional and teleseismic arrival times of first and later arriving phases. An efficient multi-scale double-difference (DD) algorithm is used to solve for relative event locations to the precision of a few km or less, while incorporating information on absolute hypocenter locations from catalogs such as EHB and GEM. We run the computations on both a 40-core cluster geared towards HTC problems (data processing) and a 500-core HPC cluster for data inversion. Currently, we are incorporating waveform correlation delay time measurements available for events in selected regions, but are continuously building up a comprehensive, global correlation database for densely distributed events recorded at stations with a long history of high-quality waveforms. The current global DD catalog includes nearly one million earthquakes, equivalent to approximately 70% of the number of events in the ISC/EDR catalogs initially selected for relocation. The relocations sharpen the view of seismicity in most active regions around the world, in particular along subduction zones where event density is high, but also along mid-ocean ridges where existing hypocenters are especially poorly located. The new data offers the opportunity to investigate earthquake processes and fault structures along entire plate boundaries at the ~km scale, and provides a common framework that facilitates analysis and comparisons of findings across different plate boundary systems.

  11. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  12. High resolution seismic refraction method (development and applications); Koseido kussetsuho jishin tansa no kaihatsu to tekiyorei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, K.; Saito, H. [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    Described herein are measurement/analysis procedures of the high-resolution seismic refraction method. Recently, use of explosives has been limited for many explorative activities. The measurement systems and waveform processing procedures described herein can minimize use of explosives and widen applicability of non-explosive seismic sources. The seismic refraction method is now advanced, e.g., to process large quantities of high-quality data, use tomographic algorithm and include analysis of vibration-receiving points in holes, and is applicable to grounds of complicated structures, for which the conventional method is difficult to use. The new method is aided by a personal computer to give the analysis results almost automatically, thereby establishing objectivity of the explorative results and securing data quality. The high-resolution seismic refraction method, aided by the new techniques of measurement/analysis, can now give the results in a much shorter time than the conventional one. 40 refs., 22 figs.

  13. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-20

    bottom). complicated tectonics . Lg appears to propagate well in the Arabian plate but is dramatically attenuated in the Lesser Caucasus. This may be...AFRL-RV-HA-TR-2010-1022 High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region Robert J. Mellors...Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8718-07-C-0007 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  14. High-resolution and super stacking of time-reversal mirrors in locating seismic sources

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Weiping

    2011-07-08

    Time reversal mirrors can be used to backpropagate and refocus incident wavefields to their actual source location, with the subsequent benefits of imaging with high-resolution and super-stacking properties. These benefits of time reversal mirrors have been previously verified with computer simulations and laboratory experiments but not with exploration-scale seismic data. We now demonstrate the high-resolution and the super-stacking properties in locating seismic sources with field seismic data that include multiple scattering. Tests on both synthetic data and field data show that a time reversal mirror has the potential to exceed the Rayleigh resolution limit by factors of 4 or more. Results also show that a time reversal mirror has a significant resilience to strong Gaussian noise and that accurate imaging of source locations from passive seismic data can be accomplished with traces having signal-to-noise ratios as low as 0.001. Synthetic tests also demonstrate that time reversal mirrors can sometimes enhance the signal by a factor proportional to the square root of the product of the number of traces, denoted as N and the number of events in the traces. This enhancement property is denoted as super-stacking and greatly exceeds the classical signal-to-noise enhancement factor of. High-resolution and super-stacking are properties also enjoyed by seismic interferometry and reverse-time migration with the exact velocity model. © 2011 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  15. Combined interpretation of SkyTEM and high-resolution seismic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Anne-Sophie; Lykke-Andersen, Holger; Jørgensen, Flemming Voldum

    2011-01-01

    made based on AEM (SkyTEM) and high-resolution seismic data from an area covering 10 km2 in the western part of Denmark. As support for the interpretations, an exploration well was drilled to provide lithological and logging information in the form of resistivity and vertical seismic profiling. Based...... on the resistivity log, synthetic SkyTEM responses were calculated with a varying number of gate-times in order to illustrate the effect of the noise-level. At the exploration well geophysical data were compared to the lithological log; in general there is good agreement. The same tendency was recognised when Sky......Airborne electromagnetic methods (AEM) are used extensively in groundwater investigations, often in combination with high-resolution seismic data. Despite the frequent use of this mapping strategy, only a few cases are found in the literature. In this study, comparisons and interpretations were...

  16. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru-Shan Wu; Xiao-Bi Xie

    2008-06-08

    Our proposed work on high resolution/high fidelity seismic imaging focused on three general areas: (1) development of new, more efficient, wave-equation-based propagators and imaging conditions, (2) developments towards amplitude-preserving imaging in the local angle domain, in particular, imaging methods that allow us to estimate the reflection as a function of angle at a layer boundary, and (3) studies of wave inversion for local parameter estimation. In this report we summarize the results and progress we made during the project period. The report is divided into three parts, totaling 10 chapters. The first part is on resolution analysis and its relation to directional illumination analysis. The second part, which is composed of 6 chapters, is on the main theme of our work, the true-reflection imaging. True-reflection imaging is an advanced imaging technology which aims at keeping the image amplitude proportional to the reflection strength of the local reflectors or to obtain the reflection coefficient as function of reflection-angle. There are many factors which may influence the image amplitude, such as geometrical spreading, transmission loss, path absorption, acquisition aperture effect, etc. However, we can group these into two categories: one is the propagator effect (geometric spreading, path losses); the other is the acquisition-aperture effect. We have made significant progress in both categories. We studied the effects of different terms in the true-amplitude one-way propagators, especially the terms including lateral velocity variation of the medium. We also demonstrate the improvements by optimizing the expansion coefficients in different terms. Our research also includes directional illumination analysis for both the one-way propagators and full-wave propagators. We developed the fast acquisition-aperture correction method in the local angle-domain, which is an important element in the true-reflection imaging. Other developments include the super

  17. Miscellaneous High-Resolution Seismic Imaging Investigations in Salt Lake and Utah Valleys for Earthquake Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.; Worley, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In support of earthquake hazards and ground motion studies by researchers at the Utah Geological Survey, University of Utah, Utah State University, Brigham Young University, and San Diego State University, the U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Hazards Team Intermountain West Project conducted three high-resolution seismic imaging investigations along the Wasatch Front between September 2003 and September 2005. These three investigations include: (1) a proof-of-concept P-wave minivib reflection imaging profile in south-central Salt Lake Valley, (2) a series of seven deep (as deep as 400 m) S-wave reflection/refraction soundings using an S-wave minivib in both Salt Lake and Utah Valleys, and (3) an S-wave (and P-wave) investigation to 30 m at four sites in Utah Valley and at two previously investigated S-wave (Vs) minivib sites. In addition, we present results from a previously unpublished downhole S-wave investigation conducted at four sites in Utah Valley. The locations for each of these investigations are shown in figure 1. Coordinates for the investigation sites are listed in Table 1. With the exception of the P-wave common mid-point (CMP) reflection profile, whose end points are listed, these coordinates are for the midpoint of each velocity sounding. Vs30 and Vs100, also shown in Table 1, are defined as the average shear-wave velocities to depths of 30 and 100 m, respectively, and details of their calculation can be found in Stephenson and others (2005). The information from these studies will be incorporated into components of the urban hazards maps along the Wasatch Front being developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, Utah Geological Survey, and numerous collaborating research institutions.

  18. High Resolution Wide Angle Seismics of A Mud Volcano - Crimea, Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, J.; Broser, A.; Zillmer, M.; M52-1 Shipboard Party, The

    Gashydrates in marine sediments have been identified in the Black Sea first (Yefre- mova and Zhizchenko, 1974). Since russian researchers frequently reported gashy- drate findings near the seafloor from sediment cores (Soliviev and Ginsburg, 1994; Ivanov et al., 1998). Additional indications for emplacements of gas hydrates near the surface are observations of gas plumes by acoustic systems (Polikarpov et al., 1999) as well as direct observations of the ocean floor by video systems (Limonov et al., 1997). The existence of a Bottom-Simulating-Reflector (BSR) is used to identify gashydrate layers in seismic sections. These negative polarized reflector indicates the base of the hydrate stability zone (BHSZ) and generally cuts stratigraphic sequences. Still in dis- cussion is the question whether this reflection is caused by a velocity increase above the BHSZ or a velocity decrease due to free gas below the BHSZ (Pecher et al., 1996). Knowledge about gas and gashydrate concentrations in the sediments will be neces- sary to answer these questions. In January 2002 an interdisciplinary team of researches from Germany (Kiel and Bre- men), the Ukraine and Russia is going to carry out detailed investigations across a mud volcano in the waters offshore Crimea. Besides ocean floor video observations and geological sampling high resolution seismic data acquisition will be done. Record- ings of a multichannel streamer adopted to the alternating shot sequences (University of Bremen) will be accompanied by Ocean-Bottom-Hydrophones (OBH) and Ocean- Bottom-Seismometers (OBS) from GEOMAR, Kiel. During data acquisition three dif- ferent seismic sources (water gun, 2 GI gun) will be shot in alternating mode. There- fore three profiles of different frequency content will be achieved simultaneously. The corresponding resolution and depth of signal penetration will allow to study different sediment layers with increased resolution near the seafloor. It is planned to observe the shots with

  19. The offshore Yangsan fault activity in the Quaternary, SE Korea: Analysis of high-resolution seismic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Joon; Moon, Seonghoon; Jou, Hyeong-Tae; Lee, Gwang Hoon; Yoo, Dong Geun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kwang Hee

    2016-12-01

    The NNE-trending dextral Yangsan fault is a > 190-km-long structure in the Korean Peninsula traced to the southeastern coast. The scarcity of Quaternary deposits onland precludes any detailed investigation of the Quaternary activity and structure of the Yangsan fault using seismic reflection profiling. We acquired offshore high-resolution seismic profiles to investigate the extension of the Yangsan fault and constrain its Quaternary activity using stratigraphic markers. The seismic profiles reveal a NNE-trending fault system consisting of a main fault and an array of subsidiary faults that displaced Quaternary sequences. Stratigraphic analysis of seismic profiles indicates that the offshore faults were activated repeatedly in the Quaternary. The up-to-the-east sense of throw on the main fault and plan-view pattern of the fault system are explained by dextral strike-slip faulting. The main fault, when projected toward the Korean Peninsula along its strike, aligns well with the Yangsan fault. We suggest that the offshore fault system is a continuation of the Yangsan fault and has spatial correlation with weak but ongoing seismicity.

  20. High-Resolution Seismic Definition of the Distribution of Gas in the West Svalbard Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshull, T. A.; Westbrook, G. K.; Marin-Moreno, H.; Marsset, B.; Ker, S.; Sarkar, S.; Vardy, M. E.; Henstock, T.

    2014-12-01

    The widespread presence of gas beneath the seabed west of Svalbard is shown by negative-polarity high-amplitude reflectors (nephars), imaged in high-resolution near-surface and deep-towed seismic reflection data. The principal controls on the presence of gas are the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), from which free gas is generally excluded, and stratigraphic control of permeable layers. A widespread bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) beneath the lower-mid continental slope indicates gas at the base of the GHSZ. The depth of the base of the GHSZ predicted by a numerical model that takes in to account variation in ocean temperature over the past two thousand years, is consistent with the depth of the BSR, even at its shallowest depth, where a steady-state model places base of the GHSZ shallower than the BSR. Similarly, farther up slope, where the BSR loses it coherency, the depths of the shallowest nephars are compatible with the predicted depth of the base of the GHSZ from the time-dependent model, but are about three times deeper than the predicted steady-state depth of the BSR. This approach to defining the limits of the GHSZ is not precise, as it depends upon the presence of gas. In the shallow sediment sequence, which has a high proportion of glacigenic sediments, gas is restricted to a smaller number of permeable units than in the contourite-dominated sequence farther down the continental slope. Where the seabed is shallower than the GHSZ, numerous plumes of methane gas ascend from the seabed, and gas, which has migrated up slope through dipping permeable layers, locally ponds beneath a thin veneer of unconformable glacial and post-glacial sediments on the continental shelf.

  1. Study on the genesis of karstic collapse column and characteristics of high resolution seismic data in one coal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shao-hong; LIN Chang-rong

    2008-01-01

    On the standpoint of the disaster prevention from water inrush,discussed the genesis and geologic condition of karstic collapse column in one coal field,analyzed the geophysical characteristics of karstic collapse column by using high resolution 3D seismic data.It shows the effective result of the technology of high resolution 3D seismic prospecting in the exploration of the karstic collapse column,and presents some prediction methods and prevention measures.

  2. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring earthquake activity and verification of the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. We show results from our continuing effort in developing efficient waveform cross-correlation and double-difference analysis methods for the large-scale processing of regional and global seismic archives to improve existing earthquake parameter estimates, detect seismic events with magnitudes below current detection thresholds, and improve real-time monitoring procedures. We demonstrate the performance of these algorithms as applied to the 28-year long seismic archive of the Northern California Seismic Network. The tools enable the computation of periodic updates of a high-resolution earthquake catalog of currently over 500,000 earthquakes using simultaneous double-difference inversions, achieving up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. This catalog, together with associated metadata, form the underlying relational database for a real-time double-difference scheme, DDRT, which rapidly computes high-precision correlation times and hypocenter locations of new events with respect to the background archive (http://ddrt.ldeo.columbia.edu). The DDRT system facilitates near-real-time seismicity analysis, including the ability to search at an unprecedented resolution for spatio-temporal changes in seismogenic properties. In areas with continuously recording stations, we show that a detector built around a scaled cross-correlation function can lower the detection threshold by one magnitude unit compared to the STA/LTA based detector employed at the network. This leads to increased event density, which in turn pushes the resolution capability of our location algorithms. On a global scale, we are currently building

  3. Worldwide Marine Seismic Reflection Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC maintains a large volume of both Analog and Digital seismic reflection data. Currently only a limited number of lines are available online. Digital data include...

  4. The Project Serapis: High Resolution Seismic Imagingof The Campi Flegrei Caldera Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Chiarabba, C.; de Franco, R.; Makris, J.; Michelini, A.; Musacchio, G.; Serapis Group

    During September 2001, an extended active seismic survey has been performed in the gulfs of Naples and Pozzuoli in the framework of the so called SERAPIS (SEismic Re- flection Acquisition Project for Imaging Structures). The project SERAPIS is aimed at the acquisition in the bays of Naples and Pozzuoli, on land and at the sea bottom (using sea bottom seismographs), of seismic signals emitted by a very dense network of airgun sources. The energization is performed through the syncronized implosion of bubbles produced by a battery of three to twelve, 16 liters airguns, mounted on the oceanographic vessel NADIR, owned by the french company IFREMER, which supported the project at no cost. The experiment has been designed to have 2D-3D acquisition lay-outs and its objective is the high resolution imaging of the main shal- low crustal discontinuities underneath the major neapolitan volcanic complexes. In particular some desired targets are the location and spatial definition of the magmatic feeding system of Campi Flegrei and the morphologic reconstruction of the interface separating the shallow volcano-alluvium sediments and the Mesozoic carbonates, re- cently detected and accurately imaged underneath Mt.Vesuvius volcano. A secondary but not less important objective is the denser re-sampling of areas in the Bay of Naples prospicient to Mt.Vesuvius, which have been investigated during the last marine sur- vey using the same vessel in 1997 (MareVes 97). Sixty, three-component stations have been installed on-land in the areas of Campi Flegrei, Mt.Vesuvius and on the islands of Ischia and Procida. In particular, the Mt.Vesuvius stations have been deployed along a 40 km long, SE-NW profile crossing the Campanian Plain toward the limestone out- crops. 72 sea bottom seismographs (OBS) have been installed in the gulfs of Naples and Pozzuoli by the University of Hamburg, with the logistic support of Geopro smbh and Geolab Italia. The OBS network geometry follows the main

  5. Fast history matching of time-lapse seismic and production data for high resolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Arismendi, Eduardo Antonio

    Integrated reservoir modeling has become an important part of day-to-day decision analysis in oil and gas management practices. A very attractive and promising technology is the use of time-lapse or 4D seismic as an essential component in subsurface modeling. Today, 4D seismic is enabling oil companies to optimize production and increase recovery through monitoring fluid movements throughout the reservoir. 4D seismic advances are also being driven by an increased need by the petroleum engineering community to become more quantitative and accurate in our ability to monitor reservoir processes. Qualitative interpretations of time-lapse anomalies are being replaced by quantitative inversions of 4D seismic data to produce accurate maps of fluid saturations, pore pressure, temperature, among others. Within all steps involved in this subsurface modeling process, the most demanding one is integrating the geologic model with dynamic field data, including 4Dseismic when available. The validation of the geologic model with observed dynamic data is accomplished through a "history matching" (HM) process typically carried out with well-based measurements. Due to low resolution of production data, the validation process is severely limited in its reservoir areal coverage, compromising the quality of the model and any subsequent predictive exercise. This research will aim to provide a novel history matching approach that can use information from high-resolution seismic data to supplement the areally sparse production data. The proposed approach will utilize streamline-derived sensitivities as means of relating the forward model performance with the prior geologic model. The essential ideas underlying this approach are similar to those used for high-frequency approximations in seismic wave propagation. In both cases, this leads to solutions that are defined along "streamlines" (fluid flow), or "rays" (seismic wave propagation). Synthetic and field data examples will be used

  6. Near-Surface & High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Bennett Thrust Fault in the Indio Mountains of West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennemann, A.; Karplus, M. S.; Kaip, G.; Harder, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the crustal structure of the Indio Mountains in southwest Texas, 34 km southwest of Van Horn at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) field station using newly acquired active-source seismic data. These new data are the first active-source seismic data acquired at the UTEP field station. The dominant regional lithologies in this area comprise a transgressive sequence nearly 2 km in total stratigraphic thickness, formed by extensional processes. The area is highly faulted with multiple fault generations. I will show images of the Bennett Thrust Fault, a northwest-striking, northeast-dipping fault associated with the Laramide Orogeny and discuss the near-surface geometries of this fault and adjacent rock units. This region is a pre-salt analog for similar areas that are ideal for petroleum reservoirs, such are reservoirs off the coasts of Brazil and Angola. While there are no petroleum plays in the Indio Mountains region, imaging and understanding subsurface structural and lithological geometries and how that geometry directs potential fluid flow has implications for other regions with petroleum plays. I will present processed data and interpretation of a 1 km 2-D near-surface, high-resolution seismic reflection line. Along the 1 km line, we collected a lower frequency dataset using 100 third-pound explosions and a higher frequency dataset produced from 500 sledge-hammer blows at the same 100 source points (5 blows will be stacked at each source point). The lower frequency data set will be the focus of this presentation. The data will be processed using standard seismic reflection practices using ProMAX. This image will be imported into Petrel to create a model of the faults' geometries and the sedimentary layers. My research will identify near-surface structures, fault geometries and lithologies.

  7. High resolution velocity structure beneath Mount Vesuvius from seismic array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Roberto; Tronca, Fabrizio; Bianco, Francesca; Del Pezzo, Edoardo

    2002-11-01

    A high resolution P-wave image of Mt. Vesuvius edifice has been derived from simultaneous inversion of travel times and hypocentral parameters of local earthquakes, land based shots and small aperture array data. The results give details down to 300-500 m. The relocated local seismicity appears to extend down to 5 km below the central crater, distributed in a major cluster, centered at 3 km below the central crater and in a minor group, with diffuse hypocenters inside the volcanic edifice. The two clusters are separated by an anomalously high Vp region at around 1 km depth. A zone with high Vp/Vs in the upper layers is interpreted as produced by the presence of intense fluid circulation. The highest energy quakes (up to M = 3.6) are located in the deeper cluster, in a high P-wave velocity zone. Our results favor an interpretation in terms of absence of shallow magma reservoirs.

  8. High-resolution seismic attenuation structures beneath Hokkaido corner, northeastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, S.; Nakajima, J.; Okada, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Katsumata, K.; Asano, Y.; Uchida, N.

    2013-12-01

    1. Introduction In the Hokkaido corner, the Kuril fore-arc sliver collides with the northeastern Japan arc. Using data from the nationwide Kiban seismic network and a temporary seismic network, Kita et al. [2012] determined high-resolution 3D seismic velocity structure beneath this area for deeper understanding of the collision process of two fore-arcs. The results show that a broad low-V zone (crust material) anomalously descends into the mantle wedge at depths of 30-90 km in the west of the Hidaka main thrust. On the other hand, several high-velocity zones having velocities of mantle materials are distributed in the crust at depths of 10-35 km. These high-velocity zones are inclined eastward, being nearly parallel to each other. Two of the western boundaries of these high-V zones correspond to the fault planes of the 1970 Mj 6.7 Hidaka and the 1982 Mj 7.1 Urakawa-oki earthquakes, respectively. In this study, we merged waveform data from the Kiban-network and from a dense temporary seismic network [Katsumata et al., 2002], and estimated the seismic attenuation structure to compare with the seismic velocity images of Kita et al. [2012]. 2. Data and method We estimated corner frequency for each earthquake by the spectral ratio method using the coda waves [e.g. Mayeda et al., 2007]. Then, we simultaneously determined values of t* and the amplitude level at lower frequencies from the observed spectra after correcting for the source spectrum. Seismic attenuation (Q-1 value) structure was obtained, inverting t* values with the tomographic code of Zhao et al. [1992]. We adopted the geometry of the Pacific plate which was precisely estimated by Kita et al. [2010b]. The study region covers an area of 41-45N, 140.5-146E, and a depth range of 0-200 km. We obtained 131,958 t* from 6,186 events (M>2.5) that occurred during the period from Aug. 1999 to Dec. 2012. The number of stations used is 353. Horizontal and vertical grid nodes were set with spacing of 0.10-0.3 degree and

  9. On the use of CCD area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenter, P; Catalano, J G; Park, C; Zhang, Z

    2006-07-01

    The use and application of charge coupled device (CCD) area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity is discussed. Direct comparison of high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity data measured with CCD area detectors and traditional X-ray scintillator ('point') detectors demonstrates that the use of CCD detectors leads to a substantial (approximately 30-fold) reduction in data acquisition rates because of the elimination of the need to scan the sample to distinguish signal from background. The angular resolution with a CCD detector is also improved by a factor of approximately 3. The ability to probe the large dynamic range inherent to high-resolution X-ray reflectivity data in the specular reflection geometry was demonstrated with measurements of the orthoclase (001)- and alpha-Al2O3 (012)-water interfaces, with measured reflectivity signals varying by a factor of approximately 10(6) without the use of any beam attenuators. Statistical errors in the reflectivity signal are also derived and directly compared with the repeatability of the measurements.

  10. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of Fault Zones: Methods and Examples From The San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Prentice, C. S.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic imaging of fault zones at shallow depths is challenging. Conventional seismic reflection methods do not work well in fault zones that consist of non-planar strata or that have large variations in velocity structure, two properties that occur in most fault zones. Understanding the structure and geometry of fault zones is important to elucidate the earthquake hazard associated with fault zones and the barrier effect that faults impose on subsurface fluid flow. In collaboration with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) at San Andreas Lake on the San Francisco peninsula, we acquired combined seismic P-wave and S-wave reflection, refraction, and guided-wave data to image the principal strand of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) that ruptured the surface during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and additional fault strands east of the rupture. The locations and geometries of these fault strands are important because the SFPUC is seismically retrofitting the Hetch Hetchy water delivery system, which provides much of the water for the San Francisco Bay area, and the delivery system is close to the SAF at San Andreas Lake. Seismic reflection images did not image the SAF zone well due to the brecciated bedrock, a lack of layered stratigraphy, and widely varying velocities. Tomographic P-wave velocity images clearly delineate the fault zone as a low-velocity zone at about 10 m depth in more competent rock, but due to soil saturation above the rock, the P-waves do not clearly image the fault strands at shallower depths. S-wave velocity images, however, clearly show a diagnostic low-velocity zone at the mapped 1906 surface break. To image the fault zone at greater depths, we utilized guided waves, which exhibit high amplitude seismic energy within fault zones. The guided waves appear to image the fault zone at varying depths depending on the frequency of the seismic waves. At higher frequencies (~30 to 40 Hz), the guided waves show strong amplification at the

  11. High-resolution seismic analysis of the coastal Mecklenburg Bay (North German Basin): the pre-Alpine evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöllner, H.; Reicherter, K.; Schikowsky, P.

    2008-09-01

    The pre-Alpine structural and geological evolution in the northern part of the North German Basin have been revealed on the basis of a very dense reflection seismic profile grid. The study area is situated in the coastal Mecklenburg Bay (Germany), part of the southwestern Baltic Sea. From the central part of the North German Basin to the northern basin margin in the Grimmen High area a series of high-resolution maps show the evolution from the base Zechstein to the Lower Jurassic. We present a map of basement faults affecting the pre-Zechstein. The pre-Alpine structural evolution of the region has been determined from digital mapping of post-Permian key horizons traced on the processed seismic time sections. The geological evolution of the North German Basin can be separated into four distinct periods in the Rerik study area. During Late Permian and Early Triassic evaporites and clastics were deposited. Salt movement was initiated after the deposition of the Middle Triassic Muschelkalk. Salt pillows, which were previously unmapped in the study area, are responsible for the creation of smaller subsidence centers and angular unconformities in the Late Triassic Keuper, especially in the vicinity of the fault-bounded Grimmen High. In this area, partly Lower Jurassic sediments overlie the Keuper unconformably. The change from extension to compression in the regional stress field remobilized the salt, leading to a major unconformity marked at the base of the Late Cretaceous.

  12. Fault and dyke detectability in high resolution seismic surveys for coal: a view from numerical modelling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Binzhong 13Hatherly, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Modern underground coal mining requires certainty about geological faults, dykes and other structural features. Faults with throws of even just a few metres can create safety issues and lead to costly delays in mine production. In this paper, we use numerical modelling in an ideal, noise-free environment with homogeneous layering to investigate the detectability of small faults by seismic reflection surveying. If the layering is horizontal, faults with throws of 1/8 of the wavelength should be detectable in a 2D survey. In a coal mining setting where the seismic velocity of the overburden ranges from 3000 m/s to 4000 m/s and the dominant seismic frequency is ~100 Hz, this corresponds to a fault with a throw of 4-5 m. However, if the layers are dipping or folded, the faults may be more difficult to detect, especially when their throws oppose the trend of the background structure. In the case of 3D seismic surveying we suggest that faults with throws as small as 1/16 of wavelength (2-2.5 m) can be detectable because of the benefits offered by computer-aided horizon identification and the improved spatial coherence in 3D seismic surveys. With dykes, we find that Berkhout's definition of the Fresnel zone is more consistent with actual experience. At a depth of 500 m, which is typically encountered in coal mining, and a 100 Hz dominant seismic frequency, dykes less than 8 m in width are undetectable, even after migration.

  13. High-resolution 3D seismic model of the crustal and uppermost mantle structure in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Marek; Polkowski, Marcin; Ostaficzuk, Stanisław R.

    2016-01-01

    In the area of Poland a contact between the Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe and the Carpathians has a complicated structure and a complex P-wave velocity of the sedimentary cover, crystalline crust, Moho depth and the uppermost mantle. The geometry of the uppermost several kilometers of sediments is relatively well recognized from over 100,000 boreholes. The vertical seismic profiling (VSP) from 1188 boreholes provided detailed velocity data for regional tectonic units and for stratigraphic successions from Permian to the Tertiary and Quaternary deposits. These data, however, do not provide information about the velocity and basement depth in the central part of the Trans-European suture zone (TESZ) and in the Carpathians. So, the data set is supplemented by 2D velocity models from 32 deep seismic sounding refraction profiles which also provide information about the crust and uppermost mantle. Together with the results of other methods: vertical seismic profiling, magnetotelluric, allow for the creation of a detailed, high-resolution 3D model for the entire Earth's crust and the uppermost mantle down to a depth of 60 km. The thinnest sedimentary cover in the Mazury-Belarus anteclise is only 0.3 to 1 km thick, which increases to 7 to 8 km along the East European Craton (EEC) margin, and 9 to 12 km in the TESZ. The Variscan domain is characterized by a 1-4 km thick sedimentary cover, while the Carpathians are characterized by very thick sedimentary layers, up to about 20 km. The crystalline crust is differentiated and has a layered structure. The crust beneath the West European Platform (WEP; Variscan domain) is characterized by P-wave velocities of 5.8-6.6 km/s. The upper and middle crusts beneath the EEC are characterized by velocities of 6.1-6.6 km/s, and are underlain by a high velocity lower crust with a velocity of about 7 km/s. A general decrease in velocity is observed from the older to the younger tectonic domains. The TESZ is associated with a steep dip

  14. LATE QUATERNARY SEISMIC SEQUENCES AND SEDIMENTATION ALONG THE COAST OFF TAISHAN,GUANGDONG,AS REVEALED BY HIGH RESOLUTION SEISMIC DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴时国; 黄孝健

    2002-01-01

    Seismic stratigraphic analysis of 150 km of high-resolution seismic profiles (G E OPULSE and 3.5 kHz) obtained along the muddy coast off Taishan, Guangdong pr ovided valuable information on the offshore Quaternary stratigraphy, tectonics, sedimentary evol ution, and environmental and engineering geology of this area.The following late Quaternary stratigraphic sequences were mapped. (1) Pleistoce ne alluvial silty sand and shallow marine clay; (2) coarse fluvial channel sand; (3 ) nearshore and bay clayey sediments. The incision of fluvial channels occurred in two stages: duri ng the Late Pleistocene and at the beginning of the Holocene. The Pleistocene fluvial channe ls have been filled by coarse sand overlain by more than 10 m of late Pleistocene clay and 20-30 m o f Holocene clay.The coastal area is dissected by two major fault systems: the first group strike s ENE-WSW and controls the evolution of the adjacent Quaternary basin, while the second one tr ends NNE-SSW. These fault systems must be taken into account in any coastal engineering consid erations. In addition, both granitic and metamorphic basements were recognized.

  15. The Seismogenic Zone in Southern Chile: Insights from high resolution receiver function analysis and seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietbrock, A.; Haberland, C.; Lange, D.; Bataille, K.

    2007-12-01

    Subduction zones, the expression of convergent plate boundaries, generate the world's largest and most destructive earthquakes. The Southern Chilean subduction zone is an ideal natural laboratory to study the processes involved in generating these devastat- ing earthquakes and is one of the main aims of the international and interdisciplinary research initiative TIPTEQ (from The Incoming Plate to megaThrust EarthQuake pro- cesses). High resolution images, using different techniques as well as different physi- cal parameters, form the base for identifying the processes involved. Here we present new data from teleseismic receiver function analysis and 3D seismic tomography to study in detail the down-dip end of the seismogenic zone in the nucleation area of the 1960 magnitude Mw=9.5 Valdivia, Chile, earthquake. Within the project TIPTEQ two dense amphibious passive seismic networks have been installed between Nov. 2004 and Oct. 2005, both covering the entire forearc from the trench to the active volcanic front. The Northern array was located between 37° and 39° South including the epicentre of the 1960 Chile earthquake. It consisted out of 120 continuously recording, three component stations on land and 10 continuously recording Ocean Bottom Seismometers/Hydrophones (OBS/H) at sea. The Southern array was located between 41.5° and 43.5° South roughly in the middle of the rupture zone of the Valdivia earthquake. It consisted out of 20 continuously recording three component stations on land and 20 continuously recording Ocean Bottom Seismometers/Hydrophones (OBS/H) at sea. Several hundreds of micro earthquakes could be located using manual picked P- and S-wave arrivals. Joint 2D/3D inversions for earthquake location, P-wave velocity and vp/vs-ratio were carried out and give a detailed image of the structure as well as a snapshot of the seismicity distribution in both study regions. The subducting Nazca plate can be clearly identified in both regions dipping at a

  16. Architectures of the Moroccan continental shelf of the Alboran Sea: insights from high-resolution bathymetry and seismic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafosse, Manfred; Gorini, Christian; Leroy, Pascal; d'Acremont, Elia; Rabineau, Marina; Ercilla, Gemma; Alonso, Belén; Ammar, Abdellah

    2016-04-01

    The MARLBORO and the SARAS oceanographic surveys have explored the continental shelf in the vicinity of the transtensive Nekor basin (South Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean) and over three submarine highs located at several tens of kilometers from the shelf. Those surveys have produced high-resolution (≤29m²/pixel) bathymetry maps. Simultaneously, seismic SPARKER and TOPAS profiles were recorded. To quantify and understand Quaternary vertical motions of this tectonically active area, we searched for morphological and sedimentary paleobathymetric or paleo-elevations markers. Shelf-edge wedges associated marine terraces and paleo-shorelines have been identified on the bathymetry and on seismic cross-sections. These features reflect the trends of long term accommodation variations. Along the Moroccan continental shelf the lateral changes of shelf-edges geometries and the spatial distribution of marine landforms (sedimentary marine terraces, sediment wave fields, marine incisions) reflect the interaction between sea level changes and spatial variations of subsidence rates. Positions of paleo-shorelines identified in the studied area have been correlated with the relative sea-level curve (Rohling et al., 2014). Several still stands or slow stands periods have been recognized between -130-125m, -100-110m and -85-80m. The astronomical forcing controls the architecture of Mediterranean continental shelves. Marine landforms distribution also reveals the way sea level changed since the LGM. The comparison with observations on other western Mediterranean margins (e.g. the Gulf of Lion, the Ionian-Calabrian shelf) allowed a first order access to vertical motion rates.

  17. Revisiting the Submerged Paleo Elbe Valley (S North Sea) with High-Resolution Shallow Seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenmeier, S.; Hass, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Elbe paleo valley is the most prominent subsurface structure in the southern North Sea (~10,000 km²) and constitutes an important part of Germany's largest marine Natura 2000-Reserve "Sylter Außenriff" (European environmental protection area). It is supposed that the valley was formed by epeirogenic movement during the Tertiary. The depression developed to its present form during the Weichselian sea-level lowstand (-130 m below present). Melt waters that discharged in north-westerly directions fed the paleo Elbe at that time. During the Holocene the valley drowned in the rising sea. A narrow raster of new shallow seismic data combined with high resolution sidescan sonar data is used to shed new light on the Holocene development of the paleo Elbe valley and its adjacent regions in detail. Cross sections distributed with transect distances of 400 and 800 m, respectively, over a length of 100 km (approximately one third of the total valley length) enable a good comprehensive analysis of the historical process of sedimentary valley infill and coastal evolution with the successive Holocene sea level rise. The eastern flank of the valley is characterized by a relatively steep slope with one or more terraces, representing moraine deposits which are today still present at the seafloor surface, partly covered with Holocene marine deposits. The western slip-off slope of the valley is much smoother than the eastern undercut slope. West of the valley, sediment cores show peat and tidal flat sediments. Shallow seismic data show the base of the valley. There are conspicuous internal seismic reflectors above the base, inclined in northeastern direction. They indicate a sedimentary infill of the valley from the southwest when the southern part of the Dogger Bank was flooded during the early Holocene sea-level rise. In this process the steeper eastern slope acted as a natural barrier towards the northeast, averted sediment transport beyond the eastern boundary of the paleo

  18. Study on Anti-Disturbance and High-Resolution Shallow Seismic Exploration of Active Faults in Urban Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jishun; Zhang Xiankang; Liu Baojin; Fan Shengming; Wang Fuyun; Duan Yonghong; Zhang Hongqiang

    2003-01-01

    The significance of detection of urban active faults and the general situation concerning detection of urban active faults in the world are briefly introduced. In a brief description of the basic principles of anti-disturbance and high-resolution shallow seismic exploration, the stress is put on the excitation of seismic sources, the performance of digital seismographs, receiving mode and conditions, geometry as well as data acquisition, processing and interpretation in the anti-disturbance and high-resolution shallow seismic exploration of urban active faults. The study indicates that a controlled seismic source with a linear or nonlinear frequency-conversion scanning function and the relevant seismographs must be used in data acquisition, as well as working methods for small group interval, small offset, multi-channel receiving, short-array and high-frequency detectors for receiving are used. Attention should be paid to the application of techniques for static correction of refraction, noise suppressing, high-precision analysis of velocity, wavelet compressing, zero-phasing of wavelet and pre-stacking migration to data processing and interpretation. Finally, some cases of anti-disturbance and high-resolution shallow seismic exploration of urban active faults are present in the paper.

  19. Numerical simulation for accuracy of velocity analysis in small-scale high-resolution marine multichannel seismic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Di; Cai, Feng; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2017-06-01

    When used with large energy sparkers, marine multichannel small-scale high-resolution seismic detection technology has a high resolution, high-detection precision, a wide applicable range, and is very flexible. Positive results have been achieved in submarine geological research, particularly in the investigation of marine gas hydrates. However, the amount of traveltime difference information is reduced for the velocity analysis under conditions of a shorter spread length, thus leading to poorer focusing of the velocity spectrum energy group and a lower accuracy of the velocity analysis. It is thus currently debatable whether the velocity analysis accuracy of short-arrangement multichannel seismic detection technology is able to meet the requirements of practical application in natural gas hydrate exploration. Therefore, in this study the bottom boundary of gas hydrates (Bottom Simulating Reflector, BSR) is used to conduct numerical simulation to discuss the accuracy of the velocity analysis related to such technology. Results show that a higher dominant frequency and smaller sampling interval are not only able to improve the seismic resolution, but they also compensate for the defects of the short-arrangement, thereby improving the accuracy of the velocity analysis. In conclusion, the accuracy of the velocity analysis in this small-scale, high-resolution, multi-channel seismic detection technology meets the requirements of natural gas hydrate exploration.

  20. High-resolution probing of inner core structure with seismic interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Hsin-Hua

    2015-12-23

    © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Increasing complexity of Earth\\'s inner core has been revealed in recent decades as the global distribution of seismic stations has improved. The uneven distribution of earthquakes, however, still causes a biased geographical sampling of the inner core. Recent developments in seismic interferometry, which allow for the retrieval of core-sensitive body waves propagating between two receivers, can significantly improve ray path coverage of the inner core. In this study, we apply such earthquake coda interferometry to 1846 USArray stations deployed across the U.S. from 2004 through 2013. Clear inner core phases PKIKP2 and PKIIKP2 are observed across the entire array. Spatial analysis of the differential travel time residuals between the two phases reveals significant short-wavelength variation and implies the existence of strong structural variability in the deep Earth. A linear N-S trending anomaly across the middle of the U.S. may reflect an asymmetric quasi-hemispherical structure deep within the inner core with boundaries of 99°W and 88°E.

  1. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru-Shan Wu, Xiao-Bi Xie, Thorne Lay

    2005-06-06

    In this project, we develop new theories and methods for multi-domain one-way wave-equation based propagators, and apply these techniques to seismic modeling, seismic imaging, seismic illumination and model parameter estimation in 3D complex environments. The major progress of this project includes: (1) The development of the dual-domain wave propagators. We continue to improve the one-way wave-equation based propagators. Our target is making propagators capable of handling more realistic velocity models. A wide-angle propagator for transversely isotropic media with vertically symmetric axis (VTI) has been developed for P-wave modeling and imaging. The resulting propagator is accurate for large velocity perturbations and wide propagation angles. The thin-slab propagator for one-way elastic-wave propagation is further improved. With the introduction of complex velocities, the quality factors Qp and Qs have been incorporated into the thin-slab propagator. The resulting viscoelastic thin-slab propagator can handle elastic-wave propagation in models with intrinsic attenuations. We apply this method to complex models for AVO modeling, random media characterization and frequency-dependent reflectivity simulation. (2) Exploring the Information in the Local Angle Domain. Traditionally, the local angle information can only be extracted using the ray-based method. We develop a wave-equation based technique to process the local angle domain information. The approach can avoid the singularity problem usually linked to the high-frequency asymptotic method. We successfully apply this technique to seismic illumination and the resulting method provides a practical tool for three-dimensional full-volume illumination analysis in complex structures. The directional illumination also provides information for angle-domain imaging corrections. (3) Elastic-Wave Imaging. We develop a multicomponent elastic migration method. The application of the multicomponent one-way elastic propagator

  2. High-resolution processing methods for multi-channel reflection seismic data of Lile sea area in the southern South China Sea%南海南部礼乐海区二维地震资料的高分辨率处理方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑红波; 阎贫; 王彦林

    2014-01-01

    Lile sea area of the southern South China Sea has become an important prospective area of oil and gas exploration because of its abundant resources. At present, the exploration level of Lile sea area is low, and there are only two-dimensional seismic data of a few survey lines. Due to complex terrains and large changes of water depth, multiform interferential waves can be commonly distinguished from these seismic data. Moreover, the trace number of shot gather is small, and the S/N ration of data is low. Above factors are of disadvantage to high-resolution processing of seismic data. According to the characteristics of seismic data in the area, various means have been used for true amplitude recovery and abnormal amplitude suppression in the pretreatment. Series deconvolution methods have been used to enhance the resolution of the seismic data;τ-p domain predictive deconvolution, velocity filtering and inner muting have been adopted for multiples suppression based on the types of multiples. From the result of processing, it can be found that the energy of shallow, middle and deep layers is proportioned. Interferential waves such as multiples have been well suppressed, and the S/N ratio and resolution of seismic data have been improved. High-resolution seismic stacked profiles have been achieved finally.%南海南部礼乐海区以其丰富的油气资源储备成为我国油气勘探的后备区,目前勘探程度低,地震资料较少,仅有少量的二维地震资料。由于该区地形复杂、水深变化范围大,因此在地震数据中发育着多种类型的干扰波,加之该批数据道数少、信噪比低,上述因素都成为高分辨率处理的难点。针对该区地震数据的特征,采用多种手段的真振幅恢复技术以及异常振幅压制等预处理方法;采用串联反褶积提高了资料的分辨率;根据多次波的类型分别采用τ-p域预测反褶积、速度滤波、内切除等组合方法压制多次

  3. Reflection seismic imaging of shallow aquifers in Milano (northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, R.; Zaja, A.; Giudici, M.; Schmitt, D.

    2003-04-01

    A high resolution P-wave seismic reflection survey was conducted in the Lambro park within the city of Milano (northern Italy). The objective of the survey was to image structure and stratigraphy of shallow late tertiary and quaternary deposits. This information is necessary to develop a comprehensive 3D hydrological model of the fresh water aquifers where the municipality drilled several production wells. The expected complexity of the acoustic framework and the urban environment with its complications created a challenging test site for the reflection technique. The aquifer system was targeted with a 2-D high resolution seismic reflection survey to outline its vertical and lateral dimensions to a depth of 150-200 m and to estimate some petrophysical properties of the depositional units. A 0.8-km CMP seismic line, with 1-m station spacing, was deployed to collect reflection data. The recording geometry was a 240-channel split spread array, with 6-m shot separation, resulting in a maximum of 20-fold dataset. A single 40-Hz geophone at each station location detected the incoming signals. Field records exhibit clear reflections although the signal to noise ratio is poor because of strong surface waves and severe disturbances from the nearby highway. Optimized FK and KL transforms were used to attenuate these coherent noises and to enhance the primary reflections from the main horizons. The data analysis was also assisted by forward modeling to guide the selection of the processing parameters. The seismic data have a good correlation thourhgout the section and most of the acoustic units show flat bedding. The boundaries of the three major depositional units are clearly resolved by the seismic images. The stacked section clearly indicates that reflection technique provides a powerful method to characterize aquifers, even in a very noisy environment like the urban areas.

  4. High resolution applications of seismic tomography: low velocity anomalies and static corrections using wave-equation datuming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flecha, I.; Marti, D.; Escuder, J.; Perez-Estaun, A.; Carbonell, R.

    2003-04-01

    A detailed characterization of the internal structure and physical properties of shallow surface can be obtained using high-resolution seismic tomography. Two applications of high resolution seismic tomography are presented in this study. Several synthetics simulations have been carried out to asses the resolving power of this methodology in different cases. The first studied case is the detection of low velocity anomalies in the shallow subsoil. Underground cavities (mines), water flows (formation wich loose sand), etc., are geological features present in the shallow subsurface characterized by low seismic velocities, and are targets of considerable social interest. We have considered a 400m×50m two dimensional velocity model consisting of a background velocity gradient in depth from 3 to 4 Km/s which included a rectangular low velocity anomaly (300 m/s). This anomaly was placed between 10m and 30m in depth and between 180m and 220m in length. The inversions schemes provided estimates of the velocity, however the tomograms and the ray tracing diagrams indicated a low resolution for the anomaly. In the second case we have applied wave-equation datuming to pre-stack layer replacement. The standard seismic data processing applies a vertical time shift to the data traces. However, it is not a good option when we are dealing with rugged topography or bathymetry, and when the media presents a high heterogeneity. Wave-equation datuming extrapolates seismic time data to some level datum keeping consistency between raypaths and wavefield propagation. It improves considerably seismic reflectors imaging. In order to implement this technique a velocity model is required, and usually a constant velocity is used to propagate the wavefield; instead of it we have used seismic tomography to provide an accurate velocity model.

  5. Seismic reflection imaging of mixing processes in Fram Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sudipta; Sheen, Katy L.; Klaeschen, Dirk; Brearley, J. Alexander; Minshull, Timothy A.; Berndt, Christian; Hobbs, Richard W.; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.

    2015-10-01

    The West Spitsbergen Current, which flows northward along the western Svalbard continental slope, transports warm and saline Atlantic water (AW) into the Arctic Ocean. A combined analysis of high-resolution seismic images and hydrographic sections across this current has uncovered the oceanographic processes involved in horizontal and vertical mixing of AW. At the shelf break, where a strong horizontal temperature gradient exists east of the warmest AW, isopycnal interleaving of warm AW and surrounding colder waters is observed. Strong seismic reflections characterize these interleaving features, with a negative polarity reflection arising from an interface of warm water overlying colder water. A seismic-derived sound speed image reveals the extent and lateral continuity of such interleaving layers. There is evidence of obliquely aligned internal waves emanating from the slope at 450-500 m. They follow the predicted trajectory of internal S2 tidal waves and can promote vertical mixing between Atlantic and Arctic-origin waters.

  6. Evidence for sub-lacustrine volcanic activity in Lake Bolsena (central Italy) revealed by high resolution seismic data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhorst, Katja; Krastel, Sebastian; Wagner, Bernd; Schuerer, Anke

    2017-06-01

    The Bolsena caldera that formed between 0.6 and 0.2 Ma has a well preserved structural rim, which makes it an ideal site to study the tectonic and volcanic evolution of calderas. However, the main area is covered by a 150 m deep lake which makes it rather difficult to investigate the subsurface structure directly. To overcome this problem new high resolution hydro-acoustic surveys using a multichannel reflection seismic system and a sediment echo-sounder system were conducted in September 2012. As space was limited we used a rowing boat towed by a rubber boat to handle a 36 m long and 24 channel streamer to receive seismic reflections produced using a Mini GI-Gun (0.25 l). The subsurface structure of Lake Bolsena was imaged up to a sediment depth of 190 m, which is estimated to have filled over a period of 333 kyrs. However, massive pyroclastic flow deposits found in the deeper parts of the basin indicate an initial infill of volcanic deposits from two adjacent younger calderas, the Latera (W) and Montefiascone (SE) calderas. Our data suggest that the caldera has a long history of active volcanism, because the lacustrine sediments show post-sedimentary influences of geothermal fluids. We mapped several mound structures at various stratigraphic depths. Two volcanic structures outcrop at the modern lake surface implying recent activity. One of these structures is hardly covered by sediments and has a crater-like feature in its summit. The other structure shows a pockmark-like depression on top. Another observable feature is a partially sediment filled crater located in the western part of the lake which further implies the existence of a magma chamber located beneath the Bolsena caldera. Since the late Pleistocene and Holocene, the sedimentation was mainly hemipelagic evidenced by a sediment drape of up to 10 m thick sediment drape on the uppermost sediments. Beneath the drape we found evidence for a distal tephra layer likely related to an explosive eruption from

  7. High-resolution shear-wave seismics across the Carlsberg Fault zone south of Copenhagen - Implications for linking Mesozoic and late Pleistocene structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone (CFZ) is a NNW-SSE striking structure close to the transition zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. We examine the fault evolution by combining very-high-resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The faulting geometry indicates a strong influence of Triassic subsidence and rifting in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the CFZ surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the Lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. These findings contrast the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, such as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image faulting in Quaternary and Danian layers in the CFZ. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the uppermost 30 m of the western part of CFZ. The complex fault zone comprises normal block faults and one reverse block fault. The observed faults cut through the Danian as well as the Quaternary overburden. Hence, there are strong indicators for ongoing faulting, like mapped faulting in Quaternary sediments and ongoing subsidence of the eastern block of the CFZ as interpreted by other authors. The lack of earthquakes localized in the fault zone implies that either the frequency of occurring earthquakes is too small to be recorded in the observation time-span, or that the movement of the shallow sub-surface layers may be due to other sources than purely tectonic processes.

  8. 3D HIGH RESOLUTION SEISMIC PROSPECTING IN MINING AREAS; XIEQIAO COLLIERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiRuofei

    1996-01-01

    3D seismic prospecting in mining areas of Xieqiao Colliery is a successfulmodel for an advancement from the resource prospecting to mining prospecting stagein coal fields. Its results have proved that faults with a throw of 5-10 m can be detected in an area with good seismogeologic conditions by using 3D seismic technique.Detection of underground tunnels for the first time utilizing 3D seismic data indicates that subsided columns, gotten and mine goaf can be detected using 3D seismic technique, so it has a broad applied prospect.

  9. High Resolution Topography and Multiple Seismic Uplift on the Main Frontal Thrust near the Ratu River, Eastern Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, C.; Tapponnier, P.; Sapkota, S. N.; Coudurier Curveur, A.; Ildefonso, S.; Gao, M.; Bollinger, L.; Klinger, Y.; Tiwari, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    New data at several more sites along the Main Frontal Thrust between 85°49' to 86°27' E corroborates the surface emergence of the great M ≈ 8.4, 1934 Bihar-Nepal and 1255 AD earthquakes. Here we show unambiguous evidences of surface rupture and co-seismic uplift in the Ratu river area based on high-resolution geomorphic surveys. We present a refined map of uplifted terrace surfaces and abandoned paleo-channels truncated by the MFT, obtained by newly acquired high resolution Digital Elevation Models from Total station, Terrestrial Lidar Scanner (TLS), Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and kinematic GPS surveys. In the Ratu valley, using these new high resolution topographic datasets, we identify five and possibly seven distinct terrace levels uplifted parallel to the riverbed, that cap the folded Siwaliks. Such measurements may be taken to imply broadly characteristic increments of throw during sequences of at least five to seven events of riverbed abandonment related to co-seismic uplifts. Newly collected detrital charcoals from several pits and from a rejuvenated paleoseismological wall will help assess more precisely uplift and shortening rates over the length of segments of the MFT east and west of Bardibas. A regional comparison of comparable long term paleoseismological data at other sites along the 1934 rupture length is in progress.

  10. Raw ODEC Bathy2000 CHIRP subbottom profiler - CHIRP high-resolution Seismic Profile data for the Chukchi Cap and Arctic Ocean.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ODEC Bathy2000 CHIRP subbottom profiler - CHIRP high-resolution Seismic Profile data were collected in Raw ODEC Bathy2000 CHIRP dat Datagram Format.

  11. Raw ODEC Bathy2000 CHIRP subbottom profiler - CHIRP high-resolution Seismic Profile data for the U.S. Arctic Continental Margin.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ODEC Bathy2000 CHIRP subbottom profiler - CHIRP high-resolution Seismic Profile data were collected in Raw ODEC Bathy2000 CHIRP dat Datagram Format.

  12. Raw ODEC Bathy2000 CHIRP subbottom profiler - CHIRP high-resolution Seismic Profile data for the Chukchi Cap and Arctic Ocean.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ODEC Bathy2000 CHIRP subbottom profiler - CHIRP high-resolution Seismic Profile data were collected in Raw ODEC Bathy2000 CHIRP dat Datagram Format.

  13. A Study of Thin Sandstone Reservoirs by High-resolution Seismic Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Songhua

    2006-01-01

    In this paper seismic inversion was used as a key technique and the seismic wavelet most suitable to the actual underground situation was extracted with the higher-order statistics algorithm. The wavelets extracted in this way and the wavelets extracted with the seismic statistics techniques were used separately for inverting the seismic data of the southern part of Tahe oilfield, Tarim basin. The results showed that the resolution of the wavelet inversion with the higher-order statistics method was greatly improved, and the wavelet-inverted section could better distinguish the thin sandstone reservoirs of the upper and lower Carboniferous and their lateral distribution, providing a reliable basis of analysis for the study of thin sandstone reservoirs.

  14. High-resolution gravity and seismic-refraction surveys of the Smoke Tree Wash area, Joshua Tree National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheim, Victoria E.; Rymer, Michael J.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Goldman, Mark R.; Watt, Janet T.; Powell, Robert E.; Matti, Jonathan C.

