WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-resolution nmr structure

  1. Structure of high-resolution NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Corio, PL

    2012-01-01

    Structure of High-Resolution NMR Spectra provides the principles, theories, and mathematical and physical concepts of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.The book presents the elementary theory of magnetic resonance; the quantum mechanical theory of angular momentum; the general theory of steady state spectra; and multiple quantum transitions, double resonance and spin echo experiments.Physicists, chemists, and researchers will find the book a valuable reference text.

  2. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1999-01-01

    High Resolution NMR provides a broad treatment of the principles and theory of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as it is used in the chemical sciences. It is written at an "intermediate" level, with mathematics used to augment, rather than replace, clear verbal descriptions of the phenomena. The book is intended to allow a graduate student, advanced undergraduate, or researcher to understand NMR at a fundamental level, and to see illustrations of the applications of NMR to the determination of the structure of small organic molecules and macromolecules, including proteins. Emphasis is on the study of NMR in liquids, but the treatment also includes high resolution NMR in the solid state and the principles of NMR imaging and localized spectroscopy. Careful attention is given to developing and interrelating four approaches - steady state energy levels, the rotating vector picture, the density matrix, and the product operator formalism. The presentation is based on the assumption that the reader has an acquaintan...

  3. High-resolution NMR structures of the domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tho1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Julian O. B.; Allen, Mark D.; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Bycroft, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and the C-terminal RNA-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tho1 have been determined. THO is a multi-protein complex involved in the formation of messenger ribonuclear particles (mRNPs) by coupling transcription with mRNA processing and export. THO is thought to be formed from five subunits, Tho2p, Hpr1p, Tex1p, Mft1p and Thp2p, and recent work has determined a low-resolution structure of the complex [Poulsen et al. (2014 ▸), PLoS One, 9, e103470]. A number of additional proteins are thought to be involved in the formation of mRNP in yeast, including Tho1, which has been shown to bind RNA in vitro and is recruited to actively transcribed chromatin in vivo in a THO-complex and RNA-dependent manner. Tho1 is known to contain a SAP domain at the N-terminus, but the ability to suppress the expression defects of the hpr1Δ mutant of THO was shown to reside in the RNA-binding C-terminal region. In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and C-terminal RNA-binding domain have been determined

  4. High-resolution NMR structures of the domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tho1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Julian O. B.; Allen, Mark D.; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Bycroft, Mark, E-mail: mxb@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-23

    In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and the C-terminal RNA-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tho1 have been determined. THO is a multi-protein complex involved in the formation of messenger ribonuclear particles (mRNPs) by coupling transcription with mRNA processing and export. THO is thought to be formed from five subunits, Tho2p, Hpr1p, Tex1p, Mft1p and Thp2p, and recent work has determined a low-resolution structure of the complex [Poulsen et al. (2014 ▸), PLoS One, 9, e103470]. A number of additional proteins are thought to be involved in the formation of mRNP in yeast, including Tho1, which has been shown to bind RNA in vitro and is recruited to actively transcribed chromatin in vivo in a THO-complex and RNA-dependent manner. Tho1 is known to contain a SAP domain at the N-terminus, but the ability to suppress the expression defects of the hpr1Δ mutant of THO was shown to reside in the RNA-binding C-terminal region. In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and C-terminal RNA-binding domain have been determined.

  5. Principles of high resolution NMR in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Mehring, Michael

    1983-01-01

    The field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has developed at a fascinating pace during the last decade. It always has been an extremely valuable tool to the organic chemist by supplying molecular "finger print" spectra at the atomic level. Unfortunately the high resolution achievable in liquid solutions could not be obtained in solids and physicists and physical chemists had to live with unresolved lines open to a wealth of curve fitting procedures and a vast amount of speculations. High resolution NMR in solids seemed to be a paradoxon. Broad structure­ less lines are usually encountered when dealing with NMR in solids. Only with the recent advent of mUltiple pulse, magic angle, cross-polarization, two-dimen­ sional and multiple-quantum spectroscopy and other techniques during the last decade it became possible to resolve finer details of nuclear spin interactions in solids. I have felt that graduate students, researchers and others beginning to get involved with these techniques needed a book which trea...

  6. High resolution NMR in zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Anix [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela). Dept. de Analisis y Evalucion

    1992-12-31

    In this work {sup 29} Si and {sup 27} Al NMR spectroscopy was used to study various types of zeolites. The corresponding spectra were used to measure the Si/Al ratios, to follow chemical modifications induced by acid and hydrothermal treatments, to determine non-equivalent crystallographic sites in highly dealuminated mordenites, and to detect modifications of faujasites due to the insertion of titanium atoms in the lattice. (author) 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. High resolution NMR in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Anix

    1991-01-01

    In this work 29 Si and 27 Al NMR spectroscopy was used to study various types of zeolites. The corresponding spectra were used to measure the Si/Al ratios, to follow chemical modifications induced by acid and hydrothermal treatments, to determine non-equivalent crystallographic sites in highly dealuminated mordenites, and to detect modifications of faujasites due to the insertion of titanium atoms in the lattice. (author)

  8. Structural elucidation of the Brucella melitensis M antigen by high-resolution NMR at 500 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundle, D.R.; Cherwonogrodzky, J.W.; Perry, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    The Brucella M antigen from the species type strain Brucella melitensis 16M has been identified as a component of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS). O polysaccharide liberated from this LPS by mild acid hydrolysis exhibited M activity in serological tests and was shown to be a homopolymer of 4-formamido-4,6-dideoxy-α-D-mannopyranosyl residues arranged in an oligosaccharide repeating unit as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the native lipopolysaccharide. Structural analysis of the O polysaccharide by NMR methods was difficult due to apparent microheterogeneity of the repeating unit, which was in fact caused by the presence of rotational isomers of the N-formyl moiety. This problem was resolved by chemical modification of the polysaccharide to its amino and N-acetyl derivatives, the 500-MHz 1 H and 125-MHz 13 C NMR spectra of which could be analyzed in terms of a unique structure through application of pH-dependent β-shifts and two-dimensional techniques that included COSY, relayed COSY, and NOESY experiments together with heteronuclear C/H shift correlation spectroscopy. On the basis of these experiments and supported by methylation and periodate oxidation data, the structure of the M polysaccharide was determined as a linear polymer of unbranched pentasaccharide repeating units consisting of four 1,2-linked and one 1,3-lined 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-α-D-mannopyranosyl residues. The marked structural similarity of the M antigen and the A antigen, which is known to be a 1,2-linked homopolysaccharide of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-α-D-mannopyranosyl units, accounts for cross-serological reactions of the two and the long-standing confusion surrounding the nature of their antigenic determinants

  9. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    2012-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications discusses the principles and theory of nuclear magnetic resonance and how this concept is used in the chemical sciences. This book is written at an intermediate level, with mathematics used to augment verbal descriptions of the phenomena. This text pays attention to developing and interrelating four approaches - the steady state energy levels, the rotating vector picture, the density matrix, and the product operator formalism. The style of this book is based on the assumption that the reader has an acquaintance with the general principles of quantum mechanics, but no extensive background in quantum theory or proficiency in mathematics is required. This book begins with a description of the basic physics, together with a brief account of the historical development of the field. It looks at the study of NMR in liquids, including high resolution NMR in the solid state and the principles of NMR imaging and localized spectroscopy. This book is intended to assis...

  10. Utilization of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements for high-resolution NMR structure determination of a soluble loop-rich protein with sparse NOE distance restraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuita, Kyoko; Kataoka, Saori; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Hattori, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2015-01-01

    NMR structure determination of soluble proteins depends in large part on distance restraints derived from NOE. In this study, we examined the impact of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)-derived distance restraints on protein structure determination. A high-resolution structure of the loop-rich soluble protein Sin1 could not be determined by conventional NOE-based procedures due to an insufficient number of NOE restraints. By using the 867 PRE-derived distance restraints obtained from the NOE-based structure determination procedure, a high-resolution structure of Sin1 could be successfully determined. The convergence and accuracy of the determined structure were improved by increasing the number of PRE-derived distance restraints. This study demonstrates that PRE-derived distance restraints are useful in the determination of a high-resolution structure of a soluble protein when the number of NOE constraints is insufficient

  11. High resolution NMR spectroscopy of synthetic polymers in bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komorski, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of high-resolution NMR of solid polymers; High-resolution NMR of glassy amorphous polymers; Carbon-13 solid-state NMR of semicrystalline polymers; Conformational analysis of polymers of solid-state NMR; High-resolution NMR studies of oriented polymers; High-resolution solid-state NMR of protons in polymers; and Deuterium NMR of solid polymers. This work brings together the various approaches for high-resolution NMR studies of bulk polymers into one volume. Heavy emphasis is, of course, given to 13C NMR studies both above and below Tg. Standard high-power pulse and wide-line techniques are not covered

  12. High-resolution NMR structure of the antimicrobial peptide protegrin-2 in the presence of DPC micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usachev, K. S., E-mail: k.usachev@kpfu.ru; Efimov, S. V.; Kolosova, O. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Klochkov, V. V. [Kazan Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    PG-1 adopts a dimeric structure in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles, and a channel is formed by the association of several dimers but the molecular mechanisms of the membrane damage by non-α-helical peptides are still unknown. The formation of the PG-1 dimer is important for pore formation in the lipid bilayer, since the dimer can be regarded as the primary unit for assembly into the ordered aggregates. It was supposed that only 12 residues (RGGRL-CYCRR-RFCVC-V) are needed to endow protegrin molecules with strong antibacterial activity and that at least four additional residues are needed to add potent antifungal properties. Thus, the 16-residue protegrin (PG-2) represents the minimal structure needed for broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity encompassing bacteria and fungi. As the peptide conformation and peptide-to-membrane binding properties are very sensitive to single amino acid substitutions, the solution structure of PG-2 in solution and in a membrane mimicking environment are crucial. In order to find evidence if the oligomerization state of PG-1 in a lipid environment will be the same or not for another protegrins, we investigate in the present work the PG-2 NMR solution structure in the presence of perdeuterated DPC micelles. The NMR study reported in the present work indicates that PG-2 form a well-defined structure (PDB: 2MUH) composed of a two-stranded antiparallel β-sheet when it binds to DPC micelles.

  13. DNA oligonucleotide conformations: high resolution NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellema, J.-R.

    1984-01-01

    The present work describes a DNA double-helix model, which is well comparable with the models derived from fibre-diffraction studies. The model has a mononucleotide repeat with torsion angles in accordance with average geometries as derived from 1 H NMR studies. Special attention was paid to reduce the number of short H-H nonbonding contacts, which are abundantly present in the 'classical' fibre-diffraction models. Chapter 3 describes the first complete assignment of a 1 H NMR spectrum of a DNA tetramer, d(TAAT). Preliminary conformational data derived from the spectral parameters recorded at 27 0 C are given. A more detailed analysis employing temperature-dependence studies is given in Chapter 4. (Auth.)

  14. Automated high-resolution NMR with a sample changer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, C.G.; Johnson, R.D.; Philson, S.B.; Strouse, J.; McEnroe, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    Within the past two years, it has become possible to obtain high-resolution NMR spectra using automated commercial instrumentation. Software control of all spectrometer functions has reduced most of the tedious manual operations to typing a few computer commands or even making selections from a menu. Addition of an automatic sample changer is the next natural step in improving efficiency and sample throughput; it has a significant (and even unexpected) impact on how NMR laboratories are run and how it is taught. Such an instrument makes even sophisticated experiments routine, so that people with no previous exposure to NMR can run these experiments after a training session of an hour or less. This A/C Interface examines the impact of such instrumentation on both the academic and the industrial laboratory

  15. Toward high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of microscopic liquid samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Mark C.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Chen, Ying; Reardon, Patrick N.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Khbeis, Michael; Irish, Duane; Mueller, Karl T.

    2017-01-01

    A longstanding limitation of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is the requirement for samples to have macroscopic dimensions. Commercial probes, for example, are designed for volumes of at least 5 mL, in spite of decades of work directed toward the goal of miniaturization. Progress in miniaturizing inductive detectors has been limited by a perceived need to meet two technical requirements: (1) minimal separation between the sample and the detector, which is essential for sensitivity, and (2) near-perfect magnetic-field homogeneity at the sample, which is typically needed for spectral resolution. The first of these requirements is real, but the second can be relaxed, as we demonstrate here. By using pulse sequences that yield high-resolution spectra in an inhomogeneous field, we eliminate the need for near-perfect field homogeneity and the accompanying requirement for susceptibility matching of microfabricated detector components. With this requirement removed, typical imperfections in microfabricated components can be tolerated, and detector dimensions can be matched to those of the sample, even for samples of volume << 5 uL. Pulse sequences that are robust to field inhomogeneity thus enable small-volume detection with optimal sensitivity. We illustrate the potential of this approach to miniaturization by presenting spectra acquired with a flat-wire detector that can easily be scaled to subnanoliter volumes. In particular, we report high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of an alanine sample of volume 500 pL.

  16. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  17. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed

  18. High-resolution solution-state NMR of unfractionated plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Fachuang Lu; Hoon Kim; Dino Ress; Daniel J. Yelle; Kenneth E. Hammel; Sally A. Ralph; Bernadette Nanayakkara; Armin Wagner; Takuya Akiyama; Paul F. Schatz; Shawn D. Mansfield; Noritsugu Terashima; Wout Boerjan; Bjorn Sundberg; Mattias Hedenstrom

    2009-01-01

    Detailed structural studies on the plant cell wall have traditionally been difficult. NMR is one of the preeminent structural tools, but obtaining high-resolution solution-state spectra has typically required fractionation and isolation of components of interest. With recent methods for dissolution of, admittedly, finely divided plant cell wall material, the wall can...

  19. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  20. Chemical structure changes in coals after low-temperature oxidation and demineralization by acid treatment as revealed by high resolution solid state 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekely, P.; Nicole, D.; Delpuech, J.-J.; Totino, E.; Muller, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    13 C CP/MAS NMR has been used for characterization of chemical structure changes in coals after low-temperature oxidation and prolonged demineralization by acid treatment. In both cases the changes take place mainly in the aliphatic part of coal molecules. 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  2. High Resolution NMR Studies of Encapsulated Proteins In Liquid Ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronald W.; Lefebvre, Brian G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2005-01-01

    Many of the difficulties presented by large, aggregation-prone, and membrane proteins to modern solution NMR spectroscopy can be alleviated by actively seeking to increase the effective rate of molecular reorientation. An emerging approach involves encapsulating the protein of interest within the protective shell of a reverse micelle, and dissolving the resulting particle in a low viscosity fluid, such as the short chain alkanes. Here we present the encapsulation of proteins with high structural fidelity within reverse micelles dissolved in liquid ethane. The addition of appropriate co-surfactants can significantly reduce the pressure required for successful encapsulation. At these reduced pressures, the viscosity of the ethane solution is low enough to provide sufficiently rapid molecular reorientation to significantly lengthen the spin-spin NMR relaxation times of the encapsulated protein. PMID:16028922

  3. High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Spectroscopies Distinguish Metabolome and Structural Properties of Maize Seeds from Plants Treated with Different Fertilizers and Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Cozzolino, Vincenza; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2018-03-21

    Both high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) NMR spectroscopies were applied here to identify the changes of metabolome, morphology, and structural properties induced in seeds (caryopses) of maize plants grown at field level under either mineral or compost fertilization in combination with the inoculation by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The metabolome of intact caryopses was examined by HRMAS-NMR, while the morphological aspects, endosperm properties and seed water distribution were investigated by MRI. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to evaluate 1 H CPMG (Carr-Purcel-Meiboom-Gill) HRMAS spectra as well as several MRI-derived parameters ( T 1 , T 2 , and self-diffusion coefficients) of intact maize caryopses. PCA score-plots from spectral results indicated that both seeds metabolome and structural properties depended on the specific field treatment undergone by maize plants. Our findings show that a combination of multivariate statistical analyses with advanced and nondestructive NMR techniques, such as HRMAS and MRI, enables the evaluation of the effects induced on maize caryopses by different fertilization and management practices at field level. The spectroscopic approach adopted here may become useful for the objective appraisal of the quality of seeds produced under a sustainable agriculture.

  4. Structural Masquerade of Plesiomonas shigelloides Strain CNCTC 78/89 O-Antigen-High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR Reveals the Modified d-galactan I of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucieklak, Karolina; Koj, Sabina; Pawelczyk, Damian; Niedziela, Tomasz

    2017-11-29

    The high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR) analysis of Plesiomonas shigelloides 78/89 lipopolysaccharide directly on bacteria revealed the characteristic structural features of the O -acetylated polysaccharide in the NMR spectra. The O -antigen profiles were unique, yet the pattern of signals in the, spectra along with their ¹H, 13 C chemical shift values, resembled these of d-galactan I of Klebsiella pneumoniae . The isolated O- specific polysaccharide (O-PS) of P. shigelloides strain CNCTC 78/89 was investigated by ¹H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the P. shigelloides 78/89 O- PS is composed of →3)-α-d-Gal p -(1→3)-β-d-Gal f 2OAc-(1→ disaccharide repeating units. The O- acetylation was incomplete and resulted in a microheterogeneity of the O- antigen. This O- acetylation generates additional antigenic determinants within the O- antigen, forms a new chemotype, and contributes to the epitopes recognized by the O- serotype specific antibodies. The serological cross-reactivities further confirmed the inter-specific structural similarity of these O- antigens.

  5. 'In vivo' and high resolution spectroscopy in solids by NMR: an instrument for transgenic plants study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colnago, L.A.; Herrmann, P.S.P.; Bernardes Filho, R.

    1995-01-01

    This work has developed a study on transgenic plants using two different techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance, in vivo NMR and high resolution NMR. In order to understand the gene mutations and characterize the plants constituents, NMR spectral data were analysed and discussed, then the results were presented

  6. Applications of high resolution 3H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.G.

    1987-10-01

    The advantages of tritium as an NMR nucleus are pointed out. Examples of its use are given, including labelled toluene, hydrogenation of β-methylstyrene, and maltose and its binding proteins. 7 refs., 2 figs

  7. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 (micro)m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  8. Introduction to quantum calculation methods in high resolution NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.

    1996-01-01

    New techniques as for instance the polarization transfer, the coherence with several quanta and the double Fourier transformation have appeared fifteen years ago. These techniques constitute a considerable advance in NMR. Indeed, they allow to study more complex molecules than it was before possible. But with these advances, the classical description of the NMR is not enough to understand precisely the physical phenomena induced by these methods. It is then necessary to resort to quantum calculation methods. The aim of this work is to present these calculation methods. After some recalls of quantum mechanics, the author describes the NMR with the density matrix, reviews the main methods of double Fourier transformation and then gives the principle of the relaxation times calculation. (O.M.)

  9. Structure and dynamics of alpha-tocopherol in model membranes and in solution: a broad-line and high-resolution NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekiel, I.H.; Hughes, L.; Burton, G.W.; Jovall, P.A.; Ingold, K.U.; Smith, I.C.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to study the conformational dynamics of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) in solution and in model membranes. In nonviscous solution, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that alpha-tocopherol is in rapid equilibrium between two or more puckered conformers of its heterocyclic ring. The most likely conformers to be so involved are the two half-chair forms. Deuterium NMR spectra of specifically deuteriated alpha-tocopherol in multilamellar dispersions of egg phosphatidylcholine, measured in the liquid-crystalline state, were characteristic of axially symmetric motional averaging. The orientation of the rotational axis within the molecular framework was determined. Studies on oriented multilamellar membranes revealed that this axis is perpendicular to the surface of the membrane. The profile of quadrupolar splittings along the hydrophobic tail does not have a plateau, in contrast to that of the fatty acyl chains of the membrane lipids. Longitudinal relaxation times (T1) were short. The presence of a minimum in their temperature dependence shows that molecular motion with an effective correlation time tau eff approximately equal to 3 X 10(-9)s is responsible for relaxation. However, the temperatures and absolute values of the minima depend on the position of the deuterium in the molecule, demonstrating that tau eff represents a complex blend of motions

  10. High-resolution NMR field-cycling device for full-range relaxation and structural studies of biopolymers on a shared commercial instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redfield, Alfred G.

    2012-01-01

    Improvements are described in a shuttling field-cycling device (Redfield in Magn Reson Chem 41:753–768, 2003), designed to allow widespread access to this useful technique by configuring it as a removable module to a commercial 500 MHz NMR instrument. The main improvements described here, leading to greater versatility, high reliability and simple construction, include: shuttling provided by a linear motor driven by an integrated-control servomotor; provision of automated bucking magnets to allow fast two-stage cycling to nearly zero field; and overall control by a microprocessor. A brief review of history and publications that have used the system is followed by a discussion of topics related to such a device including discussion of some future applications. A description of new aspects of the shuttling device follows. The minimum round trip time to 1T and above is less than 0.25 s and to 0.002 T is 0.36 s. Commercial probes are used and sensitivity is that of the host spectrometer reduced only by relaxation during travel. A key element is development of a linkage that prevents vibration of the linear motor from reaching the probe.

  11. High resolution NMR imaging using a high field yokeless permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    We measured the homogeneity and stability of the magnetic field of a high field (about 1.04 tesla) yokeless permanent magnet with 40-mm gap for high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. Homogeneity was evaluated using a 3-dimensional (3D) lattice phantom and 3D spin-echo imaging sequences. In the central sphere (20-mm diameter), peak-to-peak magnetic field inhomogeneity was about 60 ppm, and the root-mean-square was 8 ppm. We measured room temperature, magnet temperature, and NMR frequency of the magnet simultaneously every minute for about 68 hours with and without the thermal insulator of the magnet. A simple mathematical model described the magnet's thermal property. Based on magnet performance, we performed high resolution (up to [20 µm](2)) imaging with internal NMR lock sequences of several biological samples. Our results demonstrated the usefulness of the high field small yokeless permanent magnet for high resolution NMR imaging.

  12. High resolution NMR imaging using a high field yokeless permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    We measured the homogeneity and stability of the magnetic field of a high field (about 1.04 tesla) yokeless permanent magnet with 40-mm gap for high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. Homogeneity was evaluated using a 3-dimensional (3D) lattice phantom and 3D spin-echo imaging sequences. In the central sphere (20-mm diameter), peak-to-peak magnetic field inhomogeneity was about 60 ppm, and the root-mean-square was 8 ppm. We measured room temperature, magnet temperature, and NMR frequency of the magnet simultaneously every minute for about 68 hours with and without the thermal insulator of the magnet. A simple mathematical model described the magnet's thermal property. Based on magnet performance, we performed high resolution (up to [20 μm] 2 ) imaging with internal NMR lock sequences of several biological samples. Our results demonstrated the usefulness of the high field small yokeless permanent magnet for high resolution NMR imaging. (author)

  13. Characterization of nonderivatized plant cell walls using high-resolution solution-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2008-01-01

    A recently described plant cell wall dissolution system has been modified to use perdeuterated solvents to allow direct in-NMR-tube dissolution and high-resolution solution-state NMR of the whole cell wall without derivatization. Finely ground cell wall material dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide-d6 and 1-methylimidazole-d6 in a ratio of 4:1 (v/...

  14. Studies of interactions of porphyrins with transfer RNA by high-resolution NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, W.J.; Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA; Anderson, W.R. Jr; Foster, N.

    1989-01-01

    The interactions of tetra-4N-methulpyridyl porphyrin and its zinc (II), copper (II) and manganese (III) complexes with brewer's yeast type V phenylalanine specific tRNA have been evaluated by high-resolution NMR. Differences in chemical shifts have been noted for thre proton resonances in response to the presence of small quantities of the fre base and the zinc and copper complexes. The protons giving rise to these signals are located on bases T54 and psi55, both of which are involved in the primary intraloop and interloop hydroen bonds that hold the D and TpsiC loops together in the tertiary structure. In addition, broadening of specific resonances due to hydrogen bonding protons in the D stem at low ratios of porphyrin to tRNA indicates that the association of porphyrins increases the rate of imino proton exchange. The titration of the tRNA with the manganese (III) complex did not eveal shifts or spcific broadening comparable to the other porpyrins at low ratios. The changes induced in the NMR spectrum of tNA by porphyrins define their site of interaction with the polynucleotide. This site, at the outside of the elbow-bend in the tRNA 'L', is different from the locus of binding in tRNA for other classical DNA intercalators. Furthermore, a new mode of binding may be involved that is neither intercalative nor simply electrostatic. (author). 36 refs.; 4 figs

  15. Isotopomer analysis of lipid biosynthesis by high resolution mass spectrometry and NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Andrew N., E-mail: anlane01@louisville.edu [JG Brown Cancer Center, 529 S. Jackson Street, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Center for Regulatory and Environmental Analytical Metabolomics (CREAM), University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Fan, Teresa W.-M. [JG Brown Cancer Center, 529 S. Jackson Street, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Center for Regulatory and Environmental Analytical Metabolomics (CREAM), University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Xie, Zhengzhi; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M. [Center for Regulatory and Environmental Analytical Metabolomics (CREAM), University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States)

    2009-10-05

    We have coupled 2D-NMR and infusion FT-ICR-MS with computer-assisted assignment to profile {sup 13}C-isotopologues of glycerophospholipids (GPL) directly in crude cell extracts, resulting in very high information throughput of >3000 isobaric molecules in a few minutes. A mass accuracy of better than 1 ppm combined with a resolution of 100,000 at the measured m/z was required to distinguish isotopomers from other GPL structures. Isotopologue analysis of GPLs extracted from LCC2 breast cancer cells grown on [U-{sup 13}C]-glucose provided a rich trove of information about the biosynthesis and turnover of the GPLs. The isotopologue intensity ratios from the FT-ICR-MS were accurate to {approx}1% or better based on natural abundance background, and depended on the signal-to-nose ratio. The time course of incorporation of {sup 13}C from [U-{sup 13}C]-glucose into a particular phosphatidylcholine was analyzed in detail, to provide a quantitative measure of the sizes of glycerol, acetyl CoA and total GPL pools in growing LCC2 cells. Independent and complementary analysis of the positional {sup 13}C enrichment in the glycerol and fatty acyl chains obtained from high resolution 2D NMR was used to verify key aspects of the model. This technology enables simple and rapid sample preparation, has rapid analysis, and is generally applicable to unfractionated GPLs of almost any head group, and to mixtures of other classes of metabolites.

  16. Isotopomer analysis of lipid biosynthesis by high resolution mass spectrometry and NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, Andrew N.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.; Xie, Zhengzhi; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    We have coupled 2D-NMR and infusion FT-ICR-MS with computer-assisted assignment to profile 13 C-isotopologues of glycerophospholipids (GPL) directly in crude cell extracts, resulting in very high information throughput of >3000 isobaric molecules in a few minutes. A mass accuracy of better than 1 ppm combined with a resolution of 100,000 at the measured m/z was required to distinguish isotopomers from other GPL structures. Isotopologue analysis of GPLs extracted from LCC2 breast cancer cells grown on [U- 13 C]-glucose provided a rich trove of information about the biosynthesis and turnover of the GPLs. The isotopologue intensity ratios from the FT-ICR-MS were accurate to ∼1% or better based on natural abundance background, and depended on the signal-to-nose ratio. The time course of incorporation of 13 C from [U- 13 C]-glucose into a particular phosphatidylcholine was analyzed in detail, to provide a quantitative measure of the sizes of glycerol, acetyl CoA and total GPL pools in growing LCC2 cells. Independent and complementary analysis of the positional 13 C enrichment in the glycerol and fatty acyl chains obtained from high resolution 2D NMR was used to verify key aspects of the model. This technology enables simple and rapid sample preparation, has rapid analysis, and is generally applicable to unfractionated GPLs of almost any head group, and to mixtures of other classes of metabolites.

  17. High resolution NMR spectroscopy of physiological fluids: from metabolism to physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vion-Dury, J.; Nicoli, F.; Torri, G.; Torri, J.; Kriat, M.; Sciaky, M.; Davin, A.; Viout, P.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Cozzone, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    High resolution NMR spectroscopy of physiological fluids provides quantitative, qualitative and dynamic information on the metabolic status of the interstitial and plasma compartments under a variety of pathophysiological conditions. The simultaneous detection and quantitation by NMR spectroscopy of numerous compounds of the intermediary metabolism offers a new insight in the understanding of the 'milieu interieur'.NMR spectroscopy of physiological fluids offers a unique way to define and monitor the global metabolic homeostasis in humans. The development of this analytical approach is still limited by the scarcity of pluridisciplinary teams able to fully exploit the wealth of information present on the NMR spectrum of a fluid. While application in pharmacology and toxicology is already established, the main areas of current development are cancer, hereditary metabolic disorders, organ transplantation and neurological diseases

  18. High resolution interface nanochemistry and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A summary is given of results on nanospectroscopy etc. during the previous three years, divided into the following subsections: development of methods and instrumentation for interface/boundary chemical analysis, interface and boundary structure in ceramic matrix composites, quantitative composition measurements of thin films and inclusions, theoretical calculations for electron energy loss near edge fine structure and grain boundary structure, and small probe radiation effects in ceramics. Materials studied include SiC whisker-reinforced Si3N4, SiC, Si oxides, Si, Si oxynitride, other ceramics. Methods mentioned include field emission, EELS (electron energy loss spectroscopy), nanospectroscopy, electron nanoprobe, etc

  19. High-resolution proton and carbon-13 NMR of membranes: why sonicate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldfield, E.; Bowers, J.L.; Forbes, J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have obtained high-field (11.7-T) proton and carbon-13 Fourier transform (FT) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of egg lecithin and egg lecithin-chloresterol (1:1) multibilayers, using magic-angle sample spinning (MASS) techniques, and sonicated egg lecithin and egg lecithin-cholesterol (1:1) vesicles, using conventional FT NMR methods. Resolution of the proton and carbon-13 MASS NMR spectra of the pure egg lecithin samples is essentially identical with that of sonicated samples, but spectra of the unsonicated lipid, using MASS, can be obtained very much faster than with the more dilute, sonicated systems. With the 1:1 lecithin-cholesterol system, proton MASS NMR spectra are virtually identical with conventional FT spectra of sonicated samples, while the 13 C NMR, the authors demonstrate that most 13 C nuclei in the cholesterol moiety can be monitored, even though these same nuclei are essentially invisible, i.e., are severely broadened, in the corresponding sonicated systems. In addition, 13 C MASS NMR spectra can again be recorded much faster than with sonicated samples, due to concentration effects. Taken together, these results strongly suggest there will seldom be need in the future to resort to ultransonic disruption of lipid bilayer membranes in order to obtain high-resolution proton or carbon-13 NMR spectra

  20. Multi element high resolution scintillator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusano, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    A gamma camera scintillator structure, suitable for detecting high energy gamma photons which, in a single scintillator camera, would require a comparatively thick scintillator crystal, so resulting in unacceptable dispersion of light photons, comprises a collimator array of a high Z material with elongated, parallel wall channels with the scintillator material being disposed in one end of the channels so as to form an integrated collimator/scintillator structure. The collimator channel walls are preferably coated with light reflective material and further light reflective surfaces being translucent to gamma photons, may be provided in each channel. The scintillators may be single crystals or preferably comprise a phosphor dispersed in a thermosetting translucent matrix as disclosed in GB2012800A. The light detectors of the assembled camera may be photomultiplier tubes charge coupled devices or charge injection devices. (author)

  1. High resolution NMR study of cellulose in solid state and in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Germain, Jean

    1983-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of native cellulose (cotton) and wood by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). As far as the cotton spectrum is concerned, the author assigned resonances which more specifically corresponded to amorphous or crystalline areas. Wood was studied in its bulk condition, and resonances have been determined for the different wood components. The behaviour of cellulose in solution in a solvent has been studied by liquid high resolution NMR. The solvation mechanism has been determined and a study of model components of the macromolecule allowed a conformational study of cellulose in this solvent to be performed. Bi-dimensional NMR and longitudinal relaxation time measurements highlighted the existence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond in the cellulose in solution [fr

  2. Determination of accurate 1H positions of an alanine tripeptide with anti-parallel and parallel β-sheet structures by high resolution 1H solid state NMR and GIPAW chemical shift calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Koji; Suzuki, Furitsu; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ohata, Takuya; Aoki, Akihiro; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Kaji, Hironori; Shimizu, Tadashi; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2012-11-25

    The accurate (1)H positions of alanine tripeptide, A(3), with anti-parallel and parallel β-sheet structures could be determined by highly resolved (1)H DQMAS solid-state NMR spectra and (1)H chemical shift calculation with gauge-including projector augmented wave calculations.

  3. An introduction to the Omega 500 High Resolution FT-NMR and its application to biochemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyabu, Matashige; Ohno, Yasushi; Fujita, Shin; Koide, Junichi; Iwata, Yosuke; Terashita, Eisaku; Masuda, Junichi

    1991-01-01

    The Omega 500 High Resolution FT-NMR was designed using the latest radio frequency (RF) and computer technologies resulting in an instrument which is capable of executing many of the most advanced NMR methods. In this article, quadrature phase detection and Fourier transformation signal processing, which are basic principles in FT-NMR, are explained. Special emphasis is given to the unique NMR shell which serves as the user interface to the system and which takes advantage of the tools provided in the UNIX C environment. Each specific application program-called a 'panel'-provides for simple operation of the instrument and ready execution of the powerful data processing functions contained in the system. An overview is given of these software panels and their convenience in the execution of analyses. NMR spectroscopy has been applied to structural determinations of complex biochemicals such as proteins, nucleic acids and peptides. As an example Omega 500 application, the cyclic peptide Gramicidin S -an antibiotic produced by a strain of Bacillus brevis- was analyzed by the DQF-COSY, HOHAHA and NOESY methods which are typical for structural determination sequences for materials of biological origin. The algorithm used for spectral interpretation is discussed. (author)

  4. High-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy of cerebrospinal fluid: methodological issues and potential clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriat, M.; Nicoli, F.; Vion-Dury, J.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Cozzone, P.J.; Nicoli, F.; Gastaut, J.L.; Dano, P.; Grisoli, F.

    1991-01-01

    High resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a new analytical technique which allows to readily identify and quantitate a variety of key metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in relation to normal and pathological brain activity. Proton NMR spectroscopy can be performed on native CSF, with or without addition of exchange reagent (NH 4 Cl). The analysis of native CSF provides qualitative information (identification) of metabolites or xenobiotics present in the fluid. Alternately, CSF can be lyophilized and dissolved in deuterated water. This concentration offers 2 advantages: additional compounds are detected and a precise quantification of all CSF metabolites can be obtained. Both protocols require a very small volume of CFS (1-2 ml). The high informational content available on the NMR spectra of CSF, the ease-of-use of NMR spectroscopy and its cost effectiveness concur to predict that this analytical approach will keep developing to completement the array of existing tests which are already routinely performed on CSF. 6 figs [fr

  5. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present ...

  6. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references

  7. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, E.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of /sup 29/Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 1300/sup 0/C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for /sup 23/Na and /sup 29/Si.

  8. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, E.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by 29 Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of 29 Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 1300 0 C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T 1 and T 2 ) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for 23 Na and 29 Si

  9. Solution NMR structure determination of proteins revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, Martin; Wagner, Gerhard; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    This 'Perspective' bears on the present state of protein structure determination by NMR in solution. The focus is on a comparison of the infrastructure available for NMR structure determination when compared to protein crystal structure determination by X-ray diffraction. The main conclusion emerges that the unique potential of NMR to generate high resolution data also on dynamics, interactions and conformational equilibria has contributed to a lack of standard procedures for structure determination which would be readily amenable to improved efficiency by automation. To spark renewed discussion on the topic of NMR structure determination of proteins, procedural steps with high potential for improvement are identified

  10. Spin Choreography: Basic Steps in High Resolution NMR (by Ray Freeman)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minch, Michael J.

    1998-02-01

    There are three orientations that NMR courses may take. The traditional molecular structure course focuses on the interpretation of spectra and the use of chemical shifts, coupling constants, and nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) to sort out subtle details of structure and stereochemistry. Courses can also focus on the fundamental quantum mechanics of observable NMR parameters and processes such a spin-spin splitting and relaxation. More recently there are courses devoted to the manipulation of nuclear spins and the basic steps of one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments. Freeman's book is directed towards the latter audience. Modern NMR methods offer a myriad ways to extract information about molecular structure and motion by observing the behavior of nuclear spins under a variety of conditions. In Freeman's words: "We can lead the spins through an intricate dance, carefully programmed in advance, to enhance, simplify, correlate, decouple, edit or assign NMR spectra." This is a carefully written, well-illustrated account of how this dance is choreographed by pulse programming, double resonance, and gradient effects. Although well written, this book is not an easy read; every word counts. It is recommended for graduate courses that emphasize the fundamentals of magnetic resonance. It is not a text on interpretation of spectra.

  11. High-resolution structure of the native histone octamer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Christopher M.; Nicholson, James M.; Lambert, Stanley J.; Chantalat, Laurent; Reynolds, Colin D.; Baldwin, John P.

    2005-01-01

    The high-resolution (1.90 Å) model of the native histone octamer allows structural comparisons to be made with the nucleosome-core particle, along with an identification of a likely core-histone binding site. Crystals of native histone octamers (H2A–H2B)–(H4–H3)–(H3′–H4′)–(H2B′–H2A′) from chick erythrocytes in 2 M KCl, 1.35 M potassium phosphate pH 6.9 diffract X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution, yielding a structure with an R work value of 18.7% and an R free of 22.2%. The crystal space group is P6 5 , the asymmetric unit of which contains one complete octamer. This high-resolution model of the histone-core octamer allows further insight into intermolecular interactions, including water molecules, that dock the histone dimers to the tetramer in the nucleosome-core particle and have relevance to nucleosome remodelling. The three key areas analysed are the H2A′–H3–H4 molecular cluster (also H2A–H3′–H4′), the H4–H2B′ interaction (also H4′–H2B) and the H2A′–H4 β-sheet interaction (also H2A–H4′). The latter of these three regions is important to nucleosome remodelling by RNA polymerase II, as it is shown to be a likely core-histone binding site, and its disruption creates an instability in the nucleosome-core particle. A majority of the water molecules in the high-resolution octamer have positions that correlate to similar positions in the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle structure, suggesting that the high-resolution octamer model can be used for comparative studies with the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle

  12. High-resolution, high-sensitivity NMR of nano-litre anisotropic samples by coil spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakellariou, D [CEA Saclay, DSM, DRECAM, SCM, Lab Struct and Dynam Resonance Magnet, CNRS URA 331, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Le Goff, G; Jacquinot, J F [CEA Saclay, DSM, DRECAM, SPEC: Serv Phys Etat Condense, CNRS URA 2464, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can probe the local structure and dynamic properties of liquids and solids, making it one of the most powerful and versatile analytical methods available today. However, its intrinsically low sensitivity precludes NMR analysis of very small samples - as frequently used when studying isotopically labelled biological molecules or advanced materials, or as preferred when conducting high-throughput screening of biological samples or 'lab-on-a-chip' studies. The sensitivity of NMR has been improved by using static micro-coils, alternative detection schemes and pre-polarization approaches. But these strategies cannot be easily used in NMR experiments involving the fast sample spinning essential for obtaining well-resolved spectra from non-liquid samples. Here we demonstrate that inductive coupling allows wireless transmission of radio-frequency pulses and the reception of NMR signals under fast spinning of both detector coil and sample. This enables NMR measurements characterized by an optimal filling factor, very high radio-frequency field amplitudes and enhanced sensitivity that increases with decreasing sample volume. Signals obtained for nano-litre-sized samples of organic powders and biological tissue increase by almost one order of magnitude (or, equivalently, are acquired two orders of magnitude faster), compared to standard NMR measurements. Our approach also offers optimal sensitivity when studying samples that need to be confined inside multiple safety barriers, such as radioactive materials. In principle, the co-rotation of a micrometer-sized detector coil with the sample and the use of inductive coupling (techniques that are at the heart of our method) should enable highly sensitive NMR measurements on any mass-limited sample that requires fast mechanical rotation to obtain well-resolved spectra. The method is easy to implement on a commercial NMR set-up and exhibits improved performance with miniaturization, and we

  13. High resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yong; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Park, Sang Ho; Rai, Ratan; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Opella, Stanley J.; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2017-01-01

    The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most abundant proteins on the cell surface of Yersinia pestis during human infection. Its functions are expressed through interactions with a variety of human host proteins, and are essential for microbial virulence. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but those samples contained detergents that interfere with functionality, thus, precluding analysis of the structural basis for Ail’s biological activity. Here, we demonstrate that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from samples of Ail in detergent-free phospholipid liposomes, prepared with a lipid to protein molar ratio of 100. The spectra, obtained with 13 C or 1 H detection, have very narrow line widths (0.40–0.60 ppm for 13 C, 0.11–0.15 ppm for 1 H, and 0.46–0.64 ppm for 15 N) that are consistent with a high level of sample homogeneity. The spectra enable resonance assignments to be obtained for N, CO, CA and CB atomic sites from 75 out of 156 residues in the sequence of Ail, including 80% of the transmembrane region. The 1 H-detected solid-state NMR 1 H/ 15 N correlation spectra obtained for Ail in liposomes compare very favorably with the solution NMR 1 H/ 15 N TROSY spectra obtained for Ail in nanodiscs prepared with a similar lipid to protein molar ratio. These results set the stage for studies of the molecular basis of the functional interactions of Ail with its protein partners from human host cells, as well as the development of drugs targeting Ail.

  14. High resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yong; Dutta, Samit Kumar [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Park, Sang Ho; Rai, Ratan [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Fujimoto, L. Miya; Bobkov, Andrey A. [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Opella, Stanley J. [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbp.edu [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most abundant proteins on the cell surface of Yersinia pestis during human infection. Its functions are expressed through interactions with a variety of human host proteins, and are essential for microbial virulence. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but those samples contained detergents that interfere with functionality, thus, precluding analysis of the structural basis for Ail’s biological activity. Here, we demonstrate that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from samples of Ail in detergent-free phospholipid liposomes, prepared with a lipid to protein molar ratio of 100. The spectra, obtained with {sup 13}C or {sup 1}H detection, have very narrow line widths (0.40–0.60 ppm for {sup 13}C, 0.11–0.15 ppm for {sup 1}H, and 0.46–0.64 ppm for {sup 15}N) that are consistent with a high level of sample homogeneity. The spectra enable resonance assignments to be obtained for N, CO, CA and CB atomic sites from 75 out of 156 residues in the sequence of Ail, including 80% of the transmembrane region. The {sup 1}H-detected solid-state NMR {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N correlation spectra obtained for Ail in liposomes compare very favorably with the solution NMR {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N TROSY spectra obtained for Ail in nanodiscs prepared with a similar lipid to protein molar ratio. These results set the stage for studies of the molecular basis of the functional interactions of Ail with its protein partners from human host cells, as well as the development of drugs targeting Ail.