    2016-03-02

    We describe high-resolution gravity and seismic refraction surveys acquired to determine the thickness of valley-fill deposits and to delineate geologic structures that might influence groundwater flow beneath the Smoke Tree Wash area in Joshua Tree National Park. These surveys identified a sedimentary basin that is fault-controlled. A profile across the Smoke Tree Wash fault zone reveals low gravity values and seismic velocities that coincide with a mapped strand of the Smoke Tree Wash fault. Modeling of the gravity data reveals a basin about 2–2.5 km long and 1 km wide that is roughly centered on this mapped strand, and bounded by inferred faults. According to the gravity model the deepest part of the basin is about 270 m, but this area coincides with low velocities that are not characteristic of typical basement complex rocks. Most likely, the density contrast assumed in the inversion is too high or the uncharacteristically low velocities represent highly fractured or weathered basement rocks, or both. A longer seismic profile extending onto basement outcrops would help differentiate which scenario is more accurate. The seismic velocities also determine the depth to water table along the profile to be about 40–60 m, consistent with water levels measured in water wells near the northern end of the profile.

  15. High-resolution seismic profiling: development of acquisition, processing, and interpretation for the practical implementation of the method in shallow sub-surface exploration and engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the last few years there has been a general increase in the activities in the field of high-resolution seismic profiling. A growing interest in shallow sub-surface exploration probably underlies this development. Major attention is paid to the adaptation of highresolution seismic profiling for en

  16. High-resolution seismic profiling : development of acquisition, processing, and interpretation for the practical implementation of the method in shallow sub-surface exploration and engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the last few years there has been a general increase in the activities in the field of high-resolution seismic profiling. A growing interest in shallow sub-surface exploration probably underlies this development. Major attention is paid to the adaptation of highresolution seismic profiling for en

  17. Seismic attribute detection of faults and fluid pathways within an active strike-slip shear zone: New insights from high-resolution 3D P-Cable™ seismic data along the Hosgri Fault, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluesner, Jared; Brothers, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Poststack data conditioning and neural-network seismic attribute workflows are used to detect and visualize faulting and fluid migration pathways within a 13.7 km2 13.7 km2 3D P-Cable™ seismic volume located along the Hosgri Fault Zone offshore central California. The high-resolution 3D volume used in this study was collected in 2012 as part of Pacific Gas and Electric’s Central California Seismic Imaging Project. Three-dimensional seismic reflection data were acquired using a triple-plate boomer source (1.75 kJ) and a short-offset, 14-streamer, P-Cable system. The high-resolution seismic data were processed into a prestack time-migrated 3D volume and publically released in 2014. Postprocessing, we employed dip-steering (dip and azimuth) and structural filtering to enhance laterally continuous events and remove random noise and acquisition artifacts. In addition, the structural filtering was used to enhance laterally continuous edges, such as faults. Following data conditioning, neural-network based meta-attribute workflows were used to detect and visualize faults and probable fluid-migration pathways within the 3D seismic volume. The workflow used in this study clearly illustrates the utility of advanced attribute analysis applied to high-resolution 3D P-Cable data. For example, results from the fault attribute workflow reveal a network of splayed and convergent fault strands within an approximately 1.3 km wide shear zone that is characterized by distinctive sections of transpressional and transtensional dominance. Neural-network chimney attribute calculations indicate that fluids are concentrated along discrete faults in the transtensional zones, but appear to be more broadly distributed amongst fault bounded anticlines and structurally controlled traps in the transpressional zones. These results provide high-resolution, 3D constraints on the relationships between strike-slip fault mechanics, substrate deformation, and fluid migration along an active

  18. High-resolution seismic constraints on flow dynamics in the oceanic asthenosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Ying Patty; Gaherty, James B.; Jin, Ge; Collins, John A.; Lizarralde, Daniel; Evans, Rob. L.; Hirth, Greg

    2016-07-01

    Convective flow in the mantle and the motions of tectonic plates produce deformation of Earth’s interior, and the rock fabric produced by this deformation can be discerned using the anisotropy of the seismic wavespeed. This deformation is commonly inferred close to lithospheric boundaries beneath the ocean in the uppermost mantle, including near seafloor-spreading centres as new plates are formed via corner flow, and within a weak asthenosphere that lubricates large-scale plate-driven flow and accommodates smaller-scale convection. Seismic models of oceanic upper mantle differ as to the relative importance of these deformation processes: seafloor-spreading fabric is very strong just beneath the crust-mantle boundary (the Mohorovičić discontinuity, or Moho) at relatively local scales, but at the global and ocean-basin scales, oceanic lithosphere typically appears weakly anisotropic when compared to the asthenosphere. Here we use Rayleigh waves, recorded across an ocean-bottom seismograph array in the central Pacific Ocean (the NoMelt Experiment), to provide unique localized constraints on seismic anisotropy within the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the middle of a plate. We find that azimuthal anisotropy is strongest within the high-seismic-velocity lid, with the fast direction coincident with seafloor spreading. A minimum in the magnitude of azimuthal anisotropy occurs within the middle of the seismic low-velocity zone, and then increases with depth below the weakest portion of the asthenosphere. At no depth does the fast direction correlate with the apparent plate motion. Our results suggest that the highest strain deformation in the shallow oceanic mantle occurs during corner flow at the ridge axis, and via pressure-driven or buoyancy-driven flow within the asthenosphere. Shear associated with motion of the plate over the underlying asthenosphere, if present, is weak compared to these other processes.

  19. High-resolution seismic constraints on flow dynamics in the oceanic asthenosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Ying Patty; Gaherty, James B; Jin, Ge; Collins, John A; Lizarralde, Daniel; Evans, Rob L; Hirth, Greg

    2016-07-28

    Convective flow in the mantle and the motions of tectonic plates produce deformation of Earth's interior, and the rock fabric produced by this deformation can be discerned using the anisotropy of the seismic wave speed. This deformation is commonly inferred close to lithospheric boundaries beneath the ocean in the uppermost mantle, including near seafloor-spreading centres as new plates are formed via corner flow, and within a weak asthenosphere that lubricates large-scale plate-driven flow and accommodates smaller scale convection. Seismic models of oceanic upper mantle differ as to the relative importance of these deformation processes: seafloor spreading fabric is very strong just beneath the crust-mantle boundary (the Mohorovičić discontinuity, or Moho) at relatively local scales, but at the global and ocean-basin scales, oceanic lithosphere typically appears weakly anisotropic when compared to the asthenosphere. Here we use Rayleigh waves, recorded across an ocean-bottom seismograph array in the central Pacific Ocean (the NoMelt Experiment), to provide unique localized constraints on seismic anisotropy within the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the middle of a plate. We find that azimuthal anisotropy is strongest within the high-seismic-velocity lid, with the fast direction coincident with seafloor spreading. A minimum in the magnitude of azimuthal anisotropy occurs within the middle of the seismic low-velocity zone, and then increases with depth below the weakest portion of the asthenosphere. At no depth does the fast direction correlate with the apparent plate motion. Our results suggest that the highest strain deformation in the shallow oceanic mantle occurs during corner flow at the ridge axis, and via pressure-driven or buoyancy-driven flow within the asthenosphere. Shear associated with motion of the plate over the underlying asthenosphere, if present, is weak compared to these other processes.

  20. Active faulting in the Inner California Borderlands: new constraints from high-resolution multichannel seismic and multibeam bathymetric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, J. M.; Holmes, J. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic data indicate that faults offshore of Southern California accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of dextral Pacific-North American relative plate motion. In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), modern strike-slip deformation is overprinted on topography formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Despite its proximity to urban Southern California, the hazard posed by active faults in the ICB remains poorly understood. We acquired a 4000-line-km regional grid of high-resolution, 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data and multibeam bathymetry to examine the fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We interpret the MCS data using a sequence stratigraphic approach to establish a chronostratigraphy and identify discrete episodes of deformation. We present our results in a regional fault model that distinguishes active deformation from older structures. Significant differences exist between our model of ICB deformation and existing models. Mounting evidence suggests a westward temporal migration of slip between faults in the ICB. In the eastern ICB, slip on the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault and the neighboring Coronado Bank fault (CBF) diminishes to the north and appears to decrease over time. Undeformed Late Pliocene sediments overlie the northern extent of the CBF and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, CBF slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Palos Verdes fault to the north are unwarranted. Deformation along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends is best explained as localized deformation resulting from geometrical complexities in a dextral strike-slip fault system. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the eastern margin of Avalon Knoll, where the fault is spatially coincident with the San Pedro Basin fault (SPBF). Farther west, the San Clemente fault (SCF) has a strong linear bathymetric expression. The length

  1. Bedload transport rates in a gravel bedded-river derived from high-resolution monitoring using seismic impact plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Peter; Soar, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Accurate characterisation of bedload transport rates is critical for a better understanding of geomorphological process dynamics, aquatic habitats, sediment budgets and strategies for catchment-scale initiatives in sediment management under conditions of climate change. However, rate estimation is challenging in practice: direct measurements are costly and logistically difficult to achieve with acceptable accuracy over geomorphologically-relevant time periods, and the uncertainty in transport rates predicted from empirical formulae and numerical simulation is rarely below 50 per cent. Partly reflecting these issues, passive technologies for continuous bedload monitoring are becoming increasingly popular. Sensors such as seismic impact plates offer the opportunity to characterise bedload activity at exceptionally high resolution - monitoring from the River Avon, (Devon, UK) indicated that despite significant intra-event and between-plate differences in apparent bedload transport aggregated over 5-minute periods, the magnitude-frequency product of discharge and impact frequency result in a highly plausible effective discharge, supporting the potential value of impact plates as indicators of relative sediment transport loads over annual timescales. Whereas the focus in bedload rate estimation to date has been on developing satisfactory sediment rating curves from detection signals, we instead develop a method for directly estimating bedload transport rates from impact plate data as a function of intensity of transport (count, n, per second), bed material mass (kg) and cross-stream transport variability. Bulk sediment samples are converted to a mass in transit for each instantaneous discharge according to the intensity of transport and a Monte Carlo simulation of the load in transit determined at random from the bed material particle size distribution. The lower detection threshold is determined using experimental calibration and the upper size limit is determined from

  2. Application of high-resolution passive seismic tomographic inversion and estimating reservoir properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahy Tafti, T.; Aminzadeh, F.

    2011-12-01

    We use the travel time information from micro-seismic events of the micro earthquake data to perform tomographic inversion to accurately estimate P wave and S wave velocities. These velocities lead us to structural and lithological information about the subsurface. We test the method using the MEQ data from the NW Geysers geothermal field for both velocity inversion and estimating the reservoir properties. Complementary geophysical data are helpful for imaging the sub-surface structure. We integrate the available geologic information with the MEQ data. Porosity, fracture density and permeability are some of the properties that we extract from our integrated method. In addition, we quantify the changes of the velocities with time in parts of the field; we then ascribe such changes to various phenomena of transient geological processes such as, dyke intrusions or fluid pressure increase in the fracture network or even fracture network propagation into the medium. We demonstrate that integrating the passive seismic tomography with geologic information allows us to detect the space-time dependency of elastic properties in response to local variations of fluid pressure. We use the seismicity data set as a geothermal reservoir monitoring tool for mapping the fluid movements and other changes in reservoir properties. Our results are consistent with both injection and production well data. We focus on two sub-regions for our investigation. One region corresponds to a traditional hydrothermal reservoir. The second region relates to a high temperature zone, a candidate for creation of Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) project. These results show the importance of integration of passive seismic tomography with geologic information for estimating the geothermal reservoir properties where sufficient microseismicity is present.

  3. Lamont Doherty Seismic Reflection Scanned Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains single channel seismic reflection profiles as provided to NGDC by Lamont Doherty Earh Observatory (LDEO). The profiles were originally...

  4. High Resolution Seismic Survey off the Pacific Shore of Costa Rica - Detailed Imaging of Deformational Patterns, Fluid Venting and Carbonate Mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, N.; Spiess, V.; Heidersdorf, F.; v. Lom, H.; Zuehlsdorff, L.; Denil, D.; Huguen, C.; Schnabel, M.

    2003-04-01

    R/V METEOR Research Cruise M54/1 in summer 2002 from Balboa (Panama) to Caldera (Costa Rica) aimed at imaging the near sea floor sedimentary structures of both the continental and oceanic plates of the Costa Rican Subduction Zone with the high resolution seismic method. The cruise evolved from a cooperation of the Marine Seismics Group of the University of Bremen with the DFG funded Special Research Project 574 - Fluids and Volatiles in Subduction Zones - and is intended to supplement the marine geophysical, geological and geochemical as well as oceanographic data collected during R/V SONNE cruises in the area, as well as subsequent R/V METEOR cruises M54/2 and /3. The objectives of SFB 574 are the investigation of shallow and deep processes in subduction zones through near surface sampling of fluid vent sites and gas hydrate occurrences, as well as through detailed seismic and acoustic imaging of related structures. The main objectives of the cruise were to study 1) the volatile and material input into the sedimentary system on the oceanic plate, 2) the distribution of gas hydrates within the sediments, and 3) possible pathways and resulting structures of fluid/gas escape. Several working areas were selected, which had been identified as highly fractured sediment packages above subducting seamounts (Jaco Scar, Parrita Scar, Rio Bongo, Hongo area), areas of pronounced decollement reflection, major slump masses (Nicoya slide), regions of major fracturing of the oceanic crust, or carbonate mounds (Hongo area, Mound Culebra) during previous cruises. For calibration of seismic data, survey lines were also shot in the vicinity of ODP Leg 170 drill sites. Several seismic examples from various survey sites will be shown. Closely spaced profiles, allowing the acquisition of 3D and 2.5D seismic data in the Hongo area and near Mound Culebra, respectively, reveal the complex internal structure of fluid pathways, the distribution of gas hydrates, and the tectonic framework of

  5. High-resolution seismic monitoring of geomorphic activity in a catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtin, A.; Hovius, N.; Turowski, J.; McArdell, B.; Vergne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Continuous survey of the surface activity in a river catchment is essential for the understanding of the landscape dynamics. In steep mountain catchments, a detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of geomorphic processes is generally impossible. The classic techniques (imagery and in situ channel approaches) are not adapted to the extreme conditions that occur during strong rainstorms. There is a real need to develop a method and to define the procedures that will allow the study of surface processes without any environmental dependency. Nowadays, more and more studies explore the use of the seismic instruments to survey the catchment activity. Seismometers can be deployed in sheltered area, which allow us to record in continuous the ground vibrations induced by surface processes, like the sediment transport and mass movements. To continue the exploration of this potential, we deployed a dense array of 10 seismometers in the Illgraben, a 10-km2 catchment in the Swiss Alps, during the summer 2011. This catchment is highly prone to hillslope and debris flow activity, so almost every summer convective storms trigger geomorphic events. The network was designed to monitor the spatial and temporal features of every type of surface activity. Thus during rainstorms, the stations located along the main stream well record the channel activity like the passage of sediment flows, while the instruments installed around the catchment reveal the occurrences of many rockfalls. These latter events show a spectral seismic signature at high frequencies (> 1 Hz), whereas the channel activity is dominant between 10 and 30 Hz. For the largest debris flow of the summer, we are able to identify the location of its initiation from the hillslope. Then, we can map the secondary events, which were triggered by the propagation of the debris flow. With these preliminary results, we demonstrate that the use of a dense seismic array is relevant to map in real time the landscape dynamics at the

  6. Sísmica de reflexión de alta resolución en el estudio del Cuaternario de áreas de pie de monte Shallow, high-resolution seismic reflection in the study of the Quaternary in foothill areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. González Bonorino

    2003-03-01

    noroeste de la Argentina para obtener imágenes del subsuelo en ambientes de abanicos aluviales distales.Several trial shallow seismic reflexion surveys were carried out in distal alluvial fan settings in Salta Province, Argentina. The tests span two areas with contrasting subsurface characteristics. In the north-eastern sector of the province, the extensive Bermejo alluvial fan deposits are sandy and massive, with almost no clay intercalations; the water table in this area was located below a depth of 40 m at the time of the survey. The other survey area is located south of Salta City, where small, coalescing alluvial fans fill the Valle de Lerma with sandy and gravelly deposits that in the distal, axial reaches interfinger with thick clayey beds; the water table in this area was located below a depth of 20 m at the time of the survey. Seismic operation involved a Geometrics R24 seismograph with 24 active channels that were incremented to 48 using a roll-over switch, providing a maximum 1200% subsurface coverage. Two seismic source types were tested: a 5 kg sledge hammer and a 12-gauge down-hole seismic gun. Mainly due to operational considerations the hammer source was finally chosen. Tests on the Bermejo fan generally resulted in poor quality seismic records, likely due to rapid loss of energy through the unconsolidated, dry sands. Locally, however, three seismic units could be distinguished and the top of the Tertiary bedrock was possibly mapped. Tests along the axis of the Valle Lerma resulted in excellent quality seismic records. Four seismic units were distinguished. A weak reflector at about 220 msec marks a shift to velocities of around 2500 m/s and may correspond with the top of Tertiary bedrock. A thick clay unit at 25-50 m depth can be clearly mapped and acts as an aquitard. The results of this pilot study show that shallow seismic reflection can be applied profitably in NW Argentina for subsurface imaging in distal alluvial fan environments.

  7. High-resolution, high-reflectivity operation of lamellar multilayer amplitude gratings: identification of the single-order regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozhevnikov, I. V.; van der Meer, R.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K. J.; F. Bijkerk,

    2010-01-01

    High resolution while maintaining high peak reflectivities can be achieved for Lamellar Multilayer Amplitude Gratings (LMAG) in the soft-x-ray (SXR) region. Using the coupled waves approach (CWA), it is derived that for small lamellar widths only the zeroth diffraction order needs to be considered f

  8. Seismic architecture of the Chalk Group from onshore reflection data in eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Anderskouv, Kresten; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    completed with the acquisition of an extensive set of subsurface data. The data include high resolution 2D multichannel seismics onshore and offshore, a seismic refraction profile, two entirely cored boreholes including wireline logs, GPR cross-hole tomography, thermographic analysis, etc. We intend...... to compile and merge the geological and geophysical datasets to investigate the variation of the Chalk Group properties and their signature in the subsurface. In this communication, the seismic reflection data are being analysed. Very high resolution litho-, bio- and cyclostratigraphy can be correlated...... but the succession has been uplifted of c. 1 km. The main fracture patterns are associated with the recent unloading of the ice, opening shallow horizontal fractures. Subvertical fracturation affects also the Chalk and contribute to most of the permeability. Observation of the seismic reflection profiles shows...

  9. Evidence for active faults in Küçükçekmece Lagoon (Marmara Sea, Turkey), inferred from high-resolution seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Hakan

    2014-10-01

    A total of 42 km of high-resolution seismic reflection and bathymetric data were collected for the first time to document stratigraphic and structural features of the uppermost 5 m of the Holocene sedimentary infill of Küçükçekmece Lagoon along the Marmara Sea coast of Turkey. The lagoon gradually deepens from 1 m off the northern coast to a maximum of 20 m in the southern basin. Stratigraphically, the uppermost seismic unit is characterized by a generally parallel reflection configuration, indicating deposition under low-energy conditions. In the southern basin of the lagoon, the sub-bottom is locally characterized by frequency attenuated and chaotic reflections interpreted as gas-charged sediments. Structurally, the soft sediment of the first 5 m below the lagoon floor is locally deformed by active strike-slip fault zones, here named FZ1, FZ2, and FZ3. These fault zones are NW-SE oriented and follow the long axis of the lagoon, compatible with the geographic alignment of the lagoon, the onland drainage pattern, and the scarps of the surrounding terrain. Moreover, the fault zones in Küçükçekmece Lagoon are well correlated with active offshore faults mapped during previous studies. This suggests that the FZ1, FZ2, and FZ3 fault zones are not merely local fault systems deforming the Küçükçekmece Lagoon bottom, but that they may be part of a regional fault zone extending both north and southward to merge with the northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in the Çınarcık Basin. This, however, needs to be confirmed by further structural and seismological studies around Küçükçekmece Lagoon in order to more firmly establish its link with the NAFZ in the Marmara Sea, and to highlight potential seismic risks for the densely populated Istanbul metropolitan area.

  10. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars

    . In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. This finding contrasts the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image structures in Quaternary layers in the Carlsberg....... In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise normal block faults and one reverse block fault showing the complexity of the fault zone. The observed faults appear to affect both the Danian......The Carlsberg Fault zone is located in the N-S striking Höllviken Graben and traverses the city of Copenhagen. The fault zone is a NNW-SSE striking structure in direct vicinity to the transition zone of the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent small earthquakes indicate activity in the area...

  11. New Progress in High-Precision and High-Resolution Seismic Exploration Technique in Coal Industry of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the past twenty years, the proportion of coal in primary-energy consumption in China is generally between 71.3% and 76.5%. The output of coal was 1.374 billion tons in 1996, and 1.21 tons in 1998, which ranked first in the world. Now coal is mined mainly with mechanization in China, which is planned to reach 80% in major State-owned coal mines in 2000 according to the planning of the government (Li et al., 1998; Tang Dejin, 1998).Compared with the USA and Australia, China has more complex coal geological structures. Based on high-resolution seismic technique in coal exploration, a new seismic technique with high-precision and high-resolution (2-D and 3-D) has been developed for the purpose of detecting small geological structures in coal mine construction and production to meet the needs of large-scale popularization of mechanized coal mining in China. The technique is low in cost and requires a relatively short period of exploration, with high precision and wide-range applications. In the middle of the 1980s, it began to be used in pre-mining coal exploration on a trial basis, and entered the peak of exploration in the 1990s, which has made significant progress in providing high-precision geological results for the construction and production of coal industry in China, and is still in the ascendant.This paper discusses some new progress and the exploration capability and application range of the technique.

  12. Seismic reflection imaging at a Shallow Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, P.; Rector, J.; Bainer, R.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of our studies was to determine the best seismic method to image these sediments, between the water table at 3 m depth to the basement at 35 m depth. Good cross-correlation between well logs and the seismic data was also desirable, and would facilitate the tracking of known lithological units away from the wells. For instance, known aquifer control boundaries may then be mapped out over the boundaries, and may be used in a joint inversion with reflectivity data and other non-seismic geophysical data to produce a 3-D image containing quantitative physical properties of the target area.

  13. Seismic reflection characteristics of naturally-induced subsidence affecting transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipelines can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  14. Seismic Reflection Characteristics of Naturally-Induced Subsidence Affecting Transportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard D Miller; Jianghai Xia; Don W Steeples

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipeliues can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure.

  15. Double seismic zone of the Nazca plate in northern Chile: High-resolution velocity structure, petrological implications, and thermomechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbath, Catherine; Gerbault, Muriel; Carlier, Gabriel; Guiraud, Michel

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents an interdisciplinary study of the northern Chile double seismic zone. First, a high-resolution velocity structure of the subducting Nazca plate has been obtained by the tomoDD double-difference tomography method. The double seismic zone (DSZ) is observed between 80 and 140 km depth, and the two seismic planes is 20 km apart. Then, the chemical and petrologic characteristics of the oceanic lithosphere associated with this DSZ are deduced by using current thermal-petrological-seismological models and are compared to pressure-temperature conditions provided by a numerical thermomechanical model. Our results agree with the common hypothesis that seismicity in both upper and lower planes is related to fluid releases associated with metamorphic dehydration reactions. In the seismic upper plane located within the upper crust, these reactions would affect material of basaltic (MORB) composition and document different metamorphic reactions occurring within high-P (>2.4 GPa) and low-T (130 km), lawsonite-amphibole eclogite conditions. The lower plane lying in the oceanic mantle can be associated with serpentinite dehydration reactions. The Vp and Vs characteristics of the region in between both planes are consistent with a partially (˜25-30 vol % antigorite, ˜0-10% vol % brucite, and ˜4-10 vol % chlorite) hydrated harzburgitic material. Discrepancies persist that we attribute to complexities inherent to heterogeneous structural compositions. While various geophysical indicators evidence particularly cold conditions in both the descending Nazca plate and the continental fore arc, thermomechanical models indicate that both seismic planes delimit the inner slab compressional zone around the 400°C (±50°C) isotherm. Lower plane earthquakes are predicted to occur in the slab's flexural neutral plane, where fluids released from surrounding metamorphic reactions could accumulate and trigger seismicity. Fluids migrating upward from the tensile zone below

  16. Fabrication of high-resolution reflective scale grating for an optical encoder using a patterned self-assembly process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shanjin; Jiang, Weitao; Li, Xuan; Yu, Haoyu; Lei, Biao; Shi, Yongsheng; Yin, Lei; Chen, Bangdao; Liu, Hongzhong

    2016-07-01

    Steel tape scale grating of a reflective incremental linear encoder has a key impact on the measurement accuracy of the optical encoder. However, it is difficult for conventional manufacturing processes to fabricate scale grating with high-resolution grating strips, due to process and material problems. In this paper, self-assembly technology was employed to fabricate high-resolution steel tape scale grating for a reflective incremental linear encoder. Graphene oxide nanoparticles were adopted to form anti-reflective grating strips of steel tape scale grating. They were deposited in the tape, which had a hydrophobic and hydrophilic grating pattern when the dispersion of the nanoparticles evaporated. A standard lift-off process was employed to fabricate the hydrophobic grating strips on the steel tape. Simultaneously, the steel tape itself presents a hydrophilic property. The hydrophobic and hydrophilic grating pattern was thus obtained. In this study, octafluorocyclobutane was used to prepare the hydrophobic grating strips, due to its hydrophobic property. High-resolution graphene oxide steel tape scale grating with a pitch of 20 μm was obtained through the self-assembly process. The photoelectric signals of the optical encoder containing the graphene oxide scale grating and conventional scale grating were tested under the same conditions. Comparison test results showed that the graphene oxide scale grating has a better performance in its amplitude and harmonic components than that of the conventional steel tape scale. A comparison experiment of position errors was also conducted, demonstrating an improvement in the positioning error of the graphene oxide scale grating. The comparison results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed self-assembly process to fabricate high-resolution graphene oxide scale grating for a reflective incremental linear encoder.

  17. Resolution of Reflection Seismic Data Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Mosegaard, Klaus; Zunino, Andrea

    wavelength of the wavelet within the thin layer. Using a simple thin-layer parameterization Widess (1973) demonstrated that thin layers with thickness less that around λb/8 cannot be resolved from seismic data independent of the noise level. This has results since been widely adopted as a commonly accepted...... lower vertical resolution of reflection seismic data. In the following we will revisit think layer model and demonstrate that there is in practice no limit to the vertical resolution using the parameterization of Widess (1973), and that the vertical resolution is limited by the noise in the data....... In general, we discuss that the resolution of reflection seismic data is controlled by the noise level and the a priori information available...

  18. High-resolution seismic velocities and shallow structure of the San Andreas fault zone at Middle Mountain, Parkfield, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Hole, J.A.; Huggins, R.; Lippus, C.

    2002-01-01

    A 5-km-long, high-resolution seismic imaging survey across the San Andreas fault (SAF) zone and the proposed San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drill site near Parkfield, California, shows that velocities vary both laterally and vertically. Velocities range from 4.0 km/sec) probably correspond to granitic rock of the Salinian block, which is exposed a few kilometers southwest of the SAF. The depth to the top of probable granitic rock varies laterally along the seismic profile but is about 600 m below the surface at the proposed SAFOD site. We observe a prominent, lateral low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath and southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. The LVZ is about 1.5 km wide at 300-m depth but tapers to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. At the maximum depth of the velocity model (750 m), the LVZ is centered approximately 400 m southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. Similar velocities and velocity gradients are observed at comparable depths on both sides of the LVZ, suggesting that the LVZ is anomalous relative to rocks on either side of it. Velocities within the LVZ are lower than those of San Andreas fault gouge, and the LVZ is also anomalous with respect to gravity, magnetic, and resistivity measurements. Because of its proximity to the surface trace of the SAF, it is tempting to suggest that the LVZ represents a zone of fractured crystalline rocks at depth. However, the LVZ instead probably represents a tectonic sliver of sedimentary rock that now rests adjacent to or encompasses the SAF. Such a sliver of sedimentary rock implies fault strands on both sides and possibly within the sliver, suggesting a zone of fault strands at least 1.5 km wide at a depth of 300 m, tapering to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. Fluids within the sedimentary sliver are probably responsible for observed low-resistivity values.

  19. High-resolution seismic imaging of the Kevitsa mafic-ultramafic Cu-Ni-PGE hosted intrusion, northern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Koivisto, Emilia; Wjins, Chris; Tryggvason, Ari; Juhlin, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Kevitsa, in northern Finland, is a large nickel/copper ore body hosted by a massive mafic-ultramafic intrusion with measured and indicated resources of 240 million tons (cutoff 0.1%) grading 0.30% Ni and 0.41% Cu. Mining started in 2012 with an open pit that will extend down to about 550-600 m depth. The expected mine life is more than 20 years. Numerous boreholes are available in the area, but the majority of them are shallow and do not provide a comprehensive understanding of the dimensions of the intrusion. However, a number of boreholes do penetrate the basal contact of the intrusion. Most of these are also shallow and concentrated at the edge of the intrusion. A better knowledge of the geometry of the intrusion would provide a framework for near-mine and deep exploration in the area, but also a better understanding of the geology. Exact mapping of the basal contact of the intrusion would also provide an exploration target for the contact-type mineralization that is often more massive and richer in Ni-Cu than the disseminated mineralization away from the contact. With the objective of better characterizing the intrusion, a series of 2D profiles were acquired followed by a 3D reflection survey that covered an area of about 3 km by 3 km. Even though the geology is complex and the seismic P-wave velocity ranges between 5 to 8 km/s, conventional processing results show gently- to steeply-dipping reflections from depths of approximately 2 km to as shallow as 100 m. Many of these reflections are interpreted to originate from either fault systems or internal magmatic layering within the Kevitsa main intrusion. Correlations between the 3D surface seismic data and VSP data, based upon time shifts or phase changes along the reflections, support the interpretation that numerous faults are imaged in the volume. Some of these faults cross the planned open-pit mine at depths of about 300-500 m, and it is, therefore, critical to map them for mine planning. The seismic 3D

  20. Characterization of intrabasin faulting and deformation for earthquake hazards in southern Utah Valley, Utah, from high-resolution seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; McBride, John H.; Tomlinson, Iris

    2012-01-01

    We conducted active and passive seismic imaging investigations along a 5.6-km-long, east–west transect ending at the mapped trace of the Wasatch fault in southern Utah Valley. Using two-dimensional (2D) P-wave seismic reflection data, we imaged basin deformation and faulting to a depth of 1.4 km and developed a detailed interval velocity model for prestack depth migration and 2D ground-motion simulations. Passive-source microtremor data acquired at two sites along the seismic reflection transect resolve S-wave velocities of approximately 200 m/s at the surface to about 900 m/s at 160 m depth and confirm a substantial thickening of low-velocity material westward into the valley. From the P-wave reflection profile, we interpret shallow (100–600 m) bedrock deformation extending from the surface trace of the Wasatch fault to roughly 1.5 km west into the valley. The bedrock deformation is caused by multiple interpreted fault splays displacing fault blocks downward to the west of the range front. Further west in the valley, the P-wave data reveal subhorizontal horizons from approximately 90 to 900 m depth that vary in thickness and whose dip increases with depth eastward toward the Wasatch fault. Another inferred fault about 4 km west of the mapped Wasatch fault displaces horizons within the valley to as shallow as 100 m depth. The overall deformational pattern imaged in our data is consistent with the Wasatch fault migrating eastward through time and with the abandonment of earlier synextensional faults, as part of the evolution of an inferred 20-km-wide half-graben structure within Utah Valley. Finite-difference 2D modeling suggests the imaged subsurface basin geometry can cause fourfold variation in peak ground velocity over distances of 300 m.

  1. Lung density on high resolution computer tomography (HRCT) reflects degree of inflammation in smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Smokers have increased cell concentration in the lower respiratory tract indicating a chronic inflammatory state, which in some individuals may lead to development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Computer tomography (CT) imaging provides means of quantifying pulmonary structure and early signs of disease. We investigated whether lung density on high resolution CT differs between smokers and never-smokers and if this were associated to intensity of inflammation. Methods Forty smoking volunteers with normal pulmonary function, 40 healthy never-smokers and 40 patients with COPD of GOLD stage I-II, were included. Mean lung attenuation and percentage of pixels in the lung with attenuation between −750 and −900 HU (percentage higher density spectrum (%HDS)) were calculated on inspiratory CT-scans. Markers of systemic inflammation in blood and cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were recorded. Results Lung density expressed as %HDS was increased in smokers (44.0 ± 5.8%) compared to both never-smokers (38.3 ± 5.8%) and patients with COPD (39.1 ± 5.8%), (p lungs than males, which was dependent on body height. Cell concentration in BAL were correlated to lung density in smokers (r = 0.50, p Lung density on CT is associated with cell concentration in BAL in smokers and may mirror an inflammatory response in the lung. Gender difference in lung density is dependent on height. In COPD with emphysema, loss of lung tissue may counterbalance the expected increase in density due to inflammation. The findings may help to interpret high resolution CT in the context of smoking and gender and highlight the heterogeneity of structural changes in COPD. PMID:24564813

  2. Analysis of Properties of Reflectance Reference Targets for Permanent Radiometric Test Sites of High Resolution Airborne Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero Ahokas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and optimal exploitation of rapidly developing airborne imaging methods requires geometric and radiometric quality assurance of production systems in operational conditions. Permanent test sites are the most promising approach for cost-efficient performance assessment. Optimal construction of permanent radiometric test sites for high resolution airborne imaging systems is an unresolved issue. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of commercially available gravels and painted and unpainted concrete targets for permanent, open-air radiometric test sites under sub-optimal climate conditions in Southern Finland. The reflectance spectrum and reflectance anisotropy and their stability were characterized during the summer of 2009. The management of reflectance anisotropy and stability were shown to be the key issues for better than 5% reflectance accuracy.

  3. Millennial-scale climatic fluctuation in the fluvial record during MIS3: Very high-resolution seismic images from NE Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserkész-Nagy, Ágnes; Sztanó, Orsolya

    2016-12-01

    Alluvial architectures of a meandering river existing in MIS3 were observed on very high-resolution (VHR) single-channel waterborne seismic profiles, 20-30 m below the Tisza River in the Pannonian Basin (Hungary). The study investigated the spatial and temporal variations of two, more than 2 km-long continuous series of inclined reflections interpreted as laterally accreted point bar complexes. The phases of natural meander migration were reconstructed in 3D based on the changes in the geometry and dip of the inclined reflections. A channel-forming discharge curve extending over approximately 2.5 ky was calculated by using paleo-width and depth data derived from the lateral accretion surfaces. Systematic analysis of the geometrical variations coupled with the discharge curve evaluation on each point bar complexes indicates millennial-scale discharge fluctuations 40-50 ky ago, to that the river responded principally by incision and infilling. The primary periodicity, comparable to the sub-Milankovitch cycles, is superimposed by shorter periods: ca. 500-year cycles reflect the phases of unidirectional meander development, while the smallest ones reflect the recurrence interval (150-200 years) of the highest floods. River-bed incisions happened step-by-step related to extreme floods, when the meander development also changed. The smaller-scale and more rapid fluctuations within a development unit were represented in variations of the channel width. Although the poor geochronology of the sandy fluvial deposits cannot allow any direct correlation to the climatostratigraphic events, the millennial-scale climate variations of MIS3 were pronouncedly characteristic in the discharge fluctuations.

  4. Detailed Seismic Reflection Images of the Central American Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, K. D.; Fulthorpe, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    New high-resolution seismic reflection profiles across the Central American volcanic arc (CAVA) reveal an asymmetric deformation pattern with large-scale folding and uplift of basinal strata in the forearc contrasted by intrusive bodies, normal faults, and possible strikes-slip faults in the backarc. Since Miocene times the CAVA has migrated seaward, apparently impinging on the Sandino forearc basin and creating or modifying the low-lying Nicaragua depression, which contains the backarc and much of the arc. However the structural nature of the depression and its possible relationship to forearc sliver movement is poorly known. In November-December 2004 we recorded a large, high-resolution, seismic reflection dataset largely on the Pacific shelf (forearc) area of Central America, extending from NW Costa Rica to the SE edge of El Salvador's territorial waters. We seized an opportunity to study the nature of the CAVA by recording data into the Gulf of Fonseca, a large embayment at the intersection of Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador. With 3 GI airguns and a 2100 m streamer we recorded data with typical penetration of 2-3 seconds in the Sandino basin and frequency content of ~10-250 Hz (at shallow levels). Penetration was limited over the arc summit with high velocity volcanic rocks encountered at depths as shallow as a few hundred meters. To the NE the edge of the Nicaragua depression occurs abruptly; our data show a well-developed sedimentary basin 1.5-3 km thick separated by numerous steeply-dipping faults. The broadband signal and good penetration of this dataset will help us determine the chronology of arc development in this position and the styles of deformation in the forearc, arc, and backarc areas. In turn, this will help us understand the regional tectonic and stratigraphic development of this margin due to the profound affects of the arc.

  5. Quaternary onset and evolution of Kimberley coral reefs (Northwest Australia) revealed by high-resolution seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufarale, Giada; Collins, Lindsay B.; O'Leary, Michael J.; Stevens, Alexandra; Kordi, Moataz; Solihuddin, Tubagus

    2016-07-01

    The inner shelf Kimberley Bioregion of Northwest Australia is characterised by a macrotidal setting where prolific coral reefs growth as developed around a complex drowned landscape and is considered a biodiversity "hotspot". High-resolution shallow seismic studies were conducted across various reef settings in the Kimberley (Buccaneer Archipelago, north of Dampier Peninsula, latitude: between 16°40‧S and 16°00‧S) to evaluate stratigraphic evolution, interaction with different substrates, morphological patterns and distribution. Reef sites were chosen to assess most of the reef types present, particularly high intertidal planar reefs and fringing reefs. Reef internal acoustic reflectors were identified according to their shape, stratigraphic position and characteristics. Two main seismic horizons were identified marking the boundaries between Holocene reef (Marine Isotope Stage 1, MIS 1, last 12 ky), commonly 10-20 m thick, and MIS 5 (Last Interglacial, LIG, ~120 ky, up to 12 m thick) and Proterozoic rock foundation over which Quaternary reef growth occurred. Within the Holocene Reef unit, at least three minor internal reflectors, generally discontinuous, subparallel to the reef flat were recognised and interpreted as either growth hiatuses or a change of the coral framework or sediment matrix. The LIG reefs represent a new northernmost occurrence along the Western Australian coast. The research presented here achieved the first regional geophysical study of the Kimberley reefs. Subbottom profiles demonstrated that the surveyed reefs are characterised by a multi-stage reef buildup, indicating that coral growth occurred in the Kimberley during previous sea level highstands. The data show also that antecedent substrate and regional subsidence have contributed, too, in determining the amount of accommodation available for reef growth and controlling the morphology of the successive reef building stages. Moreover, the study showed that in spite of macrotidal

  6. High-resolution images of tremor migrations beneath the Olympic Peninsula from stacked array of arrays seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yajun; Rubin, Allan M.

    2016-02-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) in subduction zones is generally interpreted as the manifestation of shear slip near the base of earthquake-generating portion of the plate interface. Here we devise a new method of cross-correlating stacked Array of Arrays seismic data that provides greatly improved tremor locations, a proxy for the underlying slow slip, beneath the Olympic Peninsula. This increased resolution allows us to image many features of tremor that were not visible previously. We resolve the spatial transition between the rupture zones of the inter-ETS and major ETS episodes in 2010, suggesting stress redistribution by the former. Most tremor migrations propagated along the slowly advancing main tremor front during both the inter-ETS and the major ETS episodes, even though the main front of the former deviated strongly from its usual (along-dip) orientation. We find a distinct contrast between along-dip rupture extent of large-scale rapid tremor reversals (RTRs) to the south and that to the north in our study region that anticorrelates with the locations of inter-ETS events. These RTRs originate from the main front, similar to smaller-scale RTRs previously observed at high-resolution, and many start by propagating along the main front. This could be consistent with RTRs being triggered by a cascading failure of brittle asperities. After initiation, the RTRs repeatedly occupy the same source region, and the early repetitions appear not to be tidally driven. Their stress drop may come from continuing fault weakening processes within the tremor zone, or loading by aseismic slip in surrounding regions.

  7. High-resolution seismic profiling reveals faulting associated with the 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley earthquake (Utah, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo G.; Duross, Christopher; Kokkalas, Sotirios

    2017-01-01

    The 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley, Utah, earthquake produced an 8-km-long by 3-km-wide zone of north-south−trending surface deformation in an extensional basin within the easternmost Basin and Range Province. Less than 0.5 m of purely vertical displacement was measured at the surface, although seismologic data suggest mostly strike-slip faulting at depth. Characterization of the origin and kinematics of faulting in the Hansel Valley earthquake is important to understand how complex fault ruptures accommodate regions of continental extension and transtension. Here, we address three questions: (1) How does the 1934 surface rupture compare with faults in the subsurface? (2) Are the 1934 fault scarps tectonic or secondary features? (3) Did the 1934 earthquake have components of both strike-slip and dip-slip motion? To address these questions, we acquired a 6.6-km-long, high-resolution seismic profile across Hansel Valley, including the 1934 ruptures. We observed numerous east- and west-dipping normal faults that dip 40°−70° and offset late Quaternary strata from within a few tens of meters of the surface down to a depth of ∼1 km. Spatial correspondence between the 1934 surface ruptures and subsurface faults suggests that ruptures associated with the earthquake are of tectonic origin. Our data clearly show complex basin faulting that is most consistent with transtensional tectonics. Although the kinematics of the 1934 earthquake remain underconstrained, we interpret the disagreement between surface (normal) and subsurface (strike-slip) kinematics as due to slip partitioning during fault propagation and to the effect of preexisting structural complexities. We infer that the 1934 earthquake occurred along an ∼3-km wide, off-fault damage zone characterized by distributed deformation along small-displacement faults that may be alternatively activated during different earthquake episodes.

  8. A conceptual model for hydrocarbon accumulation and seepage processes inside Chapopote asphalt volcanism site, Southern Gulf of Mexico: from high resolution seismic point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, F.; Spiess, V.; Fekete, N.; Keil, H.; Bohrmann, G.

    2007-05-01

    As part of the German R/V Meteor M67/2 expedition in 2006 to the southern Gulf of Mexico, a set of 2D high resolution seismic profiles was acquired across the Chapopote knoll to study sea floor asphalt occurrences and their origin. Based on regional seismic stratigraphy studies, correlated to DSDP sites, a higher reflective coarse grained sediment unit of Late Miocene age is identified as a potential shallow gas reservoir, overlain by a low permeability fine grained Pliocene and Pleistocene cover. As a result of salt diapirism, local uplift has caused reduced accumulation rates above the diaper since the late Pliocene, while the rates had been uniform throughout the area before. This has further improved the seal properties, since more fine grained material deposited in elevated locations. Nevertheless, on the crest of Chapopote, sediments above the coarse sediment unit are only around 150-75 m thick. Since oil and gas production can well be expected at depth in Jurassic and Tertiary source rocks, the presence of high amplitude reflector packages within the reservoir unit is interpreted as a result of the presence of hydrocarbons. This interpretation is further supported by the observation that some reflectors are cross-cutting and/or reveal a drop in instantaneous frequency. But, the thin seal above the reservoir unit, located directly underneath a widespread occurrence of asphalts at the sea floor, probably facilitates the leakage of hydrocarbons trapped inside the reservoir through a ~ 750 m wide acoustically chaotic zone partly aided by faulting. Since the top of Chapopote shows a high structural complexity, more seepage sites may exist beyond where seafloor asphalts have been found so far. Evolution and structure of the migration and reservoir system, which may be deep rooted, will be discussed both with respect to shallow gas and asphalt occurrences.

  9. Achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscopy based on total-reflection mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Emi, Yoji; Kino, Hidetoshi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2015-04-20

    We developed an achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscope based on advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics that comprises two pairs of elliptical mirrors and hyperbolic mirrors utilizing the total reflection of X-rays. Performance tests to investigate the spatial resolution and chromatic aberration were performed at SPring-8. The microscope clearly resolved the pattern with ~100-nm feature size. Imaging the pattern by changing the X-ray energy revealed achromatism in the wide energy range of 8-11 keV.

  10. Vertical seismic profiling and integration with reflection seismic studies at Laxemar, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhlin, C.; Bergman, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Cosma, C.; Keskinen, J.; Enescu, N. [Vibrometric Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-02-01

    . Three groups of reflections are observed. A sub.horizontal set that is interpreted to originate from greenstone lenses; a moderately dipping one consisting of two sub.groups, one dipping to the NNW and the other to the SSE; and a steeply dipping one that strikes at 50-70 deg and dips at 70-80 deg to the SE. Reflections from the two latter groups probably originate from fracture zones. The last group being responsible for the highly fractured zone between 1550 m and 1700 m. Reflections from the first sub.horizontal group and the NNW dipping sub.group are also observed on the surface seismic with the same general strike and dips. However, the estimated dips on the surface seismic are consistently lower. This may be explained by the VSP imaging the local reflector dip, while the surface seismic images the more larger scale regional dip. Dips and depth estimates to reflectors are generally known to an accuracy of better than {+-} 5% on both surface seismic and VSP data if its strike is known and it is planar. A special high resolution VSP survey was run in the cased part of the hole down to 200 m to image a clear 45 deg N dipping reflector on the surface seismic that intersects the borehole at the bottom of the casing at 200 m depth. This reflector generates PP and PS reflections and misinterpretation of the data can easily be done if the PS conversion is not taken into account.

  11. High-resolution x-ray scatter and reflectivity study of sputtered IR surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S.; Hornstrup, Allan

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the possible use of Ir as the reflecting surface in X-ray telescope programs. An X-ray study of such surfaces produced by sputtering of Ir on highly polished Zerodur flats is presented here. The study was performed using Fe K(alpha) 1 (6.......404 Kev) and Cu K(alpha) 1 (8.048 keV) and includes measurement of total external reflection and scattering. The scattering measurement was made with three different instruments arrangements; one employed a 1D position sensitive detector for low resolution studies giving approximately 30 arcsec resolution...... (FWHM), and the other two arrangements employed channel cut crystals providing resolutions (FWHM) of 5 arcsec and 1 arcsec, respectively at Cu K(alpha) 1. The reflectivity study revealed a very close correspondence with a theoretical model based on recently published optical constants. This important...

  12. High-resolution x-ray scatter and reflectivity study of sputtered IR surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S.; Hornstrup, Allan

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the possible use of Ir as the reflecting surface in X-ray telescope programs. An X-ray study of such surfaces produced by sputtering of Ir on highly polished Zerodur flats is presented here. The study was performed using Fe K(alpha) 1 (6.......404 Kev) and Cu K(alpha) 1 (8.048 keV) and includes measurement of total external reflection and scattering. The scattering measurement was made with three different instruments arrangements; one employed a 1D position sensitive detector for low resolution studies giving approximately 30 arcsec resolution...... (FWHM), and the other two arrangements employed channel cut crystals providing resolutions (FWHM) of 5 arcsec and 1 arcsec, respectively at Cu K(alpha) 1. The reflectivity study revealed a very close correspondence with a theoretical model based on recently published optical constants. This important...

  13. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emissions of Vegetation Canopies From High Resolution Field Reflectance Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; Corp, L. A.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva

    2006-01-01

    A two-year experiment was performed on corn (Zea mays L.) crops under nitrogen (N) fertilization regimes to examine the use of hyperspectral canopy reflectance information for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vegetation production. Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll ChlF peaks centered at 685V10 nm and 735V5 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops, as part of an ongoing multi-year experiment at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. A spectroradiometer (ASD-FR Fieldspec Pro, Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., Boulder, CO) was used to measure canopy radiances 1 m above plant canopies with a 22deg field of view and a 0deg nadir view zenith angle. Canopy and plant measurements were made at the R3 grain fill reproductive stage on 3-4 replicate N application plots provided seasonal inputs of 280, 140, 70, and 28 kg N/ha. Leaf level measurements were also made which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and N contents). Crop yields were determined at harvest. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrowband regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red S F ratio derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment levels (e.g., total chlorophyll, Chl) associated with N application rates in both corn crops. This canopy-level spectral ratio was also

  14. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Buried volcanic structures in the Gulf of Naples (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy resulting from high resolution magnetic survey and seismic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ruggieri

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a correlation between volcanic structures and magnetic anomalies in the Gulf of Naples (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea based on high resolution magnetic profiling. A densely spaced grid of magnetic profiles coupled with multichannel seismics (seismic source Watergun 15 cubic inch was recorded in the Gulf of Naples, representing an active volcanic area during the Late Quaternary (volcanic centers of Somma-Vesuvius, Phlegraean Fields and Ischia and Procida islands. The dataset was collected during the oceanographic cruise GMS00-05 which took place during October-November 2000 in the South Tyrrhenian Sea onboard of the R/V Urania (National Research Council, Italy. Shallow volcanic structures in the subsurface of the gulf were recognized by seismo-stratigraphic analysis of high resolution profiles; the volcanic nature of some of these structures was inferred identifying the magnetic anomalies on a high resolution magnetic anomaly map of the gulf. Even if qualitative, the correlations between seismic and magnetic profiles allow us to better assess the geological structure of the Gulf of Naples.

  16. Reflection seismic studies in the Forsmark area - stage 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhlin, Christopher; Bergman Bjoern; Palm, Hans [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2002-10-01

    Reflection seismic data were acquired in the Spring of 2002 in the Forsmark area, located about 70 km northeast of Uppsala, Sweden. The Forsmark area has been targeted by SKB as a possible storage site for high level radioactive waste. About 16 km of high resolution seismic data were acquired along five separate profiles varying in length from 2 to 5 km. Non-final source and receiver spacing was 10 m with 100 active channels when recording data from a dynamite source (15-75 g). The profiles were located within a relatively undeformed lens of bedrock that trends in the NW-SE direction. The lens is surrounded by highly deformed rock on all sides. In conjunction with the reflection component of the study, all shots were also recorded on up to eleven 3-component fixed Orion seismographs. These recordings provided long offset data from which a velocity model of the uppermost 400 m of bedrock could be derived. Results from the study show that the bedrock has been well imaged down to depths of at least 3 km. The upper 1000 m of bedrock is much more reflective in the southeastern portion of the lens compared to the northwestern part close to the Forsmark reactors. This is interpreted as the bedrock being more homogeneous in the northwest. However, a major reflective zone (the A1 reflector) is interpreted to dip to the S-SE below this homogeneous bedrock. In the southeastern portion of the lens the orientation of the reflectors is well determined where the profiles cross one another. The general strike of the major reflectors is NE-SW with dips of 20-35 degrees to the southeast.

  17. Global significance of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) deduced from high-resolution seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, K.; Tittgemeyer, M.; Ryberg, T.; Wenzel, F.; Mooney, W.

    2002-01-01

    We infer the fine structure of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) at the top of the lithospheric mantle from high-resolution seismic observations of Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE) on superlong-range profiles in Russia. Densely recorded seismograms permit recognition of previously unknown features of teleseismic propagation of the well known Pn and Sn phases, such as a band of incoherent, scattered, high-frequency seismic energy, developing consistently from station to station, apparent velocities of sub-Moho material, and high-frequency energy to distances of more than 3000 km with a coda band, incoherent at 10 km spacing and yet consistently observed to the end of the profiles. Estimates of the other key elements of the SMBL were obtained by finite difference calculations of wave propagation in elastic 2D models from a systematic grid search through parameter space. The SMBL consists of randomly distributed, mild velocity fluctuations of 2% or schlieren of high aspect ratios (???40) with long horizontal extent (???20 km) and therefore as thin as 0.5 km only; SMBL thickness is 60-100 km. It is suggested that the SMBL is of global significance as the physical base of the platewide observed high-frequency phases Pn and Sn. It is shown that wave propagation in the SMBL waveguide is insensitive to the background velocity distribution on which its schlieren are superimposed. This explains why the Pn and Sn phases traverse geological provinces of various age, heat flow, crustal thickness, and tectonic regimes. Their propagation appears to be independent of age. temperature, pressure, and stress. Dynamic stretching of mantle material during subduction or flow, possibly combined with chemical differentiation have to be considered as scale-forming processes in the upper mantle. However, it is difficult to distinguish with the present sets of Pn/Sn array data whether (and also where) the boundary layer is a frozen-in feature of paleo-processes or whether it is a response to

  18. A seismic reflection experiment near Runanga, Westland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, M.; Jenkins, R.

    1982-08-01

    An experiment was performed between Runanga and Rapahoe, a few kilometres north of Greymouth, to determine whether seismic waves reflected from Tertiary and Mesozoic sediments associated with coal seams could be recorded and identified. Reflections were observed at both sites occupied during the experiment, which were centred on National Yard Grid coordinates S44/770 964 and S44/776 957. Reflections observed at the western site have been tentatively associated with boundaries in or at the base of the Island Sandstone (about 180 metres below the ground surface), and within or at the bounds of the Rewanui Coal Measures (at about 400 metres depth). At the eastern site, reflections have been attributed to a boundary at about 170 metres depth. Reflections were generated using explosions 10 metres below the ground surface, and also by using groups of shallower, smaller simultaneous explosions at distances of more than 100 metres from the geophones where the reflections were detected. Average velocity estimates derived from the seismic measurements alone were 2.6 and 3.0 km/s for Rapahoe and Mawheranui Group sediments respectively. Sonic log measurements yield an average velocity of 3.3 km/s fro the Mawheranui Group. The areal coverage of the experiment was restricted by the difficulty of gaining access to locations off roads and the vulnerability of local access routes, services, and structures to vibration induced damage. The scope of the experimentation was further restricted by difficulties encountered in drilling shot holes and by recording equipment limitations. (4 refs.)

  19. High resolution seismic refraction method with multichannel digital data acquisition system; Digital ta channel sokutei system wo mochiita koseido kussetsuho jishin tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, K. [Oyo Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    This paper introduces a multichannel digital data acquisition system and examples of measurements with the system in seismic exploration using the high resolution seismic refraction method. The high resolution seismic refraction system performs analyses nearly automatically by using a computer after initial travel time has been read. Therefore, the system requires high-accuracy travel time data, for which a multichannel digital measuring instrument developed recently for seismic exploration using the refraction method has been used for the measurement. The specification specifies the number of channels at 144 as a maximum, a sampling time of 62.5 {mu}sec to 4 m sec, the maximum number of sampling of 80,000 samples, and gain accuracy of {plus_minus} 1%. The system was used for surveying a tunnel having a maximum soil cover of about 800 m. The traverse line length is about 6 km, the distance between vibration receiving points is 50 m, and the number of vibration receiving points is 194. Executing measurements of single point system using GPS can derive accurate velocity in the vicinity of the basic face of the tunnel construction. Results were obtained from the investigation, which can serve more for actual construction work. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Imaging continental shelf shallow stratigraphy by using different high-resolution seismic sources: an example from the Calabro-Tyrrhenian margin (Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Martorelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution seismic reflection profiles of the Calabro-Tyrrhenian continental shelf were collected using different seismic sources (Sub-Bottom Profiler, Uniboom, Sparker 0.5-1-4.5 kJ. Noticeable differences and results were obtained both from a geophysical and geological-interpretative point of view. The availability of different sources permitted the definition of the most suitable seismostratigraphic characterization in terms of resolution, penetration and acoustic facies. Very high resolution stratigraphy was defined through profiles produced by different seismic systems used in parallel. This permitted the application of sequence-stratigraphy concepts with the reconstruction of a thick postglacial depositional sequence, formed by a transgressive and a high-stand systems tract. The thickness distribution of postglacial deposits reveals that the main depocenter (55-65 m is located offshore of the Coastal Range, along a stretch of coast supplied by several small and seasonal streams ("fiumare" and characterized by the lack of a coastal plain. This suggests the greater efficiency of sediment supply and bypass in this area relatively to sectors located offshore of the main rivers. The transgressive systems tract, usually thin or nearly absent, is particularly well developed (up to 33 m and is composed of up to three parasequences with a retrogradational stacking pattern. The high-stand systems tract, up to 30 m thick, is made up of two parasequences and has a quite regular geometry and acoustic facies.Perfis de reflexão sísmica de alta resolução da plataforma continental tirreniana de Calabro foram obtidos utilizando-se recursos sísmicos diversos (Perfilador de Sub-superfície, Uniboom, Sparker 0.5-1-4.5 kJ. Diferenças evidentes foram encontradas sob o ponto de vista geofísico e geológico-interpretativo. A disponibilidade de diferentes fontes permitiu a definição de uma caracterização sismo-estratigráfica mais acurada em termos

  1. Spectral Knowledge (SK-UTALCA): Software for Exploratory Analysis of High-Resolution Spectral Reflectance Data on Plant Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos, Gustavo A.; Poblete-Echeverría, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This article describes public, free software that provides efficient exploratory analysis of high-resolution spectral reflectance data. Spectral reflectance data can suffer from problems such as poor signal to noise ratios in various wavebands or invalid measurements due to changes in incoming solar radiation or operator fatigue leading to poor orientation of sensors. Thus, exploratory data analysis is essential to identify appropriate data for further analyses. This software overcomes the problem that analysis tools such as Excel are cumbersome to use for the high number of wavelengths and samples typically acquired in these studies. The software, Spectral Knowledge (SK-UTALCA), was initially developed for plant breeding, but it is also suitable for other studies such as precision agriculture, crop protection, ecophysiology plant nutrition, and soil fertility. Various spectral reflectance indices (SRIs) are often used to relate crop characteristics to spectral data and the software is loaded with 255 SRIs which can be applied quickly to the data. This article describes the architecture and functions of SK-UTALCA and the features of the data that led to the development of each of its modules. PMID:28119705

  2. New insights on multiple seismic uplift on the Main Frontal Thrust near the Ratu river, Eastern Nepal using high-resolution topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Cagil; Tapponnier, Paul; Nath Sapkota, Soma; Coudurier Curveur, Aurelie; Ildefonso, Sorvigenaleon; Gao, Mingxing; Bollinger, Laurent; Klinger, Yann

    2016-04-01

    The number of localities along the Main Frontal Thrust, between 85°49' to 86°27' E, where new data corroborates the surface emergence of the great M ≈ 8.4, 1934 Bihar-Nepal and 1255 AD earthquakes has increased over the past years. Here we show new high-resolution, quantitative evidences of surface rupture and co-seismic uplift near the Ratu river area. We present a refined map of uplifted terrace surfaces and abandoned paleo-channels truncated by the MFT, obtained by the combination of newly acquired high resolution Digital Elevation Models from Total station, Terrestrial Lidar Scanner (TLS), Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and kinematic GPS surveys. In the Ratu valley, using these new high-resolution topographic datasets, we identify six and possibly seven distinct terrace levels uplifted parallel to the riverbed, lying unconformably on top of folded Siwaliks. Several sets of measurements may be taken to imply broadly characteristic increments of throw during sequences of at least six to seven events of riverbed abandonment related to co-seismic uplifts. Newly collected detrital charcoals from several pits and from a rejuvenated paleoseismological wall will help assess more precisely uplift and shortening rates over the length of segments of the MFT east and west of Bardibas. A regional comparison of comparable long-term paleoseismological data at other sites along the 1934 rupture length is in progress.

  3. Shallow shear-wave reflection seismics in the tsunami struck Krueng Aceh River Basin, Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Polom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the project "Management of Georisk" (MANGEONAD of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR, Hanover, high resolution shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam, North Sumatra in cooperation with the Government of Indonesia, local counterparts, and the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Hanover. The investigations were expected to support classification of earthquake site effects for the reconstruction of buildings and infrastructure as well as for groundwater exploration. The study focussed on the city of Banda Aceh and the surroundings of Aceh Besar. The shear-wave seismic surveys were done parallel to standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests to support subsequent site specific statistical calibration. They were also partly supplemented by shallow p-wave seismics for the identification of (a elastic subsurface parameters and (b zones with abundance of groundwater. Evaluation of seismic site effects based on shallow reflection seismics has in fact been found to be a highly useful method in Aceh province. In particular, use of a vibratory seismic source was essential for successful application of shear-wave seismics in the city of Banda Aceh and in areas with compacted ground like on farm tracks in the surroundings, presenting mostly agricultural land use areas. We thus were able to explore the mechanical stiffness of the subsurface down to 100 m depth, occasionally even deeper, with remarkably high resolution. The results were transferred into geotechnical site classification in terms of the International Building Code (IBC, 2003. The seismic images give also insights into the history of the basin sedimentation processes of the Krueng Aceh River delta, which is relevant for the exploration of new areas for construction of safe foundations of buildings and for identification of fresh water aquifers in the tsunami

  4. High-Resolution Seismicity Image of the Shallow Part of the Subduction Zone Beneath Mejillones in Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerow, Jörn; Bloch, Wasja; Salazar, Pablo; Wigger, Peter; Asch, Günter; Shapiro, Serge A.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze slab-related seismicity which has been recorded by a recently (June 2013) installed local seismic monitoring system on the Mejillones peninsula in the forearc region of Northern Chile. The monitoring system consists of 20 seismic stations and is complemented by components of the permanent IPOC (Integrated Plate Boundary Obervatory Chile) seismic network, providing a singular on-shore possibility to study in detail the relatively shallow seismicity of the subducting Nazca slab. To date, about thousand local seismic events have been identified. Precise earthquake relocation involving a local 2.5D velocity model and improved arrival time picks from an iterative cross-correlation based technique allows to trace sharply the slab interface between 25km and 40km depth. Furthermore, we observe distinct and continuous seismic activity on a near-vertical structure which transects the subducting oceanic crust from 40km to 50km depth. Location, orientation and size of this plane correspond to the rupture fault of the MW6.8 Michilla intraslab earthquake which occurred weeks after the MW7.7 Tocopilla earthquake of November 2007. We discuss here particularly the results from cluster analysis and the spatio-temporal signatures of the recorded seismicity.

  5. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: 2013 multi-component and high-resolution 2D acquisition at GC955 and WR313

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.; Shedd, William W.; Frye, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data. GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations. In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems. Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

  6. Retrieval of reflections from seismic background‐noise measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draganov, D.S.; Wapenaar, K.; Mulder, W.; Singer, J.; Verdel, A.

    2007-01-01

    The retrieval of the earth's reflection response from cross‐correlations of seismic noise recordings can provide valuable information, which may otherwise not be available due to limited spatial distribution of seismic sources. We cross‐correlated ten hours of seismic background‐noise data acquired

  7. Seismic reflection data from Lake Elsinore, Southern CA, reveal a sustained late-Holocene lake lowstand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, B. N.; Kirby, M. E.; Scholz, C. A.; Cattaneo, P.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Elsinore, located 120 kilometers southeast of Los Angeles, California, is Southern California’s largest natural lake. In December 2008, we collected over 75 km of high-resolution seismic reflection data using a CHIRP single-channel seismic-reflection Edgetech Geostar and the Geopulse™ Boomer systems. Initial interpretations reveal several interesting seismic sequences over the past 10,000 calendar years before present (cy BP: age control is based on dated sediment cores tied to the seismic lines). Most intriguing is evidence for a sustained interval of low lake level bracketed between ~ 3,000 and 1,800 cy BP. Prominent truncated stratal terminations characterize the upper boundary of this low stand seismic sequence. Sediment core data in the form of mudcracks, grain size variations, and geochemical data from various depositional environments (i.e., littoral and profundal) within Lake Elsinore support the seismic reflection interpretation for a low stand. Regionally, there is evidence for a similar interval of dry climate at Tulare Lake, the Mojave lakes, the Salton Sea, and possibly Dry Lake. A comparison to marine proxies along the eastern Pacific is less straight forward. The reason for this interval of sustained dry climate is not clear at this time. However, these results suggest that the already water-poor, over populated region of Southern California is subject to “droughts” of longer duration than that seen in the historical or tree-ring records from the region.

  8. P-Cable 3D high-resolution seismic data as a powerful tool to characterize subglacial landforms and their genesis: A case study from the SW Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellwald, Benjamin; Planke, Sverre; Matar, Mohammed; Daria Piasecka, Emilia

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution 3D seismic data have significantly increased our knowledge about petroleum reservoirs and submarine geohazards. However, little effort has been undertaken to evaluate the potential of such data for mapping subglacial landforms. The Barents Sea has been subjected to repeated Pleistocene glaciations, which intensively eroded the region, resulting in a generally thin (water depths of 380-470 m with a recorded in-line spacing of <7 m. Three seismic horizons, highly affected by glacial processes, have been interpreted in great detail. Combining different seismic volume attributes allowed to improve the visualization and characterization of subglacial features. Grids of the most prominent intra-glacial reflection reveal an up to 50 m-thick ridge-shaped feature, which cannot be identified in conventional seismic data. Internal inclined negative-amplitude reflections characterize the ridge-shaped feature. The outermost inclined reflection is laterally extending to a NE-SW topographic step on the Upper Regional Unconformity. Therefore we suggest the ridge-shaped feature to represent a shear margin moraine generated during one of the episodes of the Bjørnøyrenna Ice Stream readvances. We interpret fast-streaming ice in the west and slowly-flowing ice sheet to the east of the shear margin moraine. This past glacial configuration is further suggested to affect the current morphology of the sea bed. The zone correlating with ice-streaming is overlain by a thick package of homogenous to semi-parallel negative amplitude reflections, dominated by megascale glacial lineations. The shear margin moraine is overlain by a thin glacial package and its sea bed dominated by iceberg ploughmarks. The third zone, affected by the paleo ice-sheet, is characterized by a flat sea bed and few pockmarks. We conclude that the mapped seabed morphologies are strongly dependent on the sub-bottom geology. Therefore high-resolution seismic data is beneficial in identifying and

  9. Minisparker seismic-reflection data of field activity B-1-08-SC: between Huntington Beach and San Diego, offshore southern California from 2008-04-28 to 2008-05-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes raw and processed, high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2008 to collect information on active offshore faults. The survey area...

  10. Minisparker seismic-reflection data of field activity S-07-11-SC: offshore San Diego, and Los Angeles Counties, southern California from 2011-06-08 to 2011-06-22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes raw and processed, high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2011 to collect information on active offshore faults. The survey area...

  11. Multichannel minisparker seismic-reflection data of field activity 2014-645-FA; Santa Cruz and Catalina Basins, offshore southern California from 2014-11-12 to 2014-11-25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release contains processed, high-resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected in 2014 to explore marine geologic hazards offshore of...

  12. Minisparker seismic-reflection data of field activity S-5-09-SC: San Pedro Basin, offshore southern California from 2009-07-06 to 2009-07-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes raw and processed, high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2009 to explore a possible connection between the San Diego Trough...

  13. Minisparker seismic-reflection data of field activity S-12-10-SC: Oceanside to La Jolla, offshore southern California from 2010-06-01 to 2010-06-12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes raw and processed, high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2010 to collect information on active offshore faults. The survey area...

  14. Chirp seismic-reflection data of field activity 2014-645-FA; Santa Cruz Basin offshore Santa Barbara, southern California from 2014-11-12 to 2014-11-25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release contains high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2014 to explore to explore marine geologic hazards offshore of southern California....

  15. Nature of the seismic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary within normal oceanic mantle from high-resolution receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugboji, Tolulope Morayo; Park, Jeffrey; Karato, Shun-ichiro; Shinohara, Masanao

    2016-04-01

    Receiver function observations in the oceanic upper mantle can test causal mechanisms for the depth, sharpness, and age dependence of the seismic wave speed decrease thought to mark the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). We use a combination of frequency-dependent harmonic decomposition of receiver functions and synthetic forward modeling to provide new seismological constraints on this "seismic LAB" from 17 ocean-bottom stations and 2 borehole stations in the Philippine Sea and northwest Pacific Ocean. Underneath young oceanic crust, the seismic LAB depth follows the ˜1300 K isotherm but a lower isotherm (˜1000 K) is suggested in the Daito ridge, the Izu-Bonin-Mariana trench, and the northern Shikoku basin. Underneath old oceanic crust, the seismic LAB lies at a constant depth ˜70 km. The age dependence of the seismic LAB depth is consistent with either a transition to partial-melt conditions or a subsolidus rheological change as the causative factor. The age dependence of interface sharpness provides critical information to distinguish these two models. Underneath young oceanic crust, the velocity gradient is gradational, while for old oceanic crust, a sharper velocity gradient is suggested by the receiver functions. This behavior is consistent with the prediction of the subsolidus model invoking anelastic relaxation mediated by temperature and water content, but is not readily explained by a partial-melt model. The Ps conversions display negligible two-lobed or four-lobed back azimuth dependence in harmonic stacks, suggesting that a sharp change in azimuthal anisotropy with depth is not responsible for them. We conclude that these ocean-bottom observations indicate a subsolidus elastically accommodated grain-boundary sliding (EAGBS) model for the seismic LAB. Because EAGBS does not facilitate long-term ductile deformation, the seismic LAB may not coincide with the conventional transition from lithosphere to asthenosphere corresponding to a change in

  16. Advances through collaboration: sharing seismic reflection data via the Antarctic Seismic Data Library System for Cooperative Research (SDLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, N.; Childs, J. R.; Cooper, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Antarctic Seismic Data Library System for Cooperative Research (SDLS) has served for the past 16 years under the auspices of the Antarctic Treaty (ATCM Recommendation XVI-12) as a role model for collaboration and equitable sharing of Antarctic multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data for geoscience studies. During this period, collaboration in MCS studies has advanced deciphering the seismic stratigraphy and structure of Antarctica’s continental margin more rapidly than previously. MCS data compilations provided the geologic framework for scientific drilling at several Antarctic locations and for high-resolution seismic and sampling studies to decipher Cenozoic depositional paleoenvironments. The SDLS successes come from cooperation of National Antarctic Programs and individual investigators in “on-time” submissions of their MCS data. Most do, but some do not. The SDLS community has an International Polar Year (IPY) goal of all overdue MCS data being sent to the SDLS by end of IPY. The community science objective is to compile all Antarctic MCS data to derive a unified seismic stratigraphy for the continental margin – a stratigraphy to be used with drilling data to derive Cenozoic circum-Antarctic paleobathymetry maps and local-to-regional scale paleoenvironmental histories.

  17. Development of a High Resolution BRDF/Albedo Product by Fusing Airborne CASI Reflectance with MODIS Daily Reflectance in the Oasis Area of the Heihe River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqin You

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A land-cover-based linear BRDF (bi-directional reflectance distribution function unmixing (LLBU algorithm based on the kernel-driven model is proposed to combine the compact airborne spectrographic imager (CASI reflectance with the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS daily reflectance product to derive the BRDF/albedo of the two sensors simultaneously in the foci experimental area (FEA of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER, which was carried out in the Heihe River basin, China. For each land cover type, an archetypal BRDF, which characterizes the shape of its anisotropic reflectance, is extracted by linearly unmixing from the MODIS reflectance with the assistance of a high-resolution classification map. The isotropic coefficients accounting for the differences within a class are derived from the CASI reflectance. The BRDF is finally determined by the archetypal BRDF and the corresponding isotropic coefficients. Direct comparisons of the cropland archetypal BRDF and CASI albedo with in situ measurements show good agreement. An indirect validation which compares retrieved BRDF/albedo with that of the MCD43A1 standard product issued by NASA and aggregated CASI albedo also suggests reasonable reliability. LLBU has potential to retrieve the high spatial resolution BRDF/albedo product for airborne and spaceborne sensors which have inadequate angular samplings. In addition, it can shorten the timescale for coarse spatial resolution product like MODIS.

  18. Identification of Seismic Reflections Using Singular Value Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Ursin

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Singular value decomposition (SVD is applied to the identification of seismic reflections by using two different models: the impulse response model where a seismic trace is assumed to consist of a known signal pulse convolved with a reflection coefficient series plus noise, and the delayed pulse model where the seismic signal is assumed to consist of a small number of delayed pulses of known shape and with unknown amplitudes and arrival times.

  19. High Resolution Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of M87 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers on XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Sakelliou, I; Tamura, T; Paerels, F B S; Kaastra, J S; Belsole, E; Böhringer, H; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Ferrigno, C; Den Herder, J W A; Kennea, J; Mushotzky, R F; Vestrand, W T; Worrall, D M

    2002-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of M87 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers on XMM-Newton. We detect strong K-shell line emission from N, O, Ne, Mg, some emission from He-like Si, a fully resolved set of Fe L-shell emission spectra, and some emission from C. The angular intensity distributions of the strong emission lines are detectably resolved on scales (15-160) arcsec. The gas in the inner arcmin of M87 has a multi-phase structure, as indicated by the similarity of the emission line profiles of Fe L shell ions with widely separated ionization potentials. The global Fe L spectrum is approximately consistent with an isothermal plasma at kT_e ~ 1.8 keV, in addition to a component with a temperature distribution appropriate to an isobaric cooling flow, but with a minimum temperature cutoff of kT_min ~ 600 eV. The behaviour of this cooling-flow component is qualitatively similar to what is seen in other cooling flow clusters. Finally, we do not find any strong evidence for a spa...

  20. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of microtubule structures by quantitative multi-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Luhong; Wu, Jian; Xiu, Peng; Fan, Jiannan; Hu, Miao; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) has been widely used in biomedical research to visualize cellular processes near the cell surface. In this study, a novel multi-angle ring-illuminated TIRFM system, equipped with two galvo mirrors that are on conjugate plan of a 4f optical system was developed. Multi-angle TIRFM generates images with different penetration depths through the controlled variation of the incident angle of illuminating laser. We presented a method to perform three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of microtubules from multi-angle TIRFM images. The performance of our method was validated in simulated microtubules with variable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and the axial resolution and accuracy of reconstruction were evaluated in selecting different numbers of illumination angles or in different SNR conditions. In U373 cells, we reconstructed the 3-D localization of microtubules near the cell surface with high resolution using over a hundred different angles. Theoretically, the presented TIRFM setup and 3-D reconstruction method can achieve 40 nm axial resolution in experimental conditions where SNR is as low as 2, with 35 different illumination angles. Moreover, our system and reconstruction method have the potential to be used in live cells to track membrane dynamics in 3-D.

  1. Application of high-resolution 2D-3C seismic for characterization of the perspective Jurassic shale play in Central Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyz, M.; Malinowski, M.; Krzywiec, P.; Mulińska, M.; Słonka, Ł.

    2016-10-01

    Here we show the application of broadband (4-120 Hz) 2D-3C seismic for characterization of the perspective Jurassic shale play in Central Poland. Data were acquired along a network of 250 km 2D profiles using single-point, densely spaced receivers (digital 3C sensors) and acquisition was focused on providing both high-resolution and broadband seismic that would enable structural imaging and quantitative interpretation of the key stratigraphic horizons in the Mesozoic sedimentary cover. Such acquisition parameters resulted in good quality data and allowed for more flexibility during processing, e.g., unaliased F-K filtering or digital group forming for ground-roll removal. Processing was oriented to preserve relative amplitudes and the broadband character of the dataset as the input for future quantitative interpretation. We obtained a high-resolution stratigraphic image of the target Upper Jurassic (Upper Kimmeridgian-Tithonian) sequence as well as overall structural portrait of this part of Mid-Polish Trough characterized by strong imprint of the salt tectonics. Lateral continuity of particular stratigraphic sequences has been determined and a more precise structural context for deposition and present-day structure of the Upper Kimmeridgian-Tithonian has been established.

  2. Analytical fundamentals of migration in reflection seismics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Arnab K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider migration in reflection seismics from a completely analytical perspective. We review the basic geometrical ray-path approach to understanding the subject of migration, and discuss the limitations of this method. We stress the importance of the linear differential wave equation in migration. We also review briefly how a wavefield, travelling with a constant velocity, is extrapolated from the differential wave equation, with the aid of Fourier transforms. Then we present a non-numerical treatment by which we derive an asymptotic solution for both the amplitude and the phase of a planar subsurface wavefield that has a vertical velocity variation. This treatment entails the application of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, whose self-consistency can be established due to a very slow logarithmic variation of the velocity in the vertical direction, a feature that holds more firmly at increasingly greater subsurface depths. For a planar subsurface wavefield, we also demonstrate an equivalence between two apparently different migration algorithms, namely, the constant-velocity Stolt Migration algorithm and the stationary-phase approximation method.

  3. A seismic reflection image for the base of a tectonic plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, T A; Henrys, S A; Okaya, D; Louie, J N; Savage, M K; Lamb, S; Sato, H; Sutherland, R; Iwasaki, T

    2015-02-05

    Plate tectonics successfully describes the surface of Earth as a mosaic of moving lithospheric plates. But it is not clear what happens at the base of the plates, the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). The LAB has been well imaged with converted teleseismic waves, whose 10-40-kilometre wavelength controls the structural resolution. Here we use explosion-generated seismic waves (of about 0.5-kilometre wavelength) to form a high-resolution image for the base of an oceanic plate that is subducting beneath North Island, New Zealand. Our 80-kilometre-wide image is based on P-wave reflections and shows an approximately 15° dipping, abrupt, seismic wave-speed transition (less than 1 kilometre thick) at a depth of about 100 kilometres. The boundary is parallel to the top of the plate and seismic attributes indicate a P-wave speed decrease of at least 8 ± 3 per cent across it. A parallel reflection event approximately 10 kilometres deeper shows that the decrease in P-wave speed is confined to a channel at the base of the plate, which we interpret as a sheared zone of ponded partial melts or volatiles. This is independent, high-resolution evidence for a low-viscosity channel at the LAB that decouples plates from mantle flow beneath, and allows plate tectonics to work.

  4. High resolution seismic velocity structure around the Yamasaki fault zone of southwest Japan as revealed from travel-time tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ohmi, Shiro; Mori, Jim; Shibutani, Takuo

    2013-08-01

    The Yamasaki fault zone in southwestern Japan currently has a high potential for producing a large damaging earthquake. We carried out a seismic tomographic study to determine detailed crustal structures for the region. The velocity model clearly images a low-velocity and high V p / V s (high Poisson's ratio) anomaly in the lower crust beneath the Yamasaki fault zone at a depth of ~15-20 km. This anomaly may be associated with the existence of partially-melted minerals. The existence of this anomaly below the fault zone may contribute to changing the long-term stress concentration in the seismogenic zone.

  5. Can faults become barriers for deep fluid circulation? Insights from high-resolution seismic VSP tomography at the Soultz-sous-Forêts geothermal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Marco; Dorbath, Catherine; Lubrano Lavadera, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) surveys are generally used for modelling converted phases of the seismic body waves propagating in the medium allowing the detection of waves interpreted as reflections on steeply dipping reflecting structures such as faults, abrupt lateral changes of lithology, and fractures. At the Enhanced Geothermal System geothermal field of Soultz-sous-Forêts the analysis of data recorded during a VSP experiment allowed describing the presence of at least two structures near the wells. Here we show how seismic tomography method can be applied to the VSP data to reconstruct the 3-D shape of structures in the volume surrounding the geothermal wells. The three-dimensional P wave velocity model obtained shows positive velocity anomalies associated with the main faults observed by the VSP analysis and negative anomalies in the regions affected by massive hydraulic stimulations performed in the past. This pattern can be explained as a different response of the rock volume to the fluid injections where regions marked by relative pre-existing high permeability were less affected by the hydraulic stimulations. This difference in permeability produced regions that could work as barriers for fluid diffusion through the reservoir. Comparisons of our high resolved model with the location of the induced seismicity and with another model obtained using seismic noise correlation give evidence of the presence of these structures and may explain the poor connection between the wells GPK4 and GPK2-GPK3 system.

  6. Probing seismic solar analogues through observations with the NASA Kepler space telescope and HERMES high-resolution spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, P G; García, R A; Nascimento,, J do; Duarte, T S S; Mathis, S; Regulo, C; Ballot, J; Egeland, R; Castro, M; Pérez-Herńandez, F; Creevey, O; Tkachenko, A; van Reeth, T; Bigot, L; Corsaro, E; Metcalfe, T; Mathur, S; Palle, P L; Prieto, C Allende; Montes, D; Johnston, C; Andersen, M F; van Winckel, H

    2016-01-01

    Stars similar to the Sun, known as solar analogues, provide an excellent opportunity to study the preceding and following evolutionary phases of our host star. The unprecedented quality of photometric data collected by the \\Kepler NASA mission allows us to characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology and study diagnostics of stellar evolution, such as variation of magnetic activity, rotation and the surface lithium abundance. In this project, presented in a series of papers by Salabert et al. (2016a,b) and Beck et al (2016a,b), we investigate the link between stellar activity, rotation, lithium abundance and oscillations in a group of 18 solar-analogue stars through space photometry, obtained with the NASA Kepler space telescope and from currently 50+ hours of ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy with the Hermes instrument. In these proceedings, we first discuss the selection of the stars in the sample, observations and calibrations and then summarise the main results of the project. By invest...

  7. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

    2002-03-11

    The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

  8. 2D and 3D high resolution seismic imaging of shallow Solfatara crater in Campi Flegrei (Italy): new insights on deep hydrothermal fluid circulation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Landro, Grazia; Gammaldi, Sergio; Serlenga, Vincenzo; Amoroso, Ortensia; Russo, Guido; Festa, Gaetano; D'Auria, Luca; Bruno, Pier Paolo; Gresse, Marceau; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Zollo, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Seismic tomography can be used to image the spatial variation of rock properties within complex geological media such as volcanoes. Solfatara is a volcano located within the Campi Flegrei still active caldera, characterized by periodic episodes of extended, low-rate ground subsidence and uplift called bradyseism accompanied by intense seismic and geochemical activities. In particular, Solfatara is characterized by an impressive magnitude diffuse degassing, which underlines the relevance of fluid and heat transport at the crater and prompted further research to improve the understanding of the hydrothermal system feeding the surface phenomenon. In this line, an active seismic experiment, Repeated Induced Earthquake and Noise (RICEN) (EU Project MEDSUV), was carried out between September 2013 and November 2014 to provide time-varying high-resolution images of the structure of Solfatara. In this study we used the datasets provided by two different acquisition geometries: a) A 2D array cover an area of 90 x 115 m ^ 2 sampled by a regular grid of 240 vertical sensors deployed at the crater surface; b) two 1D orthogonal seismic arrays deployed along NE-SW and NW-SE directions crossing the 400 m crater surface. The arrays are sampled with a regular line of 240 receiver and 116 shots. We present 2D and 3D tomographic high-resolution P-wave velocity images obtained using two different tomographic methods adopting a multiscale strategy. The 3D image of the shallow (30-35 m) central part of Solfatara crater is performed through the iterative, linearized, tomographic inversion of the P-wave first arrival times. 2D P-wave velocity sections (60-70 m) are obtained using a non-linear travel-time tomography method based on the evaluation of a posteriori probability density with a Bayesian approach. The 3D retrieved images integrated with resistivity section and temperature and CO2 flux measurements , define the following characteristics: 1. A depth dependent P-wave velocity layer

  9. Linking geomorphology and high resolution seismic imaging for defining the evolution of a formerly glaciated valley in Vinschgau/Val Venosta, Eastern Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraio, Stefano; Bruno, Pier Paolo; Brardinoni, Francesco; Picotti, Vincenzo; Cucato, Maurizio; Morelli, Corrado; Mair, Volkmar

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the sedimentary architecture of Quaternary valley fills, in relation to past climate changes, represents an essential condition for estimating the evolution of the contemporary mountain landscape. Mountain drainage basins are considered as systems that are largely affected by environmental changes, during glacial-interglacial transitions and consequently represent natural archives that record the main processes depending on climate variations. In this paper, we aim to reconstruct the post-Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) evolution of a cross-sectional transect of the Venosta Valley (Eastern Italian Alps), with a special focus on the confluences between the Adige River and its tributaries Gadria-Strimm and Lasa streams. We acquired and processed four high-resolution dense, wide-aperture seismic profiles to obtain seismic data of quality and resolution adequate to 1) study the internal architecture of the debris-flow fans; 2) delineate the morphology of the bedrock valley bottom and the associated sedimentary fills above it; and 3) evaluate the geometric relationships between the debris-flow fans and the hosting valley fills. We integrated the results of the high-resolution seismic imaging with existing speleothem and radiocarbon dating, and with four newly acquired sedimentary cores and about twenty new radiocarbon dates. The new set of radiocarbon ages, allowed us to define timelines across the seismic imaging, and consequently across the stratigraphic profiles to calculate average sedimentation rates between the dated samples, within each core. Our results show that the onset of paraglacial sediment evacuation from the three tributary systems was primarily controlled by basin aspect, a proxy for incoming solar radiation that typically affects the timing and pace of deglaciation. We further show that the debris-flow sediment flux associated with the formation of the Gadria fan, the best-constrained tributary system in the study area, describes a primary

  10. High resolution seismic imaging at the Odessa (TX) meteorite impact site: the ground-impact geohazard and integration with magnetic gradiometry and time-domain electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, D.; Everett, M.

    2007-05-01

    Comet and asteroid bombardment along with impact crater formation has occurred continuously throughout Earth's history. The greatest impact-related geohazard is due to moderate sized impactors which represent the worst-case trade-off between frequency of occurrence, difficulty of mitigation, and severity of environmental destruction. Impacts in this size range pose a significant regional threat to densely populated areas. The primary objective of this research is to evaluate the ground-impact geohazard via high resolution seismic imaging of the remnants of a moderate-sized impact event, namely that associated with the 50 ka Odessa (TX) Group IAB iron meteorite. We provide high-resolution subsurface images of the 150-m diameter crater, the outcropping crater rim, the ejecta blanket, and the surrounding plain. The subsurface images are analyzed in terms of the deformation and thrusting of the underlying Cretaceous limestone and shale strata and the likely environmental effects caused by the impact. The analysis will build upon and extend our previous geophysical investigations based on magnetic gradiometry and time-domain electromagnetic data.

  11. Imaging the Namibian Passive Margin with Crustal-Scale Reflection Seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, C. A.; Bauer, K.; Weber, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Passive continental margins offer the unique opportunity to study the processes involved in continental extension and break up and the role of hot-spot related magmatism. In 2011 we conducted combined on- and offshore seismic experiments specifically designed to characterize the Southern African passive margin at the Walvis Ridge in Namibia. A coast-parallel crustal model for P- and S-waves was derived by traveltime tomography of refracted waves. These model show a characteristic high-velocity body in the lower crust at the location where the Walvis Ridge hits the African continent. This body is most likely associated with magmatic processes of the continental break-up and the formation of the Atlantic Ocean. To study this region in more detail, we conducted a crustal-scale reflection seismic project in 2012, focussing on the high-velocity body. The reflection seismic imaging processing included the application of novel line-drawing migration techniques. A high-resolution reflection seismic image of the lower crustal high-velocity body could be derived. We present the result and discuss the possible interpretation of the data.

  12. Marine Seismic Reflection Profiles Data of San Francisco Bay Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dataset consists of two-dimensional marine seismic reflection profile data from the San Francisco Bay area. These data were acquired in 1995, with the vessel Robert...

  13. Marine Seismic Reflection Profiles Data of San Francisco Bay Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dataset consists of two-dimensional marine seismic reflection profile data from the San Francisco Bay area. These data were acquired in 1993, with the vessel David...

  14. Marine Seismic Reflection Profiles Data of San Francisco Bay Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dataset consists of two-dimensional marine seismic reflection profile data from the San Francisco Bay area. These data were acquired in 1997, with the vessel Davidt...

  15. Marine Seismic Reflection Profiles Data of San Francisco Bay Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dataset consists of two-dimensional marine seismic reflection profile data from the San Francisco Bay area. These data were acquired in 1995, with the vessel Robert...

  16. Marine Seismic Reflection Profiles Data of San Francisco Bay Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dataset consists of two-dimensional marine seismic reflection profile data from the San Francisco Bay area. These data were acquired in 1993, with the vessel David...

  17. Probing Seismic Solar Analogues Through Observations With The NASA Kepler Space Telescope and Hermes High-Resolution Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P. G.; Salabert, D.; Garcia, R. A.; do Nascimento, J., Jr.; Duarte, T. S. S.; Mathis, S.; Regulo, C.; Ballot, J.; Egeland, R.; Castro, M.; Pérez-Herńandez, F.,; Creevey, O.; Tkachenko, A.; van Reeth, T.; Bigot, L.; Corsaro, E.; Metcalfe, T.; Mathur, S.; Palle, P. L.; Allende Prieto, C.; Montes, D.; Johnston, C.; Andersen, M. F.; van Winckel, H.

    2016-11-01

    Stars similar to the Sun, known as solar analogues, provide an excellent opportunity to study the preceding and following evolutionary phases of our host star. The unprecedented quality of photometric data collected by the Kepler NASA mission allows us to characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology and study diagnostics of stellar evolution, such as variation of magnetic activity, rotation and the surface lithium abundance. In this project, presented in a series of papers by Salabert et al (2016ab) and Beck et al. (2016ab), we investigate the link between stellar activity, rotation, lithium abundance and oscillations in a group of 18 solar-analogue stars through space photometry, obtained with the NASA Kepler space telescope and from currently 50+ hours of ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy with the Hermes instrument. In these proceedings, we first discuss the selection of the stars in the sample, observations and calibrations and then summarise the main results of the project. By investigating the chromospheric and photospheric activity of the solar analogues in this sample, it was shown that for a large fraction of these stars the measured activity levels are compatible to levels of the 11-year solar activity cycle 23. A clear correlation between the lithium abundance and surface rotation was found for rotation periods shorter than the solar value. Comparing the lithium abundance measured in the solar analogues to evolutionary models with the Toulouse-Geneva Evolutionary Code (TGEC), we found that the solar models calibrated to the Sun also correctly describe the set of solar/stellar analogs showing that they share the same internal mixing physics. Finally, the star KIC3241581 and KIC10644353 are discussed in more detail.

  18. 2D/3D velocity model for the high resolution 2D and 3D seismic data from the CO2SINK Ketzin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, A.; Asch, G.; Lueth, S.; Goetz, J.

    2009-04-01

    Seismic traveltime inversion, traveltime tomography and seismic reflection techniques have been applied for two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) data acquired in conjunction with characterization and monitoring aspects at a carbon dioxide (CO2) geological storage site at Ketzin, Germany (the CO2SINK project) (S.Yordkayhun, 2008). A seismic source comparison from the 2D pilot study regarding acquisition parameters have been tested at the side has shown the weight drop source is suitable concerning the signal penetration, frequency content of the data and minimizing time and costs for the 3D data acquisition. For the Ketzin seismic data, the ability to obtain an accurate 2D/3D interval velocity model is limited by the acquisition geometry, source-generated noise and time shifts due to the near-surface effects producing severe distortions in the data. Moreover, these time shifts are comparable to the dominant periods of the reflections and to the size of structures to be imaged. Therefore, a combination of seismic refraction and state-of-the-art processing techniques, including careful static corrections and more accurate velocity analysis, has resulted in key improvements of the images and has allowed new information about the 2D/3D interval velocities. The results from these studies together with borehole information, hydrogeologic models and seismic modeling will be combined into an integrated 2D/3D velocity model. After that a careful 2D/3D depth migration is to be provided. It can be used as a database for the future monitoring program at the site.

  19. High-resolution seismic tomography of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha earthquake, Nepal: Evidence for the crustal tearing of the Himalayan rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shunping; Liu, Hongbing; Bai, Ling; Liu, Yanbing; Sun, Quan

    2016-09-01

    The Mw7.8 Gorkha earthquake struck Nepal and ruptured the boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates. We conducted 2-D Pg wave tomography to clarify the seismogenic structure and try to understand causal mechanisms for this large earthquake, using the aftershock data recorded by 15 broadband seismic stations located near the China-Nepal border. Our high-resolution results show that coseismic slip area of the main shock is consistent with the high P wave velocity anomaly, and the region of maximum slip has a larger area with higher velocity than the region of initial slip, possibly resulting in the dominant low-frequency radiation of energy observed after the dominant high-frequency radiation of energy in the source rupture process. The boundary between these regions of contrasting high and low seismic velocity anomalies suggests a potential crustal tearing at the southern end of the Tangra Yum Co Rift, possibly resulting from different thrust speeds in the Greater Himalaya.

  20. The character and amplitude of 'discontinuous' bottom-simulating reflections in marine seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Jess I. T.; Cook, Ann E.; Sawyer, Derek E.; Küçük, H. Mert; Goldberg, David S.

    2017-02-01

    Bottom-simulating reflections (BSRs) identified in seismic data are well documented; and are commonly interpreted to indicate the presence of gas hydrates along continental margins, as well as to estimate regional volumes of gas hydrate. A BSR is defined as a reflection that sub-parallels the seafloor but is opposite in polarity and cross-cuts dipping sedimentary strata. BSRs form as a result of a strong negative acoustic impedance contrast. BSRs, however, are a diverse seismic phenomena that manifest in strikingly contrasting ways in different geological settings, and in different seismic data types. We investigate the characteristics of BSRs, using conventional and high resolution, 2D and 3D seismic data sets in three locations: the Terrebonne and Orca Basins in the Gulf of Mexico, and Blake Ridge on the US Atlantic Margin. The acquisition geometry and frequency content of the seismic data significantly impact the resultant character of BSRs, as observed with depth and amplitude maps of the BSRs. Furthermore, our amplitude maps reinforce the concept that the BSR represents a zone, over which the transition from hydrate to free gas occurs, as opposed to the conventional model of the BSR occurring at a single interface. Our results show that a BSR can be mapped in three dimensions but it is not spatially continuous, at least not at the basin scale. Rather, a BSR manifests itself as a discontinuous, or patchy, reflection and only at local scales is it continuous. We suggest the discontinuous nature of BSRs is the result of variable saturation and distribution of free gas and hydrate, acquisition geometry and frequency content of the recorded seismic data. The commonly accepted definition of a BSR should be broadened with careful consideration of these factors, to represent the uppermost extent of enhanced amplitude at the shallowest occurrence of free gas trapped by overlying hydrate-bearing sediments.

  1. The multi-parameter borehole system and high resolution seismic studies in the western part of the main Marmara Fault in the frame of MARSITE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Oguz; Guralp, Cansun; Tunc, Suleyman; Yalcinkaya, Esref

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to install a multi-parameter borehole system and surface array as close to the main Marmara Fault (MMF) in the western Marmara Sea as possible, and measure continuously the evolution of the state of the fault zone surrounding the MMF and to detect any anomaly or change, which may occur before earthquakes by making use of the data from the arrays already running in the eastern part of the Marmara Sea. The multi-parameter borehole system is composed of very wide dynamic range and stable borehole (VBB) broad band seismic sensor, and incorporate strain meter, tilt meter, and temperature and local hydrostatic pressure measuring devices. The borehole seismic station uses the latest update technologies and design ideas to record "Earth tides" signals to the smallest magnitude -3 events. Additionally, a surface microearthquake observation array, consisting of 8-10 seismometers around the borehole is established to obtain continuous high resolution locations of micro-seismicity and to better understand the existing seismically active structures and their roles in local tectonic settings.Bringing face to face the seismograms of microearthquakes recorded by borehole and surface instruments portrays quite different contents. The shorter recording duration and nearly flat frequency spectrum up to the Nyquist frequencies of borehole records are faced with longer recording duration and rapid decay of spectral amplitudes at higher frequencies of a surface seismogram. The main causative of the observed differences are near surface geology effects that mask most of the source related information the seismograms include, and that give rise to scattering, generating longer duration seismograms. In view of these circumstances, studies on microearthquakes employing surface seismograms may bring on misleading results. Particularly, the works on earthquake physics and nucleation process of earthquakes requires elaborate analysis of tiny events. It is

  2. Dextral Shear on the Olympic-Wallowa Lineament, Washington--Evidence from High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Anomalies and Implications for Cascadia Seismic Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, R. J.; Sherrod, B. L.; Weaver, C. S.; Wells, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Olympic-Wallowa physiographic lineament (OWL) extends northwestward ~500 km from northeastern Oregon to Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The tectonic relevance of the OWL, particularly the degree to which horizontal shear has contributed to its evolution, is an important element in assessing kinematic connections between the Cascadia backarc and forearc, and the consequent seismic hazard it poses to the region. Past workers have come to rather different conclusions, some suggesting sinistral, others suggesting dextral, and still others suggesting no horizontal displacement on the OWL. North-northwest-striking dikes of the 8.5 Ma Ice Harbor Member of the Columbia River Basalt Group are offset and disrupted by the Wallula fault zone (WFZ), a 45-km-long segment of the OWL southeast of Kennewick. Although mostly concealed by young deposits, Ice Harbor dikes are clearly delineated in high-resolution aeromagnetic anomalies as near-vertical intrusions, affording an opportunity to estimate the sense and amount of offset along this part of the OWL. Aided by various derivative products calculated from magnetic anomalies, we interpret five piercing points from single-dike anomalies intersecting the Wallula fault (the northernmost strand of the WFZ), together indicating an average of 1.72 km of right-lateral offset on this single strand. Right-lateral offset across the entire WFZ is 6.9 km, an average rate of 0.8 mm/y since 8.5 Ma. We cannot rule out the possibility that tectonic offsets are only apparent because the injection process itself was offset during emplacement. However, consistent right-lateral offsets are observed in stream drainages along the OWL, supporting our magnetic anomaly interpretations. Aerial photography and airborne LiDAR surveys show seven offset streams along a fault scarp on the northeastern slope of Rattlesnake Mountain, located along the OWL about 70 km northwest of the WFZ. Incised in Pleistocene deposits, these stream offsets average about

  3. New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imagery of Deformation and Fault Architecture Along Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon Fault in the Inner California Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. J.; Bormann, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic deformation and geomorphology of the Inner California Borderlands (ICB) records the transition from a convergent plate margin to a predominantly dextral strike-slip system. Geodetic measurements of plate boundary deformation onshore indicate that approximately 15%, or 6-8 mm/yr, of the total Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by faults offshore. The largest near-shore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NI/RC) fault complex, has a Holocene slip rate estimate of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr, according to onshore trenching, and current models suggest the potential to produce an Mw 7.0+ earthquake. The fault zone extends approximately 120 km, initiating from the south near downtown San Diego and striking northwards with a constraining bend north of Mt. Soledad in La Jolla and continuing northwestward along the continental shelf, eventually stepping onshore at Newport Beach, California. In late 2013, we completed the first high-resolution 3D seismic survey (3.125 m bins) of the NI/RC fault offshore of San Onofre as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project. We present new constraints on fault geometry and segmentation of the fault system that may play a role in limiting the extent of future earthquake ruptures. In addition, slip rate estimates using piercing points such as offset channels will be explored. These new observations will allow us to investigate recent deformation and strain transfer along the NI/RC fault system.

  4. Seismic imaging of esker structures from a combination of high-resolution broadband multicomponent streamer and wireless sensors, Turku-Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maries, Georgiana; Ahokangas, Elina; Mäkinen, Joni; Pasanen, Antti; Malehmir, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    Eskers and glaciofluvial interlobate formations, mainly composed of sands and gravels and deposited in winding ridges, define the locations of glacial melt-water streams. These sediments, porous and permeable, form the most important aquifers in Finland and are often used as aggregates or for artificial aquifer recharge. The Virttaankangas interlobate suite and artificial aquifer recharge plant provides the entire water supply for the city of Turku and therefore an accurate delineation of the aquifer is critical for long term planning and sustainable use of these natural resources. The study area is part of the Säkylänharju-Virttaankangas Glaciofluvial esker-chain complex and lies on an igneous, crystalline basement rocks. To provide complementary information to existing boreholes and GPR studies at the site, such as identification of potential esker cores, planning for a water extraction, fractured bedrock and possible kettle holes, a new seismic investigation was designed and carried out during summer 2014. Two seismic profiles each about 1 km long were acquired using a newly developed 200 m long prototype, comprising of 80-3C MEMs-based, landstreamer system. To provide velocity information at larger depths (and longer offsets), fifty-two 10-Hz 1C wireless sensors spaced at about every 20 m were used. A Bobcat mounted drop-hammer source, generating three hits per source location, was used as the seismic source. This proved to be a good choice given the attenuative nature of the dry sediments down to about 20 m depth. One of the seismic lines overlaps an existing streamer survey and thus allows a comparison between the system used in this study and the one employed before. Except at a few places where the loose sands mixed with leaves affected the coupling, the data quality is excellent with several reflections identifiable in the raw shot gathers. First arrivals were easily identifiable in almost all the traces and shots and this allowed obtaining velocity

  5. Velocity structure and active fault of Yanyuan-Mabian seismic zone——The result of high-resolution seismic refraction experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG FuYun; XU XiWei; LIU BaoFeng; DUAN YongHong; YANG ZhuoXin; ZHANG ChengKe; ZHAO JinRen; ZHANG JianShi; ZHANG XianKang; LIU QiYuan; ZHU AiLan

    2008-01-01

    The authors processed the seismic retraction Pg-wave travel time data with finite difference tomography method and revealed velocity structure of the upper crust on active block boundaries and deep features of the active faults in western Sichuan Province.The following are the results of our investigation.The upper crust of Yanyuan basin and the Houlong Mountains consists of the superficial low-velocity layer and the deep uniform high-velocity layer, and between the two layers, there is a distinct, and gently west-dipping structural plane.Between model coordinates 180-240 km, P-wave velocity distribution features steeply inclined strip-like structure with strongly non-uniform high and low velocities alternately.Xichang Mesozoic basin between 240 and 300 km consists of a thick low-velocity upper layer and a high-velocity lower layer, where lateral and vertical velocity variations are very strong and the interface between the two layers fluctuates a lot.The Daliang Mountains to the east of the 300 km coordinate is a non-uniform high-velocity zone, with a superficial velocity of approximately 5 km/s.From 130 to 150 km and from 280 to 310 km, there are extremely distinct deep anomalous high-velocity bodies, which are supposed to be related with Permian magmatic activity.The Yanyuan nappe structure is composed of the superficial low-velocity nappe, the gently west-dipping detachment surface and the deep high-velocity basement, with Jinhe-Qinghe fault zone as the nappe front.Mopanshan fault is a west-dipping low-velocity zone, which extends to the top surface of the basement.Anninghe fault and Zemuhe fault are east-dipping, tabular-like, and low-velocity zones, which extend deep into the basement.At a great depth, Daliangshan fault separates into two segments, which are represented by drastic variation of velocity structures in a narrow strip: the west segment dips westward and the east segment dips eastward, both stretching into the basement.The east margin fault of

  6. Velocity structure and active fault of Yanyuan-Mabian seismic zone―The result of high-resolution seismic refraction experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The authors processed the seismic refraction Pg-wave travel time data with finite difference tomography method and revealed velocity structure of the upper crust on active block boundaries and deep features of the active faults in western Sichuan Province. The following are the results of our investigation. The upper crust of Yanyuan basin and the Houlong Mountains consists of the superficial low-velocity layer and the deep uniform high-velocity layer, and between the two layers, there is a distinct, and gently west-dipping structural plane. Between model coordinates 180-240 km, P-wave velocity distribution features steeply inclined strip-like structure with strongly non-uniform high and low velocities alternately. Xichang Mesozoic basin between 240 and 300 km consists of a thick low-velocity upper layer and a high-velocity lower layer, where lateral and vertical velocity variations are very strong and the interface between the two layers fluctuates a lot. The Daliang Mountains to the east of the 300 km coordinate is a non-uniform high-velocity zone, with a superficial velocity of approximately 5 km/s. From 130 to 150 km and from 280 to 310 km, there are extremely distinct deep anomalous high-velocity bodies, which are supposed to be related with Permian magmatic activity. The Yanyuan nappe structure is composed of the superficial low-velocity nappe, the gently west-dipping detachment surface and the deep high-velocity basement, with Jinhe-Qinghe fault zone as the nappe front. Mopanshan fault is a west-dipping low-velocity zone, which extends to the top surface of the basement. Anninghe fault and Zemuhe fault are east-dipping, tabular-like, and low-velocity zones, which extend deep into the base-ment. At a great depth, Daliangshan fault separates into two segments, which are represented by drastic variation of velocity structures in a narrow strip: the west segment dips westward and the east segment dips eastward, both stretching into the basement. The east margin

  7. Shallow seismic reflection profiles and geological structure in the Benton Hills, southeast Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, J.R.; Hoffman, D.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Williams, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    During late May and early June of 1993, we conducted two shallow, high-resolution seismic reflection surveys (Mini-Sosie method) across the southern escarpment of the Benton Hills segment of Crowleys Ridge. The reflection profiles imaged numerous post-late Cretaceous faults and folds. We believe these faults may represent a significant earthquake source zone. The stratigraphy of the Benton Hills consists of a thin, less than about 130 m, sequence of mostly unconsolidated Cretaceous, Tertiary and Quaternary sediments which unconformably overlie a much thicker section of Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The survey did not resolve reflectors within the upper 75-100 ms of two-way travel time (about 60-100 m), which would include all of the Tertiary and Quaternary and most of the Cretaceous. However, the Paleozoic-Cretaceous unconformity (Pz) produced an excellent reflection, and, locally a shallower reflector within the Cretaceous (K) was resolved. No coherent reflections below about 200 ms of two-way travel time were identified. Numerous faults and folds, which clearly offset the Paleozoic-Cretaceous unconformity reflector, were imaged on both seismic reflection profiles. Many structures imaged by the reflection data are coincident with the surface mapped locations of faults within the Cretaceous and Tertiary succession. Two locations show important structures that are clearly complex fault zones. The English Hill fault zone, striking N30??-35??E, is present along Line 1 and is important because earlier workers indicated it has Pleistocene Loess faulted against Eocene sands. The Commerce fault zone striking N50??E, overlies a major regional basement geophysical lineament, and is present on both seismic lines at the southern margin of the escarpment. The fault zones imaged by these surveys are 30 km from the area of intense microseismicity in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ). If these are northeast and north-northeast oriented fault zones like those at Thebes Gap they are

  8. Dem Reconstruction Using Light Field and Bidirectional Reflectance Function from Multi-View High Resolution Spatial Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vieilleville, F.; Ristorcelli, T.; Delvit, J.-M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a method for dense DSM reconstruction from high resolution, mono sensor, passive imagery, spatial panchromatic image sequence. The interest of our approach is four-fold. Firstly, we extend the core of light field approaches using an explicit BRDF model from the Image Synthesis community which is more realistic than the Lambertian model. The chosen model is the Cook-Torrance BRDF which enables us to model rough surfaces with specular effects using specific material parameters. Secondly, we extend light field approaches for non-pinhole sensors and non-rectilinear motion by using a proper geometric transformation on the image sequence. Thirdly, we produce a 3D volume cost embodying all the tested possible heights and filter it using simple methods such as Volume Cost Filtering or variational optimal methods. We have tested our method on a Pleiades image sequence on various locations with dense urban buildings and report encouraging results with respect to classic multi-label methods such as MIC-MAC, or more recent pipelines such as S2P. Last but not least, our method also produces maps of material parameters on the estimated points, allowing us to simplify building classification or road extraction.