  15. sup 3 sup 1 P high resolution solid state NMR studies of phosphoorganic compounds of biological interest

    CERN Document Server

    Potrzebowski, M J; Kazmierski, S

    2001-01-01

    In this review several applications of sup 3 sup 1 P high resolution solid state NMR spectroscopy in structural studies of bioorganic samples is recorded. The problem of pseudopolymorphism of bis[6-O,6'-O-(1,2:3,4diisopropylidene-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl) phosphothionyl] disulfide (1) and application of sup 3 sup 1 P C/MAS experiment to investigate of this phenomenon is discussed. The influence of weak C-H--S intermolecular contacts on molecular packing of 1,6-anhydro-2-O-tosyl-4-S- (5,5-dimethyl-2-thioxa-1,3,2-dioxaphosphophorinan-2-= yl)-beta-D-glucopyranose (2) and S sub P , R sub P diastereomers of deoxyxylothymidyl-3'-O-acetylthymidyl (3',5')-O-(2-cyanoethyl) phosphorothioate (3) and their implication on sup 3 sup 1 P NMR spectra is shown. The final part of review describes the recent progress in structural studies of O-phosphorylated amino acids (serine, threonine, tyrosine), relationship between molecular structure and sup 3 sup 1 P chemical shift parameters delta sub i sub i and influence of hydrogen ...

  16. Free radicals. High-resolution spectroscopy and molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, E.

    1983-01-01

    High-resolution, high-sensitivity spectroscopy using CW laser and microwave sources has been applied to free radicals and transient molecules to establish their existence and to explore their properties in detail. The radicals studied were mainly generated by discharge-induced reactions. A few molecules are used as typical examples to illustrate the results so far obtained. The molecular and electronic structures of free radicals, intramolecular motions of large amplitudes in some labile molecules, and metastable electronic states of carbenes are given special emphasis. The significance of the present spectroscopic results in other related fields such as astronomy and atmospheric chemistry is stressed. 4 figures, 3 tables

  17. Exploring high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy for metabonomic analysis of apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermathen, Martina; Marzorati, Mattia; Vermathen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Classical liquid-state high-resolution (HR) NMR spectroscopy has proved a powerful tool in the metabonomic analysis of liquid food samples like fruit juices. In this paper the application of (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy to apple tissue is presented probing its potential for metabonomic studies. The (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra are discussed in terms of the chemical composition of apple tissue and compared to liquid-state NMR spectra of apple juice. Differences indicate that specific metabolic changes are induced by juice preparation. The feasibility of HR-MAS NMR-based multivariate analysis is demonstrated by a study distinguishing three different apple cultivars by principal component analysis (PCA). Preliminary results are shown from subsequent studies comparing three different cultivation methods by means of PCA and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) of the HR-MAS NMR data. The compounds responsible for discriminating organically grown apples are discussed. Finally, an outlook of our ongoing work is given including a longitudinal study on apples.

  18. High-resolution bacterial growth inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of antibacterial constituents in Chinese plants used to treat snakebites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yueqiu; Nielsen, Mia; Stærk, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The biochromatograms demonstrated that tannins play a main role for the bacterial growth inhibition observed for all above-mentioned plants except for Polygonum cuspidatum. Furthermore, the high-resolution bacterial...... growth inhibition profiling combined with HPLC–HRMS–SPE–NMR allowed fast identification of three non-tannin active compounds, i.e., piceid, resveratrol and emodin from ethanol extract of Polygonum cuspidatum. Conclusion The high-resolution bacterial growth inhibition profiling allowed fast pinpointing...... of constituents responsible for the bioactivity, e.g., either showing tannins being the main bacterial growth inhibitors as observed for the majority of the active plants, or combined with HPLC–HRMS–SPE–NMR for fast structural identification of non-tannin constituents correlated with antibacterial activity....

  19. High-Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping for Characterizing Deformation Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Wolfgang; Wejdemann, Christian; Jakobsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    With high-angular resolution three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD), quantitative information is gained about dislocation structures in individual grains in the bulk of a macroscopic specimen by acquiring reciprocal space maps. In high-resolution 3D reciprocal space maps of tensile......-deformed copper, individual, almost dislocation-free subgrains are identified from high-intensity peaks and distinguished by their unique combination of orientation and elastic strain; dislocation walls manifest themselves as a smooth cloud of lower intensity. The elastic strain shows only minor variations within...... dynamics is followed in situ during varying loading conditions by reciprocal space mapping: during uninterrupted tensile deformation, formation of subgrains is observed concurrently with broadening of Bragg reflections shortly after the onset of plastic deformation. When the traction is terminated, stress...

  20. Antimicrobial peptide protegrin-3 adopt an antiparallel dimer in the presence of DPC micelles: a high-resolution NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usachev, K. S., E-mail: k.usachev@kpfu.ru; Efimov, S. V.; Kolosova, O. A.; Klochkova, E. A.; Aganov, A. V.; Klochkov, V. V. [Kazan Federal University, NMR Laboratory, Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    A tendency to dimerize in the presence of lipids was found for the protegrin. The dimer formation by the protegrin-1 (PG-1) is the first step for further oligomeric membrane pore formation. Generally there are two distinct model of PG-1 dimerization in either a parallel or antiparallel β-sheet. But despite the wealth of data available today, protegrin dimer structure and pore formation is still not completely understood. In order to investigate a more detailed dimerization process of PG-1 and if it will be the same for another type of protegrins, in this work we used a high-resolution NMR spectroscopy for structure determination of protegrin-3 (RGGGL-CYCRR-RFCVC-VGR) in the presence of perdeuterated DPC micelles and demonstrate that PG-3 forms an antiparallel NCCN dimer with a possible association of these dimers. This structural study complements previously published solution, solid state and computational studies of PG-1 in various environments and validate the potential of mean force simulations of PG-1 dimers and association of dimers to form octameric or decameric β-barrels.

  1. High resolution NMR spectroscopy of nanocrystalline proteins at ultra-high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2010-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of uniformly- 13 C, 15 N labeled protein samples provides insight into atomic-resolution chemistry and structure. Data collection efficiency has advanced remarkably in the last decade; however, the study of larger proteins is still challenged by relatively low resolution in comparison to solution NMR. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of SSNMR protein spectra acquired at 11.7, 17.6 and 21.1 Tesla ( 1 H frequencies of 500, 750, and 900 MHz). For two protein systems-GB1, a 6 kDa nanocrystalline protein and DsbA, a 21 kDa nanocrystalline protein-line narrowing is demonstrated in all spectral regions with increasing field. Resolution enhancement is greatest in the aliphatic region, including methine, methylene and methyl sites. The resolution for GB1 increases markedly as a function of field, and for DsbA, resolution in the C-C region increases by 42%, according to the number of peaks that can be uniquely picked and integrated in the 900 MHz spectra when compared to the 500 MHz spectra. Additionally, chemical exchange is uniquely observed in the highest field spectra for at least two isoleucine Cδ1 sites in DsbA. These results further illustrate the benefits of high-field MAS SSNMR spectroscopy for protein structural studies.

  2. Styrylpyrylium Salts: 1H and 13C NMR High-Resolution Spectroscopy (1D and 2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Claude W. Ouédraogo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 1H and 13C NMR high-resolution spectroscopy (1D and 2D (1H, 1H-COSY, HSQC, HMBC for four styrylpyrylium perchlorates were carried out and signal attributions are reported. Chemical shifts observed on 13C NMR spectra for the styrylpyrylium salts were compared with net atomic charge for carbon obtained by AM1 semiempirical calculations. The position of the styryl group present low effect on chemical shifts for carbon atoms, while the presence of methyl group led to the unshielding of the substituted carbon.

  3. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Koh; Arthanari, Haribabu; Shimada, Ichio; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Detection of 15 N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached 15 N nuclei (TROSY 15 N H ) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow 15 N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low 15 N sensitivity. The 15 N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY 15 N H component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a 15 N-detected 2D 1 H– 15 N TROSY-HSQC ( 15 N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τ c  ∼ 40 ns). Unlike for 1 H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit 15 N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording 15 N TROSY of proteins expressed in H 2 O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D 2 O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of 15 N H -detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz

  4. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Koh [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Arthanari, Haribabu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Wagner, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard-wagner@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Detection of {sup 15}N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached {sup 15}N nuclei (TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H}) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow {sup 15}N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low {sup 15}N sensitivity. The {sup 15}N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H} component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a {sup 15}N-detected 2D {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N TROSY-HSQC ({sup 15}N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τ{sub c} ∼ 40 ns). Unlike for {sup 1}H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit {sup 15}N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording {sup 15}N TROSY of proteins expressed in H{sub 2}O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D{sub 2}O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of {sup 15}N{sub H}-detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz.

  5. HCN Polymers: Toward Structure Comprehension Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Thissen, Roland; Frisari, Ma; Vuitton, Veronique; Quirico, Eric; Le Roy, Léna; Fray, Nicolas; Cottin, Hervé; Horst, Sarah; Yelle, Roger

    A lot of solar system materials, including cometary ices and Titan aerosols, contain dark matter that can be interpreted as complex nitrogen bearing organic matter [1]. In laboratory experi-ments, HCN polymers are thus analogs of great interest. In fact they may be present in Titan atmosphere and in comet nuclei and then reprocessed as a CN distributed source [2], when ices began to sublimate and ejects from the nucleus organic matter grains [3]. The presence of HCN polymers is suggested because HCN molecule has been directly observed in 1P/Halley comet [4] and others. HCN polymers are also of prebiotic interest [5] as it can form amino acid under hydrolysis conditions. Even if they have been studied during the last decades, their chemical composition and structure are still poorly understood, and a great analytical effort has to be continued. In this way we present a high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and a high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/HRMS) analysis of HCN polymers. It was shown [6] that this is a suitable technique to elucidate composition and structure of the soluble part of tholins analogs of Titan's atmosphere aerosols. HCN polymers have never been studied by HRMS, thus we used a LTQ-Orbitrap XL high resolution mass spectrometer to analyse the HCN polymers. These are produced at LISA by direct polymerisation of pure liquid HCN, catalyzed by ammonia. HCN polymers have been completely dissolved in methanol and then injected in the mass spectrometer by ElectroSpray Ionization (ESI). This atmospheric pressure ionization process produces protonated or deprotonated ions, but it does not fragment molecules. Thus HRMS, allows a direct access to the stoechiometry of all the ionizable molecules present in the samples. Fragmentation analyses (MS/MS) of selected ions have also been performed. Thess analysis provide information about the different chemical fonctionnalities present in HCN poly-mers and also about their structure. Thus we are able to

  6. High-resolution polypeptide structure and dynamics in anisotropic environments: The gramicidin channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Lee, K.C.; Ketchem, R.R.; Hu, W.; Lazo, N.D.; Huo, S. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    To understand the details of macromolecular function, high-resolution structural and dynamic detail is essential. The polypeptide fold of the gramicidin channel has been effectively modeled for the past 20 years, yet the functional changes in conductance and channel lifetime associated with amino acid substitutions cannot be predicted. To accomplish this goal, high-resolution electrostatic modeling and the precise orientation of all dipoles are required. Furthermore, an enhanced knowledge of the complex molecular environment of this membrane-bound peptide is needed. An aqueous environment is relatively uniform and achiral. The membrane environment is very heterogenous and chiral. A knowledge of the interactions, specific and nonspecific, between peptide and lipid will aid in developing a better understanding of this environment. To accomplish this goal, it is necessary to study the peptide in an extended lipid bilayer, rather than in a vesicular or micellar form. These latter environments are likely to possess increased dynamics, increased water penetration, and distorted interactions between the polypeptide and membrane surface. To perform NMR studies on bilayer bound peptides, solid state NMR methods are required, and for specific site information, isotopic labels are incorporated using solid phase peptide synthesis.

  7. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  8. Stripline-based microfluidic devices for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, J.

    2009-01-01

    A novel route towards microchip integrated NMR analysis was studied. For NMR analysis of mass-limited samples, research has focussed for decennia on microsolenoidal or planar helical detection coils on microfluidic substrates. Since these approaches suffer from static field distortion resulting in

  9. High-resolution hyaluronidase inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of anti-necrosis constituents in Chinese plants used to treat snakebite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yueqiu; Stærk, Dan; Nielsen, Mia N.

    2015-01-01

    for the 22 plants showing highest hyaluronidase inhibition, and the results were used to guide subsequent structural analysis towards specific hyaluronidase inhibitors. Structural analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography, high-resolution mass spectrometry, solid-phase extraction...... and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HPLC–HRMS–SPE–NMR. This allowed identification of four non-tannin inhibitors, i.e., lansiumamide B (6) from Clausena excavata Burm.f., myricetin 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (7) from Androsace umbellata (Lour.) Merr., and vitexin (8) and 4′,7-dihydroxy-5...

  10. Investigation of sea microorganisms of the genus Alteromonas by 31P-NMR of high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, E.P.; Isakov, V.V.; Mikhajlov, V.V.; Sokolova, S.V.; Gorshkova, N.M.; Fedosov, Yu.V.; Kiprianova, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the 31 P-NMR spectra of intact cells of bacteria belonging to the genus Alteromonas, the producers of alkaline phosphatase was carried out. Differences in the content of phosphate-containing compounds were detected in individual species of the genus Alteromonas. By comparing the data on 31 P-NMR spectra, the electron micrographs and phosphatase activities, the possibility of revealing the presence of capsules was shown. Peculiar features of the 31 P-NMR spectra of alteromonades, as compared with other taxonomic groups of microorganisms, have been discussed

  11. Towards high resolution ^1H NMR spectra of tannin colloidal aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabel, M.; Glories, Y.; Pianet, I.; Dufourc, E. J.

    1999-10-01

    The time dependent colloidal formation of tannins in hydro-alcoholic medium has been studied by 1H-NMR. Line broadening observed with time can be cancelled by making use of magic angle sample spinning (MASS) thus yielding sharp lines that allow structural studies. We used as an example catechin, a constitutive monomer of Bordeaux young red wine tannins. Chemical shift variations of polyphenol protons allow monitoring the time course of aggregation. La formation de tanins colloïdaux au cours du temps, en milieu hydroalcoolique, a été suivie par RMN-^1H. Un élargissement marqué des résonances est observé et peut être supprimé par la rotation de l'échantillon à l'angle magique ce qui ouvre tout un champ d'études structurales sur ces composés colloïdaux. L'exemple proposé est celui de la catéchine, monomère constitutif de tannins présents en grande quantité dans les vins rouges jeunes de Bordeaux. Des variations du déplacement chimique de certains protons polyphénoliques permettent de suivre l'évolution temporelle de l'agrégation.

  12. Towards automatic metabolomic profiling of high-resolution one-dimensional proton NMR spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, Pascal; Lewis, Michael J.; Chang, David, E-mail: dchang@chenomx.com [Chenomx Inc (Canada); Baker, David [Pfizer Inc (United States); Wishart, David S. [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science and Biological Sciences (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Mass Spectroscopy (MS) are the two most common spectroscopic analytical techniques employed in metabolomics. The large spectral datasets generated by NMR and MS are often analyzed using data reduction techniques like Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Although rapid, these methods are susceptible to solvent and matrix effects, high rates of false positives, lack of reproducibility and limited data transferability from one platform to the next. Given these limitations, a growing trend in both NMR and MS-based metabolomics is towards targeted profiling or 'quantitative' metabolomics, wherein compounds are identified and quantified via spectral fitting prior to any statistical analysis. Despite the obvious advantages of this method, targeted profiling is hindered by the time required to perform manual or computer-assisted spectral fitting. In an effort to increase data analysis throughput for NMR-based metabolomics, we have developed an automatic method for identifying and quantifying metabolites in one-dimensional (1D) proton NMR spectra. This new algorithm is capable of using carefully constructed reference spectra and optimizing thousands of variables to reconstruct experimental NMR spectra of biofluids using rules and concepts derived from physical chemistry and NMR theory. The automated profiling program has been tested against spectra of synthetic mixtures as well as biological spectra of urine, serum and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Our results indicate that the algorithm can correctly identify compounds with high fidelity in each biofluid sample (except for urine). Furthermore, the metabolite concentrations exhibit a very high correlation with both simulated and manually-detected values.

  13. Towards automatic metabolomic profiling of high-resolution one-dimensional proton NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Pascal; Lewis, Michael J.; Chang, David; Baker, David; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Mass Spectroscopy (MS) are the two most common spectroscopic analytical techniques employed in metabolomics. The large spectral datasets generated by NMR and MS are often analyzed using data reduction techniques like Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Although rapid, these methods are susceptible to solvent and matrix effects, high rates of false positives, lack of reproducibility and limited data transferability from one platform to the next. Given these limitations, a growing trend in both NMR and MS-based metabolomics is towards targeted profiling or “quantitative” metabolomics, wherein compounds are identified and quantified via spectral fitting prior to any statistical analysis. Despite the obvious advantages of this method, targeted profiling is hindered by the time required to perform manual or computer-assisted spectral fitting. In an effort to increase data analysis throughput for NMR-based metabolomics, we have developed an automatic method for identifying and quantifying metabolites in one-dimensional (1D) proton NMR spectra. This new algorithm is capable of using carefully constructed reference spectra and optimizing thousands of variables to reconstruct experimental NMR spectra of biofluids using rules and concepts derived from physical chemistry and NMR theory. The automated profiling program has been tested against spectra of synthetic mixtures as well as biological spectra of urine, serum and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Our results indicate that the algorithm can correctly identify compounds with high fidelity in each biofluid sample (except for urine). Furthermore, the metabolite concentrations exhibit a very high correlation with both simulated and manually-detected values.

  14. Controlling residual dipolar couplings in high-resolution NMR of proteins by strain induced alignment in a gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshitaka; Markus, Michelle A.; Tycko, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Water-soluble biological macromolecules can be weakly aligned by dissolution in a strained, hydrated gel such as cross-linked polyacrylamide, an effect termed 'strain-induced alignment in a gel' (SAG). SAG induces nonzero nuclear magnetic dipole-dipole couplings that can be measured in high-resolution NMR spectra and used as structural constraints. The dependence of experimental 15 N- 1 H dipolar couplings extracted from two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra on several properties of compressed polyacrylamide, including the extent of compression, the polyacrylamide concentration, and the cross-link density, is reported for the B1 immunoglobulin binding domain of streptococcal protein G (protein G/B1, 57 residues). It is shown that the magnitude of macromolecular alignment can be widely varied by adjusting these properties, although the orientation and asymmetry of the alignment tensor are not affected significantly. The dependence of the 15 N relaxation times T 1 and T 2 of protein G/B1 on polyacrylamide concentration are also reported. In addition, the results of 15 N relaxation and HSQC experiments on the RNA binding domain of prokaryotic protein S4 from Bacillus stearothermophilus (S4 Δ41, residues 43-200) in a compressed polyacrylamide gel are presented. These results demonstrate the applicability of SAG to proteins of higher molecular weight and greater complexity. A modified in-phase/anti-phase (IPAP) HSQC technique is described that suppresses natural-abundance 15 N background signals from amide groups in polyacrylamide, resulting in cleaner HSQC spectra in SAG experiments. The mechanism of protein alignment in strained polyacrylamide gels is contrasted with that in liquid crystalline media

  15. Uniform isotope labeling of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein in yeast enables high-resolution solid-state NMR studies in the lipid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Ying; Shi Lichi; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S.

    2011-01-01

    Overexpression of isotope-labeled multi-spanning eukaryotic membrane proteins for structural NMR studies is often challenging. On the one hand, difficulties with achieving proper folding, membrane insertion, and native-like post-translational modifications frequently disqualify bacterial expression systems. On the other hand, eukaryotic cell cultures can be prohibitively expensive. One of the viable alternatives, successfully used for producing proteins for solution NMR studies, is yeast expression systems, particularly Pichia pastoris. We report on successful implementation and optimization of isotope labeling protocols, previously used for soluble secreted proteins, to produce homogeneous samples of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein, rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans. Even in shake-flask cultures, yields exceeded 5 mg of purified uniformly 13 C, 15 N-labeled protein per liter of culture. The protein was stable (at least several weeks at 5°C) and functionally active upon reconstitution into lipid membranes at high protein-to-lipid ratio required for solid-state NMR. The samples gave high-resolution 13 C and 15 N solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectra, amenable to a detailed structural analysis. We believe that similar protocols can be adopted for challenging mammalian targets, which often resist characterization by other structural methods.

  16. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    spectroscopy (NMR) Self- decontaminating fabric Reactive fabric...reactions of reagents including chemical weapons on materials like concrete, soil , and sand, as well as reactive polymers.3,4,5,6,7 There are...sample. The rotor and cap can be cleaned by rinsing with solvent or decontamination solution and reused. 12.0 DATA ANALYSIS AND CALCULATIONS 12.1

  17. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Samuel A; Brender, Jeffrey R; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Marsh, E Neil G; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-03

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5-15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils.

  18. High-resolution structure of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilski, Miroslaw; Kazmierczyk, Maciej; Krzywda, Szymon; Zábranská, Helena; Cooper, Seth; Popović, Zoran; Khatib, Firas; DiMaio, Frank; Thompson, James; Baker, David; Pichová, Iva; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure of Mason–Pfizer monkey virus protease folded as a monomer has been solved by molecular replacement using a model generated by players of the online game Foldit. The structure shows at high resolution the details of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer which can guide rational design of protease dimerization inhibitors as retroviral drugs. Mason–Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), a D-type retrovirus assembling in the cytoplasm, causes simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus monkeys. Its pepsin-like aspartic protease (retropepsin) is an integral part of the expressed retroviral polyproteins. As in all retroviral life cycles, release and dimerization of the protease (PR) is strictly required for polyprotein processing and virion maturation. Biophysical and NMR studies have indicated that in the absence of substrates or inhibitors M-PMV PR should fold into a stable monomer, but the crystal structure of this protein could not be solved by molecular replacement despite countless attempts. Ultimately, a solution was obtained in mr-rosetta using a model constructed by players of the online protein-folding game Foldit. The structure indeed shows a monomeric protein, with the N- and C-termini completely disordered. On the other hand, the flap loop, which normally gates access to the active site of homodimeric retropepsins, is clearly traceable in the electron density. The flap has an unusual curled shape and a different orientation from both the open and closed states known from dimeric retropepsins. The overall fold of the protein follows the retropepsin canon, but the C α deviations are large and the active-site ‘DTG’ loop (here NTG) deviates up to 2.7 Å from the standard conformation. This structure of a monomeric retropepsin determined at high resolution (1.6 Å) provides important extra information for the design of dimerization inhibitors that might be developed as drugs for the treatment of retroviral infections

  19. Microwave structure of quiescent solar filaments at high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution very low altitude maps of a quiescent filament at three frequencies are presented. The spatial resolution (approx. 15'' at 1.45 GHz, approx. 6'' at 4.9 GHz, and approx. 2'' at 15 GHz) is several times better than previously attained. At each frequency, the filament appears as a depression in the quiet Sun background. The depression is measurably wider and longer in extent than the corresponding H alpha filament at 1.45 GHz and 4.9 GHz, indicating that the depression is due in large part to a deficit in coronal density associated with the filament channel. In contrast, the shape of the radio depression at 15 CHz closely matches that of the H alpha filament. In addition, the 15 GHz map shows enhanced emission along both sides of the radio depression. A similar enhancement is seen in an observation of a second filament 4 days later, which suggests that the enhancement is a general feature of filaments. Possible causes of the enhanced emission are explored

  20. Response of melanoma tumor phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea: a high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aïcha; Madelmont, Jean-Claude

    2003-07-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is tightly involved in tumor growth regulation and tumor cell survival. The response of phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea treatment is investigated in a murine B16 melanoma model. Measurements of phospholipid derivatives are performed on intact tumor tissue samples using one- and two-dimensional proton NMR spectroscopy. During the tumor growth inhibition phase under treatment, tumors overexpress phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine, glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine, whereas phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine levels are maintained to control levels. During re-growth, which remained quantitatively much below control growth, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors overexpress phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine only. In treated melanoma, phosphatidylcholine levels show an inverse relationship with tumor growth rates. In conclusion, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors maintain their phosphatidylcholine levels and exhibit transformed phospholipid metabolism phenotype, by mechanisms that could participate in tumor cell survival.

  1. Detergent/nanodisc screening for high-resolution NMR studies of an integral membrane protein containing a cytoplasmic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Tzitzilonis

    Full Text Available Because membrane proteins need to be extracted from their natural environment and reconstituted in artificial milieus for the 3D structure determination by X-ray crystallography or NMR, the search for membrane mimetic that conserve the native structure and functional activities remains challenging. We demonstrate here a detergent/nanodisc screening study by NMR of the bacterial α-helical membrane protein YgaP containing a cytoplasmic rhodanese domain. The analysis of 2D [(15N,(1H]-TROSY spectra shows that only a careful usage of low amounts of mixed detergents did not perturb the cytoplasmic domain while solubilizing in parallel the transmembrane segments with good spectral quality. In contrast, the incorporation of YgaP into nanodiscs appeared to be straightforward and yielded a surprisingly high quality [(15N,(1H]-TROSY spectrum opening an avenue for the structural studies of a helical membrane protein in a bilayer system by solution state NMR.

  2. Curing reactions of bismaleimide resins catalyzed by triphenylphosphine. High resolution solid-state 13C NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibahara, Sumio; Enoki, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Motoyoshiya, Jiro; Hayashi, Sadao.

    1996-01-01

    The curing reactions of bismaleimide resins consisted of N,N'-4,4'-diphenylmethanebismaleimide (BMI) and o,o'-diallylbisphenol-A (DABA) in the presence of triphenylphosphine (TPP) as a catalyst were investigated. DSC measurements showed that the catalytic effect of TPP on the curing reaction of BMI was more in the presence of DABA than in its absence. In order to explore this curing reaction, N-phenylmaleimide (PMI) and o-allylphenol (AP) were selected as model compounds. The products of the PMI/TPP system were oligomers and polymers of PMI, whereas the main product of the PMI/AP/TPP system was the PMI trimer which had the five-membered ring formed via the phosphonium ylide intermediate. In these model reactions, 13 C NMR was found to be useful to distinguish between trimerization and polymerization of PMI. On the basis of the results of the model reactions, the curing reactions of bismaleimide resins were investigated by high resolution solid state 13 C NMR techniques. In the BMI/TPP system, maleimides polymerize above 175degC, but the polymerization does not proceed at 120degC. On the other hand, maleimides trimerize above 120degC in the presence of DABA and TPP. The mechanism of the trimerization is briefly discussed. (author)

  3. Chemical profile of beans cultivars (Phaseolus vulgaris) by 1H NMR - high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS);Perfil quimico de cultivares de feijao (Phaseolus vulgaris) pela tecnica de high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Luciano Morais; Choze, Rafael; Cavalcante, Pedro Paulo Araujo; Santos, Suzana da Costa; Ferri, Pedro Henrique, E-mail: luciano@quimica.ufg.b [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFScar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The application of one-dimensional proton high-resolution magic angle spinning ({sup 1}H HR-MAS) NMR combined with a typical advantages of solid and liquid-state NMR techniques was used as input variables for the multivariate statistical analysis. In this paper, different cultivars of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed and in development by EMBRAPA - Arroz e Feijao were analyzed by {sup 1}H HR-MAS, which have been demonstrated to be a valuable tool in its differentiation according chemical composition and avoid the manipulation of the samples as used in other techniques. (author)

  4. High-Resolution Structural Monitoring of Ionospheric Absorption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    7 riometry. Incorporation of an outrigger site, to enable treatment of the unknown structure of the celestial background and the effects of...riometry. Incorporation of an outrigger site, to enable treatment of the unknown structure of the celestial background and the effects of confusion...event captured with this system . Note that, even at this fairly coarse resolution, there is discrete structure that changes in position and strength

  5. High Resolution Studies of the Structure of the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-04

    the variable emission from active regions", submitted to Solar Phys., August 1993. M. Karovska and F. Blundell, "The fine structure at the limb in a ...in a coronal hole", in preparation. 3.2 Conference Presentations M. Karovska , S. R. Habbal and F. Blundell, "Fine structure at the limb in a coronal...hole", 181st AAS Meeting, Phoenix, Arizona, January 1993. M. Karovska , "Exploring the dynamical structure at the limb in a coronal hole, 24th Solar

  6. Water polygons in high-resolution protein crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonas; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2009-07-01

    We have analyzed the interstitial water (ISW) structures in 1500 protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank that have greater than 1.5 A resolution with less than 90% sequence similarity with each other. We observed varieties of polygonal water structures composed of three to eight water molecules. These polygons may represent the time- and space-averaged structures of "stable" water oligomers present in liquid water, and their presence as well as relative population may be relevant in understanding physical properties of liquid water at a given temperature. On an average, 13% of ISWs are localized enough to be visible by X-ray diffraction. Of those, averages of 78% are water molecules in the first water layer on the protein surface. Of the localized ISWs beyond the first layer, almost half of them form water polygons such as trigons, tetragons, as well as expected pentagons, hexagons, higher polygons, partial dodecahedrons, and disordered networks. Most of the octagons and nanogons are formed by fusion of smaller polygons. The trigons are most commonly observed. We suggest that our observation provides an experimental basis for including these water polygon structures in correlating and predicting various water properties in liquid state.

  7. High resolution soil moisture radiometer. [large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilheit, T. T.

    1978-01-01

    An electrically scanned pushbroom phased antenna array is described for a microwave radiometer which can provide agriculturally meaningful measurements of soil moisture. The antenna size of 100 meters at 1400 MHz or 230 meters at 611 MHz requires several shuttle launches and orbital assembly. Problems inherent to the size of the structure and specific instrument problems are discussed as well as the preliminary design.

  8. Evidence for radiation induced crosslinking in polytetrafluoroethylene by means of high-resolution solid-state 19F high-speed MAS NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Etsuko; Sugisawa, Hisashi; Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Seguchi, Tadao; Yamazaki, Toshimasa

    1999-01-01

    Radiation effects on molecular structure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were studied by high-resolution solid-state 19 F high speed magic angle spinning (HS MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Samples used for the NMR studies were prepared by electron beam irradiation of PTFE with a wide range of irradiation doses from 0.5-10 MGy in the molten state at 340 deg. C under oxygen-free atmosphere. While the non-irradiated PTFE displayed only an intense peak of the internal CF 2 , several new signals corresponding to CF 3 , CF 2 and CF groups were observed for the PTFE which was high temperature irradiated at 340 deg. C in oxygen-free atmosphere (hti-PTFE). Intensities of these new signals increased with an increase of irradiation dose. The present solid-state 19 F HS MAS NMR studies provide not only the first experimental evidence regarding the existence of crosslinking structure in hti-PTFE, directly detected as the CF signal, but also the crosslinking density which can be estimated from a proportion of the CF versus total fluorine signal intensities. The higher the irradiation dose, the higher the crosslinking density; hti-PTFE with 10 MGy contains one crosslinking site per approximately 24 CF 2 groups, while the hti-PTFE with 5 MGy contains one crosslinking site per approximately 36 CF 2 groups. Further, G value of crosslinking (G(x)) was estimated from the signal intensities of 19 F HS MAS NMR spectra. The highest G(x)-value, 1.85, was observed for the 2MGy hti-PTFE sample, suggesting that crosslinking of PTFE is formed most efficaciously with 2 MGy irradiation in the molten state at 340 deg. C under oxygen-free atmosphere

  9. High Resolutions Studies of the Structure of the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-30

    Regions", manuscript in preparation. M. Karovska , F. Blundell and S. R. Habbal, "Fine Scale Structure of the Solar Limb in a Coronal Hole", manuscript in...Astrophysical Observatory RIPORr MUMUR Smithsonian Institution AFOSR-TR- 2 0 9 1 MS 15 - 60 Garden Street Cambridge, 1; A 02138 SD. U sC,, i~ro AGENCY NAMI(S...visited the Solar and Stellar Physics Division for three months, and with Dr. Ruth Esser who has recently joined the Division as a physicist. 92

  10. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  11. Application of High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy to Define the Cell Uptake of MRI Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabi, Luisella; Alfieri, Goffredo; Biondi, Luca; De Miranda, Mario; Paleari, Lino; Ghelli, Stefano

    2002-06-01

    A new method, based on proton high-resolution magic-angle spinning ( 1H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, has been employed to study the cell uptake of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI-CAs). The method was tested on human red blood cells (HRBC) and white blood cells (HWBC) by using three gadolinium complexes, widely used in diagnostics, Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, and Gd-DOTA, and the analogous complexes obtained by replacing Gd(III) with Dy(III), Nd(III), and Tb(III) (i.e., complexes isostructural to the ones of gadolinium but acting as shift agents). The method is based on the evaluation of the magnetic effects, line broadening, or induced lanthanide shift (LIS) caused by these complexes on NMR signals of intra- and extracellular water. Since magnetic effects are directly linked to permeability, this method is direct. In all the tests, these magnetic effects were detected for the extracellular water signal only, providing a direct proof that these complexes are not able to cross the cell membrane. Line broadening effects (i.e., the use of gadolinium complexes) only allow qualitative evaluations. On the contrary, LIS effects can be measured with high precision and they can be related to the concentration of the paramagnetic species in the cellular compartments. This is possible because the HR-MAS technique provides the complete elimination of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift and the differentiation of extra- and intracellular water signals. Thus with this method, the rapid quantification of the MRI-CA amount inside and outside the cells is actually feasible.

  12. High-resolution flow structure measurements in a rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ylönen, A. T.

    2013-07-01

    Flow behaviour inside a rod bundle has been an active research topic since the early days of the nuclear power industry. Of particular interest in previous studies have been topics such as flow mixing, two-phase flow structure and mapping of two-phase flow transitions. The optimisation of fuel element design can only be achieved by truly understanding the nature of flow. The ultimate goal in this research is to enhance the heat transfer and increase the critical heat flux, which would improve the fuel economy. A better understanding of the flow would also improve nuclear safety as departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) can be predicted more accurately. The motivation for the current project (SUBFLOW) was to increase knowledge of the complex flow phenomena inside a rod bundle. A dedicated sub-channel flow test facility was designed and constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen, Switzerland. An adiabatic test loop has an up-scaled (1:2.6) vertical fuel rod bundle model with a 4 × 4 geometry. For the very first time, the wire-mesh sensor measurement technique was implemented in a rod bundle as two 64×64 conductivity wire-mesh sensors were installed in the upper part of the test section. The measurement technique enables one to study single- and two-phase flow behaviour with high spatial and temporal resolution. The research topics addressed in this thesis cover a wide range of flow conditions with and without a spacer grid in a rod bundle. The experimental campaign was started by studying natural mixing of a passive scalar to characterise the development of turbulent diffusion in an injection sub-channel and, later on, cross-mixing between adjacent sub-channels. The results were also used in comparison with the in-house CFD code PSI-Boil that is being developed at PSI. The code could estimate the mixing inside the sub-channel and the transition to cross-mixing with a good accuracy. As a natural transition, the SUBFLOW experiments were continued by

  13. High-resolution flow structure measurements in a rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ylönen, A. T.

    2013-01-01

    Flow behaviour inside a rod bundle has been an active research topic since the early days of the nuclear power industry. Of particular interest in previous studies have been topics such as flow mixing, two-phase flow structure and mapping of two-phase flow transitions. The optimisation of fuel element design can only be achieved by truly understanding the nature of flow. The ultimate goal in this research is to enhance the heat transfer and increase the critical heat flux, which would improve the fuel economy. A better understanding of the flow would also improve nuclear safety as departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) can be predicted more accurately. The motivation for the current project (SUBFLOW) was to increase knowledge of the complex flow phenomena inside a rod bundle. A dedicated sub-channel flow test facility was designed and constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen, Switzerland. An adiabatic test loop has an up-scaled (1:2.6) vertical fuel rod bundle model with a 4 × 4 geometry. For the very first time, the wire-mesh sensor measurement technique was implemented in a rod bundle as two 64×64 conductivity wire-mesh sensors were installed in the upper part of the test section. The measurement technique enables one to study single- and two-phase flow behaviour with high spatial and temporal resolution. The research topics addressed in this thesis cover a wide range of flow conditions with and without a spacer grid in a rod bundle. The experimental campaign was started by studying natural mixing of a passive scalar to characterise the development of turbulent diffusion in an injection sub-channel and, later on, cross-mixing between adjacent sub-channels. The results were also used in comparison with the in-house CFD code PSI-Boil that is being developed at PSI. The code could estimate the mixing inside the sub-channel and the transition to cross-mixing with a good accuracy. As a natural transition, the SUBFLOW experiments were continued by

  14. High-resolution bioactivity profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR: α-glucosidase inhibitors and acetylated ellagic acid rhamnosides from Myrcia palustris DC. (Myrtaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Moresco, Henrique H.; Tahtah, Yousof

    2015-01-01

    , and therefore improved drug leads or functional foods containing α-glucosidase inhibitors are needed for management of blood glucose. In this study, leaves of Myrcia palustris were investigated by high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with HPLC–HRMS–SPE–NMR. This led to identification...

  15. Solid-phase synthesis and high-resolution NMR studies of two synthetic double-helical RNA dodecamers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, S.H.; Flynn, P.; Reid, B.

    1989-01-01

    Ten-micromole solid-phase RNA synthesis has been successfully performed on an automated nucleic acid synthesizer with coupling efficiencies up to 99%, using the tert-butyldimethylsilyl group to protect the 2'-hydroxyl. The tert-butyldimethylsilyl group was easily removed by tetrabutylammonium fluoride under conditions in which virtually no 2'- to 3'-isomerization was found to occur. By use of this approach, the self-complementary RNA dodecamers r(CGCGAAUUCGCG) and r(CGCGUAUACGCG) were synthesized on an automated nucleic acid synthesizer, purified by TLC, and studied by high-resolution NMR. Imino protons were assigned from one-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effects. The nonexchangeable base, H1', and H2' protons were assigned by the sequential NOESY connectivity method. The NOE data from these two oligomers were analyzed qualitatively and compared to the ideal A- and B-type helix models of Arnott et al. (1972a,b). The internucleotide H6/H8 NOEs to the preceding H1' in r(CGCGUAUACGCG) were found to be sequence-dependent and probably reflect the roll angles between adjacent bases. The internucleotide H6/H8 to H2' NOEs of these oligomers correspond very well to an A-type conformation, but the interstrand adenine H2 NOEs to the following H1' were much stronger than those predicted from the fiber model. These strong interstrand NOEs can be rationalized by base pair slide to favor more interstrand base overlap

  16. NMR spectrometers. Current status and assessment of demand for high-resolution NMR spectrometers and for high-performance, solid NMR spectrometers at the scientific colleges and other research institutes in the Federal Republic of Germany. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, K.

    1989-01-01

    The survey includes high-resolution NMR spectrometers for liquids and solutions with magnetic field intensities of 11.7 Tesla and more (proton frequencies from 500 to 600 MHz) as well as high-performance solid-state NMR spectrometers with field intensities of, at least, 6.3 Tesla (proton frequencies of 270 MHz and more). The given results which had been obtained from documents of the manufacturers try to meet the manufacturers' need for safety. Market shares and sites are not listed. (DG) [de

  17. A Simple Approach for Obtaining High Resolution, High Sensitivity ¹H NMR Metabolite Spectra of Biofluids with Limited Mass Supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Wind, Robert A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Sears, Jesse A.

    2006-11-01

    A simple approach is reported that yields high resolution, high sensitivity ¹H NMR spectra of biofluids with limited mass supply. This is achieved by spinning a capillary sample tube containing a biofluid at the magic angle at a frequency of about 80Hz. A 2D pulse sequence called ¹H PASS is then used to produce a high-resolution ¹H NMR spectrum that is free from magnetic susceptibility induced line broadening. With this new approach a high resolution ¹H NMR spectrum of biofluids with a volume less than 1.0 µl can be easily achieved at a magnetic field strength as low as 7.05T. Furthermore, the methodology facilitates easy sample handling, i.e., the samples can be directly collected into inexpensive and disposable capillary tubes at the site of collection and subsequently used for NMR measurements. In addition, slow magic angle spinning improves magnetic field shimming and is especially suitable for high throughput investigations. In this paper first results are shown obtained in a magnetic field of 7.05T on urine samples collected from mice using a modified commercial NMR probe.

  18. 13C-NMR assignment, structure, and dynamics of deoxyoligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanatta, N.; Borer, P.N.; Levy, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    The unique spectral properties of 13 C-NMR for studying nucleic acids and some of the important features of 13 C-NMR in oligonucleotide studies are demostrated. The main difficulty in studying oligonucleotides by 13 C-NMR and recent improvements in NMR instrumentation and advances in oligonucleotide synthesis are presented. The high resolution 13 C-NMR spectra, T 1 relaxation times and NOEs were measured for duplex of the self-complementary oligo-DNAs: d(CG) 3 and d(GGTATACC) are studied. The target of this study is to developed a systematic 13 C-NMR spectral assignment and to investigate the structure and dynamics of these two sequences by this techniques. (M.J.C.) [pt

  19. Assessment of constituents in Allium by multivariate data analysis, high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition assay and HPLC-SPE-NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jeppe Secher; Nyberg, Nils; Stærk, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Bulbs and leaves of 35 Allium species and cultivars bought or collected in 2010–2012 were investigated with multivariate data analysis, high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition assays and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR with the aim of exploring the potential of Allium as a future functional food for management...... of type 2 diabetes. It was found that 30 out of 106 crude extracts showed more than 80% inhibition of the α-glucosidase enzyme at a concentration of 40 mg/mL (dry sample) or 0.4 g/mL (fresh sample). High-resolution α-glucosidase biochromatograms of these extracts allowed fast identification of three...

  20. High-resolution EELS investigation of the electronic structure of ilmenites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radtke, G.; Lazar, S.; Botton, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of a series of compounds belonging to the ilmenite family is investigated using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The energy loss near edge structure (ELNES) of the O-K, Ti-L23 and transition metal L23 edges have been recorded in MnTiO3, FeTiO3,

  1. An Optimized, Grid Independent, Narrow Band Data Structure for High Resolution Level Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Bang; Museth, Ken

    2004-01-01

    enforced by the convex boundaries of an underlying cartesian computational grid. Here we present a novel very memory efficient narrow band data structure, dubbed the Sparse Grid, that enables the representation of grid independent high resolution level sets. The key features our new data structure are...

  2. In-situ investigations of structural changes during cyclic loading by high resolution reciprocal space mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichs, Annika M.; Thiel, Felix; Lienert, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    dislocation structures can be identified using advanced electron microscopy and synchrotron techniques. A detailed characterization of the microstructure during cyclic loading by in-situ monitoring the internal structure within individual grains with high energy x-rays can help to understand and predict...... the materials behavior during cyclic deformation and to improve the material design. While monitoring macroscopic stress and strain during cyclic loading, reciprocal space maps of diffraction peaks from single grains are obtained with high resolution. High Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping was applied...

  3. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  4. Recombinant proteins incorporating short non-native extensions may display increased aggregation propensity as detected by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanzoni, Serena; D’Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bile acid binding proteins from different constructs retain structural integrity. ► NMR 15 N-T 1 relaxation data of BABPs show differences if LVPR extension is present. ► Deviations from a 15 N-T 1 /molecular-weight calibration curve indicate aggregation. -- Abstract: The use of a recombinant protein to investigate the function of the native molecule requires that the former be obtained with the same amino acid sequence as the template. However, in many cases few additional residues are artificially introduced for cloning or purification purposes, possibly resulting in altered physico-chemical properties that may escape routine characterization. For example, increased aggregation propensity without visible protein precipitation is hardly detected by most analytical techniques but its investigation may be of great importance for optimizing the yield of recombinant protein production in biotechnological and structural biology applications. In this work we show that bile acid binding proteins incorporating the common C-terminal LeuValProArg extension display different hydrodynamic properties from those of the corresponding molecules without such additional amino acids. The proteins were produced enriched in nitrogen-15 for analysis via heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Residue-specific spin relaxation rates were measured and related to rotational tumbling time and molecular size. While the native-like recombinant proteins show spin-relaxation rates in agreement with those expected for monomeric globular proteins of their mass, our data indicate the presence of larger adducts for samples of proteins with very short amino acid extensions. The used approach is proposed as a further screening method for the quality assessment of biotechnological protein products.