  9. Reflectance Data Processing of High Resolution Multispectral Data Acquired with an Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle AggieairTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, B.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the performance and accuracy of a method for converting airborne multispectral data to reflectance data are characterized. Spectral reflectance is the ratio of reflected to incident radiant flux and it may have values only in the interval 0-1, inclusive. Reflectance is a key physical property of a surface and is empirically derived from on-ground observations. The paper presents a method for processing multispectral data acquired by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform, called AggieAirTM, and a process for converting raw digital numbers to calibrated reflectance values. Imagery is acquired by two identical sets of cameras. One set is aboard the UAV and the other is over a barium sulfate reference panel. The cameras have identical settings. The major steps for producing the reflectance data involve the calibration of the reference panel, calibration of the multispectral UAV cameras, zenith angle calculations and image processing. The method converts airborne multispectral data by calculating the ratio of linearly-interpolated reference values from the pre- and post-flight reference panel readings. The flight interval is typically approximately 30 minutes and the imagery is acquired around local solar noon. The UAV is typically flown at low altitudes to reduce atmospheric effects to a negligible level. Data acquired over wetlands near Great Salt Lake, Utah is used to illustrate ground data and processed imagery. The spectral resolution of the multispectral data is 25 cms. The paper discusses the accuracy issues and errors associated with the proposed method.

  10. Exemple d'imagerie de puits par diagraphie acoustique et sismique haute résolution An Example of Acoustics and Very High Resolution Seismic in a Highly Deviated Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari J. L.

    2006-11-01

    conventionally used to determine the slowness of formations. The total-field recordings made in highly-deviated or horizontal boreholes can be processed to provide microseismic borehole cross-sections having a lateral investigation range of some ten meters around the drain hole. This article describes the results of experiments performed in a limestone quarry located in Burgundy, France. A highly deviated borehole (10 degrees was drilled into a white oolitegeologic unit that was about 80 m thick. Acoustic logs and high resolution seismic were recorded in the deviated borehole. In acoustic logging, two sets of data were recorded : a constant-offset cross-section and a common shotpoint with a great number of traces and a centimetric distance between traces. Data processing brought out reflections inside the white oolite several meters away from the drain hole. The acoustic log was not able to determine the top and bottom of the white oolite unit. This goal was partially achieved by very high resolution seismic in the borehole. This type of seismic works in a frequency band intermediate between conventional borehole seismic and acoustic logging. It requires the development of special tools, particularly with regard to the borehole sources. A common shotpoint gather of very high-resolution seismic data obtained with a prototype source of the impulsional type shows reflections corresponding to reflectors situated several tens of meters (~40 m away from the drain hole. The results of these experiments showed the potential of acoustic logging and high-resolution borehole seismic for describing a reservoir unit at different scales.

  11. High-resolution ultrasound of rotator cuff and biceps reflection pulley in non-elite junior tennis players: anatomical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tennis is believed to be potentially harmful for the shoulder, therefore the purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomy of the rotator cuff and the coraco-humeral ligament (CHL) in a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players with high-resolution ultrasound (US). Methods From August 2009 to September 2010 n = 90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age ± standard deviation: 15 ± 3) and a control group of age- and sex- matched subjects were included. Shoulder assessment with a customized standardized protocol was performed. Body mass index, dominant arm, years of practice, weekly hours of training, racket weight, grip (Eastern, Western and semi-Western), kind of strings were recorded. Results Abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 14/90 (15%) players. Two players had supraspinatus tendinosis, two had subacromial impingement and ten had subacromial bursitis. CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3 ± 4.4 mm vs. 13 ± 4.2, p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that no association was present among CHL thickness and the variables evaluated. In the control group, abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 6/60 (10%) subjects (sub-acromial bursitis). No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p = 0.71). Conclusion In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found. PMID:25034864

  12. Tectonic and eustatic controls of late quaternary shelf sedimentation along the Central California (Santa Cruz) continental margin: high-resolution seismic stratigraphic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Henry T.; Nagel, David K.; Dominguez, Laura L.

    1985-07-01

    A high-resolution "uniboom", seismic stratigraphic investigation of a portion of the central California continental shelf has demonstrated that depositional patterns and sequences are controlled largely by an interplay of glacioeustatic sea-level fluctuations superimposed on local tectonics. Wrench tectonics, associated with active right-lateral shear along the San Gregorio fault zone, and the Pigeon Point Basement High control the location, distribution and overall geometry of depositional sequences via en echelon folding and differential subsidence. Areas of relatively thick and thin late Quaternary sediments conform in large part with structures produced during wrenching. Glacioeustatic sea-level oscillations have also shaped depositional patterns and sequences. Correlation of our seismic stratigraphic data with a southern California continental margin sea-level curve, suggests that during the last glacial maximum, approximately 18,000 yrs ago, a relative lowstand resulted in the erosion of a distinct unconformity upon which late Quaternary sediments have accumulated. A rapid rise of sea level to a relative stillstand, approximately 12,000 yrs ago, produced a concave-up, marine terrace profile across the mid-shelf, that has since been infilled with as much as 22 m of Holocene clastic sediments. A relative drop of sea level, approximately 11,000 yrs ago, allowed sediments to build seaward as a series of prograding clinoforms that form the basal sequences of the late Quaternary sediment fill. The succeeding Holocene transgression partially eroded the top of this earlier regressive sequence, and has now established a typical, wave-graded shelf along which sediments fine in a seaward direction to water depths of 90-100 m. At greater shelf water depths, surface sediments coarsen and appear to be relicts of previous relative sea-level lowstands. The presence of now submerged and buried marine terraces along both the central and southern California continental margins

  13. Active tectonics of the Calabrian subduction revealed by new multi-beam bathymetric data and high-resolution seismic profiles in the Ionian Sea (Central Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutscher, Marc-André; Kopp, Heidrun; Krastel, Sebastian; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Garlan, Thierry; Zaragosi, Sebastien; Klaucke, Ingo; Wintersteller, Paul; Loubrieu, Benoit; Le Faou, Yann; San Pedro, Laurine; Dominguez, Stephane; Rovere, Marzia; Mercier de Lepinay, Bernard; Ranero, Cesar; Sallares, Valenti

    2017-03-01

    The detailed morphology and internal structure of the Calabrian accretionary wedge and adjacent Eastern Sicily margin are imaged in unprecedented detail by a combined dataset of multi-beam bathymetry and high-resolution seismic profiles. The bathymetric data represent the results of 6 recent marine geophysical surveys since 2010 as well as a compilation of earlier surveys presented as a 2 arc-sec (60 m) grid. Several distinct morpho-tectonic provinces are identified including: the deeply incised Malta-Hyblean Escarpment, numerous submarine canyons, broad regions of relatively flat seafloor dominated by fields of sediment waves, the gently undulating anticlinal fold-and-thrust belts of the external Calabrian accretionary wedge and the adjacent portion of the Western Mediterranean Ridge. The Calabrian arc can be divided into 4 domains (from SE to NW): 1) the undeformed Ionian abyssal plain, 2) the external evaporitic wedge, 3) the internal clastic wedge, 4) the Calabrian backstop (Variscan crystalline basement). The Calabrian accretionary wedge can also be divided laterally into two major lobes, the NE- and the SW lobes, and two minor lobes. The kinematics of the limit between the two major lobes is investigated and shown to be sinistral in the external (evaporitic) wedge. A network of radial slip lines within the southernmost external wedge unequivocally demonstrate ongoing dextral displacement of a rigid indenter (representing the corner of the clastic wedge) into the evaporitic wedge thereby confirming the geodynamic model of an active lateral slab tear fault here off eastern Sicily. The slab tear produces a series of major sub-parallel dextral strike-slip faults offshore Mt. Etna and south of the Straits of Messina consistent with the relative motions between Calabria and the Peloritan domain (NE Sicily). Abundant strike-slip faulting, and wide-spread folding and thrusting observed throughout the entire accretionary wedge, indicate regional shortening between the

  14. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Reflection seismic studies at the Laxemar area; Reflektionsseismiska studier inom Laxemaromraadet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, B.; Juhlin, C.; Palm, H. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2001-02-01

    Two 2 km long crossing lines with high-resolution reflection seismics were acquired at Laxemar, close to The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, in December 1999. The main goal with the investigation was to make a full-scale test of developed methods in reflection seismics with the use of small shotholes and small explosive charges. The secondary goal was to identify fracture zones that might correlate with water bearing fracture zones found in boreholes. Both lines had 10-meter separation between the geophones and charge holes. Shot sizes were 15-gram plastic explosives for shots in rock and 75-gram ones for shots in lose sediments and till. The results from the measurements show that the small shotholes technique and small charges works well to investigate the rock down to a depth of 3-4 kilometers. The signal penetrates at least to 1500-metres (500 ms travel time for the seismic signal) along both lines. Over some parts of the lines the seismic signal penetrates to c. 6000- metres (2 seconds travel time). Five dipping reflectors (c. 30-50 deg) can be identified. Three of these can be projected up to the surface on both lines and their 3D orientation can be determined. These reflectors also coincide with topographical depressions. The two other dipping reflectors are only visible on one line, but can be assumed to correlate with topographical depressions and that way be assigned a three dimensional orientation. Four of the reflectors correlate with previously mapped fracture zones. A zone of sub-horizontal reflectivity (0-15 deg) is visible at 650-900 meters depth where the lines cross the deep borehole KLX02. This zone dips gently towards the east and can be correlated with sections of greenstones found in KLX02. The zone of sub-horizontal reflectivity continues to the deep borehole KLX01, but is not as clear here. This sub-horizontal zone may be the hydraulic connection between the boreholes in their deeper part. Deeper down at 1100 ms (c. 3 km), there are strong

  16. High-resolution Reflection Spectroscopy of Cs D2 Line Studied by High-order-harmonic Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yanting; MA Weiguang; XIAO Liantuan; LI Changyong; ZHANG Linjie; JIA Suotang

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, by numerical analysis the relationship of the modulation broaden index with modulation index using high-order-harmonic detection is investigated. Using the voltage modulation the 2f,4f and 6f harmonic signals about the reflection spectroscopy of 6S1/2(F=4)→6P3/2 transition of the cesium D2 line are also be measured. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. It is found that narrower line-width can be achieved by higher-harmonic detection than the line-width detected by direct absorption when the modulation index is smaller than 1.81, 2.98 and 4.14 for 2f, 4f, and 6f signals, respectively.

  17. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest.

  18. Very High Resolution Optical Images for Detecting Co-seismic Surface Effects: the Cases of the 2005 Kashmir (Pakistan) and the 2003 Bam (Iran) Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, M.; Cinti, F. R.; Stramondo, S.

    2008-12-01

    Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite panchromatic image has revealed to be a reliable tool to detect surface effects of natural disasters. This is particularly true whereas the hit territory is a remote land and/or with logistic and security problems. Data from this kind of sensor have a potential for more exhaustive and accurate mapping of the environment with details of sub-meter ground resolution. We show two large earthquake case studies, the 2005 Mw 7.6 Kashmir and the 2003 Mw 6.6 Bam events, both producing significant surface effects as ruptures, landslides and building damages. In order to test the capability of VHR images to recognize and evaluate such features we used panchromatic QuickBird imagery (0.6 m spatial resolution) acquired before and after the events (kindly provided by DigitalGlobe). Concerning the Pakistan we focus on the Muzaffarabad and Balakot areas, both crossed by the earthquake fault and experiencing edifice collapses. Same sort of analysis is performed for the ancient town of Bam. We proceed with: 1. identification on the images of the main rupture trace and of major landslides; 2. generation of a detailed spatial distribution of damage and collapses through a single building automatic classification approach; 3. cross-comparison of the different surface effects. The QuickBird panchromatic images provide a view of the co-seismic features at large scale, revealing complex geometric pattern of the cracks and compressional deformation features. It is possible to detect the lateral sense of movement, and based on the sun shade projection in the images, we infer the facing of the scarp, thus the uplifted side. Regarding point two, if in one hand the use of QuickBird images leads to detect very small details, on the other hand buildings become rather complex structures. Furthermore they may be surrounded by scattering objects making less evident the contrast between the roofs and the ground, thus increasing the difficulties in the

  19. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made

  20. Acquisition, processing and interpretation of high-resolution seismic data using a small-scale multi-channel system: an example from the Korea Strait inner shelf, south-east Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dong-Geun; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Lee, Ho-Young; Kim, Byoung-Yeop; Kim, Young-Jun; Cheong, Snons

    2016-10-01

    A high-resolution seismic survey was designed to improve the quality of seismic data and study the evolution of inner shelf deposits off the southern coast of Korea. A 0.5 L air gun and 6- or 8-channel streamer cable with a 5 m group interval were used as a seismic source and receiver system, respectively. Data recording was digitally performed at a shot interval of 2 s and a sample interval of 0.1 ms using a personal computer (PC)-based recording system with an analogue to digital (A/D) converter. In the data processing, deconvolution and static corrections were very effective for improving the data resolution. The data resolution and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio were improved by using multi-channel digital seismic systems as opposed to a single-channel analogue streamer. The results show that a small-scale multi-channel seismic system is an effective way to investigate late Quaternary deposits. Seismic stratigraphic analysis of the high-resolution seismic profiles revealed that inner shelf deposits, up to 30 m thick, consist of three sedimentary units, which comprise transgressive and highstand systems tracts deposited after the last glacial period. The transgressive systems tract includes two units (I and II) separated by a ravinement surface (RS). The lower Unit I, lying below the RS, consists of estuarine sediments left behind by shoreface erosion during transgression, and represents a paralic component. The upper Unit II, including two sub-units (IIa and IIb), lies above the RS and consists of sand produced by shoreface erosion during landward transgression, which corresponds to a marine component. The uppermost Unit III lies above the maximum flooding surface and consists of thick mud clinoforms of the modern Nakdong and Seomjin subaqueous deltas. This unit likely formed during the recent sea level highstand and represents the highstand systems tract.

  1. High resolution sedimentary record of dinoflagellate cysts reflects decadal variability and 20th century warming in the Santa Barbara Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringué, Manuel; Pospelova, Vera; Field, David B.

    2014-12-01

    We present a continuous record of dinoflagellate cysts from a core of laminated sediments collected in the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB), off Southern California. The core spans the last ∼260 years and is analysed at biennial (two-year) resolution. Variations in dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are compared with 20th century historical changes, and are used to examine changes in primary productivity and species composition, which are bound to the variability in upwelling and sea-surface temperature (SST) in the region. Cysts produced by heterotrophic dinoflagellates dominate the assemblages. In particular, Brigantedinium spp. (on average 64.2% of the assemblages) are commonly associated with high levels of primary productivity, typically observed under active upwelling conditions, when nutrient supply is higher. Other heterotrophic taxa such as cysts of Protoperidinium americanum, Protoperidinium fukuyoi, Protoperidinium minutum and Archaeperidinium saanichi, all Echinidinium species, Quinquecuspis concreta and Selenopemphix undulata are more abundant in the early part of the record (∼1750s-1870s). These taxa are generally associated with high primary productivity and are observed predominantly during intervals marked by relatively variable conditions of SST, stratification and nutrient loading. The 20th century is marked by an increase in several species of autotrophic affinity, primarily Lingulodinium machaerophorum and Spiniferites ramosus. In recent surface sediments from the region, these species are more abundant in the Southern California Bight, and they are associated with conditions of relaxed upwelling in the SBB (typically observed during summer and fall), when SST is higher and nutrient supply is moderate. Their increasing concentrations since the early 20th century reflect warmer SST and possibly stronger stratification during the warmest season. Taken together, the changes in cyst assemblages provide further evidence that persistently warmer conditions

  2. A Synthesis of Local, Teleseismic, and Ambient Noise Data for High-Resolution Models of Seismic Structure in Western and Southeast Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. K.; Tkalcic, H.; Rawlinson, N.; Arroucau, P.; Reading, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Group and phase velocity maps of the Tasmanian and Western Australian lithosphere are obtained through the cross-correlation of seismic ambient noise recorded by temporary array deployments. Group velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves are calculated through an automated frequency-time (FTAN) procedure. Phase-matched filters are applied to the negative time derivative of the symmetric component of the cross-correlation of ambient noise between two stations. Phase velocity maps are derived from the far-field representation of the Green's functions, and the phase ambiguity is resolved through analysis of the observed phase move-out. Group and phase velocities are mapped using an iterative non-linear inversion technique, which smoothly interpolates velocities between a grid of nodes using cubic B-splines. 3-D shear wave velocity can be readily obtained from the phase velocity maps. Additional constraints from receiver functions have the potential to improve depth resolution. The southeast Australia dataset comes from the WOMBAT rolling seismic array project in Tasmania, which in the last decade has seen over 500 stations deployed. Here, we use the 40 station SETA array, which was deployed in southeast Tasmania during 2006 and 2007 and has a station spacing of just 20km. Group and phase velocity maps for this area reinforce results from previous wide-angle tomography studies and clearly discriminate between regions of hard rock and sediment. One of the prominent features of the maps is a pronounced low velocity lineation that coincides with the Tasman conductivity anomaly, a region of elevated conductivity and heat flow, which may reflect the presence of a lithospheric boundary. These methods were also applied to the 20 CAPRAL stations in western Australia. While station spacing is sparser in this case, the greater interstation distances enable longer period dispersion maps to be resolved. The final shear velocity crust models obtained through the joint

  3. Reflection seismic survey across a fault zone in the Leinetal Graben, Germany, using P- and SH-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musmann, P.; Polom, U.; Buness, H.; Thomas, R.

    2012-04-01

    Fault systems are considered as a valuable hydro-geothermal reservoir for heat and energy extraction, as permeability may be enhanced compared to the surrounding host rock. Seismic measurements are a well established tool to reveal their structure at depth. Apart from structural parameters like dip, extent and throw, they allow us to derive lithologic parameters, e.g. seismic velocities and impedance. Usually, only compressional waves have been used so far. In the context of the "gebo" Collaborative Research Program, seismic methods are revised to image and characterize geological fault zones in order to minimize the geological and technical risk for geothermal projects. In doing so, we evaluate and develop seismic acquisition, processing and interpretation techniques both for compressional and shear wave surveys to estimate the geothermal potential of fault zones. Here, we present results from high-resolution P- and SH-wave reflection seismic surveys along one and the same profile. They were carried out across the eastern border of the Leinetal Graben, Lower Saxony, Germany. At this survey site, primarily Triassic units crop out that are disrupted by major fault system probably extending down into Permian Zechstein. The seismic P-wave measurements (2.5 m CDP spacing, 20 - 180 Hz sweep sent out by a small vibrator) imaged the structure of the subsurface and its fault inventory with high resolution. Imaging ranges from approximately 50 m (base Keuper) to approximately 1.8 km (within Zechstein) depth. The profiles reveal that the area has undergone multiphase tectonics. This becomes manifest in a complex seismic reflection pattern. In addition the P-wave velocity model shows several features that can be related to folding and faulting. Preliminary results of the SH-wave measurements (0.5 m CDP spacing, 10 - 100 Hz sweep) show that the complex structural geological settings in the subsurface, as imaged by the P-wave survey, can also be imaged by a reflection shear

  4. Reflection seismic imaging of a hydraulically conductive fracture zone in a high noise area, Forsmark, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhlin, C.; Stephens, M. B.; Cosma, C.

    2007-05-01

    High resolution reflection seismic methods have proven to be useful tools for locating fracture zones in crystalline rock. Siting of potential high-level nuclear waste repositories is a particularly important application of these methods. By using small explosive sources (15-75 grams), high resolution images of the sub-surface have been obtained in the depth range 100 m to 2 km in Sweden, Canada and elsewhere. Although ambient noise conditions in areas such as the Fennoscandian and Canadian shields are generally low, industrial noise can be high in some areas, particularly at potential sites suitable for repositories, since these are often close to existing infrastructure. In addition, the presence of this infrastructure limits the choice of sources available to the geophysicist. Forsmark, located about 140 km north of Stockholm, is one such potential site where reflection seismics have been carried out. Existing infrastructure includes nuclear reactors for power generation and a low- level waste repository. In the vicinity of the reactors, it was not possible to use an explosive source due to permitting restrictions. Instead, a VIBSIST system consisting of a tractor mounted hydraulic hammer was used in the vicinity of the reactors. By repeatedly hitting the pavement, without breaking it, at predefined sweeps and then stacking the signals, shot records comparable to explosive data could be generated. These shot records were then processed using standard methods to produce stacked sections along 3 profiles within the reactor area. Clear reflections are seen in the uppermost 600 m along 3 of these profiles. Correlation of crossing profiles shows that the strongest reflection (B8) is generated by a gently east-southeast dipping interface. Prior to construction of the reactors, several boreholes were drilled to investigate the bedrock in the area. One of these boreholes was located close to where two of the profiles cross. Projection of the B8 reflection into the

  5. Investigation on the Combined Use of Ground Penetrating Radar, Cone Penetrometer and High Resolution Seismic Data for Near Surface and Vadose Zone Characterization in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyatt, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Cumbest, R.J.; Aadland, R.K.; Syms, F.H.; Stephenson, D.E.; Sherrill, J.C.

    1997-06-01

    This study compares data from Cone Penetrometer Tests (CPT), high resolution surface reflection seismic (HRS) data and ground penetrating radar (GPR) data in the upper 120 feet (40 meters) of the A/M Area, Upper Three Runs Watershed at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The CPT, GPR, and HRS data were obtained along the Silverton Road in the western sector of the A/M Area groundwater plume, and adjacent to Geophysical Correlation Boring {number_sign}1 (GCB-1). This location allows for multiple correlations to be made between the various data sources, and supports shallow investigations for near surface affects of the Crackerneck Fault, a major structural feature in the area. Borehole geophysical data from GCB-1 were used to provide subsurface constraints on the CPT, GPR, and HRS data. core data, natural gamma ray, spectral gamma data, multi-level induction resistivity, density and sonic data were utilized to distinguish clays, sands and silts. The CPT data provided tip bearing and sleeve stress, as an indicator of stratigraphy. Reflection seismic data provided continuous subsurface profiles of key marker horizons. Ground Penetrating Radar provided information on shallow subsurface geological features. Conclusions from this study suggest that there is a high degree of correlation between the CPT and borehole geophysical data, specifically, the Friction Ratio and gamma/spectral gamma curves. The Upland/Tobacco Road, Tobacco Road/Dry Branch, Dry Branch/Santee, Santee/Warley Hill and the Warley Hill/Congaree contacts are discernible. From these contacts it is possible to map structural relationships in the shallow subsurface that are tied to regional data. Because formation contacts are discernible, CPT, HRS, GPR, and geophysical log intra-formational anomalies are mappable. These features allow for stratigraphic and facies mapping using the GPR and HRS data for continuity and the CPT and geophysical data for lithofacies analysis. It is possible to use the

  6. Thrust fault growth within accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, H.; Bell, R. E.; Jackson, C. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. Previous studies have reported en-echelon thrust fault geometries from the NW part of the dataset, and have related this complex structure to seamount subduction. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. We also demonstrate that the majority of faults grew upward from the décollement, although there is some evidence for downward fault propagation. Our observations

  7. Marine deep seismic reflection profiles off central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, J. (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (USA) Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX (USA)); Talwani, M. (Rice Univ. Houston, TX (USA) Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX (USA))

    1991-04-10

    A strong reflection horizon at two-way travel time of approximately 6 s is observed in a deep seismic profile across the outer continental shelf of central California. It is interpreted as the seismic image of subducted oceanic crust emplaced prior to the change from principally convergent to principally transcurrent motion between the Pacific and North American plates during the late Paleogene. The reflector dips landward at a very shallow angle and is at a depth of 14-15 km under Santa Lucia Bank. The reflection is not observed, or at best is very discontinuous, under the inner shelf (Santa Maria Basin). This suggests that tectonic or other processes have produced significantly different structural styles or compositions on the two sides of the Santa Lucia Bank fault. Under the outer shelf a prominent, apparently deeper (later arrival time) horizon dips more steeply and diverges from the 6-s reflector. The deep horizon is at least partially composed of diffracted energy but is nearly linear after migration. Possible interpretations are that the horizon indicates crustal imbrication or out-of-plane diffractions. Alternatively, it is a relict feature imparted to the crust at the now inactive Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge. Reflective zones at intermediate depths are observed in apparently accreted sediments in parts of the Santa Lucia and Santa Maria basins. These features could represent tectonically induced fabrics within the accretionary complex, or they could be coherent depositional sequences.

  8. Characterization of the Vajont landslide (North-Eastern Italy) by means of reflection and surface wave seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Lorenzo; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of the disastrous Vajont rockslide (North-Eastern Italy, October 9, 1963) have been studied in great detail over the past five decades. Nevertheless, the reconstruction of the rockslide dynamics still presents several uncertainties, including those related to the accurate estimation of the actual landslide mass. This work presents the results of a geophysical characterization of the Vajont landslide body in terms of material properties and buried geometry. Both aspects add new information to the existing dataset and will help a better understanding of the rockslide failure mechanisms and dynamics. In addition, some general considerations concerning the intricacies of landslide characterization can be drawn, with due attention to potential pitfalls. The employed techniques are: (i) high resolution P-wave reflection, (ii) high resolution SH-wave reflection, (iii) controlled source surface wave analysis. We adopted as a seismic source a vibrator both for P waves and SH waves, using vertical and horizontal geophones respectively. For the surface wave seismic survey we used a heavy drop-weight source and low frequency receivers. Despite the high noise level caused by the fractured conditions of the large rock body, a common situation in landslide studies, we managed to achieve a satisfying imaging quality of the landslide structure thanks to the large number of active channels, the short receiver interval and the test of appropriate seismic sources. The joint use of different seismic techniques help focus the investigation on the rock mass mechanical properties. Results are in good agreement with the available borehole data, the geological sections and the mechanical properties of the rockmass estimated by other studies. In general the proposed approach is likely to be applicable successfully to similar situations where scattering and other noise sources are a typical bottleneck to geophysical data acquisition on landslide bodies.

  9. 岫岩陨石撞击坑结构高精度地震探测研究%High-resolution seismic exploration of Xiuyan impact crater structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵成彬; 刘明军; 樊计昌; 姬计法; 郭新景; 李春周; 杨利普

    2011-01-01

    The Xiuyan impact crater with a rim-rim diameter of 1. 8 km is located at northern hills in the Liaodong peninsula, Liaoning province, China. It is reserved well and confirmed to be a meteorite impact crater. A special geophysical field resulted from the meteorite impact and subsequent deposit at the crater makes different medium velocity and density between inside and outside of the crater. In the project, velocity structures, stratum structures and whole configuration of the crater are gotten using the differences of seismic velocity and wave impedance from the combined exploration of reflection and refraction. Based on the reflection features, the crater body formed by the direct impact has a diameter about 1. 8 km, and a depth about 800 m, and the depth affected by the impact is about 1. 4 km. The crater structure is divided into 3 parts, slow deposit area, rapid deposit area and affected area. According to the seismic velocity features, the velocity at the crater center where the depth is 800 m reaches 7. 0 km/s, the isoline of 7. 0 km/s is consistent with the crater configuration, but the velocity reached 7. 0 km/s at the depth of 500~600 m in the edge of the crater. The structure of the crater body and the physical property of rocks confirm further the Xiuyan crater origin from meteorite impact.%我国的岫岩陨石撞击坑位于辽东半岛北部低山丘陵地区,直径1.8 km,保存完好,已被多方面的证据证实为陨石撞击坑.陨石的撞击和此后的沉积作用在坑内形成了特殊的地球物理场,使坑内与坑外的介质在速度、密度等方面存在差异.本次通过采用反射和折射地震相结合的探测方法,利用陨石撞击所形成的岩石的地震波速度和波阻抗差异,获得了陨石坑的速度结构、地层结构和整体形态.根据地层反射特征,直接撞击形成的区域为直径约1.8 km、深度800 m左右的坑体;受撞击影响的深度约1.4 km.撞击坑的结构分为慢速沉积

  10. Repair, Evaluation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation Research Program. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Investigations at Beaver Dam, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    Commander and Director of WES during the preparation of this report was LTC Jack R. Stephens, EN. Technical Director was Dr. Robert W. Whalin. L1...wts u : tovoFew TS% 0111 nill sau am <~a eel:v ,*S lamin m PA.6 WIU 11501= S at WEWS 3:AN to~a Sa. w1s 6n oQUALI TY CONTROL 12111Wilt Cog oup.06 FINKS

  11. 1D Seismic reflection technique to increase depth information in surface seismic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilletti, Stefano; Fiera, Francesco; Umberto Pacini, Lando; Perini, Massimiliano; Prosperi, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    1D seismic methods, such as MASW Re.Mi. and HVSR, have been extensively used in engineering investigations, bedrock research, Vs profile and to some extent for hydrologic applications, during the past 20 years. Recent advances in equipment, sound sources and computer interpretation techniques, make 1D seismic methods highly effective in shallow subsoil modeling. Classical 1D seismic surveys allows economical collection of subsurface data however they fail to return accurate information for depths greater than 50 meters. Using a particular acquisition technique it is possible to collect data that can be quickly processed through reflection technique in order to obtain more accurate velocity information in depth. Furthermore, data processing returns a narrow stratigraphic section, alongside the 1D velocity model, where lithological boundaries are represented. This work will show how collect a single-CMP to determine: (1) depth of bedrock; (2) gravel layers in clayey domains; (3) accurate Vs profile. Seismic traces was processed by means a new software developed in collaboration with SARA electronics instruments S.r.l company, Perugia - ITALY. This software has the great advantage of being able to be used directly in the field in order to reduce the times elapsing between acquisition and processing.

  12. 2D seismic reflection tomography in strongly anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangnan; Zhou, Bing; Li, Hongxi; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zelin

    2014-12-01

    Seismic traveltime tomography is an effective method to reconstruct underground anisotropic parameters. Currently, most anisotropic tomographic methods were developed under the assumption of weak anisotropy. The tomographic method proposed here can be implemented for imaging subsurface targets in strongly anisotropic media with a known tilted symmetry axis, since the adopted ray tracing method is suitable for anisotropic media with arbitrary degree. There are three kinds of reflection waves (qP, qSV and qSH waves) that were separately used to invert the blocky abnormal body model. The reflection traveltime tomographiy is developed here because a surface observation system is the most economical and practical way compared with crosswell and VSP. The numerical examples show that the traveltimes of qP reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}13},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully. Traveltimes of qSV reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully, with the exception of the {{c}13}, since it is less sensitive than other parameters. Traveltimes of qSH reflection wave also have inverted parameters {{c}44} \\text{and} {{c}66} successfully. In addition, we find that the velocity sensitivity functions (derivatives of phase velocity with respect to elastic moduli parameters) and raypath illuminating angles have a great influence on the qualities of tomograms according to the inversion of theoretical models. Finally, the numerical examples confirm that the reflection traveltime tomography can be applied to invert strongly anisotropic models.

  13. Derivation of Land Surface Albedo at High Resolution by Combining HJ-1A/B Reflectance Observations with MODIS BRDF Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Land surface albedo is an essential parameter for monitoring global/regional climate and land surface energy balance. Although many studies have been conducted on global or regional land surface albedo using various remote sensing data over the past few decades, land surface albedo product with a high spatio–temporal resolution is currently very scarce. This paper proposes a method for deriving land surface albedo with a high spatio–temporal resolution (space: 30 m and time: 2–4 days. The proposed method works by combining the land surface reflectance data at 30 m spatial resolution obtained from the charge-coupled devices in the Huanjing-1A and -1B (HJ-1A/B satellites with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS land surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF parameters product (MCD43A1, which is at a spatial resolution of 500 m. First, the land surface BRDF parameters for HJ-1A/B land surface reflectance with a spatial–temporal resolutions of 30 m and 2–4 day are calculated on the basis of the prior knowledge from the MODIS BRDF product; then, the calculated high resolution BRDF parameters are integrated over the illuminating/viewing hemisphere to produce the white- and black-sky albedos at 30 m resolution. These results form the basis for the final land surface albedo derivation by accounting for the proportion of direct and diffuse solar radiation arriving at the ground. The albedo retrieved by this novel method is compared with MODIS land surface albedo products, as well as with ground measurements. The results show that the derived land surface albedo during the growing season of 2012 generally achieved a mean absolute accuracy of ±0.044, and a root mean square error of 0.039, confirming the effectiveness of the newly proposed method.

  14. 3D Seismic Reflection Experiment over the Galicia Deep Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D. S.; Jordan, B.; Reston, T. J.; Minshull, T. A.; Klaeschen, D.; Ranero, C.; Shillington, D. J.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    In June thru September, 2013, a 3D reflection and a long offset seismic experiment were conducted at the Galicia rifted margin by investigators from the US, UK, Germany, and Spain. The 3D multichannel experiment covered 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2), using the RV Marcus Langseth. Four streamers 6 km long were deployed at 12.5 m hydrophone channel spacing. The streamers were 200 m apart. Two airgun arrays, each 3300 cu in, were fired alternately every 37.5 m, to collectively yield a 400 m wide sail line consisting of 8 CMP lines at 50 m spacing. The long offset seismic experiment included 72 short period OBS's deployed below the 3D reflection survey box. Most of the instruments recorded all the shots from the airgun array shots. The 3D seismic box covered a variety of geologic features. The Peridotite Ridge (PR), is associated with the exhumation of upper mantle rocks to the seafloor during the final stage of the continental separation between the Galicia Bank and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The S reflector is present below most of the continental blocks under the deep Galicia basin. S is interpreted to be a low-angle detachment fault formed late in the rifting process, and a number of rotated fault block basins and ranges containing pre and syn-rift sediments. Initial observations from stacked 3D seismic data, and samples of 2D pre-stack time migrated (PSTM) 3D seismic data show that the PR is elevated above the present seafloor in the South and not exposed through the seafloor in the North. The relative smoothness of the PR surface for the entire 20 km N-S contrasts with the more complex, shorter wavelength, faulting of the continental crustal blocks to the east. The PR does not seem to show offsets or any apparent internal structure. The PSTM dip lines show substantial improvement for the structures in the deep sedimentary basin East of the PR. These seem to extend the S reflector somewhat farther to the West. The migrated data show a substantial network of

  15. Evolution of a high-latitude sediment drift inside a glacially-carved trough based on high-resolution seismic stratigraphy (Kveithola, NW Barents Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebesco, Michele; Özmaral, Asli; Urgeles, Roger; Accettella, Daniela; Lucchi, Renata G.; Rüther, Denise; Winsborrow, Monica; Llopart, Jaume; Caburlotto, Andrea; Lantzsch, Hendrik; Hanebuth, Till J. J.

    2016-09-01

    Kveithola is a glacially-carved, E-W trending trough located in the NW Barents Sea, an epicontinental shelf sea of the Arctic Ocean located off northern Norway and Russia. A set of confined sediment drifts (the "Kveithola Drift") is located in the inner part of the trough. In general, drift deposits are commonly characterized by high lateral continuity, restricted occurrence of hiatuses and relatively high accumulation rates, and thus represent excellent repositories of paleo-environmental information. We provide for the first time a detailed morphological and seismostratigraphic insight into this sediment drift, which is further supported by some preliminary lithological and sedimentological analyses. The complex morphology of the drift, imaged by combining all available multibeam data, includes a main and a minor drift body, two drift lenses in the outer part of the trough, more or less connected drift patches in the innermost part and small perched sediment patches in a structurally-controlled channel to the north. The seismic (PARASOUND) data show that the main and minor drift bodies are mainly well-stratified, characterized by sub-parallel reflections of moderate to high amplitude and good lateral continuity. The reflectors show an abrupt pinch-out on the northern edge where a distinct moat is present, and a gradual tapering to the south. Internally we identify the base of the drift and four internal horizons, which we correlate throughout the drift. Two units display high amplitude reflectors, marked lensoidal character and restricted lateral extent, suggesting the occurrence of more energetic sedimentary conditions. Facies typical for contourite deposition are found in the sediment cores, with strongly bioturbated sediments and abundant silty/sandy mottles that contain shell fragments. These characteristics, along with the morphological and seismic information, suggest a strong control by a bottom current flowing along the moat on the northern edge of the

  16. Shallow Seismic Reflection Survey at Garner Valley Digital Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Z. S.; Brackman, T. B.; Bodin, P.; Stephenson, W. J.; Steidl, J. H.; Gomberg, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Garner Valley Digital Array (GVDA) site is a NEES-sponsored facility in a small, sediment-filled, intermountain valley in Southern California, established for the purpose of investigating ground motion site response and soil-structure interaction, in situ. The site has been well-characterized geotechnically, and is thoroughly instrumented with both surface and downhole instrumentation of various types. Nevertheless, a borehole recently drilled into lake bed sediments and deeply weathered granitic rocks that comprise the valley fill at GVDA encountered hard, unweathered bedrock at an unexpected depth, suggesting an apparent 38 meter offset in the unweathered bedrock between two wells 40 meters apart. The apparent offset can be most easily explained either by faulting, or as a buried erosional surface. The Hot Springs fault, a strand of the San Jacinto fault zone, runs through Garner Valley, although its inferred location is several hundred meters east of GVDA. To better characterize the subsurface strata, particularly the existence and configuration of faulting that may disturb them; we conducted a 120-meter long, 12-fold shallow seismic reflection common midpoint (CMP) survey at GVDA using a 24-channel seismograph, vertical 4.5 Hz geophones at 2-meter intervals and a sledgehammer seismic source. Preliminary processing reveals strong refractors and surface waves that may mask reflections, although reflections are visible in some raw shot records. Semi-continuous reflections seen in the CMP section from a shallow reflector may coincide with the water table. There are also deeper, discontinuous reflectors obscured by bands of coherent noise. We plan to present a fully migrated and interpreted CMP record section.

  17. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments - laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Buddensiek, M.-L.; Oncken, O.; Kukowski, N.

    2012-10-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezo-electric transducers used here the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads). Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0-1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and being applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of very good quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and fault traces from shear zones. Since these can be regarded in sandbox models as zones of decompaction, they behave as reflectors and can be imaged. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here improves the quality with respect to S/N-ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth penetration in glass bead layers thereby amounts to 5 cm. Thus, the presented mini-seismic device is

  18. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments – laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kukowski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezo-electric transducers used here the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads. Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0–1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and being applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of very good quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and fault traces from shear zones. Since these can be regarded in sandbox models as zones of decompaction, they behave as reflectors and can be imaged. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here improves the quality with respect to S/N-ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth penetration in glass bead layers thereby amounts to 5 cm. Thus, the presented mini-seismic

  19. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments - laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Buddensiek, M.-L.; Oncken, O.; Kukowski, N.

    2013-02-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezoelectric transducers used here for the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first 2-D experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads). Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0-1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and is applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of high quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and indications of the fault traces from shear zones. Since these were artificially introduced in our test models, they can be regarded as zones of disturbance rather than tectonic shear zones characterized by decompaction. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here, improves the quality with respect to S / N ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth penetration in glass

  20. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments – laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Krawczyk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezoelectric transducers used here for the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first 2-D experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads. Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0–1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and is applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of high quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and indications of the fault traces from shear zones. Since these were artificially introduced in our test models, they can be regarded as zones of disturbance rather than tectonic shear zones characterized by decompaction. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here, improves the quality with respect to S / N ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth

  1. Improved Dead Sea sinkhole site characterization at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, based on repeated shear wave reflection seismic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    In October 2014 a high-resolution shallow shear wave reflection seismic survey was carried out at the Dead Sea sinkhole site Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan. It extended a survey undertaken in 2013, also in order to gather time-lapse profiles. In the framework of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association and international partners, this investigation is part of a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ. At the investigation site, characterized by alluvial fan deposits, ongoing subsidence and sinkhole processes in the subsurface create massive reshaping of farming areas, including the destruction of housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure. The sinkhole hazard at the Dead Sea is significant, since similar processes are observed at several coastal segments of the Dead Sea. The new survey (in total 2.1 profile km) was targeted to improve the knowledge about the subsurface structures and to confine the results of the initial survey (1.8 km profile km), with respect to the presence or non-presence of a massive salt layer proposed at nearly 40 m depth. This salt layer is the central part of a widely established process hypothesis to generate shallow cavities by salt subrosion, which subsequently collapse to sinkholes at the surface. Results of the initial survey carried out in 2013 highlighted a new process hypothesis of subsurface mass transport by Dead Sea mud mobilization enclosed in the alluvial fan, so that an extended survey was undertaken in 2014. This, indeed, confirmed that there are no reflection seismic signal responses that would be expected to occur in the presence of a massive salt layer. Since evaluation of both hypothesis by new drilling could not be carried out due to safety reasons and permissions, it remained unclear which hypothesis is valid for the investigation site. However, we combined the 2013 and 2014 reflection seismic profiles and the

  2. Seismic tomography and ambient noise reflection interferometry on Reykjanes, SW Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Verdel, Arie; Ágústsson, Kristján; Blanck, Hanna; Franke, Steven; Metz, Malte; Ryberg, Trond; Weemstra, Cornelius; Hersir, Gylfi; Bruhn, David

    2016-04-01

    approximated by auto-correlating and stacking station ambient noise data for long periods of time. With few assumptions, single-station auto-correlations provide, underneath the station locations, local 1D high-resolution structural acoustic-contrast versus depth information. By applying the method to all network stations, a sparse map can thus be made of dominant zero-offset P-wave reflectivity in the upper few kilometres of the Reykjanes area. A logical further extension of this approach is to perform cross-correlation of all station-pairs in this seismometer network. In order to improve the lateral resolution of the subsurface structure, identifying non-zero-offset reflectivity in the pre-stack virtual source cross-correlation panels provides the opportunity to obtain subsurface reflectivity versus depth point information at locations in-between the seismic station positions. Time-lapse variations in these subsurface reflectivity can be studied by computing the correlations in different, but extended, time periods. We present results of the here described methods on optimized station network data. We show that the application of ambient noise interferometry for reflection retrieval and comparison of the herewith obtained results with those from applying both classical and noise tomography methods reduces uncertainties in, for geothermal exploitation, relevant subsurface parameters. In particular it increases the spatial resolution of subsurface images as compared to tomographic imaging results.

  3. The Crustal Structure of the Central Iberian Zone form the ALCUDIA Deep Seismic Reflection transect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, D.

    2009-04-01

    The ALCUDIA transect is a 250 km long, vertical incidence Vibroseis seismic reflection profile acquired in 2007. It extends IBERSEIS transect to the N and NE imaging from within the Ossa Morena Zone (OMZ) to the Central Iberian Zone (CIZ) from 20 km south of Fuenteovejuna in the S to Toledo in the N. The southern part of the transect samples the suture zone between the OMZ and the CIZ. It continues in a N-NE direction crossing the Pedroches batholith and a series of relatively long wavelength synclinal structures limited by sub-vertical and relatively narrow folds (e.g. the Almaden syncline, the Alcudia anticline). Lower Paleozoic quartzites and slates cover most of these synclynal structures. Farther to the N, the profile crosses several major faults system (e.g Santa Elena and Toledo) . The acquisition parameters, 35 m station spacing, 70 m VP spacing resulted in a 60-90 fold high resolution seismic reflection image. A 20 s long Vibroseis sweep with frequencies between 8-120 Hz was recorded by a 400 station recording cable a long a 14 km long split spread configuration. The new processing sequence significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio. It includes: crooked line geometry, geometrical divergence corrections, elevation statics, surface-wave attenuation, surface consistent zero-phase spiking deconvolution, time-variant band pass filtering., refraction and residual static corrections velocity analysis, NMO, surface consistent amplitude balancing, CMP stacking F-X deconvolution. The seismic image reveals the geometry of the suture between the OMZ and the CIZ. This is a reworked transpression suture (the Badajoz-Cordoba Sherar zone) includes the Central Unit (CU) as a north dipping wedge structure limited by two bands of reflectors that reach the middle crust (5 s twtt). This CU includes amphibolites with some oceanic affinity, orthogneisses, paragneisses, schists and minor amounts of peridotites. To the north the upper crust shows a moderate reflectivity

  4. Assessment of climatic and seismic cycles in southern chile from high resolution XRF and magnetic susceptibility measurements of historic lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, X.; Hubert-Ferrari, A.; Fagel, N.

    2006-12-01

    The high-resolution sedimentological studies performed on the sediment cores collected in the oceans or in the lakes constitutes the basis for inter-comparison of past climate variability. Among the new high-resolution approaches, the X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis of varved marine and lacustrine cores represents some of the best resolution. These data are particularly useful for tracking short-term climate changes expressed with calibrated time scales. However, the XRF results obtain on the fresh cores surface may be of low resolution because the core material is wet and unconsolidated. One particularly attractive method to solve this problem consists of impregnating the sediment cores with polymers in order to polish the core surface for XRF analyses. This step is essential for being able to get significant XRF and Magnetic Susceptibility (MS) results in the muddy cores. Since the 1960s, the evolution of sediment impregnation methods has been strongly linked to the development of innovative techniques (e.g., sampling devices, cryogenic and vacuum technologies, polymers, etc.). In this communication, we first propose a revised method that may be applied to prepare sediment cores for high-resolution XRF and MS data acquisition. Then we show an example of XRF and MS results obtain on laminated lake sediments from South America (Lago Puyehue, 40°S). As this area is very sensitive in terms of precipitation change (i.e., Southern Westerlies); the XRF data are compared with the regional instrumental precipitation database. The results are discussed in terms of climate and sismo- tectonic impacts over historic times. Our results shows that, in order to better interpret XRF tool over long sequences, the measurements should be first "calibrated" according to instrumental data such as precipitation, temperatures, and earthquake magnitudes.

  5. Forward modeling to improve seismic reflection energy of a protective coal seam based on Zoeppritz equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Wen-peng; DONG Shou-hua; LI Yang

    2008-01-01

    In seismic exploration for coal, seismic waves are very difficult to transmit downward because of high velocity protec-tive layers, making the reflection information very hard to receive above ground. Based on the Snell law and the Zoeppritz equation, we studied the relationship between the incidence angle and reflection seismic wave energy using a forward model of level media. The result shows that the seismic wave energy has a sudden increase at the critical angle. Based on the energy propagation rule, using big offset to receive the seismic wave energy under a protective layer can effectively reduce its protection effect.

  6. Seismic Shear Energy Reflection By Radon-Fourier Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Umairia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic waves split in an anisotropic medium, instead of rotating horizontal component to principal direction, Radon-Fourier is derived to observe the signature of shear wave reflection. Synthetic model with fracture is built and discretized using finite difference scheme for spatial and time domain. Common depth point (CDP with single shot gives traces and automatic gain is preprocessed before Radon Transform (RT, a filtering technique gives radon domain. It makes easier to observe fractures at specific incidence and improves its quality in some way by removing the noise. A comparison of synthetic data and BF-data is performed on the basis of root means square error (RMS values. The RMS error is minimum at the 10th trace in radon domain.

  7. Crustal deformation styles along the reprocessed deep seismic reflection transect of the Central Iberian Zone (Iberian Peninsula)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsan, Siddique Akhtar; Carbonell, Ramon; Ayarza, Puy; Martí, David; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Martínez-Poyatos, David Jesús; Simancas, Jose Fernando; Azor, Antonio; Mansilla, Luis

    2014-05-01

    The multichannel normal incidence (230 km long) deep seismic reflection profile ALCUDIA was acquired in summer 2007. This transect samples an intracontinental Variscan orogenic crust going across, from north to south, the major crustal domain (the Central Iberian Zone) and its suture zone with the Ossa-Morena Zone (the Central Unit) both build up most of the southwestern part of the Iberian Peninsula basement. This high resolution (60-90 fold) profile images about 70 km depth (20 s TWTT) of the continental lithosphere. A new data processing flow provides better structural constraints on the shallow and deep structures resulting in an image that reveals indentation features which strongly suggest horizontal tectonics. The ALCUDIA seismic image shows an upper crust c. 13 km thick decoupled from the comparatively reflective lower crust. The shallow reflectivity of the upper crust can be correlated with surface geological features mapped in the field whereas the deep reflectivity represents inferred imbricate thrust systems and listric extensional faults. The reflectivity of the mid-lower crust is continuous, high amplitude, and horizontal to arcuate though evidences of deformation are present as ductile boudinage structures, thrusting and an upper mantle wedge, suggesting a transpressional flower structure. The image reveals a laminated c. 1.5 km thick, subhorizontal to flat Moho indicating an average crustal thickness of 31-33 km. The Moho shows laterally variable signature, being highly reflective beneath the Central Iberian Zone, but discontinuous and diffuse below the Ossa-Morena Zone. The gravity response suggests relatively high density bodies in the mid-lower crust of the southern half of the transect. The seismic results suggest two major horizontal limits, a horizontal discontinuity at c. 13-15 km (corresponding to the brittle-ductile transition) and the Moho boundary both suggested to act as decoupling surfaces.

  8. An asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a permeable layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Goloshubin, G.

    2009-10-15

    Analysis of compression wave propagation in a poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection from a high-permeability layer in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of Biot's model of poroelasticity. A review of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and Darcy's law suggests an alternative new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The absolute value of this parameter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility and the wave frequency. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). Practical applications of the obtained asymptotic formulae are seismic modeling, inversion, and at-tribute analysis.

  9. Thrust fault segmentation and downward fault propagation in accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Haydn; Bell, Rebecca; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. Although we often assume imbricate faults are likely to have propagated upwards from the décollement we show strong evidence for fault nucleation at shallow depths and downward propagation to intersect the décollement. The complex fault interactions documented here have implications for hydraulic compartmentalisation and pore

  10. Classification of earthquake site effects by shallow reflection seismics using a shear-wave land-streamer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, U.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, S.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    Touched in the SW by the Great Sumatra Fault, the densely populated delta of the Krueng Aceh River consists mainly of young alluvial sediments of clay, sand and gravel with partially high organic content. The depth of this sediment body and its internal structure are widely unknown. Whereas traditional timber constructed buildings are mostly unaffected by strong earthquakes, the change to concrete building techniques added a significant new and locally unknown seismic risk in this region. The classification of earthquake site effects in the city of Banda Aceh and the surrounding region of Aceh Besar was the aim of a high-resolution shear-wave reflection seismic survey in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. In cooperation with the Government of Indonesia and local counterparts, this was part of the Project "Management of Georisk" of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources. Using shear-wave reflection seismics in combination with a land streamer has proven to be an enormously useful method in the sedimentary regions of the Aceh province with an easy and fast recording operation. In addition, the specialized seismic system accounts for compacted soil surfaces which allows a wide range of applications within cities, industrial sites, paved roads and also on small dirt roads. Using a vibrator seismic source, this technique was applied successfully also in areas of high building density in the city of Banda Aceh or in the surrounding mostly agricultural environment. Combined with standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests, it was possible to evaluate the soil stiffness in populated urban areas down to 100 m depth in terms of the IBC2003. This is important for the exploration of new areas for save building foundation and groundwater aquifer detection in the tsunami-flooded region.