  5. Recombinant proteins incorporating short non-native extensions may display increased aggregation propensity as detected by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzoni, Serena; D' Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette [Department of Biotechnology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Assfalg, Michael, E-mail: michael.assfalg@univr.it [Department of Biotechnology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acid binding proteins from different constructs retain structural integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} relaxation data of BABPs show differences if LVPR extension is present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deviations from a {sup 15}N-T{sub 1}/molecular-weight calibration curve indicate aggregation. -- Abstract: The use of a recombinant protein to investigate the function of the native molecule requires that the former be obtained with the same amino acid sequence as the template. However, in many cases few additional residues are artificially introduced for cloning or purification purposes, possibly resulting in altered physico-chemical properties that may escape routine characterization. For example, increased aggregation propensity without visible protein precipitation is hardly detected by most analytical techniques but its investigation may be of great importance for optimizing the yield of recombinant protein production in biotechnological and structural biology applications. In this work we show that bile acid binding proteins incorporating the common C-terminal LeuValProArg extension display different hydrodynamic properties from those of the corresponding molecules without such additional amino acids. The proteins were produced enriched in nitrogen-15 for analysis via heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Residue-specific spin relaxation rates were measured and related to rotational tumbling time and molecular size. While the native-like recombinant proteins show spin-relaxation rates in agreement with those expected for monomeric globular proteins of their mass, our data indicate the presence of larger adducts for samples of proteins with very short amino acid extensions. The used approach is proposed as a further screening method for the quality assessment of biotechnological protein products.

  6. Integration of High-Resolution Laser Displacement Sensors and 3D Printing for Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wei Chang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel experimental design for complex structural health monitoring (SHM studies achieved by integrating 3D printing technologies, high-resolution laser displacement sensors, and multiscale entropy SHM theory. A seven-story structure with a variety of composite bracing systems was constructed using a dual-material 3D printer. A wireless Bluetooth vibration speaker was used to excite the ground floor of the structure, and high-resolution laser displacement sensors (1-μm resolution were used to monitor the displacement history on different floors. Our results showed that the multiscale entropy SHM method could detect damage on the 3D-printed structures. The results of this study demonstrate that integrating 3D printing technologies and high-resolution laser displacement sensors enables the design of cheap, fast processing, complex, small-scale civil structures for future SHM studies. The novel experimental design proposed in this study provides a suitable platform for investigating the validity and sensitivity of SHM in different composite structures and damage conditions for real life applications in the future.

  7. Integration of High-Resolution Laser Displacement Sensors and 3D Printing for Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Kuo, Shih-Yu; Huang, Ting-Hsuan

    2017-12-22

    This paper presents a novel experimental design for complex structural health monitoring (SHM) studies achieved by integrating 3D printing technologies, high-resolution laser displacement sensors, and multiscale entropy SHM theory. A seven-story structure with a variety of composite bracing systems was constructed using a dual-material 3D printer. A wireless Bluetooth vibration speaker was used to excite the ground floor of the structure, and high-resolution laser displacement sensors (1-μm resolution) were used to monitor the displacement history on different floors. Our results showed that the multiscale entropy SHM method could detect damage on the 3D-printed structures. The results of this study demonstrate that integrating 3D printing technologies and high-resolution laser displacement sensors enables the design of cheap, fast processing, complex, small-scale civil structures for future SHM studies. The novel experimental design proposed in this study provides a suitable platform for investigating the validity and sensitivity of SHM in different composite structures and damage conditions for real life applications in the future.

  8. De novo protein structure determination using sparse NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, Peter M.; Strauss, Charlie E.M.; Baker, David

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for generating moderate to high-resolution protein structures using limited NMR data combined with the ab initio protein structure prediction method Rosetta. Peptide fragments are selected from proteins of known structure based on sequence similarity and consistency with chemical shift and NOE data. Models are built from these fragments by minimizing an energy function that favors hydrophobic burial, strand pairing, and satisfaction of NOE constraints. Models generated using this procedure with ∼1 NOE constraint per residue are in some cases closer to the corresponding X-ray structures than the published NMR solution structures. The method requires only the sparse constraints available during initial stages of NMR structure determination, and thus holds promise for increasing the speed with which protein solution structures can be determined

  9. High-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy of fish muscle, eggs and small whole fish via Hadamard-encoded intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy has become an important technique for tissue studies. Since tissues are in semisolid-state, their high-resolution (HR spectra cannot be obtained by conventional NMR spectroscopy. Because of this restriction, extraction and high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR MAS are widely applied for HR NMR spectra of tissues. However, both of the methods are subject to limitations. In this study, the feasibility of HR (1H NMR spectroscopy based on intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (iMQC technique is explored using fish muscle, fish eggs, and a whole fish as examples. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Intact salmon muscle tissues, intact eggs from shishamo smelt and a whole fish (Siamese algae eater are studied by using conventional 1D one-pulse sequence, Hadamard-encoded iMQC sequence, and HR MAS. RESULTS: When we use the conventional 1D one-pulse sequence, hardly any useful spectral information can be obtained due to the severe field inhomogeneity. By contrast, HR NMR spectra can be obtained in a short period of time by using the Hadamard-encoded iMQC method without shimming. Most signals from fatty acids and small metabolites can be observed. Compared to HR MAS, the iMQC method is non-invasive, but the resolution and the sensitivity of resulting spectra are not as high as those of HR MAS spectra. CONCLUSION: Due to the immunity to field inhomogeneity, the iMQC technique can be a proper supplement to HR MAS, and it provides an alternative for the investigation in cases with field distortions and with samples unsuitable for spinning. The acquisition time of the proposed method is greatly reduced by introduction of the Hadamard-encoded technique, in comparison with that of conventional iMQC method.

  10. High-Resolution Printing of 3D Structures Using an Electrohydrodynamic Inkjet with Multiple Functional Inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Byeong Wan; Kim, Kukjoo; Lee, Heejoo; Kim, So-Yun; Shim, Yulhui; Lee, Dae-Young; Song, Jun Yeob; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-08-05

    Electrohydrodynamic-inkjet-printed high-resolution complex 3D structures with multiple functional inks are demonstrated. Printed 3D structures can have a variety of fine patterns, such as vertical or helix-shaped pillars and straight or rounded walls, with high aspect ratios (greater than ≈50) and narrow diameters (≈0.7 μm). Furthermore, the formation of freestanding, bridge-like Ag wire structures on plastic substrates suggests substantial potentials as high-precision, flexible 3D interconnects. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. 3D high-resolution two-photon crosslinked hydrogel structures for biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Laura; Urciuolo, Anna; Giulitti, Stefano; Della Giustina, Gioia; Tromayer, Maximilian; Liska, Robert; Elvassore, Nicola; Brusatin, Giovanna

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogels are widely used as matrices for cell growth due to the their tuneable chemical and physical properties, which mimic the extracellular matrix of natural tissue. The microfabrication of hydrogels into arbitrarily complex 3D structures is becoming essential for numerous biological applications, and in particular for investigating the correlation between cell shape and cell function in a 3D environment. Micrometric and sub-micrometric resolution hydrogel scaffolds are required to deeply investigate molecular mechanisms behind cell-matrix interaction and downstream cellular processes. We report the design and development of high resolution 3D gelatin hydrogel woodpile structures by two-photon crosslinking. Hydrated structures of lateral linewidth down to 0.5µm, lateral and axial resolution down to a few µm are demonstrated. According to the processing parameters, different degrees of polymerization are obtained, resulting in hydrated scaffolds of variable swelling and deformation. The 3D hydrogels are biocompatible and promote cell adhesion and migration. Interestingly, according to the polymerization degree, 3D hydrogel woodpile structures show variable extent of cell adhesion and invasion. Human BJ cell lines show capability of deforming 3D micrometric resolved hydrogel structures. The design and development of high resolution 3D gelatin hydrogel woodpile structures by two-photon crosslinking is reported. Significantly, topological and mechanical conditions of polymerized gelatin structures were suitable for cell accommodation in the volume of the woodpiles, leading to a cell density per unit area comparable to the bare substrate. The fabricated structures, presenting micrometric features of high resolution, are actively deformed by cells, both in terms of cell invasion within rods and of cell attachment in-between contiguous woodpiles. Possible biological targets for this 3D approach are customized 3D tissue models, or studies of cell adhesion

  12. High-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of anti-diabetic compounds in Eremanthus crotonoides (Asteraceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lana e Silva, Eder; Felipe Revoredo Lobo, Jonathas; Vinther, Joachim Møllesøe

    2016-01-01

    with an inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 34.5 μg/mL towards α-glucosidase was investigated by high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. This led to identification of six α-glucosidase inhibitors, namely quercetin (16), trans-tiliroside (17), luteolin (19), quercetin-3.......93 and 5.20 μM, respectively. This is the first report of the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of compounds 20, 26, and 29, and the findings support the important role of Eremanthus species as novel sources of new drugs and/or herbal remedies for treatment of type 2 diabetes....

  13. A High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR Study of the Enantiodiscrimination of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA by an Immobilized Polysaccharide-Based Chiral Phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana C Barreiro

    Full Text Available This paper reports the investigation of the chiral interaction between 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA enantiomers and an immobilized polysaccharide-based chiral phase. For that, suspended-state high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H HR-MAS NMR was used. 1H HR-MAS longitudinal relaxation time and Saturation Transfer Difference (STD NMR titration experiments were carried out yielding information at the molecular level of the transient diastereoisomeric complexes of MDMA enantiomers and the chiral stationary phase. The interaction of the enantiomers takes place through the aromatic moiety of MDMA and the aromatic group of the chiral selector by π-π stacking for both enantiomers; however, a stronger interaction was observed for the (R-enantiomer, which is the second one to elute at the chromatographic conditions.

  14. 1H High Resolution Magic-Angle Coil Spinning (HR-MACS µNMR Metabolic Profiling of whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells: A Demonstrative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eWong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The low sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR is its prime shortcoming compared to other analytical methods for metabolomic studies. It relies on large sample volume (30–50 µl for HR-MAS for rich metabolic profiling, hindering high-throughput screening especially when the sample requires a labor-intensive preparation or is a sacred specimen. This is indeed the case for some living organisms. This study evaluates a 1H HR-MAS approach for metabolic profiling of small volume (250 nl whole bacterial cells, Saccharomyces cervisiae, using an emerging micro-NMR technology: high-resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS. As a demonstrative study for whole cells, we perform two independent metabolomics studies identifying the significant metabolites associated with osmotic stress and aging.

  15. Homogenization-based topology optimization for high-resolution manufacturable micro-structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groen, Jeroen Peter; Sigmund, Ole

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a projection method to obtain high-resolution, manufacturable structures from efficient and coarse-scale, homogenization-based topology optimization results. The presented approach bridges coarse and fine scale, such that the complex periodic micro-structures can be represented...... by a smooth and continuous lattice on the fine mesh. A heuristic methodology allows control of the projected topology, such that a minimum length-scale on both solid and void features is ensured in the final result. Numerical examples show excellent behavior of the method, where performances of the projected...

  16. Investigating the reactivity of pMDI with wood cell walls using high-resolution solution-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study are the following: (1) Use solution-state NMR to assign contours in HSQC spectra of the reaction products between pMDI model compounds and: (a) lignin model compounds, (b) milled-wood lignin, (c) ball-milled wood, (d) microtomed loblolly pine; (2) Determine where and to what degree urethane formation occurs with loblolly pine cell wall...

  17. Identification and quantification of the main organic components of vinegars by high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caligiani, A.; Acquotti, D.; Palla, G.; Bocchi, V.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the proton high-field NMR spectra of vinegars (in particular of Italian balsamic vinegars) is reported. A large number of organic substances belonging to different classes, such as carbohydrates, alcohols, organic acids, volatile compounds and amino acids, were assigned. The possibility of quantification of the substances identified in the whole vinegar sample, without extraction or pre-concentration steps, was also tested. The data validity was demonstrated in terms of precision, accuracy, repeatability and inter-day reproducibility. The effects of the most critical experimental parameters (sample concentration, water suppression and relaxation time) on the analysis response were also discussed. 1 H NMR results were compared with those obtained by traditional techniques (GC-MS, titrations), and good correlations were obtained. The results showed that 1 H NMR with water suppression allows a rapid, simultaneous determination of carbohydrates (glucose and fructose), organic acids (acetic, formic, lactic, malic, citric, succinic and tartaric acids), alcohols and polyols (ethanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, hydroxymethylfurfural), and volatile substances (ethyl acetate) in vinegar samples. On the contrary, the amino acid determination without sample pre-concentration was critical. The 1 H NMR method proposed was applied to different samples of vinegars, allowing, in particular, the discrimination of vinegars and balsamic vinegars

  18. Evaluation of variability in high-resolution protein structures by global distance scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Anzai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic analysis of the statistical and dynamical properties of proteins is critical to understanding cellular events. Extraction of biologically relevant information from a set of high-resolution structures is important because it can provide mechanistic details behind the functional properties of protein families, enabling rational comparison between families. Most of the current structural comparisons are pairwise-based, which hampers the global analysis of increasing contents in the Protein Data Bank. Additionally, pairing of protein structures introduces uncertainty with respect to reproducibility because it frequently accompanies other settings for superimposition. This study introduces intramolecular distance scoring for the global analysis of proteins, for each of which at least several high-resolution structures are available. As a pilot study, we have tested 300 human proteins and showed that the method is comprehensively used to overview advances in each protein and protein family at the atomic level. This method, together with the interpretation of the model calculations, provide new criteria for understanding specific structural variation in a protein, enabling global comparison of the variability in proteins from different species.

  19. Evaluation of variability in high-resolution protein structures by global distance scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Risa; Asami, Yoshiki; Inoue, Waka; Ueno, Hina; Yamada, Koya; Okada, Tetsuji

    2018-01-01

    Systematic analysis of the statistical and dynamical properties of proteins is critical to understanding cellular events. Extraction of biologically relevant information from a set of high-resolution structures is important because it can provide mechanistic details behind the functional properties of protein families, enabling rational comparison between families. Most of the current structural comparisons are pairwise-based, which hampers the global analysis of increasing contents in the Protein Data Bank. Additionally, pairing of protein structures introduces uncertainty with respect to reproducibility because it frequently accompanies other settings for superimposition. This study introduces intramolecular distance scoring for the global analysis of proteins, for each of which at least several high-resolution structures are available. As a pilot study, we have tested 300 human proteins and showed that the method is comprehensively used to overview advances in each protein and protein family at the atomic level. This method, together with the interpretation of the model calculations, provide new criteria for understanding specific structural variation in a protein, enabling global comparison of the variability in proteins from different species.

  20. Quantifying vegetation distribution and structure using high resolution drone-based structure-from-motion photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Okin, G.

    2017-12-01

    Vegetation is one of the most important driving factors of different ecosystem processes in drylands. The structure of vegetation controls the spatial distribution of moisture and heat in the canopy and the surrounding area. Also, the structure of vegetation influences both airflow and boundary layer resistance above the land surface. Multispectral satellite remote sensing has been widely used to monitor vegetation coverage and its change; however, it can only capture 2D images, which do not contain the vertical information of vegetation. In situ observation uses different methods to measure the structure of vegetation, and their results are accurate; however, these methods are laborious and time-consuming, and susceptible to undersampling in spatial heterogeneity. Drylands are sparsely covered by short plants, which allows the drone fly at a relatively low height to obtain ultra-high resolution images. Structure-from-motion (SfM) is a photogrammetric method that was proved to produce 3D model based on 2D images. Drone-based remote sensing can obtain the multiangle images for one object, which can be used to constructed 3D models of vegetation in drylands. Using these images detected by the drone, the orthomosaics and digital surface model (DSM) can be built. In this study, the drone-based remote sensing was conducted in Jornada Basin, New Mexico, in the spring of 2016 and 2017, and three derived vegetation parameters (i.e., canopy size, bare soil gap size, and plant height) were compared with those obtained with field measurement. The correlation coefficient of canopy size, bare soil gap size, and plant height between drone images and field data are 0.91, 0.96, and 0.84, respectively. The two-year averaged root-mean-square error (RMSE) of canopy size, bare soil gap size, and plant height between drone images and field data are 0.61 m, 1.21 m, and 0.25 cm, respectively. The two-year averaged measure error (ME) of canopy size, bare soil gap size, and plant height

  1. Pollen structure visualization using high-resolution laboratory-based hard X-ray tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiong; Gluch, Jürgen; Krüger, Peter; Gall, Martin; Neinhuis, Christoph; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2016-10-14

    A laboratory-based X-ray microscope is used to investigate the 3D structure of unstained whole pollen grains. For the first time, high-resolution laboratory-based hard X-ray microscopy is applied to study pollen grains. Based on the efficient acquisition of statistically relevant information-rich images using Zernike phase contrast, both surface- and internal structures of pine pollen - including exine, intine and cellular structures - are clearly visualized. The specific volumes of these structures are calculated from the tomographic data. The systematic three-dimensional study of pollen grains provides morphological and structural information about taxonomic characters that are essential in palynology. Such studies have a direct impact on disciplines such as forestry, agriculture, horticulture, plant breeding and biodiversity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An application of impediography to the high sensitivity and high resolution identification of structural damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, L; Yang, J; Semperlotti, F; Wang, K W

    2015-01-01

    In this study we explore the use of impediographic techniques to perform damage detection in plate-like metal structures. Impediography relies on the piezo-resistive coupling of the host structure to reconstruct high sensitivity and high resolution maps of the internal electrical conductivity. By exploiting localized strain perturbations generated via focused acoustic waves, the piezo-resistive coupling allows extracting a set of linearly independent boundary voltage data that drastically reduces the ill-conditioning of the inverse problem, therefore increasing the performance. The localized perturbation is achieved by leveraging the concept of frequency selective structure (FSS), that is a dynamically tailored structural element enabling the required acoustic focusing via vibration localization. Based on the FSS approach, the impediographic technique is numerically tested to investigate the performance of the combined approach for structural damage detection. The effects of practical implementation issues, such as limited perturbations and limited boundary data, are also explored. (paper)

  3. LTE modeling of inhomogeneous chromospheric structure using high-resolution limb observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, C.

    1987-01-01

    The paper discusses considerations relevant to LTE modeling of rough atmospheres. Particular attention is given to the application of recent high-resolution observations of the solar limb in the far-infrared and radio continuum to the modeling of chromospheric spicules. It is explained how the continuum limb observations can be combined with morphological knowledge of spicule structure to model the physical conditions in chromospheric spicules. This discussion forms the basis for a chromospheric model presented in a parallel publication based on observations ranging from 100 microns to 2.6 mm.

  4. Metabolic profiling of lymph from pigs fed with ß-glucan by high-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Jørgensen, Henry Johs. Høgh; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2010-01-01

    To gain information about the effect of ingesting different β-glucan sources on intestinal lymph metabolic profile, 10 growing pigs (30-36 kg) were fitted with a catheter in the jejunal lymphatic trunk, and lymph samples collected continuously -1 to 8 h postprandial and again at 24 h after feeding...... a diet containing either 0.4% added yeast or barley β-glucan and compared to a Control diet. The lymph samples were analysed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and subsequently subjected to chemometric analysis. The dominant resonances in the 1H NMR spectra of lymph arose...... of increased lymph viscosity induced by barley β-glucan compared to yeast β-glucan were observed...

  5. High-resolution x-ray imaging using a structured scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hormozan, Yashar, E-mail: hormozan@kth.se; Sychugov, Ilya; Linnros, Jan [Materials and Nano Physics, School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, Kista, Stockholm SE-16440 (Sweden)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors introduce a new generation of finely structured scintillators with a very high spatial resolution (a few micrometers) compared to conventional scintillators, yet maintaining a thick absorbing layer for improved detectivity. Methods: Their concept is based on a 2D array of high aspect ratio pores which are fabricated by ICP etching, with spacings (pitches) of a few micrometers, on silicon and oxidation of the pore walls. The pores were subsequently filled by melting of powdered CsI(Tl), as the scintillating agent. In order to couple the secondary emitted photons of the back of the scintillator array to a CCD device, having a larger pixel size than the pore pitch, an open optical microscope with adjustable magnification was designed and implemented. By imaging a sharp edge, the authors were able to calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF) of this finely structured scintillator. Results: The x-ray images of individually resolved pores suggest that they have been almost uniformly filled, and the MTF measurements show the feasibility of a few microns spatial resolution imaging, as set by the scintillator pore size. Compared to existing techniques utilizing CsI needles as a structured scintillator, their results imply an almost sevenfold improvement in resolution. Finally, high resolution images, taken by their detector, are presented. Conclusions: The presented work successfully shows the functionality of their detector concept for high resolution imaging and further fabrication developments are most likely to result in higher quantum efficiencies.

  6. Probing molecular dynamics of metal borohydrides on the surface of mesoporous scaffolds by multinuclear high resolution solid state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Son-Jong, E-mail: Sonjong@cheme.caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Hyun-Sook [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); To, Magnus [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Young-Su; Cho, Young Whan [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyungkeun; Kim, Chul [Department of Chemistry, Hannam University, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-05

    Graphical abstract: In situ variable temperature multinuclear solid state NMR allows to probe surface wetting, diffusivity, and confinement of metal borohydrides into nanopores. - Abstract: Understanding of surface interactions between borohydride molecules and the surfaces of porous supports have gained growing attention for successful development of nano-confinement engineering. By use of in situ variable temperature (VT) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, molecular mobility changes of LiBH{sub 4} crystalline solid has been investigated in the presence of silica based and carbonaceous surfaces. Spin–spin J-coupling of {sup 1}H–{sup 11}B in LiBH{sub 4} was monitored in series of VT NMR spectra to probe translational mobility of LiBH{sub 4} that appeared to be greatly enhanced upon surface contact. Such enhanced diffusivity was found to be effective in the formation of solid solution and co-confinement with other metal borohydrides. Co-confinement of LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} mixture was demonstrated at temperature as low as 100 °C, much lower than the reported bulk eutectic melting temperature. The discovery adds a novel property of LiBH{sub 4} that has been proven to be highly versatile in many energy related applications.

  7. Structural characterization of suppressor lipids by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovillos, Mary Joy; Pauling, Josch Konstantin; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Suppressor lipids were originally identified in 1993 and reported to encompass six lipid classes that enable Saccharomyces cerevisiae to live without sphingolipids. Structural characterization, using non-mass spectrometric approaches, revealed that these suppressor lipids are very long...... chain fatty acid (VLCFA)-containing glycerophospholipids with polar head groups that are typically incorporated into sphingolipids. Here we report, for the first time, the structural characterization of the yeast suppressor lipids using high-resolution mass spectrometry. METHODS: Suppressor lipids were...... isolated by preparative chromatography and subjected to structural characterization using hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight and ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Our investigation recapitulates the overall structural features of the suppressor lipids and provides an in-depth characterization...

  8. A High-resolution Atlas and Statistical Model of the Vocal Tract from Structural MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z; Xing, Fangxu; Al-Talib, Meena; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an essential tool in the study of muscle anatomy and functional activity in the tongue. Objective assessment of similarities and differences in tongue structure and function has been performed using unnormalized data, but this is biased by the differences in size, shape, and orientation of the structures. To remedy this, we propose a methodology to build a 3D vocal tract atlas based on structural MRI volumes from twenty normal subjects. We first constructed high-resolution volumes from three orthogonal stacks. We then removed extraneous data so that all 3D volumes contained the same anatomy. We used an unbiased diffeomorphic groupwise registration using a cross-correlation similarity metric. Principal component analysis was applied to the deformation fields to create a statistical model from the atlas. Various evaluations and applications were carried out to show the behaviour and utility of the atlas.

  9. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozyukhin, S.; Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A.; Shpotyuk, O.; Jain, H.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As x Se 100−x , As x S 100−x , Ge x Se 100−x and Ge x S 100−x chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  10. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyukhin, S., E-mail: sergkoz@igic.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Science, Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A. [Lehigh University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' (Ukraine); Jain, H. [Lehigh University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States)

    2011-04-15

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x}, As{sub x}S{sub 100-x}, Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} and Ge{sub x}S{sub 100-x} chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  11. Advances in high-resolution imaging--techniques for three-dimensional imaging of cellular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidke, Diane S; Lidke, Keith A

    2012-06-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to determine how cellular organization is coupled to function. To achieve this goal, a better understanding of organelle composition and structure is needed. Although visualization of cellular organelles using fluorescence or electron microscopy (EM) has become a common tool for the cell biologist, recent advances are providing a clearer picture of the cell than ever before. In particular, advanced light-microscopy techniques are achieving resolutions below the diffraction limit and EM tomography provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of cellular structures. The ability to perform both fluorescence and electron microscopy on the same sample (correlative light and electron microscopy, CLEM) makes it possible to identify where a fluorescently labeled protein is located with respect to organelle structures visualized by EM. Here, we review the current state of the art in 3D biological imaging techniques with a focus on recent advances in electron microscopy and fluorescence super-resolution techniques.

  12. Structural characterization of ether lipids from the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus by high-resolution shotgun lipidomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sara Munk; Brandl, Martin; Treusch, Alexander H

    2015-01-01

    The molecular structures, biosynthetic pathways and physiological functions of membrane lipids produced by organisms in the domain Archaea are poorly characterized as compared with that of counterparts in Bacteria and Eukaryota. Here we report on the use of high-resolution shotgun lipidomics......-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry using an ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. This analysis identified five clusters of molecular ions that matched ether lipids in the database with sub-ppm mass accuracy. To structurally characterize and validate the identities of the potential lipid species, we...... performed structural analysis using multistage activation on the ion trap-orbitrap instrument as well as tandem mass analysis using a quadrupole time-of-flight machine. Our analysis identified four ether lipid species previously reported in Archaea, and one ether lipid species that had not been described...

  13. Three dimensional imaging of damage in structural materials using high resolution micro-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffiere, J.-Y. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jean-yves.buffiere@insa-lyon.fr; Proudhon, H. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ferrie, E. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ludwig, W. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Maire, E. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Cloetens, P. [ESRF Grenoble (France)

    2005-08-15

    This paper presents recent results showing the ability of high resolution synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography to image damage initiation and development during mechanical loading of structural metallic materials. First, the initiation, growth and coalescence of porosities in the bulk of two metal matrix composites have been imaged at different stages of a tensile test. Quantitative data on damage development has been obtained and related to the nature of the composite matrix. Second, three dimensional images of fatigue crack have been obtained in situ for two different Al alloys submitted to fretting and/or uniaxial in situ fatigue. The analysis of those images shows the strong interaction of the cracks with the local microstructure and provides unique experimental data for modelling the behaviour of such short cracks.

  14. Three dimensional imaging of damage in structural materials using high resolution micro-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffiere, J.-Y.; Proudhon, H.; Ferrie, E.; Ludwig, W.; Maire, E.; Cloetens, P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent results showing the ability of high resolution synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography to image damage initiation and development during mechanical loading of structural metallic materials. First, the initiation, growth and coalescence of porosities in the bulk of two metal matrix composites have been imaged at different stages of a tensile test. Quantitative data on damage development has been obtained and related to the nature of the composite matrix. Second, three dimensional images of fatigue crack have been obtained in situ for two different Al alloys submitted to fretting and/or uniaxial in situ fatigue. The analysis of those images shows the strong interaction of the cracks with the local microstructure and provides unique experimental data for modelling the behaviour of such short cracks

  15. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  16. A Color-Texture-Structure Descriptor for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Scene classification plays an important role in understanding high-resolution satellite (HRS remotely sensed imagery. For remotely sensed scenes, both color information and texture information provide the discriminative ability in classification tasks. In recent years, substantial performance gains in HRS image classification have been reported in the literature. One branch of research combines multiple complementary features based on various aspects such as texture, color and structure. Two methods are commonly used to combine these features: early fusion and late fusion. In this paper, we propose combining the two methods under a tree of regions and present a new descriptor to encode color, texture and structure features using a hierarchical structure-Color Binary Partition Tree (CBPT, which we call the CTS descriptor. Specifically, we first build the hierarchical representation of HRS imagery using the CBPT. Then we quantize the texture and color features of dense regions. Next, we analyze and extract the co-occurrence patterns of regions based on the hierarchical structure. Finally, we encode local descriptors to obtain the final CTS descriptor and test its discriminative capability using object categorization and scene classification with HRS images. The proposed descriptor contains the spectral, textural and structural information of the HRS imagery and is also robust to changes in illuminant color, scale, orientation and contrast. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed CTS descriptor achieves competitive classification results compared with state-of-the-art algorithms.

  17. High-resolution AFM structure of DNA G-wires in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Krishnashish; Lech, Christopher J; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2018-05-17

    We investigate the self-assembly of short pieces of the Tetrahymena telomeric DNA sequence d[G 4 T 2 G 4 ] in physiologically relevant aqueous solution using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Wire-like structures (G-wires) of 3.0 nm height with well-defined surface periodic features were observed. Analysis of high-resolution AFM images allowed their classification based on the periodicity of these features. A major species is identified with periodic features of 4.3 nm displaying left-handed ridges or zigzag features on the molecular surface. A minor species shows primarily left-handed periodic features of 2.2 nm. In addition to 4.3 and 2.2 nm ridges, background features with periodicity of 0.9 nm are also observed. Using molecular modeling and simulation, we identify a molecular structure that can explain both the periodicity and handedness of the major G-wire species. Our results demonstrate the potential structural diversity of G-wire formation and provide valuable insight into the structure of higher-order intermolecular G-quadruplexes. Our results also demonstrate how AFM can be combined with simulation to gain insight into biomolecular structure.

  18. High-resolution structure of TBP with TAF1 reveals anchoring patterns in transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandapadamanaban, Madhanagopal; Andresen, Cecilia; Helander, Sara; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Siponen, Marina I; Lundström, Patrik; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Moche, Martin; Sunnerhagen, Maria

    2013-08-01

    The general transcription factor TFIID provides a regulatory platform for transcription initiation. Here we present the crystal structure (1.97 Å) and NMR analysis of yeast TAF1 N-terminal domains TAND1 and TAND2 bound to yeast TBP, together with mutational data. We find that yeast TAF1-TAND1, which in itself acts as a transcriptional activator, binds TBP's concave DNA-binding surface by presenting similar anchor residues to TBP as does Mot1 but from a distinct structural scaffold. Furthermore, we show how TAF1-TAND2 uses an aromatic and acidic anchoring pattern to bind a conserved TBP surface groove traversing the basic helix region, and we find highly similar TBP-binding motifs also presented by the structurally distinct TFIIA, Mot1 and Brf1 proteins. Our identification of these anchoring patterns, which can be easily disrupted or enhanced, provides insight into the competitive multiprotein TBP interplay critical to transcriptional regulation.

  19. High-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein using the high-pressure cryocooling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiura, Akifumi; Ohta, Kazunori; Masaki, Mika; Sato, Masaru; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. This is the first ultra-high-resolution structure obtained from a high-pressure cryocooled crystal. Recently, many technical improvements in macromolecular X-ray crystallography have increased the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank and improved the resolution limit of protein structures. Almost all high-resolution structures have been determined using a synchrotron radiation source in conjunction with cryocooling techniques, which are required in order to minimize radiation damage. However, optimization of cryoprotectant conditions is a time-consuming and difficult step. To overcome this problem, the high-pressure cryocooling method was developed (Kim et al., 2005 ▶) and successfully applied to many protein-structure analyses. In this report, using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. Structural comparisons between high- and ambient-pressure cryocooled crystals at ultra-high resolution illustrate the versatility of this technique. This is the first ultra-high-resolution X-ray structure obtained using the high-pressure cryocooling method

  20. New approaches to high-resolution mapping of marine vertical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Katleen; Huvenne, Veerle A I; Georgiopoulou, Aggeliki; Jones, Daniel O B; Marsh, Leigh; D O Carter, Gareth; Chaumillon, Leo

    2017-08-21

    Vertical walls in marine environments can harbour high biodiversity and provide natural protection from bottom-trawling activities. However, traditional mapping techniques are usually restricted to down-looking approaches which cannot adequately replicate their 3D structure. We combined sideways-looking multibeam echosounder (MBES) data from an AUV, forward-looking MBES data from ROVs and ROV-acquired videos to examine walls from Rockall Bank and Whittard Canyon, Northeast Atlantic. High-resolution 3D point clouds were extracted from each sonar dataset and structure from motion photogrammetry (SfM) was applied to recreate 3D representations of video transects along the walls. With these reconstructions, it was possible to interact with extensive sections of video footage and precisely position individuals. Terrain variables were derived on scales comparable to those experienced by megabenthic individuals. These were used to show differences in environmental conditions between observed and background locations as well as explain spatial patterns in ecological characteristics. In addition, since the SfM 3D reconstructions retained colours, they were employed to separate and quantify live coral colonies versus dead framework. The combination of these new technologies allows us, for the first time, to map the physical 3D structure of previously inaccessible habitats and demonstrates the complexity and importance of vertical structures.

  1. High-resolution synchrotron imaging shows that root hairs influence rhizosphere soil structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebernick, Nicolai; Daly, Keith R; Keyes, Samuel D; George, Timothy S; Brown, Lawrie K; Raffan, Annette; Cooper, Laura J; Naveed, Muhammad; Bengough, Anthony G; Sinclair, Ian; Hallett, Paul D; Roose, Tiina

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we provide direct evidence of the importance of root hairs on pore structure development at the root-soil interface during the early stage of crop establishment. This was achieved by use of high-resolution (c. 5 μm) synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT) to visualise both the structure of root hairs and the soil pore structure in plant-soil microcosms. Two contrasting genotypes of barley (Hordeum vulgare), with and without root hairs, were grown for 8 d in microcosms packed with sandy loam soil at 1.2 g cm -3 dry bulk density. Root hairs were visualised within air-filled pore spaces, but not in the fine-textured soil regions. We found that the genotype with root hairs significantly altered the porosity and connectivity of the detectable pore space (> 5 μm) in the rhizosphere, as compared with the no-hair mutants. Both genotypes showed decreasing pore space between 0.8 and 0.1 mm from the root surface. Interestingly the root-hair-bearing genotype had a significantly greater soil pore volume-fraction at the root-soil interface. Effects of pore structure on diffusion and permeability were estimated to be functionally insignificant under saturated conditions when simulated using image-based modelling. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Similarity of High-Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectra of Structurally Related Micropollutants and Transformation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schollée, Jennifer E.; Schymanski, Emma L.; Stravs, Michael A.; Gulde, Rebekka; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S.; Hollender, Juliane

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HRMS2) with electrospray ionization is frequently applied to study polar organic molecules such as micropollutants. Fragmentation provides structural information to confirm structures of known compounds or propose structures of unknown compounds. Similarity of HRMS2 spectra between structurally related compounds has been suggested to facilitate identification of unknown compounds. To test this hypothesis, the similarity of reference standard HRMS2 spectra was calculated for 243 pairs of micropollutants and their structurally related transformation products (TPs); for comparison, spectral similarity was also calculated for 219 pairs of unrelated compounds. Spectra were measured on Orbitrap and QTOF mass spectrometers and similarity was calculated with the dot product. The influence of different factors on spectral similarity [e.g., normalized collision energy (NCE), merging fragments from all NCEs, and shifting fragments by the mass difference of the pair] was considered. Spectral similarity increased at higher NCEs and highest similarity scores for related pairs were obtained with merged spectra including measured fragments and shifted fragments. Removal of the monoisotopic peak was critical to reduce false positives. Using a spectral similarity score threshold of 0.52, 40% of related pairs and 0% of unrelated pairs were above this value. Structural similarity was estimated with the Tanimoto coefficient and pairs with higher structural similarity generally had higher spectral similarity. Pairs where one or both compounds contained heteroatoms such as sulfur often resulted in dissimilar spectra. This work demonstrates that HRMS2 spectral similarity may indicate structural similarity and that spectral similarity can be used in the future to screen complex samples for related compounds such as micropollutants and TPs, assisting in the prioritization of non-target compounds. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. The development of high-resolution spectroscopic methods and their use in atomic structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, O.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis discusses work performed during the last nine years in the field of atomic spectroscopy. Several high-resolution techniques, ranging from quantum beats, level crossings, rf-laser double resonances to nonlinear field atom interactions, have been employed. In particular, these methods have been adopted and developed to deal with fast accelerated atomic or ionic beams, allowing studies of problems in atomic-structure theory. Fine- and hyperfine-structure determinations in the He I and Li I isoelectronic sequences, in 51 V I, and in 235 U I, II have permitted a detailed comparison with ab initio calculations, demonstrating the change in problems when going towards heavier elements or higher ionization stage. The last part of the thesis is concerned with the fundamental question of obtaining very high optical resolution in the interaction between a fast accelerated atom or ion beam and a laser field, this problem being the core in the continuing development of atomic spectroscopy necessary to challenge the more precise and sophisticated theories advanced. (Auth.)

  4. Multinuclear solid-state high-resolution and C-13 -{Al-27} double-resonance magic-angle spinning NMR studies on aluminum alkoxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, A.; Prins, R.; Bokhoven, J.A. van; Eck, E.R.H. van; Kentgens, A.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    A combination of Al-27 magic-angle spinning (MAS)/multiple quantum (MQ)-MAS, C-13-H-1 CPMAS, and C-13-{Al-27} transfer of population in double-resonance (TRAPDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used for the structural elucidation of the aluminum alkoxides aluminum ethoxide, aluminum

  5. NMR studies of the structure of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, P.J.; Gravina, S.J.; Stallworth, P.E.; Szu, S.P.; Jianhui Zhong

    1988-01-01

    Earlier continuous wave (CW) NMR studies of chemical bonding and structure in glasses are summarized. Examples are given of this use of the quadrupolar interaction and chemical shift to obtain structural information. New NMR data and analyses are presented for alkali borate and gallate glasses. Extensions to other elements (e.g. molybdenum, lanthanum) are suggested. 44 refs. (author)

  6. NMR in structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Marta G; Ab, Eiso; Theisgen, Stephan; Siegal, Gregg

    2017-11-08

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can provide valuable structural information for drug discovery endeavors. Here, we discuss the strengths (and limitations) of NMR applications to structure-based drug discovery, highlighting the different levels of resolution and throughput obtainable. Additionally, the emerging field of paramagnetic NMR in drug discovery and recent developments in approaches to speed up and automate protein-observed NMR data collection and analysis are discussed. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. High-resolution NMR studies of chimeric DNA-RNA-DNA duplexes, heteronomous base pairing, and continuous base stacking at junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Shanho; Flynn, P.; Wang, A.; Reid, B.

    1991-01-01

    Two symmetrical DNA-RNA-DNA duplex chimeras, d(CGCG)r(AAUU)d(CGCG) (designated rAAUU) and d(CGCG)r(UAUA)d(CGCG) (designated rUAUA), and a nonsymmetrical chimeric duplex, d(CGTT)r(AUAA)d(TGCG)/d(CGCA)r(UUAU)d(AACG) (designated rAUAA), as well as their pure DNA analogues, containing dU instead of T, have been synthesized by solid-phase phosphoramidite methods and studied by high-resolution NMR techniques. The 1D imino proton NOE spectra of these d-r-d chimeras indicate normal Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding and base stacking at the junction region. Preliminary qualitative NOESY, COSY, and chemical shift data suggest that the internal RNA segment contains C3'-endo (A-type) sugar conformations except for the first RNA residues (position 5 and 17) following the 3' end of the DNA block, which, unlike the other six ribonucleotides, exhibit detectable H1'-H2' J coupling. The nucleosides of the two flanking DNA segments appear to adopt a fairly normal C2'-endo B-DNA conformation except at the junction with the RNA blocks (residues 4 and 16), where the last DNA residue appears to adopt an intermediate sugar conformation. The data indicate that A-type and B-type conformations can coexist in a single short continuous nucleic acid duplex, but these results differ somewhat from previous theoretical model studies

  8. High-Resolution Inhibition Profiling Combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for Identification of PTP1B Inhibitors from Vietnamese Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Binh Thi Dieu; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2017-07-20

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays a key role as a negative regulator in insulin signal transduction by deactivating the insulin receptor. Thus, PTP1B inhibition has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for curing insulin resistance. In this study, 40 extracts from 18 different plant species were investigated for PTP1B inhibitory activity in vitro. The most promising one, the EtOAc extract of Ficus racemosa , was investigated by high-resolution PTP1B inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis. This led to the identification of isoderrone ( 1 ), derrone ( 2 ), alpinumisoflavone ( 3 ) and mucusisoflavone B ( 4 ) as PTP1B inhibitors. IC 50 of these compounds were 22.7 ± 1.7, 12.6 ± 1.6, 21.2 ± 3.8 and 2.5 ± 0.2 µM, respectively. Kinetics analysis revealed that these compounds inhibited PTP1B non-competitively with K i values of 21.3 ± 2.8, 7.9 ± 1.9, 14.3 ± 2.0, and 3.0 ± 0.5 µM, respectively. These findings support the important role of F. racemosa as a novel source of new drugs and/or as a herbal remedy for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  9. High-Resolution Inhibition Profiling Combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for Identification of PTP1B Inhibitors from Vietnamese Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Thi Dieu Trinh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B plays a key role as a negative regulator in insulin signal transduction by deactivating the insulin receptor. Thus, PTP1B inhibition has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for curing insulin resistance. In this study, 40 extracts from 18 different plant species were investigated for PTP1B inhibitory activity in vitro. The most promising one, the EtOAc extract of Ficus racemosa, was investigated by high-resolution PTP1B inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis. This led to the identification of isoderrone (1, derrone (2, alpinumisoflavone (3 and mucusisoflavone B (4 as PTP1B inhibitors. IC50 of these compounds were 22.7 ± 1.7, 12.6 ± 1.6, 21.2 ± 3.8 and 2.5 ± 0.2 µM, respectively. Kinetics analysis revealed that these compounds inhibited PTP1B non-competitively with Ki values of 21.3 ± 2.8, 7.9 ± 1.9, 14.3 ± 2.0, and 3.0 ± 0.5 µM, respectively. These findings support the important role of F. racemosa as a novel source of new drugs and/or as a herbal remedy for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  10. High-resolution bioactivity profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR: α-Glucosidase inhibitors and acetylated ellagic acid rhamnosides from Myrcia palustris DC. (Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubshet, Sileshi G; Moresco, Henrique H; Tahtah, Yousof; Brighente, Inês M C; Staerk, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is an endocrine metabolic disease with a worldwide prevalence of more than 8%, and an expected increase close to 50% in the next 15-20years. T2D is associated with severe and life-threatening complications like retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular diseases, and therefore improved drug leads or functional foods containing α-glucosidase inhibitors are needed for management of blood glucose. In this study, leaves of Myrcia palustris were investigated by high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. This led to identification of casuarinin, myricetin 3-O-β-d-(6″-galloyl)galactopyranoside, kaempferol 3-O-β-d-galactopyranoside, myricetin, and quercetin as α-glucosidase inhibitors. In addition, four acetylated ellagic acid rhamnosides, i.e., 4-O-(2″,4″-O-diacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid, 4-O-(2″,3″-O-diacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid, 4-O-(3″,4″-O-diacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid, and 4-O-(2″,3″,4″-O-triacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid were identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Computationally-optimized bone mechanical modeling from high-resolution structural images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy F Magland

    Full Text Available Image-based mechanical modeling of the complex micro-structure of human bone has shown promise as a non-invasive method for characterizing bone strength and fracture risk in vivo. In particular, elastic moduli obtained from image-derived micro-finite element (μFE simulations have been shown to correlate well with results obtained by mechanical testing of cadaveric bone. However, most existing large-scale finite-element simulation programs require significant computing resources, which hamper their use in common laboratory and clinical environments. In this work, we theoretically derive and computationally evaluate the resources needed to perform such simulations (in terms of computer memory and computation time, which are dependent on the number of finite elements in the image-derived bone model. A detailed description of our approach is provided, which is specifically optimized for μFE modeling of the complex three-dimensional architecture of trabecular bone. Our implementation includes domain decomposition for parallel computing, a novel stopping criterion, and a system for speeding up convergence by pre-iterating on coarser grids. The performance of the system is demonstrated on a dual quad-core Xeon 3.16 GHz CPUs equipped with 40 GB of RAM. Models of distal tibia derived from 3D in-vivo MR images in a patient comprising 200,000 elements required less than 30 seconds to converge (and 40 MB RAM. To illustrate the system's potential for large-scale μFE simulations, axial stiffness was estimated from high-resolution micro-CT images of a voxel array of 90 million elements comprising the human proximal femur in seven hours CPU time. In conclusion, the system described should enable image-based finite-element bone simulations in practical computation times on high-end desktop computers with applications to laboratory studies and clinical imaging.

  12. NMR in the SPINE Structural Proteomics project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab, E; Atkinson, A R; Banci, L; Bertini, I; Ciofi-Baffoni, S; Brunner, K; Diercks, T; Dötsch, V; Engelke, F; Folkers, G E; Griesinger, C; Gronwald, W; Günther, U; Habeck, M; de Jong, R N; Kalbitzer, H R; Kieffer, B; Leeflang, B R; Loss, S; Luchinat, C; Marquardsen, T; Moskau, D; Neidig, K P; Nilges, M; Piccioli, M; Pierattelli, R; Rieping, W; Schippmann, T; Schwalbe, H; Travé, G; Trenner, J; Wöhnert, J; Zweckstetter, M; Kaptein, R

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the developments, role and contributions of the NMR spectroscopy groups in the Structural Proteomics In Europe (SPINE) consortium. Focusing on the development of high-throughput (HTP) pipelines for NMR structure determinations of proteins, all aspects from sample preparation, data acquisition, data processing, data analysis to structure determination have been improved with respect to sensitivity, automation, speed, robustness and validation. Specific highlights are protonless (13)C-direct detection methods and inferential structure determinations (ISD). In addition to technological improvements, these methods have been applied to deliver over 60 NMR structures of proteins, among which are five that failed to crystallize. The inclusion of NMR spectroscopy in structural proteomics pipelines improves the success rate for protein structure determinations.

  13. Structure and Evolution of Hawaii's Loihi Seamount from High-resolution Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Moyer, C. L.; Glazer, B. T.; Caress, D. W.; Yoerger, D.; Kaiser, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    Loihi Seamount has been mapped repeatedly using shipboard multibeam sonars with improving resolution over time. Simrad EM302 data with 25m resolution at the 950m summit and 90m at the 5000m base of the volcano were collected from Schmidt Ocean Institute's R/V Falkor in 2014. A contracted multibeam survey in 1997 employing a deep-towed vehicle has 7m resolution for the summit and upper north and south rift zones, but suffered from poor navigation. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's AUV Sentry surveyed most of the summit and low-T hydrothermal vents on the base of the south rift in 2013 and 2014. The 2m resolution of most data is more precise than the navigation. The 6 summit surveys were reprocessed using MB-System to remove abundant bad bottom picks and adjust the navigation to produce a spatially accurate map. The 3 summit pits, including Pele's Pit that formed in 1996, are complex collapse structures and nested inside a larger caldera that was modified by large landslides on the east and west summit flanks. The pits cut low shields that once formed a complex of overlapping summit shields, similar to Kilauea before the current caldera formed 1500 to 1790 CE. An 11m section of ash deposits crops out on the east rim of the summit along a caldera-bounding fault and is analogous to Kilauea where the caldera-bounding faults expose ash erupted as the present caldera formed. Most of the Loihi ash section is 3300 to 5880 yr BP, indicating that the larger caldera structure at Loihi is younger than 3300 yr BP. The landslides on the east and west edges of the summit are therefore younger 3300 yr BP. The uppermost south rift has several small pit craters between cones and pillow ridges, also analogous to Kilauea. Two cones near the deep low-T vents are steep pillow mounds with slopes of talus. High-resolution mapping reveals, for the first time, the many similarities between the structure and evolution of submarine Loihi Seamount and subaerial Kilauea Volcano.

  14. The cyclopropene radical cation: Rovibrational level structure at low energies from high-resolution photoelectron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilatou, K.; Michaud, J. M.; Baykusheva, D.; Grassi, G.; Merkt, F. [Laboratorium für Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-08-14

    The cyclopropene radical cation (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}) is an important but poorly characterized three-membered-ring hydrocarbon. We report on a measurement of the high-resolution photoelectron and photoionization spectra of cyclopropene and several deuterated isotopomers, from which we have determined the rovibrational energy level structure of the X{sup ~+} {sup 2}B{sub 2} ground electronic state of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +} at low energies for the first time. The synthesis of the partially deuterated isotopomers always resulted in mixtures of several isotopomers, differing in their number of D atoms and in the location of these atoms, so that the photoelectron spectra of deuterated samples are superpositions of the spectra of several isotopomers. The rotationally resolved spectra indicate a C{sub 2v}-symmetric R{sub 0} structure for the ground electronic state of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}. Two vibrational modes of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +} are found to have vibrational wave numbers below 300 cm{sup −1}, which is surprising for such a small cyclic hydrocarbon. The analysis of the isotopic shifts of the vibrational levels enabled the assignment of the lowest-frequency mode (fundamental wave number of ≈110 cm{sup −1} in c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}) to the CH{sub 2} torsional mode (ν{sub 8}{sup +}, A{sub 2} symmetry) and of the second-lowest-frequency mode (≈210 cm{sup −1} in c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}) to a mode combining a CH out-of-plane with a CH{sub 2} rocking motion (ν{sub 15}{sup +}, B{sub 2} symmetry). The potential energy along the CH{sub 2} torsional coordinate is flat near the equilibrium structure and leads to a pronounced anharmonicity.

  15. Hydrogen atoms in protein structures: high-resolution X-ray diffraction structure of the DFPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen atoms represent about half of the total number of atoms in proteins and are often involved in substrate recognition and catalysis. Unfortunately, X-ray protein crystallography at usual resolution fails to access directly their positioning, mainly because light atoms display weak contributions to diffraction. However, sub-Ångstrom diffraction data, careful modeling and a proper refinement strategy can allow the positioning of a significant part of hydrogen atoms. Results A comprehensive study on the X-ray structure of the diisopropyl-fluorophosphatase (DFPase) was performed, and the hydrogen atoms were modeled, including those of solvent molecules. This model was compared to the available neutron structure of DFPase, and differences in the protein and the active site solvation were noticed. Conclusions A further examination of the DFPase X-ray structure provides substantial evidence about the presence of an activated water molecule that may constitute an interesting piece of information as regard to the enzymatic hydrolysis mechanism. PMID:23915572

  16. Linear versus non-linear structural information limit in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aert, S.; Chen, J.H.; Van Dyck, D.

    2010-01-01

    A widely used performance criterion in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is the information limit. It corresponds to the inverse of the maximum spatial object frequency that is linearly transmitted with sufficient intensity from the exit plane of the object to the image plane and is limited due to partial temporal coherence. In practice, the information limit is often measured from a diffractogram or from Young's fringes assuming a weak phase object scattering beyond the inverse of the information limit. However, for an aberration corrected electron microscope, with an information limit in the sub-angstrom range, weak phase objects are no longer applicable since they do not scatter sufficiently in this range. Therefore, one relies on more strongly scattering objects such as crystals of heavy atoms observed along a low index zone axis. In that case, dynamical scattering becomes important such that the non-linear and linear interaction may be equally important. The non-linear interaction may then set the experimental cut-off frequency observed in a diffractogram. The goal of this paper is to quantify both the linear and the non-linear information transfer in terms of closed form analytical expressions. Whereas the cut-off frequency set by the linear transfer can be directly related with the attainable resolution, information from the non-linear transfer can only be extracted using quantitative, model-based methods. In contrast to the historic definition of the information limit depending on microscope parameters only, the expressions derived in this paper explicitly incorporate their dependence on the structure parameters as well. In order to emphasize this dependence and to distinguish from the usual information limit, the expressions derived for the inverse cut-off frequencies will be referred to as the linear and non-linear structural information limit. The present findings confirm the well-known result that partial temporal coherence has

  17. Characterizing the structural maturity of fault zones using high-resolution earthquake locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, C.; Waldhauser, F.; Scholz, C. H.

    2017-12-01

    We use high-resolution earthquake locations to characterize the three-dimensional structure of active faults in California and how it evolves with fault structural maturity. We investigate the distribution of aftershocks of several recent large earthquakes that occurred on immature faults (i.e., slow moving and small cumulative displacement), such as the 1992 (Mw7.3) Landers and 1999 (Mw7.1) Hector Mine events, and earthquakes that occurred on mature faults, such as the 1984 (Mw6.2) Morgan Hill and 2004 (Mw6.0) Parkfield events. Unlike previous studies which typically estimated the width of fault zones from the distribution of earthquakes perpendicular to the surface fault trace, we resolve fault zone widths with respect to the 3D fault surface estimated from principal component analysis of local seismicity. We find that the zone of brittle deformation around the fault core is narrower along mature faults compared to immature faults. We observe a rapid fall off of the number of events at a distance range of 70 - 100 m from the main fault surface of mature faults (140-200 m fault zone width), and 200-300 m from the fault surface of immature faults (400-600 m fault zone width). These observations are in good agreement with fault zone widths estimated from guided waves trapped in low velocity damage zones. The total width of the active zone of deformation surrounding the main fault plane reach 1.2 km and 2-4 km for mature and immature faults, respectively. The wider zone of deformation presumably reflects the increased heterogeneity in the stress field along complex and discontinuous faults strands that make up immature faults. In contrast, narrower deformation zones tend to align with well-defined fault planes of mature faults where most of the deformation is concentrated. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that surface fault traces become smoother, and thus fault zones simpler, as cumulative fault slip increases.

  18. CIRS High-Resolution Thermal Scans and the Structure of Saturn's B Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. M.; Spilker, L. J.; Showalter, M.; Pilorz, S.; Edgington, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    The flyby of Titan on November 29, 2016, sent the Cassini spacecraft on a trajectory that would take it within 10,000 kilometers of Saturn's F ring multiple times before a subsequent Titan encounter on April 22, 2017, would send it on ballistic trajectory carrying it between Saturn's cloud tops and the planet's D ring for several flybys. This geometry has proven beneficial for high-resolution studies of the rings, not just because of Cassini's proximity to the rings, but also because of the spacecraft's high elevation angle above the rings, which reduces the foreshortening that tends to degrade resolution in the ring plane. We will report on several observations of Saturn's main rings at the high spatial resolutions enabled by the end-of-mission geometry, particulary the B ring, with the Composite Infrared Spectrometer onboard Cassini during the F-ring and proximal orbits. CIRS' three infrared detectors cover a combined spectral range of 10 to 1400 cm-1 (1 mm down to 7 microns). We focus on data from Focal Plane 1, which covers the 10 to 600 cm-1 range (1 mm to 16 microns). The apodized spectral resolution of the instrument can be varied from 15 cm-1 to 0.5 cm-1 (Flasar et al. 2004). FP1's wavelength range makes it well-suited to sensing thermal emission from objects at temperatures typical of Saturn's rings. Correlating ring optical depth with temperatures retrieved from scans of the face of the rings exposed to direct solar illumination (the lit face) and the opposite (unlit) face suggests differences in ring structure or particle transport between the lit and unlit sides of the rings in different regions of the B ring. Lit side temperatures in the core of the B ring range between 82 and 87 K; temperatures on the unlit side of the core vary from 66 K up to 74 K. Ferrari and Reffet (2013) and Pilorz et al. (2015) published thorough analyses of the thermal throughput across this optically thick ring. We will discuss these recent CIRS rings observations and their

  19. High-resolution Anorectal Manometry for Identifying Defecatory Disorders and Rectal Structural Abnormalities in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, David O; Lee, Taehee; Parthasarathy, Gopanandan; Fletcher, Joel G; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Bharucha, Adil E

    2017-03-01

    Contrary to conventional wisdom, the rectoanal gradient during evacuation is negative in many healthy people, undermining the utility of anorectal high-resolution manometry (HRM) for diagnosing defecatory disorders. We aimed to compare HRM and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing rectal evacuation and structural abnormalities. We performed a retrospective analysis of 118 patients (all female; 51 with constipation, 48 with fecal incontinence, and 19 with rectal prolapse; age, 53 ± 1 years) assessed by HRM, the rectal balloon expulsion test (BET), and MRI at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, from February 2011 through March 2013. Thirty healthy asymptomatic women (age, 37 ± 2 years) served as controls. We used principal components analysis of HRM variables to identify rectoanal pressure patterns associated with rectal prolapse and phenotypes of patients with prolapse. Compared with patients with normal findings from the rectal BET, patients with an abnormal BET had lower median rectal pressure (36 vs 22 mm Hg, P = .002), a more negative median rectoanal gradient (-6 vs -29 mm Hg, P = .006) during evacuation, and a lower proportion of evacuation on the basis of MRI analysis (median of 40% vs 80%, P < .0001). A score derived from rectal pressure and anorectal descent during evacuation and a patulous anal canal was associated (P = .005) with large rectoceles (3 cm or larger). A principal component (PC) logistic model discriminated between patients with and without prolapse with 96% accuracy. Among patients with prolapse, there were 2 phenotypes, which were characterized by high (PC1) or low (PC2) anal pressures at rest and squeeze along with higher rectal and anal pressures (PC1) or a higher rectoanal gradient during evacuation (PC2). In a retrospective analysis of patients assessed by HRM, measurements of rectal evacuation by anorectal HRM, BET, and MRI were correlated. HRM alone and together with anorectal descent during evacuation may identify

  20. High-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein using the high-pressure cryocooling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiura, Akifumi; Ohta, Kazunori; Masaki, Mika; Sato, Masaru; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Recently, many technical improvements in macromolecular X-ray crystallography have increased the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank and improved the resolution limit of protein structures. Almost all high-resolution structures have been determined using a synchrotron radiation source in conjunction with cryocooling techniques, which are required in order to minimize radiation damage. However, optimization of cryoprotectant conditions is a time-consuming and difficult step. To overcome this problem, the high-pressure cryocooling method was developed (Kim et al., 2005) and successfully applied to many protein-structure analyses. In this report, using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. Structural comparisons between high- and ambient-pressure cryocooled crystals at ultra-high resolution illustrate the versatility of this technique. This is the first ultra-high-resolution X-ray structure obtained using the high-pressure cryocooling method.

  1. Non-Uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-08-24

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in the efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Evolution of dislocation structures following a change in loading conditions studied by in situ high resolution reciprocal space mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejdemann, Christian

    or to a strain of 7% at a temperature of -196 ○C, and the samples were characterized by electron microscopy and mechanical tests. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the pre-deformation produced a characteristic dislocation cell structure consisting of regions with relatively high dislocation density...... the pre-deformation axis. In the X-ray diffraction experiments a technique was employed with which it is possible to obtain high-resolution reciprocal space maps from individual bulk grains. The high-resolution reciprocal space maps contain features related to the dislocation structure in the grains......: A spread-out ‘cloud’ of low intensity caused by diffraction from the dislocation walls and a number of sharp peaks of high intensity caused by diffraction from the individual subgrains. By acquiring reciprocal space maps at a number of different strain levels the evolution of the dislocation structures can...

  3. NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneeland, J.B.; Lee, B.C.P.; Whalen, J.P.; Knowles, R.J.R.; Cahill, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    Although still quite new, NMR imaging has already emerged as a safe, noninvasive, painless, and effective diagnostic modality requiring no ionizing radiation. Also, NMR appears already to have established itself as the method of choice for the examination of the brain spinal cord (excluding herniated disks). Another area in which NMR excels is in the examination of the pelvis. The use of surface coils offers the promise of visualizing structures with resolution unobtainable by any other means. In addition, NMR, with its superb visualization of vascular structures and potential ability to measure flow, may soon revolutionize the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Finally, NMR, through biochemically and physiologically based T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ indices or through spectroscopy, may provide a means of monitoring therapeutic response so as to permit tailoring of treatment to the individual patient. In short, NMR is today probably at the same stage as the x-ray was in Roentgen's day

  4. The Project Serapis: High Resolution Seismic Imagingof The Campi Flegrei Caldera Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Chiarabba, C.; de Franco, R.; Makris, J.; Michelini, A.; Musacchio, G.; Serapis Group

    During September 2001, an extended active seismic survey has been performed in the gulfs of Naples and Pozzuoli in the framework of the so called SERAPIS (SEismic Re- flection Acquisition Project for Imaging Structures). The project SERAPIS is aimed at the acquisition in the bays of Naples and Pozzuoli, on land and at the sea bottom (using sea bottom seismographs), of seismic signals emitted by a very dense network of airgun sources. The energization is performed through the syncronized implosion of bubbles produced by a battery of three to twelve, 16 liters airguns, mounted on the oceanographic vessel NADIR, owned by the french company IFREMER, which supported the project at no cost. The experiment has been designed to have 2D-3D acquisition lay-outs and its objective is the high resolution imaging of the main shal- low crustal discontinuities underneath the major neapolitan volcanic complexes. In particular some desired targets are the location and spatial definition of the magmatic feeding system of Campi Flegrei and the morphologic reconstruction of the interface separating the shallow volcano-alluvium sediments and the Mesozoic carbonates, re- cently detected and accurately imaged underneath Mt.Vesuvius volcano. A secondary but not less important objective is the denser re-sampling of areas in the Bay of Naples prospicient to Mt.Vesuvius, which have been investigated during the last marine sur- vey using the same vessel in 1997 (MareVes 97). Sixty, three-component stations have been installed on-land in the areas of Campi Flegrei, Mt.Vesuvius and on the islands of Ischia and Procida. In particular, the Mt.Vesuvius stations have been deployed along a 40 km long, SE-NW profile crossing the Campanian Plain toward the limestone out- crops. 72 sea bottom seismographs (OBS) have been installed in the gulfs of Naples and Pozzuoli by the University of Hamburg, with the logistic support of Geopro smbh and Geolab Italia. The OBS network geometry follows the main

  5. Design and development of high-resolution atomic beam fluorescence spectroscopy facility for isotope shift and hyperfine structure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharyulu, G.V.S.G.; Sankari, M.; Kiran Kumar, P.V.; Suryanarayana, M.V.

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution atomic beam fluorescence spectroscopy facility for the determination of isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in atomic species has been designed and developed. A resistively heated graphite tube atomic beam source was designed, tested and integrated into a compact interaction chamber for atomic beam fluorescence experiments. The design of the laser-atom interaction chamber and the source has been modified in a phased manner so as to achieve sub-Doppler resolution. The system has been used to record the hyperfine spectrum of the D2 transitions of Rb and K isotopes. The spectral resolution achieved is ∼ 26 MHz and is adequate to carry out high resolution measurement of isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of various atomic species. The other major advantage of the source is that it requires very small amounts of sample for achieving very good signal to noise ratio. (author)

  6. Dual High-Resolution α-Glucosidase and Radical Scavenging Profiling Combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for Identification of Minor and Major Constituents Directly from the Crude Extract of Pueraria lobata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Qinglei, Sun

    2015-01-01

    The crude methanol extract of Pueraria lobata was investigated by dual high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition and radical scavenging profiling combined with hyphenated HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Direct analysis of the crude extract without preceding purification was facilitated by combining chromatograms...... from two analytical-scale HPLC separations of 120 and 600 μg on-column, respectively. High-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiles were obtained after microfractionation of the eluate in 96-well microplates. This allowed full bioactivity profiling of individual peaks in the HPLC...... chromatogram of the crude methanol extract. Subsequent HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis allowed identification of 21 known compounds in addition to two new compounds, i.e., 3′-methoxydaidzein 8-C-[α-d-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)]-β-d-glucopyranoside and 6″-O-malonyl-3′-methoxydaidzin, as well as an unstable compound...

  7. Structural Characterization of a Thrombin-Aptamer Complex by High Resolution Native Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiang; Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A.

    2017-09-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) has evolved as an invaluable tool for the characterization of intact native proteins and non-covalently bound protein complexes. Here we report the structural characterization by high resolution native top-down MS of human thrombin and its complex with the Bock thrombin binding aptamer (TBA), a 15-nucleotide DNA with high specificity and affinity for thrombin. Accurate mass measurements revealed that the predominant form of native human α-thrombin contains a glycosylation mass of 2205 Da, corresponding to a sialylated symmetric biantennary oligosaccharide structure without fucosylation. Native MS showed that thrombin and TBA predominantly form a 1:1 complex under near physiological conditions (pH 6.8, 200 mM NH4OAc), but the binding stoichiometry is influenced by the solution ionic strength. In 20 mM ammonium acetate solution, up to two TBAs were bound to thrombin, whereas increasing the solution ionic strength destabilized the thrombin-TBA complex and 1 M NH4OAc nearly completely dissociated the complex. This observation is consistent with the mediation of thrombin-aptamer binding through electrostatic interactions and it is further consistent with the human thrombin structure that contains two anion binding sites on the surface. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) top-down MS of the thrombin-TBA complex performed with a high resolution 15 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer showed the primary binding site to be at exosite I located near the N-terminal sequence of the heavy chain, consistent with crystallographic data. High resolution native top-down MS is complementary to traditional structural biology methods for structurally characterizing native proteins and protein-DNA complexes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Absorbed dose estimates to structures of the brain and head using a high-resolution voxel-based head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Jeffrey F.; Blue, Thomas E.; Gupta, Nilendu

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the viability of using a high-resolution 3-D head phantom in Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) structure dosimetry. This work describes a high-resolution voxel-based model of a human head and its use for calculating absorbed doses to the structures of the brain. The Zubal head phantom is a 3-D model of a human head that can be displayed and manipulated on a computer. Several changes were made to the original head phantom which now contains over 29 critical structures of the brain and head. The modified phantom is a 85x109x120 lattice of voxels, where each voxel is 2.2x2.2x1.4 mm 3 . This model was translated into MCNP lattice format. As a proof of principle study, two MCNP absorbed dose calculations were made (left and right lateral irradiations) using a uniformly distributed neutron disk source with an 1/E energy spectrum. Additionally, the results of these two calculations were combined to estimate the absorbed doses from a bilateral irradiation. Radiobiologically equivalent (RBE) doses were calculated for all structures and were normalized to 12.8 Gy-Eq. For a left lateral irradiation, the left motor cortex receives the limiting RBE dose. For a bilateral irradiation, the insula cortices receive the limiting dose. Among the nonencephalic structures, the parotid glands receive RBE doses that were within 15% of the limiting dose

  9. High-resolution crystal structures of protein helices reconciled with three-centered hydrogen bonds and multipole electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Daniel J; Liu, Chengyu; Fang, Zheng; Ponder, Jay W; Marshall, Garland R

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for non-linear hydrogen bonds in protein helices is ubiquitous. In particular, amide three-centered hydrogen bonds are common features of helices in high-resolution crystal structures of proteins. These high-resolution structures (1.0 to 1.5 Å nominal crystallographic resolution) position backbone atoms without significant bias from modeling constraints and identify Φ = -62°, ψ = -43 as the consensus backbone torsional angles of protein helices. These torsional angles preserve the atomic positions of α-β carbons of the classic Pauling α-helix while allowing the amide carbonyls to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds as first suggested by Némethy et al. in 1967. Molecular dynamics simulations of a capped 12-residue oligoalanine in water with AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications), a second-generation force field that includes multipole electrostatics and polarizability, reproduces the experimentally observed high-resolution helical conformation and correctly reorients the amide-bond carbonyls into bifurcated hydrogen bonds. This simple modification of backbone torsional angles reconciles experimental and theoretical views to provide a unified view of amide three-centered hydrogen bonds as crucial components of protein helices. The reason why they have been overlooked by structural biologists depends on the small crankshaft-like changes in orientation of the amide bond that allows maintenance of the overall helical parameters (helix pitch (p) and residues per turn (n)). The Pauling 3.6(13) α-helix fits the high-resolution experimental data with the minor exception of the amide-carbonyl electron density, but the previously associated backbone torsional angles (Φ, Ψ) needed slight modification to be reconciled with three-atom centered H-bonds and multipole electrostatics. Thus, a new standard helix, the 3.6(13/10)-, Némethy- or N-helix, is proposed. Due to the use of constraints from

  10. Structural studies of SpoIIAA using NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comfort, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    The protein SpoIIAA participates, via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, in the four-component system that regulates the sporulation sigma factor e. Differential gene expression depends on specialised transcription factors called sigma factors, which direct the RNA polymerase to transcribe specific genes in one or other of the two chambers at various stages of sporulation. The first sporulation-specific sigma factor to be activated is 4 transcription that depends on σ F is essential for the remaining sigma factors to become active in turn. Early in sporulation SpoIIAA is in the phosphorylated state (SpoIIAA-P), as a result of the activity of the ATP-dependent protein kinase, SpoIIAB. About 80 minutes after the initiation of sporulation a specific phosphatase, SpoIIE, begins to hydrolyse SpoIIAA-P, and the resulting SpoIIAA again becomes a substrate for SpoIIAB. SpoIIAB is also an anti-sigma factor which in its free form inhibits a F by binding to it. Competition by SpoIIAA (the anti-anti-sigma factor) for binding to SpoIIAB releases e activity. The three-dimensional structure of SpoIIAA has been determined using high resolution NMR. SpoIIAA has a novel fold, composed of a-helices and P-strand elements. The structural differences between SpoIIAA and its inactive form, SpoIIAA-P, were also investigated by NMR. Tentative evidence points to the observation that phosphorylation of SpoIIAA results in a minor conformational change near the site of phosphorylation, which interferes with the hydrophobic interaction between SpoIIAA and SpoIIAB. Further NMR studies helped to predict the location of SpoIIAA-, GTP-, and ATP-binding sites on the SpoIIAA structure. In addition, the automated iterative NOE assignment algorithm, ARIA, was used to obtain additional NOE-based distance constraints and to calculate a refined structure. (author)

  11. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru-Shan Wu; Xiao-Bi Xie

    2008-06-08

    Our proposed work on high resolution/high fidelity seismic imaging focused on three general areas: (1) development of new, more efficient, wave-equation-based propagators and imaging conditions, (2) developments towards amplitude-preserving imaging in the local angle domain, in particular, imaging methods that allow us to estimate the reflection as a function of angle at a layer boundary, and (3) studies of wave inversion for local parameter estimation. In this report we summarize the results and progress we made during the project period. The report is divided into three parts, totaling 10 chapters. The first part is on resolution analysis and its relation to directional illumination analysis. The second part, which is composed of 6 chapters, is on the main theme of our work, the true-reflection imaging. True-reflection imaging is an advanced imaging technology which aims at keeping the image amplitude proportional to the reflection strength of the local reflectors or to obtain the reflection coefficient as function of reflection-angle. There are many factors which may influence the image amplitude, such as geometrical spreading, transmission loss, path absorption, acquisition aperture effect, etc. However, we can group these into two categories: one is the propagator effect (geometric spreading, path losses); the other is the acquisition-aperture effect. We have made significant progress in both categories. We studied the effects of different terms in the true-amplitude one-way propagators, especially the terms including lateral velocity variation of the medium. We also demonstrate the improvements by optimizing the expansion coefficients in different terms. Our research also includes directional illumination analysis for both the one-way propagators and full-wave propagators. We developed the fast acquisition-aperture correction method in the local angle-domain, which is an important element in the true-reflection imaging. Other developments include the super

  12. Real time, high resolution studies of protein adsorption and structure at the solid-liquid interface using dual polarization interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Neville J; Peel, Louise L; Swann, Marcus J; Cross, Graham H; Reeves, Andrew; Brand, Stuart; Lu, Jian R

    2004-01-01

    A novel method for the analysis of thin biological films, called dual polarization interferometry (DPI), is described. This high resolution (<1 A), laboratory-based technique allows the thickness and refractive index (density) of biological molecules adsorbing or reacting at the solid-liquid interface to be measured in real time (up to 10 measurements per second). Results from the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on to a silicon oxynitride chip surface are presented to demonstrate how time dependent molecular behaviour can be examined using DPI. Mechanistic and structural information relating to the adsorption process is obtained as a function of the solution pH

  13. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    an edge over the X-ray method as it can be used to study biomolecules ... currently as an Associate. Professor. ... Such a wealth of data is made available to the NMR ... important step towards structural characterization of a biomolecule. Box 1.

  14. Coupling HPLC-SPE-NMR with a microplate-based high-resolution antioxidant assay for efficient analysis of antioxidants in food--validation and proof-of-concept study with caper buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Stefanie; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Nielsen, John; Staerk, Dan

    2013-12-15

    This work describes the coupling of a microplate-based antioxidant assay with a hyphenated system consisting of high-performance liquid chromatography-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HPLC-SPE-NMR/high-resolution antioxidant assay, for the analysis of complex food extracts. The applicability of the microplate-based antioxidant assay for high-resolution screening of common food phenolics as well as parameters related to their trapping efficiency, elution behavior, and recovery on/from SPE cartridges are described. It was found that the microplate-based high-resolution antioxidant assay is an attractive and easy implementable alternative to direct on-line screening methods. Furthermore, it was shown that Resin SH and Resin GP SPE material are superior to RP C18HD for trapping of phenolic compounds. Proof-of-concept study was performed with caper bud extract, revealing the most important antioxidants to be quercetin, kaempferol, rutin, kaempferol-3-O-β-rutinoside and N(1),N(5),N(10)-triphenylpropenoyl spermidine amides. Targeted isolation of the latter, and comprehensive NMR experiments showed them to be N(1),N(10)-di-(E)-caffeoyl-N(5)-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine, N(1)-(E)-caffeoyl-N(5),N(10)-di-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine, N(10)-(E)-caffeoyl-N(1),N(5)-di-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine, and N(1),N(5),N(10)-tri-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine amides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. NMR-study of dynamic structural transtions in RNA-molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Fürtig, Boris

    2007-01-01

    The following thesis is concerned with the elucidation of structural changes of RNA molecules during the time course of dynamic processes that are commonly denoted as folding reactions. In contrast to the field of protein folding, the concept of RNA folding comprises not only folding reactions itself but also refolding- or conformational switching- and assembly processes (see chapter III). The method in this thesis to monitor these diverse processes is high resolution liquid-state NMR spectro...

  16. Mobile and embedded fast high resolution image stitching for long length rectangular monochromatic objects with periodic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limonova, Elena; Tropin, Daniil; Savelyev, Boris; Mamay, Igor; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we describe stitching protocol, which allows to obtain high resolution images of long length monochromatic objects with periodic structure. This protocol can be used for long length documents or human-induced objects in satellite images of uninhabitable regions like Arctic regions. The length of such objects can reach notable values, while modern camera sensors have limited resolution and are not able to provide good enough image of the whole object for further processing, e.g. using in OCR system. The idea of the proposed method is to acquire a video stream containing full object in high resolution and use image stitching. We expect the scanned object to have straight boundaries and periodic structure, which allow us to introduce regularization to the stitching problem and adapt algorithm for limited computational power of mobile and embedded CPUs. With the help of detected boundaries and structure we estimate homography between frames and use this information to reduce complexity of stitching. We demonstrate our algorithm on mobile device and show image processing speed of 2 fps on Samsung Exynos 5422 processor

  17. Lunar Circular Structure Classification from Chang 'e 2 High Resolution Lunar Images with Convolutional Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X. G.; Liu, J. J.; Zuo, W.; Chen, W. L.; Liu, Y. X.

    2018-04-01

    Circular structures are widely distributed around the lunar surface. The most typical of them could be lunar impact crater, lunar dome, et.al. In this approach, we are trying to use the Convolutional Neural Network to classify the lunar circular structures from the lunar images.

  18. Nucleic acid helix structure determination from NMR proton chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werf, Ramon M. van der; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S., E-mail: S.Wijmenga@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Molecules and Materials (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    We present a method for de novo derivation of the three-dimensional helix structure of nucleic acids using non-exchangeable proton chemical shifts as sole source of experimental restraints. The method is called chemical shift de novo structure derivation protocol employing singular value decomposition (CHEOPS) and uses iterative singular value decomposition to optimize the structure in helix parameter space. The correct performance of CHEOPS and its range of application are established via an extensive set of structure derivations using either simulated or experimental chemical shifts as input. The simulated input data are used to assess in a defined manner the effect of errors or limitations in the input data on the derived structures. We find that the RNA helix parameters can be determined with high accuracy. We finally demonstrate via three deposited RNA structures that experimental proton chemical shifts suffice to derive RNA helix structures with high precision and accuracy. CHEOPS provides, subject to further development, new directions for high-resolution NMR structure determination of nucleic acids.

  19. Structural Characterisation of Acetogenins from Annona muricata by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography Coupled to High-Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboureur, Laurent; Bonneau, Natacha; Champy, Pierre; Brunelle, Alain; Touboul, David

    2017-11-01

    Acetogenins are plant polyketides known to be cytotoxic and proposed as antitumor candidates. They are also suspected to be alimentary neurotoxins. Their occurrence as complex mixtures renders their dereplication and structural identification difficult using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry and efforts are required to improve the methodology. To develop a supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry method, involving lithium post-column cationisation, for the structural characterisation of Annonaceous acetogenins in crude extracts. The seeds of Annona muricata L. were extracted with methanol. Supercritical fluid chromatography of the extract, using a 2-ethylpyridine stationary phase column, was monitored using a high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Lithium iodide was added post-column in the make-up solvent. For comparison, the same extract was analysed using high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to the same mass spectrometer, with a column based on solid core particles. Sensitivity was similar for both HPLC and SFC approaches. Retention behaviour and fragmentation pathways of three different isomer groups are described. A previously unknown group of acetogenins was also evidenced for the first time. The use of SFC-MS/MS allows the reduction of the time of analysis, of environmental impact and an increase in the chromatographic resolution, compared to liquid chromatography. This new methodology enlightened a new group of acetogenins, isomers of montanacin-D. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Ultra high resolution tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  1. High resolution (transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Souto, Jose A; Lamela-Rivera, Horacio

    2006-10-16

    A novel fiber-optic interferometric sensor is presented for vibrations measurements and analysis. In this approach, it is shown applied to the vibrations of electrical structures within power transformers. A main feature of the sensor is that an unambiguous optical phase measurement is performed using the direct detection of the interferometer output, without external modulation, for a more compact and stable implementation. High resolution of the interferometric measurement is obtained with this technique (transformers are also highlighted.

  2. The digital structural analysis of cadmium selenide crystals by a method of ion beam thinning for high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Koichi; Baba, Norio; Naka, Michiaki; Kitagawa, Yukihisa; Suzuki, Kunio

    1986-01-01

    A digital processing method using a scanning densitometer system for structural analysis of electron micrographs was successfully applied to a study of cadmium selenide crystals, which were prepared by an argon-ion beam thinning method. Based on Fourier techniques for structural analysis from a computer-generated diffractogram, it was demonstrated that when cadmium selenide crystals were sufficiently thin to display the higher order diffraction spots at a high resolution approaching the atomic level, they constitute an alternative hexagonal lattice of imperfect wurtzite phase from a superposition of individual harmonic images by the enhanced scattering amplitude and corrected phase. From the structural analysis data, a Fourier synthetic lattice image was reconstructed, representing the precise location and three-dimensional arrangement of each of the atoms in the unit cell. Extensively enhanced lattice defect images of dislocations and stacking faults were also derived and shown graphically. (author)

  3. Structure of Se-rich As-Se glasses by high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A.; Miller, A. C.; Jain, H.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2007-01-01

    To establish the validity of various proposed structural models, we have investigated the structure of the binary As x Se 100-x chalcogenide glass family (x≤40) by high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. From the composition dependence of the valence band, the contributions to the density of states from the 4p lone pair electrons of Se and the 4p bonding states and 4s electrons of Se and As are identified in the top part of the band. The analysis of Se 3d and As 3d core-level spectra supports the so-called chain crossing model for the atomic structure of Se-rich As x Se 100-x bulk glasses. The results also indicate small deviations (∼3-8%) from this model, especially for glass compositions with short Se chains (25 40 Se 60 and of Se-Se-Se fragments in a glass with composition x=30 is established

  4. A first principles study of the binding of formic acid in catalase complementing high resolution X-ray structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Carme; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Biarnes, Xevi; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    Density functional molecular dynamics simulations using a QM/MM approach are used to get insight into the binding modes of formic acid in catalase. Two ligand binding sites are found, named A and B, in agreement with recent high resolution structures of catalase with bound formic acid. In addition, the calculations show that the His56 residue is protonated and the ligand is present as a formate anion. The lowest energy minimum structure (A) corresponds to the ligand interacting with both the heme iron and the catalytic residues (His56 and Asn129). The second minimum energy structure (B) corresponds to the situation in which the ligand interacts solely with the catalytic residues. A mechanism for the process of formic acid binding in catalase is suggested

  5. Use of high-resolution satellite images for detection of geological structures related to Calerias geothermal field, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano-Baeza, A. A.; Urzua, L.

    2011-12-01

    Chile has enormous potential to use the geothermal resources for electric energy generation. The main geothermal fields are located in the Central Andean Volcanic Chain in the North, between the Central valley and the border with Argentina in the center, and in the fault system Liquiñe-Ofqui in the South of the country. High resolution images from the LANDSAT and ASTER satellites have been used to delineate the geological structures related to the Calerias geothermal field located at the northern end of the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile. It was done by applying the lineament extraction technique developed by authors. These structures have been compared with the distribution of main geological structures obtained in the field. It was found that the lineament density increases in the areas of the major heat flux indicating that the lineament analysis could be a power tool for the detection of faults and joint zones associated to the geothermal fields.

  6. A first principles study of the binding of formic acid in catalase complementing high resolution X-ray structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, Carme [Centre especial de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: crovira@pcb.ub.es; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes [Centre especial de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Biarnes, Xevi [Centre especial de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Carpena, Xavi [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas y Parc Cientific de Barcelona (CSIC-PCB), Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fita, Ignacio [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas y Parc Cientific de Barcelona (CSIC-PCB), Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Loewen, Peter C. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2006-03-31

    Density functional molecular dynamics simulations using a QM/MM approach are used to get insight into the binding modes of formic acid in catalase. Two ligand binding sites are found, named A and B, in agreement with recent high resolution structures of catalase with bound formic acid. In addition, the calculations show that the His56 residue is protonated and the ligand is present as a formate anion. The lowest energy minimum structure (A) corresponds to the ligand interacting with both the heme iron and the catalytic residues (His56 and Asn129). The second minimum energy structure (B) corresponds to the situation in which the ligand interacts solely with the catalytic residues. A mechanism for the process of formic acid binding in catalase is suggested.

  7. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, Elke R. [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Maderwald, Stefan [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Linn, Jennifer; Bochmann, Katja [LMU Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Dassinger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  8. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizewski, Elke R.; Maderwald, Stefan; Linn, Jennifer; Bochmann, Katja; Dassinger, Benjamin; Forsting, Michael; Ladd, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  9. Effects of NMR spectral resolution on protein structure calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Tikole

    Full Text Available Adequate digital resolution and signal sensitivity are two critical factors for protein structure determinations by solution NMR spectroscopy. The prime objective for obtaining high digital resolution is to resolve peak overlap, especially in NOESY spectra with thousands of signals where the signal analysis needs to be performed on a large scale. Achieving maximum digital resolution is usually limited by the practically available measurement time. We developed a method utilizing non-uniform sampling for balancing digital resolution and signal sensitivity, and performed a large-scale analysis of the effect of the digital resolution on the accuracy of the resulting protein structures. Structure calculations were performed as a function of digital resolution for about 400 proteins with molecular sizes ranging between 5 and 33 kDa. The structural accuracy was assessed by atomic coordinate RMSD values from the reference structures of the proteins. In addition, we monitored also the number of assigned NOESY cross peaks, the average signal sensitivity, and the chemical shift spectral overlap. We show that high resolution is equally important for proteins of every molecular size. The chemical shift spectral overlap depends strongly on the corresponding spectral digital resolution. Thus, knowing the extent of overlap can be a predictor of the resulting structural accuracy. Our results show that for every molecular size a minimal digital resolution, corresponding to the natural linewidth, needs to be achieved for obtaining the highest accuracy possible for the given protein size using state-of-the-art automated NOESY assignment and structure calculation methods.

  10. Determination of dynamic characteristics of multi-layer carbon plastic structures of high-resolution scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Н. Маслей

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The comparative analysis results for the numerical determination of the dynamic characteristics of multi-layer carbon-fiber plates of the space vehicle scanner design by various types of finite element approximation of the physico-mechanical properties of the composite material are presented. Using the topological structure of the construction of reinforcing layers material in the plate package plane, experimental data for the elastic and mass characteristics of homogeneous carbon-fiber fibers, equivalent structural and orthotropic stiffness and elastic characteristics of the material of composite plates are determined.

  11. High-resolution studies of the structure of the solar atmosphere using a new imaging algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karovska, Margarita; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    1991-01-01

    The results of the application of a new image restoration algorithm developed by Ayers and Dainty (1988) to the multiwavelength EUV/Skylab observations of the solar atmosphere are presented. The application of the algorithm makes it possible to reach a resolution better than 5 arcsec, and thus study the structure of the quiet sun on that spatial scale. The results show evidence for discrete looplike structures in the network boundary, 5-10 arcsec in size, at temperatures of 100,000 K.

  12. High-resolution structures of Lactobacillus salivarius transketolase in the presence and absence of thiamine pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacik, Petra; Lobley, Carina M C; Bumann, Mario; Arena de Souza, Victoria; Owens, Raymond J; O'Toole, Paul W; Walsh, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    Probiotic bacterial strains have been shown to enhance the health of the host through a range of mechanisms including colonization, resistance against pathogens, secretion of antimicrobial compounds and modulation of the activity of the innate immune system. Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 is a well characterized probiotic strain which survives intestinal transit and has many desirable host-interaction properties. Probiotic bacteria display a wide range of catabolic activities, which determine their competitiveness in vivo. Some lactobacilli are heterofermentative and can metabolize pentoses, using a pathway in which transketolase and transaldolase are key enzymes. L. salivarius UCC118 is capable of pentose utilization because it encodes the key enzymes on a megaplasmid. The crystal structures of the megaplasmid-encoded transketolase with and without the enzyme cofactor thiamine pyrophosphate have been determined. Comparisons with other known transketolase structures reveal a high degree of structural conservation in both the catalytic site and the overall conformation. This work extends structural knowledge of the transketolases to the industrially and commercially important Lactobacillus genus.

  13. GPCR engineering yields high-resolution structural insights into beta2-adrenergic receptor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) is a well-studied prototype for heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that respond to diffusible hormones and neurotransmitters. To overcome the structural flexibility of the beta2AR and to facilitate its cr...