  11. Urban shear-wave reflection seismics: Reconstruction support by combined shallow seismic and engineering geology investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, U.; Guenther, A.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, P.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    After the big 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the massive reconstruction activities in the Aceh province (Northern Sumatra) were promoted by the Republic of Indonesia and the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The aims of the project MANGEONAD (Management of Georisk Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam). are to establish geoscientific on the ground support for a sustainable development and management of save building constructions, lifelines, infrastructure and also natural resources. Therefore, shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in close combination to engineering geology investigations in the period between 2005-2009 since depth and internal structure of the Krueng Aceh River delta (mainly young alluvial sediments) were widely unknown. Due to the requirements in the densely populated Banda Aceh region, lacking also traffic infrastructure, a small and lightweight engineering seismic setup of high mobility and high subsurface resolution capability was chosen. The S-wave land streamer system with 48 channels was applied successfully together with the ELVIS vibratory source using S- and P-waves on paved roads within the city of Banda Aceh. The performance of the S-wave system enabled the detailed seismic investigation of the shallow subsurface down to 50-150 m depth generating shaking frequencies between 20 Hz to 200 Hz. This also provides depth information extending the maximum depths of boreholes and Standard Penetrometer Testings (SPT), which could only be applied to max. 20 m depth. To integrate the results gained from all three methods, and further to provide a fast statistical analysis tool for engineering use, the Information System Engineering Geology (ISEG, BGR) was developed. This geospatial information tool includes the seismic data, all borehole information, geotechnical SPT and laboratory results from samples available in the investigation area. Thereby, the geotechnical 3D analysis of the subsurface units is enabled. The

  12. The flat to normal subduction transition study to obtain the Nazca plate morphology using high resolution seismicity data from the Nazca plate in Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacif, Silvina; Triep, Enrique G.; Spagnotto, Silvana L.; Aragon, Eugenio; Furlani, Renzo; Álvarez, Orlando

    2015-08-01

    Data from 45 seismological stations mostly temporary were used to obtain an accurate data set of intraslab seismicity of the Nazca subducted plate between 33°S and 35°S. The interest zone located in the transition section where the Nazca plate changes from flat slab north of ~ 33° to normal slab south of that latitude. In addition, the study region is located where the active volcanic arc appears. From a set of earthquakes which were relocated using a grid-search multiple events algorithm we obtained the plate geometry from latitudes of 33°S to 34.5°S and from 60 km to 120 km in depth. The obtained morphology shows notable similarity in its structure to Maipo Orocline revealing some possible strong connection between the overriding plate and the subducting plate. We suggest that the subducted plate at the trench has been deformed in its shape consistently with the Maipo Orocline pattern and its deformation is observed below the interface zone. Our results are consistent with van Keken et al., 2011 models, and based on this the seismicity located between 70 and 120 km is probably related with dehydration processes rather than mechanical processes. From our precise earthquake locations we observed a complete lack of intraslab seismicity below 120 km depth. This valuable finding can be used to better constrain thermal models for the subduction region of Central Chile.

  13. The damping of seismic waves and its determination from reflection seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, L.

    1979-01-01

    The damping in theoretical waveforms is described phenomenologically and a classification is proposed. A method for studying the Earth's crust was developed which includes this damping as derived from reflection seismograms. Seismic wave propagation by absorption, attenuation of seismic waves by scattering, and dispersion relations are considered. Absorption of seismic waves within the Earth as well as reflection and transmission of elastic waves seen through boundary layer absorption are also discussed.

  14. Seismic reflection profiles from offshore central California: evidence for post-Miocene imbricate thrust faulting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, J.K.; Bachman, S.

    1984-04-01

    High-resolution, 36-fold seismic reflection data with penetration to 3 sec have been collected recently in the northeastern offshore Santa Maria basin, the northern Santa Barbara Channel, and off Point Conception, California. These profiles reveal major east-over-west thrust in areas previously interpreted as being characterized by strike-slip faults and/or high-angle normal or reverse faults. Like those in well known foreland thrust belts, these faults typically from an imbricate system in which they curve asymptotically downward to a common basal sole thrust. ''Soling out'' generally occurs at depths of 1.5-3km (5000-10,000 ft). Detailed mapping of faults and folds associated with these thrust systems coupled with fault-plane solutions suggest that: these thrust formed within the last 5 m.y.,; many have modern activity; and compressive forces causing them are normal to the strike of the San Andreas fault. These observations agree with present-day plate motion studies which require that Pacific-North American relative plate motion include a component of compression orthogonal to the San Andreas fault. These overthrust regions are all sites of recent major petroleum discoveries. However, these discoveries have all been made on obvious anticlinal structures that generally are attributed to wrench tectonics. Recognition of thrust faulting in these areas may lead to additional discoveries from more subtle geologic traps associated with overthrusting.

  15. 3D reflection seismic imaging at the 2.5 km deep COSC-1 scientific borehole, central Scandinavian Caledonides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Peter; Almqvist, Bjarne; Berthet, Théo; Juhlin, Christopher; Buske, Stefan; Simon, Helge; Giese, Rüdiger; Krauß, Felix; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Alm, Per-Gunnar

    2016-10-01

    The 2.5 km deep scientific COSC-1 borehole (ICDP 5054-1-A) was successfully drilled with nearly complete core recovery during spring and summer of 2014. Downhole and on-core measurements through the targeted Lower Seve Nappe provide a comprehensive data set. An observed gradual increase in strain below 1700 m, with mica schists and intermittent mylonites increasing in frequency and thickness, is here interpreted as the basal thrust zone of the Lower Seve Nappe. This high strain zone was not fully penetrated at the total drilled depth and is thus greater than 800 m in thickness. To allow extrapolation of the results from downhole logging, core analysis and other experiments into the surrounding rock and to link these with the regional tectonic setting and evolution, three post-drilling high-resolution seismic experiments were conducted in and around the borehole. One of these, the first 3D seismic reflection land survey to target the nappe structures of the Scandinavian Caledonides, is presented here. It provides new information on the 3D geometry of structures both within the drilled Lower Seve Nappe and underlying rocks down to at least 9 km. The observed reflectivity correlates well with results from the core analysis and downhole logging, despite challenges in processing. Reflections from the uppermost part of the Lower Seve Nappe have limited lateral extent and varying dips, possibly related to mafic lenses or boudins of variable character within felsic rock. Reflections occurring within the high strain zone, however, are laterally continuous over distances of a kilometer or more and dip 10-15° towards the southeast. Reflections from structures beneath the high strain unit and the COSC-1 borehole can be followed through most of the seismic volume down to at least 9 km and have dips of varying degree, mainly in the east-west thrust direction of the orogen.

  16. Seismic Reflectivity Evolution Beneath Sakurajima Volcano, Japan, from 2009 through 2014, Revealed with Rounds of Controlled-source Seismic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, T.; Iguchi, M.; Tameguri, T.; Nakamichi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Evolution in seismic reflectivity is detected beneath an active volcano, Sakurajima Volcano, from 2009 through 2014 with using controlled seismic experiments . The reflectivity variation is interpreted to associate with discharging magma. Sakurajima Volcano is the target of this study, which is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan. Seven rounds of the seismic experiment with controlled sources have been conducted annually in the volcano. Two seismic reflection profiles tied up are obtained from the datasets under successful reproduction during rounds. Clear annual variation in seismic reflectivity at 6.2km depth is detected in the northeastern part of Sakurajima during the rounds. The reflectivity marked its maximum on December 2009 on the first intrusion of magma and decreased gradually until December 2013, which coincides with inflation and following deflation in Sakurajima Volcano. The active reflector at 6.2km depth occupies a part of embedded clear reflector. A sandwich structure is invoked as the reflector model. Intrusion of fresh and high temperature magma into the intermediate layer of the model and its decline explains the variation range of reflectivity successfully. Our study presents one of new approaches for sensing magma properties instantaneously and for monitoring active volcanoes.

  17. New Seismic Reflection Profiling Across the Northern Newark Basin USA: Data Acquisition and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymchak, M.; Collins, D.; Brown, C.; Conrad, J.; Papadeas, P.; Coueslan, M. L.; Tamulonis, K.; Goldberg, D.; Olsen, P. E.

    2011-12-01

    Deep saline formations in basins underlying major population centers represent opportunities for carbon (CO2) sequestration, but intensive surface development in such settings can hinder field operations to acquire geologic and geophysical data critical to effective characterization. Seismic-reflection is a tool that can be used to characterize basins and their potential capacity for carbon storage. The northern part of the Triassic-Jurassic Newark Rift Basin represents a potential storage opportunity for carbon as a result of its proximity to large-scale CO2 emitters; however, a lack of deep geologic and seismic data from this area has precluded evaluation of this basin to date. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Labs (NETL) Carbon Sequestration programs portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)- and NYSERDA-funded TriCarb Consortium for Carbon Sequestration basin characterization project, two new seismic-reflection profiles were acquired in the northern portion of the Newark Basin in Rockland County, NY and Bergen County NJ. This densely developed region, proximal to New York City, presents a variety of challenges for seismic surveys, including route selection and access, community acceptance, high traffic volumes and associated data noise, in addition to regulatory requirements and private property limitations. In spite of these challenges, two high-resolution, perpendicular lines were successfully surveyed in late March and early April, 2011; one dip line extending 21 km (13 mi) across most of the basin (east-west), and a shorter strike line extending 8 km (5 mi, north-south). The survey lines intersected near the location of a planned 8,000 ft stratigraphic borehole to be drilled by the TriCarb consortium. Three vibroseis trucks comprised the source array. Source points were spaced at 36.5 m (120-ft) intervals and geophone accelerometers collected data at a 3.05 m (10 ft) intervals. Seismic-reflection data

  18. High Resolution Elevation Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset contains contours generated from high resolution data sources such as LiDAR. Generally speaking this data is 2 foot or less contour interval.

  19. Gravity-mode period spacings as seismic diagnostic for a sample of gamma Doradus stars from Kepler space photometry and high-resolution ground-based spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Van Reeth, T; Aerts, C; Papics, P I; Triana, S A; Zwintz, K; Degroote, P; Debosscher, J; Bloemen, S; Schmid, V S; De Smedt, K; Fremat, Y; Fuentes, A S; Homan, W; Hrudkova, M; Karjalainen, R; Lombaert, R; Nemeth, P; Oestensen, R; Van De Steene, G; Vos, J; Raskin, G; Van Winckel, H

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Doradus stars (hereafter gamma Dor stars) are gravity-mode pulsators of spectral type A or F. Such modes probe the deep stellar interior, offering a detailed fingerprint of their structure. Four-year high-precision space-based Kepler photometry of gamma Dor stars has become available, allowing us to study these stars with unprecedented detail. We selected, analysed, and characterized a sample of 67 gamma Dor stars for which we have Kepler observations available. For all the targets in the sample we assembled high-resolution spectroscopy to confirm their F-type nature. We found fourteen binaries, among which four single-lined binaries, five double-lined binaries, two triple systems and three binaries with no detected radial velocity variations. We estimated the orbital parameters whenever possible. For the single stars and the single-lined binaries, fundamental parameter values were determined from spectroscopy. We searched for period spacing patterns in the photometric data and identified this diagnosti...

  20. Application of 3D reflection seismic methods to mineral exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urosevic, Milovan

    2013-04-01

    Seismic exploration for mineral deposits is often tested by excessively complex structures, regolith heterogeneity, intrinsically low signal to noise ratio, ground relief and accessibility. In brown fields, where the majority of the seismic surveys have been conducted, existing infrastructure, old pits and tailings, heavy machinery in operation, mine drainage and other mine related activities are further challenging the application of seismic methods and furthermore increasing its cost. It is therefore not surprising that the mining industry has been reluctant to use seismic methods, particularly 3D for mineral exploration, primarily due to the high cost, but also because of variable performance, and in some cases ambiguous interpretation results. However, shallow mineral reserves are becoming depleted and exploration is moving towards deeper targets. Seismic methods will be more important for deeper investigations and may become the primary exploration tool in the near future. The big issue is if we have an appropriate seismic "strategy" for exploration of deep, complex mineral reserves. From the existing case histories worldwide we know that massive ore deposits (VMS, VHMS) constitute the best case scenario for the application of 3D seismic. Direct targeting of massive ore bodies from seismic has been documented in several case histories. Sediment hosted deposits could, in some cases, can also produce a detectable seismic signature. Other deposit types such as IOCG and skarn are much more challenging for the application of seismic methods. The complexity of these deposits requires new thinking. Several 3D surveys acquired over different deposit types will be presented and discussed.

  1. Retrieval of the P wave reflectivity response from autocorrelation of seismic noise: Jakarta Basin, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil R.; Lumley, David

    2017-01-01

    We autocorrelate the continuously recorded seismic wavefield across a dense network of seismometers to map the P wave reflectivity response of the Jakarta Basin, Indonesia. The proximity of this mega city to known active faults and the subduction of the Australian plate, especially when the predominance of masonry construction and thick sedimentary basin fill are considered, suggests that it is a hot spot for seismic risk. In order to understand the type of ground motion that earthquakes might cause in the basin, it is essential to obtain reliable information on its seismic velocity structure. The body wave reflections are sensitive to the sharp velocity contrasts, which makes them useful in seismic imaging. Results show autocorrelograms at different seismic stations with reflected-wave travel time variations, which reflect the variation in basement depth across the thick sedimentary basin. We also confirm the validity of the observed autocorrelation waveforms by conducting a 2-D full waveform modeling.

  2. Minisparker seismic-reflection data of field activity S-5-09-SC: San Pedro Basin, offshore southern California from 2009-07-06 to 2009-07-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Conrad, James E.; Ryan, Holly F; Triezenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This dataset includes raw and processed, high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2009 to explore a possible connection between the San Diego Trough Fault and the San Pedro Basin Fault. The survey is in the San Pedro Basin between Santa Catalina Island and San Pedro, California. The data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. The seismic-reflection data were acquired using a SIG 2mille minisparker. Subbottom acoustic penetration spanned tens to several hundreds of meters, variable by location.

  3. Chirp seismic-reflection data of field activity S-5-09-SC: San Pedro Basin, offshore southern California from 2009-07-06 to 2009-07-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Conrad, James E.; Ryan, Holly F.; Triezenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This dataset includes raw and processed, high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2009 to explore a possible connection between the San Diego Trough Fault and the San Pedro Basin Fault. The survey is in the San Pedro Basin between Catalina Island and San Pedro, California. The data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. The seismic-reflection data were acquired using an Edgetech 512 Chirp subbottom profiling system. Subbottom acoustic penetration spanned tens to hundreds of meters, variable by location.

  4. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments – laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    OpenAIRE

    Kukowski, N.; Oncken, O.; M.-L. Buddensiek; C. M. Krawczyk

    2012-01-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezo-electric transducers used here the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox mo...

  5. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments – laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    OpenAIRE

    C. M. Krawczyk; Buddensiek, M.-L.; Oncken, O.; Kukowski, N.

    2013-01-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezoelectric transducers used here for the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale str...

  6. Sensitivity of Seismic Interferometry and Conventional Reflection Seismics at a Landfil to Processing and Survey Errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantaki, L.A.; Draganov, D.S.; Heimovaara, T.J.; Ghose, R.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how sensitive the seismic method is to errors that can occur during a seismic survey or during the processing of the seismic data is of high importance for any exploration geophysical project. Our aim is to image the subsurface of a landfill, which is typically a heterogeneous system

  7. TranSCorBe Project: A high-resolution seismic-passive profile to study the variation of the crustal and upper mantle structures under the Betic mountain ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, José; Martín, Rosa; Stich, Daniel; Heit, Benjamín; Yuan, Xiaohui; Mancilla, Flor; Benito, José; Carrion, Francisco; Serrano, Inmaculada; López-Comino, Jose Angel; Abreu, Rafael; Alguacil, Gerardo; Almendros, Javier; Carmona, Enrique; Ontiveros, Alfonso; García-Quiroga, Daniel; García-Jerez, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this project is to study the crustal and upper mantle structures under the Betic mountain ranges and their variations between the different geological domains. We deployed 50 broadband and short period seismic stations during 18 months following two profiles. We collect teleseismic events to perform a high-resolution P-to-S and S-to-P receiver function analysis. The main profile (TranSCorBe), of 160 km length, starts near the coast in Mazarrón (Murcia) and follows a NW-SE direction, crossing the Cazorla mountain range. It probes, from south to north, the Alboran domain (metamorphic rocks), the External zones (sedimentary rocks) and the Variscan terrains of the Iberian Massif. The spacing between stations is around 3-4 km. This inter-station distance allows us mapping with high accuracy the variations of the crust and upper mantle discontinuities in the Betic Range and their transition to the Iberian Massif. A second profile (HiRe II) with a larger spacing between seismic stations, is a continuation of a previously installed HiRe I profile, a NS profile starting near the Mediterranean coast in Adra (Almería) through Sierra Nevada Mountains. HiRe II profile prolongs HiRe I profile until the Variscan intersecting with TranSCorBe profile near Cazorla.

  8. Monitoring CO2 storage using seismic-interferometry ghost reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draganov, D.S.; Heller, H.K.J.; Ghose, R.

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic monitoring is a fundamental part in most monitoring programmes involving CO2 storage. Even though the seismic method has proven its applicability for monitoring, there are two major causes of uncertainty in the estimation of changes in the reservoir properties: non-repeatability o

  9. Archive of digitized analog boomer seismic reflection data collected during U.S. Geological Survey cruise Acadiana 87-2 in the northern Gulf of Mexico, June 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Stephen T.; Flocks, James G.; Forde, Arnell S.

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program has actively collected geophysical and sedimentological data in the northern Gulf of Mexico for several decades, including shallow subsurface data in the form of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles (HRSP). Prior to the mid-1990s most HRSP data were collected in analog format as paper rolls of continuous profiles up to 25 meters long. As part of the National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program, scientists at the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center are converting the analog paper records to digital format using a large-format continuous scanner. This data release serves as an archive of seismic profiles with headers, converted Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG-Y) files, navigation data, and trackline shapefiles for digitized boomer seismic data collected from the Research Vessel (R/V) Acadiana. The Acadiana 87-2 geophysical cruise included seismic data collected in the northern Gulf of Mexico, Chandeleur Sound, and Mississippi Sound from June 15-26, 1987. Data collection and processing methods are described in USGS Data Series 1047. Bosse, S.T., Flocks, J.G., Forde, A.S., 2017, Digitized analog boomer seismic-reflection data collected during U.S. Geological Survey cruises Erda 90-1_HC, Erda 90-1_PBP, and Erda 91-3 in Mississippi Sound, June 1990 and September 1991, U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1047, https://doi.org/10.3133/ds1047.

  10. High-frequency seismic radiation from Maule earthquake (Mw 8.8, 2010 February 27) inferred from high-resolution backprojection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, M.; Tilmann, F.; Krüger, F.; Ehlert, L.; Lange, D.

    2014-11-01

    The Maule earthquake (2010 February 27, Mw 8.8, Chile) broke the subduction megathrust along a previously locked segment. Based on an international aftershock deployment, catalogues of precisely located aftershocks have become available. Using 23 well-located aftershocks, we calibrate the classic teleseismic backprojection procedure to map the high-frequency seismic radiation emitted during the earthquake. The calibration corrects traveltimes in a standard earth model both with a static term specific to each station, and a `dynamic' term specific to each combination of grid point and station. The second term has been interpolated over the whole slipping area by kriging, and is about an order of magnitude smaller than the static term. This procedure ensures that the teleseismic images of rupture development are properly located with respect to aftershocks recorded with local networks and does not depend on accurate hypocentre location of the main shock. We track a bilateral rupture propagation lasting ˜160 s, with its dominant branch rupturing northeastwards at about 3 km s-1. The area of maximum energy emission is offset from the maximum coseismic slip but matches the zone where most plate interface aftershocks occur. Along dip, energy is preferentially released from two disconnected interface belts, and a distinct jump from the shallower belt to the deeper one is visible after about 20 s from the onset. However, both belts keep on being active until the end of the rupture. These belts approximately match the position of the interface aftershocks, which are split into two clusters of events at different depths, thus suggesting the existence of a repeated transition from stick-slip to creeping frictional regime.

  11. Reconstruction of the geology and structure of Lake Rotomahana and its hydrothermal systems from high-resolution multibeam mapping and seismic surveys: Effects of the 1886 Tarawera Rift eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, C. E. J.; Walker, S. L.; LeBlanc, C.; Davy, B. W.; Fornari, D. J.; Tontini, F. Caratori; Scott, B. J.; Seebeck, H.; Stewart, T. J.; Mazot, A.; Nicol, A.; Tivey, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Present-day Lake Rotomahana is one of the two focal points of the most destructive eruption in New Zealand's historical record, i.e., that of Mt. Tarawera on 10 June 1886, with devastating loss of life and presumed destruction of the iconic Pink and White Terraces that adorned the margins of the lake. Basaltic dikes are considered to have ascended near surface in the area, intruding into hydrothermally altered and water-saturated ground beneath the existing lake. The consequential hydrothermal and phreatomagmatic eruptions ejected 0.5325 km3 of material from the lakefloor and below, plastering the nearby landscape for several kilometers with mud and other debris. The eruption buried the natural outlet of the lake, with the bottom of the craters becoming filled by water within months and completely concealed from view within years; today Lake Rotomahana has depths up to 118 m. High-resolution (0.5 m) bathymetric mapping, when combined with a 2-D seismic reflection survey, enables us to 'see' details of the maar craters on the lakefloor, including those parts subsequently buried by sediment. The large Rotomahana Crater described by workers immediately after the eruption measures ~ 2.5 km in diameter near its southwestern end, and excavated ground to 155 m below present-day lake level. The vent system, as revealed by the present study, forms an array of right-stepping (dextral) craters, with the main crater being host to two sub-craters Rotomahana West Crater and Rotomahana East Crater today buried beneath the lakefloor, and which are in-filled by 36 and 37 m of sediment, respectively. Subordinate craters along the same 057° Tarawera Rift trace include Hochstetter Crater (11 m of infill), Waingongongongo Crater (14 m) and Rotomakariri Crater (26 m). These craters host a total 0.0268 km3 of sediment. Other features highlighted by the bathymetric data include; craters not filled by sediment, sediment fan deltas, volcanic ridges and dikes, submerged wave-cut terraces

  12. High-resolution headlamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  13. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Amundsen Sea - 1986-1987, SDLS CD-ROM vol 23

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1986-87 in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, by the Japan National Oil Corporation....

  14. Monte Carlo reservoir analysis combining seismic reflection data and informed priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zunino, Andrea; Mosegaard, Klaus; Lange, Katrine;

    2015-01-01

    Determination of a petroleum reservoir structure and rock bulk properties relies extensively on inference from reflection seismology. However, classic deterministic methods to invert seismic data for reservoir properties suffer from some limitations, among which are the difficulty of handling...

  15. 04TRKLN - Boomer Seismic Reflection Trackline data for USGS cruise 00SCC04

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Marine seismic reflection data are used to image and map sedimentary and structural features of the seafloor and subsurface. These data are useful in mapping...

  16. 02TRKLN - Boomer Seismic Reflection Trackline data for USGS cruise 00SCC02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Marine seismic reflection data are used to image and map sedimentary and structural features of the seafloor and subsurface. These data are useful in mapping...

  17. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Prydz Bay - 1984-1985, SDLS CD-ROM vol 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1984-85 in the Prydz Bay region, Antarctica, by the Japan National Oil...

  18. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Ross Sea 1987-1988, SDLS CD-ROM vol 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data from six lines recorded during 1988 in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  19. Worldwide Interpretive Reports for Marine Seismic-Reflection and Other Geophysical Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This file contains US Geological Survey Open File Reports for Marine Seismic-Reflection data. The majority of these data are available on mylar/black line full-size...

  20. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Wilkes Land 1982, SDLS CD-ROM vol 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data from sixteen lines recorded during 1982 off Wilkes Island, Antarctica, by the Institut Francais du...

  1. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Ross Sea 1980, SDLS, CD-ROM vol 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data from eleven lines recorded during 1980 in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  2. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data, SCAR - Wilkes Land 1982, SDLS, CD-ROM 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data from thirteen lines recorded during 1983 off Wilkes Island, Antarctica, by the U.S. Geological...

  3. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Antarctic Peninsula 1987-88, SDLS CD-ROM vol 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1987-88 in the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, by the Japan National Oil...

  4. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Ross Sea 1982, SDLS CD-ROM vol 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data from seven lines recorded during 1982 in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, by the Institut Francais du...

  5. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Ross Sea - 1987, SDLS CD-ROM vol 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during the 1987 field season in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, by SEVMORGEOLOGIA, RUSSIA. The...

  6. 04TRKLN - Boomer Seismic Reflection Trackline data for USGS cruise 00SCC04

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Marine seismic reflection data are used to image and map sedimentary and structural features of the seafloor and subsurface. These data are useful in mapping...

  7. 02TRKLN - Boomer Seismic Reflection Trackline data for USGS cruise 00SCC02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Marine seismic reflection data are used to image and map sedimentary and structural features of the seafloor and subsurface. These data are useful in mapping...

  8. Multichannel Seismic Reflection - SCAR- Prydz Bay 1980 SDLS CD-ROM vol 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1980 in the Prydz Bay region, by Australian Geological Survey Organization. The...

  9. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Ross Sea - 1980, SDLS, CD-ROM vol 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data from seven lines recorded during 1980 in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  10. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Wilkes Land, 1983, SDLS CD-ROM vol 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data from thirteen lines recorded during 1983 off Wilkes Island, Antarctica, by the Japan National Oil...

  11. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Ross Sea - 1980, SDLS CD-ROM vol 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data from four lines recorded during 1980 in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  12. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Weddell Sea - 1978, SDLS CD-ROM vol 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1978 in the Weddell Sea and Queen Maud Land, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  13. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Weddell Sea - 1978, SDLS CD-ROM vol 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1978 in the Weddell Sea and Queen Maud Land, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  14. Multichannel Seismic Reflection - SCAR- Antarctic Penn. 1987-88 SDLS CD-ROM vol 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1987-88 in the Antarctica Peninsula region, by Petrobras, Brazil. The following...

  15. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Antarctic Peninsula - 1988-1989, SDLS CD-ROM vol 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1988-89 in the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, by the Japan National Oil...

  16. Multichannel Seismic Reflection - SCAR- Antarctic Penn. 1987-88 SDLS CD-ROM vol 27

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1987-88 in the Antarctica Peninsula region, by Petrobras, Brazil. The following...

  17. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Weddell Sea - 1978, SDLS CD-ROM vol 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1978 in the Weddell Sea and Queen Maud Land, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  18. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Antarctic Peninsula - 1985, SDLS CD-ROM vol 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1985 field season along the north side of the Antarctic-Peninsula by the British...

  19. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Ross Sea - 1989, SDLS CD-ROM vol 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1989 field season in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, by the SEVMORGEOLOGIA, RUSSIS. The...

  20. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR, Ross Sea - 1982-1983, CD-ROM vol 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data from fourteen lines recorded during 1982 in the Ross Sea and Wilkes Island, Antarctica, by the...

  1. Mid- to Late-Holocene estuarine infilling processes studied by radiocarbon dates, high resolution seismic and biofacies at Vitoria Bay, Espirito Santo, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C. Bastos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitoria Bay is a 20 km long estuary, morphologically narrow, with a microtidal regime and, as other modern estuaries, was formed during the last post-glacial transgression. The estuarine bed morphology is characterised by a main natural channel limited by tidal flats with developed mangroves. Original radiocarbon dates were obtained for the site. Five radiocarbon ages ranging from 1,010 to 7,240 years BP were obtained from two sedimentary cores, which represent a 5 m thick stratigraphic sequence. The results indicate that, until about 4,000 cal. yrs BP, environmental conditions in Vitoria Bay were still of an open bay, with a free and wide connection with marine waters. During the last 4,000 yrs, the bay has experienced a major regression phase, by becoming more restricted in terms of seawater circulation and probably increasing tidal energy. Three main stratigraphic surfaces were recognised, which limit trangressive, trangressive/highstand and regressive facies. The present channel morphology represents a tidal scouring surface or a tidal diastem, which erodes and truncates regressive facies bedding. Foraminiferal biofacies, which change from marine to brackish and mangrove tidal-flat environments, support the seismic stratigraphic interpretation. Absence of mangrove biofacies at one of the two cores is also an indication of modern tidal ravinement.A Baía de Vitória é um estuário com 20 km de comprimento, morfologicamente estreito, com um regime de micromaré e, como outros estuários modernos, formado durante a última transgressão pós-glacial. A morfologia de fundo do estrato estuarino é caracterizada por um canal natural principal limitado por planícies de maré com manguezais desenvolvidos. Datações de radiocarbono originais foram obtidas para a área. Cinco idades de radiocarbono estendendo-se de 1.010 a 7.240 anos AP foram obtidas através de dois testemunhos de sedimento, representando uma sequência estratigráfica de 5 m de

  2. Sediments of Lake Van - a high-resolution archive of changing climate, volcanic events and seismic activity in Eastern Anatolia for the last 500'000 yrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhecke, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Sturm, M.; Paleovan Scientific Party

    2012-04-01

    record. The sub-mm thin laminated intervals as recovered from different interglacials/interstadials stand out prominently against the more banded lithologies of the remaining sections. From 168 to 189 meters below the lake floor a unit of major irregularities and accumulation of deformations were identified as a large-scale mega-event deposit. It overlies a unit of carbonate-poor diatomaceous mud and a gravel-rich unit containing fresh-water gastropods (Bithynia) and mussels. The gravel is interpreted to have been deposited under beach-like conditions and reflects the early transgressive state of the lakés history. The distinct and great variability of sediment types is indicative of highly and rapidly changing depositional conditions forced by lake level and other climate-driven changes and by tectonic events over the past 500'000 years. The annual laminated intervals reflect strong seasonal fluctuations in particle fluxes to the lake bottom and bottom water anoxia. The onset/cessation of theses episodically occurring laminations represent threshold crossings indicative for abrupt changes of climate (e.g. Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles) and tectonic activities. The partly varved lacustrine record enables, for the first time, to reconstruct the environmental and climate conditions captured during several glacial/interglacial cycles at a mid-latitudinal continental realm.

  3. Ultra high resolution tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  4. High Resolution Acoustical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    1028 (September 1982). 26 G. Arfken , Mathematical Methods for Physicists (Academic Press, New York, 1971), 2nd printing, pp.662-666. 27 W. R. Hahn...difference in the approach used by the two methods , as noted in the previous paragraph, forming a direct mathematical com- parison may be impossible...examines high resolution methods which use a linear array to locate stationary objects which have scattered the fressure waves. Several;- new methods

  5. Ship Tracklines for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Western Rhode Island Sound (N80_1LINES.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the...

  6. Using seismic reflection to locate a tracer testing complex south of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryder, Levi

    Tracer testing in the fractured volcanic aquifer near Yucca Mountain, and in the alluvial aquifer south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been conducted in the past to determine the flow and transport properties of groundwater in those geologic units. However, no tracer testing has been conducted across the alluvium/volcanic interface. This thesis documents the investigative process and subsequent analysis and interpretations used to identify a location suitable for installation of a tracer testing complex, near existing Nye County wells south of Yucca Mountain. The work involved evaluation of existing geologic data, collection of wellbore seismic data, and a detailed surface seismic reflection survey. Borehole seismic data yielded useful information on alluvial P-wave velocities. Seismic reflection data were collected over a line of 4.5-km length, with a 10-m receiver and shot spacing. Reflection data were extensively processed to image the alluvium/volcanic interface. A location for installation of an alluvial/volcanic tracer testing complex was identified based on one of the reflectors imaged in the reflection survey; this site is located between existing Nye County monitoring wells, near an outcrop of Paintbrush Tuff. Noise in the reflection data (due to some combination of seismic source signal attenuation, poor receiver-to-ground coupling, and anthropogenic sources) were sources of error that affected the final processed data set. In addition, in some areas low impedance contrast between geologic units caused an absence of reflections in the data, complicating the processing and interpretation. Forward seismic modeling was conducted using Seismic Un*x; however, geometry considerations prevented direct comparison of the modeled and processed data sets. Recommendations for additional work to address uncertainties identified during the course of this thesis work include: drilling additional boreholes to collect borehole seismic and geologic data; reprocessing a

  7. Refraction and reflection seismic investigations for geological energy-storage site characterization: Dalby (Tornquist Zone), southwest Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Bergman, Bo; Andersson, Benjamin; Sturk, Robert; Johansson, Mattis

    2017-04-01

    Three high-resolution, 5 m shot and receiver spacing using 141-172 receivers, refraction and reflection seismic profiles for the planning of a major underground energy-storage site near the town of Dalby-Lund within the Scania Tornquist suture zone in southwest of Sweden were acquired during August 2015. The site is situated ca. 1 km north of the RFZ (Romeleåsen fault and flexure zone) with a complex geologic and tectonic history. Near vertical dikes are observed from several quarries in the area crosscutting granitic-gneissic-amphibiotic rocks and form clear magnetic lineaments. These dikes likely have also acted as surfaces on which further faulting have occurred. Although a major high-speed and traffic road runs in the middle of the study area, the seismic data show excellent quality particularly for the data along two profiles (profiles 2 and 3) perpendicular to the road, and slightly noisy, due to high wind, for the data along a profile (profile 4) parallel to the road. A bobcat-mounted drop hammer (500 kg) was used to generate the seismic signal. To provide continuity from one side of the road to another, 51 wireless recorders connected to 10 Hz geophones and operating in an autonomous mode were used. GPS times of the source impacts were used to extract the data from the wireless recorders and then merged with the data from the cabled recorders (also 10 Hz geophones). Three shot records per source position were generated and vertically stacked to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. First arrivals are clear in most shot gathers allowing them to be used for traditional refraction seismic data analysis and also for more advanced traveltime tomography. The velocity models obtained through traveltime tomography clearly depict bedrock surface and its undulations and in many places show good correlation with the boreholes recently drilled in the area. At places where bedrock is intersected at greater depths than usual, for example 25 m at one place, depression

  8. Saturn's rings - high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 obtained this high-resolution picture of Saturn's rings Aug. 22, when the spacecraft was 4 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) away. Evident here are the numerous 'spoke' features, in the B-ring; their very sharp, narrow appearance suggests short formation times. Scientists think electromagnetic forces are responsible in some way for these features, but no detailed theory has been worked out. Pictures such as this and analyses of Voyager 2's spoke movies may reveal more clues about the origins of these complex structures. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  9. Near-surface 3D reflections seismic survey; Sanjigen senso hanshaho jishin tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahigashi, H.; Mitsui, H.; Nakano, O.; Kobayashi, T. [DIA Consultants Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Faults are being actively investigated across Japan since the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake. Discussed in this report is the application of the 3D near-surface reflection seismic survey in big cities. Data from trenching and drilling is used for the geological interpretation of the surroundings of a fault, and the reflection seismic survey is used to identify the position, etc., of the fault. In this article, when the results obtained from the experimental field are examined, it is found that the conventional 2D imaging reflection survey betrays the limit of its capability when the geological structure is complicated, that the 3D reflection seismic survey, on the contrary, is capable of high-precision imaging and, when augmented by drilling, etc., becomes capable of a more detailed interpretation, and that it also contributes effectively to the improvement of local disaster prevention in big cities. Using as the model the Tachikawa fault that runs near JR Tachikawa Station, embodiment of the 3D reflection seismic survey is reviewed. For the acquisition of data excellent in quality in a 3D reflection seismic survey conducted utilizing the roads in the sector chosen for experiment in the urban area, the shock generating points and receiving points should be positioned by taking into account the parameters in the bin arranging process so that the mid-points will be regularly distributed on the surface. 3 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong; Wang Xuben; Li Zhirong; Li Qiong; Li Zhengwen

    2009-01-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  11. Noninvasive determination of the location and distribution of DNAPL using advanced seismic reflection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temples, T J; Waddell, M G; Domoracki, W J; Eyer, J

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude analysis (e.g., amplitude versus offset-AVO, bright spot mapping) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL (e.g., CCl4) were applied to 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West Area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington. Modeling to determine what type of anomaly might be present was performed. Model results were incorporated in the interpretation of the seismic data to determine the location of any seismic amplitude anomalies associated with the presence of high concentrations of CCl4. Seismic reflection profiles were collected and analyzed for the presence of DNAPL. Structure contour maps of the contact between the Hanford fine unit and the Plio/Pleistocene unit and between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the caliche layer were interpreted to determine potential DNAPL flow direction. Models indicate that the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the caliche should have a positive reflection coefficient. When high concentrations of CCl4 are present, the reflection coefficient of this interface displays a noticeable positive increase in the seismic amplitude (i.e., bright spot). Amplitude data contoured on the Plio/Pleistocene-caliche boundary display high values indicating the presence of DNAPL to the north and east of the crib area. The seismic data agree well with the well control in areas of high concentrations of CCl4.

  12. Effective wave identification and interference analysis of the seismic reflection method in mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yun-bing; WU Yan-qing; KANG Hou-qing

    2009-01-01

    Through discussion of the time-distance curve characteristics of the direct wave and from the front, side and rear of the reflection waves of the seismic reflection method for advanced exploration in mines, and analysis of several major interference waves in mines, the differences in time-distance curve, frequency, apparent velocity between the effective wave and interference wave in the seismic reflection method for advanced ex-ploration are obtained. According to the differences, the effective wave is extracted and the interference wave is filtered and the system's precision and accuracy is improved.

  13. Planning for shallow high resolution seismic surveys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fourie, CJS

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available to Geophysical Exploration: Second Edition, Blackwell Scientific Publications, 1991. [12] T W B Kibble:Classical Mechanics: Third Edition, Longman Scientific & Technical Press, London, 1985. [13] Sears, Zemansky and Young: University Physics: (Seventh...

  14. A workflow for sub-/seismic structure and deformation quantification of 3-D reflection seismic data sets across different scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk, C.M.; Lohr, T.; Oncken, O. [GFZ Potsdam (Germany); Tanner, D.C. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). GZG; Endres, H. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)]|[TEEC, Isernhagen (Germany); Trappe, H.; Kukla, P. [TEEC, Isernhagen (Germany)

    2007-09-13

    The evolution of a sedimentary basin is mostly affected by deformation. Large-scale, subsurface deformation is typically identified by seismic data, sub-seismic small-scale fractures by well data. Between these two methods, we lack a deeper understanding of how deformation scales. We analysed a 3-D reflection seismic data set in the North German Basin, in order to determine the magnitude and distribution of deformation and its accumulation in space and time. A five-step approach is introduced for quantitative deformation and fracture prediction. An increased resolution of subtle tectonic lineaments is achieved by coherency processing, allowing to unravel the kinematics in the North German Basin from structural interpretation. Extensional events during basin initiation and later inversion are evident. 3-D retrodeformation shows major-strain magnitudes between 0-20% up to 1.3 km away from a fault trace, and variable deviations of associated extensional fractures. Good correlation of FMI data, strain distribution from retro-deformation and from geostatistic tools (see also Trappe et al., this volume) allows the validation of the results and makes the prediction of small-scale faults/fractures possible. The temporal component will be gained in the future by analogue models. The suggested workflow is applicable to reflection seismic surveys and yields in great detail both the tectonic history of a region as well as predictions for hydrocarbon plays or deep groundwater or geothermal reservoirs. (orig.)

  15. Computing method of mark line number for high resolution single-channel seismic section%高分辨率单道地震剖面上定标号的计算方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽青; 唐卫; 陈泓君; 高佩兰; 温明明

    2012-01-01

    定标号在野外采集时同步打印在模拟剖面上,它是海洋单道地震勘探剖面对比解释时重要的地理位置依据,但是数字单道地震记录仪记录的地震道中缺失此信息.文章介绍了三种计算和标识定标号(Mark)的方法,根据班报线性内插法、模拟剖面读取法以及坐标对比法,分析了各自的优缺点.其中最可靠和实用的是坐标对比法.通过软件开发实现了坐标对比法自动获取Mark-Shot关系,通过这个关系即可对地震数据和剖面进行定标号的标识.软件模块能够处理导航与地震不同步、航向航速不稳定、导航与地震坐标格式多样化等情况,具有较强的适应性.对实测数据计算发现,当导航、地震不同步时,线性内插法获得的mark值误差很大,而坐标对比法能够精确反映Mark-Shot实际的对应关系.当航向、航速稳定时Mark-Shot关系表现为线性关系,而航向、航速不稳定时Mark-Shot关系为弯曲的非线性关系,由于导航系统过零点时会出现重复定标情况,在Mark-Shot关系图中表现为拐点.为了对计算结果进行质量控制,软件同时提供了Mark-Shot计算误差值列表,在误差散点图中显示所有定标号位置误差都小于1个炮距,说明软件计算获得的Mark位置精度较高,结果可靠.%Mark line and its number is plotted on field analog section at a certain distance such as lkm or 500m. it contains important location information for marine high resolution single-channel seismic section interpretation. According to this common location mark, seismic section could be compared with boring data, logging, sub-bottom profiler, seabed video or some other survey data. However, mark line number is not recorded in seismic data by IXSEA DELPH single-channel seismic recorder. Raw seismic data were polluted by all kinds of noise such as multiples, wave noise and vessel mechanical noise, which bring down the signal-to-noise. Raw data need to be

  16. Overdeepened glacigenic landforms in Lake Thun (Switzerland) revealed by a multichannel reflection seismic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Stefano; Herwegh, Marco; Schlunegger, Fritz; Hübscher, Christian; Weiss, Benedikt J.; Schmelzbach, Cédric; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Buechi, Marius W.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2016-04-01

    Recently acquired high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, in combination with a 2D multichannel reflection seismic campaign on perialpine Lake Thun (Switzerland) reveals new insights into the diverse geometry of the lake basin and a so far unknown subaquatic moraine crest with unprecedented clarity. These new data will improve our comprehension concerning the retreat phases of the Aare glacier, the morphology of its proximal deposits and the facies architecture of the subglacial units. The overdeepened basin of Lake Thun was formed by a combination of tectonically predefined weak zones and glacial erosion during the last glacial periods. The new data indicate that below the outermost edge of a morphologically distinct platform in the south eastern part of the lake basin, a ridge structure marked by strong reflection amplitudes occurs. This structure is interpreted as a subaquatic terminal moraine crest, most likely created by a slightly advancing or stagnant grounded Aare glacier during its major retreating phase. The terminal moraine smoothly transforms downstream into well distinguishable foresets with internally recognisable layering, which dip steeply towards the deepest part of the basin, eventually transforming into bottomsets. This depositional sequence formed by the fore- and bottomsets represents ˜50% of the overall sediment volume that fills the basin and was deposited while the glacier was stagnant, interpreted to represent a rather short period of time of a few hundreds of years. This sequence is overlain by lacustrine deposits formed by late-glacial and Holocene laminated muds comprising intercalated turbidites (Wirth et al. 2011). Little is known about the exact timing and behaviour of retreating glaciers between their recessional phase from the Alpine foreland to the deglaciation of the inner-Alpine ice cap, mostly due to the lack of well-developed moraines that indicate glacial stabilization or slight readvance. Findings from pollen analyses by

  17. DOBRE-2000: Deep Reflection Seismic, Gravimetric and Surface Structural Controls Across a Devonian Failed Rift in the Southeastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Chowdhury, K.; Bayer, U.; Gajewski, D.; Huebscher, C.; Rabbel, W.; Saintot, A.; Starostenko, V. I.; Stephenson, R.; Stovba, S. M.; Tolkunov, A.; Thybo, H.

    2001-12-01

    Situated between the Ukrainian Shield and the Voronezh Masif, the Pripyat-Dniepr-Donets Basin (PDD) is a crustal-scale geodynamic feature associated with the Late Devonian rifting of the East European Craton. The Donbas Foldbelt (DF), comprising the eastern part of the PDD, includes pre- & syn-rift deposits below a large thickness of post-rift successions. Later, DF has been inverted (elevated, eroded, deformed). With 20+ km of sediments, it has a large economic potential, but its tectonic history - and the cause for its isolated evolution - is not well understood. Recently, 130+ km multi-channel reflection seismic profiling data has been acquired across the southern part of the DF in the framework of an international industry-academic collaboration. Coincident gravity data has been collected along the profile too, and extensive structural studies have been carried out to understand the spatio-temporal distribution of the stress-regime in the area. The high-resolution seismic images reveal an extensive stair-step like fragmentation of the basement including faults with upto 2km offset. The typical size of these "steps" are influenced by the ambient conditions at the time of their formation. Combined use of the different datasets is expected to shed light on several intriguing features associated with DF. The presence/extent of salt, causing localization and/or partition of strain both laterally and vertically, may be studied by using its seismic and gravitational reponses simultaneously. The interaction between the lower crust and the upper mantle may also be studied in the same manner, which should result in a lithological interpretation at depth favoring in turn one of the causative mechanisms.

  18. Combined Studies of ODP log Data and Seismic Reflection Data at Southern Hydrate Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenberg, C. A.; Petersen, J.; Klaeschen, D.

    2003-12-01

    In August 2002 Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204 (Hydrate Ridge) provided essential borehole data to complement recent seismic studies at Hydrate Ridge to correlate amplitude analysis investigations and to constrain previous results. Seismic data was acquired during cruise SO-150 in September 2000 on the German RV SONNE, aiming at qualitative and quantitative estimates of free gas and gas hydrates within the sediments across Hydrate Ridge. Hydrate Ridge is part of the accretionary complex and is characterized by the presence of extensive gas hydrates, causing a prominent Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) in marine seismic records. Several seismic in- and crosslines were shot across the ridge to map the spatial distribution of the BSR. Wide angle reflection data of narrowly spaced Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) allow frequency dependent amplitude variations with offset (AVO) investigations. Seismic reflection data, recorded simultaneously with a single channel surface and deep tow streamer completed the data set. The usage of different sources during acquisition provided additional information of the frequency response of the BSR signature. This data set was used to study the complex seismic behaviour of such gas hydrate environments in detail. The borehole data, collected during ODP Leg 204, now improve recent seismic investigations and support previous results. Within the COLIBRI project log information (Vp, Vs and density) was used for forward modeling to combine seismic investigations with new borehole data. The P wave velocity model of a traveltime inversion and AVO analysis of the seismic OBS sections suggest rather low quantities of gas hydrate or at least the lack of massive hydrate zones. Shear wave phases, identified in the seismic OBS sections, refer to slow S wave velocities in the upper sediment layers above the BSR, which support a model with small amounts of hydrate or patchy hydrate zones within the upper sediments.

  19. Mechanical and chemical processes affecting the chalk during burial, insights from combined reflection seismics, well data and field work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph;

    2014-01-01

    and cores analyses, respectively.However, few sites allow to combine all the different scale of observation for chalk diagenesis. Onshore and offshore high resolution seismics, two fully cored >350 m wells with wireline logging tools and very high quality exposures from a coastal cliff and a quarry form...

  20. Seismic reflection imaging of underground cavities using open-source software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellors, R J

    2011-12-20

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) includes provisions for an on-site inspection (OSI), which allows the use of specific techniques to detect underground anomalies including cavities and rubble zones. One permitted technique is active seismic surveys such as seismic refraction or reflection. The purpose of this report is to conduct some simple modeling to evaluate the potential use of seismic reflection in detecting cavities and to test the use of open-source software in modeling possible scenarios. It should be noted that OSI inspections are conducted under specific constraints regarding duration and logistics. These constraints are likely to significantly impact active seismic surveying, as a seismic survey typically requires considerable equipment, effort, and expertise. For the purposes of this study, which is a first-order feasibility study, these issues will not be considered. This report provides a brief description of the seismic reflection method along with some commonly used software packages. This is followed by an outline of a simple processing stream based on a synthetic model, along with results from a set of models representing underground cavities. A set of scripts used to generate the models are presented in an appendix. We do not consider detection of underground facilities in this work and the geologic setting used in these tests is an extremely simple one.

  1. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brünken, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limita...

  2. Piedmont seismic reflection study: A program integrated with tectonics to probe the cause of eastern seismicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, L. III; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.; Bollinger, G.A. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-03-01

    A new tectonic model of the Appalachian orogen indicates that one, not two or more, terrane boundaries is present in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge of the central and southern Appalachians. This terrane boundary is the Taconic suture, it has been transported in the allochthonous Blue Ridge/Piedmont crystalline thrust nappe, and it is repeated at the surface by faulting and folding associated with later Paleozoic orogenies. The suture passes through the lower crust and lithosphere somewhere east of Richmond. It is spatially associated with seismicity in the central Virginia seismic zone, but is not conformable with earthquake focal planes and appears to have little causal relation to their localization.

  3. A High-Resolution Transmission-Type (TT) Phaser Based on Reflection-Type (RT) Units for Radio Analog Signal Processing (R-ASP)

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Lianfeng

    2014-01-01

    A high Radio Analog Signal Processing (R-ASP) resolution transmission-type (TT) phaser based on reflection-type (RT) phaser units is introduced, theoretically studied and experimentally demonstrated. It is first shown that RT phasers inherently exhibit higher R-ASP resolution than their TT counterparts because their group delay swing is proportional to the reflection coefficient associated with a resonator coupling mechanism (admittance inverter), easy to maximize towards unity, rather than to a coupled-line coupling coefficient, typically restricted to values will inferior to unity, as in the RT case. Moreover, a detailed sensitivity analysis reveals that the proposed phaser is simultaneously features high R-ASP resolution and low sensitivity to fabrication tolerance, which makes it an ideal solution for R-ASP. The proposed phaser exhibits a 5 ns group delay swing over a fractional bandwidth of about 50% around 4 GHz.

  4. Further development and application of a mobile multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer for analytical high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lippert, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a mobile multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) for analytical mass spectrometry was enhanced in many important aspects. Technical as well as software-based improvements have been added to the instrument, thus greatly increasing its performance and applicability. Changes have been applied to the whole beam preparation system of the MR-TOF-MS. In this context, the electronic setup was completely overhauled and a quadrupole mass filter was commissioned. C...

  5. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    The lipid matrix of biomembranes is an in-plane fluid, thermally and compositionally disordered leaflet of 5 nm thickness and notoriously difficult to characterize in structural terms. Yet, biomembranes are ubiquitous in the cell, and membrane-bound proteins are implicated in a variety of signaling pathways and intra-cellular transport. We developed methodology to study proteins associated with model membranes using neutron reflection measurements and showed recently that this approach can resolve the penetration depth and orientation of membrane proteins with ångstrom resolution if their crystal or NMR structure is known. Here we apply this technology to determine the membrane bindung and unravel functional details of the PTEN phosphatase, a key player in the PI3K apoptosis pathway. PTEN is an important regulatory protein and tumor suppressor that performs its phosphatase activity as an interfacial enzyme at the plasma membrane-cytoplasm boundary. Acting as an antagonist to phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cell signaling, it is deleted in many human cancers. Despite its importance in regulating the levels of the phosphoinositoltriphosphate PI(3,4,5)P3, there is little understanding of how PTEN binds to membranes, is activated and then acts as a phosphatase. We investigated the structure and function of PTEN by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act synergetically in attracting the enzyme to the membrane surface. Membrane affinities depend strongly on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase ``scoots'' along the membrane surface (penetration protein, ˜ 60 å away from the bilayer surface, in a rather compact

  6. Probabilistic modeling of caprock leakage from seismic reflection data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zunino, Andrea; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Bergjofd-Kitterød, Ingjerd

    within the storage complexes. The geological models are built on top of geophysical data such as seismic surveys, geological information and well logs from the reservoir or nearby regions. The risk assessment of CO2 storage requires a careful analysis which accounts for all sources of uncertainty...... is a realization of a geostatistical model generated with the help of geological expert knowledge and available prototype models. Employing a Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we generate many realizations of the geostatistical model consistent with our a priori knowledge (in the form of prototype images, well logs....... However, at present, no well-defined and consistent method for mapping the true uncertainty related to the geophysical data and how that uncertainty affects the overall risk assessment for the potential storage site is available. To properly quantify the uncertainties and to avoid unrealistic...

  7. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Jerome Eyer

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface DNAPL carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high-resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are noninvasive means of site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This final report covers the results of Tasks 1, 2, and 3. Task (1) contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task (2) is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task (3) is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. During the commission of these tasks four seismic reflection profiles were collected. Subsurface velocity information was obtained by vertical seismic profile surveys in three wells. The interpretation of these data is in two parts. Part one is the construction and interpretation of structural contour maps of the contact between the Hanford Fine unit and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene unit and of the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the underlying caliche layer. These two contacts were determined to be the most likely surfaces to contain the highest concentration CCl{sub 4}. Part two of the interpretation uses the results of the AVO modeling to locate any seismic amplitude anomalies that might be

  8. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  9. Galicia Bank ocean-continent transition zone: New seismic reflection constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, S. L.; Sawyer, D. S.; Morgan, J. K.

    2015-03-01

    The West Iberia continental margin is a type locale for magma-poor rifting, and studies there have been instrumental in changing the classical view of the ocean-continent transition (OCT) from a discrete boundary juxtaposing continental and oceanic crust, into a more complicated zone of varying width that can include exhumed mantle. This study examines two new seismic lines in the Galicia Bank area extending west of the Peridotite Ridge, showing high resolution images of five new ridges. These ridges could be hyperextended continental crust, exhumed continental mantle, or rough ultra-slow spreading oceanic crust. There are no tilted fault blocks with pre-syn rift stratigraphy that would indicate continental crust. There are also no faults indicating mid-ocean spreading with seismic layer stratigraphy indicating normal oceanic crust. The ridges have no coherent internal seismic structure, and some resemble the topographic profile of the Peridotite Ridge. Therefore, it is likely the western ridges are also mainly composed of serpentinized mantle. These western ridges are also similar to small oceanic core complexes observed along the active part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which also contain exhumed serpentinized mantle. This implies that there is a gradual transition within our study area from continental extension to seafloor spreading. Exhumation of continental mantle results in the formation of peridotite ridges, then transitions to episodic volcanism, which produces local thin basaltic crust, and exhumation of oceanic core complexes. Asymmetric processes during initial rifting and spreading result in contrasting structures on the two resulting margins.