  14. High-resolution structure of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gilski, M.; Kazmierczyk, M.; Krzywda, S.; Zábranská, Helena; Cooper, S.; Popovic, Z.; Khatíb, F.; Dímaio, F.; Thompson, J.; Baker, D.; Pichová, Iva; Jaskolski, M.

    D67, č. 11 (2011), s. 907-914 ISSN 0907-4449 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : M-PMV protease * crystal structure * monomer * dimerization inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 12.619, year: 2011

  15. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  16. High-resolution probing of inner core structure with seismic interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Hsin-Hua; Lin, Fan-Chi; Tsai, Victor C.; Koper, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    of the differential travel time residuals between the two phases reveals significant short-wavelength variation and implies the existence of strong structural variability in the deep Earth. A linear N-S trending anomaly across the middle of the U.S. may reflect

  17. Edible seaweed as future functional food: Identification of α-glucosidase inhibitors by combined use of high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Wiese, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    -glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry–solid-phase extraction–nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-bioassay/HPLC–HRMS–SPE–NMR). The results showed Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesicolosus to be rich in antioxidants, equaling...... as fatty acids – with oleic acid, linoleic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid being the most potent with IC50 values of 0.069, 0.075 and 0.10 mM, respectively, and showing a mixed-type inhibition mode....

  18. Structural biology by NMR: structure, dynamics, and interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phineus R L Markwick

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The function of bio-macromolecules is determined by both their 3D structure and conformational dynamics. These molecules are inherently flexible systems displaying a broad range of dynamics on time-scales from picoseconds to seconds. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy has emerged as the method of choice for studying both protein structure and dynamics in solution. Typically, NMR experiments are sensitive both to structural features and to dynamics, and hence the measured data contain information on both. Despite major progress in both experimental approaches and computational methods, obtaining a consistent view of structure and dynamics from experimental NMR data remains a challenge. Molecular dynamics simulations have emerged as an indispensable tool in the analysis of NMR data.

  19. High resolution, high sensitivity, dynamic distributed structural monitoring using optical frequency domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreger, Stephen T.; Sang, Alex K.; Garg, Naman; Michel, Julia

    2013-05-01

    Fiber-optic ultrasonic transducers are an important component of an active ultrasonic testing system for structural health monitoring. Fiber-optic transducers have several advantages such as small size, light weight, and immunity to electromagnetic interference that make them much more attractive than the current available piezoelectric transducers, especially as embedded and permanent transducers in active ultrasonic testing for structural health monitoring. In this paper, a distributed fiber-optic laser-ultrasound generation based on the ghost-mode of tilted fiber Bragg gratings is studied. The influences of the laser power and laser pulse duration on the laser-ultrasound generation are investigated. The results of this paper are helpful to understand the working principle of this laser-ultrasound method and improve the ultrasonic generation efficiency.

  20. Preservation of high resolution protein structure by cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sader, Kasim; Studer, Daniel; Zuber, Benoit; Gnaegi, Helmut; Trinick, John

    2009-01-01

    We have quantitated the degree of structural preservation in cryo-sections of a vitrified biological specimen. Previous studies have used sections of periodic specimens to assess the resolution present, but preservation before sectioning was not assessed and so the damage due particularly to cutting was not clear. In this study large single crystals of lysozyme were vitrified and from these X-ray diffraction patterns extending to better than 2.1 A were obtained. The crystals were high pressure frozen in 30% dextran, and cryo-sectioned using a diamond knife. In the best case, preservation to a resolution of 7.9 A was shown by electron diffraction, the first observation of sub-nanometre structural preservation in a vitreous section.

  1. High-resolution Crystal Structure of Dimeric VP40 From Sudan ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Matthew C; Bruhn, Jessica F; Atkins, Kateri; Webb, Terry L; Baydo, Ruth O; Raymond, Amy; Lorimer, Donald D; Edwards, Thomas E; Myler, Peter J; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2015-10-01

    Ebolaviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever. Central to the Ebola life cycle is the matrix protein VP40, which oligomerizes and drives viral budding. Here we present the crystal structure of the Sudan virus (SUDV) matrix protein. This structure is higher resolution (1.6 Å) than previously achievable. Despite differences in the protein purification, we find that it still forms a stable dimer in solution, as was noted for other Ebola VP40s. Although the N-terminal domain interface by which VP40 dimerizes is conserved between Ebola virus and SUDV, the C-terminal domain interface by which VP40 dimers may further assemble is significantly smaller in this SUDV assembly. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Test of a detection structure for a high-resolution vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenewald, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    For the LEP experiment L3 a self-supporting detection structure in the TEC principle for the central vertex chamber was tested both with particles and with laser beams. The main topic of this thesis lied thereby on the determination of the coordinate of the particle passage along the signal-wire axis. Two different methods for the determination of this coordinate along the signal wire were studied. (orig./HSI) [de

  3. Medical images of patients in voxel structures in high resolution for Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Menezes, Artur F.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to present a computational process of conversion of tomographic and MRI medical images from patients in voxel structures to an input file, which will be manipulated in Monte Carlo Simulation code for tumor's radiotherapic treatments. The problem's scenario inherent to the patient is simulated by such process, using the volume element (voxel) as a unit of computational tracing. The head's voxel structure geometry has voxels with volumetric dimensions around 1 mm 3 and a population of millions, which helps - in that way, for a realistic simulation and a decrease in image's digital process techniques for adjustments and equalizations. With such additional data from the code, a more critical analysis can be developed in order to determine the volume of the tumor, and the protection, beside the patients' medical images were borrowed by Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas (COI/RJ), joined to the previous performed planning. In order to execute this computational process, SAPDI computational system is used in a digital image process for optimization of data, conversion program Scan2MCNP, which manipulates, processes, and converts the medical images into voxel structures to input files and the graphic visualizer Moritz for the verification of image's geometry placing. (author)

  4. High-resolution structure of the recombinant sweet-tasting protein thaumatin I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    The structure of a recombinant form of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin I was determined at 1.1 Å resolution and refined to an R work of 9.1% and an R free of 11.7%. Comparisons with plant thaumatin revealed the electron density of recombinant thaumatin I to be significantly improved, especially around Asn46 and Ser63. Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting plant protein, elicits a sweet taste at a concentration of 50 nM. The crystal structure of a recombinant form of thaumatin I produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris has been determined to a resolution of 1.1 Å. The model was refined with anisotropic B parameters and riding H atoms. A comparison of the diffraction data and refinement statistics for recombinant thaumatin I with those for plant thaumatin I revealed no significant differences in the diffraction data. The R values for recombinant thaumatin I and plant thaumatin I (F o > 4σ) were 9.11% and 9.91%, respectively, indicating the final model to be of good quality. Notably, the electron-density maps around Asn46 and Ser63, which differ between thaumatin variants, were significantly improved. Furthermore, a number of H atoms became visible in an OMIT map and could be assigned. The high-quality structure of recombinant thaumatin with H atoms should provide details about sweetness determinants in thaumatin and provide valuable insights into the mechanism of its interaction with taste receptors

  5. Medical images of patients in voxel structures in high resolution for Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Menezes, Artur F.; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: lboia@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Salmon Junior, Helio A. [Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas (COI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work aims to present a computational process of conversion of tomographic and MRI medical images from patients in voxel structures to an input file, which will be manipulated in Monte Carlo Simulation code for tumor's radiotherapic treatments. The problem's scenario inherent to the patient is simulated by such process, using the volume element (voxel) as a unit of computational tracing. The head's voxel structure geometry has voxels with volumetric dimensions around 1 mm{sup 3} and a population of millions, which helps - in that way, for a realistic simulation and a decrease in image's digital process techniques for adjustments and equalizations. With such additional data from the code, a more critical analysis can be developed in order to determine the volume of the tumor, and the protection, beside the patients' medical images were borrowed by Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas (COI/RJ), joined to the previous performed planning. In order to execute this computational process, SAPDI computational system is used in a digital image process for optimization of data, conversion program Scan2MCNP, which manipulates, processes, and converts the medical images into voxel structures to input files and the graphic visualizer Moritz for the verification of image's geometry placing. (author)

  6. HIGH RESOLUTION MICROTOMOGRAPHY FOR DENSITY AND SPATIAL INFORMATION ABOUT WOOD STRUCTURES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ILLMAN,B.

    1999-07-22

    Microtomography has successfully been used to characterize loss of structural integrity of wood. Tomographic images were generated with the newly developed third generation x-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) instrument at the X27A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The beamline is equipped with high-flux x-ray monochromator based on multilayer optics developed for this application. The sample is mounted on a translation stage with which to center the sample rotation, a rotation stage to perform the rotation during data collection and a motorized goniometer head for small alignment motions. The absorption image is recorded by a single-crystal scintillator, an optical microscope and a cooled CCD array detector. Data reconstruction has provided three-dimensional geometry of the heterogeneous wood matrix in microtomographic images. Wood is a heterogeneous material composed of long lignocellulose vessels. Although wood is a strong natural product, fungi have evolved chemical systems that weaken the strength properties of wood by degrading structural vessels. Tomographic images with a resolution of three microns were obtained nonintrusively to characterize the compromised structural integrity of wood. Computational tools developed by Lindquist et al (1996) applied to characterize the microstructure of the tomographic volumes.

  7. Combined use of high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for investigation of antidiabetic principles in crude plant extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Özdemir, Ceylan; Barzak, Asmah

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide, and new drug leads or functional foods containing selective α-glucosidase inhibitors are needed. Crude extract of 24 plants were assessed for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Methanol extracts of Cinnamomum zeylanicum...... bark, Rheum rhabarbarum peel, and Rheum palmatum root and ethyl acetate extracts of C. zeylanicum bark, Allium ascalonicum peel, and R. palmatum root showed IC50 values below 20 μg/mL. Subsequently, high-resolution α-glucosidase profiling was used in combination with high-performance liquid...... chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry–solid-phase extraction–nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for identification of metabolites responsible for the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Quercetin (1) and its dimer (2), trimer (3), and tetramer (4) were identified as main α-glucosidase inhibitors...

  8. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, L D; Rivas, J; José-Yacamán, M

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS 2 will be discussed. MoS 2 -based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important

  9. High-resolution probing of inner core structure with seismic interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Hsin-Hua

    2015-12-23

    © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Increasing complexity of Earth\\'s inner core has been revealed in recent decades as the global distribution of seismic stations has improved. The uneven distribution of earthquakes, however, still causes a biased geographical sampling of the inner core. Recent developments in seismic interferometry, which allow for the retrieval of core-sensitive body waves propagating between two receivers, can significantly improve ray path coverage of the inner core. In this study, we apply such earthquake coda interferometry to 1846 USArray stations deployed across the U.S. from 2004 through 2013. Clear inner core phases PKIKP2 and PKIIKP2 are observed across the entire array. Spatial analysis of the differential travel time residuals between the two phases reveals significant short-wavelength variation and implies the existence of strong structural variability in the deep Earth. A linear N-S trending anomaly across the middle of the U.S. may reflect an asymmetric quasi-hemispherical structure deep within the inner core with boundaries of 99°W and 88°E.

  10. High-resolution structure of the antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S.; Tedesco, Consiglia; McSweeney, Seán M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the 1.2 Å atomic resolution crystal structure of the 5-nitroimidazole antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrNimA) is presented. Many anaerobic human pathogenic bacteria are treated using 5-nitroimidazole-based (5-Ni) antibiotics, a class of inactive prodrugs that contain a nitro group. The nitro group must be activated in an anaerobic one-electron reduction and is therefore dependent on the redox system in the target cells. Antibiotic resistance towards 5-Ni drugs is found to be related to the nim genes (nimA, nimB, nimC, nimD, nimE and nimF), which are proposed to encode a reductase that is responsible for converting the nitro group of the antibiotic into a nonbactericidal amine. A mechanism for the Nim enzyme has been proposed in which two-electron reduction of the nitro group leads to the generation of nontoxic derivatives and confers resistance against these antibiotics. The cofactor was found to be important in the mechanism and was found to be covalently linked to the reactive His71. In this paper, the 1.2 Å atomic resolution crystal structure of the 5-nitroimidazole antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrNimA) is presented. A planar cofactor is clearly visible and well defined in the electron-density map adjacent to His71, the identification of the cofactor and its properties are discussed

  11. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of coherent bremsstrahlung fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this research was to provide experimental evidence for fine structure due to umklapp by distinct reciprocal lattice vectors in coherent bremsstrahlung spectra. The spontaneous emission of photons by relativistic electrons transversing thin crystals is made possible by recoil of the crystal, which absorbs momentum in multiples of ℎG where G is a reciprocal lattice vector. Previous work in the MeV-GeV beam energy range used detectors whose energy resolution was greater than 10%. By fitting a Johann wavelength dispersive spectrometer to a transmission electron microscope the author obtained coherent bremsstrahlung spectra of very high quality with energy resolution of 1%. Important to this result were also the fine angular collimation, small energy width of the electron beam in the microscope, and the accurate control of crystal orientation possible in a modern goniometer stage. The theory of the design of bent crystal x-ray spectrometers is extended to include effects of defocus and aberrations. The theory for diffraction from a stationary three dimensional grating due to a dipole radiator moving at relativistic speeds is derived as well as several other broadening mechanisms stemming from experimental variables. This dissertation provides the first experimental observations and corresponding theoretical background for the fine structure of coherent bremsstrahlung due to umklapp by different G-vectors in the same reciprocal lattice plane

  12. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance from high-resolution inelastic proton scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, A.

    2005-02-01

    In the present work the phenomenon of fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in a number of heavy and medium-heavy nuclei is systematically investigated for the first time. High energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering experiments were carried out in September-October 2001 and in October 2003 at the iThemba LABS cyclotron facility in South Africa with an incident proton energy of 200 MeV. The obtained data with the energy resolution of triangle E 58 Ni, 89 Y, 90 Zr, 120 Sn, 142 Nd, 166 Er, 208 Pb), thereby establishing the global character of this phenomenon. Fine structure can be described using characteristic energy scales, appearing as a result of the decay of collective modes towards the compound nucleus through a hierarchy of couplings to complex degrees of freedom. For the extraction of the characteristic energy scales from the spectra an entropy index method and a novel technique based on the wavelet analysis are utilized. The global analysis of available data shows the presence of three groups of scales, according to their values. To the first group belong the scales with the values around and below 100 keV, which were detected in all the nuclei studied. The second group contains intermediate scales in the range of 100 keV to 1 MeV. These scales show large variations depending on the nuclear structure of the nucleus. The largest scales above 1 MeV are classified to the third group, describing the global structure of the resonance (the width). The interpretation of the observed scales is realized via the comparison with microscopic model calculations including the coupling of the initial one-particle-one-hole excitations to more complex configurations. A qualitative agreement of the experimentally observed scales with those obtained from the theoretical predictions supports the suggestion of the origin of fine structure from the coupling to the two-particle-two-hole states. However, quantitatively, large deviations are

  13. High resolution 3-D shear wave velocity structure in South China from surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, S.; Guo, Z.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    Using continuous data from a total of 638 seismic stations, including 484 from CEArray between 2008 and 2013 and 154 from SINOPROBE between 2014 and 2015, we perform both ambient noise and earthquake Rayleigh wave tomography across South China. Combining Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 6and 40s periods from ambient noise tomography and Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 20and 140s from teleseismic two-plane-wave tomography, we obtain phase velocity maps between 6 and140 s periods. We then invert Rayleigh wave phase velocity to construct a 3-D shear wave velocity structure of South China by Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Similar to other inversion results, our results correspond topography well. Moreover, our results also reveal that velocity structure of the eastern South China in mantle depth is similar to eastern North China, the core of the western South China, Sichuan Block (SB),still exists thick lithosphere. However, owing to much more data employed and some data quality control techniques in this research, our results reveal more detailed structures. Along Qinling-Dabie Orogenic Belt (QDOB), North-South Gravity Lineament (NSGL) and the Sichuan-Yunnan Rhombic Block (SYRB), there are obvious high speed anomalies in depths of 10-20 km, which possibly imply ancient intrusions. Moreover, it seems that Tancheng-Lujiang Fault Zone (TLFZ) has already cut through QDOB, forming a deep fracture cutting through the crust of the whole China continent. Although SB still exists thick lithosphere, there are indications for thermal erosion. At the same time, the lithosphere of the central SYRB seems to be experiencing delamination process, obviously forming a barrier to prevent the hot Tibetan Plateau (TP) mantle material from flowing further southeast. Upwelling hot mantle material possibly triggered by this delamination process might be the cause of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province. There exists an intercontinental low velocity layer in the crust of the TP

  14. Microbeam high-resolution diffraction and x-ray standing wave methods applied to semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimirov, A; Bilderback, D H; Huang, R; Sirenko, A; Ougazzaden, A

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to conditioning x-ray microbeams for high angular resolution x-ray diffraction and scattering techniques is introduced. We combined focusing optics (one-bounce imaging capillary) and post-focusing collimating optics (miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal) to generate an x-ray microbeam with a size of 10 μm and ultimate angular resolution of 14 μrad. The microbeam was used to analyse the strain in sub-micron thick InGaAsP epitaxial layers grown on an InP(100) substrate by the selective area growth technique in narrow openings between the oxide stripes. For the structures for which the diffraction peaks from the substrate and the film overlap, the x-ray standing wave technique was applied for precise measurements of the strain with a Δd/d resolution of better than 10 -4 . (rapid communication)

  15. Kotai Antibody Builder: automated high-resolution structural modeling of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kazuo; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Amada, Karlou; Liang, Shide; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Nakamura, Haruki; Shirai, Hiroki; Standley, Daron M

    2014-11-15

    Kotai Antibody Builder is a Web service for tertiary structural modeling of antibody variable regions. It consists of three main steps: hybrid template selection by sequence alignment and canonical rules, 3D rendering of alignments and CDR-H3 loop modeling. For the last step, in addition to rule-based heuristics used to build the initial model, a refinement option is available that uses fragment assembly followed by knowledge-based scoring. Using targets from the Second Antibody Modeling Assessment, we demonstrate that Kotai Antibody Builder generates models with an overall accuracy equal to that of the best-performing semi-automated predictors using expert knowledge. Kotai Antibody Builder is available at http://kotaiab.org standley@ifrec.osaka-u.ac.jp. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The braingraph.org database of high resolution structural connectomes and the brain graph tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Szalkai, Balázs; Varga, Bálint; Grolmusz, Vince

    2017-10-01

    Based on the data of the NIH-funded Human Connectome Project, we have computed structural connectomes of 426 human subjects in five different resolutions of 83, 129, 234, 463 and 1015 nodes and several edge weights. The graphs are given in anatomically annotated GraphML format that facilitates better further processing and visualization. For 96 subjects, the anatomically classified sub-graphs can also be accessed, formed from the vertices corresponding to distinct lobes or even smaller regions of interests of the brain. For example, one can easily download and study the connectomes, restricted to the frontal lobes or just to the left precuneus of 96 subjects using the data. Partially directed connectomes of 423 subjects are also available for download. We also present a GitHub-deposited set of tools, called the Brain Graph Tools, for several processing tasks of the connectomes on the site http://braingraph.org.

  17. High-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy for monitoring ovarian structures in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Jaswant

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, the limit of spatial resolution of ultrasound systems has prevented characterization of structures Methods Experiment 1 was a pilot study to develop methods of immobilization (physical restraint vs. general anesthesia and determine technical factors affecting ovarian images using ultrasound bio-microscopy in rats vs. mice. The hair coat was removed over the thoraco-lumber area using depilation cream, and a highly viscous acoustic gel was applied while the animals were maintained in sternal recumbency. In Experiment 2, changes in ovarian structures during the estrous cycle were monitored by twice daily ultrasonography in 10 mice for 2 estrous cycles. Results Ovarian images were not distinct in rats due to attenuation of ultrasound waves. Physical restraint, without general anesthesia, was insufficient for immobilization in mice. By placing the transducer face over the dorsal flank, the kidney was visualized initially as a point of reference. A routine of moving the transducer a few millimetres caudo-laterally from the kidney was established to quickly and consistently localize the ovaries; the total time to scan both ovaries in a mouse was about 10 minutes. By comparing vaginal cytology with non-anesthetized controls, repeated exposure to anesthesia did not affect the estrous cycle. Temporal changes in the number of follicles in 3 different size categories support the hypothesis that follicles ≥ 20 microns develop in a wave-like fashion. Conclusion The mouse is a suitable model for the study of ovarian dynamics using transcutaneous ultrasound bio-microscopy. Repeated general anesthesia for examination had no apparent effect on the estrous cycle, and preliminary results revealed a wave-like pattern of ovarian follicle development in mice.

  18. A high-resolution study of mesospheric fine structure with the Jicamarca MST radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sheth

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Correlation studies performed on data from recent mesospheric experiments conducted with the 50-MHz Jicamarca radar in May 2003 and July 2004 are reported. The study is based on signals detected from a combination of vertical and off-vertical beams. The nominal height resolution was 150 m and spectral estimates were obtained after ~1 min integration. Spectral widths and backscattered power generally show positive correlations at upper mesospheric heights in agreement with earlier findings (e.g., Fukao et al., 1980 that upper mesospheric echoes are dominated by isotropic Bragg scatter. In many instances in the upper mesosphere, a weakening of positive correlation away from layer centers (towards top and bottom boundaries was observed with the aid of improved height resolution. This finding supports the idea that layer edges are dominated by anisotropic turbulence. The data also suggests that negative correlations observed at lower mesospheric heights are caused by scattering from anisotropic structures rather than reflections from sharp vertical gradients in electron density.

  19. Ultra-high resolution four dimensional geodetic imaging of engineered structures for stability assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawden, Gerald W.; Bond, Sandra; Podoski, J. H.; Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2012-01-01

    We used ground-based Tripod LiDAR (T-LiDAR) to assess the stability of two engineered structures: a bridge spanning the San Andreas fault following the M6.0 Parkfield earthquake in Central California and a newly built coastal breakwater located at the Kaumālapa`u Harbor Lana'i, Hawaii. In the 10 weeks following the earthquake, we found that the surface under the bridge shifted 7.1 cm with an additional 2.6 cm of motion in the subsequent 13 weeks, which deflected the bridge's northern I-beam support 4.3 cm and 2.1 respectively; the bridge integrity remained intact. T-LiDAR imagery was collected after the completion of armored breakwater with 817 35-ton interlocking concrete armor units, Core-Locs®, in the summers of 2007, 2008 and 2010. We found a wide range of motion of individual Core-Locs, from a few centimeters to >110 cm along the ocean side of the breakwater, with lesser movement along the harbor side.

  20. A high-resolution study of mesospheric fine structure with the Jicamarca MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, R.; Kudeki, E.; Lehmacher, G.; Sarango, M.; Woodman, R.; Chau, J.; Guo, L.; Reyes, P.

    2006-07-01

    Correlation studies performed on data from recent mesospheric experiments conducted with the 50-MHz Jicamarca radar in May 2003 and July 2004 are reported. The study is based on signals detected from a combination of vertical and off-vertical beams. The nominal height resolution was 150 m and spectral estimates were obtained after ~1 min integration. Spectral widths and backscattered power generally show positive correlations at upper mesospheric heights in agreement with earlier findings (e.g., Fukao et al., 1980) that upper mesospheric echoes are dominated by isotropic Bragg scatter. In many instances in the upper mesosphere, a weakening of positive correlation away from layer centers (towards top and bottom boundaries) was observed with the aid of improved height resolution. This finding supports the idea that layer edges are dominated by anisotropic turbulence. The data also suggests that negative correlations observed at lower mesospheric heights are caused by scattering from anisotropic structures rather than reflections from sharp vertical gradients in electron density.

  1. High resolution structuring of emitter tips for the gaseous field ionization source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubby, J.A.; Siegel, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Extraction of a stable, high brightness ion beam from an apertured field ion emitter surface requires microfabrication procedures to sculpture the surface topography on both microscopic (100 --1000 nm) and near atomic (10 --100 nm) length scales. Structuring on a near atomic scale is required to confine and stabilize the ion beam by local enhancement of the surface electrostatic field and to orient that emission on the optical axis. Control of the emitter contour on a microscopic scale is required for manipulating the supply of neutral molecules to the ionization site and also affects beam stability. We have developed a method using ion milling for configuring surface contour on microscopic and near atomic length scales which utilizes the morphological changes occurring at ion bombarded surfaces as a result of erosion by sputtering. A SEM study of the microscopic emitter topographical development is compared to computer simulations of the kinematical wave equation which depicts the erosion process. In this way, prediction of configuration on a length scale large compared to the ion penetration depth has been established. TEM observations show the surface development on the length scale of ion penetration depth. Preliminary results using this microfabricated emitter in a gaseous field ion source to produce a hydrogen ion beam with high angular beam confinement are given. Requirements for surface topography that are essential to obtain stable high brightness ion beams are discussed

  2. Structural characterization and gas reactions of small metal particles by high-resolution TEM and TED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of 100 and 200 keV electron beams with amorphous alumina, titania, and aluminum nitride substrates and nanometer-size palladium particulate deposits was investigated for the two extreme cases of (1) large-area electron-beam flash-heating and (2) small-area high-intensity electron-beam irradiation. The former simulates a short-term heating effect with minimum electron irradiation exposure, the latter simulates high-dosage irradiation with minimum heating effect. All alumina and titania samples responded to the flash-heating treatment with significant recrystallization. However, the size, crystal structure, shape, and orientation of the grains depended on the type and thickness of the films and the thickness of the Pd deposit. High-dosage electron irradiation also readily crystallized the alumina substrate films but did not affect the titania films. The alumina recrystallization products were usually either all in the alpha phase, or they were a mixture of small grains in a number of low-temperature phases including gamma, delta, kappa, beta, theta-alumina. Palladium deposits reacted heavily with the alumina substrates during either treatment, but they were very little effected when supported on titania. Both treatments had the same, less prominent localized crystallization effect on aluminum nitride films.

  3. Joint inversion of high resolution S-wave velocity structure underneath North China Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Li, G.; Niu, F.

    2017-12-01

    North China basin is one of earthquake prone areas in China. Many devastating earthquakes occurred in the last century and before, such as the 1937 M7.0 Heze Earthquake in Shandong province, the 1966 M7.2 Xingtai Earthquake and 1976 Tangshan Earthquake in Hebei province. Knowing the structure of the sediment cover is of great importance to predict strong ground motion caused by earthquakes. Unconsolidated sediments are loose materials, ranging from clay to sand to gravel. Earthquakes can liquefy unconsolidated sediments, thus knowing the distribution and thickness of the unconsolidated sediments has significant implication in seismic hazard analysis of the area. Quantitative estimates of the amount of extension of the North China basin is important to understand the thinning and evolution of the eastern North China craton and the underlying mechanism. In principle, the amount of lithospheric stretching can be estimated from sediment and crustal thickness. Therefore an accurate estimate of the sediment and crustal thickness of the area is also important in understanding regional tectonics. In this study, we jointly invert the Rayleigh wave phase-velocity dispersion and Z/H ratio data to construct a 3-D S-wave velocity model beneath North China area. We use 4-year ambient noise data recorded from 249 temporary stations, and 139 earthquake events to extract Rayleigh wave Z/H ratios. The Z/H ratios obtained from ambient noise data and earthquake data show a good agreement within the overlapped periods. The phase velocity dispersion curve was estimated from the same ambient noise data. The preliminary result shows a relatively low Z/H ratio and low velocity anomaly at the shallow part of sediment basins.

  4. Automated protein structure calculation from NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Mike P.; Craven, C. Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Current software is almost at the stage to permit completely automatic structure determination of small proteins of <15 kDa, from NMR spectra to structure validation with minimal user interaction. This goal is welcome, as it makes structure calculation more objective and therefore more easily validated, without any loss in the quality of the structures generated. Moreover, it releases expert spectroscopists to carry out research that cannot be automated. It should not take much further effort to extend automation to ca 20 kDa. However, there are technological barriers to further automation, of which the biggest are identified as: routines for peak picking; adoption and sharing of a common framework for structure calculation, including the assembly of an automated and trusted package for structure validation; and sample preparation, particularly for larger proteins. These barriers should be the main target for development of methodology for protein structure determination, particularly by structural genomics consortia

  5. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1)H NMR spectroscopy of metabolic changes in rabbit lens after treatment with dexamethasone combined with UVB exposure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seather, O.; Risa, O.; Čejková, Jitka; Krane, J.; Midelfart, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 242, - (2004), s. 1000-1007 ISSN 0721-832X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/03/0419 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5008914 Keywords : HR-MAS 1H NMR Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 1.513, year: 2004

  6. Parallel computation of fluid-structural interactions using high resolution upwind schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zongjun

    An efficient and accurate solver is developed to simulate the non-linear fluid-structural interactions in turbomachinery flutter flows. A new low diffusion E-CUSP scheme, Zha CUSP scheme, is developed to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the inviscid flux computation. The 3D unsteady Navier-Stokes equations with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model are solved using the finite volume method with the dual-time stepping scheme. The linearized equations are solved with Gauss-Seidel line iterations. The parallel computation is implemented using MPI protocol. The solver is validated with 2D cases for its turbulence modeling, parallel computation and unsteady calculation. The Zha CUSP scheme is validated with 2D cases, including a supersonic flat plate boundary layer, a transonic converging-diverging nozzle and a transonic inlet diffuser. The Zha CUSP2 scheme is tested with 3D cases, including a circular-to-rectangular nozzle, a subsonic compressor cascade and a transonic channel. The Zha CUSP schemes are proved to be accurate, robust and efficient in these tests. The steady and unsteady separation flows in a 3D stationary cascade under high incidence and three inlet Mach numbers are calculated to study the steady state separation flow patterns and their unsteady oscillation characteristics. The leading edge vortex shedding is the mechanism behind the unsteady characteristics of the high incidence separated flows. The separation flow characteristics is affected by the inlet Mach number. The blade aeroelasticity of a linear cascade with forced oscillating blades is studied using parallel computation. A simplified two-passage cascade with periodic boundary condition is first calculated under a medium frequency and a low incidence. The full scale cascade with 9 blades and two end walls is then studied more extensively under three oscillation frequencies and two incidence angles. The end wall influence and the blade stability are studied and compared under different

  7. Coupling physics and biogeochemistry thanks to high-resolution observations of the phytoplankton community structure in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrec, Pierre; Grégori, Gérald; Doglioli, Andrea M.; Dugenne, Mathilde; Della Penna, Alice; Bhairy, Nagib; Cariou, Thierry; Hélias Nunige, Sandra; Lahbib, Soumaya; Rougier, Gilles; Wagener, Thibaut; Thyssen, Melilotus

    2018-03-01

    Fine-scale physical structures and ocean dynamics strongly influence and regulate biogeochemical and ecological processes. These processes are particularly challenging to describe and understand because of their ephemeral nature. The OSCAHR (Observing Submesoscale Coupling At High Resolution) campaign was conducted in fall 2015 in which a fine-scale structure (1-10 km/1-10 days) in the northwestern Mediterranean Ligurian subbasin was pre-identified using both satellite and numerical modeling data. Along the ship track, various variables were measured at the surface (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a and nutrient concentrations) with ADCP current velocity. We also deployed a new model of the CytoSense automated flow cytometer (AFCM) optimized for small and dim cells, for near real-time characterization of the surface phytoplankton community structure of surface waters with a spatial resolution of a few kilometers and an hourly temporal resolution. For the first time with this optimized version of the AFCM, we were able to fully resolve Prochlorococcus picocyanobacteria in addition to the easily distinguishable Synechococcus. The vertical physical dynamics and biogeochemical properties of the studied area were investigated by continuous high-resolution CTD profiles thanks to a moving vessel profiler (MVP) during the vessel underway associated with a high-resolution pumping system deployed during fixed stations allowing sampling of the water column at a fine resolution (below 1 m). The observed fine-scale feature presented a cyclonic structure with a relatively cold core surrounded by warmer waters. Surface waters were totally depleted in nitrate and phosphate. In addition to the doming of the isopycnals by the cyclonic circulation, an intense wind event induced Ekman pumping. The upwelled subsurface cold nutrient-rich water fertilized surface waters and was marked by an increase in Chl a concentration. Prochlorococcus and pico- and nano-eukaryotes were more

  8. Coupling physics and biogeochemistry thanks to high-resolution observations of the phytoplankton community structure in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marrec

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine-scale physical structures and ocean dynamics strongly influence and regulate biogeochemical and ecological processes. These processes are particularly challenging to describe and understand because of their ephemeral nature. The OSCAHR (Observing Submesoscale Coupling At High Resolution campaign was conducted in fall 2015 in which a fine-scale structure (1–10 km∕1–10 days in the northwestern Mediterranean Ligurian subbasin was pre-identified using both satellite and numerical modeling data. Along the ship track, various variables were measured at the surface (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a and nutrient concentrations with ADCP current velocity. We also deployed a new model of the CytoSense automated flow cytometer (AFCM optimized for small and dim cells, for near real-time characterization of the surface phytoplankton community structure of surface waters with a spatial resolution of a few kilometers and an hourly temporal resolution. For the first time with this optimized version of the AFCM, we were able to fully resolve Prochlorococcus picocyanobacteria in addition to the easily distinguishable Synechococcus. The vertical physical dynamics and biogeochemical properties of the studied area were investigated by continuous high-resolution CTD profiles thanks to a moving vessel profiler (MVP during the vessel underway associated with a high-resolution pumping system deployed during fixed stations allowing sampling of the water column at a fine resolution (below 1 m. The observed fine-scale feature presented a cyclonic structure with a relatively cold core surrounded by warmer waters. Surface waters were totally depleted in nitrate and phosphate. In addition to the doming of the isopycnals by the cyclonic circulation, an intense wind event induced Ekman pumping. The upwelled subsurface cold nutrient-rich water fertilized surface waters and was marked by an increase in Chl a concentration. Prochlorococcus and pico

  9. Structure of La2Cu2O5 by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Placa, S.J.; Bringley, J.F.; Scott, B.A.; Cox, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Dicopper(II) dilanthanum pentaoxide, La 2 Cu 2 O 5 , M r =484.90, orthorhombic, Pbam. At T=300 K: a=5.5490(1), b=10.4774(2), c=3.8796(1) A, V=225.557(8) A 3 , Z=2, D x =7.139 g cm -3 , λ=1.2000 A. Final R I =6.20, R p =14.6 and R wp =20.61%, 124 independent reflections observed. The structure has been refined from high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data using the Rietveld method. It is of the oxygen-defect perovskite type and is composed entirely of corner-shared CuO 5 square pyramids, which share oxygen vacancies forming vacancy tunnels along the c axis. The La atoms reside at a perovskite-like A-site and are tenfold coordinated by oxygen. (orig.)

  10. High-resolution structural characterization and magnetic properties of epitaxial Ce-doped yttrium iron garnet thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Vikram Singh, Amit; Rastogi, Ankur; Gazquez, Jaume; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mishra, Rohan; Gupta, Arunava

    2017-07-01

    Thin films of magnetic garnet materials, e.g. yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12, YIG), are useful for a variety of applications including microwave integrated circuits and spintronics. Substitution of rare earth ions, such as cerium, is known to enhance the magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) as compared to pure YIG. Thin films of Ce0.75Y2.25Fe5O12 (Ce:YIG) have been grown using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique and their crystal structure examined using high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Homogeneous substitution of Ce in YIG, without oxidation to form a separate CeO2 phase, can be realized in a narrow process window with resulting enhancement of the MOKE signal. The thermally generated signal due to spin Seebeck effect for the optimally doped Ce:YIG films has also been investigated.

  11. Structural evolution of a deformed Σ=9 (122) grain boundary in silicon. A high resolution electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putaux, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study by high resolution electron microscopy of the evolution of a silicon bi-crystal under deformation at different temperatures. The author notably studied the structural evolution of the boundary as well as that of grains at the vicinity of the boundary. Two observation scales have been used: the evolution of sub-structures of dislocations induced by deformation in grains and in boundary, and the structure of all defects at an atomic scale. After a presentation of experimental tools (the necessary perfect quality of the electronic optics is outlined), the author recalls some descriptive aspects of grain boundaries (geometric network concepts to describe coinciding networks, concepts of delimiting boundaries and of structural unit to describe grain boundary atomic structure), recalls the characteristics of the studied bi-crystal, and the conditions under which it is deformed. He presents the structures of all perfectly coinciding boundaries, describes defects obtained by deformation at the vicinity of the boundary, describes the entry of dissociated dislocations into the boundaries, and discusses the characterization of boundary dislocations (the notion of Burgers vector is put into question again), and the atomic mechanism of displacement of dislocations in boundaries [fr

  12. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.; Babaa, M.-R.; Bouhrara, M.; Kim, Y.; Saih, Y.; Dennler, S.; Mauri, F.; Basset, Jean-Marie; Goze-Bac, C.; Wå gberg, T.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled

  13. Edible seaweed as future functional food: Identification of α-glucosidase inhibitors by combined use of high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Wiese, Stefanie; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2016-07-15

    Crude chloroform, ethanol and acetone extracts of nineteen seaweed species were screened for their antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Samples showing more than 60% α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, at a concentration of 1 mg/ml, were furthermore investigated using high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR). The results showed Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesicolosus to be rich in antioxidants, equaling a Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity of 135 and 108 mM Troloxmg(-1) extract, respectively. HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR showed the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of A. nodosum, F. vesoculosus, Laminaria digitata, Laminaria japonica and Undaria pinnatifida to be caused by phlorotannins as well as fatty acids - with oleic acid, linoleic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid being the most potent with IC50 values of 0.069, 0.075 and 0.10 mM, respectively, and showing a mixed-type inhibition mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification and accurate quantification of structurally related peptide impurities in synthetic human C-peptide by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Josephs, Ralf D; Daireaux, Adeline; Choteau, Tiphaine; Westwood, Steven; Wielgosz, Robert I; Li, Hongmei

    2018-06-04

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of biomarkers and pharmaceuticals. The accurate purity characterization of peptide calibrators is critical for the development of reference measurement systems for laboratory medicine and quality control of pharmaceuticals. The peptides used for these purposes are increasingly produced through peptide synthesis. Various approaches (for example mass balance, amino acid analysis, qNMR, and nitrogen determination) can be applied to accurately value assign the purity of peptide calibrators. However, all purity assessment approaches require a correction for structurally related peptide impurities in order to avoid biases. Liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-hrMS) has become the key technique for the identification and accurate quantification of structurally related peptide impurities in intact peptide calibrator materials. In this study, LC-hrMS-based methods were developed and validated in-house for the identification and quantification of structurally related peptide impurities in a synthetic human C-peptide (hCP) material, which served as a study material for an international comparison looking at the competencies of laboratories to perform peptide purity mass fraction assignments. More than 65 impurities were identified, confirmed, and accurately quantified by using LC-hrMS. The total mass fraction of all structurally related peptide impurities in the hCP study material was estimated to be 83.3 mg/g with an associated expanded uncertainty of 3.0 mg/g (k = 2). The calibration hierarchy concept used for the quantification of individual impurities is described in detail. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  15. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Sekii, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  16. High-resolution 3-D S-wave Tomography of upper crust structures in Yilan Plain from Ambient Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai-Xun; Chen, Po-Fei; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chen, Li-Wei; Gung, YuanCheng

    2015-04-01

    The Yilan Plain (YP) in NE Taiwan locates on the western YP of the Okinawa Trough and displays high geothermal gradients with abundant hot springs, likely resulting from magmatism associated with the back-arc spreading as attested by the offshore volcanic island (Kueishantao). YP features NS distinctive characteristics that the South YP exhibits thin top sedimentary layer, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements, relative those of the northern counterpart. A dense network (~2.5 km station interval) of 89 Texan instruments was deployed in Aug. 2014, covering most of the YP and its vicinity. The ray path coverage density of each 0.015 degree cells are greater than 150 km that could provide the robustness assessment of tomographic results. We analyze ambient noise signals to invert a high-resolution 3D S-wave model for shallow velocity structures in and around YP. The aim is to investigate the velocity anomalies corresponding to geothermal resources and the NS geological distinctions aforementioned. We apply the Welch's method to generate empirical Rayleigh wave Green's functions between two stations records of continuous vertical components. The group velocities of thus derived functions are then obtained by the multiple-filter analysis technique measured at the frequency range between 0.25 and 1 Hz. Finally, we implement a wavelet-based multi-scale parameterization technique to construct 3D model of S-wave velocity. Our first month results exhibit low velocity in the plain, corresponding existing sediments, those of whole YP show low velocity offshore YP and those of high-resolution south YP reveal stark velocity contrast across the Sanshin fault. Key words: ambient seismic noises, Welch's method, S-wave, Yilan Plain

  17. Aluminum siting in silicon-rich zeolite frameworks: A combined high-resolution Al-27 NMR spectroscopy and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of ZSM-5

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenák, Štěpán; Dědeček, Jiří; Li, Chengbin; Wichterlová, Blanka; Gábová, Vendula; Sierka, M.; Sauer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 38 (2007), s. 7286-7289 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400400413; GA ČR GA203/06/1449; GA AV ČR IAA4040308 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : MQ MAS NMR * chemical-shifts * ab-initio * catalysts Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 10.031, year: 2007

  18. Structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films on yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates, studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Robert, E-mail: bobsinc@stanford.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lee, Sang Chul, E-mail: sclee99@stanford.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Shi, Yezhou; Chueh, William C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    We have applied aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to study the structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films, grown by pulsed laser deposition onto (001) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. There are few observable defects apart from the expected mismatch interfacial dislocations and so the films would be expected to have good potential for applications. Under high electron beam dose rate (above about 6000 e{sup -}/Å{sup 2}s) domains of an ordered structure appear and these are interpreted as being created by oxygen vacancy ordering. The ordered structure does not appear at lower lose rates (ca. 2600 e{sup -}/Å{sup 2}s) and can be removed by imaging under 1 mbar oxygen gas in an environmental TEM. EELS confirms that there is both oxygen deficiency and the associated increase in Ce{sup 3+} versus Ce{sup 4+} cations in the ordered domains. In situ high resolution TEM recordings show the formation of the ordered domains as well as atomic migration along the ceria thin film (001) surface. - Highlights: • The local structure and chemistry of ceria can be studied by TEM combined with EELS. • At lower electron, there are no observable changes in the ceria thin films. • At higher dose rates, an ordered phase is created due to oxygen vacancy ordering. • In situ HRTEM shows the oxygen vacancy ordering and the movement of surface atoms.