  10. Deep seismic reflection study over the Vindhyans of Rajasthan: Implications for geophysical setting of the basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Rajendra Prasad; V Vijaya Rao

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents results of high-resolution deep seismic reflection profiling of the Proterozoic Vindhyan basin of the Rajasthan area along the Chandli –Bundi –Kota –Kunjer pro file.Seismic images have been used to estimate the thickness of Vindhyan strata as well as to understand the tectonic framework of the basin.The results are constrained by gravity,magnetic and magne-totelluric data.The study reveals gentle SE-dipping reflection bands representing the Vindhyan strata.The seismic sections depict gradual thickening of the Vindhyan succession towards south-east from Bundi.The velocities of the upper and lower Vindhyans are identified as 4.6 –4.8 km/s and 5.1 –5.3 km/s.The NW limit of the Vindhyan basin is demarcated by the Great Boundary Fault (GBF)that manifests as a 30 km wide NW dipping thrust fault extending to a depth of 30 km.

  11. Low-frequency asymptotic analysis of seismic reflection from afluid-saturated medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.B.; Korneev, V.A.; Goloshubin, G.M.; Patzek, T.W.

    2004-04-14

    Reflection of a seismic wave from a plane interface betweentwo elastic media does not depend on the frequency. If one of the mediais poroelastic and fluid-saturated, then the reflection becomesfrequency-dependent. This paper presents a low-frequency asymptoticformula for the reflection of seismic plane p-wave from a fluid-saturatedporous medium. The obtained asymptotic scaling of the frequency-dependentcomponent of the reflection coefficient shows that it is asymptoticallyproportional to the square root of the product of the reservoir fluidmobility and the frequency of the signal. The dependence of this scalingon the dynamic Darcy's law relaxation time is investigated as well.Derivation of the main equations of the theory of poroelasticity from thedynamic filtration theory reveals that this relaxation time isproportional to Biot's tortuosity parameter.

  12. Seismic reflection data report: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hern, J.L.; Powers, D.W.; Barrows, L.J.

    1978-12-01

    Volume II contains uninterpreted processed lines and shotpoint maps from three seismic reflection surveys conducted from 1976 through 1978 by Sandia Laboratories to support investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Data interpretations will be the subject of subsequent reports. (LK)

  13. IPOD-USGS multichannel seismic reflection profile from Cape Hatteras to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, John A.; Markl, Rudi G.

    1977-01-01

    A 3,400-km-long multichannel seismic-reflection profile from Cape Hatteras to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge was acquired commercially under contract to the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Geological Survey. These data show evidence for massive erosion of the continental slope, diapirs at the base of the continental slope, and mantle reflections beneath the Hatteras Abyssal Plain.

  14. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  15. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  16. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  17. Theory of reflectivity blurring in seismic depth imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, C. J.; Kitchenside, P. W.; Fletcher, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    A subsurface extended image gather obtained during controlled-source depth imaging yields a blurred kernel of an interface reflection operator. This reflectivity kernel or reflection function is comprised of the interface plane-wave reflection coefficients and so, in principle, the gather contains amplitude versus offset or angle information. We present a modelling theory for extended image gathers that accounts for variable illumination and blurring, under the assumption of a good migration-velocity model. The method involves forward modelling as well as migration or back propagation so as to define a receiver-side blurring function, which contains the effects of the detector array for a given shot. Composition with the modelled incident wave and summation over shots then yields an overall blurring function that relates the reflectivity to the extended image gather obtained from field data. The spatial evolution or instability of blurring functions is a key concept and there is generally not just spatial blurring in the apparent reflectivity, but also slowness or angle blurring. Gridded blurring functions can be estimated with, for example, a reverse-time migration modelling engine. A calibration step is required to account for ad hoc band limitedness in the modelling and the method also exploits blurring-function reciprocity. To demonstrate the concepts, we show numerical examples of various quantities using the well-known SIGSBEE test model and a simple salt-body overburden model, both for 2-D. The moderately strong slowness/angle blurring in the latter model suggests that the effect on amplitude versus offset or angle analysis should be considered in more realistic structures. Although the description and examples are for 2-D, the extension to 3-D is conceptually straightforward. The computational cost of overall blurring functions implies their targeted use for the foreseeable future, for example, in reservoir characterization. The description is for scalar

  18. 2D magnetotelluric inversion using reflection seismic images as constraints and application in the COSC project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalscheuer, Thomas; Yan, Ping; Hedin, Peter; Garcia Juanatey, Maria d. l. A.

    2017-04-01

    We introduce a new constrained 2D magnetotelluric (MT) inversion scheme, in which the local weights of the regularization operator with smoothness constraints are based directly on the envelope attribute of a reflection seismic image. The weights resemble those of a previously published seismic modification of the minimum gradient support method introducing a global stabilization parameter. We measure the directional gradients of the seismic envelope to modify the horizontal and vertical smoothness constraints separately. An appropriate choice of the new stabilization parameter is based on a simple trial-and-error procedure. Our proposed constrained inversion scheme was easily implemented in an existing Gauss-Newton inversion package. From a theoretical perspective, we compare our new constrained inversion to similar constrained inversion methods, which are based on image theory and seismic attributes. Successful application of the proposed inversion scheme to the MT field data of the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project using constraints from the envelope attribute of the COSC reflection seismic profile (CSP) helped to reduce the uncertainty of the interpretation of the main décollement. Thus, the new model gave support to the proposed location of a future borehole COSC-2 which is supposed to penetrate the main décollement and the underlying Precambrian basement.

  19. Seismic reflection characteristics of glacial and glacimarine sediment in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    Glaciation together with tectonism have been dominant factors affecting sedimentation in the Gulf of Alaska area from at least the late Miocene throughout the Quaternary. The effects of tectonism are apparent in high mountains that border the gulf, raised terraces of Middleton Island and the eastern gulf coastal zone, and numerous active faults and related earthquakes. Glacial evidence includes magnificent glaciers and their onshore deposits, spectacular fjords, large sea valleys incised in the continental shelf, submarine morainal ridges at mouths of bays and sea valleys, and thick glacimarine sedimentary sequences (diamicts) that are exposed onshore and at the sea floor along the outer shelf. Seismic-reflection profiling and sampling of the uppermost marine sedimentary sequences in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent fjords and bays have allowed identification of three discrete glacially related stratigraphic units. These units were delineated on the basis of seismic signature, geometry, physiographic location, stratigraphic position, and sedimentologic characteristics. The oldest unit, a Quaternary diamict, is portrayed on seismic profiles by irregular, discontinuous reflections. This unit probably includes till, outwash and glacimarine sediment. A geographically restricted unit, one incorporating Holocene end moraines at bay mouths and associated with some sea valleys, consists of jumbled masses of discontinuous reflections and very irregular surface morphology. The youngest unit, a blanket of Holocene sand to clayey silt prograding as a sediment wedge across the shelf, contains nearly horizontal, parallel reflections except where disrupted by mass movement. Although seismic-reflection data alone cannot provide definitive proof of the presence of glacial sediment, when combined with sea-floor sampling, seismic profiling is a powerful tool for determining the continuity of marine sedimentary units and relationships to past and modern glaciers. ?? 1989.

  20. Archive of digital and digitized analog boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS cruise 96CCT02 in Copano, Corpus Christi, and Nueces Bays and Corpus Christi Bayou, Texas, July 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Morton, Robert A.; Blum, Mike D.; Wiese, Dana S.; Subiño, Janice A.

    2007-01-01

    In June of 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys from Nueces to Copano Bays, Texas. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, cruise log, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles and high resolution scanned TIFF images of the original paper printouts are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  1. Application of the Common Offset Seismic Reflection Method to Urban Active Fault Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Baojin; Ji Jifa; Xu Zhaofan; Yuan Hongke; Liao Xu; Bai Yun; Wan Bo

    2007-01-01

    The method and principle of common offset seismic surveys as well as the field data gathering and processing technique were introduced briefly. Through two urban active fault survey examples in Fuzhou and Shenyang, the efficiency and limitation of using the common offset seismic reflection technique to carry out urban active fault surveys were probed. The results show that this technique has the properties of high resolving power, better reconstruction of subsurface structures, and real-time analyzing and interpretation of investigation results on site. This method can be used to quickly locate objects under investigation accurately in the areas with thinner Quaternary overburdens and strong bedrock interface fluctuations.

  2. Datum Level and NMO Corrections to Shallow Seismic Reflection Data on Rugged Topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jiangping; Xia Jianghai; Chen Chao; Zhang Suxin

    2003-01-01

    The application of the seismic reflection method is often limited in complex terrain areas.The problem is the incorrect correction of time-shift caused by topography. To apply normal moveout (NMO) correction to reflection data correctly, static corrections are necessary to be applied in advance for the compensation of the time distortions of topography and the time-delays from near-surface weathered layers. For environment and engineering investigation, weathered layers are our targets so that the static correction mainly serves the adjustment of time-shift due to an undulating surface. In practice,seismic reflected raypaths are assumed to be almost vertical through the near-surface layers because they have much lower velocities than layers below. This assumption is typically acceptable in most cases since it results in little residual error for small elevation changes and small offsets in reflection events. Although static algorithms based on choosing a floating datum related to common midpoint gathers or residual surface-consistent functions are available and effective, errors caused by the assumption of vertical raypaths often generate pseudo indications of structures. This paper presents the comparison of applying corrections based on the vertical raypaths and bias (non-vertical) raypaths. It also provides an approach of combining elevation and NMO corrections. The advantages of the approach are demonstrated by a synthetic example of multi-coverage seismic reflection surveys on rough topography.

  3. Pervasive seismic wave reflectivity and metasomatism of the Tonga mantle wedge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yingcai; Lay, Thorne; Flanagan, Megan P; Williams, Quentin

    2007-05-11

    Subduction zones play critical roles in the recycling of oceanic lithosphere and the generation of continental crust. Seismic imaging can reveal structures associated with key dynamic processes occurring in the upper-mantle wedge above the sinking oceanic slab. Three-dimensional images of reflecting interfaces throughout the upper-mantle wedge above the subducting Tonga slab were obtained by migration of teleseismic recordings of underside P- and S-wave reflections. Laterally continuous weak reflectors with tens of kilometers of topography were detected at depths near 90, 125, 200, 250, 300, 330, 390, 410, and 450 kilometers. P- and S-wave impedances decreased at the 330-kilometer and 450-kilometer reflectors, and S-wave impedance decreased near 200 kilometers in the vicinity of the slab and near 390 kilometers, just above the global 410-kilometer increase. The pervasive seismic reflectivity results from phase transitions and compositional zonation associated with extensive metasomatism involving slab-derived fluids rising through the wedge.

  4. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies.

  5. Gravity and multichannel seismic reflection constraints on the lithospheric structure of the Canary Swell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranero, C. R.; Torne, M.; Banda, E.

    1995-12-01

    Deep penetrating multichannel seismic reflection and gravity data have been used to study the lithospheric structure of the Canary Swell. The seismic reflection data show the transition from undisturbed Jurassic oceanic crust, away from the Canary Islands, to an area of ocean crust strongly modified by the Canary volcanism (ACV). Outside the ACV the seismic records image a well layered sedimentary cover, underlined by a bright reflection from the top of the igneous basement and also relatively continuous reflections from the base of the crust. In the ACV the definition of the boundary between sedimentary cover and igneous basement and the crust-mantle boundary remains very loose. Two-dimensional gravity modelling in the area outside the influence of the Canary volcanism, where the reflection data constrain the structure of the ocean crust, suggests a thinning of the lithosphere. The base of the lithosphere rises from 100 km, about 400 km west of the ACV, to 80 km at the outer limit of the ACV. In addition, depth conversion of the seismic reflection data and unloading of the sediments indicate the presence of a regional depth anomaly of an extension similar to the lithospheric thinning inferred from gravity modelling. The depth anomaly associated with the swell, after correction for sediment weight, is about 500 m. We interpret the lithospheric thinning as an indication of reheating of old Mesozoic lithosphere beneath the Canary Basin and along with the depth anomaly as indicating a thermal rejuvenation of the lithosphere. We suggest that the most likely origin for the Canary Islands is a hot spot.

  6. Reflection imaging of the Moho and the aseismic Nazca slab in the Malargüe region with global-phase seismic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganov, D.; Nishitsuji, Y.; Ruigrok, E.; Gomez, M.; Wapenaar, C. P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A number of passive seismic methods have been developed over many decades. Still, imaging of aseismical zones of the subducting slabs is one of challenging themes in the geoscience community. Conventional seismological approaches, such as hypocentral mapping, receiver functions, and global tomography, have been providing useful imaging of the Nazca slab, which subducts under the South American plate; however, the aseismic zones remained unclear. Here, we propose to apply global-phase seismic interferometry (GloPSI) for the imaging of the aseismic zones of the Nazca slab beneath the Malargüe region (Mendoza, Argentina). GloPSI uses global phases (epicentral distances ≥ 120°) such as PKP, PKiKP, and PKIKP, recorded on the vertical component of the seismic sensors. These phases illuminate the lithosphere below the receivers with small angles of incidence, which illumination suffices for creating virtual sources that radiate primarily downwards. We then migrate the retrieved virtual responses to obtain a subsurface reflection image with high resolution (< 15 km in depth). We use data recorded in the Malargüe region using an exploration-type receiver array called MalARRgue. This array was recording continuously in 2012 for one year. In this presentation, we show the imaging results from the Moho down to the aseismic Nazca slab, including the upper mantle.

  7. Thin-layer detection using reflection seismic; Deteccao de camadas delgadas usando sismica de reflexao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Armando Lopes [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao e Producao; Freitas, Lucas Batista; Tygel, Martin [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (LGC/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Lab. Geofisica Computacional

    2008-03-15

    Improvement of vertical resolution in seismic data is one of the major challenges for the seismic reflection method. The main problem is related to the larger loss of high frequencies relative to the lower ones during seismic wave propagation. As a consequence, the contribution of lower frequencies in the final section is significantly greater than the corresponding one due to higher frequencies. In principle, this situation should not constitute an obstacle to the full recovery of the spectrum, because of the powerful tools available in seismic processing, designed to equalize all frequencies that are present in the data volume. The main reason why these tools in general do not succeed is the presence of noise, for example random noise. Such situation gives rise to a critical frequency, such that all frequencies above it are impossible to recover and, as a consequence, the seismic pulse cannot be made short enough to allow for optimal resolution. Methods to solve the problem by means of random noise attenuation have been extensively investigated and tested without relevant results. The alternative to such techniques is the enhancement of the multiplicity that can be used for stacking. Since the amplitude decays exponentially with frequency, a large multiplicity is necessary in order to attain a significant effective frequency gain. The capability to attain extremely large multiplicity is exactly the main virtue of the Common Reflection Surface (CRS) method. In this paper, we propose the strategy of combining the CRS method with the spectral whitening, a known frequency recovery technique, so as to optimize vertical resolution in seismic data and, as a consequence, improve the discrimination of thin reservoirs. First tests on synthetic and real data shown in this work are very encouraging and permit to conclude that the proposed approach has a good potential for practical application. (author)

  8. Modelling study of challenges in sinkhole detection with shear wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burschil, Thomas; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    The detection of cavities with reflection seismics is a difficult task even if high impedance contrasts are assumed. Especially the shear wave reflection method with a higher resolution potential trough lower velocities and short wavelength has come into focus of investigation. But shear wave propagation fails if material exists that partially has no shear strength. The shear wave does not propagate into or through those voids. Here, we evaluate the influence of a possible fracture zone above a cavity. We simulate shear wave propagation with finite difference modelling for two reference models, with and without cavity, and various sets of input models with a fracture zone above the cavity. Reflections and multiples of the reference models image the subsidence structure and the cavity. For the fracture input models, we implemented a fracture network, derived from numerical crack propagation modelling (Schneider-Löbens et al., 2015). The cracks possess the minimum possible aperture of one grid point (i.e. 0.1 m) and no shear stiffness. The seismic modelling exhibits that the shear wave does not pass through the fracture zone and shadows the subjacent cavity. Sequences of randomly discontinuous cracks, cf. displacement discontinuity model with zero crack stiffness, approximate partially seismic connected rock on both sides of the crack. The amount of these seismic pathways determines whether a reflection of the cavity can be detected at the surface or not. Cracks with higher aperture, e.g. two or three grid points, need a higher amount of intact rock/defective cracks, since more connected grid points are necessary to create seismic pathways. Furthermore, it turns out that the crack filling is important for shear wave transmission. While a mineralized fracture zone, implemented with high velocity, facilitate shear wave propagation, water or air-filled cracks avoid shear wave transmission. Crack orientation affects the shear wave propagation through the geometry. A

  9. Reflection imaging of the Moon's interior using deep-moonquake seismic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitsuji, Yohei; Rowe, C. A.; Wapenaar, Kees; Draganov, Deyan

    2016-04-01

    The internal structure of the Moon has been investigated over many years using a variety of seismic methods, such as travel time analysis, receiver functions, and tomography. Here we propose to apply body-wave seismic interferometry to deep moonquakes in order to retrieve zero-offset reflection responses (and thus images) beneath the Apollo stations on the nearside of the Moon from virtual sources colocated with the stations. This method is called deep-moonquake seismic interferometry (DMSI). Our results show a laterally coherent acoustic boundary around 50 km depth beneath all four Apollo stations. We interpret this boundary as the lunar seismic Moho. This depth agrees with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) SELenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) result and previous travel time analysis at the Apollo 12/14 sites. The deeper part of the image we obtain from DMSI shows laterally incoherent structures. Such lateral inhomogeneity we interpret as representing a zone characterized by strong scattering and constant apparent seismic velocity at our resolution scale (0.2-2.0 Hz).

  10. Bedrock mapping of buried valley networks using seismic reflection and airborne electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenborger, G. A.; Logan, C. E.; Hinton, M. J.; Pugin, A. J.-M.; Sapia, V.; Sharpe, D. R.; Russell, H. A. J.

    2016-05-01

    In glaciated terrain, buried valleys often host aquifers that are significant groundwater resources. However, given the range of scales, spatial complexity and depth of burial, buried valleys often remain undetected or insufficiently mapped. Accurate and thorough mapping of bedrock topography is a crucial step in detecting and delineating buried valleys and understanding formative valley processes. We develop a bedrock mapping procedure supported by the combination of seismic reflection data and helicopter time-domain electromagnetic data with water well records for the Spiritwood buried valley aquifer system in Manitoba, Canada. The limited spatial density of water well bedrock observations precludes complete depiction of the buried valley bedrock topography and renders the water well records alone inadequate for accurate hydrogeological model building. Instead, we leverage the complementary strengths of seismic reflection and airborne electromagnetic data for accurate local detection of the sediment-bedrock interface and for spatially extensive coverage, respectively. Seismic reflection data are used to define buried valley morphology in cross-section beneath survey lines distributed over a regional area. A 3D model of electrical conductivity is derived from inversion of the airborne electromagnetic data and used to extrapolate buried valley morphology over the entire survey area. A spatially variable assignment of the electrical conductivity at the bedrock surface is applied to different features of the buried valley morphology identified in the seismic cross-sections. Electrical conductivity is then used to guide construction of buried valley shapes between seismic sections. The 3D locus of points defining each morphological valley feature is constructed using a path optimization routine that utilizes deviation from the assigned electrical conductivities as the cost function. Our resulting map represents a bedrock surface of unprecedented detail with more

  11. The application of high-resolution 3D seismic data to model the distribution of mechanical and hydrogeological properties of a potential host rock for the deep storage of radioactive waste in France

    CERN Document Server

    Mari, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    In the context of a deep geological repository of high-level radioactive wastes, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) has conducted an extensive characterization of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock and surrounding formations in the Eastern Paris Basin. As part of this project, an accurate 3D seismic derived geological model is needed. The paper shows the procedure used for building the 3D seismic constrained geological model in depth by combining time-to-depth conversion of seismic horizons, consistent seismic velocity model and elastic impedance in time. It also shows how the 3D model is used for mechanical and hydrogeological studies. The 3D seismic field data example illustrates the potential of the proposed depth conversion procedure for estimating density and velocity distributions, which are consistent with the depth conversion of seismic horizons using the Bayesian Kriging method. The geological model shows good agreement with well log data obtained from a reference we...

  12. Seismic Reflection - Focusing on Muting Jacquelyn Daves University of Colorado - Boulder SAGE 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daves, J.

    2014-12-01

    The SAGE 2014 survey was conducted directly west of the Santo Domingo Pueblo, along Borrego Canyon Road. This survey is a continuation of the SAGE 2010 and 2011 investigations. The survey was aimed to locate a previously mapped fault running orthogonal to the road. The SAGE 2014 seismic line ran 5.6 km long with 20 meter geophone spacing. 8-80 Hz sweeps were utilized with 10 s sweeps and 4 s of listening. Once the data was converted into the proper file type, preprocesses was conducted. After the preprocessing was complete, various processing methods were used to obtain the final Common Midpoint (CMP) stack. Two CMP stacks were created-one containing the muting method and one without. The ideal result would be to interpret stratigraphic structures and potential faults. The Rio Grande Rift is a Cenozoic continental rift zone that extends approximately 1000 km from Leadville, Colorado to west Texas and Chihuahua, Mexico. The Northern most extent of the rift separates the Great Plains from the Colorado Plateau. The rift consists of a series of interconnected grabbens that lie in an asymmetric pattern (Baldridge, 1989). Basins involved with this rifting are a distinct features along with faults that bound one or both sides. SAGE has been investigating these for over a decade to interpolate the complex structures. By examining Borrego Canyon, we were able to add to the investigation. Various geophysical methods were utilized to study Borrego Canyon. AMT, MT, TEM, gravity, seismic reflection and seismic refraction were individually used to understand the subsurface and were subsequently integrated together in order to have a full spectrum of subsurface depths. Each method has unique processing steps and are critical in order to analyze the gathered data. As such, this paper will focus on processing seismic reflection with an emphasis on muting. Each technique used in processing the SAGE 2014 seismic reflection data will be explained. Next, this paper will validate muting

  13. Seismic volcanostratigraphy of large, extrusive complexes in continental rift basins of Northeast China:Analysis of general bedding patterns in volcanostratigraphy and their seismic reflection configurations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    衣健; 王璞珺; 高有峰; 陈崇阳; 赵然磊

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to establish volcanic seismic reflection configuration models in the rift basins of Northeast China from a new perspective, the volcanostratigraphic structure. Accordingly, the volcanostratigraphic structure of an outcrop near the Hailaier Rift Basin was analyzed to understand the characteristics and causal factors of physical boundaries. Further, 3D seismic reflection data and analysis of deep boreholes in the Songliao Rift Basin were used to establish the relationship between volcanic seismic reflection configurations and volcanostratigraphic structures. These studies suggested that in volcanic successions, physical boundaries coincide with volcanic boundaries, and their distributions are controlled by the stacking patterns of volcanic units. Therefore, volcanic seismic reflection configurations can be interpreted in terms of the stacking patterns of volcanic units. These are also referred to as general bedding patterns in volcanostratigraphy. Furthermore, four typical seismic reflection configurations were identified, namely, the chaotic, the parallel continuous, the hummocky, the multi-mound superimposed and the composite. The corresponding interpretation models comprised single massive unit, vertical, intersectional, lateral multi-mound, and composite stacking patterns. The hummocky and composite reflection configurations with intersectional and composite stacking patterns are the most favorable for the exploration of volcanic reservoirs in rift basins.

  14. Crustal structure of the Kapuskasing Uplift from LITHOPROBE near-vertical/wide-angle seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianjun; Mereu, Robert F.

    1992-11-01

    Reprocessing of one LITHOPROBE Kapuskasing deep seismic reflection profile discloses significant new information on the structure of the Kapuskasing Uplift (KU). The shallow structure of the Ivanhoe Lake fault zone (ILFZ), along which the high-grade granulites of the KU were thrust to the surface, is conspicuously imaged on a seismic section as a series of prominent northwest-dipping reflections with listric geometry. The new images show that the ILFZ is a steep fault (about 50 deg) near the surface which quickly flattens out at shallow depths. These reflections coincide with bright positive aeromagnetic anomalies over the fault zone. Direct correlation with geological observations indicates that the high reflectivity and high magnetism associated with the fault zone likely originate from mylonites. The reprocessing also reveals a pronounced midcrustal reflector within the Abitibi greenstone belt (AGB), dipping northwest and plunging under the KU. The existence of such a reflector is independently confirmed by wide-angle reflection data acquired from a cross-profile. This reflector is apparently also detected on two other reflection profiles crossing the ILFZ about 80 km to the southwest. Its concave-down shape and broad lateral extent suggest that it represents underthrusting of the AGB beneath the KU. With these new results, a more complete structural cross-section is constructed.

  15. 08034_BOOMERPROFILES: High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Boomer Profiles in SEG-Y and JPEG Formats From Cruise RAFA08034 off Edgartown, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  16. 08034_KELPROFILES: High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Chirp Profiles in SEG-Y and JPEG Formats From Cruise RAFA08034 off Edgartown, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  17. 08034_BOOMERPROFILES: High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Boomer Profiles in SEG-Y and JPEG Formats From Cruise RAFA08034 off Edgartown, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  18. 08034_KELPROFILES: High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Chirp Profiles in SEG-Y and JPEG Formats From Cruise RAFA08034 off Edgartown, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  19. High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Profiles in SEG-Y and JPEG Formats From the Cruise RAFA07034 in the Vicinity of Woods Hole, Offshore Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  20. High-Resolution Geologic Mapping of the Inner Continental Shelf: Cape Ann to Salisbury Beach, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhardt, Walter A.; Andrews, Brian D.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Hein, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    The geologic framework of the Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Cape Ann and Salisbury Beach has been shaped by a complicated history of glaciation, deglaciation, and changes in relative sea level. New geophysical data (swath bathymetry, sidescan sonar and seismic-reflection profiling), sediment samples, and seafloor photography provide insight into the geomorphic and stratigraphic record generated by these processes. High-resolution spatial data and geologic maps in this report support coastal research and efforts to understand the type, distribution, and quality of subtidal marine habitats in the Massachusetts coastal ocean.

  1. On the estimation of stochastic parameters from deep seismic reflection data and its use in delineating lower crustal structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpentier, S.F.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a new experimental method of extracting geological data from seismic reflection data was developed and tested on synthetic and real seismic data. The method uses statistics to describe the distribution of geological heterogeneity of the subsurface as well as the distribution of reflec

  2. REPROCESSING OF SHALLOW SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA TO IMAGE FAULTS NEAR A HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE ON THE OAK RIDGE RESERVATION, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOLL, W.E.

    1997-12-30

    Shallow seismic reflection data from Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation demonstrates that spectral balancing and tomographic refraction statics can be important processing tools for shallow seismic data. At this site, reprocessing of data which had previously yielded no useable CMP stacked sections was successful after application of these processing techniques.

  3. Reprocessing of Shallow Seismic Reflection Data to Image Faults Near a Hazardous Waste Site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, W.E.

    1997-12-31

    Shallow seismic reflection data from Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation demonstrates that spectral balancing and tomographic refraction statics can be important processing tools for shallow seismic data. At this site, reprocessing of data which had previously yielded no usable CMP stacked sections was successful after application of these processing techniques.

  4. On the estimation of stochastic parameters from deep seismic reflection data and its use in delineating lower crustal structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpentier, S.F.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a new experimental method of extracting geological data from seismic reflection data was developed and tested on synthetic and real seismic data. The method uses statistics to describe the distribution of geological heterogeneity of the subsurface as well as the distribution of

  5. Integration of seismic reflection and geologically balanced profiles; Integration reflexionsseismischer und geologisch bilanzierter Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, A. [Trappe Erdoel Erdgas Consultant, Isernhagen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Geophysics and geology employ different kinds of techniques in order to preserve the underground structure. These techniques are based on different sets of data, i.e. seismic or geological data. A sensible combination of the two techniques should produce a better model of the ground structure. This study attempts to integrate geologically balanced profiles and seismic reflection data. A balanced geological profile can than be compared with seismic reflection data measured in the field. The geological model is then changed into a seismic model of the underground by means of seismic modeling. Synthetic modeling is based on the acquisition of available field data. The synthetic stack section or the synthetic migration image are then compared to the field data. Deviations between the two can be attributed to speed errors and the fact that balances will never give an unequivocal solution but always present a group of solutions. (orig. MSK). [Deutsch] In der Geophysik und der Geologie werden verschiedene Techniken verwendet, um die Untergrundstruktur zu erhalten. Diese Techniken basieren auf verschiedenen Datensaetzen, z.B. seismische und geologische Daten. Eine sinnvolle Kombination der Techniken sollte ein besseres Abbild des Untergrundes liefern. In dieser Studie wird ein Versuch unternommen geologisch bilanzierte Profile und reflexionsseismische Daten zu integrieren. Soll ein bilanziertes geologisches Profil mit im Feld gemessenen reflexionsseismischen Daten verglichen werden, dann wird das geologische Modell mit Hilfe der seismischen Modellierung in ein seismisches Abbild des Untergrundes verwandelt. Dabei wird die synthetische Modellierung entsprechend der Aquisition der vorliegenden Felddaten durchgefuehrt. Die synthetische Stapelsektion oder das synthetische Migrationsimage werden anschliessend mit den Felddaten verglichen. Abweichungen zwischen beobachteten und Felddaten haben ihre Ursachen sowohl in Geschwindigkeitsfehlern, als auch in der Tatsache, dass eine

  6. Imaging Geological Structures Up to the Acquisition Surface Using a Hybrid Refraction-Reflection Seismic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of seismic imaging is to reconstruct the reflectivity associated with subsurface structures. In standard imaging techniques, the reflectivity model usually starts a few meters below the surface, the actual depth being dependent on data acquisition parameters and the mute used to remove stretching of first arrivals after normal moveout correction. In this paper, we describe a method to image the reflectivity of near-surface structures starting from the acquisition surface. This is achieved by processing both the first arrivals and the reflected phases present in data collected for refraction surveys. The proposed imaging procedure works in three steps. First, we obtain a velocity model for the shallow region by combining the Plus-Minus method of refraction interpretation with tomographic inversion of first arrival times. Second, by processing reflection events present in the refraction data, we obtain a standard reflectivity section for the deeper region. Finally, we compute reflectivity for the shallow region using the velocity model estimated from first arrival information in step 1. This velocity model is used both to compute reflectivity and to convert it in time. The reflectivity obtained for the shallow region is associated with velocity contrasts. In order to merge it with the reflectivity section for the deeper region a scaling factor between the two sets of reflectivity sections must be computed and applied. The novelty of this contribution is the use the tomographic velocity model in evaluating reflectivity for the upper part of the section. This improves the continuity of information about all near-surface structures in comparison with previous works that were limited to reflection data. Three field examples illustrate the proposed procedure showing continuous information about reflectivity of structures starting from the acquisition surface.

  7. New imaging method for seismic reflection wave and its theoretical basis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Some new imaging formulas for seismic reflection wave and theirtheoretical basis are given. Phenomena of wave propagation should be characterized by instantaneous spectrum and expressed by complex function of three variables (time, space and frequency) in mathematics. Various physical parameters of medium are also complex functions of two variables (space and frequency). The relationship between reflection coefficient of medium and spectrum of reflected wave is given. Multi-reflection and filter of formations are considered in inversion formulas. Prob-lems in classical convolution model and wave equation are illustrated. All these inversion formulas can be used to image underground medium by wavelet transform and method of "3-basic colors". Different colors mean different media.

  8. Acquisition and preliminary analysis of multi-channel seismic reflection data, acquired during the oceanographic cruises of the TOMO-ETNA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Firetto Carlino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The TOMO-ETNA experiment was performed in the framework of the FP7 “MED-SUV” (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes in order to gain a detailed geological and structural model of the continental and oceanic crust concerning Etna and Aeolian Islands volcanoes (Sicily, Italy, by means of active and passive seismic exploration methodologies. Among all data collected, some 1410 km of marine multi-channel seismic (MCS reflection profiles were acquired in the Ionian and Tyrrhenian Seas during two of the three oceanographic cruises of the TOMO-ETNA experiment, in July and November 2014, with the aim of shading light to deep, intermediate and shallow stratigraphy and crustal structure of the two above mentioned areas. The MCS sections, targeted to deep exploration, were acquired during the oceanographic cruise on board the R/V “Sarmiento de Gamboa”, using an active seismic source of 16 air-guns, for a total volume of 4340 cu. in., and a 3000 m long, 240-channels digital streamer as receiving system. High-resolution seismic profiles were instead collected through the R/V “Aegaeo”, using two smaller air-guns (overall 270 cu. in. volume and a 96 channels, 300 m long digital streamer. This paper provides a detailed description of the acquisition parameters and main processing steps adopted for the MCS data. Some processed lines are shown and preliminarily interpreted, to highlight the overall good quality and the high potential of the MCS sections collected during the TOMO-ETNA experiment.

  9. Formation of diapiric structure in the deformation zone, central Indian Ocean: A model from gravity and seismic reflection data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Rao, D.G.; Neprochnov, Y.P.

    Analyses of bathymetry, gravity and seismic reflection data of the diffusive plate boundary in the central Indian Ocean reveal a new kind of deformed structure besides the well-reported structures of long-wavelength anticlinal basement rises...

  10. Multichannel seismic-reflection data acquired off the coast of southern California - Part A 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Multichannel seismic-reflection (MCS) data were collected in the California Continental Borderland as part of southern California Earthquake Hazards Task. Five data...

  11. Multichannel seismic-reflection data acquired off the coast of southern California - Part A 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Multichannel seismic-reflection (MCS) data were collected in the California Continental Borderland as part of southern California Earthquake Hazards Task. Five data...

  12. Analysis of multi-channel seismic reflection and magnetic data along 13 degrees N latitude across the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.G.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Ramprasad, T.; Krishna, K.S.; Chaubey, A.K.; Murty, G.P.S.; Srinivas, K.; Desa, M.; Reddy, S.I.; Ashalata, B.; Subrahmanyam, C.; Mital, G.S.; Drolia, R.K.; rai, S.N.; Ghosh, S.K.; Singh, R.N.; Majumdar, M.

    and the Ninetyeast Ridge), the Ninetyeast Ridge and the Sunda Arc. The study revealed eight seismic sequences, H1 to H8 of parallel continuous to discontinuous reflectors. Considering especially depth to the horozons, nature of reflection and on comparison...

  13. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Queen Maud Land - 1985-1986, SDLS CD-ROM vol 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1985-86 in the Queen Maud Land region, Antarctica, by the Japan National Oil...

  14. Operational Data Report C&GS DR-8, Seismic Reflection Profiles Northern Bering Sea (NODC Accession 7000753)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A series of seismic reflection profiles were taken aboard the USC&GSS SURVEYOR during the summer of 1969 as part of a general continental shelf survey in the...

  15. BASIN STRUCTURE FROM TWO-DIMENSIONAL SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA, CRAZY MOUNTAINS BASIN, MONTANA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Taylor

    2003-08-01

    Some 140 miles of multichannel seismic reflection data, acquired commercially in the 1970's, were reprocessed by the U.S. Geological Survey in late 2000 and early 2001 to interpret the subsurface geology of the Crazy Mountains Basin, an asymmetric Laramide foreland basin located in south-central Montana. The seismic data indicate that the northwestern basin margin is controlled by a thrust fault that places basement rocks over a thick (22,000 feet) sequence of Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks to the south. From the deep basin trough, Paleozoic through Tertiary rocks slope gently upward to the south and southeast. The northern boundary of the basin, which is not imaged well by the seismic data, appears to be folded over a basement ridge rather than being truncated against a fault plane. Seismic data along the basin margin to the south indicate that several fault controlled basement highs may have been created by thin-skinned tectonics where a series of shallow thrust faults cut Precambrian, Paleozoic, and early Mesozoic rocks, whereas, in contrast, Cretaceous and Tertiary strata are folded. The data are further interpreted to indicate that this fault-bounded asymmetric basin contains several structures that possibly could trap hydrocarbons, provided source rocks, reservoirs, and seals are present. In addition, faults in the deep basin trough may have created enough fracturing to enhance porosity, thus developing ''sweet spots'' for hydrocarbons in basin-centered continuous gas accumulations.

  16. Techniques for Surveying Urban Active Faults by Seismic Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Mingcai; Gao Jinghua; Liu Jianxun; Rong Lixin

    2005-01-01

    Using the seismic method to detect active faults directly below cities is an irreplaceable prospecting technique. The seismic method can precisely determine the fault position. Seismic method itself can hardly determine the geological age of fault. However, by considering in connection with the borehole data and the standard geological cross-section of the surveyed area, the geological age of reflected wave group can be qualitatively (or semi-quantitatively)determined from the seismic depth profile. To determine the upper terminal point of active faults directly below city, it is necessary to use the high-resolution seismic reflection technique.To effectively determine the geometric feature of deep faults, especially to determine the relation between deep and shallow fracture structures, the seismic reflection method is better than the seismic refraction method.

  17. Faults survey by 3D reflection seismics; Sanjigen hanshaho jishin tansa ni yoru danso chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Ejiri, T.; Yamada, N.; Narita, N.; Aso, H.; Takano, H.; Matsumura, M. [Dia Consultants Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes fault survey by 3D seismic reflection exploration. Survey has been conducted mainly at flat land area without pavement not in urban area in Japan. Subsurface structure is complicated with intersecting multiple faults. In this area, a lot of geological investigations have been done prior to the seismic reflection exploration. Fairly certain images of faults have been obtained. However, there were still unknown structures. Survey was conducted at an area of 170m{times}280m in the CDP range. Measurements were carried out by using 100 g of dynamite per seismic generation point combined with 40 Hz velocity geophones. Fixed distribution consisting of lattice points of 12{times}12 was adopted as an observation method. In and around the lattice, a great number of explosions were carried out. The CDP stacking method and the method of migration after stacking were used for the data processing. The 3D structures of six horizons and five faults could be interpreted. Interpreted horizons were well agreed with the logging results. 3 figs.

  18. The Northern end of the Dead Sea Basin: Geometry from reflection seismic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, A. S.; Heinrichs, T.; Qabbani, I.; ten Brink, U.S.

    2007-01-01

    Recently released reflection seismic lines from the Eastern side of the Jordan River north of the Dead Sea were interpreted by using borehole data and incorporated with the previously published seismic lines of the eastern side of the Jordan River. For the first time, the lines from the eastern side of the Jordan River were combined with the published reflection seismic lines from the western side of the Jordan River. In the complete cross sections, the inner deep basin is strongly asymmetric toward the Jericho Fault supporting the interpretation of this segment of the fault as the long-lived and presently active part of the Dead Sea Transform. There is no indication for a shift of the depocenter toward a hypothetical eastern major fault with time, as recently suggested. Rather, the north-eastern margin of the deep basin takes the form of a large flexure, modestly faulted. In the N-S-section along its depocenter, the floor of the basin at its northern end appears to deepen continuously by roughly 0.5??km over 10??km distance, without evidence of a transverse fault. The asymmetric and gently-dipping shape of the basin can be explained by models in which the basin is located outside the area of overlap between en-echelon strike-slip faults. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Crustal structure of Shatsky Rise from joint refraction and reflection seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, J.; Sager, W. W.

    2011-12-01

    Shatsky Rise in the western Pacific is one of a few gigantic oceanic plateaus in the world, with a surface area of ˜ 4.8 ± 105~km2 (about the same size as California). In contrast to other large oceanic plateaus formed during the Cretaceous Quite Period, Shatsky Rise formed during the frequent reversals of magnetic polarity, allowing its tectonic environment to be resolved in detail. It was formed at a rapidly spreading ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction, so the effect of lithospheric lid on magma migration is expected to be minimal, thereby facilitating the petrological interpretation of its seismic structure in terms of parental mantle processes. In the summer of 2010, a seismic refraction survey combined with multichannel seismic profiling was conducted across Shatsky Rise. Twenty eight ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed along two crossing perpendicular lines, and all of the instruments were recovered successfully, yielding a large volume of high-quality wide-angle refraction and reflection data, with the source-receiver distance often exceeding 200~km. In this contribution, we present the P-wave velocity structure of the Shatsky Rise crust, which is constructed by joint refraction and reflection travel time tomography, and also discuss its implications for the origin of Shatsky Rise.

  20. Cordilleran front range structural features in northwest Montana interpreted from vintage seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Mason C.; Rutherford, Bradley S.; Speece, Marvin A.; Mosolf, Jesse G.

    2016-04-01

    Industry seismic reflection data spanning the Rocky Mountain Cordillera front ranges of northwest Montana were reprocessed and interpreted in this study. Five seismic profiles represent 160 km of deep reflection data collected in 1983 that span the eastern Purcell anticlinorium, Rocky Mountain Trench (RMT), Rocky Mountain Basal Décollement (RMBD), and Lewis thrust. The data were reprocessed using modern techniques including refraction statics, pre-stack time migration (PSTM), and pre- and post-stack depth migration. Results indicate the RMBD is 8-13 km below the Earth's surface and dip 3-10° west. Evidence for the autochthonous Mesoproterozoic Belt and basal Cambrian rocks beneath the RMBD is present in all of the profiles and appears to extend east of the RMT. The Lewis thrust was identified in the seismic profiles and appears to sole into the RMBD east of the RMT. The RMT fault system has a dip displacement of 3-4 km and forms a half graben filled with 1 km of unconsolidated Tertiary sedimentary deposits. The RMT and adjacent Flathead fault systems are interpreted to be structurally linked and may represent a synthetic, en echelon fault system.

  1. New imaging method for seismic reflection wave and its theoretical basis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Guangyuan

    2001-01-01

    [1]Huang Guangyuan, Principle of "3-Basic Colors" for imaging from reflected seismic wave, Acta Geophysica Sinica (in Chinese), 2000, 43(1): 138.[2]Huang Guangyuan, Revisions of convolution model of reflected seismic wave, Chinese Physics Letters, 1998, 15(11): 851.[3]Charles, K. C., An Introduction to Wavelets, San Diego: Academic Press, Inc., 1992.[4]Huang Guangyuan, Liu Weiqian, Revision wave expression and wave equation, Abstracts of Chinese Sci. & Tech. (Letters) (in Chinese), 1999, 5(3): 335.[5]Silvia, M. T., Deconvolution of geophysical time series in the exploration for oil and natural gas, Amsterdam-Oxford-New York: Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, 1973.[6]Huang Guangyuan, Liu Xiaojun, Inverse Problems in Mathematical Physics (in Chinese), Jinan: Shandong Sci. & Tech. Press, 1993.[7]Huang Guangyuan, Liu Xiaojun, Discussion of several mathematical inverse models in seismic prospecting, CT Theory and Application (in Chinese), 1992, 1(2): 8.[8]Huang Guangyuan, The second discussion on acoustic velocity inversion from wave equation, CT Theory and Application (in Chinese), 1993, 2(3): 14[9]Huang Guangyuan, Dynamic revision of classical laws in physics from the viewpoint of system science, Systems Science and Systems Engineering, 1993, 2(1): 15[10]Brekhovskikh, L. M., Wave in Layered Media, San Diego: Academic Press, 1980.

  2. Detection of Reflected Waves from Plate Boundary Using ACROSS Source and Seismic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, T.; Watanabe, T.; Ikuta, R.; Saiga, A.; Miyajima, R.; Yamaoka, K.; Tsuruga, K.; Kunitomo, T.; Hasada, Y.; Kasahara, J.; Satomura, M.; Kumazawa, M.; Fujii, N.

    2005-12-01

    ACROSS (Accurately Controlled and Routinely Operated Signal System) is effective in monitoring temporary changes of Earth's interior. A long-term operation experiment near Nojima fault [Ikuta et al.,2004] detected small temporary changes of travel time of P and S waves at tele-seismic events. Toward Tokai monitoring plan to detect the reflected phases from the top of Philippine Sea Plate and monitor its temporal changes, a mid-term continuous experiment was conducted using ACROSS source and a seismic array. The experiment was operated for the period from Dec. 2004 to Sep.2005 in the Tokai area, Pacific side of the central part of Japan. In this region, the expected Tokai earthquake is a serious concern. In addition, slow slip events and low-frequency tremors are observed in this area. A strong reflected phase from the plate boundary was found by the seismic observation using artificial sources [Iidaka et al.,2003]. The purpose of the experiment is to establish a method to detect and monitor the reflection from the plate boundary using ACROSS. The ACROSS source is located in Toki city and operated by Tono Geoscience Center. The ACROSS source continuously transmits precisely-controlled frequency-modulated signals whose frequency band ranges from 10 to 20 Hz with an interval of 50 seconds. We deployed a short-span seismic array at the distance of 55 km from the ACROSS source. The cross-shaped seismic array spanning 2 km consists of 12 seismometers equipped with an offline data logger, amplifier and solarpanel. We stacked the received signal for a month with an interval of 200 seconds in order to improve signal noise ratio. We extracted a series of line spectrum of ACROSS signal. Transfer function can be obtained by dividing spectrum by the source. Applying inverse Fourier transform, we can obtain the transfer function in time-domain. We identified direct P and S phases by comparing with the standard travel time table by JMA. We also found some coherent later phases

  3. Deep 3-D seismic reflection imaging of Precambrian sills in the crystalline crust of Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welford, Joanna Kim

    2005-07-01

    Using deep 3-D seismic reflection datasets collected by the Canadian petroleum exploration industry in southwestern and northwestern Alberta, the Head-Smashed-In and Winagami Precambrian sill complexes within the crystalline upper crust, previously identified on Lithoprobe 2-D multichannel reflection lines, are investigated to determine their 3-D geometries and reflective characteristics. During seismic processing of the dataset in southwestern Alberta, a recently developed wavelet-based method, Physical Wavelet Frame Denoising, is applied and shown to successfully suppress ground roll contamination while preserving low frequency signals from deeper structures. A new 3-D empirical trace interpolation scheme, DSInt, is developed to address the problem of spatial aliasing associated with 3-D data acquisition. Results from applying the algorithm to both datasets are comparable to available interpolation codes while allowing for greater flexibility in the handling of irregular acquisition geometries and interpolated trace headers. Evidence of the Head-Smashed-In reflector in southwestern Alberta is obtained using a dataset acquired to 8 s TWTT (approx. 24 km depth). From locally coherent, discontinuous pockets of basement reflectivity, the dataset appears to image the tapering western edge of the deep reflections imaged by Lithoprobe. A statistical approach of tracking reflectivity is developed and applied to obtain the spatial and temporal distribution of reflections. Simple 1-D forward modelling results reveal that the brightest reflections likely arise from a 50 to 150 m thick body of high density/high velocity material although variations in the amplitudes and lateral distribution of the reflections indicate that the thickness of the sills is laterally variable. Thus, the results are consistent with imaging the tapering edge of the sill complex. Clear evidence of the Winagami reflection sequence in northwestern Alberta, emerges from the second dataset acquired to 5

  4. Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: a Gauss-Newton augmented Lagrangian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbos, F.; Gilbert, J. Ch.; Glowinski, R.; Sinoquet, D.

    2006-03-01

    Seismic reflection tomography is a method for determining a subsurface velocity model from the traveltimes of seismic waves reflecting on geological interfaces. From an optimization viewpoint, the problem consists in minimizing a non-linear least-squares function measuring the mismatch between observed traveltimes and those calculated by ray tracing in this model. The introduction of a priori information on the model is crucial to reduce the under-determination. The contribution of this paper is to introduce a technique able to take into account geological a priori information in the reflection tomography problem expressed as inequality constraints in the optimization problem. This technique is based on a Gauss-Newton (GN) sequential quadratic programming approach. At each GN step, a solution to a convex quadratic optimization problem subject to linear constraints is computed thanks to an augmented Lagrangian algorithm. Our choice for this optimization method is motivated and its original aspects are described. First applications on real data sets are presented to illustrate the potential of the approach in practical use of reflection tomography.

  5. Seismic reflection and vibracoring studies of the continental shelf offshore central and western Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, W.M.; Albanese, J.R.; Coch, N.K.; Harsch, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The ridge-and-swale topography on the continental shelf south of Fire Island, New York, is characterized by northeast-trending linear shoals that are shore attached and shore oblique on the inner shelf and isolated and shore parallel on the middle shelf. High-resolution seismic reflection profiles show that the ridges and swales occur independent of, and are not controlled by, the presence of internal structures (for example, filled tidal inlet channels, paleobarrier strata) or underlying structure (for example, high-relief Cretaceous unconformity). Grab samples of surficial sediments on the shelf south of Fire Island average 98% sand. Locally, benthic fauna increase silt and clay content through fecal pellet production or increase the content of gravel-size material by contribution of their fragmented shell remains. Surficial sand on the ridges is unimodal at 0.33 mm (medium sand, about 50 mesh), and surficial sand in troughs is bimodal at 0.33 mm and 0.15 mm (fine sand, about 100 mesh). In addition to seismic studies, 26 vibracores were recovered from the continental shelf in state and federal waters from south of Rockaway and Long Beaches, Long Island, New York. Stratigraphic and sedimentological data gleaned from these cores were used to outline the geologic framework in the study area. A variety of sedimentary features were noted in the cores, including burrow-mottled sections of sand in a finer silty-sand, rhythmic lamination of sand and silty-sand that reflect cyclic changes in sediment transport, layers of shell hash and shells that probably represent tempestites, and changes from dark color to light color in the sediments that probably represent changes in the oxidation-reduction conditions in the area with time. The stratigraphic units identified are an upper, generally oxidized, nearshore facies, an underlying fine- to medium-sand and silty-clay unit considered to be an estuarine facies, and a lower, coarse-grained deeply oxidized, cross-laminated pre

  6. Recent faulting in western Nevada revealed by multi-scale seismic reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frary, Roxanna N.; Louie, John N.; Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jackson K.; Kell, Annie; Eisses, Amy; Kent, Graham M.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Karlin, Robert; Baskin, Robert L.; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Liberty, Lee M.

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to compare different reflection methods used to image subsurface structure within different physical environments in western Nevada. With all the methods employed, the primary goal is fault imaging for structural information toward geothermal exploration and seismic hazard estimation. We use seismic CHIRP (a swept-frequency marine acquisition system), weight drop (an accelerated hammer source), and two different vibroseis systems to characterize fault structure. We focused our efforts in the Reno metropolitan area and the area within and surrounding Pyramid Lake in northern Nevada. These different methods have provided valuable constraints on the fault geometry and activity, as well as associated fluid movement. These are critical in evaluating the potential for large earthquakes in these areas, and geothermal exploration possibilities near these structures.

  7. Reflection seismic investigations of the Beaufort Sea margin, Arctic Ocean: Variable history of Quaternary ice-sheet advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Christine; Dowdeswell, Julian; Pietras, Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    The seismic stratigraphy and sedimentary architecture of the formerly-glaciated Beaufort Sea shelf and adjacent slope are investigated using a comprehensive grid of high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data collected by ION Geophysical Corporation as part of the BeaufortSPAN East survey. Three cross-shelf troughs, representing locations of former ice streams draining a 1000 km-long section of the Laurentide Ice Sheet are examined; the Mackenzie, Amundsen Gulf and M'Clure Strait systems. These palaeo-ice streams operated during the last, Late Wisconsinan, glacial maximum and a hitherto unknown number of earlier glacial periods. Their dynamics influenced past ice-sheet configuration and may have forced abrupt climate change through transport of ice and freshwater to the Arctic Ocean. The objectives of this work are to constrain the number of ice advances through each trough, to discuss the possible timing of these events, and to examine the impact of Quaternary glaciation on the continental shelf and adjacent slope. The number of cycles of ice-sheet growth and decay varies markedly between the Mackenzie Trough on the western Beaufort Sea margin, with only two recorded events, and the Amundsen Gulf Trough to the east, with at least nine. The Mackenzie Trough was probably occupied by an ice stream during the Late Wisconsinan and either the Illinoian or Early Wisconsinan glaciation. The Amundsen Gulf ice stream was initiated earlier in the Quaternary, suggesting that the onset of cross-shelf glaciation on the eastern Beaufort Sea margin occurred significantly prior to initial glaciation of Mackenzie Trough to the west. Whereas the continental slope beyond the Mackenzie Trough lacks a significant glacial-sedimentary depocentre, major trough-mouth fans (of volumes ~10,000 km³ and ~60,000 km³) are present beyond the Amundsen Gulf and M'Clure Strait, respectively. A number of buried glacigenic landforms, including grounding-zone wedges and lateral moraines, are

  8. Deep crustal structure of Baiyun Sag, northern South China Sea revealed from deep seismic reflection profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Chunju; ZHOU Di; SUN Zhen; CHEN Changmin; HAO Hujun

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses deep crustal architecture of the Baiyun Sag of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, northern South China Sea based on velocity analysis, time-depth conversion and seismic interpretation of the deep seismic reflection profile DSRP-2002. The profile was acquired and processed to 14 S TWT by the China National Offshore Oil Corp. (CNOOC) in 2002. It extends across the Baiyun Sag of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, from the northern continental shelf of the SCS to the deepwater province. As the first deep seismic reflection profile in the Pearl River Mouth Basin,this profile reveals seismic phases from basement down to upper most mantle. The Moho surface appears in the profile as an undulating layer of varying thickness of 1-3 km. It is not a single reflector interface, but a velocity gradient or intercon- version layer. The crust thins stepwisely from the shelf to the continental slope and the abyssal plain (from north to south), and also thins under depocenters. The crustal thickness is only 7 km in the depocenter of the main Baiyun Sag, which corresponds to a Moho upwelling mirroring the basement topography. In the lower slope and the ocean-continental transition zone of the southernmost portion of the profile, three sub-parallel, NW-dipping strong reflectors found at depths around 10-21 km are interpreted as indications of a subducted Mesozoic oceanic crust. Crustal faults exist in the northern and southern boundaries of the Baiyun Sag. The intense and persistent subsidence of the Baiyun Sag might be related to the long-term activity of the crustal faults.