  19. High-Resolution Mapping of Chromatin Conformation in Cardiac Myocytes Reveals Structural Remodeling of the Epigenome in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Chapski, Douglas J; Schmitt, Anthony D; Kimball, Todd H; Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Balderas, Enrique; Pellegrini, Matteo; Shih, Tsai-Ting; Soehalim, Elizabeth; Liem, David; Ping, Peipei; Galjart, Niels J; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Ren, Bing; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2017-10-24

    Cardiovascular disease is associated with epigenomic changes in the heart; however, the endogenous structure of cardiac myocyte chromatin has never been determined. To investigate the mechanisms of epigenomic function in the heart, genome-wide chromatin conformation capture (Hi-C) and DNA sequencing were performed in adult cardiac myocytes following development of pressure overload-induced hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac-specific deletion of CTCF (a ubiquitous chromatin structural protein) were generated to explore the role of this protein in chromatin structure and cardiac phenotype. Transcriptome analyses by RNA-seq were conducted as a functional readout of the epigenomic structural changes. Depletion of CTCF was sufficient to induce heart failure in mice, and human patients with heart failure receiving mechanical unloading via left ventricular assist devices show increased CTCF abundance. Chromatin structural analyses revealed interactions within the cardiac myocyte genome at 5-kb resolution, enabling examination of intra- and interchromosomal events, and providing a resource for future cardiac epigenomic investigations. Pressure overload or CTCF depletion selectively altered boundary strength between topologically associating domains and A/B compartmentalization, measurements of genome accessibility. Heart failure involved decreased stability of chromatin interactions around disease-causing genes. In addition, pressure overload or CTCF depletion remodeled long-range interactions of cardiac enhancers, resulting in a significant decrease in local chromatin interactions around these functional elements. These findings provide a high-resolution chromatin architecture resource for cardiac epigenomic investigations and demonstrate that global structural remodeling of chromatin underpins heart failure. The newly identified principles of endogenous chromatin structure have key implications for epigenetic therapy. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. Oxidative stress-induced metabolic changes in mouse C2C12 myotubes studied with high-resolution 13C, 1H, and 31P NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straadt, Ida K; Young, Jette F; Petersen, Bent O

    2010-01-01

    In this study, stress in relation to slaughter was investigated in a model system by the use of (13)C, (1)H, and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for elucidating changes in the metabolites in C2C12 myotubes exposed to H(2)O(2)-induced stress. Oxidative stress resulted in lower...... to lower levels of the unlabeled ((12)C) lactate were identified in the (1)H spectra after stress exposure. These data indicate an increase in de novo synthesis of alanine, concomitant with a release of lactate from the myotubes to the medium at oxidative stress conditions. The changes in the metabolite...

  1. Structural studies of SpoIIAA using NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comfort, D.M

    1998-07-01

    The protein SpoIIAA participates, via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, in the four-component system that regulates the sporulation sigma factor e. Differential gene expression depends on specialised transcription factors called sigma factors, which direct the RNA polymerase to transcribe specific genes in one or other of the two chambers at various stages of sporulation. The first sporulation-specific sigma factor to be activated is 4 transcription that depends on {sigma}{sup F} is essential for the remaining sigma factors to become active in turn. Early in sporulation SpoIIAA is in the phosphorylated state (SpoIIAA-P), as a result of the activity of the ATP-dependent protein kinase, SpoIIAB. About 80 minutes after the initiation of sporulation a specific phosphatase, SpoIIE, begins to hydrolyse SpoIIAA-P, and the resulting SpoIIAA again becomes a substrate for SpoIIAB. SpoIIAB is also an anti-sigma factor which in its free form inhibits a F by binding to it. Competition by SpoIIAA (the anti-anti-sigma factor) for binding to SpoIIAB releases e activity. The three-dimensional structure of SpoIIAA has been determined using high resolution NMR. SpoIIAA has a novel fold, composed of a-helices and P-strand elements. The structural differences between SpoIIAA and its inactive form, SpoIIAA-P, were also investigated by NMR. Tentative evidence points to the observation that phosphorylation of SpoIIAA results in a minor conformational change near the site of phosphorylation, which interferes with the hydrophobic interaction between SpoIIAA and SpoIIAB. Further NMR studies helped to predict the location of SpoIIAA-, GTP-, and ATP-binding sites on the SpoIIAA structure. In addition, the automated iterative NOE assignment algorithm, ARIA, was used to obtain additional NOE-based distance constraints and to calculate a refined structure. (author)

  2. Changes in structural lung disease in cystic fibrosis children over 4 years as evaluated by high-resolution computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpio, Carlos; Alvarez-Sala, Rodolfo; Prados, Concepcion [University Hospital La Paz, La Paz Hospital Research Institute, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Albi, Gustavo [Nino de Jesus Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madrid (Spain); Rayon-Aledo, Jose Carlos; Caballero, Paloma [University Hospital La Princesa, Department of Radiology, Madrid (Spain); Giron, Rosa [University Hospital La Princesa, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    To compare the worsening of structural lung disease on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with changes in spirometry results in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and analyse factors associated with the worsening of structural lung disease over time. A total of 31 CF subjects (mean age 11.03 ± 3.67 years old) were prospectively evaluated by two HRCT and spirometry tests performed 4 years apart. HRCT abnormalities were scored using the Bhalla scoring system. Comparisons between changes on HRCT and spirometry were made for all patients, and also for groups categorized by age, sex, genotypic alterations and lung obstruction. The mean HRCT Bhalla scoring, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1} %pred.) and forced vital capacity (FVC %pred.) were 7.92 ± 3.59, 87.76 ± 20.52 and 96.54 ± 15.12, respectively. There was a significant deterioration in the Bhalla score (p < 0.01) and in certain categories: severity of bronchiectasis, peribronchial thickening, mucous plugging and bronchial divisions. Females had a more pronounced worsening of the Bhalla score than males (p = 0.048). No change over time was found in FEV{sub 1} and FVC. Only sex was associated with a deterioration in HRCT. HRCT Bhalla scoring changes statistically significantly over 4 years, but spirometry results do not. Worsening on HRCT is more evident in females. (orig.)

  3. Changes in structural lung disease in cystic fibrosis children over 4 years as evaluated by high-resolution computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpio, Carlos; Alvarez-Sala, Rodolfo; Prados, Concepcion; Albi, Gustavo; Rayon-Aledo, Jose Carlos; Caballero, Paloma; Giron, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    To compare the worsening of structural lung disease on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with changes in spirometry results in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and analyse factors associated with the worsening of structural lung disease over time. A total of 31 CF subjects (mean age 11.03 ± 3.67 years old) were prospectively evaluated by two HRCT and spirometry tests performed 4 years apart. HRCT abnormalities were scored using the Bhalla scoring system. Comparisons between changes on HRCT and spirometry were made for all patients, and also for groups categorized by age, sex, genotypic alterations and lung obstruction. The mean HRCT Bhalla scoring, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 %pred.) and forced vital capacity (FVC %pred.) were 7.92 ± 3.59, 87.76 ± 20.52 and 96.54 ± 15.12, respectively. There was a significant deterioration in the Bhalla score (p < 0.01) and in certain categories: severity of bronchiectasis, peribronchial thickening, mucous plugging and bronchial divisions. Females had a more pronounced worsening of the Bhalla score than males (p = 0.048). No change over time was found in FEV 1 and FVC. Only sex was associated with a deterioration in HRCT. HRCT Bhalla scoring changes statistically significantly over 4 years, but spirometry results do not. Worsening on HRCT is more evident in females. (orig.)

  4. High resolution bone material property assignment yields robust subject specific finite element models of complex thin bone structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdel, Amirreza; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Whyne, Cari M

    2016-06-14

    Accurate finite element (FE) modeling of complex skeletal anatomy requires high resolution in both meshing and the heterogeneous mapping of material properties onto the generated mesh. This study introduces Node-based elastic Modulus Assignment with Partial-volume correction (NMAP) as a new approach for FE material property assignment to thin bone structures. The NMAP approach incorporates point spread function based deblurring of CT images, partial-volume correction of CT image voxel intensities and anisotropic interpolation and mapping of CT intensity assignment to FE mesh nodes. The NMAP procedure combined with a derived craniomaxillo-facial skeleton (CMFS) specific density-isotropic elastic modulus relationship was applied to produce specimen-specific FE models of 6 cadaveric heads. The NMAP procedure successfully generated models of the complex thin bone structures with surface elastic moduli reflective of cortical bone material properties. The specimen-specific CMFS FE models were able to accurately predict experimental strains measured under in vitro temporalis and masseter muscle loading (r=0.93, slope=1.01, n=5). The strength of this correlation represents a robust validation for CMFS FE modeling that can be used to better understand load transfer in this complex musculoskeletal system. The developed methodology offers a systematic process-flow able to address the complexity of the CMFS that can be further applied to create high-fidelity models of any musculoskeletal anatomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High-resolution crystal structures of Drosophila melanogaster angiotensin-converting enzyme in complex with novel inhibitors and antihypertensive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akif, Mohd; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Mahajan, Aman; Dive, Vincent; Sturrock, Edward D; Isaac, R Elwyn; Acharya, K Ravi

    2010-07-16

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE), one of the central components of the renin-angiotensin system, is a key therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders. Human somatic ACE (sACE) has two homologous domains (N and C). The N- and C-domain catalytic sites have different activities toward various substrates. Moreover, some of the undesirable side effects of the currently available and widely used ACE inhibitors may arise from their targeting both domains leading to defects in other pathways. In addition, structural studies have shown that although both these domains have much in common at the inhibitor binding site, there are significant differences and these are greater at the peptide binding sites than regions distal to the active site. As a model system, we have used an ACE homologue from Drosophila melanogaster (AnCE, a single domain protein with ACE activity) to study ACE inhibitor binding. In an extensive study, we present high-resolution structures for native AnCE and in complex with six known antihypertensive drugs, a novel C-domain sACE specific inhibitor, lisW-S, and two sACE domain-specific phosphinic peptidyl inhibitors, RXPA380 and RXP407 (i.e., nine structures). These structures show detailed binding features of the inhibitors and highlight subtle changes in the orientation of side chains at different binding pockets in the active site in comparison with the active site of N- and C-domains of sACE. This study provides information about the structure-activity relationships that could be utilized for designing new inhibitors with improved domain selectivity for sACE. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of high-resolution satellite images for detection of geological structures related to Central Andes geothermal field, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides-Rivas, C. L.; Soto-Pinto, C. A.; Arellano-Baeza, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Central valley and the border with Argentina in the center, and in the fault system Liquiñe-Ofqui in the South of the country. High resolution images from the LANDSAT 8 satellite have been used to delineate the geological structures related to the potential geothermal reservoirs located at the northern end of the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile. It was done by applying the lineament extraction technique, using the ADALGEO software, developed by [Soto et al., 2013]. These structures have been compared with the distribution of main geological structures obtained in the field. It was found that the lineament density increases in the areas of the major heat flux indicating that the lineament analysis could be a power tool for the detection of faults and joint zones associated to the geothermal fields. A lineament is generally defined as a straight or slightly curved feature in the landscape visible satellite image as an aligned sequence of pixel intensity contrast compared to the background. The system features extracted from satellite images is not identical to the geological lineaments that are generally determined by ground surveys, however, generally reflects the structure of faults and fractures in the crust. A temporal sequence of eight Landsat multispectral images of Central Andes geothermal field, located in VI region de Chile, was used to study changes in the configuration of the lineaments during 2011. The presence of minerals with silicification, epidotization, and albitization, which are typical for geothrmal reservoirs, was also identified, using their spectral characteristics, and subsequently corroborated in the field. Both lineament analysis and spectral analysis gave similar location of the reservoir, which increases reliability of the results.

  7. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV for High-Resolution Reconstruction of Topography: The Structure from Motion Approach on Coastal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mancini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The availability of high-resolution Digital Surface Models of coastal environments is of increasing interest for scientists involved in the study of the coastal system processes. Among the range of terrestrial and aerial methods available to produce such a dataset, this study tests the utility of the Structure from Motion (SfM approach to low-altitude aerial imageries collected by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV. The SfM image-based approach was selected whilst searching for a rapid, inexpensive, and highly automated method, able to produce 3D information from unstructured aerial images. In particular, it was used to generate a dense point cloud and successively a high-resolution Digital Surface Models (DSM of a beach dune system in Marina di Ravenna (Italy. The quality of the elevation dataset produced by the UAV-SfM was initially evaluated by comparison with point cloud generated by a Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS surveys. Such a comparison served to highlight an average difference in the vertical values of 0.05 m (RMS = 0.19 m. However, although the points cloud comparison is the best approach to investigate the absolute or relative correspondence between UAV and TLS methods, the assessment of geomorphic features is usually based on multi-temporal surfaces analysis, where an interpolation process is required. DSMs were therefore generated from UAV and TLS points clouds and vertical absolute accuracies assessed by comparison with a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS survey. The vertical comparison of UAV and TLS DSMs with respect to GNSS measurements pointed out an average distance at cm-level (RMS = 0.011 m. The successive point by point direct comparison between UAV and TLS elevations show a very small average distance, 0.015 m, with RMS = 0.220 m. Larger values are encountered in areas where sudden changes in topography are present. The UAV-based approach was demonstrated to be a straightforward one and accuracy of the vertical dataset

  8. High-Resolution Inkjet-Printed Oxide Thin-Film Transistors with a Self-Aligned Fine Channel Bank Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Shao, Shuangshuang; Chen, Zheng; Pecunia, Vincenzo; Xia, Kai; Zhao, Jianwen; Cui, Zheng

    2018-05-09

    A self-aligned inkjet printing process has been developed to construct small channel metal oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with independent bottom gates on transparent glass substrates. Poly(methylsilsesquioxane) was used to pattern hydrophobic banks on the transparent substrate instead of commonly used self-assembled octadecyltrichlorosilane. Photolithographic exposure from backside using bottom-gate electrodes as mask formed hydrophilic channel areas for the TFTs. IGZO ink was selectively deposited by an inkjet printer in the hydrophilic channel region and confined by the hydrophobic bank structure, resulting in the precise deposition of semiconductor layers just above the gate electrodes. Inkjet-printed IGZO TFTs with independent gate electrodes of 10 μm width have been demonstrated, avoiding completely printed channel beyond the broad of the gate electrodes. The TFTs showed on/off ratios of 10 8 , maximum mobility of 3.3 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , negligible hysteresis, and good uniformity. This method is conductive to minimizing the area of printed TFTs so as to the development of high-resolution printing displays.

  9. High-Resolution Tracking Asymmetric Lithium Insertion and Extraction and Local Structure Ordering in SnS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yu-Yang; Huang, Yuan; Liao, Lei; Sutter, Peter; Liu, Kaihui; Yu, Dapeng; Wang, En-Ge

    2016-09-14

    In the rechargeable lithium ion batteries, the rate capability and energy efficiency are largely governed by the lithium ion transport dynamics and phase transition pathways in electrodes. Real-time and atomic-scale tracking of fully reversible lithium insertion and extraction processes in electrodes, which would ultimately lead to mechanistic understanding of how the electrodes function and why they fail, is highly desirable but very challenging. Here, we track lithium insertion and extraction in the van der Waals interactions dominated SnS2 by in situ high-resolution TEM method. We find that the lithium insertion occurs via a fast two-phase reaction to form expanded and defective LiSnS2, while the lithium extraction initially involves heterogeneous nucleation of intermediate superstructure Li0.5SnS2 domains with a 1-4 nm size. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the Li0.5SnS2 is kinetically favored and structurally stable. The asymmetric reaction pathways may supply enlightening insights into the mechanistic understanding of the underlying electrochemistry in the layered electrode materials and also suggest possible alternatives to the accepted explanation of the origins of voltage hysteresis in the intercalation electrode materials.

  10. Mapping Urban Tree Canopy Coverage and Structure using Data Fusion of High Resolution Satellite Imagery and Aerial Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, A.; Rogan, J.; Williams, C. A.; Martin, D. G.; Ratick, S.; Nowak, D.

    2015-12-01

    Urban tree canopy (UTC) coverage is a critical component of sustainable urban areas. Trees provide a number of important ecosystem services, including air pollution mitigation, water runoff control, and aesthetic and cultural values. Critically, urban trees also act to mitigate the urban heat island (UHI) effect by shading impervious surfaces and via evaporative cooling. The cooling effect of urban trees can be seen locally, with individual trees reducing home HVAC costs, and at a citywide scale, reducing the extent and magnitude of an urban areas UHI. In order to accurately model the ecosystem services of a given urban forest, it is essential to map in detail the condition and composition of these trees at a fine scale, capturing individual tree crowns and their vertical structure. This paper presents methods for delineating UTC and measuring canopy structure at fine spatial resolution (body of methods, relying on a data fusion method to combine the information contained in high resolution WorldView-3 satellite imagery and aerial lidar data using an object-based image classification approach. The study area, Worcester, MA, has recently undergone a large-scale tree removal and reforestation program, following a pest eradication effort. Therefore, the urban canopy in this location provides a wide mix of tree age class and functional type, ideal for illustrating the effectiveness of the proposed methods. Early results show that the object-based classifier is indeed capable of identifying individual tree crowns, while continued research will focus on extracting crown structural characteristics using lidar-derived metrics. Ultimately, the resulting fine resolution UTC map will be compared with previously created UTC maps of the same area but for earlier dates, producing a canopy change map corresponding to the Worcester area tree removal and replanting effort.

  11. High-resolution magic angle spinning 1H-NMR spectroscopy studies on the renal biochemistry in the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) and the effects of arsenic (As3+) toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, J L; Walker, L; Shore, R F; Nicholson, J K

    2001-06-01

    1. High-resolution magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H-NMR spectroscopy was used to study renal metabolism and the toxicity of As3+, a common environmental contaminant, in the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus), a wild species of rodent. 2. Following a 14-day exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of As2O3 (28 mg kg(-1) feed), voles displayed tissue damage at autopsy. MAS 1H spectra indicated abnormal lipid profiles in these samples. 3. Tissue necrosis was also evident from measurements of the apparent diffusion coefficient of water in the intact tissue using MAS 1H diffusion-weighted spectroscopy, its first application to toxicology. 4. Comparison of renal tissue from the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) exposed to identical exposure levels of As3+ suggested that the bank vole is particularly vulnerable to As3+ toxicity.

  12. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Richard [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Software Engineering (China); Wang, Yan [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Life Science and Technology (China); Xue, Zhidong, E-mail: zdxue@hust.edu.cn [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Software Engineering (China); Zhang, Yang, E-mail: zhng@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics (United States)

    2015-08-15

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement.

  13. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemak, Alexander; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy; Farès, Christophe; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution – especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  14. Demonstrating the Uneven Importance of Fine-Scale Forest Structure on Snow Distributions using High Resolution Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxton, P. D.; Harpold, A. A.; van Leeuwen, W.; Biederman, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying the amount of snow in forested mountainous environments, as well as how it may change due to warming and forest disturbance, is critical given its importance for water supply and ecosystem health. Forest canopies affect snow accumulation and ablation in ways that are difficult to observe and model. Furthermore, fine-scale forest structure can accentuate or diminish the effects of forest-snow interactions. Despite decades of research demonstrating the importance of fine-scale forest structure (e.g. canopy edges and gaps) on snow, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of where and when forest structure has the largest impact on snowpack mass and energy budgets. Here, we use a hyper-resolution (1 meter spatial resolution) mass and energy balance snow model called the Snow Physics and Laser Mapping (SnowPALM) model along with LIDAR-derived forest structure to determine where spatial variability of fine-scale forest structure has the largest influence on large scale mass and energy budgets. SnowPALM was set up and calibrated at sites representing diverse climates in New Mexico, Arizona, and California. Then, we compared simulations at different model resolutions (i.e. 1, 10, and 100 m) to elucidate the effects of including versus not including information about fine scale canopy structure. These experiments were repeated for different prescribed topographies (i.e. flat, 30% slope north, and south-facing) at each site. Higher resolution simulations had more snow at lower canopy cover, with the opposite being true at high canopy cover. Furthermore, there is considerable scatter, indicating that different canopy arrangements can lead to different amounts of snow, even when the overall canopy coverage is the same. This modeling is contributing to the development of a high resolution machine learning algorithm called the Snow Water Artificial Network (SWANN) model to generate predictions of snow distributions over much larger domains, which has implications

  15. Identification of PTP1B and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Serrulatanes from Eremophila spp. by Combined use of Dual High-Resolution PTP1B and α-Glucosidase Inhibition Profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubshet, Sileshi G; Tahtah, Yousof; Heskes, Allison M; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Pateraki, Irini; Hamberger, Björn; Møller, Birger L; Staerk, Dan

    2016-04-22

    According to the International Diabetes Federation, type 2 diabetes (T2D) has reached epidemic proportions, affecting more than 382 million people worldwide. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) and α-glucosidase is a recognized therapeutic approach for management of T2D and its associated complications. The lack of clinical drugs targeting PTP1B and side effects of the existing α-glucosidase drugs, emphasize the need for new drug leads for these T2D targets. In the present work, dual high-resolution PTP1B and α-glucosidase inhibition profiles of Eremophila gibbosa, E. glabra, and E. aff. drummondii "Kalgoorlie" were used for pinpointing α-glucosidase and/or PTP1B inhibitory constituents directly from the crude extracts. A subsequent targeted high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR) analysis and preparative-scale HPLC isolation led to identification of 21 metabolites from the three species, of which 16 were serrulatane-type diterpenoids (12 new) associated with either α-glucosidase and/or PTP1B inhibition. This is the first report of serrulatane-type diterpenoids as potential α-glucosidase and/or PTP1B inhibitors.

  16. Ultra high-resolution gene centric genomic structural analysis of a non-syndromic congenital heart defect, Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas C Bittel

    Full Text Available Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF is one of the most common severe congenital heart malformations. Great progress has been made in identifying key genes that regulate heart development, yet approximately 70% of TOF cases are sporadic and nonsyndromic with no known genetic cause. We created an ultra high-resolution gene centric comparative genomic hybridization (gcCGH microarray based on 591 genes with a validated association with cardiovascular development or function. We used our gcCGH array to analyze the genomic structure of 34 infants with sporadic TOF without a deletion on chromosome 22q11.2 (n male = 20; n female = 14; age range of 2 to 10 months. Using our custom-made gcCGH microarray platform, we identified a total of 613 copy number variations (CNVs ranging in size from 78 base pairs to 19.5 Mb. We identified 16 subjects with 33 CNVs that contained 13 different genes which are known to be directly associated with heart development. Additionally, there were 79 genes from the broader list of genes that were partially or completely contained in a CNV. All 34 individuals examined had at least one CNV involving these 79 genes. Furthermore, we had available whole genome exon arrays from right ventricular tissue in 13 of our subjects. We analyzed these for correlations between copy number and gene expression level. Surprisingly, we could detect only one clear association between CNVs and expression (GSTT1 for any of the 591 focal genes on the gcCGH array. The expression levels of GSTT1 were correlated with copy number in all cases examined (r = 0.95, p = 0.001. We identified a large number of small CNVs in genes with varying associations with heart development. Our results illustrate the complexity of human genome structural variation and underscore the need for multifactorial assessment of potential genetic/genomic factors that contribute to congenital heart defects.

  17. Structural characterizaiton and gas reactions of small metal particles by high-resolution, in-situ TEM and TED

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The existing in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) facility was improved by adding a separately pumped mini-specimen chamber. The chamber contains wire-evaporation sources for three metals and a specimen heater for moderate substrate temperatures. A sample introduction device was constructed, installed, and tested, facilitating rapid introduction of a specimen into the mini-chamber while maintaining the background pressure in that chamber in the 10(-9) millibar range. Small particles and clusters of Pd, grown by deposition from the vapor phase in an in-situ TEM facility on amorphous and crystalline support films of alumina and on ultra-thin carbon films, were analyzed by conventional high-resolution TEM and image analysis in terms of detectability, number density, and size distribution. The smallest particles that could be detected and counted contained no more than 6 atoms; size determinations could be made for particles 1 nm in diameter. The influence of various oxygen plasma treatments, annealing treatments, and of increasing the substrate temperature during deposition was investigated. The TEM technique was employed to demonstrate that under otherwise identica l conditions the lattice parameter of Pd particles in the 1 to 2 nm size range and supported in random orientation on ex-situ prepared mica films is expanded by some 3% when compared to 5 nm size particles. It is believed that this expansion is neither a small-particle diffraction effect nor due to pseudomorphism, but that it is due to a annealing-induced transformation of the small as-deposited particles with predominantly composite crystal structures into larger particles with true f.c.c. structure and thus inherently smaller lattice parameter.

  18. High resolution structure of the ba3 cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus in a lipidic environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Tiefenbrunn

    Full Text Available The fundamental chemistry underpinning aerobic life on Earth involves reduction of dioxygen to water with concomitant proton translocation. This process is catalyzed by members of the heme-copper oxidase (HCO superfamily. Despite the availability of crystal structures for all types of HCO, the mode of action for this enzyme is not understood at the atomic level, namely how vectorial H(+ and e(- transport are coupled. Toward addressing this problem, we report wild type and A120F mutant structures of the ba(3-type cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus at 1.8 Å resolution. The enzyme has been crystallized from the lipidic cubic phase, which mimics the biological membrane environment. The structures reveal 20 ordered lipid molecules that occupy binding sites on the protein surface or mediate crystal packing interfaces. The interior of the protein encloses 53 water molecules, including 3 trapped in the designated K-path of proton transfer and 8 in a cluster seen also in A-type enzymes that likely functions in egress of product water and proton translocation. The hydrophobic O(2-uptake channel, connecting the active site to the lipid bilayer, contains a single water molecule nearest the Cu(B atom but otherwise exhibits no residual electron density. The active site contains strong electron density for a pair of bonded atoms bridging the heme Fe(a3 and Cu(B atoms that is best modeled as peroxide. The structure of ba(3-oxidase reveals new information about the positioning of the enzyme within the membrane and the nature of its interactions with lipid molecules. The atomic resolution details provide insight into the mechanisms of electron transfer, oxygen diffusion into the active site, reduction of oxygen to water, and pumping of protons across the membrane. The development of a robust system for production of ba(3-oxidase crystals diffracting to high resolution, together with an established expression system for generating mutants, opens the

  19. Metabolic fingerprinting of joint tissue of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat: In vitro, high resolution NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Niraj Kumar; Sharma, Shikha; Sharma, Rajkumar; Sinha, Neeraj; Mandal, Sudhir Kumar; Sharma, Deepak

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose major characteristics persistent joint inflammation that results in joint destruction and failure of the function. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat is an autoimmune disease model and in many ways shares features with RA. The CIA is associated with systemic manifestations, including alterations in the metabolism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolomics has been successfully applied to the perchloric acid extract of the joint tissue of CIA rat and control rat for the analysis of aqueous metabolites. GPC (Glycerophosphocholine), carnitine, acetate, and creatinine were important discriminators of CIA rats as compared to control rats. Level of lactate (significance; p = 0.004), alanine (p = 0.025), BCA (Branched-chain amino acids) (p = 0.006) and creatinine (p = 0.023) was significantly higher in CIA rats as compared to control rats. Choline (p = 0.038) and GPC (p = 0.009) were significantly reduced in CIA rats as compared to control rats. Choline to GPC correlation was good and negative (Pearson correlation = -0.63) for CIA rats as well as for control rats (Pearson correlation = -0.79). All these analyses collectively considered as metabolic fingerprinting of the joint tissue of CIA rat as compared to control rat. The metabolic fingerprinting of joint tissue of CIA rats was different as compared to control rats. The metabolic fingerprinting reflects inflammatory disease activity in CIA rats with synovitis, demonstrating that underlying inflammatory process drives significant changes in metabolism that can be measured in the joint tissue. Therefore, the outcome of this study may be helpful for understanding the mechanism of metabolic processes in RA. This may be also helpful for the development of advanced diagnostic methods and therapy for RA.

  20. Isolation of dissolved organic matter from permafrost soil and freshwater environments of the Kolyma River basin, east Siberia, for high resolution structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinenkov, I. V.; Perminova, I. V.; Bulygina, E. B.; Holmes, R. M.; Davydov, S.; Mann, P. J.; Vonk, J.; Zimov, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic and Subarctic ecosystems are known to be the most vulnerable with respect to climate change. Hence, research on carbon cycling in the Arctic region is very important for understanding the current climatic trends and their consequences. The Kolyma River watershed is one of the Arctic Ocean’s largest. It is dominated by continuous permafrost which is underlain with rich organic soils susceptible to increased fluvial transport. The thaw of permafrost enhanced due to global warming might provide additional large source of organic carbon to the Kolyma River and to the Arctic Ocean as a whole. For estimating the contribution of this source to the total pool of organic carbon, specific structural features of permafrost dissolved organic matter (DOM) as opposed to the waterborne DOM of the Kolyma River should be identified and monitored. The objective of this work was to isolate a representive set of the DOM samples from permafrost soil and freshwater environments of the Kolyma River basin suitable for further structural analysis using high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectroscopy (FTICR-MS) and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The isolation protocol of DOM used in this study has been developed by Dittmar et al, 2008 for sampling marine DOM for NMR studies. It is based on the solid phase extraction of DOM from seawater using PPL Varian Bond Elute cartridges Those cartridges were shown to possess the highest efficiency in DOM isolation from marine water. Prior to discharge through the cartridge, a water sample was filtered through 0.45 μm filter for separation of particulate matter and acidified to pH 2 using HCl. About 50mg of DOM could be sequestered from aqueous phase using one cartridge. Sorption extent was monitored by measurements of DOC concentration and UV-vis spectra at the inlet and outlet of the cartridge. It was determined that from 60 to 65% of the total DOC could be extracted from the tested samples of freshwater. As a result

  1. Comparison of multiple crystal structures with NMR data for engrailed homeodomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Religa, Tomasz L. [MRC Centre for Protein Engineering (United Kingdom)], E-mail: tlr25@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk

    2008-03-15

    Two methods are currently available to solve high resolution protein structures-X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Both methods usually produce highly similar structures, but small differences between both solutions are always observed. Here the raw NMR data as well as the solved NMR structure were compared to the multiple crystal structures solved for the WT 60 residue three helix bundle engrailed homeodomain (EnHD) and single point mutants. There was excellent agreement between TALOS-predicted and crystal structure-observed dihedral angles and a good agreement for the {sup 3}J(H{sup N}H{sup {alpha}}) couplings for the multiple crystal structures. Around 1% of NOEs were violated for any crystal structure, but no NOE was inconsistent with all of the crystal structures. Violations usually occurred for surface residues or for residues for which multiple discreet conformations were observed between the crystal structures. Comparison of the disorder shown in the multiple crystal structures shows little correlation with dynamics under native conditions for this protein.

  2. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform 13 C, 15 N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific 13 C and 15 N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions

  3. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  4. Ultra-high resolution X-ray structures of two forms of human recombinant insulin at 100 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisgarten, David R; Palmer, Rex A; Lobley, Carina M C; Naylor, Claire E; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Al-Kurdi, Zakieh I; Badwan, Adnan A; Howlin, Brendan J; Gibbons, Nicholas C J; Saldanha, José W; Lisgarten, John N; Basak, Ajit K

    2017-08-01

    with the Insugen (I) structure. In the Intergen (II) structure there is no solvated propanol or acetate molecule. The electron density of Intergen (II), however, does also exhibit the three types of amino acid representations as in Insugen (I). These effects do not necessarily correspond between chains A and C or chains B and D in Intergen (II), or between corresponding residues in Insugen (I). The results of this comparison are reported. Graphical abstract Conformations of PheB25 and PheD25 in three insulin structures: implications for biological activity? Insulin residues PheB25 and PheD25 are considered to be important for insulin receptor binding and changes in biological activity occur when these residues are modified. In porcine insulin and Intergen (II) PheB25 adopts conformation B and PheD25 conformation D. However, unexpectedly PheB25 in Insugen (I) human recombinant insulin adopts two distinct conformations corresponding to B and D, Figure 1 and PheD25 adopts a single conformation corresponding to B not D, Figure 2. Conformations of this residue in the ultra-high resolution structure of Insugen (I) are therefore unique within this set. Figures were produced with Biovia, Discovery Studio 2016.

  5. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey over the Yucatan Peninsula - Implications for Chicxulub Impact, Secondary Craters and Regional Crustal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Lopez-Loera, H.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.

    2011-12-01

    We present the initial results of a low-altitude high-resolution aeromagnetic study over the Yucatan peninsula. Area surveyed extends from 86W to 91W and 18N to 21N, covering the peninsula and adjacent continental margin of Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. Aeromagnetic surveys are integrated into a regional map, and regional and residual anomalies are separated using spectral and least-squares methods. For the study, aeromagnetic field was reduced to the pole and several data filtering techniques were used, including first and second vertical derivatives, analytical signal, and upward and downward analytical continuations. The region is characterized by large amplitude broad elongated magnetic anomalies oriented north-south in the northern sector of the continental shelf, and northwest-southeast and northeast-southwest over the western and eastern sides of the peninsula, respectively. Major regional anomalies extend from the continental shelf into the peninsula, whereas other anomaly trends in the central northern sector, at northeast limit of Chicxulub crater, are restricted to the shelf. Largest anomaly on the east extends over the Holbox fracture zone. At its southern end, south of Chetumal a parallel trend extends over the Rio Hondo fault zone between Quintana Roo and Belize. On the western peninsula the anomaly is characterized by two parallel trends offset between Yucatan and Campeche. The central zone of Chicxulub is characterized by a semi-circular anomaly pattern, surrounded by long wavelength small amplitude anomalies extending to the east on the peninsula and shelf, isolated from the regional broad anomalies. To the south of Chicxulub anomaly, there is an elongated low with a central high extending southward from the terrace zone inside the crater rim. The elongated magnetic anomaly correlates with a broad gravity low, which is apparent south of the concentric zone of anomalies. To the north of Chicxulub anomaly, a magnetic high inside the crater is

  6. High resolution crystal structure of PedB: a structural basis for the classification of pediocin-like immunity proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha Sun-Shin

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediocin-like bacteriocins, ribosomally-synthesized antimicrobial peptides, are generally coexpressed with cognate immunity proteins in order to protect the bacteriocin-producer from its own bacteriocin. As a step for understanding the mode of action of immunity proteins, we determined the crystal structure of PedB, a pediocin-like immunity protein conferring immunity to pediocin PP-1. Results The 1.6 Å crystal structure of PedB reveals that PedB consists of an antiparallel four-helix bundle with a flexible C-terminal end. PedB shows structural similarity to an immunity protein against enterocin A (EntA-im but some disparity to an immunity protein against carnobacteriocin B2 (ImB2 in both the C-terminal conformation and the local structure constructed by α3, α4, and their connecting loop. Structure-inspired mutational studies reveal that deletion of the last seven residues of the C-terminus of PedB almost abolished its immunity activity. Conclusion The fact that PedB, EntA-im, and ImB2 share a four-helix bundle structure strongly suggests the structural conservation of this motif in the pediocin-like immunity proteins. The significant difference in the core structure and the C-terminal conformation provides a structural basis for the classification of pediocin-like immunity proteins. Our mutational study using C-terminal-shortened PedBs and the investigation of primary sequence of the C-terminal region, propose that several polar or charged residues in the extreme C-terminus of PedB which is crucial for the immunity are involved in the specific recognition of pediocin PP-1.

  7. High Resolution Elevation Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset contains contours generated from high resolution data sources such as LiDAR. Generally speaking this data is 2 foot or less contour interval.

  8. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet, E-mail: yphuang@cabm.rutgers.edu; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T., E-mail: gtm@rutgers.edu [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States)

    2015-08-15

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD–NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases {sup 15}N–{sup 1}H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD–NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta.

  9. On the Analytical Superiority of 1D NMR for Fingerprinting the Higher Order Structure of Protein Therapeutics Compared to Multidimensional NMR Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Leszek; Jordan, John B; Rogers, Gary; Schnier, Paul D

    2015-06-02

    An important aspect in the analytical characterization of protein therapeutics is the comprehensive characterization of higher order structure (HOS). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is arguably the most sensitive method for fingerprinting HOS of a protein in solution. Traditionally, (1)H-(15)N or (1)H-(13)C correlation spectra are used as a "structural fingerprint" of HOS. Here, we demonstrate that protein fingerprint by line shape enhancement (PROFILE), a 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy fingerprinting approach, is superior to traditional two-dimensional methods using monoclonal antibody samples and a heavily glycosylated protein therapeutic (Epoetin Alfa). PROFILE generates a high resolution structural fingerprint of a therapeutic protein in a fraction of the time required for a 2D NMR experiment. The cross-correlation analysis of PROFILE spectra allows one to distinguish contributions from HOS vs protein heterogeneity, which is difficult to accomplish by 2D NMR. We demonstrate that the major analytical limitation of two-dimensional methods is poor selectivity, which renders these approaches problematic for the purpose of fingerprinting large biological macromolecules.

  10. Structure Annotation and Quantification of Wheat Seed Oxidized Lipids by High-Resolution LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riewe, David; Wiebach, Janine; Altmann, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Lipid oxidation is a process ubiquitous in life, but the direct and comprehensive analysis of oxidized lipids has been limited by available analytical methods. We applied high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to quantify oxidized lipids (glycerides, fatty acids, phospholipids, lysophospholipids, and galactolipids) and implemented a platform-independent high-throughput-amenable analysis pipeline for the high-confidence annotation and acyl composition analysis of oxidized lipids. Lipid contents of 90 different naturally aged wheat ( Triticum aestivum ) seed stocks were quantified in an untargeted high-resolution LC-MS experiment, resulting in 18,556 quantitative mass-to-charge ratio features. In a posthoc liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry experiment, high-resolution MS/MS spectra (5 mD accuracy) were recorded for 8,957 out of 12,080 putatively monoisotopic features of the LC-MS data set. A total of 353 nonoxidized and 559 oxidized lipids with up to four additional oxygen atoms were annotated based on the accurate mass recordings (1.5 ppm tolerance) of the LC-MS data set and filtering procedures. MS/MS spectra available for 828 of these annotations were analyzed by translating experimentally known fragmentation rules of lipids into the fragmentation of oxidized lipids. This led to the identification of 259 nonoxidized and 365 oxidized lipids by both accurate mass and MS/MS spectra and to the determination of acyl compositions for 221 nonoxidized and 295 oxidized lipids. Analysis of 15-year aged wheat seeds revealed increased lipid oxidation and hydrolysis in seeds stored in ambient versus cold conditions. © 2017 The author(s). All Rights Reserved.

  11. High-resolution He beam scattering as a tool for the investigation of the structural and dynamical properties of surface soliton dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Batanouny, M.; Martini, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    We discuss the applicability of high-resolution-He-beam/surface scattering to the investigation of the structural and dynamic properties of soliton-like surface misfit dislocations and associated phase transitions. We present evidence, based on recent He diffraction measurements, for the existence of double-sine-Gordon soliton-like dislocations on the reconstructed Au(111) surface. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. High resolution solar observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Title, A.

    1985-01-01

    Currently there is a world-wide effort to develop optical technology required for large diffraction limited telescopes that must operate with high optical fluxes. These developments can be used to significantly improve high resolution solar telescopes both on the ground and in space. When looking at the problem of high resolution observations it is essential to keep in mind that a diffraction limited telescope is an interferometer. Even a 30 cm aperture telescope, which is small for high resolution observations, is a big interferometer. Meter class and above diffraction limited telescopes can be expected to be very unforgiving of inattention to details. Unfortunately, even when an earth based telescope has perfect optics there are still problems with the quality of its optical path. The optical path includes not only the interior of the telescope, but also the immediate interface between the telescope and the atmosphere, and finally the atmosphere itself

  13. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Structure Determination of Proteins from Pseudocontact Shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jianping; Pilla, Kala Bharath; Li, Qingfeng; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Su, Xuncheng; Huber, Thomas; Yang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Magic angle spinning solid-state NMR is a unique technique to study atomic-resolution structure of biomacromolecules which resist crystallization or are too large to study by solution NMR techniques. However, difficulties in obtaining sufficient number of long-range distance restraints using dipolar coupling based spectra hamper the process of structure determination of proteins in solid-state NMR. In this study it is shown that high-resolution structure of proteins in solid phase can be determined without the use of traditional dipolar-dipolar coupling based distance restraints by combining the measurements of pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) with Rosetta calculations. The PCSs were generated by chelating exogenous paramagnetic metal ions to a tag 4-mercaptomethyl-dipicolinic acid, which is covalently attached to different residue sites in a 56-residue immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1). The long-range structural restraints with metal-nucleus distance of up to ∼20 Å are quantitatively extracted from experimentally observed PCSs, and these are in good agreement with the distances back-calculated using an X-ray structure model. Moreover, we demonstrate that using several paramagnetic ions with varied paramagnetic susceptibilities as well as the introduction of paramagnetic labels at different sites can dramatically increase the number of long-range restraints and cover different regions of the protein. The structure generated from solid-state NMR PCSs restraints combined with Rosetta calculations has 0.7 Å root-mean-square deviation relative to X-ray structure. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Structure Determination of Proteins from Pseudocontact Shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jianping

    2013-06-05

    Magic angle spinning solid-state NMR is a unique technique to study atomic-resolution structure of biomacromolecules which resist crystallization or are too large to study by solution NMR techniques. However, difficulties in obtaining sufficient number of long-range distance restraints using dipolar coupling based spectra hamper the process of structure determination of proteins in solid-state NMR. In this study it is shown that high-resolution structure of proteins in solid phase can be determined without the use of traditional dipolar-dipolar coupling based distance restraints by combining the measurements of pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) with Rosetta calculations. The PCSs were generated by chelating exogenous paramagnetic metal ions to a tag 4-mercaptomethyl-dipicolinic acid, which is covalently attached to different residue sites in a 56-residue immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1). The long-range structural restraints with metal-nucleus distance of up to ∼20 Å are quantitatively extracted from experimentally observed PCSs, and these are in good agreement with the distances back-calculated using an X-ray structure model. Moreover, we demonstrate that using several paramagnetic ions with varied paramagnetic susceptibilities as well as the introduction of paramagnetic labels at different sites can dramatically increase the number of long-range restraints and cover different regions of the protein. The structure generated from solid-state NMR PCSs restraints combined with Rosetta calculations has 0.7 Å root-mean-square deviation relative to X-ray structure. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. A postprocessing method based on high-resolution spectral estimation for FDTD calculation of phononic band structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Xiaoxing, E-mail: xxsu@bjtu.edu.c [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Li Jianbao; Wang Yuesheng [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2010-05-15

    If the energy bands of a phononic crystal are calculated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method combined with the fast Fourier transform (FFT), good estimation of the eigenfrequencies can only be ensured by the postprocessing of sufficiently long time series generated by a large number of FDTD iterations. In this paper, a postprocessing method based on the high-resolution spectral estimation via the Yule-Walker method is proposed to overcome this difficulty. Numerical simulation results for three-dimensional acoustic and two-dimensional elastic systems show that, compared with the classic FFT-based postprocessing method, the proposed method can give much better estimation of the eigenfrequencies when the FDTD is run with relatively few iterations.

  16. A postprocessing method based on high-resolution spectral estimation for FDTD calculation of phononic band structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xiaoxing; Li Jianbao; Wang Yuesheng

    2010-01-01

    If the energy bands of a phononic crystal are calculated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method combined with the fast Fourier transform (FFT), good estimation of the eigenfrequencies can only be ensured by the postprocessing of sufficiently long time series generated by a large number of FDTD iterations. In this paper, a postprocessing method based on the high-resolution spectral estimation via the Yule-Walker method is proposed to overcome this difficulty. Numerical simulation results for three-dimensional acoustic and two-dimensional elastic systems show that, compared with the classic FFT-based postprocessing method, the proposed method can give much better estimation of the eigenfrequencies when the FDTD is run with relatively few iterations.