  9. Pre-stack full waveform inversion of ultra-high-frequency marine seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Giuseppe; Vardy, Mark E.; Henstock, Timothy J.

    2017-06-01

    The full waveform inversion (FWI) of seismic reflection data aims to reconstruct a detailed physical properties model of the subsurface, fitting both the amplitude and the traveltime of the reflections generated at physical discontinuities in the propagation medium. Unlike reservoir-scale seismic exploration, where seismic inversion is a widely adopted remote characterization tool, ultrahigh-frequency (UHF, 0.2-4.0 kHz) multichannel marine reflection seismology is still most often limited to a qualitative interpretation of the reflections' architecture. Here we propose an elastic FWI methodology, custom-tailored for pre-stack UHF marine data in vertically heterogeneous media to obtain a decimetric-scale distribution of P-impedance, density and Poisson's ratio within the shallow subseabed sediments. We address the deterministic multiparameter inversion in a sequential fashion. The complex trace instantaneous phase is first inverted for the P-wave velocity to make up for the lack of low frequency in the data and reduce the nonlinearity of the problem. This is followed by a short-offset P-impedance optimization and a further step of full offset range Poisson's ratio inversion. Provided that the seismogram contains wide reflection angles (>40°), we show that it is possible to invert for density and decompose a posteriori the relative contribution of P-wave velocity and density to the P-impedance. A broad range of synthetic tests is used to prove the potential of the methodology and highlights sensitivity issues specific to UHF seismic. An example application to real data is also presented. In the real case, trace normalization is applied to minimize the systematic error deriving from an inaccurate source wavelet estimation. The inverted model for the top 15 m of the subseabed agrees with the local lithological information and core-log data. Thus, we can obtain a detailed remote characterization of the shallow sediments using a multichannel sub-bottom profiler within a

  10. Ship Tracklines for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Eastern Rhode Island Sound in 1975 (A75_6LINES2.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  11. 15-Minute Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Southern Rhode Island Sound in 1980 (A80_6NAV_SORT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  12. A80_6SEGY.TXT: Seismic-Reflection Profiles in SEG-Y Format From Southern Rhode Island Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  13. 15-Minute Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Eastern Rhode Island Sound in 1975 (A75_6NAV_SORT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  14. A75_6SEGY.TXT: Seismic-Reflection Profiles in SEG-Y Format from Eastern Rhode Island Sound Collected in 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  15. One-Minute Navigation Shapefile of Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Eastern Rhode Island Sound in 1975 (A75_6_1MINNAV_SORT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  16. Ship Tracklines for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Southern Rhode Island Sound in 1980 (A80_6LINES2.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  17. 15-Minute Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Eastern Rhode Island Sound in 1975 (A75_6NAV_SORT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  18. 15-Minute Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Western Rhode Island Sound (N80_1NAV.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the...

  19. Imaging Enhancement on Deep Seismic Reflection with Petrel and Ocean Working Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P.; Huang, D.; Feng, X.; Li, L.; Liu, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, Q.

    2011-12-01

    SinoProbe has been initiated to enhance understanding of earth deep structure, resources and geological disasters forecasting throughout Chinese continent. Besides traditional deep exploration methods, various state-of-the-art technologies have been carried out in order to acquire data and jointly utilize all possible information reflecting deep crust and mantle structures and evolution.Petrel, a powerful software application developed by Schlumberger, has been successfully applied to the O&G industry. It is now a complete seismic-to-simulation application for 3D and 2D seismic interpretation. However, it has a great potential to allow the user to extend utilization with multiple types of data sets to deal with much deeper geophysical information. Petrel all-in-one concept, that functionally comprises of massive data integration, multiple domains experts participation and 3D geological object-oriented etc., will come benefit to the deep earth study. Currently, there is no special tool designed for this purpose so that Petrel is required to extend its potential to cope with not only O&G area but also a larger area with unique requests of deeper objects.Ocean, a software framework for Petrel, provides an open development environment offering seamless integration of developer intellectual contribution to the Petrel mainstream workflow. It is able to accelerate the development and deployment of user's Petrel-like workflows to resolve complex problems. It can be implemented by means of plug-ins utilities although there is additional challenge to write a robust code with Ocean framework. Deep seismic reflection profiling is a well recognized technique to reveal the fine structure of lithosphere. Moreover, it can perform a significant role for prospective evaluation of O&G and mineral resources, and geological disasters. Its near-vertical deep seismic reflection method can enhance broad band seismic observations for imaging of the deep crust and continental geodynamics

  20. Stresses and strains developed by the reflection of seismic waves at a free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banister, J.R.; Ellett, D.M.; Mehl, C.R.; Dean, F.F.

    1978-07-01

    Exact and approximate equations have been derived for the stresses and strains beneath a free surface when an incoming longitudinal wave and an incoming shear wave reflect from the surface. Results of the approximate solution for depths much less than the wave length of the incoming wave are given in tabular form and are graphed for Poisson's ratios of 0.25, 0.3, and 0.333. The results should be of use in categorizing the magnitude of near-surface stresses and strains resulting from seismic waves produced by deeply buried explosives or earthquakes.

  1. High resolution digital delay timer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  2. High Resolution Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    carbon distribution as it relates to the presence of Bainite phase (with small tetragonality) interspersed among the cubic ferrite. An example of the...preferentially segregate. The view offered by these high resolution methods differs from what has been considered before: grains thought to be Bainite

  3. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    30 September 1986 Los Angeles Air Force Station 13. NUMBER OF PAGES Los Angeles, Calif. 90009-2960 36 74. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(If...TREE PLMUT ",-20 -CUTLIASS DumpER SED AN... TREE TRUNK, -0 - MERC BUMPER f - 40 H!-I -50 iI Fig. 7. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar View of

  4. Processing of multichannel seismic reflection data acquired in 2013 for seismic investigations of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John J.; Agena, Warren F.; Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2016-04-13

    As part of a cooperative effort among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, two grids of two-dimensional multichannel seismic reflection data were acquired in the Gulf of Mexico over lease blocks Green Canyon 955 and Walker Ridge 313 between April 18 and May 3, 2013. The purpose of the data acquisition was to fill knowledge gaps in an ongoing study of known gas hydrate accumulations in the area. These data were initially processed onboard the recording ship R/V Pelican for more quality control during the recording. The data were subsequently processed in detail by the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver, Colorado, in two phases. The first phase was to create a “kinematic” dataset that removed extensive noise present in the data but did not preserve relative amplitudes. The second phase was to create a true relative amplitude dataset that included noise removal and “wavelet” deconvolution that preserved the amplitude information. This report describes the processing techniques used to create both datasets.

  5. Comparison of the bedrock depth from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and seismic profile obtained the Seismic Reflection Data, Eskisehir Basin, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tün, Muammer; Karabulut, Savaş; Özel, Oğuz

    2015-04-01

    Ground motion estimation for future earthquakes is one of the most challenging problems in seismology and earthquake engineering. The bedrock depth has a considerable seismic risk for the urban area of Eskişehir. In this study, multiple station microtremor measurement methods which are more practical, non-distructive, fast and economical compared to seismic reflection method were implemented. These method using microtremor recordings have become a very useful data for microzonation studies because of their simple acquisition and analysis. Extensive ambient noise measurements were performed in the basin of Eskisehir from June 2010 to spring 2012. We use data recorded by a broadband seismometer and digitizer CMG-6TD, Guralp seismometer. Some of the measurement locations, the CMG-6TD sensor was located into 30 cm-deep holes in the ground to avoid strongly wind-generated, long-period noise. Dominant frequency (f), bed-rock depth (h) and shear-wave velocity (Vs) were determined from Spatial Autocorrelation (SPAC) methods. With the SPAC Method, it is possible to constrain the velocity structure underlying the site using microtremor array measurements. The results obtained were compared to the 96-channel seismic reflection data with explosive energy source. Several seismic reflection surveys with P-Gun seismic source have been performed on the same place with array measurements. We used two types of seismic sources: 36 cartridge Gun. Shot interval was 10 meters, group interval (one geophone per group, 48 geophones in total) was 10 meters, near offset was 10 meters, far offset was 480 meters, CDP interval was 5 meters. We adapted the 'Off-End Spread' technique while using the Gun. Reflection images within the sedimentary section correlate well with the velocity structure obtained from SPAC.

  6. Interpretation of shallow crustal structure of the Imperial Valley, California, from seismic reflection profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severson, L.K.

    1987-05-01

    Eight seismic reflection profiles (285 km total length) from the Imperial Valley, California, were provided to CALCRUST for reprocessing and interpretation. Two profiles were located along the western margin of the valley, five profiles were situated along the eastern margin and one traversed the deepest portion of the basin. These data reveal that the central basin contains a wedge of highly faulted sediments that thins to the east. Most of the faulting is strike-slip but there is evidence for block rotations on the scale of 5 to 10 kilometers within the Brawley Seismic Zone. These lines provide insight into the nature of the east and west edges of the Imperial Valley. The basement at the northwestern margin of the valley, to the north of the Superstition Hills, has been normal-faulted and blocks of basement material have ''calved'' into the trough. A blanket of sediments has been deposited on this margin. To the south of the Superstition Hills and Superstition Mountain, the top of the basement is a detachment surface that dips gently into the basin. This margin is also covered by a thick sequence sediments. The basement of the eastern margin consists of metamorphic rocks of the upper plate of the Chocolate Mountain Thrust system underlain by the Orocopia Schist. These rocks dip to the southeast and extend westward to the Sand Hills Fault but do not appear to cross it. Thus, the Sand Hills Fault is interpreted to be the southern extension of the San Andreas Fault. North of the Sand Hills Fault the East Highline Canal seismicity lineament is associated with a strike-slip fault and is probably linked to the Sand Hills Fault. Six geothermal areas crossed by these lines, in agreement with previous studies of geothermal reservoirs, are associated with ''faded'' zones, Bouguer gravity and heat flow maxima, and with higher seismic velocities than surrounding terranes.

  7. A method to suppress spurious multiples in virtual-source gathers retrieved using seismic interferometry with reflection data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boullenger, B.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Draganov, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Seismic interferometry applied to surface reflection data (with source and receivers at the surface) allows to retrieve virtual-source gathers at the position of receivers, where no source was shot. As a result of the crosscorrelation of all primary and multiple reflections, the virtual-source gathe

  8. Pressure-dependent seismic reflection amplitude changes in crystalline crust: lessons learned at the Continental Deep Drilling Site (KTB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilecke, T.; Bram, K.; Buske, S.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted an active seismic experiment aimed at measuring changes in seismic reflection amplitudes as a consequence of fresh water injection and corresponding pressure changes at the German Continental Deep Drilling site (KTB). The injection took place at the bottom of the 4-km-deep pilot borehole in the SE2 fault zone in crystalline rock units between the springs of 2004 and 2005. Prior to the experiment, theoretical calculations indicated a possible increase in the compressional wave reflection coefficient as a result of an injection-induced reduction of the seismic velocities within the fault zone. Despite good repeatability of the emitted source signals, the experiment suffered from missing the clear reflection signals expected from the fault zone with regard to seismic data from past experiments. Applying various data-processing steps did not enhance the signals enough to obtain clear reflections or even pressure-dependent reflection amplitude changes. The signal-to-noise ratio remains smaller than the effects under observation. Provided that reflections are present in the data, the error bar of the recorded signals is of the order of 100 per cent. Therefore, we conclude that the experiment was not successful in seismically measuring pressure variations. However, important lessons for land seismic time-lapse measurements in crystalline environments have been learned: (i) The source should be capable of emitting frequencies below 30 Hz. (ii) The detector array setup proved to be partly questionable because in a scattering environment like the crystalline rocks at the KTB site, the incidence of a plane wave precondition might be violated for high-frequency signals. (iii) Near-surface variations of elastic properties likely influence seismic monitoring. (iv) Using a step function, that is a first-order pressure discontinuity, to model the subsurface pressure build-up, is very likely too simple an approach.

  9. Closure of the Tornquist sea: Constraints from MONA LISA deep seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona LISA Working Group

    1997-12-01

    Deep seismic reflection profiles west of Denmark across the suture between Baltica and Eastern Avalonia reveal weak, southward-dipping reflectors within the crystalline basement. These reflectors are interpreted as thrusts resulting from emplacement of Eastern Avalonia onto the southern edge of Baltica. North of these reflectors are the remains of a dissected Silurian foredeep. The presence of this foredeep and the 440 Ma age of metamorphism in rocks recovered from boreholes into Eastern Avalonian rocks suggest that closure of the Tornquist sea occurred in the Late Ordovician, which is consistent with paleobiogeographic data and paleomagnetic apparent polar wander paths for Eastern Avalonia and Baltica. The similarity between these reflection data and the BABEL AC profile permits correlation of reflectors beneath Denmark into the southern North Sea.

  10. Seismic reflection exploration of geothermal reservoir at Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alay G., Gebregiorgis

    The Primary objective of this study is to increase geologic and tectonic understanding of the geothermal resources at the Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada. The seismic reflection method is employed to study faults, fractures and other tectonic structures in the subsurface in order to identify geothermal drill targets. The efficiency of geothermal systems is strongly dependent on water circulation. Discrete faults may be permeable and provide pathways for water flow depending on the fracture density. It is therefore desirable to detect and map faults and fracture zones and characterize their physical properties when evaluating a geothermal prospect. The seismic data for this project were provided by the NAS environmental research program in Ridgecrest, CA. However, the data collection information was not available so the work includes determining the line geometry and mapping shot points to field files in order to process the data. ProMAX 2D(TM) is the software used to determine the geometry and to process the data. Data processing includes eliminating noise, datum and refraction statics, trace muting, bandpass filter, automatic gain control, amplitude recovery, CMP sorting, velocity analysis and NMO correction, stacking and migration. The results of this study indicate the presence of thick basin fill including Tertiary and Quaternary sediments underlain by Tertiary basalts which are interpreted to be capping rocks for the geothermal reservoirs. This seismic reflection study also reveals the presence of strongly fractured pre-Tertiary basement complex with their top at about 1500m on the north and west and about 900 m on the eastern and southern part of the study area.

  11. Two-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion using reflection seismic data as constraints and application in the COSC project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Hedin, Peter; Garcia Juanatey, Maria A.

    2017-04-01

    We present a novel 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) inversion scheme, in which the local weights of the regularizing smoothness constraints are based on the envelope attribute of a reflection seismic image. The weights resemble those of a previously published seismic modification of the minimum gradient support method. We measure the directional gradients of the seismic envelope to modify the horizontal and vertical smoothness constraints separately. Successful application of the inversion to MT field data of the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project using the envelope attribute of the COSC reflection seismic profile helped to reduce the uncertainty of the interpretation of the main décollement by demonstrating that the associated alum shales may be much thinner than suggested by a previous inversion model. Thus, the new model supports the proposed location of a future borehole COSC-2 which is hoped to penetrate the main décollement and the underlying Precambrian basement.

  12. Integration between well logging and seismic reflection techniques for structural a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Adel K.; Ghazala, Hosni H.; Mohamed, Lamees

    2016-12-01

    Abu El Gharadig basin is located in the northern part of the Western Desert, Egypt. Geophysical investigation in the form of thirty (3D) seismic lines and well logging data of five wells have been analyzed in the oil field BED-1 that is located in the northwestern part of Abu El Gharadig basin in the Western Desert of Egypt. The reflection sections have been used to shed more light on the tectonic setting of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rocks. While the well logging data have been analyzed for delineating the petrophysical characteristics of the two main reservoirs, Bahariya and Kharita Formations. The constructed subsurface geologic cross sections, seismic sections, and the isochronous reflection maps indicate that the area is structurally controlled by tectonic trends affecting the current shape of Abu El Gharadig basin. Different types of faults are well represented in the area, particularly normal one. The analysis of the average and interval velocities versus depth has shown their effect by facies changes and/or fluid content. On the other hand, the derived petrophysical parameters of Bahariya and Kharita Formations vary from well to another and they have been affected by the gas effect and/or the presence of organic matter, complex lithology, clay content of dispersed habitat, and the pore volume.

  13. Integration between well logging and seismic reflection techniques for structural a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel K. Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abu El Gharadig basin is located in the northern part of the Western Desert, Egypt. Geophysical investigation in the form of thirty (3D seismic lines and well logging data of five wells have been analyzed in the oil field BED-1 that is located in the northwestern part of Abu El Gharadig basin in the Western Desert of Egypt. The reflection sections have been used to shed more light on the tectonic setting of Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous rocks. While the well logging data have been analyzed for delineating the petrophysical characteristics of the two main reservoirs, Bahariya and Kharita Formations. The constructed subsurface geologic cross sections, seismic sections, and the isochronous reflection maps indicate that the area is structurally controlled by tectonic trends affecting the current shape of Abu El Gharadig basin. Different types of faults are well represented in the area, particularly normal one. The analysis of the average and interval velocities versus depth has shown their effect by facies changes and/or fluid content. On the other hand, the derived petrophysical parameters of Bahariya and Kharita Formations vary from well to another and they have been affected by the gas effect and/or the presence of organic matter, complex lithology, clay content of dispersed habitat, and the pore volume.

  14. Reflection seismic studies over the end-glacial Burträsk fault, Skellefteå, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Juhlin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflection seismic data were acquired along a ca. 22 km long profile over the end-glacial Burträsk fault with a nominal receiver and source spacing of 20 m. A steeply dipping reflection can be correlated to the Burträsk fault, indicating that the fault dips at about 55° to the southeast near the surface. The reflection from the fault is rather poorly imaged, probably due to a lateral offset in the fault of about 1 km at this location and the crookedness of the seismic profile in the vicinity of the fault. A more pronounced steeply dipping reflection is observed about 4 km southeast of the Burträsk fault. Based on its correlation with a topographic low at the surface this reflection is interpreted to originate from a fracture zone. There are no signs of large displacements along this zone as the glacial ice receded, but earthquakes could be associated with it today. Other reflections on the processed seismic section may originate from changes in lithological variations in the supra-crustal rocks or from intrusions of more mafic rock. Constraints on the fault geometry provided by the reflection seismic data will help determine what stresses were required to activate the fault when the major rupture along it occurred ca. 9500 years ago.

  15. Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Rogers

    2011-12-31

    The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume

  16. Optimization of Shooting Parameters in High-Resolution 3D Seismic Exploration in Coalmine Winning District%煤田采区高分辨三维地震勘探激发参数的优选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔺国华; 倪新辉; 杨文强

    2011-01-01

    The 3D seismic exploration is one of most accurate exploration methods in coalfield, which has been widely used in coal and gas exploration. One of the most important processes in 3D seismic exploration is the choice of parameters which include shooting well-depth and shooting dose. The choice of the explosion parameters whether reasonable or not will has direct impact on accuracy. With the improvement of seismic exploration technique, quantitative definition is required in the choice of parameters in field work. Double-well micro-logging is an efficient method which can easily quantitatively fix the location of the explosion site. Besides, it can easily be applied. Based on this technique, combined with spectrum analysis and a large number of theoretical and experimental analyses, we have acquired an efficient way to select the best shooting well-depth and shooting dose. Moreover, this technique can give rise to high-frequency seismic wave, and then to achieve the goal of high-quality seismic data acquisition and economic cost savings.%三维地震勘探取得可靠数据的前提是获得最佳的的激发参数,即激发井深和激发药量.双井微测井是一种行之有效的确定激发参数的方法.以某区25m双井微测井为例,介绍了通过不同激发井深的接收排列图及频谱分析图确定潜水面位置及最佳激发深度的方法;在确定的最佳激发层位上进行不同药量试验,结合目的层有效波时窗频谱图,综合考虑有效信号、地震子波频谱及信噪比等因素选择最佳激发药量.通过双井微测井工作,最终确定潜水面位置为6m,最佳激发深度为11m,激发药量为2kg.

  17. Wide-angle seismic reflection constraints on the lithosphere of the Variscan Belt on SW- Iberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Ayarza, P.; Afonso, J.; Carbonell, R.; Martinez-Poyatos, D.; Simancas, F.; Gonzalez-Lodeiro, F.; Perez-Estaun, A.

    2008-12-01

    Two wide-angle seismic transects (A and B) were acquired across the Variscan Belt on SW-Iberia. They run across three major tectonic units in the area: South Portuguese Zone, Ossa-Morena Zone, and Central Iberian Zone. Transect A is approximately 300 km long and coincides with the course of the IBERSEIS deep seismic reflection profile. Transect B is 220 km long and is located to the SE of Transect A. The close station spacing along the transects (400 m on Transect A and 150 m on Transect B) allows to identify well defined arrivals within the upper, middle and lower crust as well as in the upper mantle. Resulting velocity models were obtained by forward modeling. The most remarkable features on these models are high velocity areas at mid crustal depths (15-20 km) with velocities in the range of 6.8-7.1 km/s. The Moho discontinuity is located at 31-33 km depth, characterized by a velocity jump from 7.1 km/s to 8.2 km/s. Shot gathers show also a sharp mantle reflection at offsets larger than 180 km which has been modeled as a fairly continuous feature with a velocity increase from 8.2 km/s to 8.4 km/s at 65-67 km depth. The nature of this boundary in still uncertain but it likely reflects a lithological change with subtle velocity/density contrasts, only visible at relatively high incidence angles. The velocity depth function for the crust in the area does not fit any of the standard average crustal velocity models due to the anomalous mid crustal velocities.

  18. Investigaton of ÇINARCIK Basin and North Anatolian Fault Within the Sea of Marmara with Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atgın, O.; Çifçi, G.; Sorlien, C.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M.; Sillington, D.; Kurt, H.; Dondurur, D.; Okay, S.; Gürçay, S.; Sarıtaş, H.; Küçük, H. M.

    2012-04-01

    The Sea of Marmara is becoming a natural laboratory for structure, sedimentation, and fluid flow within the North Anatolian fault (NAF) system. Much marine geological and geophysical data has been collected there since the deadly 1999 M=7.2. Izmit earthquake. The Sea of Marmara occupies 3 major basins, with the study area located in the eastern Cinarcik basin near Istanbul. These basins are the results of an extensional component in releasing segments between bends in this right-lateral tranmsform. It is controversial whether the extensional component is taken up by partitioned normal slip on separate faults, or instead by oblique right-normal slip on the non-vertical main northern branch of the NAF. High resolution multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) and multibeam bathymetry data collected by R/V K.Piri Reis and R/V Le-Suroit as part of two different projects respectively entitled "SeisMarmara", "TAMAM" and "ESONET". 3000 km of multichannel seismic reflection profiles were collected in 2008 and 2010 using 72, 111, and 240 channels of streamer with a 6.25 m group interval. The generator-injector airgun was fired every 12.5 or 18.75 m and the resulting MCS data has 10-230 Hz frequency band. The aim of the study is to investigate continuation of North Anatolian Fault along the Sea of Marmara, in order to investigate migration of depo-centers past a fault bend. We also test and extend a recently-published age model, quantify extension across short normal faults, and investigate whether a major surface fault exists along the southern edge of Çınarcık Basin. MCS profiles indicate that main NAF strand is located at the northern boundary of Çınarcık Basin and has a large vertical component of slip. The geometry of the eastern (Tuzla) bend and estimated right-lateral slip rates from GPS data requires as much of ten mm/yr of extension across Çınarcık Basin. Based on the published age model, we calculate about 2 mm/yr of extension on short normal faults in the

  19. Estimating the location of baleen whale calls using dual streamers to support mitigation procedures in seismic reflection surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Shima H.; Tolstoy, Maya; Wilcock, William S. D.

    2017-01-01

    In order to mitigate against possible impacts of seismic surveys on baleen whales it is important to know as much as possible about the presence of whales within the vicinity of seismic operations. This study expands on previous work that analyzes single seismic streamer data to locate nearby calling baleen whales with a grid search method that utilizes the propagation angles and relative arrival times of received signals along the streamer. Three dimensional seismic reflection surveys use multiple towed hydrophone arrays for imaging the structure beneath the seafloor, providing an opportunity to significantly improve the uncertainty associated with streamer-generated call locations. All seismic surveys utilizing airguns conduct visual marine mammal monitoring surveys concurrent with the experiment, with powering-down of seismic source if a marine mammal is observed within the exposure zone. This study utilizes data from power-down periods of a seismic experiment conducted with two 8-km long seismic hydrophone arrays by the R/V Marcus G. Langseth near Alaska in summer 2011. Simulated and experiment data demonstrate that a single streamer can be utilized to resolve left-right ambiguity because the streamer is rarely perfectly straight in a field setting, but dual streamers provides significantly improved locations. Both methods represent a dramatic improvement over the existing Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) system for detecting low frequency baleen whale calls, with ~60 calls detected utilizing the seismic streamers, zero of which were detected using the current R/V Langseth PAM system. Furthermore, this method has the potential to be utilized not only for improving mitigation processes, but also for studying baleen whale behavior within the vicinity of seismic operations. PMID:28199400

  20. Estimating the location of baleen whale calls using dual streamers to support mitigation procedures in seismic reflection surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Shima H; Tolstoy, Maya; Wilcock, William S D

    2017-01-01

    In order to mitigate against possible impacts of seismic surveys on baleen whales it is important to know as much as possible about the presence of whales within the vicinity of seismic operations. This study expands on previous work that analyzes single seismic streamer data to locate nearby calling baleen whales with a grid search method that utilizes the propagation angles and relative arrival times of received signals along the streamer. Three dimensional seismic reflection surveys use multiple towed hydrophone arrays for imaging the structure beneath the seafloor, providing an opportunity to significantly improve the uncertainty associated with streamer-generated call locations. All seismic surveys utilizing airguns conduct visual marine mammal monitoring surveys concurrent with the experiment, with powering-down of seismic source if a marine mammal is observed within the exposure zone. This study utilizes data from power-down periods of a seismic experiment conducted with two 8-km long seismic hydrophone arrays by the R/V Marcus G. Langseth near Alaska in summer 2011. Simulated and experiment data demonstrate that a single streamer can be utilized to resolve left-right ambiguity because the streamer is rarely perfectly straight in a field setting, but dual streamers provides significantly improved locations. Both methods represent a dramatic improvement over the existing Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) system for detecting low frequency baleen whale calls, with ~60 calls detected utilizing the seismic streamers, zero of which were detected using the current R/V Langseth PAM system. Furthermore, this method has the potential to be utilized not only for improving mitigation processes, but also for studying baleen whale behavior within the vicinity of seismic operations.

  1. Faulting mechanism of the Campania–Lucania 1980 earthquake, Italy, from high-resolution, 3D velocity structure, aftershock relocation, fault-plane solutions, and post-seismic deformation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Scarpa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    This study performs a detailed reconstruction of the rupture mechanism of the 1980 Campania–Lucania (southern Italy earthquake. This is achieved by relocation of the main event through computation of fault-plane solutions of the aftershocks, P-wave velocity inversion, and analysis of post-seismic ground deformation, which provide an overall picture of the faulting mechanism. All of these data are in favor of a complex rupture mechanism, as already identified by many studies, which consists of three separate events. The present study defines a graben-like rupture, with the first event rupturing a (>20-km-long segment of a large, high-angle, NE-dipping, SE-NW-striking, normal fault. The two successive ruptures occurred separately, the first along the southern segment, and the second along the northern segment, of a complementary SW-dipping, normal fault. This mechanism is well evidenced by the revised location of the hypocenter of the main event, and the location of the aftershocks and their fault-plane solutions, as well as by the underlying three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure. The model proposed by Amoruso et al. [2005a] that was based on the inversion of co-seismic vertical displacement data is confirmed by the present analyses, as it satisfies all of the available experimental observations, and better constrains the location and fault-plane solutions of the aftershocks, the velocity discontinuities, and the rupture observations at the surface. This conclusion is also supported by analyses of the post-seismic data.

  2. New constraints on the formation and evolution of the Andaman Sea, a sedimented back arc spreading center in the South East Asia, from seismic reflection studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, A.; Singh, S. C.; Klinger, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Andaman Sea is an enigmatic feature in the Indian Ocean region. To the west, it is bounded by a near arc parallel Andaman subduction system and to the east by the Malaya Peninsula. It hosts volcanic provinces like Alcock and Sewell Rises and the Andaman Sea Spreading Center (ASSC) that connects the sliver strike-slip Sagaing Fault in the north with the Andaman Nicobar and Great Sumatra Faults in the south. The actual spreading center follows a succession of basins, starting by the spreading of the Mergui basin in the south-east, 32 Ma ago, that shifted to the actual position of the spreading closer to the subduction trench. Several hypotheses have been proposed for the formation of the Andaman Sea basins: (a) Pull-apart basin along the Sagaing-Sumatra fault system, driven by the collision-extrusion mechanism and/or by the slip-partitioning induced by the oblique subduction, (b) Back-arc spreading due to the subduction. There is a debate about the orientation of the present spreading/extension between the North-South motion along the strike-slip faults and the NW-SE opening of the ASSC. We have access to 7000 km of high-resolution deep seismic reflection data, and high-resolution bathymetry data, which we combine with relocated earthquake data to shed light upon the formation and evolution of the Andaman Sea Basin. The central basin contains up to 4 km thick sediments. The crustal thickness is about 5-8 km in the central basin and increases to 13-15 km beneath the Alcock and Sewell Rises, which are devoid of sediments. Here we show how both the collision and the subduction play a role in the position and orientation of the extension in the Andaman Sea Basin, and how they influence the accretion at the spreading center.

  3. Tectonic evolution of the Salton Sea inferred from seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, D.S.; Driscoll, N.W.; Kent, G.M.; Harding, A.J.; Babcock, J.M.; Baskin, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Oblique extension across strike-slip faults causes subsidence and leads to the formation of pull-apart basins such as the Salton Sea in southern California. The formation of these basins has generally been studied using laboratory experiments or numerical models. Here we combine seismic reflection data and geological observations from the Salton Sea to understand the evolution of this nascent pull-apart basin. Our data reveal the presence of a northeast-trending hinge zone that separates the sea into northern and southern sub-basins. Differential subsidence (10 mm yr 1) in the southern sub-basin suggests the existence of northwest-dipping basin-bounding faults near the southern shoreline, which may control the spatial distribution of young volcanism. Rotated and truncated strata north of the hinge zone suggest that the onset of extension associated with this pull-apart basin began after 0.5 million years ago. We suggest that slip is partitioned spatially and temporally into vertical and horizontal domains in the Salton Sea. In contrast to previous models based on historical seismicity patterns, the rapid subsidence and fault architecture that we document in the southern part of the sea are consistent with experimental models for pull-apart basins. ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  4. Seismic reflection survey at Ayer Hangat site to investigate shallow subsurface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Amin E.; Nawawi, Mohd; Kamel, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Ayer Hangat site is located in the island of Langkawi, northwest Malaysia. The site is characterized by the presence of hot spring. This hot spring is believed to be related to granitic intrusion nearby. Hence the present work is focusing on defining the shallow subsurface structures that control the migration of hot water to the surface. Seismic reflection method is used to achieve the goal of the present study. Forty three shot points were used with an offset of 5m of the nearest geophone. The shot-points interval is set to 1m. Seismograms were recorded on 24 channel TERRALOC instrument. The Geophone interval used was 1m. Conventional seismic data processing scheme was adopted. However, due to the fact that TERRALOC produce SEG2 data files, a script based on Obspy was written and used to convert to SEG-Y format. Afterwards, analyses were carried out using SU Package. The processed data is used to develop a model for the subsurface controlling structures. Such model will help in the understanding of the geothermal hot spring system in the area.

  5. Structural interpretation of seismic reflection data from eastern Salt Range and Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennock, E.S.; Lillie, R.J.; Zaman, A.S.H.; Yousaf, M.

    1989-07-01

    Approximately 1600 km of seismic reflection profiles from the eastern Salt Range and Potwar Plateau (SR/PP) of Pakistan is integrated with available magnetostratigraphic, surface geologic, and well data to classify structural styles, determine the timing of deformation, and estimate the amount of telescoping of the sedimentary cover. The eastern SR/PP are similar to other fold-and-thrust belts underlain by evaporites in that (1) it is part of a zone of overthrusting that extends considerably farther over the Himalayan foreland than adjacent areas not underlain by evaporites, (2) the overall thrust wedge has a narrow cross-sectional taper, (3) structures verge toward the hinterland as well as toward the foreland, and (4) fold trends are long and continuous, consisting of tight salt-cored anticlines separated by broad synclines. 11 figures, 1 table.

  6. Digital single-channel seismic-reflection data from western Santa Monica basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normark, William R.; Piper, David J.W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter; Gutmacher, Christina E.

    2006-01-01

    During a collaborative project in 1992, Geological Survey of Canada and United States Geological Survey scientists obtained about 850 line-km of high-quality single-channel boomer and sleeve-gun seismic-reflection profiles across Hueneme, Mugu and Dume submarine fans, Santa Monica Basin, off southern California. The goals of this work were to better understand the processes that lead to the formation of sandy submarine fans and the role of sea-level changes in controlling fan development. This report includes a trackline map of the area surveyed, as well as images of the sleeve-gun profiles and the opportunity to download both images and digital data files (SEG-Y) of all the sleeve-gun profiles.

  7. A low-frequency asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a high-permeability layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2009-03-01

    Analysis of compression wave propagation through a high-permeability layer in a homogeneous poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of the Biot's model of poroelasticity. A new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity is a result of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and the Darcy's law. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The latter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility, an imaginary unit, and the frequency of the signal. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). The practical implications of the theory developed here are seismic modeling, inversion, and attribute analysis.

  8. Subsurface mapping in the Iberian Pyrite Belt using seismic reflection profiling and potential-field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, João; Inverno, Carlos; Matos, João Xavier; Rosa, Carlos; Granado, Isabel; Branch, Tim; Represas, Patrícia; Carabaneanu, Livia; Matias, Luís; Sousa, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) hosts world-class massive sulphide deposits, such as Neves-Corvo in Portugal and Rio Tinto in Spain. In Portugal, the Palaeozoic Volcanic-Sedimentary Complex (VSC) hosts these ore deposits, extending from the Grândola-Alcácer region to the Spanish border with a NW-SE to WNW-ESE trend. In the study area, between the Neves-Corvo mine region and Alcoutim (close to the Spanish border), the VSC outcrops only in a small horst near Alcoutim. Sparse exploration drill-hole data indicate that the depth to the top of the VSC varies from several 100 m to about 1 km beneath the Mértola Formation Flysch cover. Mapping of the VSC to the SE of Neves-Corvo mine is an important exploration goal and motivated the acquisition of six 2D seismic reflection profiles with a total length of approximately 82 km in order to map the hidden extension of the VSC. The data, providing information deeper than 10 km at some locations, were integrated in a 3D software environment along with potential-field, geological and drill-hole data to form a 3D structural framework model. Seismic data show strong reflections that represent several long Variscan thrust planes that smoothly dip to the NNE. Outcropping and previously unknown Late Variscan near-vertical faults were also mapped. Our data strongly suggest that the structural framework of Neves-Corvo extends south-eastwards to Alcoutim. Furthermore, the VSC top is located at depths that show the existence within the IPB of new areas with good potential to develop exploration projects envisaging the discovery of massive sulphide deposits of the Neves-Corvo type.

  9. Subsurface mapping in the Iberian Pyrite Belt using seismic reflection profiling and potential-field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, João; Inverno, Carlos; Matos, João Xavier; Rosa, Carlos; Granado, Isabel; Branch, Tim; Represas, Patrícia; Carabaneanu, Livia; Matias, Luís; Sousa, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) hosts world-class massive sulphide deposits, such as Neves-Corvo in Portugal and Rio Tinto in Spain. In Portugal, the Palaeozoic Volcanic-Sedimentary Complex (VSC) hosts these ore deposits, extending from the Grândola-Alcácer region to the Spanish border with a NW-SE to WNW-ESE trend. In the study area, between the Neves-Corvo mine region and Alcoutim (close to the Spanish border), the VSC outcrops only in a small horst near Alcoutim. Sparse exploration drill-hole data indicate that the depth to the top of the VSC varies from several 100 m to about 1 km beneath the Mértola Formation Flysch cover. Mapping of the VSC to the SE of Neves-Corvo mine is an important exploration goal and motivated the acquisition of six 2D seismic reflection profiles with a total length of approximately 82 km in order to map the hidden extension of the VSC. The data, providing information deeper than 10 km at some locations, were integrated in a 3D software environment along with potential-field, geological and drill-hole data to form a 3D structural framework model. Seismic data show strong reflections that represent several long Variscan thrust planes that smoothly dip to the NNE. Outcropping and previously unknown Late Variscan near-vertical faults were also mapped. Our data strongly suggest that the structural framework of Neves-Corvo extends south-eastwards to Alcoutim. Furthermore, the VSC top is located at depths that show the existence within the IPB of new areas with good potential to develop exploration projects envisaging the discovery of massive sulphide deposits of the Neves-Corvo type.

  10. Digitized analog boomer seismic-reflection data collected during U.S. Geological Survey cruises Erda 90-1_HC, Erda 90-1_PBP, and Erda 91-3 in Mississippi Sound, June 1990 and September 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Stephen T.; Flocks, James G.; Forde, Arnell S.

    2017-04-21

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program has actively collected geophysical and sedimentological data in the northern Gulf of Mexico for several decades, including shallow subsurface data in the form of high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles (HRSP). Prior to the mid-1990s most HRSP data were collected in analog format as paper rolls of continuous profiles up to 25 meters long. A large portion of this data resides in a single repository with minimal metadata. As part of the National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program, scientists at the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center are converting the analog paper records to digital format using a large-format continuous scanner.This report, along with the accompanying USGS data release (Bosse and others, 2017), serves as an archive of seismic profiles with headers, converted Society of Exploration Geophysicists Y format (SEG-Y) files, navigation data, and geographic information system data files for digitized boomer seismic-reflection data collected from the Research Vessel (R/V) Erda during two cruises in 1990 and 1991. The Erda 90-1 geophysical cruise was conducted in two legs. The first leg included seismic data collected from the Hancock County region of the Mississippi Sound (Erda 90-1_HC) from June 4 to June 6, 1990. The second leg included seismic data collected from the Petit Bois Pass area of Mississippi Sound (Erda 90-1_PBP) from June 8 to June 9, 1990. The Erda 91-3 cruise occurred between September 12 and September 23, 1991, and surveyed the Mississippi Sound region just west of Horn Island, Mississippi.

  11. Interpretation of a 3D Seismic-Reflection Volume in the Basin and Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J. N.; Kell, A. M.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Oldow, J. S.; Sabin, A.; Lazaro, M.

    2009-12-01

    A collaborative effort by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Optim Inc. of Reno has interpreted a 3d seismic data set recorded by the U.S. Navy Geothermal Programs Office (GPO) at the Hawthorne Army Depot, Nevada. The 3d survey incorporated about 20 NNW-striking lines covering an area of approximately 3 by 10 km. The survey covered an alluvial area below the eastern flank of the Wassuk Range. In the reflection volume the most prominent events are interpreted to be the base of Quaternary alluvium, the Quaternary Wassuk Range-front normal fault zone, and sequences of intercalated Tertiary volcanic flows and sediments. Such a data set is rare in the Basin and Range. Our interpretation reveals structural and stratigraphic details that form a basis for rapid development of the geothermal-energy resources underlying the Depot. We interpret a map of the time-elevation of the Wassuk Range fault and its associated splays and basin-ward step faults. The range-front fault is the deepest, and its isochron map provides essentially a map of "economic basement" under the prospect area. There are three faults that are the most readily picked through vertical sections. The fault reflections show an uncertainty in the time-depth that we can interpret for them of 50 to 200 ms, due to the over-migrated appearance of the processing contractor’s prestack time-migrated data set. Proper assessment of velocities for mitigating the migration artifacts through prestack depth migration is not possible from this data set alone, as the offsets are not long enough for sufficiently deep velocity tomography. The three faults we interpreted appear as gradients in potential-field maps. In addition, the southern boundary of a major Tertiary graben may be seen within the volume as the northward termination of the strong reflections from older Tertiary volcanics. Using a transparent volume view across the survey gives a view of the volcanics in full

  12. Imaging near-subsurface subrosion structures and faults using SH-wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja; Polom, Ulrich; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Subrosion is a term for underground leaching of soluble rocks and is a global phenomenon. It involves dissolution of evaporites due to the presence of unsaturated water, fractures and faults. Fractures and faults are pathways for water to circulate and to generate subsurface cavities. Depending on the leached material and the parameters of the generation process, especially the dissolution rate, different kinds of subrosion structures evolve in the subsurface. The two end members are collapse and depression structures. Subrosion is a natural process, but it can be enhanced by anthropogenic factors like manipulation of the aquifer system and groundwater flow and by e.g. extraction of saline water. The formation of sinkholes and depressions are a dangerous geohazard, especially if they occur in urban areas, which often leads to building and infrastructural damage and life-threatening situations. For this reason investigations of the processes that induce subrosion and a detailed analysis of the resulting structures are of importance. To develop a comprehensive model of near-subsurface subrosion structures, reflection seismics is one of the methods used by the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics. The study area is located in the city of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by Permian deposits. Bad Frankenhausen is situated directly south of the Kyffhäuser mountain range at the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault. This major fault is one of the main pathways for the circulating ground- and meteoric waters that leach the Permian deposits, especially the Leine-, Staßfurt- and Werra Formations. 2014 and 2015 eight shear wave reflection seismic profiles were carried out in the urban area of Bad Frankenhausen and three profiles in the countrified surroundings. Altogether ca. 3.6 km were surveyed using a landstreamer as receiver and an electro-dynamic vibrator as source. The surveys were

  13. Seismic reflection data imaging and interpretation from Braniewo2014 experiment using additional wide-angle refraction and reflection and well-logs data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Majdański, Mariusz; Białas, Sebastian; Gaczyński, Edward; Maksym, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Braniewo2014 reflection and refraction experiment was realized in cooperation between Polish Oil and Gas Company (PGNiG) and the Institute of Geophysics (IGF), Polish Academy of Sciences, near the locality of Braniewo in northern Poland. PGNiG realized a 20-km-long reflection profile, using vibroseis and dynamite shooting; the aim of the reflection survey was to characterise Silurian shale gas reservoir. IGF deployed 59 seismic stations along this profile and registered additional full-spread wide-angle refraction and reflection data, with offsets up to 12 km; maximum offsets from the seismic reflection survey was 3 km. To improve the velocity information two velocity logs from near deep boreholes were used. The main goal of the joint reflection-refraction interpretation was to find relations between velocity field from reflection velocity analysis and refraction tomography, and to build a velocity model which would be consistent for both, reflection and refraction, datasets. In this paper we present imaging results and velocity models from Braniewo2014 experiment and the methodology we used.

  14. JPEG image of Seismic-Reflection Profiles Collected in the Pulley Ridge Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These seismic data were collected to infer the paleodepositional environment of Pulley Ridge through seismic facies analysis. Without actual rock cores, remote...

  15. JPEG image of Seismic-Reflection Profiles Collected in the Pulley Ridge Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These seismic data were collected to infer the paleodepositional environment of Pulley Ridge through seismic facies analysis. Without actual rock cores, remote...

  16. High-resolution land topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonnet, Didier; Elachi, Charles

    2006-11-01

    After a description of the background, methods of production and some scientific uses of high-resolution land topography, we present the current status and the prospect of radar interferometry, regarded as one of the best techniques for obtaining the most global and the most accurate topographic maps. After introducing briefly the theoretical aspects of radar interferometry - principles, limits of operation and various capabilities -, we will focus on the topographic applications that resulted in an almost global topographic map of the earth: the SRTM map. After introducing the Interferometric Cartwheel system, we will build on its expected performances to discuss the scientific prospects of refining a global topographic map to sub-metric accuracy. We also show how other fields of sciences such as hydrology may benefit from the products generated by interferometric radar systems. To cite this article: D. Massonnet, C. Elachi, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  17. High-resolution image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, K

    1986-01-01

    In many departments of cytology, cytogenetics, hematology, and pathology, research projects using high-resolution computerized microscopy are now being mounted for computation of morphometric measurements on various structural components, as well as for determination of cellular DNA content. The majority of these measurements are made in a partially automated, computer-assisted mode, wherein there is strong interaction between the user and the computerized microscope. At the same time, full automation has been accomplished for both sample preparation and sample examination for clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. At the time of writing, approximately 1,000 robot differential counting microscopes are in the field, analyzing images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the overall rate of about 100,000 slides per day. This mammoth through-put represents a major accomplishment in the application of machine vision to automated microscopy for hematology. In other areas of automated high-resolution microscopy, such as cytology and cytogenetics, no commercial instruments are available (although a few metaphase-finding machines are available and other new machines have been announced during the past year). This is a disappointing product, considering the nearly half century of research effort in these areas. This paper provides examples of the state of the art in automation of cell analysis for blood smears, cervical smears, and chromosome preparations. Also treated are new developments in multi-resolution automated microscopy, where images are now being generated and analyzed by a single machine over a range of 64:1 magnification and from 10,000 X 20,000 to 500 X 500 in total picture elements (pixels). Examples of images of human lymph node and liver tissue are presented. Semi-automated systems are not treated, although there is mention of recent research in the automation of tissue analysis.

  18. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  19. Geophysical Surveys of the San Andreas and Crystal Springs Reservoir System Including Seismic-Reflection Profiles and Swath Bathymetry, San Mateo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, David P.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes geophysical data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Andreas Reservoir and Upper and Lower Crystal Springs Reservoirs, San Mateo County, California, as part of an effort to refine knowledge of the location of traces of the San Andreas Fault within the reservoir system and to provide improved reservoir bathymetry for estimates of reservoir water volume. The surveys were conducted by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the USGS for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC). The data were acquired in three separate surveys: (1) in June 2007, personnel from WCMG completed a three-day survey of San Andreas Reservoir, collecting approximately 50 km of high-resolution Chirp subbottom seismic-reflection data; (2) in November 2007, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of San Andreas reservoir; and finally (3) in April 2008, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of both the upper and lower Crystal Springs Reservoir system. Top of PageFor more information, contact David Finlayson.

  20. Surface seismic refraction/reflection measurement determinations of potential site resonances and the areal uniformity of NEHRP site class D in Memphis, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.A.; Wood, S.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Meremonte, M.E.; Street, R.; Worley, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    We determined S-wave velocities (Vs) to about 40-m depth at 65 locations in the Memphis-Shelby County, Tennessee, area. The Vs measurements were made using high-resolution seismic refraction and reflection methods on the ground surface. We find a clear difference in the Vs profiles between sites located on the Mississippi River flood plain and those located to the east, mostly covered by loess, in the urban areas of Memphis. The average Vs to 30-m depth at 19 sites on the modern Mississippi River floodplain averages 197 m/s (?? 15 m/s) and places 17 of these sites at the low end of NEHRP soil profile category type D (average Vs 180-360 m/s). The two remaining sites are type E. Vs to 30-m depth at 46 sites in the urban areas east of the modern floodplain are more variable and generally higher than the floodplain sites, averaging about 262 m/s (??45 m/s), still within category D. We often observed the base of the loess as a prominent S-wave reflection and as an increase in Vs to about 500 m/s. Based on the two-way travel time of this reflection, during an earthquake the impedance boundary at the loess base may generate resonances in the 3- to 6-Hz range over many areas of Memphis. Amplitude spectra from four local earthquakes recorded at one site located on loess indicate consistent resonance peaks in the 4.5- to 6.5-Hz range.

  1. Fault analysis in the very shallow seismic reflection method; Gokusenso jishin hanshaho ni okeru danso kaiseki. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagumo, S.; Muraoka, S.; Kaida, Y.; Takahashi, T. [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    To effectively use the very shallow seismic reflection for active fault survey, a method has been investigated by which fault structures can be appropriately reconstructed from the fault information detected in the original records. The first step of reconstructing the fault system from the travel time reflection curve was to grasp an outline of fault structure from the patterns of travel time curve observed in the original record. For the very shallow seismic reflection method, especially, the low velocity layers in a shallow part succeeding from the ground surface made the issue complicated. Then, the travel time reflection curves were calculated in the case of existing several horizontal reflection surfaces in the surface layer. The constant values, mean velocities to the depth at individual reflection surfaces were used for the approximation of velocities. The outline of fault structure was grasped from the observation of original record. Then, the structure was reconstructed from the travel time curves. When the mean velocity in the medium was known, reconstruction of the feature of reflection surfaces from the travel time curves could be determined by simple mapping. When the mean velocity was unknown, it was calculated using the reciprocal travel time from the common reflection surface for individual reflection surfaces. 7 figs.

  2. Pronounced central uplift identified in the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana, using multichannel seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Christopher A.; Karp, Tobias; Brooks, Keely M.; Milkereit, Bernd; Amoako, Philip Y. O.; Arko, Justice A.

    2002-10-01

    The Lake Bosumtwi impact structure is the youngest and best-preserved complex terrestrial impact crater and serves as an important reference site for the study of cratering processes. Because the impacting body struck continental crystalline target rocks and not a submerged sedimentary platform, no significant backwash processes have modified the crater morphology. Not only may Bosumtwi contain the best-preserved central uplift structure on Earth, but it is the most accessible relatively large, young crater in the solar system generated in a large gravity field. There is a well-established link between the Lake Bosumtwi impact structure and the Ivory Coast tektite field, and the lacustrine sediments within the crater contain a unique 1 m.y. record of paleoclimate in the continental tropics south of the Sahel. Eight profiles of marine-type multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data were acquired from the 8-km-diameter, ˜75-m-deep lake that fills much of the crater. These were augmented by wide-angle seismic data acquired with ocean-bottom hydrophones. MCS data reveal a well-defined central uplift near the northwest-central part of the lake and a maximum postimpact lacustrine sediment thickness of ˜310 m. The central uplift structure has a diameter of 1.9 km and a maximum height of 130 m above the annular moat inside the crater. An intermediate velocity layer (3200 m/s) beneath the lacustrine sediment is interpreted as fallback breccia or a breccia-melt horizon. The measured apparent depth of the crater (da) is 500 m, implying a slightly higher aspect ratio for the structure than predicted from published empirical relationships. The Bosumtwi structure is a small complex crater that deviates slightly from trends predicted from classical scaling laws, perhaps because of the effects of a large gravity field.

  3. Crustal Structure and Deformation of the Yakutat Microplate: New Insights From STEEP Marine Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, L. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G.; van Avendonk, H.; Reece, R.; Elmore, R.; Pavlis, T.

    2008-12-01

    In fall 2008, we will conduct an active source marine seismic experiment of the offshore Yakutat microplate in the northern Gulf of Alaska. The survey will be conducted aboard the academic research vessel, R/V Marcus Langseth, collecting deep-penetrating multi-channel seismic reflection survey using an 8-km, 640 channel hydrophone streamer and a 6600 cu. in., 36 airgun array. The survey is the concluding data acquisition phase for the ST. Elias Erosion and tectonics Project (STEEP), a multi-institution NSF-Continental Dynamics project investigating the interplay of climate and tectonics in the Chugach-St. Elias Mountains in southern Alaska. The experiment will also provide important site survey information for possible future Integrated Ocean Drilling Program investigations. Two profiles coincident with wide-angle refraction data (see Christeson, et al., this session) will image structural changes across the Dangerous River Zone from east to west and the Transition Fault from south to north. We will also image the western portion of the Transition Fault to determine the nature of faulting along this boundary including whether or not the Pacific Plate is underthrusting beneath the Yakutat microplate as part of this collision. Our westernmost profile will image the Kayak Island Zone, typically described as the northern extension of the Aleutian megathrust but which may be a forming suture acting as a deformation backstop for the converging Yakutat and North American plates. Profiles across the Pamplona Zone, the current Yakutat-North America deformation front, will further constrain relative timing of structural development and the depth of deformation on the broad folds and thrust faults that comprise the area. This new dataset will allow further insight into regional tectonics of the St. Elias region as well as provide more detail regarding the development of the south Alaskan margin during major Plio-Pleistocene glacial- interglacial periods.