  17. Spatial attributes of the four-helix bundle group of bacteriocins – The high-resolution structure of BacSp222 in solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nowakowski, Michał; Jaremko, Łukasz; Wladyka, Benedykt; Dubin, Grzegorz; Ejchart, Andrzej; Mak, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    collected. The structure was calculated based on NMR-derived constraints and consists of a rigid and tightly packed globular bundle of four alpha-helices separated by three short turns.Although the amino acid sequence of BacSp222 has no significant

  18. High-resolution electron microscopic evidence for the filamentous structure of the cyst wall in Giardia muris and Giardia duodenalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsen, S L; Bemrick, W J; Pawley, J

    1989-10-01

    High-resolution morphological studies of the cyst wall of Giardia spp. were performed using low-voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cyst wall was composed of membranous and filamentous layers. The membranous layer consisted of an inner and an outer cyst membrane separated by a thin layer of cytoplasm. The filamentous layer contained individual filaments that ranged from 7 to 20 nm in diameter when measured by LVSEM, formed a dense meshwork with branches or interconnections, and were occasionally arranged on the surface in whorled patterns. Cysts of Giardia muris from mice, Giardia duodenalis from dogs, pigs, voles, beavers, muskrats, and humans, and Giardia psittaci from a bird (parakeet), possessed an essentially identical wall composed of filaments. Inducement of excystation in viable Giardia cysts produced a dramatic increase in the interfilament spacing over an entire cyst, but none was observed in heat-killed or chemically fixed control cysts. These results demonstrated that the cyst wall of Giardia spp. was composed of a complex arrangement of filaments, presumably formed during the process of encystment.

  19. Potential of Polygonum cuspidatum Root as an Antidiabetic Food: Dual High-Resolution α-Glucosidase and PTP1B Inhibition Profiling Combined with HPLC-HRMS and NMR for Identification of Antidiabetic Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Chen, Martin Xiaoyong; Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Jäger, Anna Katharina; Staerk, Dan

    2017-06-07

    The worldwide increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes has fueled an intensified search for food and herbal remedies with preventive and/or therapeutic properties. Polygonum cuspidatum Siebold & Zucc. (Polygonaceae) is used as a functional food in Japan and South Korea, and it is also a well-known traditional antidiabetic herb used in China. In this study, dual high-resolution α-glucosidase and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibition profiling was used for the identification of individual antidiabetic constituents directly from the crude ethyl acetate extract and fractions of P. cuspidatum. Subsequent preparative-scale HPLC was used to isolate a series of α-glucosidase inhibitors, which after HPLC-HRMS and NMR analysis were identified as procyanidin B2 3,3″-O-digallate (3) and (-)-epicatechin gallate (5) with IC 50 values of 0.42 ± 0.02 and 0.48 ± 0.0004 μM, respectively, as well as a series of stilbene analogues with IC 50 value in the range from 6.05 ± 0.05 to 116.10 ± 2.04 μM. In addition, (trans)-emodin-physcion bianthrone (15b) and (cis)-emodin-physcion bianthrone (15c) were identified as potent PTP1B inhibitors with IC 50 values of 2.77 ± 1.23 and 7.29 ± 2.32 μM, respectively. These findings show that P. cuspidatum is a potential functional food for management of type 2 diabetes.

  20. 2D NMR studies of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamerichs, R.M.J.N.

    1989-01-01

    The work described in this thesis comprises two related subjects. The first part describes methods to derive high-resolution structures of proteins in solution using two-dimensional (2-D) NMR. The second part describes 2-D NMR studies on the interaction between proteins and DNA. (author). 261 refs.; 52 figs.; 23 tabs

  1. High resolution data acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  2. ANL high resolution injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, E.; Kutschera, W.; Hartog, P.D.; Billquist, P.

    1985-01-01

    The ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) high-resolution injector has been installed to obtain higher mass resolution and higher preacceleration, and to utilize effectively the full mass range of ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System). Preliminary results of the first beam test are reported briefly. The design and performance, in particular a high-mass-resolution magnet with aberration compensation, are discussed. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Improved reliability, accuracy and quality in automated NMR structure calculation with ARIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mareuil, Fabien [Institut Pasteur, Cellule d' Informatique pour la Biologie (France); Malliavin, Thérèse E.; Nilges, Michael; Bardiaux, Benjamin, E-mail: bardiaux@pasteur.fr [Institut Pasteur, Unité de Bioinformatique Structurale, CNRS UMR 3528 (France)

    2015-08-15

    In biological NMR, assignment of NOE cross-peaks and calculation of atomic conformations are critical steps in the determination of reliable high-resolution structures. ARIA is an automated approach that performs NOE assignment and structure calculation in a concomitant manner in an iterative procedure. The log-harmonic shape for distance restraint potential and the Bayesian weighting of distance restraints, recently introduced in ARIA, were shown to significantly improve the quality and the accuracy of determined structures. In this paper, we propose two modifications of the ARIA protocol: (1) the softening of the force field together with adapted hydrogen radii, which is meaningful in the context of the log-harmonic potential with Bayesian weighting, (2) a procedure that automatically adjusts the violation tolerance used in the selection of active restraints, based on the fitting of the structure to the input data sets. The new ARIA protocols were fine-tuned on a set of eight protein targets from the CASD–NMR initiative. As a result, the convergence problems previously observed for some targets was resolved and the obtained structures exhibited better quality. In addition, the new ARIA protocols were applied for the structure calculation of ten new CASD–NMR targets in a blind fashion, i.e. without knowing the actual solution. Even though optimisation of parameters and pre-filtering of unrefined NOE peak lists were necessary for half of the targets, ARIA consistently and reliably determined very precise and highly accurate structures for all cases. In the context of integrative structural biology, an increasing number of experimental methods are used that produce distance data for the determination of 3D structures of macromolecules, stressing the importance of methods that successfully make use of ambiguous and noisy distance data.

  4. Structural study of pyrones by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandarino, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Extracts of two species of Aniba, designed Aniba-SA (light petroleum extract) and Aniba-SB (benzene extract), afforded by chromatographic fraccionation some compounds. The isolated compounds were identified using spectrometric data and C 13 -NMR coupled and decompled spectra of pyrones were registered. Measurement of the heteronuclear residual coupling by irradiation proton frequency off-resonance was used for distinguish C-5, C-7 and C-8 carbons of the pyrones SB-1, SB-3, SB-4 and SB-5. (M.J.C.) [pt

  5. High resolution CT of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F H [Eemland Hospital (Netherlands), Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Compared to conventional CT high resolution CT (HRCT) shows several extra anatomical structures which might effect both diagnosis and therapy. The extra anatomical structures were discussed briefly in this article. (18 refs.).

  6. Open H-shaped permanent magnet structure for NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.; Delamare, J.; Yonnet, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since NMR imaging at low field is now technically possible, permanent magnets can replace resistive coils or superconducting magnets. This paper reviews most of NMR structures that provide an uniform field using only permanent magnets. We propose a new open H-shaped structure that is simple to manufacture. This structure has been calculated thanks to an optimization program and a calculation method we presente here. It enables to determine with a good accuracy the field created by passive systems composed by permanent magnets and ferromagnetic materials. (author)

  7. Crystal structure and defects of Zr4Co4Si7( V-phase) investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, J.F.; Ye, H.Q.; Ning, X.G.; He, L.L.; Yang, D.Z.

    1997-01-01

    The results of high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) observation and image simulation show that Zr 4 Co 4 Si 7 possesses the same structure type of Zr 4 Co 4 Ge 7 . Adding of Fe or Ni into the Zr 4 Co 4 Si 7 compound, except that the dimensions changed slightly, does not change the lattice type and coordination in the crystal structure, maintaining the V-phase structure. Also, twins with coherent boundaries and with partially coherent at interfaces are observed. The image conditions of Zr 4 Co 4 Si 7 and the structure differences between Zr 4 Co 4 Si 7 and tetrahedral close-packed phases are also discussed. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  8. Structural Elucidation of Metabolites of Synthetic Cannabinoid UR-144 by Cunninghamella elegans Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shimpei; Kuzhiumparambil, Unnikrishnan; Fu, Shanlin

    2018-03-08

    The number of new psychoactive substances keeps on rising despite the controlling efforts by law enforcement. Although metabolism of the newly emerging drugs is continuously studied to keep up with the new additions, the exact structures of the metabolites are often not identified due to the insufficient sample quantities for techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to characterise several metabolites of the synthetic cannabinoid (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl) (2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl) methanone (UR-144) by NMR spectroscopy after the incubation with the fungus Cunninghamella elegans. UR-144 was incubated with C. elegans for 72 h, and the resulting metabolites were chromatographically separated. Six fractions were collected and analysed by NMR spectroscopy. UR-144 was also incubated with human liver microsomes (HLM), and the liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry analysis was performed on the HLM metabolites with the characterised fungal metabolites as reference standards. Ten metabolites were characterised by NMR analysis including dihydroxy metabolites, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, a hydroxy and ketone metabolite, and a carboxy and ketone metabolite. Of these metabolites, dihydroxy metabolite, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, and a hydroxy and ketone metabolite were identified in HLM incubation. The results indicate that the fungus is capable of producing human-relevant metabolites including the exact isomers. The capacity of the fungus C. elegans to allow for NMR structural characterisation by enabling production of large amounts of metabolites makes it an ideal model to complement metabolism studies.

  9. Study of the structure of the particles of channel black of phase-contrasting electron microscopy of high resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlakov, V.P.; Fialkov, A.S.; Smirnov, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of channel black, DG-100, in the initial and graphitized states has been studied by phase-contrasting electron microscopy with a direct resolution of the carbon layers. An individual carbon layer is the main structural element of carbon black. The structure of channel black in the graphitized state looks like a hollow closed polyhedron made up of bundles of continuous carbon layers which can bend and become deformed to a great extent, testifying to the polymeric nature of the structure of channel black. The authors give an interpretation of the roentgen values of the 'dimensions of crystallites' in channel black.

  10. NMR structural studies of peptides and proteins in membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opella, S J [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    The use of NMR methodology in structural studies is described as applicable to larger proteins, considering that the majority of membrane proteins is constructed from a limited repertoire of structural and dynamic elements. The membrane associated domains of these proteins are made up of long hydrophobic membrane spanning helices, shorter amphipathic bridging helices in the plane of the bilayer, connecting loops with varying degrees of mobility, and mobile N- and C- terminal sections. NMR studies have been successful in identifying all of these elements and their orientations relative to each other and the membrane bilayer 19 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Native chemical ligation at Asx-Cys, Glx-Cys: chemical synthesis and high-resolution X-ray structure of ShK toxin by racemic protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bobo; Kubota, Tomoya; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Bezanilla, Francisco; Kent, Stephen B H

    2013-08-14

    We have re-examined the utility of native chemical ligation at -Gln/Glu-Cys- [Glx-Cys] and -Asn/Asp-Cys- [Asx-Cys] sites. Using the improved thioaryl catalyst 4-mercaptophenylacetic acid (MPAA), native chemical ligation could be performed at -Gln-Cys- and Asn-Cys- sites without side reactions. After optimization, ligation at a -Glu-Cys- site could also be used as a ligation site, with minimal levels of byproduct formation. However, -Asp-Cys- is not appropriate for use as a site for native chemical ligation because of formation of significant amounts of β-linked byproduct. The feasibility of native chemical ligation at -Gln-Cys- enabled a convergent total chemical synthesis of the enantiomeric forms of the ShK toxin protein molecule. The D-ShK protein molecule was ~50,000-fold less active in blocking the Kv1.3 channel than the L-ShK protein molecule. Racemic protein crystallography was used to obtain high-resolution X-ray diffraction data for ShK toxin. The structure was solved by direct methods and showed significant differences from the previously reported NMR structures in some regions of the ShK protein molecule.

  12. Restoring defect structures in 3C-SiC/Si (001) from spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope images by means of deconvolution processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, C; Wan, W; Li, F H; Tang, D

    2015-04-01

    The [110] cross-sectional samples of 3C-SiC/Si (001) were observed with a spherical aberration-corrected 300 kV high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Two images taken not close to the Scherzer focus condition and not representing the projected structures intuitively were utilized for performing the deconvolution. The principle and procedure of image deconvolution and atomic sort recognition are summarized. The defect structure restoration together with the recognition of Si and C atoms from the experimental images has been illustrated. The structure maps of an intrinsic stacking fault in the area of SiC, and of Lomer and 60° shuffle dislocations at the interface have been obtained at atomic level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The mechanism of vault opening from the high resolution structure of the N-terminal repeats of MVP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol-Audí, Jordi; Casañas, Arnau; Usón, Isabel; Luque, Daniel; Castón, José R; Fita, Ignasi; Verdaguer, Nuria

    2009-11-04

    Vaults are ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in a diversity of cellular processes, including multidrug resistance, transport mechanisms and signal transmission. The vault particle shows a barrel-shaped structure organized in two identical moieties, each consisting of 39 copies of the major vault protein MVP. Earlier data indicated that vault halves can dissociate at acidic pH. The crystal structure of the vault particle solved at 8 A resolution, together with the 2.1-A structure of the seven N-terminal domains (R1-R7) of MVP, reveal the interactions governing vault association and provide an explanation for a reversible dissociation induced by low pH. The structural comparison with the recently published 3.5 A model shows major discrepancies, both in the main chain tracing and in the side chain assignment of the two terminal domains R1 and R2.

  14. Precision mechanical structure of an ultra-high-resolution spectrometer for inelastic X-ray scattering instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Deming; Shvydko, Yuri; Stoupin, Stanislav A.; Khachatryan, Ruben; Goetze, Kurt A.; Roberts, Timothy

    2015-04-14

    A method and an ultrahigh-resolution spectrometer including a precision mechanical structure for positioning inelastic X-ray scattering optics are provided. The spectrometer includes an X-ray monochromator and an X-ray analyzer, each including X-ray optics of a collimating (C) crystal, a pair of dispersing (D) element crystals, anomalous transmission filter (F) and a wavelength (W) selector crystal. A respective precision mechanical structure is provided with the X-ray monochromator and the X-ray analyzer. The precision mechanical structure includes a base plate, such as an aluminum base plate; positioning stages for D-crystal alignment; positioning stages with an incline sensor for C/F/W-crystal alignment, and the positioning stages including flexure-based high-stiffness structure.

  15. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Miyagi, Masaru, E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Lodowski, David T., E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.

  16. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna; Miyagi, Masaru; Lodowski, David T.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity

  17. High resolution X-ray structures of mouse major urinary protein nasal isoform in complex with pheromones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Miller, Samantha; Zou, Qin; Novotny, Milos V.; Hurley, Thomas D. (Indiana-Med); (Indiana)

    2010-09-07

    In mice, the major urinary proteins (MUP) play a key role in pheromonal communication by binding and transporting semiochemicals. MUP-IV is the only isoform known to be expressed in the vomeronasal mucosa. In comparison with the MUP isoforms that are abundantly excreted in the urine, MUP-IV is highly specific for the male mouse pheromone 2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole (SBT). To examine the structural basis of this ligand preference, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of MUP-IV bound to three mouse pheromones: SBT, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, and 2-heptanone. We also obtained the structure of MUP-IV with 2-ethylhexanol bound in the cavity. These four structures show that relative to the major excreted MUP isoforms, three amino acid substitutions within the binding calyx impact ligand coordination. The F103 for A along with F54 for L result in a smaller cavity, potentially creating a more closely packed environment for the ligand. The E118 for G substitution introduces a charged group into a hydrophobic environment. The sidechain of E118 is observed to hydrogen bond to polar groups on all four ligands with nearly the same geometry as seen for the water-mediated hydrogen bond network in the MUP-I and MUP-II crystal structures. These differences in cavity size and interactions between the protein and ligand are likely to contribute to the observed specificity of MUP-IV.

  18. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks

  19. Analyses of the temporal and spatial structures of heavy rainfall from a catalog of high-resolution radar rainfall fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Smith, James A.; Baeck, Mary Lynn

    2014-01-01

    that relate to size, structure and evolution of heavy rainfall. Extreme rainfall is also linked with severe weather (tornados, large hail and damaging wind). The diurnal cycle of rainfall for heavy rain days is characterized by an early peak in the largest rainfall rates, an afternoon-evening peak in rain...

  20. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound to t...

  1. High-Resolution Mapping of Chromatin Conformation in Cardiac Myocytes Reveals Structural Remodeling of the Epigenome in Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rosa-Garrido (Manuel); Chapski, D.J. (Douglas J.); Schmitt, A.D. (Anthony D.); Kimball, T.H. (Todd H.); Karbassi, E. (Elaheh); Monte, E. (Emma); Balderas, E. (Enrique); Pellegrini, M. (Matteo); Shih, T.-T. (Tsai-Ting); Soehalim, E. (Elizabeth); D.A. Liem (David); Ping, P. (Peipei); N.J. Galjart (Niels); Ren, S. (Shuxun); Wang, Y. (Yibin); Ren, B. (Bing); Vondriska, T.M. (Thomas M.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is associated with epigenomic changes in the heart; however, the endogenous structure of cardiac myocyte chromatin has never been determined.METHODS: To investigate the mechanisms of epigenomic function in the heart, genome-wide chromatin conformation

  2. NMR structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase thumb subdomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharaf, Naima G. [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States); Brereton, Andrew E. [Oregon State University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2011 Ag & Life Sciences Bldg (United States); Byeon, In-Ja L. [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States); Andrew Karplus, P. [Oregon State University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2011 Ag & Life Sciences Bldg (United States); Gronenborn, Angela M., E-mail: amg100@pitt.edu [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The solution NMR structure of the isolated thumb subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has been determined. A detailed comparison of the current structure with dozens of the highest resolution crystal structures of this domain in the context of the full-length enzyme reveals that the overall structures are very similar, with only two regions exhibiting local conformational differences. The C-terminal capping pattern of the αH helix is subtly different, and the loop connecting the αI and αJ helices in the p51 chain of the full-length p51/p66 heterodimeric RT differs from our NMR structure due to unique packing interactions in mature RT. Overall, our data show that the thumb subdomain folds independently and essentially the same in isolation as in its natural structural context.

  3. Ultra-High Resolution Ion Mobility Separations Utilizing Traveling Waves in a 13 m Serpentine Path Length Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Webb, Ian K.; Zheng, Xueyun; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-09-20

    We report the development and initial evaluation of a 13-m path length Structures for Lossless Manipulations (SLIM) module for achieving high resolution separations using traveling waves (TW) with ion mobility (IM) spectrometry. The TW SLIM module was fabricated using two mirror-image printed circuit boards with appropriately configured RF, DC and TW electrodes and positioned with a 2.75-mm inter-surface gap. Ions were effective confined between the surfaces by RF-generated pseudopotential fields and moved losslessly through a serpentine path including 44 “U” turns using TWs. The ion mobility resolution was characterized at different pressures, gaps between the SLIM surfaces, TW and RF parameters. After initial optimization the SLIM IM-MS module provided about 5-fold higher resolution separations than present commercially available drift tube or traveling wave IM-MS platforms. Peak capacity and peak generation rates achieved were 246 and 370 s-1, respectively, at a TW speed of 148 m/s. The high resolution achieved in the TW SLIM IM-MS enabled e.g., isomeric sugars (Lacto-N-fucopentaose I and Lacto-N-fucopentaose II) to be baseline resolved, and peptides from a albumin tryptic digest much better resolved than with existing commercial IM-MS platforms. The present work also provides a foundation for the development of much higher resolution SLIM devices based upon both considerably longer path lengths and multi-pass designs.

  4. Temperature-salinity structure of the AMOC in high-resolution ocean simulations and in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.; Xu, X.; Chassignet, E.

    2017-12-01

    On average, the CMIP5 models represent the AMOC structure, water properties, Heat transport and Freshwater transport reasonably well. For temperature, CMIP5 models exhibit a colder northward upper limb and a warmer southward lower limb. the temperature contrast induces weaker heat transport than observation. For salinity, CMIP5 models exhibit saltier southward lower limb, thus contributes to weaker column freshwater transport. Models have large spread, among them, AMOC strength contributes to Heat transport but not freshwater transport. AMOC structure (the overturning depth) contributes to transport-weighted temperature not transport-weighted salinity in southward lower limb. The salinity contrast in upper and lower limb contributes to freshwater transport, but temperature contrast do not contribute to heat transport.

  5. The high-resolution structure of the Centaurus A nucleus at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, D.L.; Preston, R.A.; Morabito, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    VLBI observations of the nucleus of Centaurus A have been made at two frequencies with an array of five Australian radio telescopes as part of the Southern Hemisphere VLBI Experiment. Observations were made at 2.3 GHz with all five antennas, while only two were employed at 8.4 GHz. At 2.3 GHz seven tracks in the (u,v) plane with coverage of 6-8 hr each were obtained, yielding significant information on the structure of the nuclear jet. At 8.4 GHz a compact unresolved core was detected as well. It is found that the source consists of the compact self-absorbed core, a jet containing a set of three knots extending from 100 to 160 mas from the core, and a very long, narrow component elongated along the same position angle as the knots. The allowable range for the position angle of the jet is 51 + or - 3 deg, in agreement with that of the radio and X-ray structure on arcsecond and arcminute scales. The jet has brightened at 2.3 GHz by about 4 Jy, a factor of nearly 3, since the early 1970s, 1.8 Jy of which has occurred in the last 2 yr with no discernable changes in structure. 21 refs

  6. High Resolution 3D Experimental Investigation of Flow Structures and Turbulence Statistics in the Viscous and Buffer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian; Malkiel, Edwin; Katz, Joseph

    2006-11-01

    Digital Holographic Microscopy is implemented to perform 3D velocity measurement in the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer in a square channel over a smooth wall at Reτ=1,400. The measurements are performed at a resolution of ˜1μm over a sample volume of 1.5x2x1.5mm (x^+=50, y^+=60, z^+=50), sufficient for resolving buffer layer structures and for measuring the instantaneous wall shear stress distributions from velocity gradients in the sublayer. The data provides detailed statistics on the spatial distribution of both wall shear stress components along with the characteristic flow structures, including streamwise counter-rotating vortex pairs, multiple streamwise vortices, and rare hairpins. Conditional sampling identifies characteristic length scales of 70 wall units in spanwise and 10 wall units in wall-normal direction. In the region of high stress, the conditionally averaged flow consists of a stagnation-like sweeping motion induced by a counter rotating pair of streamwise vortices. Regions with low stress are associated with ejection motion, also generated by pairs of counter-rotating vortices. Statistics on the local strain and geometric alignment between strain and vorticity shows that the high shear generating vortices are inclined at 45 to streamwise direction, indicating that vortices are being stretched. Results of on-going analysis examines statistics of helicity, strain and impacts of near-wall structures.

  7. Structure and hydrocarbon potential of the Nuussuaq basin: acquisition and interpretation of high-resolution multichannel seismic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcussen, C.; Skaarup, N.; Chalmers, J.A.

    2002-07-01

    Data acquisition of project NuussuaqSeis2000 (GEUS2000G survey) was very successful. Due to very favourable weather and ice conditions, 2743 km of good quality data were acquired, nearly 20% more than originally planned. High concentrations of icebergs prevented acquisition of data in the eastern part of Uummannaq Fjord and east of Svartenhuk Halvoe. Data from project NuussuaqSeis 2000 have therefore considerably increased the seismic coverage in the region. Interpretation of the new data has given information on the size and geometry of the individual fault blocks in areas with Cretaceous sediments. Furthermore the new data confirm that the seeps in the Vaigat region are structurally controlled and mainly occur in the block-faulted area north of the Disko gneiss ridge. Data from the GEUS2000G survey confirm the overall structural interpretation published in Chalmers et al. (1999). The interpretation of the structural style in western Vaigat is confirmed as being substantially correct, although the fault patterns have been shown to be much more complex than realised previously, from either the onshore data or from the single line GGU/95-06. The main area of revision has been in eastern Vaigat, but even there the essentials of the Chalmers et al. (1999) interpretation remain. In the area north of Nuussuaq in Uummannaq Fjord and Illorssuit Sund the fault trend is more N-S than in Vaigat, but also here the complexity in the fault pattern prohibites a correlation for too long distances. The general fault pattern from the structural interpretation of Chalmers et al. (1999) remains valid in this area as well. Some of the data acquired under project NuussuaqSeis2000 are highly relevant for an assessment of the petroleum prospectivity of the Disko-Nuussuaq region, and the data and their interpretation will be included in the next revised GEUS Note to the Bureau of Minerals and Petroleum on this matter. The new data and the interpretations are particularly important for

  8. NMR study of structure of lanthanide complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    The diagnostic value PMR studies of diamagnetic lanthanide complexes to define the nature of the species in the lanthanide-pyruvate system is discussed. The use of NMR spectra of both diamagnetic and paramagnetic lanthanide complexes to obtain detailed structural information is reviewed

  9. High-resolution crystal structure of a polyextreme GH43 glycosidase from Halothermothrix orenii with α-l-arabinofuranosidase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Noor; Kori, Lokesh D.; Gandini, Rosaria; Patel, Bharat K. C.; Divne, Christina; Tan, Tien Chye

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the H. orenii glycosidase was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 1.10 Å resolution. A gene from the heterotrophic, halothermophilic marine bacterium Halothermothrix orenii has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. This gene encodes the only glycoside hydrolase of family 43 (GH43) produced by H. orenii. The crystal structure of the H. orenii glycosidase was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 1.10 Å resolution. As for other GH43 members, the enzyme folds as a five-bladed β-propeller. The structure features a metal-binding site on the propeller axis, near the active site. Based on thermal denaturation data, the H. orenii glycosidase depends on divalent cations in combination with high salt for optimal thermal stability against unfolding. A maximum melting temperature of 76°C was observed in the presence of 4 M NaCl and Mn 2+ at pH 6.5. The gene encoding the H. orenii GH43 enzyme has previously been annotated as a putative α-l-arabinofuranosidase. Activity was detected with p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside as a substrate, and therefore the name HoAraf43 was suggested for the enzyme. In agreement with the conditions for optimal thermal stability against unfolding, the highest arabinofuranosidase activity was obtained in the presence of 4 M NaCl and Mn 2+ at pH 6.5, giving a specific activity of 20–36 µmol min −1 mg −1 . The active site is structurally distinct from those of other GH43 members, including arabinanases, arabinofuranosidases and xylanases. This probably reflects the special requirements for degrading the unique biomass available in highly saline aqueous ecosystems, such as halophilic algae and halophytes. The amino-acid distribution of HoAraf43 has similarities to those of mesophiles, thermophiles and halophiles, but also has unique features, for example more hydrophobic amino acids on the surface and fewer buried charged residues

  10. High-resolution crystal structure of a polyextreme GH43 glycosidase from Halothermothrix orenii with α-l-arabinofuranosidase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Noor [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Kori, Lokesh D. [Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Gandini, Rosaria [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Patel, Bharat K. C. [Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Divne, Christina; Tan, Tien Chye, E-mail: tantc@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-02-19

    The crystal structure of the H. orenii glycosidase was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 1.10 Å resolution. A gene from the heterotrophic, halothermophilic marine bacterium Halothermothrix orenii has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. This gene encodes the only glycoside hydrolase of family 43 (GH43) produced by H. orenii. The crystal structure of the H. orenii glycosidase was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 1.10 Å resolution. As for other GH43 members, the enzyme folds as a five-bladed β-propeller. The structure features a metal-binding site on the propeller axis, near the active site. Based on thermal denaturation data, the H. orenii glycosidase depends on divalent cations in combination with high salt for optimal thermal stability against unfolding. A maximum melting temperature of 76°C was observed in the presence of 4 M NaCl and Mn{sup 2+} at pH 6.5. The gene encoding the H. orenii GH43 enzyme has previously been annotated as a putative α-l-arabinofuranosidase. Activity was detected with p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside as a substrate, and therefore the name HoAraf43 was suggested for the enzyme. In agreement with the conditions for optimal thermal stability against unfolding, the highest arabinofuranosidase activity was obtained in the presence of 4 M NaCl and Mn{sup 2+} at pH 6.5, giving a specific activity of 20–36 µmol min{sup −1} mg{sup −1}. The active site is structurally distinct from those of other GH43 members, including arabinanases, arabinofuranosidases and xylanases. This probably reflects the special requirements for degrading the unique biomass available in highly saline aqueous ecosystems, such as halophilic algae and halophytes. The amino-acid distribution of HoAraf43 has similarities to those of mesophiles, thermophiles and halophiles, but also has unique features, for example more hydrophobic amino acids on the surface and fewer buried charged residues.

  11. High-resolution deep sequencing reveals biodiversity, population structure, and persistence of HIV-1 quasispecies within host ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sequencing provides the basis for analysis of biodiversity of taxonomically similar organisms in an environment. While extensively applied to microbiome studies, population genetics studies of viruses are limited. To define the scope of HIV-1 population biodiversity within infected individuals, a suite of phylogenetic and population genetic algorithms was applied to HIV-1 envelope hypervariable domain 3 (Env V3 within peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a group of perinatally HIV-1 subtype B infected, therapy-naïve children. Results Biodiversity of HIV-1 Env V3 quasispecies ranged from about 70 to 270 unique sequence clusters across individuals. Viral population structure was organized into a limited number of clusters that included the dominant variants combined with multiple clusters of low frequency variants. Next generation viral quasispecies evolved from low frequency variants at earlier time points through multiple non-synonymous changes in lineages within the evolutionary landscape. Minor V3 variants detected as long as four years after infection co-localized in phylogenetic reconstructions with early transmitting viruses or with subsequent plasma virus circulating two years later. Conclusions Deep sequencing defines HIV-1 population complexity and structure, reveals the ebb and flow of dominant and rare viral variants in the host ecosystem, and identifies an evolutionary record of low-frequency cell-associated viral V3 variants that persist for years. Bioinformatics pipeline developed for HIV-1 can be applied for biodiversity studies of virome populations in human, animal, or plant ecosystems.

  12. High resolution crystal structure of the Grb2 SH2 domain with a phosphopeptide derived from CD28.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunitake Higo

    Full Text Available Src homology 2 (SH2 domains play a critical role in cellular signal transduction. They bind to peptides containing phosphotyrosine (pY with various specificities that depend on the flanking amino-acid residues. The SH2 domain of growth-factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2 specifically recognizes pY-X-N-X, whereas the SH2 domains in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K recognize pY-X-X-M. Binding of the pY site in CD28 (pY-M-N-M by PI3K and Grb2 through their SH2 domains is a key step that triggers the CD28 signal transduction for T cell activation and differentiation. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of the Grb2 SH2 domain in complex with a pY-containing peptide derived from CD28 at 1.35 Å resolution. The peptide was found to adopt a twisted U-type conformation, similar to, but distinct from type-I β-turn. In all previously reported crystal structures, the peptide bound to the Grb2 SH2 domains adopts a type-I β-turn conformation, except those with a proline residue at the pY+3 position. Molecular modeling also suggests that the same peptide bound to PI3K might adopt a very different conformation.

  13. High resolution crystal structure of the Grb2 SH2 domain with a phosphopeptide derived from CD28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higo, Kunitake; Ikura, Teikichi; Oda, Masayuki; Morii, Hisayuki; Takahashi, Jun; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Nobutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains play a critical role in cellular signal transduction. They bind to peptides containing phosphotyrosine (pY) with various specificities that depend on the flanking amino-acid residues. The SH2 domain of growth-factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) specifically recognizes pY-X-N-X, whereas the SH2 domains in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) recognize pY-X-X-M. Binding of the pY site in CD28 (pY-M-N-M) by PI3K and Grb2 through their SH2 domains is a key step that triggers the CD28 signal transduction for T cell activation and differentiation. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of the Grb2 SH2 domain in complex with a pY-containing peptide derived from CD28 at 1.35 Å resolution. The peptide was found to adopt a twisted U-type conformation, similar to, but distinct from type-I β-turn. In all previously reported crystal structures, the peptide bound to the Grb2 SH2 domains adopts a type-I β-turn conformation, except those with a proline residue at the pY+3 position. Molecular modeling also suggests that the same peptide bound to PI3K might adopt a very different conformation.

  14. Design and analysis of a cross-type structured-illumination confocal microscope for high speed and high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-Duk; Ahn, MyoungKi; Kim, Taejoong; Gweon, DaeGab; Yoo, Hongki

    2012-01-01

    There have been many studies about a super resolution microscope for many years. A super resolution microscope can detect the physical phenomena or morphology of a biological sample more precisely than conventional microscopes. The structured-illumination microscope (SIM) is one of the technologies that demonstrate super resolution. However, the conventional SIM requires more time to obtain one resolution-enhanced image than other super resolution microscopes. More specifically, the conventional SIM uses three images with a 120° phase difference for each direction and three different directions are image-processed to make one resolution enhancement by increasing the optical transfer function in three directions. In this paper, we present a novel cross structured-illumination confocal microscope (CSICM) that takes the advantage of the technology of both SIM and the confocal microscope. The CSICM uses only two directions with three phase difference images, for a total of six images. By reducing the number of images that must be obtained, the total image acquisition time and image reconstruction time in obtaining the final output images can be decreased, and the confocal microscope provides axial information of the sample automatically. We demonstrate our method of cross illumination and evaluate the performance of the CSICM and compare it to the conventional SIM and the confocal microscope. (paper)

  15. Spatial attributes of the four-helix bundle group of bacteriocins – The high-resolution structure of BacSp222 in solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nowakowski, Michał

    2017-11-01

    BacSp222 is a multifunctional bacteriocin produced by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius strain 222, an opportunistic pathogen of domestic animals. At micromolar concentrations, BacSp222 kills Gram-positive bacteria and is cytotoxic toward mammalian cells, while at nanomolar doses, it acts as an immunomodulatory factor, enhancing nitric oxide release in macrophage-like cell lines. The bacteriocin is a cationic, N-terminally formylated, 50-amino-acid-long linear peptide that is rich in tryptophan residues.In this study, the solution structure of BacSp222 was determined and compared to the currently known structures of similar bacteriocins. BacSp222 was isolated from a liquid culture medium in a uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled form, and NMR data were collected. The structure was calculated based on NMR-derived constraints and consists of a rigid and tightly packed globular bundle of four alpha-helices separated by three short turns.Although the amino acid sequence of BacSp222 has no significant similarity to any known peptide or protein, a 3D structure similarity search indicates a close relation to other four-helix bundle-motif bacteriocins, such as aureocin A53, lacticin Q and enterocins 7A/7B. Assuming similar functions, biology, structure and physicochemical properties, we propose to distinguish the four-helix bundle bacteriocins as a new Type A in subclass IId of bacteriocins, containing linear, non-pediocin-like peptides.

  16. Internal structure of InP/ZnS nanocrystals unraveled by high-resolution soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai; Demadrille, Renaud; Silly, Mathieu G; Sirotti, Fausto; Reiss, Peter; Renault, Olivier

    2010-08-24

    High-energy resolution photoelectron spectroscopy (DeltaE InP/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals synthesized using a single-step procedure (core and shell precursors added at the same time), a homogeneously alloyed InPZnS core structure is evidenced by quantitative analysis of their In3d(5/2) spectra recorded at variable excitation energy. When using a two-step method (core InP nanocrystal synthesis followed by subsequent ZnS shell growth), XPS analysis reveals a graded core/shell interface. We demonstrate the existence of In-S and S(x)-In-P(1-x) bonding states in both types of InP/ZnS nanocrystals, which allows a refined view on the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  17. High-resolution structure of AKR1a4 in the apo form and its interaction with ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faucher, Frédérick; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    Despite its high affinity for NADPH, AKR1a4 crystallized in the apo form, which is very rare for aldo-keto reductase enzymes. Aldo-keto reductase 1a4 (AKR1a4; EC 1.1.1.2) is the mouse orthologue of human aldehyde reductase (AKR1a1), the founding member of the AKR family. As an NADPH-dependent enzyme, AKR1a4 catalyses the conversion of d-glucuronate to l-gulonate. AKR1a4 is involved in ascorbate biosynthesis in mice, but has also recently been found to interact with SMAR1, providing a novel mechanism of ROS regulation by ATM. Here, the crystal structure of AKR1a4 in its apo form at 1.64 Å resolution as well as the characterization of the binding of AKR1a4 to NADPH and P44, a peptide derived from SMAR1, is presented

  18. Fully convergent chemical synthesis of ester insulin: determination of the high resolution X-ray structure by racemic protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Gates, Zachary P; Phillips, Nelson B; Weiss, Michael A; Kent, Stephen B H

    2013-02-27

    Efficient total synthesis of insulin is important to enable the application of medicinal chemistry to the optimization of the properties of this important protein molecule. Recently we described "ester insulin"--a novel form of insulin in which the function of the 35 residue C-peptide of proinsulin is replaced by a single covalent bond--as a key intermediate for the efficient total synthesis of insulin. Here we describe a fully convergent synthetic route to the ester insulin molecule from three unprotected peptide segments of approximately equal size. The synthetic ester insulin polypeptide chain folded much more rapidly than proinsulin, and at physiological pH. Both the D-protein and L-protein enantiomers of monomeric DKP ester insulin (i.e., [Asp(B10), Lys(B28), Pro(B29)]ester insulin) were prepared by total chemical synthesis. The atomic structure of the synthetic ester insulin molecule was determined by racemic protein X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.6 Å. Diffraction quality crystals were readily obtained from the racemic mixture of {D-DKP ester insulin + L-DKP ester insulin}, whereas crystals were not obtained from the L-ester insulin alone even after extensive trials. Both the D-protein and L-protein enantiomers of monomeric DKP ester insulin were assayed for receptor binding and in diabetic rats, before and after conversion by saponification to the corresponding DKP insulin enantiomers. L-DKP ester insulin bound weakly to the insulin receptor, while synthetic L-DKP insulin derived from the L-DKP ester insulin intermediate was fully active in binding to the insulin receptor. The D- and L-DKP ester insulins and D-DKP insulin were inactive in lowering blood glucose in diabetic rats, while synthetic L-DKP insulin was fully active in this biological assay. The structural basis of the lack of biological activity of ester insulin is discussed.

  19. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-10-10

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range from 0.7 to 100 nm and with number of walls from 1 to 90. We provide models on how diameter and the number of nanotube walls influence NMR linewidth and line position. Both models are supported by theoretical calculations. Increasing the diameter D, from the smallest investigated nanotube, which in our study corresponds to the inner nanotube of a double-walled tube to the largest studied diameter, corresponding to large multiwalled nanotubes, leads to a 23.5 ppm diamagnetic shift of the isotropic NMR line position δ. We show that the isotropic line follows the relation δ = 18.3/D + 102.5 ppm, where D is the diameter of the tube and NMR line position δ is relative to tetramethylsilane. The relation asymptotically tends to approach the line position expected in graphene. A characteristic broadening of the line shape is observed with the increasing number of walls. This feature can be rationalized by an isotropic shift distribution originating from different diamagnetic shielding of the encapsulated nanotubes together with a heterogeneity of the samples. Based on our results, NMR is shown to be a nondestructive spectroscopic method that can be used as a complementary method to, for example, transmission electron microscopy to obtain structural information for carbon nanotubes, especially bulk samples.

  20. High resolution crustal structure for the region between the Chilenia and Cuyania terrane above the Pampean flat slab of Argentina from local receiver function and petrological analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammirati, J. B.; Alvarado, P. M.; Pérez, S. B.; Beck, S. L.; Porter, R. C.; Zandt, G.

    2015-12-01

    Jean-Baptiste Ammirati 1,Sofía Perez 1, Patricia Alvarado 1, Susan L. Beck 2, Ryan Porter 3 and George Zandt 2(1) CIGEOBIO-CONICET, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Argentina (2) The University of Arizona, USA (3) Northern Arizona University, USA At ~31ºS, The subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American plate presents along-strike variations of its dip angle referred to the Chilean-Pampean flat slab. Geological observations suggest that the regional crustal structure is inherited from the accretion of different terranes at Ordovician times and later reactivated during Andean compression since Miocene. Geophysical observations confirmed that the structure is extending in depth with décollement levels that accommodate crustal shortening in the region. In order to get a better insight on the shallow tectonics we computed high frequency local receiver functions from slab seismicity (~100 km depth). Local earthquakes present a higher frequency content that permits a better vertical resolution. Using a common conversion point (CCP) stacking method we obtained cross sections showing high-resolution crustal structure in the western part of the Pampean flat slab region, at the transition between the Precordillera and the Frontal Cordillera. Our results show a well-defined structure and their lateral extent for both units down to 80 km depth. In good agreement with previous studies, our higher resolution images better identify very shallow discontinuities putting more constraints on the relationships with the regional structural geology. Recent petrological analyses combined with RF high-resolution structure also allow us to better understand the regional crustal composition. Interestingly, we are able to observe a shifting structure beneath the Uspallata-Calingasta Valley, highlighting the differences in terms of crustal structure between the Precordillera and the Frontal Cordillera. Previously determined focal mechanisms in the region match well this

  1. High resolution spectroscopic mapping imaging applied in situ to multilayer structures for stratigraphic identification of painted art objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Georgios Th.

    2016-04-01

    The development of non-destructive techniques is a reality in the field of conservation science. These techniques are usually not so accurate, as the analytical micro-sampling techniques, however, the proper development of soft-computing techniques can improve their accuracy. In this work, we propose a real-time fast acquisition spectroscopic mapping imaging system that operates from the ultraviolet to mid infrared (UV/Vis/nIR/mIR) area of the electromagnetic spectrum and it is supported by a set of soft-computing methods to identify the materials that exist in a stratigraphic structure of paint layers. Particularly, the system acquires spectra in diffuse-reflectance mode, scanning in a Region-Of-Interest (ROI), and having wavelength range from 200 up to 5000 nm. Also, a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm, i.e., the particular soft-computing algorithm, produces the mapping images. The evaluation of the method was tested on a byzantine painted icon.

  2. High-resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear-structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avignone, F.T. III.

    1981-01-01

    Extensive data analysis and theoretical analysis has been done to complete the extensive decay scheme investigation of 206 208 Fr and the level structures of 206 208 Rn. A final version of a journal article is presented in preprint form. Extensive Monte Carlo calculations have been made to correct the end point energies of positron spectra taken with intrinsic Ge detectors for annihilation radiation interferences. These calculations were tested using the decay of 82 Sr which has previously measured positron branches. This technique was applied to the positron spectra collected at the on-line UNISOR isotope separator. The reactions used were 60 Ni( 20 Ne;p2n) 77 Rb and 60 Ni( 20 Ne;pn) 78 Rb. Values for 5, γ-β + coincidence positron end point energies are given for the decay of 77 Rb. The implied Q-value is 5.075 +- 0.010 MeV. A complete paper on the calculated corrections is presented. A flow chart of a more complete program which accounts for positrons scattering out of the detector and for bremsstralung radiation is also presented. End-point energies of four β + branches in 77 Rb are given as well as a proposed energy level scheme of 75 Kr based on γ-γ coincidence data taken at UNISOR

  3. High-resolution structure of the M14-type cytosolic carboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia refined exploiting PDB-REDO strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimsa, Vadim; Eadsforth, Thomas C. [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Joosten, Robbie P. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    The structure of a bacterial M14-family carboxypeptidase determined exploiting microfocus synchrotron radiation and highly automated refinement protocols reveals its potential to act as a polyglutamylase. A potential cytosolic metallocarboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been crystallized and a synchrotron-radiation microfocus beamline allowed the acquisition of diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit comprises a tetramer containing over 1500 amino acids, and the high-throughput automated protocols embedded in PDB-REDO were coupled with model–map inspections in refinement. This approach has highlighted the value of such protocols for efficient analyses. The subunit is constructed from two domains. The N-terminal domain has previously only been observed in cytosolic carboxypeptidase (CCP) proteins. The C-terminal domain, which carries the Zn{sup 2+}-containing active site, serves to classify this protein as a member of the M14D subfamily of carboxypeptidases. Although eukaryotic CCPs possess deglutamylase activity and are implicated in processing modified tubulin, the function and substrates of the bacterial family members remain unknown. The B. cenocepacia protein did not display deglutamylase activity towards a furylacryloyl glutamate derivative, a potential substrate. Residues previously shown to coordinate the divalent cation and that contribute to peptide-bond cleavage in related enzymes such as bovine carboxypeptidase are conserved. The location of a conserved basic patch in the active site adjacent to the catalytic Zn{sup 2+}, where an acetate ion is identified, suggests recognition of the carboxy-terminus in a similar fashion to other carboxypeptidases. However, there are significant differences that indicate the recognition of substrates with different properties. Of note is the presence of a lysine in the S1′ recognition subsite that suggests specificity towards an acidic substrate.