  4. Tectonics of the West Iberia continental margin from seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Alison Teagan

    Continental rifting is a fundamental component of the plate tectonic cycle. The West Iberia passive margin is a classic example of a nonvolcanic rifted margin. The West Iberia margin contains an enigmatic north-south ridge of serpentinized peridotite located within the ocean-continent transition. Interpretation of multichannel seismic data and tectonic subsidence analyses suggests that the ridge is located within a broad zone of exhumed mantle that has been serpentinized. This implies that seafloor spreading does not immediately follow continental breakup. Where the peridotite ridge is well-developed, it parallels a deeply-penetrating, west-dipping normal fault. Hydrodynamic circulation drove seawater down this fault close to the beginning of seafloor spreading and caused a concentration of serpentinization at its base. This water-driven process of formation accounts for the variability of the ridge along strike. Prestack depth migration of a 340 km long seismic reflection profile across the margin served as the basis for stratigraphic interpretation. The proximal margin displays horsts and grabens, with 1--2 km thick synrift deposits from Early Cretaceous (Valanginian) rifting. The deep water margin displays rotated blocks with distinct internal seismic patterns. These blocks formed during the final Cretaceous rifting event that led to continental breakup, and contain earlier Valanginian synrift deposits as part of the rotated blocks, thus providing evidence of two separate rifting stages along this profile. A large mantle-penetrating fault located seaward of the last rotated block of continental crust provides evidence for a third and final Cretaceous rifting event that may have been coeval with early seafloor spreading. Two independent estimates of crustal thickness along this line indicate stretching factors of 50% on the proximal margin (corresponding to a continental crustal thickness of ˜16 km), increasing to 100% in the deep water. Plate tectonics is one

  5. A Pilot Near-vertical Seismic Reflection Experiment In Central Chile Landward of The Offshore Spoc Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Onshore Nvr Party, Spoc

    Between 36 and 39 S, the multi-disciplinary offshore project SPOC (Subduction Processes Off Chile) was extended landwards in November 2001 by different active and passive seismic experiments, with the zone of seismic coupling, generally located between 20-40 km depth, as the prime target. Here, we report the first results from the near-vertical incidence reflection (NVR) seismic experiment component that was designed to image that part of the subduction zone between the S-America and over- riding Nazca-Plate that is located in the offshore-onshore transition zone. The NVR profile was located at 37 15`S. Covering the westernmost part of a long E-W refrac- tion seismic line (one amongst three), the profile spread was 54 km long, with three sections of 18 km length each, and extended from the coast in the west to the east. 180 geophone-groups were deployed with 100 m spacing which recorded the offshore pro- file shot by the R/V SONNE with the airgun array. Furthermore, 2 small shots in the Pacific Ocean (50 kg and 25 kg charge), 11 small shots (75 kg charge) at 7 different lo- cations within the onshore reflection seismic line, and 1 shot (150 kg charge) ca. 22.5 km east of the active spread were shot. This active NVR-experiment thereby resulted in a 45 km long 2-fold CDP line, and single-fold coverage along 72 km profile length. The preliminary data processing of single shots gives an image of different reflection bands in the upper and middle crust. On the entire profile, a 1 s TWT thick strong reflection band is observed between 3 and 4 s TWT, which shows almost no dip. On the western half of the profile, prominent reflections dip eastward from ca. 6 s TWT down to ca. 8 s TWT. Finally, in the central part of the seismic reflection profile, some relatively weaker reflections are found between 10 to 14 s TWT. All theses eastward dipping reflection bands between 6 and 14 s TWT could be interpreted as indications for the downgoing plate.

  6. Mechanical and chemical processes affecting the chalk during burial, insights from combined reflection seismics, well data and field work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph

    2014-01-01

    and cores analyses, respectively.However, few sites allow to combine all the different scale of observation for chalk diagenesis. Onshore and offshore high resolution seismics, two fully cored >350 m wells with wireline logging tools and very high quality exposures from a coastal cliff and a quarry form...... works have been performed with astronomical calibration based on stable isotope stratigraphy, wireline logs as well as several palaeontological proxies and detailed sedimentological analysis. Since a couple of decades, a specific kind of fractures has been described in the Chalk of Denmark, the so......-called hairline fractures. They have recently been interpreted as compaction bands associated with the pore collapse of the chalk. We have observed these fractures on the field and on the cores in specific intervals. At depth, these fractures are in genetic relation with the formation of some stylolithes...

  7. Georadar - high resolution geophysical electromagnetic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Stern

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Georadar is a high resolution geophysical electromagnetic device that was developed in the first part of the 1980's. In Slovenia it was first tested in 1991 on several objects of economicgeological, geotechnical and hydrogeologic nature.Here its usefulness in karst studied is presented. The first part of the paper deals with description of measurement procedure and methodological bases, and the second part with experience and results of case histories. Shown are radargrams from ornamental stone quarry Hotavlje, calcite mine Stahovica, Golobja jama karstcave near Divača and from highway construction site Razdrto-Čebulovica. All measurements were performed with the georadar instrument Pulse EKKO IV with a lOOMHz antenna according to the method of reflection profiling.

  8. Enabling Technology for the Exploration of the Arctic Ocean - Multi Channel Seismic Reflection data acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, B.; Anderson, R.; Chayes, D. N.; Goemmer, S.; Oursler, M.

    2009-12-01

    Great advances in mapping the Arctic Ocean have recently been made through the relatively routine acquisition of multibeam data from icebreakers operating on various cruise. The USCGC Healy, the German icebreaker Polarstern, the Canadian icebreaker Amundsen and the Swedish icebreaker Oden all routinely collect multibeam data, even while in heavy ice pack. This increase in data has substantially improved our knowledge of the form of the Arctic Ocean seafloor. Unfortunately, it is not possible to routinely collect Multi Channel Seismic Reflection (MCS) data while underway in the ice pack. Our inability to simply collect these data restricts how we understand many of the features that segment the basin by depriving us of the historical information that can be obtained by imaging the stratigraphy. Without these data, scientific ocean drilling, the ultimate ground truth for Marine Geology, cannot be done. The technology and expertise to collect MCS must be adapted for the particular circumstances of the Arctic Ocean. While MCS data have been collected in the Arctic Ocean, the procedures have relied on icebreakers towing equipment. Since icebreakers follow the path of least resistance through the pack, data are acquired in locations that are not scientifically optimal and rarely in the relatively straight lines necessary for optimal processing. Towing in the ice pack is also difficult, inefficient and puts this equipment at substantial risk of crushing or loss. While icebreakers are one means to collect these data, it is time to conduct a systematic evaluation of the costs and benefits of different platforms for MCS data acquisition. This evaluation should enable collection of high-quality data set at selected locations to solve scientific problems. Substantial uncertainties exist about the relative capabilities, costs and limitations for acquisition of MCS data from various platforms in the Arctic Ocean. For example; - Is it possible to collect multi-channel seismic

  9. High-resolution infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  10. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  11. High-resolution geophysical data from the sea floor surrounding the Western Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Twichell, David C.; Foster, David S.; Worley, Charles R.; Irwin, Barry J.; Danforth, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Geophysical and geospatial data were collected in the nearshore area surrounding the western Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts on the U.S. Geological Survey research vessel Rafael during September 2010 in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts, Office of Coastal Zone Management. This report describes the results of the short-term goals of this collaborative effort, which were to map the geology of the inner shelf zone of the western Elizabeth Islands and study the geologic processes that have contributed to its evolution. Data collected during the survey include: Bathymetric and sidescan-sonar data, chirp seismic-reflection data , sound velocity profiles, and navigation data. The long-term goals of this project are to provide high-resolution geophysical data that will support research on the influence of sea-level change and sediment supply on coastal evolution and inventory subtidal marine habitat type and distribution within the coastal zone of Massachusetts.

  12. 3D Seismic Reflection Data: Has the Geological Hubble Retained Its Focus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    In their seminal paper in 2002, Joe Cartwright and Mads Huuse referred to 3D seismic reflection data as the 'Geological Hubble', illustrating how these data had the potential to revolutionise our understanding of the genesis and evolution of sedimentary basins. 14 years on, I will here outline just some of the key recent advances made in our understanding of basin structure and stratigraphy, focusing on: (i) the intrusion and extrusion of igneous rocks; (ii) salt tectonics, with particular emphasis on intrasalt structure and the kinematics and mechanics of diapirism; (iii) the geometry and growth of normal faults; and (iv) the structure and emplacement of mass-transport complexes (MTCs). I will stress that future advances at least partly relies on hydrocarbon exploration companies and government agencies continuing to make their data freely available via easy-to-access data portals. I will issue a clarion call to academics, stressing that 'geodynamicists', sedimentologists, structural geologists and geomorphologists, amongst others, can benefit from utilising what I believe are currently an underused data type.

  13. Geometry and kinematics of accretionary wedge faults inherited from the structure and rheology of the incoming sedimentary section; insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Rebecca; Orme, Haydn; Lenette, Kathryn; Jackson, Christopher; Fitch, Peter; Phillips, Thomas; Moore, Gregory

    2017-04-01

    Intra-wedge thrust faults represent important conduits for fluid flow in accretionary prisms, modulating pore fluid pressure, effective stress and, ultimately, the seismic hazard potential of convergent plate boundaries. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust networks in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images. To address this we here present observations from two subduction zones, the Nankai and Lesser Antilles margins, where 3D seismic and borehole data allow us to constrain the geometry and kinematics of intra-wedge fault networks and to thus shed light on the mechanisms responsible for their structural style variability. At the Muroto transect, Nankai margin we find that the style of protothrust zone deformation varies markedly along-strike over distances of only a few km. Using structural restoration and quantitative fault analysis, we reveal that in the northern part of the study area deformation occurred by buckle folding followed by faulting. Further south, intra-wedge faults nucleate above the décollement and propagate radially with no folding, resulting in variable connectivity between faults and the décollement. The seismic facies character of sediments immediately above the décollement varies along strike, with borehole data revealing that, in the north, where buckle folding dominates un-cemented Lower Shikoku Basin sediments overlie the décollement. In contrast, further south, Opal CT-cemented, and thus rigid Upper Shikoku Basin sediments overlie the décollement. We suggest these along-strike variations in diagenesis and thus rheology control the observed structural style variability. Near Barbados, at the Lesser Antilles margin, rough subducting plate relief is blanketed by up to 700 m of sediment. 3D seismic data reveal that basement relief is defined by linear normal fault blocks and volcanic ridges, and sub

  14. High-resolution slug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases.

  15. Diferentiation of Basements Types Using Seismic Reflection Data and 40Ar-39Ar Dating in the Western Half of the Farallon Basin (gulf of California, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero Lajas, D.; González Fernández, A.; López-Martínez, M.; Lonsdale, P.; Kluesner, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Gulf of California is an active continental rift with an oblique right lateral displacement. Defining a clear boundary between continental and oceanic crust is difficult due to the high sedimentation rate. The new crust is a mixture of sills and sediments that do not produce aligned magnetic anomalies. The main objective of this work is to identify this boundary in the western part of the Farallon Basin. In order to accomplish this goal we used multichannel 2D high-resolution seismic reflection data taken during a cruise aboard oceanographic vessel Francisco de Ulloa in 2006. We also used petrological characterization and 40Ar-39Ar dating of continental samples collected in nearby Santa Catalina, Santa Cruz and San Diego islands, Punta Botella in the Baja California Peninsula, and marine samples of the continental margin next to Las Animas island (ROCA 2008 cruise). Oceanic crust created in the Farallòn spreading axis is identified primarily by saucer-shaped structures in the seismic profiles, which are interpreted as sills. The plutonic continental basement is located on the westernmost part of the margin and is recognized by a continuous high amplitude reflector. There are also volcanic patches in this area, like the South Farallon Massif, which are evident as discontinuities in the high amplitude reflector and with a different seismic character. The Farallon Basin is affected by two different tectonic regimes, the first (compressive) is related to the subduction of the Farallon Plate under the North American Plate, when the plutonic basement was originated. It consists of granodiorites and tonalites belonging to two phases of subduction during the Upper Cretaceous and Early Miocene. Outcrops of the latter phase are exposed in the peninsula of Baja California (Conception Bay); Mexico mainland (middle Sinaloa); and dredged samples of Pescadero Basin. These are similar to the plutonic Santa Catalina Island outcrop described and dated in this study. These

  16. Seismic reflection characteristics of fluvial sand and shale interbedded layers%河流相砂泥岩薄互层地震反射特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国发; 熊金良; 周辉; 翟通利

    2008-01-01

    A sedimentary geological model is established in order to study the seismic reflection characteristics of channel sand bodies. Synthetic seismic shot gathers are simulated using the acoustic wave equation and then are prestack time migrated. On the imaged data,the reflection characteristics and instantaneous attributes are analyzed and log-constrained impedance inversion is tested. Because of wave field interference, the experimental results show that seismic events do not definitely correspond to the channel sand bodies and that seismic modes of occurrence do not represent the actual ones. The seismic events formed by wave interference may lead to errors and pitfalls in sand body interpretation. The corresponding relations between instantaneous seismic attributes and sedimentary sands are not well established. Log-constrained impedance inversion improves the resolution of channel sands. However, if the inverted resolution is forced to be too high, artifacts related to the initial model may occur.

  17. Structure of the Gabon Margin from integrated seismic reflection and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Stéphanie; Cloetingh, Sierd; Bertotti, Giovanni

    2011-06-01

    In the South Gabon Basin, deep multi-channel seismic reflection and gravity modeling analysis have shed light on key features of the structure of the margin. The thinned continental crust beneath the Gabon Margin appears to be composed of two distinct layers, separated by a clear, strong and more or less continuous reflector running in the 7-10 s TWT window. The lower crust is characterized by a higher density, intermediate between the lower values of the upper crust and the denser values of the mantle. The lower crust is irregularly shaped and presents lateral thickness variations along the direction of thinning and along the coast. In the offshore thinned continental domain, the lower and upper crust form a 20-25 km thick body. Crustal thicknesses point to a relatively sharp and narrow transition, along a few tens of kilometers, between the unthinned and the thinned continental crust. The high density layer identified offshore Gabon presents similar characteristics in density, geometry and spatial distribution, as the underplated magmatic bodies observed along volcanic margins, e.g. along the South Atlantic Namibia Margin or the North Atlantic Vøring Margin. Although this lower crustal body could possibly represent ultra mafic serpentinized rocks or high grade metamorphic crustal rocks, we suggest that it could be composed of mafic rocks. Magmas resulting from partial melting during rifting may underplate the crust and/or be intruded in the lower crust through a system of dykes and sills. In this view, the present-day crustal thicknesses along rifted margins, characterized by magmatic underplating and/or intrusion, are not representative of the thinning that the crust experienced during rifting. Results of this study point to relatively shallow sedimentary basins along the South Gabon Margin. The deepest offshore depocenters located under the westernmost side of the continental platform appear to be associated with the deepest syn-rift basins These basins seem

  18. The crustal structure under Sanjiang and its dynamic implications: Revealed by seismic reflection/refraction profile between Zhefang and Binchuan, Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhongjie; BAI Zhiming; WANG Chunyong; TENG Jiwen; L(U) Qingtian; LI Jiliang; LIU Yifeng; LIU Zhenkuan

    2005-01-01

    The fault belts in Sanjiang mainly include Jinshajiang-Honghe fault, Lancangjiang fault and Nujiang fault (called Sanjiang faults) in western Yunnan Province, China. By interpreting the wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profile between Zhefang and Binchuan, which crosses Tengchong and Baoshan blocks in Dianxi (western Yunnan) tectonic zone, we reconstruct the crustal structure with seismic traveltime tomography for crustal P-wave velocity and the seismic scattering image for crustal seismic reflection structure. In this paper, we firstly present the crustal structure images of P-wave velocity and seismic reflection under the wide-angle seismic profile. These results demonstrate that, the crustal velocity structure and seismic reflection structure along the profile can be divided into 3 segments, and there is an obvious difference of crustal structure among the eastern, the western and the middle segment. Generally, crustal P-wave velocities in the Baoshan segment are 0.1-0.2 km/s slower and seismic reflection amplitudes from Moho discontinuity are stronger than the other 2 segments. In the studied area, crustal thickness is about 40 km, and shows the thickening tendency from west to east along the profile. Additionally, it can be seen that there is one strong-amplitude seismic reflection event as bright points at the depths of 8-10 km, along the segment of 80-115 km of the profile (southward of Tengchong); and seismic reflection wave-field from Moho discontinuity varies obviously along the lateral direction. Finally, we make some discussions on the crustal thickening pattern in the Sanjiang fault belt, structural environment of earthquake development and the contact relationship between the Tengchong block, Banshan block and Luxi trough.

  19. High-resolution intravital microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Andresen

    Full Text Available Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy--the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and

  20. Stochastic velocity inversion of seismic reflection/refraction traveltime data for rift structure of the southwest Barents Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Stephen A.; Faleide, Jan Inge; Hauser, Juerg

    2013-01-01

    We present results from an active-source, onshore–offshore seismic reflection/refraction transect acquired as part of the PETROBAR project (Petroleum-related studies of the Barents Sea region). The 700 km-long profile is oriented NW–SE, coincident with previously published multichannel seismic...... reflection profiles. We utilize layer-based raytracing in a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion to determine a probabilistic velocity model constraining the sedimentary rocks, crystalline crust, and uppermost mantle in a complex tectonic regime. The profile images a wide range of crustal types and ages...... with the amount of overlap derived from published plate reconstructions. Local β factors approach 3, where Bjørnøya Basin reaches a depth of more than 13 km. Volcanics, carbonates, salt, diagenesis and metamorphism make deep sedimentary basin fill difficult to distinguish from original, pre-rift crystalline crust...

  1. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  2. Precambrian crust beneath the Mesozoic northern Canadian Cordillera discovered by Lithoprobe seismic reflection profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Frederick A.; Clowes, Ronald M.; Snyder, David B.; van der Velden, Arie J.; Hall, Kevin W.; Erdmer, Philippe; Evenchick, Carol A.

    2004-04-01

    The Cordillera in northern Canada is underlain by westward tapering layers that can be followed from outcrops of Proterozoic strata in the Foreland belt to the lowermost crust of the orogenic interior, a distance of as much as 500 km across strike. They are interpreted as stratified Proterozoic rocks, including ˜1.8-0.7 Ga supracrustal rocks and their basement. The layering was discovered on two new deep seismic reflection profiles in the Yukon (Line 3; ˜650 km) and northern British Columbia (Line 2; ˜1245 km in two segments) that were acquired as part of the Lithoprobe Slave-Northern Cordillera Lithospheric Evolution (SNORCLE) transect. In the Mackenzie Mountains of the eastern Yukon, the layering in Line 3 is visible between 5.0 and 12.0 s (˜15 to 36 km depth). It is followed southwestward for nearly 650 km (˜500 km across strike) and thins to less than 1.0 s (˜3.0-3.5 km thickness) near the Moho at the Yukon-Alaska international boundary. In the northern Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, the upper part of the layering on Line 2 correlates with outcrops of Proterozoic (1.76-1.0 Ga) strata in the Muskwa anticlinorium. At this location, the layering is at least 15 km thick and is followed westward then southward into the middle and lower crust for ˜700 km (˜300 km across strike). It disappears as a thin taper at the base of the crust ˜150 km east of the coast of the Alaskan panhandle. The only significant disruption in the layering occurs at the Tintina fault zone, a late to postorogenic strike-slip fault with up to 800 km of displacement, which appears as a vertical zone of little reflectivity that disrupts the continuity of the deep layering on both profiles (˜300 km apart). The base of the layered reflection zone coincides with the Moho, which exhibits variable character and undulates in a series of broad arches with widths of ˜150 km. In general, the mantle appears to have few reflections. However, at the southwest end of Line 3 near the Alaska

  3. Application of advanced seismic reflection imaging techniques to mapping permeable zones at Dixie Valley, Nevada. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-18

    Multifold seismic reflection data from the Dixie Valley geothermal field in Nevada were reprocessed using a nonlinear optimization scheme called simulated annealing to model subsurface acoustic velocities, followed by a pre-stack Kirchhoff migration to produce accurate and detailed depth-migrated images of subsurface structure. In contrast to conventional processing techniques, these methods account for significant lateral variations in velocity and thus have the potential ability to image steeply-dipping faults and fractures that may affect permeability within geothermal fields. The optimization scheme develops two-dimensional velocity models to within 6% of velocities obtained from well and surface geologic data. Only the seismic data (i.e., first arrival times of P waves) are used to construct the velocity models and pre-stack migration images, and no other a priori assumptions are invoked. Velocities obtained by processing individual seismic tracks were integrated to develop a block diagram of velocities to 2.3 km depth within the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Details of the tectonic and stratigraphic structure allowed three dimensional extension of the interpretations of two dimensional data. Interpretations of the processed seismic data are compared with well data, surface mapping, and other geophysical data. The Dixie Valley fault along the southeastern Stillwater Range Piedmont is associated with a pronounced lateral velocity gradient that is interpreted to represent the juxtaposition of relatively low velocity basin-fill strata in the hanging wall against higher velocity crystalline rocks in the footwall. The down-dip geometry of the fault was evaluated by inverting arrival times from a negative move-out event, which we associate with the dipping fault plane, on individual shot gathers for seismic line SRC-3 for the location and depth of the associated reflection points on the fault.

  4. Deep seismic reflection profile across the juncture zone between the Tarim Basin and the West Kunlun Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Fine structures of the crust and upper mantle of the basin-and-range juncture on the northwestern margin of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau are first delineated by the deep seismic reflection profile across the juncture zone between the Tarim Basin and the West Kunlun Mountains. Evidence is found for the northward subduction of the northwest marginal lithosphere of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and its collision with Tarim lithosphere beneath the West Kunlun Mountains. The lithosphere image of the face-to-face subduction and collision determines the coupling relationship between the Tarim Basin and the West Kunlun Mountains at the lithosphere scale and reflects the process of continent- continent collision.

  5. Compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum sorter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhao Wan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum (OAM sorter is proposed and demonstrated. The sorter comprises a quadratic fan-out mapper and a dual-phase corrector positioned in the pupil plane and the Fourier plane, respectively. The optical system is greatly simplified compared to previous demonstrations of OAM sorting, and the performance in resolution and efficiency is maintained. A folded configuration is set up using a single reflective spatial light modulator (SLM to demonstrate the validity of the scheme. The two phase elements are implemented on the left and right halves of the SLM and connected by a right-angle prism. Experimental results demonstrate the high resolution of the compact OAM sorter, and the current limit in efficiency can be overcome by replacing with transmissive SLMs and removing the beam splitters. This novel scheme paves the way for the miniaturization and integration of high-resolution OAM sorters.

  6. 3D Seismic Experimentation and Advanced Processing/Inversion Development for Investigations of the Shallow Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levander, Alan Richard [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Earth Science Department; Zelt, Colin A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Earth Science Department

    2015-03-17

    The work plan for this project was to develop and apply advanced seismic reflection and wide-angle processing and inversion techniques to high resolution seismic data for the shallow subsurface to seismically characterize the shallow subsurface at hazardous waste sites as an aid to containment and cleanup activities. We proposed to continue work on seismic data that we had already acquired under a previous DoE grant, as well as to acquire additional new datasets for analysis. The project successfully developed and/or implemented the use of 3D reflection seismology algorithms, waveform tomography and finite-frequency tomography using compressional and shear waves for high resolution characterization of the shallow subsurface at two waste sites. These two sites have markedly different near-surface structures, groundwater flow patterns, and hazardous waste problems. This is documented in the list of refereed documents, conference proceedings, and Rice graduate theses, listed below.

  7. Archive of digitized analog boomer seismic-reflection data collected during U.S. Geological Survey cruises Erda 90-1_HC, Erda 90-1_PBP, and Erda 91-3 in Mississippi Sound, June 1990 and September 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Stephen T.; Flocks, James G.; Forde, Arnell S.

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program has actively collected geophysical and sedimentological data in the northern Gulf of Mexico for several decades, including shallow subsurface data in the form of high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles (HRSP). Prior to the mid-1990s most HRSP data were collected in analog format as paper rolls of continuous profiles up to 25 meters long. As part of the National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center are converting the analog paper records to digital format using a large-format continuous scanner.This data release serves as an archive of seismic profiles with headers, converted SEG-Y files, navigation data, and trackline shapefiles for digitized boomer seismic data collected from the Research Vessel (R/V) Erda during two cruises in 1990 and 1991 (Figure 1). The Erda 90-1 geophysical cruise was conducted in two legs. The first leg included seismic data collected from the Hancock County region of the Mississippi Sound (Erda 90-1_HC) from June 4 to June 6, 1990. The second leg included seismic data collected from the Petit Bois Pass area of Mississippi Sound (Erda 90-1_PBP) from June 8 to June 9, 1990. The Erda 91-3 cruise occurred between September 12 and September 23, 1991 and surveyed the Mississippi Sound region just west of Horn Island, Mississippi. Additional project and data rescue details are included in the associated USGS Data Series 1047.Bosse, S.T., Flocks, J.G., and Forde, A.S., 2017, Digitized analog boomer seismic-reflection data collected during U.S. Geological Survey cruises Erda 90-1_HC, Erda 90-1_PBP, and Erda 91-3 in Mississippi Sound, June 1990 and September 1991: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1047, https://doi.org/10.3133/ds1047.

  8. Shear Wave Reflection Seismics Image Internal Structure of Quick-Clay Landslides in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, U.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Malehmir, A.

    2014-12-01

    Covering many different sizes of scale, landslides are widespread and pose a severe hazard in many areas as soon as humans or infrastructure are affected. In order to provide geophysical tools and techniques to better characterize sites prone to sliding, a geophysical assessment working towards a geotechnical understanding of landslides is necessary. As part of a joint project studying clay-related landslides in Nordic countries by a suite of geophysical methods, we therefore tested the use of shear wave reflection seismics to survey shallow structures that are known to be related to quick-clay landslide processes in southern Sweden. On two crossing profiles, a land streamer consisting of 120 SH-geophones with 1 m spacing was deployed, and an ELVIS micro-vibrator was shaking every 4 m to generate the shear wave signal. SH-wave data of high quality were thereby acquired to resolve the gaps between P-wave data and electrical and surface wave based methods of lower resolution. After quality control, correlation, subtractive stack, and geometry setup, single shot gathers already demonstrate the high data quality gained in the region, especially on a gravel road. The migrated depth sections image the structural inventory down to ca. 50 m depth with vertical resolution of less than 1 m. Horizontally layered sediments are visible in the upper 40 m of soft (marine) sediments, followed by top basement with a rough topography varying between ca. 20-40 m depth. The imaged, bowl-shaped basement morphology centres near the profile crossing, and basement is exposed at three sides of the profiles. Three distinct sediment sequences are separated by high-amplitude unconformities. The quick-clay layer may be located above the marked reflection set that lies on top of the more transparent sequence that levels out the basement. Located between 15-20 m depth, this correlates with the height of the last scarp that occurred in the area. In addition, shear wave velocities are determined

  9. N80_1SEGY.TXT: Seismic-Reflection Profiles in SEG-Y Format From Western Rhode Island Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, a Uniboom seismic-reflection survey was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research Vessel...

  10. High-resolution tunnel fluctuoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatz, A.; Varlamov, A. A.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2014-08-01

    Electron tunneling spectroscopy pioneered by Esaki and Giaever offered a powerful tool for studying electronic spectra and density of states (DOS) in superconductors. This led to important discoveries that revealed, in particular, the pseudogap in the tunneling spectrum of superconductors above their critical temperatures. However, the phenomenological approach of Giaever and Megerle does not resolve the fine structure of low-bias behavior carrying significant information about electron scattering, interactions, and decoherence effects. Here we construct a complete microscopic theory of electron tunneling into a superconductor in the fluctuation regime. We reveal a non-trivial low-energy anomaly in tunneling conductivity due to Andreev-like reflections of injected electrons from superconducting fluctuations. Our findings enable real-time observation of fluctuating Cooper pairs dynamics by time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and open new horizons for quantitative analysis of the fluctuation electronic spectra of superconductors.

  11. High-resolution light microscopy of nanoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Pustovyy, Oleg; Vainrub, Arnold

    2007-09-01

    We developed a high resolution light imaging system. Diffraction gratings with 100 nm width lines as well as less than 100 nm size features of different-shaped objects are clearly visible on a calibrated microscope test slide (Vainrub et al., Optics Letters, 2006, 31, 2855). The two-point resolution increase results from a known narrowing of the central diffraction peak for the annular aperture. Better visibility and advanced contrast of the smallest features in the image are due to enhancement of high spatial frequencies in the optical transfer function. The imaging system is portable, low energy, and battery operated. It has been adapted to use in both transmitting and reflecting light. It is particularly applicable for motile nanoform systems where structure and functions can be depicted in real time. We have isolated micrometer and submicrometer particles, termed proteons, from human and animal blood. Proteons form by reversible seeded aggregation of proteins around proteon nucleating centers (PNCs). PNCs are comprised of 1-2nm metallic nanoclusters containing 40-300 atoms. Proteons are capable of spontaneous assembling into higher nanoform systems assuming structure of complicated topology. The arrangement of complex proteon system mimics the structure of a small biological cell. It has structures that imitate membrane and nucleolus or nuclei. Some of these nanoforms are motile. They interact and divide. Complex nanoform systems can spontaneously reduce to simple proteons. The physical properties of these nanoforms could shed some light on the properties of early life forms or forms at extreme conditions.

  12. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  13. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  14. SH-wave reflection seismic and VSP as tools for the investigation of sinkhole areas in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja; Tschache, Saskia; Polom, Ulrich; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2017-04-01

    Sinkholes can lead to damage of buildings and infrastructure and they can cause life-threatening situations, if they occur in urban areas. The process behind this phenomenon is called subrosion. Subrosion is the underground leaching of soluble rocks, e.g. anhydrite and gypsum, due to the contact with ground- and meteoric water. Depending on the leached material, and especially the dissolution rate, different kinds of subrosion structures evolve in the subsurface. The two end members are collapse and depression structures. For a better understanding of the subrosion processes a detailed characterization of the resulting structures is necessary. In Germany sinkholes are a problem in many areas. In northern Germany salt and in central and southern Germany sulfate and carbonate deposits are affected by subrosion. The study areas described here are located in Thuringia in central Germany and the underground is characterized by soluble Permian deposits. The occurrence of 20 to 50 sinkholes is reported per year. Two regions, Bad Frankenhausen and Schmalkalden, are investigated, showing a leaning church tower and a sinkhole of 30 m diameter and 20 m depth, respectively. In Bad Frankenhausen four P-wave and 16 SH-wave reflection seismic profiles were carried out, supplemented by three zero-offset VSPs. In Schmalkalden five SH-wave reflection seismic profiles and one zero-offset VSP were acquired. The 2-D seismic sections, in particular the SH-wave profiles, showed known and unknown near-surface faults in the vicinity of sinkholes and depressions. For imaging the near-surface ( 2,5, probably indicating unstable areas due to subrosion. We conclude, that SH-wave reflection seismic offer an important tool for the imaging and characterization of near-surface subrosion structures and the identification of unstable zones, especially in combination with P-wave reflection seismic and zero-offset VSP with P- and S-waves. Presumably there is a connection between the presence of large

  15. Seismic reflection survey in Omama fan area, Gunma prefecture; Gunma Omama senjochi ni okeru hanshaho jishin tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, K.; Kano, N.; Yokokura, T.; Kiguchi, T.; Yokota, T.; Matsushima, J. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Seismic reflection survey was performed for the Medial Tectonic Line, an important geological tectonic line in the Kanto plains, at Kushibiki district, Saitama prefecture in the north-western part of the Kanto plains. It was estimated that movements of the basement were different in the individual sides of the active fault. In this study, the seismic reflection survey was performed at the Omama fan area, Gunma prefecture, which is located at the north-eastern extension of the Kushibiki plateau, to grasp the structure of basement to the depth of about 1.0 s of return travel time, and the upper sediments. Two traverse lines passing Ota city, Kiryu city, and Nitta town were used. Southern part of the traverse line-1 was in the bottom land in the middle of Tone river, and northern part was in the Omama fan area. The ground surface along the traverse line was flat. Hachioji heights are the heights elongating in the NW-SE direction and having relative height of 100 to 200 m against the surrounding plain. Another traverse line-2 was set on the steep slope having relative height more than 100 m. The Brute stack time section of each traverse line was characterized by the gradient reflection surface AA of the traverse line-1. It was suggested that the AA or intermittent parts of reflection surfaces deeper than AA may relate to the tectonic lines in the more ancient geological ages. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Fault-related-folding structures and reflection seismic sections. Study by seismic modeling and balanced cross section; Danso ga kaizaisuru shukyoku kozo no keitai to jishin tansa danmen. 2. Seismic modeling oyobi balanced cross section ni yoru study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamagawa, T.; Matsuoka, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Tsukui, R. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-05-27

    It occasionally happens that there exists a part where reflection near the thrust is not clearly observed in a thrust zone seismic survey cross section. For the effective interpretation of such an occurrence, the use of geological structures as well as the reflected pattern is effective. When the velocity structures for a fold structure having a listric fault caused anticline (unidirectionally inclined with a backlimb, without a forelimb) and for a fault propagation fold are involved, a wrong interpretation may be made since they look alike in reflection wave pattern despite their difference in geological structure. In the concept of balanced cross section, a check is performed, when the stratum after deformation is recovered to the time of deposition, as to whether the geologic stratum area is conserved without excess or shortage. An excess or shortage occurs if there is an error in the model, and this shows that the fault surface or fold structure is not correctly reflected. Positive application of geological knowledge is required in the processing and interpreting of data from a seismic survey. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Interpretation of electrical resistivity and shallow seismic reflection profiles, Whirlwind Valley and Horse Heaven areas, Beowawe KGRA, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.

    1979-12-01

    Numerical modeling and analysis of surface electrical and seismic data from the Beowawe KGRA, north-central Nevada, permit extrapolation of mapped geologic units and structures to approximately a mile (1.6 km) depth from which inferences about the geothermal system can be made. Detailed numerical modeling was complete for 78 line-mi. (125 km) of dipole-dipole resistivity data and includes compensation for topographic effects caused by the Malpais Rim scarp. The interpreted sections have as many as five distinct electrical units, one of which occurs only within the area of hydrothermal alteration along the fault set at the base of the Malpais Rim. The weight-drop seismic reflection data show numerous normal faults sub-parallel to the Malpais Rim within Whirlwind Valley west and southwest of The Geysers.

  18. Seismic-reflection evidence that the hayward fault extends into the lower crust of the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.

    1998-01-01

    This article presents deep seismic-reflection data from an experiment across San Francisco Peninsula in 1995 using large (125 to 500 kg) explosive sources. Shot gathers show a mostly nonreflective upper crust in both the Franciscan and Salinian terranes (juxtaposed across the San Andreas fault), an onset of weak lower-crustal reflectivity beginning at about 6-sec two-way travel time (TWTT) and bright southwest-dipping reflections between 11 and 13 sec TWTT. Previous studies have shown that the Moho in this area is no deeper than 25 km (~8 to 9 sec TWTT). Three-dimensional reflection travel-time modeling of the 11 to 13 sec events from the shot gathers indicates that the bright events may be explained by reflectors 15 to 20 km into the upper mantle, northeast of the San Andreas fault. However, upper mantle reflections from these depths were not observed on marine-reflection profiles collected in San Francisco Bay, nor were they reported from a refraction profile on San Francisco Peninsula. The most consistent interpretation of these events from 2D raytracing and 3D travel-time modeling is that they are out-of-plane reflections from a high-angle (dipping ~70??to the southwest) impedance contrast in the lower crust that corresponds with the surface trace of the Hayward fault. These results suggest that the Hayward fault truncates the horizontal detachment fault suggested to be active beneath San Francisco Bay.

  19. Near-surface mapping using SH-wave and P-wave seismic land-streamer data acquisition in Illinois, U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugin, Andre J.M.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; McBride, J.H.; Bexfield, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    SH-wave and P-wave high-resolution seismic reflection combined with land-streamer technology provide 3D regional maps of geologic formations that can be associated with aquifers and aquitards. Examples for three study areas are considered to demonstrate this. In these areas, reflection profiling detected near-surface faulting and mapped a buried glacial valley and its aquifers in two settings. The resulting seismic data can be used directly to constrain hydrogeologic modeling of shallow aquifers.

  20. DESIR high resolution separator at GANIL, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toprek Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution separator for the SPIRAL2/DESIR project at GANIL has been designed. The extracted isotopes from SPIRAL2 will be transported to and cooled in a RFQ cooler yielding beams with very low transverse emittance and energy spread. These beams will then be accelerated to 60 keV and sent to a high-resolution mass separator where a specific isotope will be selected. The good beam properties extracted from the RFQ cooler will allow one to obtain a mass resolution of č26000 with the high-resolution mass separator.

  1. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  2. One-Minute Shot Point Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data from Southern Rhode Island Sound Collected in 1980; Formatted for Use With Landmark (A80_6_SHOTNAV.TXT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  3. One-Minute Shot Point Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in 1975 from Eastern Rhode Island Sound; Formatted for Use With Landmark (A75_6_SHOTNAV.TXT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  4. Ship Tracklines of Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Southern Rhode Island Sound in 1980; Lines Correspond to SEG-Y Files (A80_6_SEGYLINES.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  5. Report of reprocessing of reflection seismic profile X-5 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, Eddy County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John J.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic reflection profile X-5 exhibits a 7,700 ft long anomalous zone of poor quality to nonexistent reflections between shotpoints 100 and 170, compared to the high-quality, flat-lying, coherent reflections on either side. Results from drill holes in the area suggest 'layer cake' geology with no detectable abnormalities such as faults present. In an attempt to determine whether the anomalous zone of the seismic profile is an artifact or actually indicates a geologic condition, the data were extensively reprocessed using state-of-the-art processing techniques and the following conclusions were made: 1. The field-recorded data in the anomalous zone are of poor quality due to surface conditions and recording parameters used. 2. Reprocessing shows reflectors throughout the anomalous zone at all levels. However, it cannot prove that the reflectors are continuous throughout the anomalous zone. 3. Significant improvement in data quality may be achieved if the line is reshot using carefully determined recording parameters.

  6. Mapping of crustal scale tectonic boundaries in the Ossa-Morena Zone using reprocessed IBERSEIS reflection seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashubin, A. S.; Juhlin, C.

    2010-06-01

    The IBERSEIS deep seismic reflection profile imaged crustal scale structures in the SW Iberian Variscan belt, crossing the South Portuguese Zone, the Ossa-Morena Zone and the Central Iberian Zone in Spain. Two subsets of the profile, corresponding to the South Portuguese Zone-Ossa-Morena Zone and the Ossa-Morena Zone-Central Iberian Zone tectonic contacts, have been reprocessed with the aim of investigating the influence of cross-dip and to better image steeply dipping features. Alternative strategies for binning midpoints into common depth point (CDP) bins using different azimuths were examined for synthetic data. We show that the choice of the CDP-processing line and the bin azimuth orientation has a significant impact on the normal moveout and dip-moveout velocities and is crucial to optimizing the quality of the stacked seismic image along the crooked profile. Multi-azimuth binning, normal moveout/dip-moveout, and migration velocity analysis on synthetic and real data show the presence of clear sub-vertical upper crustal structures near the South Portuguese Zone-Ossa-Morena Zone suture, the Aroche fault. This sub-vertical reflectivity that was not imaged earlier, projects into a location in the lower crust with low reflectivity.

  7. Lateral continuity of basement seismic reflections in 15 Ma ultrafast-spreading crust at ODP Site 1256

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sreeja; Swift, Stephen A.

    2011-09-01

    The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) initiated drilling at Site 1256D in the Guatemala Basin, about 1,000 km off the East Pacific Rise to penetrate plutonic rocks, anticipated to be relatively shallow in this region, formed at an ultra-fast spreading rate. IODP Expedition E312 successfully drilled into gabbros at ~1,150 m in basement. Multi-channel seismic traces show weak laterally coherent sub-basement reflections at borehole depths. Synthetic reflectivity seismograms were computed using a Ricker wavelet and impedance profiles from borehole sonic logs. These seismograms show significant sub-basement amplitude peaks. A zero-offset vertical seismic profile, shot on E312, was processed to investigate the authenticity of these reflections and their relationship to borehole geology. A dual scheme of the median filtering and F-K dip filtering was used. Tests with synthetic seismograms indicate the approach is effective at reasonable SNR levels. Downgoing energy is clearly identified but negligible upgoing energy is visible over random noise. These results indicate that lava flows and igneous contacts in upper ocean crust have significant topography on lateral scales less than the Fresnel Zone (~300 m) due to igneous and tectonic processes.

  8. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes a plan to build a prototype small stroke, high precision deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution...

  9. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal we describe a plan to build a deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution imaging. The prototype DM will be...

  10. VT Hydrography Dataset - High Resolution NHD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Vermont Hydrography Dataset (VHD) is compliant with the local resolution (also known as High Resolution) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD)...

  11. Optical alignment of high resolution Fourier transform spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Ocallaghan, F. G.; Cassie, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    Remote sensing, high resolution FTS instruments often contain three primary optical subsystems: Fore-Optics, Interferometer Optics, and Post, or Detector Optics. We discuss the alignment of a double-pass FTS containing a cat's-eye retro-reflector. Also, the alignment of fore-optics containing confocal paraboloids with a reflecting field stop which relays a field image onto a camera is discussed.

  12. Geological characterization of the Dutch Wadden Sea using shallow reflection seismics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, B.F.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Gunnink, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Mapping of the Dutch Wadden Sea is a major challenge as it is an intertidal zone and therefore has limited accessibility by surveying vessels. Hence, the current subsurface model of the Dutch Wadden Sea is based on a sparse density of lithological information derived from core samples and seismic da

  13. Seismic reflection survey at Llancanelo region (Mendoza, Argentina) and preliminary interpretation of Neogene stratigraphic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, A.; Onnis, L.; de la Vega, M.; Tassone, A.; Violante, R. A.; Lippai, H.; López, E.; Rovere, E. I.

    2015-07-01

    A shallow multichannel seismic survey reaching depths of 700/800 m was performed for the first time in the Llancanelo Lake region (Southern Mendoza Province, Argentina), in order to depict the major Neogene sedimentary-volcanic sequences that form the final infilling of the tectonic-volcanic basin where the lake is located. The seismic survey advances on the results of previous geoelectric and electromagnetic surveys carried out at early stages of the research that reached the uppermost 80-100 m of the sequences (Quaternary), and therefore they go deeper in the subsoil. All the surveys were supported by surface and subsoil geological observations. After explaining the details of the performed seismic methodology, the obtained results are discussed, which indicate the presence of three major sedimentary units with increasing volcanic (basaltic layers) intercalations with depth, that accommodate to the geometry of the depocenter. The entire sequence encompasses most of the Neogene. This research sets the methodological basis for future, more detailed shallow seismic surveys in the region.

  14. Structure of high-resolution NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Corio, PL

    2012-01-01

    Structure of High-Resolution NMR Spectra provides the principles, theories, and mathematical and physical concepts of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.The book presents the elementary theory of magnetic resonance; the quantum mechanical theory of angular momentum; the general theory of steady state spectra; and multiple quantum transitions, double resonance and spin echo experiments.Physicists, chemists, and researchers will find the book a valuable reference text.

  15. Seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in Canada Basin, Northwind Ridge and Northwind Basin, Arctic Ocean in 1988, 1992 and 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantz, Arthur; Hart, Patrick E.; May, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data were collected in generally ice-covered waters of the Canada Basin and the eastern part of the Chukchi Continental Borderland of the Amerasia Basin, Arctic Ocean, during the late summers of 1988, 1992, and 1993. The data were acquired from a Polar class icebreaker, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, using a seismic reflection system designed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The northernmost data extend to 78? 48' N latitude. In 1988, 155 km of reflection data were acquired with a prototype system consisting of a single 195 cubic inch air gun seismic source and a two-channel hydrophone streamer with a 150-m active section. In 1992 and 1993, 500 and 1,900 km, respectively, of seismic reflection profile data were acquired with an improved six air gun, 674 to 1303 cubic inch tuned seismic source array and the same two-channel streamer. In 1993, a 12-channel streamer with a 150-m active section was used to record five of the reflection lines and one line was acquired using a three air gun, 3,000 cubic inch source. All data were recorded with a DFS-V digital seismic recorder. Processed sections feature high quality vertical incidence images to more than 6 km of sub-bottom penetration in the Canada Basin. Refraction data were acquired with U.S. Navy sonobuoys recorded simultaneously with the seismic reflection profiles. In 1988 eight refraction profiles were recorded with the single air gun, and in 1992 and 1993 a total of 47 refraction profiles were recorded with the six air gun array. The sonobuoy refraction records, with offsets up to 35 km, provide acoustic velocity information to complement the short-offset reflection data. The report includes trackline maps showing the location of the data, as well as both digital data files (SEG-Y) and images of all of the profiles.

  16. Using the IODP Expedition 312 Vertical Seismic Profile to Investigate Sub-basement Reflections in Multi-Channel Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S.; Swift, S. A.; Stephen, R. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) initiated drilling at Site 1256D in the Guatemala Basin, about 1000km off the East Pacific Rise to penetrate plutonic rocks, anticipated to be relatively shallow in this region formed at an ultra- fast spreading rate. IODP Expedition E312 successfully drilled into gabbros at ~ 1150m in basement. Multi- channel seismic traces, although not processed for the purpose, show weak laterally-coherent sub-basement reflections at borehole depths (Hallenborg et. al., Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol 108 No. B11, 2532, 2003). Synthetic reflectivity seismograms were computed using a Ricker wavelet and impedance profiles from borehole sonic logs. They strongly suggest the presence of significant sub-basement amplitude peaks - although attenuation has not been modeled. Zero-offset vertical seismic profiles were processed to investigate the authenticity of these reflections and interpret the geological features that caused them. A dual scheme of the median filtering and F-K dip filtering was used. Down-going energy is clearly identified but negligible up-going energy is visible over random noise. The absence of geophones above the basement prevents comparison of basement reflections with sub-basement ones, so that a critical energy level above the noise could be established to identify up-going energy. The negative results are consistent with the topography of geological horizons on horizontal scales less than the Fresnel Zone (~ 300m). This expedition is the first penetration through volcanic extrusives and dikes into plutonic basement. In such a setting, sub-basement reflections, if present, would have been accurately measured. Absence of such clear and comprehensible observations in this area strongly suggests that lava flows and igneous contacts in upper ocean crust have significant topography on lateral scales < 300 m due to igneous and tectonic processes.

  17. Uniquely Acquired Vintage Seismic Reflection Data Reveal the Stratigraphic and Tectonic History of the Montana Disturbed Belt, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speece, M. A.; Link, C. A.; Stickney, M.

    2011-12-01

    In 1983 and 1984 Techco of Denver, Colorado, acquired approximately 302 linear kilometers of two-dimensional (2D) seismic reflection data in Flathead and Lake Counties, Montana, USA, as part of an initiative to identify potential drilling targets beneath the Swan and Whitefish Mountain Ranges and adjacent basins of northwestern Montana. These seismic lines were collected in the Montana Disturbed Belt (MDB) or Montana thrust belt along the western edge of Glacier National Park in mountainous terrain with complicated subsurface structures including thrust faults and folds. These structures formed during the Laramide Orogeny as sedimentary rocks of the Precambrian Belt Supergroup were thrust eastward. Later, during the Cenozoic, high-angle normal faults produced prominent west-facing mountain scarps of the Mission, Swan and Whitefish mountains. The 1983 data set consisted of two profiles of 24-fold (96-channels) Vibroseis data and four profiles of 24-fold (96-channels) helicopter-assisted dynamite data. The dynamite data were collected using the Poulter Method in which explosives were placed on poles and air shots were recorded. The 1983 dynamite profiles extend from southwest to northeast across the Whitefish Mountain Range to the edge of Glacier National Park and the Vibroseis data were collected along nearby roadways. The 1984 data set consists of four profiles of 30-fold (120-channels) helicopter-assisted dynamite data that were also collected using the Poulter Method. The 1984 profiles cross the Swan Mountain Range between Flathead Lake and Glacier National Park. All of these data sets were recently donated to Montana Tech and subsequently recovered from nine-track tape. Conventionally processed seismic stacked sections from the 1980s of these data show evidence of a basement decollement that separates relatively undeformed basement from overlying structures of the MDB. Unfortunately, these data sets have not been processed using modern seismic processing

  18. High-resolution TFT-LCD for spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JaeWon; Kim, Yong-Hae; Byun, Chun-Won; Pi, Jae-Eun; Oh, Himchan; Kim, GiHeon; Lee, Myung-Lae; Chu, Hye-Yong; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2014-06-01

    SLM with very fine pixel pitch is needed for the holographic display system. Among various kinds of SLMs, commercially available high resolution LCoS has been widely used as a spatial light modulator. But the size of commercially available LCoS SLM is limited because the manufacturing technology of LCoS is based on the semiconductor process developed on small size Si wafer. Recently very high resolution flat panel display panel (~500ppi) was developed as a "retina display". Until now, the pixel pitch of flat panel display is several times larger than the pixel pitch of LCoS. But considering the possibility of shrink down the pixel pitch with advanced lithographic tools, the application of flat panel display will make it possible to build a SLM with high spatial bandwidth product. We simulated High resolution TFT-LCD panel on glass substrate using oxide semiconductor TFT with pixel pitch of 20um. And we considered phase modulation behavior of LC(ECB) mode. The TFT-LCD panel is reflective type with 4-metal structure with organic planarization layers. The technical challenge for high resolution large area SLM will be discussed with very fine pixel.

  19. S-waves velocity model for the SW-Iberia derived from the IBERSEIS wide-angle seismic reflection transects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Marti, D.; Carbonell, R.; Ayarza, P.; Simancas, F.; Martinez-Poyatos, D.; Azor, A.; Gonzalez-Lodeiro, F.; Perez-Estaun, A.

    2009-04-01

    The IBERSEIS wide-angle seismic reflection transects acquired in 2003 in SW-Iberia Peninsula provided constraints on the P-wave seismic velocity structure across the three tectonic provinces in the area: the South Portuguesse Zone (SPZ), the Ossa-Morena Zone (OMZ) and the Central Iberia Zone (CIZ). These data were acquired by 650 vertical component seismographs (TEXAN seismic recorders) from the IRIS-PASSCAL Instrument center, using explosive sources with charge sizes ranging from 500 to 1000 kg. Both transects A and B are, approximately, 300 km long with a station spacing of 400 m and of 150 m respectively. The relatively small station spacing favored the lateral correlation of the seismic events and provided enough resolution for the identification of shear-wave arrivals. The most prominent S-wave phase recorded by the vertical component sensors corresponds to the SmS which is nearly horizontal for a velocity reduction of 4600 m/s. This phase can even be followed up to near vertical incidence at 18 s(twtt). A few S-wave crustal arrivals can be also identified, although at small offsets they interfere with the previous P-wave arrivals. The Sn phase can be observed at very far offsets providing additional constraints on the nature of the shallow subcrustal mantle. Furthermore, slant stacks of the shot gathers (tau-p sections) reveal the existing of PS energy. PS phases are more difficult to identify in the shot gathers. Finally, a preliminary S-wave velocity model has been derived by iterative forward modeling to provide additional constraints on the nature of the deep crust and upper mantle beneath the Variscan of SW-Iberia.

  20. Structural Geometry of a Sector of the Colorado River Delta, Baja California, Mexico, Based on Seismic Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanes-Martínez, J. Juan; González-Escobar, Mario; Suárez-Vidal, Francisco; Gallardo-Mata, Clemente G.

    2014-07-01

    A structural study in the SW section of the Colorado River delta using seismic reflection data is presented. The study area is located along the Cerro Prieto transform fault, which extends from the northern Gulf of California through the Mexicali Valley and is an active fault within the Pacific-North American plate boundary zone. The research was supported by a database of five seismic profiles with a total length of 215 km, collected in the early 80's by Petróleos Mexicanos. The results show a high density of faults, most of which are buried by sediments. Within the Cerro Prieto fault zone, several faults were identified, such as: Palmas, Mesa, and Pangas Viejas, until now unknown. In addition, even though the Indiviso fault was investigated and superficially identify prior to this work, herein mapped at depth. West of the Cerro Prieto fault zone lies the Las Tinajas basin, bound by the Dunas and Saldaña faults and by the Montague basin to the southeast. The deformation zone along the plate boundary is 18-km-wide, stretching from the Cerro Prieto fault in the east to the Pangas Viejas fault in the west. The orientations of the faults are NW-SE, and if projected from the southern side of the Sierra Cucapah southward, the faults tend to join the Cerro Prieto fault. In the Las Tinajas basin, the acoustic basement is deeper than 5,000 m. Some of the largest vertical displacements generated by the 2010 7.2-Mw El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurred southeast of the epicenter and coincided with the location of the Pangas Viejas Fault, which is buried by sediments. Before this event, seismic activity was very low, and no structures were known in the area. In this paper, we demonstrate that there are at least seven major faults that may now pose a high seismic hazard.

  1. Multifrequency seismic detectability of seasonal thermoclines assessed from ARGO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, S.; Le Gonidec, Y.; Marié, L.

    2016-08-01

    Seismic oceanography is a developing research topic where new acoustic methods allow high-resolution teledetection of the thermohaline structure of the ocean. First implementations to study the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer have recently been achieved but remain very challenging due to the weakness and shallowness of such seismic reflectors. In this article, we develop a multifrequency seismic analysis of hydrographic data sets collected in a seasonally stratified midlatitude shelf by ARGO network floats to assess the detectability issue of shallow thermoclines. This analysis, for which sensitivity to the data reduction scheme used by ARGO fl