  4. High-resolution structure of the M14-type cytosolic carboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia refined exploiting PDB-REDO strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimsa, Vadim; Eadsforth, Thomas C.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Hunter, William N.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of a bacterial M14-family carboxypeptidase determined exploiting microfocus synchrotron radiation and highly automated refinement protocols reveals its potential to act as a polyglutamylase. A potential cytosolic metallocarboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been crystallized and a synchrotron-radiation microfocus beamline allowed the acquisition of diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit comprises a tetramer containing over 1500 amino acids, and the high-throughput automated protocols embedded in PDB-REDO were coupled with model–map inspections in refinement. This approach has highlighted the value of such protocols for efficient analyses. The subunit is constructed from two domains. The N-terminal domain has previously only been observed in cytosolic carboxypeptidase (CCP) proteins. The C-terminal domain, which carries the Zn 2+ -containing active site, serves to classify this protein as a member of the M14D subfamily of carboxypeptidases. Although eukaryotic CCPs possess deglutamylase activity and are implicated in processing modified tubulin, the function and substrates of the bacterial family members remain unknown. The B. cenocepacia protein did not display deglutamylase activity towards a furylacryloyl glutamate derivative, a potential substrate. Residues previously shown to coordinate the divalent cation and that contribute to peptide-bond cleavage in related enzymes such as bovine carboxypeptidase are conserved. The location of a conserved basic patch in the active site adjacent to the catalytic Zn 2+ , where an acetate ion is identified, suggests recognition of the carboxy-terminus in a similar fashion to other carboxypeptidases. However, there are significant differences that indicate the recognition of substrates with different properties. Of note is the presence of a lysine in the S1′ recognition subsite that suggests specificity towards an acidic substrate

  5. Exploring the structure of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate through bottom-up nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization-high-resolution mass spectrometry approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Gustavo Rc; Porto, Ana Co; Soares, Paulo Ag; Vilanova, Eduardo; Mourão, Paulo As

    2017-07-01

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS) from sea cucumbers is composed of a chondroitin sulfate (CS) central core and branches of sulfated fucose. The structure of this complex glycosaminoglycan is usually investigated via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the intact molecule, ergo through a top-down approach, which often yield spectra with intricate sets of signals. Here we employed a bottom-up approach to analyze the FCSs from the sea cucumbers Isostichopus badionotus and Ludwigothurea grisea from their basic constituents, viz. CS cores and sulfated fucose branches, obtained via systematic fragmentation through mild acid hydrolysis. Oligosaccharides derived from the central CS core were analyzed via NMR spectroscopy and the disaccharides produced using chondroitin sulfate lyase via SAX-HPLC. The CS cores from the two species were similar, showing only slight differences in the proportions of 4- or 6-monosulfated and 4,6-disulfated β-d-GalNAc. Sulfated fucose units released from the FCSs were analyzed via NMR and ESI-HRMS spectroscopies. The fucose units from each species presented extensive qualitative differences, but quantitative assessments of these units were hindered, mostly because of their extensive desulfation during the hydrolysis. The bottom-up analysis performed here has proved useful to explore the structure of FCS through a sum-of-the-parts approach in a qualitative manner. We further demonstrate that under specific acidification conditions particular fucose branches can be removed preferentially from FCS. Preparation of derivatives enriched with particular fucose branches could be useful for studies on "structure vs. biological function" of FCS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Structure and Dynamic Properties of Membrane Proteins using NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösner, Heike; Kragelund, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    conformational changes. Their structural and functional decoding is challenging and has imposed demanding experimental development. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the techniques providing the capacity to make a significant difference in the deciphering of the membrane protein...... structure-function paradigm. The method has evolved dramatically during the last decade resulting in a plethora of new experiments leading to a significant increase in the scientific repertoire for studying membrane proteins. Besides solving the three-dimensional structures using state-of-the-art approaches......-populated states, this review seeks to introduce the vast possibilities solution NMR can offer to the study of membrane protein structure-function analyses with special focus on applicability. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1491-1539, 2012....

  7. Protein structure estimation from NMR data by matrix completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhicheng; Li, Yang; Lei, Qiang; Zhao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Knowledge of protein structures is very important to understand their corresponding physical and chemical properties. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the main methods to measure protein structure. In this paper, we propose a two-stage approach to calculate the structure of a protein from a highly incomplete distance matrix, where most data are obtained from NMR. We first randomly "guess" a small part of unobservable distances by utilizing the triangle inequality, which is crucial for the second stage. Then we use matrix completion to calculate the protein structure from the obtained incomplete distance matrix. We apply the accelerated proximal gradient algorithm to solve the corresponding optimization problem. Furthermore, the recovery error of our method is analyzed, and its efficiency is demonstrated by several practical examples.

  8. Nuclear structure studies using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility: Progress report, [1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, G.W.

    1986-12-01

    A major part of the work done this past year was associated with research conducted at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) and the External Proton Beam (EPB). The research focussed on (1) providing p + nucleus data which test nonrelativistic and relativistic models of the medium energy proton + nucleus interaction, (2) providing (p,p) and (p,n) data which are to be analyzed to provide new nuclear structure information (both ground state and excited state), (3) providing nucleon + nucleon data to aid in the systematic study of the fundamental nucleon-nucleon interaction, (4) developing and improving the pA models themselves, and (5) initiating new experimental programs whose goals are to search for new phenomena in nuclear physics

  9. Intensive structural investigation of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}M{sub x} intermetallic compounds using high resolution powder neutron diffractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujamilah,; Ridwan, [Materials Science Research Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-10-01

    The crystallographic and magnetic structure of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}M{sub x} intermetallic compounds system were refined by Rietveld analyses of the high resolution neutron powder diffraction data. The analyses results show that the substituent atoms were not distributed randomly over the Fe sites, but preferentially occupied some Fe sites. More further, it was also found that the substituent atoms which atomic radius smaller than Fe tend to avoid the 6c site at low concentration while the larger substituent atom tend to replace the Fe atom at this 6c site corresponding to their concentration. From these crystallographic data, it was suggested that the change of magnetic ordering temperature Tc, is not mainly determined by the change of short bond distance between this `dumb-bell` atoms, but it was also influenced by the nearest coordinated atoms to this site. (author)

  10. Glacio-tectonic thrust and deformation structures in the Vejle Fjord, Denmark revealed by high-resolution subbottom-profile data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Katrine Juul; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Wahlgreen, Katrine Bak

    Surface geomorphological features and partial cliff exposures up till now represent the predominant source of information of glaciation related deformation in Denmark. In this study we apply high-resolution marine reflection seismic data from the Vejle Fjord area, supported by gravity and Rumohr...... coring, to document intense glacio-tectonic deformation in the shallow subsurface of Denmark. The subbottom profiler seismic data have a peak frequency around 13 kHz and a vertical resolution in the order of 10-20 cm. The data reveal several variations of glacio-tectonic deformation structures, primarily...... movements from outcrops and shallow cores. The subbottom profiler data provides larger (longer and deeper) sectional views on for instance deformation and deposition complexes related to ice progressions and retreats and thus represents a very good supplement and valuable input to field mapping and outcrops...

  11. High Resolution and Differential PIXE combined with RBS, EBS and AFM analysis of magnesium titanate (MgTiO3) multilayer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, M.A.; Alves, L.C.; Barradas, N.P.; Chaves, P.C.; Nunes, B.; Taborda, A.; Surendran, K.P.; Wu, A.; Vilarinho, P.M.; Alves, E.

    2010-01-01

    Thorough structural characterization of deep laying thin film, including the inference of interdiffusion profiles is frequently a complex problem. The use of RBS/PIXE holistic approaches, already shown to represent a powerful method, sometimes faces difficulties if standard experimental procedures are used. In this work, following a series of 4 He Rutherford backscattering and 1 H elastic backscattering experiments, carried out to study the influence of SrTiO 3 as a possible cladding layer between Pt/TiO 2 /SiO 2 /(1 0 0)Si substrates and MgTiO 3 films, a simple holistic RBS-PIXE is shown to be not enough for the solution of such a problem. Establishing of the Sr depth profile, was only possible after AFM, High-Resolution EDS PIXE and differential PIXE analysis were carried out. Results, problems faced and conclusions obtained are presented.

  12. Sulfated oligosaccharide structures, as determined by NMR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noseda, M.D.; Duarte, M.E.R.; Tischer, C.A.; Gorin, P.A.J.; Cerezo, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides, produced by red seaweeds (Rhodophyta), that have important biological and physico-chemical properties. Using partial autohydrolysis, we obtained sulfated oligosaccharides from a λ-carrageenan (Noseda and Cerezo, 1993). These oligosaccharides are valuable not only for the study of the structures of the parent carrageenans but also for their possible biological activities. In this work we determined the chemical structure of one of the sulfated oligosaccharides using 1D and 2D NMR techniques. (author)

  13. Solution and solid state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of C60 and C70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.D.; Yannoni, C.S.; Salem, J.; Meijer, G.; Bethune, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates the structure and dynamics of C 60 and C 70 with 13 C NMR spectroscopy. In solution, high-resolution spectra reveal that C 60 has a single resonance at 143 ppm, indicating a strained, aromatic system with high symmetry. This is strong evidence for a C 60 soccer ball geometry. A 2D NMR INADEQUATE experiment on 13 C-enriched C 70 reveals the bonding connectivity to be a linear string, in firm support of the proposed rugby ball structure with D 5h symmetry, and furnishes resonance assignments. Solid state NMR spectra of C 60 at ambient temperatures yield a narrow resonance, indicative of rapid molecular reorientation. Variable temperature T 1 measurements show that the rotational correlation time is ∼ 10 - 9 s at 230 K. At 77 K, this time increases to more than 1 ms, and the 13 C NMR spectrum of C 60 is a powder pattern due to chemical shift anisotropy (tensor components 220, 186, 40 ppm). At intermediate temperatures a narrow peak is superimposed on the powder pattern, suggesting a distribution of barriers to molecular motion in the sample, or the presence of an additional phase in the solid state. A Carr-Purcell dipolar experiment on C 60 in the solid state allows the first precise determination of the C 60 bond lengths: 1.45 and 1.40 Angstrom

  14. Structural study of the membrane protein MscL using cell-free expression and solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdine, Alaa; Verhoeven, Michiel A.; Park, Kyu-Ho; Ghazi, Alexandre; Guittet, Eric; Berrier, Catherine; Van Heijenoort, Carine; Warschawski, Dror E.

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution structures of membrane proteins have so far been obtained mostly by X-ray crystallography, on samples where the protein is surrounded by detergent. Recent developments of solid-state NMR have opened the way to a new approach for the study of integral membrane proteins inside a membrane. At the same time, the extension of cell-free expression to the production of membrane proteins allows for the production of proteins tailor made for NMR. We present here an in situ solid-state NMR study of a membrane protein selectively labeled through the use of cell-free expression. The sample consists of MscL (mechano-sensitive channel of large conductance), a 75 kDa pentameric α-helical ion channel from Escherichia coli, reconstituted in a hydrated lipid bilayer. Compared to a uniformly labeled protein sample, the spectral crowding is greatly reduced in the cell-free expressed protein sample. This approach may be a decisive step required for spectral assignment and structure determination of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  15. Assessment of the structure of pegylated-recombinant protein therapeutics by the NMR fingerprint assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Derek J; Aubin, Yves

    2017-05-10

    A number of recombinant protein therapeutic products, such as filgrastim (methionyl granulocyte colony stimulating factor [Met-GCSF] used to boost the immune system in chemotherapy treated cancer patients), and interferon alpha-2 (used for the treatment of various viral infections), have been chemically modified with the addition of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain. This modification prolongs residency of the drug in the body and reduces metabolic degradation, which allows less frequent administration of the products. Here we show how NMR spectroscopy methods can assess the higher order structure (HOS) of pegylated-filgrastim (Neulasta®), pegylated interferon-α2a (Pegasys®) pegylated interferon-α2b (PEG-Intron®) purchased from the marketplace. The addition of the PEG moiety effectively doubles the molecular weight of the three products. This presents a significant challenge for the application of NMR techniques. Nevertheless, the results showed that high-resolution spectra could be recorded for two of the three products. Comparison of the spectra of the pegylated protein and the non-pegylated protein shows that the chemical modification did not alter the HOS of these proteins. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Renal fine structures detected by NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilch, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    A significantly improved image quality is achieved by the technique described, as compared to the magnetic resonance data obtained so far. The detailed analysis of the kidney goes as deep as into anatomic fine structures, and there is reason to hope for far better diagnostic details. (orig.) [de

  17. STRUCTURAL STUDY AND INVESTIGATION OF NMR TENSORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    theory. The structural and vibrational properties of dopamine-4-N7GUA and ... There is evidence, however, that DA is involved in the ... spectra to the results of ab initio gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) [14-17] and continuous- ..... Nicholls, G. Proteins, transmitter & synapses, Blackwell Scientific Publication: Scotland;.

  18. Dual high-resolution inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis for identification of α-glucosidase and radical scavenging inhibitors in Solanum americanum Mill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Eder Lana e; Almeida-Lafetá, Rita C.; Borges, Ricardo Moreira

    2017-01-01

    Solanum americanum is one of the most prominent species used to treat type 2 diabetes in Guatemala. In our ongoing efforts to find antidiabetic and antioxidative compounds from natural sources, an ethyl acetate extract of this medicinal herb was investigated using dual high-resolution α-glucosida......Solanum americanum is one of the most prominent species used to treat type 2 diabetes in Guatemala. In our ongoing efforts to find antidiabetic and antioxidative compounds from natural sources, an ethyl acetate extract of this medicinal herb was investigated using dual high-resolution α...

  19. Abstracts of International Conference on Experimental and Computing Methods in High Resolution Diffraction Applied for Structure Characterization of Modern Materials - HREDAMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The conference addressed all aspects of high resolution diffraction. The topics of meeting include advanced experimental diffraction methods and computer data analysis for characterization of modern materials as well as the progress and new achievements in high resolution diffraction (X-ray, electrons, neutrons). Application of these methods for characterization of modern materials are widely presented among the invited, oral and poster contributions

  20. Aortic and Cardiac Structure and Function Using High-Resolution Echocardiography and Optical Coherence Tomography in a Mouse Model of Marfan Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Lee

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is an autosomal-dominant disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1 gene. Mortality is often due to aortic dissection and rupture. We investigated the structural and functional properties of the heart and aorta in a [Fbn1C1039G/+] MFS mouse using high-resolution ultrasound (echo and optical coherence tomography (OCT. Echo was performed on 6- and 12-month old wild type (WT and MFS mice (n = 8. In vivo pulse wave velocity (PWV, aortic root diameter, ejection fraction, stroke volume, left ventricular (LV wall thickness, LV mass and mitral valve early and atrial velocities (E/A ratio were measured by high resolution echocardiography. OCT was performed on 12-month old WT and MFS fixed mouse hearts to measure ventricular volume and mass. The PWV was significantly increased in 6-mo MFS vs. WT (366.6 ± 19.9 vs. 205.2 ± 18.1 cm/s; p = 0.003 and 12-mo MFS vs. WT (459.5 ± 42.3 vs. 205.3 ± 30.3 cm/s; p< 0.0001. PWV increased with age in MFS mice only. We also found a significantly enlarged aortic root and decreased E/A ratio in MFS mice compared with WT for both age groups. The [Fbn1C1039G/+] mouse model of MFS replicates many of the anomalies of Marfan patients including significant aortic dilation, central aortic stiffness, LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. This is the first demonstration of the direct measurement in vivo of pulse wave velocity non-invasively in the aortic arch of MFS mice, a robust measure of aortic stiffness and a critical clinical parameter for the assessment of pathology in the Marfan syndrome.

  1. High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Silver(I)-RNA Hybrid Duplex Containing Watson-Crick-like C-Silver(I)-C Metallo-Base Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Tada, Yoshinari; Dairaku, Takenori; Saneyoshi, Hisao; Okamoto, Itaru; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Akira

    2015-11-02

    Metallo-base pairs have been extensively studied for applications in nucleic acid-based nanodevices and genetic code expansion. Metallo-base pairs composed of natural nucleobases are attractive because nanodevices containing natural metallo-base pairs can be easily prepared from commercially available sources. Previously, we have reported a crystal structure of a DNA duplex containing T-Hg(II)-T base pairs. Herein, we have determined a high-resolution crystal structure of the second natural metallo-base pair between pyrimidine bases C-Ag(I)-C formed in an RNA duplex. One Ag(I) occupies the center between two cytosines and forms a C-Ag(I)-C base pair through N3-Ag(I)-N3 linear coordination. The C-Ag(I)-C base pair formation does not disturb the standard A-form conformation of RNA. Since the C-Ag(I)-C base pair is structurally similar to the canonical Watson-Crick base pairs, it can be a useful building block for structure-based design and fabrication of nucleic acid-based nanodevices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. High-Resolution Digital Elevation Modeling from TLS and UAV Campaign Reveals Structural Complexity at the 2014/2015 Holuhraun Eruption Site, Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Müller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fissure eruptions are commonly linked to magma dikes at depth and are associated with elastic and inelastic surface deformation. Elastic deformation is well described by subsidence occurring above the dike plane and uplift and lateral widening occurring perpendicular to the dike plane. Inelastic deformation is associated with the formation of a graben, which is bordered by graben parallel faults that might express as sets of fractures at the surface. Additionally, secondary structures, such as push-ups, bends and step overs, yield information about the deforming domain. However, once these structures are formed during fissure eruptions, they are rarely preserved in nature, due to the effects of rapid erosion, sediment coverage or overprinting by other faulting events. Therefore, simple normal fault displacements are commonly assumed at dikes. At the 2014/2015 Holuhraun eruption sites (Iceland, increasing evidence suggests that developing fractures exhibited variations in their displacement modes. In an attempt to investigate these variations, a fieldwork mapping project combining Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV-based aerophoto analysis was undertaken. Using these data, we generated local high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs and a structural map that facilitated the identification of kinematic indicators and the assessment of the observed structures. We identified 315 fracture segments from these satellite data. We measured the strike directions of single segments, including the amount of opening and opening angles, which indicate that many of the measured fractures show transtensional dislocations. Of these, ~81% exhibit a significant left-lateral component and only ~17% exhibit a right-lateral component. Here, we demonstrate that the local complexities in these fracture traces and geometries are closely related to variations in their transtensional opening directions. Moreover, we identified local

  3. DNA nanotubes for NMR structure determination of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellot, Gaëtan; McClintock, Mark A; Chou, James J; Shih, William M

    2013-04-01

    Finding a way to determine the structures of integral membrane proteins using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has proved to be challenging. A residual-dipolar-coupling-based refinement approach can be used to resolve the structure of membrane proteins up to 40 kDa in size, but to do this you need a weak-alignment medium that is detergent-resistant and it has thus far been difficult to obtain such a medium suitable for weak alignment of membrane proteins. We describe here a protocol for robust, large-scale synthesis of detergent-resistant DNA nanotubes that can be assembled into dilute liquid crystals for application as weak-alignment media in solution NMR structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. The DNA nanotubes are heterodimers of 400-nm-long six-helix bundles, each self-assembled from a M13-based p7308 scaffold strand and >170 short oligonucleotide staple strands. Compatibility with proteins bearing considerable positive charge as well as modulation of molecular alignment, toward collection of linearly independent restraints, can be introduced by reducing the negative charge of DNA nanotubes using counter ions and small DNA-binding molecules. This detergent-resistant liquid-crystal medium offers a number of properties conducive for membrane protein alignment, including high-yield production, thermal stability, buffer compatibility and structural programmability. Production of sufficient nanotubes for four or five NMR experiments can be completed in 1 week by a single individual.

  4. Raman spectroscopy adds complementary detail to the high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of photosynthetic PsbP from Spinacia oleracea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Kopecky

    Full Text Available Raman microscopy permits structural analysis of protein crystals in situ in hanging drops, allowing for comparison with Raman measurements in solution. Nevertheless, the two methods sometimes reveal subtle differences in structure that are often ascribed to the water layer surrounding the protein. The novel method of drop-coating deposition Raman spectropscopy (DCDR exploits an intermediate phase that, although nominally "dry," has been shown to preserve protein structural features present in solution. The potential of this new approach to bridge the structural gap between proteins in solution and in crystals is explored here with extrinsic protein PsbP of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea. In the high-resolution (1.98 Å x-ray crystal structure of PsbP reported here, several segments of the protein chain are present but unresolved. Analysis of the three kinds of Raman spectra of PsbP suggests that most of the subtle differences can indeed be attributed to the water envelope, which is shown here to have a similar Raman intensity in glassy and crystal states. Using molecular dynamics simulations cross-validated by Raman solution data, two unresolved segments of the PsbP crystal structure were modeled as loops, and the amino terminus was inferred to contain an additional beta segment. The complete PsbP structure was compared with that of the PsbP-like protein CyanoP, which plays a more peripheral role in photosystem II function. The comparison suggests possible interaction surfaces of PsbP with higher-plant photosystem II. This work provides the first complete structural picture of this key protein, and it represents the first systematic comparison of Raman data from solution, glassy, and crystalline states of a protein.

  5. Automated method for relating regional pulmonary structure and function: integration of dynamic multislice CT and thin-slice high-resolution CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Jehangir K.; Kugelmass, Steven D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1993-07-01

    We have developed a method utilizing x-ray CT for relating pulmonary perfusion to global and regional anatomy, allowing for detailed study of structure to function relationships. A thick slice, high temporal resolution mode is used to follow a bolus contrast agent for blood flow evaluation and is fused with a high spatial resolution, thin slice mode to obtain structure- function detail. To aid analysis of blood flow, we have developed a software module, for our image analysis package (VIDA), to produce the combined structure-function image. Color coded images representing blood flow, mean transit time, regional tissue content, regional blood volume, regional air content, etc. are generated and imbedded in the high resolution volume image. A text file containing these values along with a voxel's 3-D coordinates is also generated. User input can be minimized to identifying the location of the pulmonary artery from which the input function to a blood flow model is derived. Any flow model utilizing one input and one output function can be easily added to a user selectable list. We present examples from our physiologic based research findings to demonstrate the strengths of combining dynamic CT and HRCT relative to other scanning modalities to uniquely characterize pulmonary normal and pathophysiology.

  6. Characterization of the Navy Fan Channel-to-Lobe Transition: Geomorphology, Gradient, and Structure Imaged through High-Resolution AUV Bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, C.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Gwiazda, R.; Fildani, A.; Dykstra, M.; McGann, M.; Maier, K. L.; Herguera, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Channel to lobe transition zones (CLTZ) are elusive sectors of the seafloor. They record complex interactions between sediment-gravity flows, flow confinement, and gradient that can result in contrasting geomorphologies. If present, structural controls can add additional intricacies. We illustrate such complexities in the Navy Fan CLTZ offshore California/Mexico using AUV-collected high-resolution (1x1x0.25 m) bathymetry and chirp profiles. The AUV bathymetry images the fine scale details of the seafloor, otherwise unresolved in surface-ship-mounted multibeam bathymetry. Three morphological areas standout that in a direction transverse to sediment transport are: 1) An unconfined area with variable but overall steep gradients (0.5o-1.7o), and considerable erosion shown by numerous large scours that truncate underlying strata. These scours are elongate (turbidity currents due to high gradients, which resulted from relief along the San Clemente Fault and probably from differential seafloor aggradation. In the moderate confinement area, the smoother and gentler seafloor may be related to more efficient sediment dispersal able to transfer/deposit sediment to heal structural relief (though not completely) while avoiding significant local aggradation, hence preventing major gradient build up. In the faulted area, the steep and prominent structure reroutes the sediments. The findings of this study have broad application to any seafloor areas with rapid changes of gradient.

  7. Determination of structural topology of a membrane protein in lipid bilayers using polarization optimized experiments (POE) for static and MAS solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mote, Kaustubh R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States); Gopinath, T. [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The low sensitivity inherent to both the static and magic angle spinning techniques of solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has thus far limited the routine application of multidimensional experiments to determine the structure of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Here, we demonstrate the advantage of using a recently developed class of experiments, polarization optimized experiments, for both static and MAS spectroscopy to achieve higher sensitivity and substantial time-savings for 2D and 3D experiments. We used sarcolipin, a single pass membrane protein, reconstituted in oriented bicelles (for oriented ssNMR) and multilamellar vesicles (for MAS ssNMR) as a benchmark. The restraints derived by these experiments are then combined into a hybrid energy function to allow simultaneous determination of structure and topology. The resulting structural ensemble converged to a helical conformation with a backbone RMSD {approx}0.44 A, a tilt angle of 24 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign , and an azimuthal angle of 55 Degree-Sign {+-} 6 Degree-Sign . This work represents a crucial first step toward obtaining high-resolution structures of large membrane proteins using combined multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR.

  8. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Short, Judith M.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Henderson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  9. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Short, Judith M.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Henderson, Richard, E-mail: rh15@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk

    2013-12-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  10. Probing the electronic structure and Au–C chemical bonding in AuC2− and AuC2 using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    We report photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and high-resolution PE imaging of AuC 2 − at a wide range of photon energies. The ground state of AuC 2 − is found to be linear (C ∞v , 1 Σ + ) with a …8π 4 4δ 4 17σ 2 9π 4 18σ 2 valence configuration. Detachments from all the five valence orbitals of the ground state of AuC 2 − are observed at 193 nm. High-resolution PE images are obtained in the energy range from 830 to 330 nm, revealing complicated vibronic structures from electron detachment of the 18σ, 9π, and 17σ orbitals. Detachment from the 18σ orbital results in the 2 Σ + ground state of neutral AuC 2 , which, however, is bent due to strong vibronic coupling with the nearby 2 Π state from detachment of a 9π electron. The 2 Σ + – 2 Π vibronic and spin-orbit coupling results in complicated vibronic structures for the 2 Σ + and 2 Π 3/2 states with extensive bending excitations. The electron affinity of AuC 2 is measured accurately to be 3.2192(7) eV with a ground state bending frequency of 195(6) cm −1 . The first excited state ( 2 A′) of AuC 2 , corresponding to the 2 Π 3/2 state at the linear geometry, is only 0.0021 eV above the ground state ( 2 A′) and has a bending frequency of 207(6) cm −1 . The 2 Π 1/2 state, 0.2291 eV above the ground state, is linear with little geometry change relative to the anion ground state. The detachment of the 17σ orbital also results in complicated vibronic structures, suggesting again a bent state due to possible vibronic coupling with the lower 2 Π state. The spectrum at 193 nm shows the presence of a minor species with less than 2% intensity relative to the ground state of AuC 2 − . High-resolution data of the minor species reveal several vibrational progressions in the Au–C stretching mode, which are assigned to be from the metastable 3 Π 2,1,0 spin-orbit excited states of AuC 2 − to the 2 Π 3/2,1/2 spin-orbit states of neutral AuC 2 . The spin-orbit splittings of the 3 Π and 2

  11. High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Buckin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy (HR-US is an analytical technique for direct and non-destructive monitoring of molecular and micro-structural transformations in liquids and semi-solid materials. It is based on precision measurements of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in analysed samples. The application areas of HR-US in research, product development, and quality and process control include analysis of conformational transitions of polymers, ligand binding, molecular self-assembly and aggregation, crystallisation, gelation, characterisation of phase transitions and phase diagrams, and monitoring of chemical and biochemical reactions. The technique does not require optical markers or optical transparency. The HR-US measurements can be performed in small sample volumes (down to droplet size, over broad temperature range, at ambient and elevated pressures, and in various measuring regimes such as automatic temperature ramps, titrations and measurements in flow.

  12. Structural characterization of epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 thin films on step-edge substrates by means of high-resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, C.L.; Kabius, B.; Urban, K.

    1993-01-01

    The microstructure of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 films epitaxially grown on step-edge (0 0 1) SrTiO 3 and LaAlO 3 substrates has been characterized by means of high-resolution electron microscopy. The results indicate a relationship between the microstructure of the film across a step and the angle the step makes with the substrate plane. On a steep, high-angle step, the film grows with its c-axis perpendicular to that of the film on substrate surface so that two grain boundaries are formed. In the upper grain boundary, on the average, a (0 1 3) habit plane alternates with a (1 0 3) habit plane. This alternating structure is caused by twinning in the orthorhombic structure. The lower boundaries consist of a chain of (0 1 3)(0 1 3) and (0 1 0)(0 0 1) type segments exhibiting a tendency to tilt the whole habit plane toward the a-b plane of the flank film. Dislocations, stacking faults and misfit strains were also observed in or close to the boundaries. (orig.)

  13. Tunneling Splittings in Vibronic Structure of CH_3F^+ ( X^2E): Studied by High Resolution Photoelectron Spectra and AB Initio Theoretical Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yuxiang; Gao, Shuming; Dai, Zuyang; Li, Hua

    2013-06-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the vibronic structure of CH_3F^+. The results show that the tunneling splittings of vibrational energy levels occur in CH_3F^+ due to the Jahn-Teller effect. Experimentally, we have measured a high resolution ZEKE spectrum of CH_3F up to 3500 cm^-^1 above the ground state. Theoretically, we performed an ab initio calculation based on the diabatic model. The adiabatic potential energy surfaces (APES) of CH_3F^+ have been calculated at the MRCI/CAS/avq(t)z level and expressed by Taylor expansions with normal coordinates as variables. The energy gradients for the lower and upper APES, the derivative couplings between them and also the energies of the APES have been used to determine the coefficients in the Taylor expansion. The spin-vibronic energy levels have been calculated by accounting all six vibrational modes and their couplings. The experimental ZEKE spectra were assigned based on the theoretical calculations. W. Domcke, D. R. Yarkony, and H. Köpple (Eds.), Conical Intersections: Eletronic Structure, Dynamics and Spectroscopy (World Scientific, Singapore, 2004). M. S. Schuurman, D. E. Weinberg, and D. R. Yarkony, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 104309 (2007).

  14. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R; Murshudov, Garib N; Short, Judith M; Scheres, Sjors H W; Henderson, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  15. Monitoring post-fire changes in species composition and stand structure in boreal forests using high-resolution, 3-D aerial drone data and Landsat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, M.; Morton, D. C.; Cook, B.; Andersen, H. E.; Mack, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    The growing frequency and severity of boreal forest fires has important consequences for fire carbon emissions and ecosystem composition. Severe fires are typically associated with high degrees of both canopy and soil organic layer (SOL) consumption, particularly in black spruce stands. Complete canopy consumption can decrease the likelihood of spruce regeneration due to reduced viability of the aerial seedbank. Deeper burning of the SOL increases fire emissions and can expose mineral soil that promotes colonization by broadleaf species. There is mounting evidence that a disturbance-driven shift from spruce to broadleaf forests may indicate an ecological state change with feedbacks to regional and global climate. If post-fire successional dynamics can be characterized at an ecosystem scale using remote sensing data, we will be better equipped to constrain carbon and energy fluxes from SOL losses and albedo changes. In this study, we used Landsat time series, very high-resolution structure-from-motion (SFM) drone imagery, and field measurements to investigate post-fire regrowth 13 years after the 2004 Taylor Complex (TC) fires in interior Alaska. Twenty-seven TC plots span a gradient of moisture conditions and burn severity as estimated by loss of SOL. A range of variables potentially governing seedling species dominance (e.g., moisture status, distance to seed sources) have been collected systematically over the years following fire. In July 2017, we additionally collected drone imagery over 25 of the TC plots. We processed these highly overlapped, nadir-view and oblique angle photos into extremely dense (>700 pts/m2) RGB-colored point clouds using SFM techniques. With these point clouds and high resolution orthomosaics, we estimated: 1) snag heights and biomass, 2) remnant snag fine branching, and 3) species and structure of shrubs and groundcover that have regrown since fire. We additionally assembled a dense Landsat time series arranged by day-of-year to monitor

  16. High Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes∥,‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD+ in most prokaryotes, most single cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD+ homeostasis has increased interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD+ consuming enzymes, such as the NAD+-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding while a trapped nicotinoyl-thioester complexed with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule, and an oxyanion hole which both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence for several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:20853856

  17. High-resolution crystal structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae nicotinamidase with trapped intermediates provide insights into the catalytic mechanism and inhibition by aldehydes .

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jarrod B; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A; Ealick, Steven E

    2010-10-12

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD(+) in most prokaryotes and most single-cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD(+) homeostasis has stimulated interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, such as the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high-resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding, while a trapped nicotinoyl thioester in a complex with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features, including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule and an oxyanion hole that both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence of several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  18. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Weill-Med)

    2010-11-11

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD{sup +} in most prokaryotes and most single-cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD{sup +} homeostasis has stimulated interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD{sup +}-consuming enzymes, such as the NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high-resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding, while a trapped nicotinoyl thioester in a complex with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features, including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule and an oxyanion hole that both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence of several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  19. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the high temperature crystal structures of GexSb2Te3+x (x=1,2,3) phase change material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structures of GeSb2Te4, Ge2Sb2Te5, and Ge3Sb2Te6 were determined using electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structure determined for the former two crystals deviates from the ones proposed in the literature. These crystal structures were

  20. NMR structural studies of oligosaccharides and other natural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Louise

    produce secondary metabolites for signaling and competing against other organisms, and these molecules are important in drug discovery due to their inherent biological activities. From a marine Photobacterium (P. halotolerans) we isolated the solonamides and the ngercheumicins, two families of cyclic...... through the nJCH correlation, this experiment has exciting applications for configurational assignment of e.g. carbohydrates and for residual dipolar couplings. Identification of known molecules and discovery of novel molecules are other important applications of NMR spectroscopy. Bacteria and fungi....... fijiensis, was also investigated for production of novel secondary metabolites, and a new pyranonigrin (E) was isolated and structure elucidated by NMR spectroscopy along with JBIR-74 and decumbenone A, two known metabolites previously isolated from Aspergillus and Penicillium species. Oligosaccharides...

  1. High-resolution crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase in complex with its endogenous inhibitor IFS reveals a highly water-rich interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Young; An, Doo Ri; Yoon, Hye-Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Sook [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jae [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Ha Na; Jang, Jun Young [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Se Won, E-mail: sewonsuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure of the complex between the C-terminal domain of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase and an endogenous inhibitor for SPN was determined at 1.70 Å. It reveals that the interface between the two proteins is highly rich in water molecules. One of the virulence factors produced by Streptococcus pyogenes is β-NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase (SPN). S. pyogenes injects SPN into the cytosol of an infected host cell using the cytolysin-mediated translocation pathway. As SPN is toxic to bacterial cells themselves, S. pyogenes possesses the ifs gene that encodes an endogenous inhibitor for SPN (IFS). IFS is localized intracellularly and forms a complex with SPN. This intracellular complex must be dissociated during export through the cell envelope. To provide a structural basis for understanding the interactions between SPN and IFS, the complex was overexpressed between the mature SPN (residues 38–451) and the full-length IFS (residues 1–161), but it could not be crystallized. Therefore, limited proteolysis was used to isolate a crystallizable SPN{sub ct}–IFS complex, which consists of the SPN C-terminal domain (SPN{sub ct}; residues 193–451) and the full-length IFS. Its crystal structure has been determined by single anomalous diffraction and the model refined at 1.70 Å resolution. Interestingly, our high-resolution structure of the complex reveals that the interface between SPN{sub ct} and IFS is highly rich in water molecules and many of the interactions are water-mediated. The wet interface may facilitate the dissociation of the complex for translocation across the cell envelope.

  2. High-resolution crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD+ glycohydrolase in complex with its endogenous inhibitor IFS reveals a highly water-rich interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ji Young; An, Doo Ri; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Lee, Sang Jae; Im, Ha Na; Jang, Jun Young; Suh, Se Won

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of the complex between the C-terminal domain of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD + glycohydrolase and an endogenous inhibitor for SPN was determined at 1.70 Å. It reveals that the interface between the two proteins is highly rich in water molecules. One of the virulence factors produced by Streptococcus pyogenes is β-NAD + glycohydrolase (SPN). S. pyogenes injects SPN into the cytosol of an infected host cell using the cytolysin-mediated translocation pathway. As SPN is toxic to bacterial cells themselves, S. pyogenes possesses the ifs gene that encodes an endogenous inhibitor for SPN (IFS). IFS is localized intracellularly and forms a complex with SPN. This intracellular complex must be dissociated during export through the cell envelope. To provide a structural basis for understanding the interactions between SPN and IFS, the complex was overexpressed between the mature SPN (residues 38–451) and the full-length IFS (residues 1–161), but it could not be crystallized. Therefore, limited proteolysis was used to isolate a crystallizable SPN ct –IFS complex, which consists of the SPN C-terminal domain (SPN ct ; residues 193–451) and the full-length IFS. Its crystal structure has been determined by single anomalous diffraction and the model refined at 1.70 Å resolution. Interestingly, our high-resolution structure of the complex reveals that the interface between SPN ct and IFS is highly rich in water molecules and many of the interactions are water-mediated. The wet interface may facilitate the dissociation of the complex for translocation across the cell envelope

  3. Sulfated oligosaccharide structures, as determined by NMR techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noseda, M.D.; Duarte, M.E.R.; Tischer, C.A.; Gorin, P.A.J. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. De Bioquimica; Cerezo, A.S. [Buenos Aires Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica Organica

    1997-12-31

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides, produced by red seaweeds (Rhodophyta), that have important biological and physico-chemical properties. Using partial autohydrolysis, we obtained sulfated oligosaccharides from a {lambda}-carrageenan (Noseda and Cerezo, 1993). These oligosaccharides are valuable not only for the study of the structures of the parent carrageenans but also for their possible biological activities. In this work we determined the chemical structure of one of the sulfated oligosaccharides using 1D and 2D NMR techniques. (author) 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tabs.

  4. Accurate evaluation of subband structure in a carrier accumulation layer at an n-type InAs surface: LDF calculation combined with high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Inaoka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption on an n-type InAs surface often induces a gradual formation of a carrier-accumulation layer at the surface. By means of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy (PES, Betti et al. made a systematic observation of subbands in the accumulation layer in the formation process. Incorporating a highly nonparabolic (NP dispersion of the conduction band into the local-density-functional (LDF formalism, we examine the subband structure in the accumulation-layer formation process. Combining the LDF calculation with the PES experiment, we make an accurate evaluation of the accumulated-carrier density, the subband-edge energies, and the subband energy dispersion at each formation stage. Our theoretical calculation can reproduce the three observed subbands quantitatively. The subband dispersion, which deviates downward from that of the projected bulk conduction band with an increase in wave number, becomes significantly weaker in the formation process. Accurate evaluation of the NP subband dispersion at each formation stage is indispensable in making a quantitative analysis of collective electronic excitations and transport properties in the subbands.

  5. Nuclear structure studies using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility: Annual progress report, [1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This document constitutes the (1987 to 1988) progress report for the ongoing medium energy nuclear physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy with the University of Texas at Austin. A major part of the work has been and will continue to be associated with research done at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS), the External Proton Beam (EPB), and the new Neutron Time of Flight Facility (NTOF). Other research is done at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The research focuses on (1) providing proton + nucleus data which test nonrelativistic and relativistic models of the medium energy proton + nucleus interaction, (2) providing (p,p) and (p,n) data which are to be analyzed to provide new nuclear structure information (both ground state and excited state), (3) providing nucleon + nucleon data to aid in the systematic study of the fundamental nucleon-nucleon interaction, (4) developing and improving the proton + nucleus theoretical models themselves, and (5) initiating new experimental programs whose goals are to search for new phenomena in nuclear physics. 182 refs., 71 figs., 5 tabs

  6. High-resolution extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of G191-B2B: structure of the stellar photosphere and the surrounding interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, M. A.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.; Bannister, N. P.; Yentis, D.; Lapington, J. S.; Tandy, J. A.; Hubeny, I.; Schuh, S.; Dreizler, S.; Barbee, T. W.

    2005-10-01

    We have continued our detailed analysis of the high-resolution (R= 4000) spectroscopic observation of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, obtained by the Joint Astrophysical Plasmadynamic Experiment (J-PEX) normal incidence sounding rocket-borne telescope, comparing the observed data with theoretical predictions for both homogeneous and stratified atmosphere structures. We find that the former models give the best agreement over the narrow waveband covered by J-PEX, in conflict with what is expected from previous studies of the lower resolution but broader wavelength coverage Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer spectra. We discuss the possible limitations of the atomic data and our understanding of the stellar atmospheres that might give rise to this inconsistency. In our earlier study, we obtained an unusually high ionization fraction for the ionized HeII present along the line of sight to the star. In the present paper, we obtain a better fit when we assume, as suggested by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph results, that this HeII resides in two separate components. When one of these is assigned to the local interstellar cloud, the implied He ionization fraction is consistent with measurements along other lines of sight. However, the resolving power and signal-to-noise available from the instrument configuration used in this first successful J-PEX flight are not sufficient to clearly identify and prove the existence of the two components.

  7. An Automated Technique for Generating Georectified Mosaics from Ultra-High Resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV Imagery, Based on Structure from Motion (SfM Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Watson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs are an exciting new remote sensing tool capable of acquiring high resolution spatial data. Remote sensing with UAVs has the potential to provide imagery at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. The small footprint of UAV imagery, however, makes it necessary to develop automated techniques to geometrically rectify and mosaic the imagery such that larger areas can be monitored. In this paper, we present a technique for geometric correction and mosaicking of UAV photography using feature matching and Structure from Motion (SfM photogrammetric techniques. Images are processed to create three dimensional point clouds, initially in an arbitrary model space. The point clouds are transformed into a real-world coordinate system using either a direct georeferencing technique that uses estimated camera positions or via a Ground Control Point (GCP technique that uses automatically identified GCPs within the point cloud. The point cloud is then used to generate a Digital Terrain Model (DTM required for rectification of the images. Subsequent georeferenced images are then joined together to form a mosaic of the study area. The absolute spatial accuracy of the direct technique was found to be 65–120 cm whilst the GCP technique achieves an accuracy of approximately 10–15 cm.

  8. Azimuthally anisotropic hydride lens structures in Zircaloy 4 nuclear fuel cladding: High-resolution neutron radiography imaging and BISON finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun-Li; Zhong, Weicheng; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Heuser, Brent J.

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution neutron radiography has been used to image bulk circumferential hydride lens particles in unirradiated Zircaloy 4 tubing cross section specimens. Zircaloy 4 is a common light water nuclear reactor (LWR) fuel cladding; hydrogen pickup, hydride formation, and the concomitant effect on the mechanical response are important for LWR applications. Ring cross section specimens with three hydrogen concentrations (460, 950, and 2830 parts per million by weight) and an as-received reference specimen were imaged. Azimuthally anisotropic hydride lens particles were observed at 950 and 2830 wppm. The BISON finite element analysis nuclear fuel performance code was used to model the system elastic response induced by hydride volumetric dilatation. The compressive hoop stress within the lens structure becomes azimuthally anisotropic at high hydrogen concentrations or high hydride phase fraction. This compressive stress anisotropy matches the observed lens anisotropy, implicating the effect of stress on hydride formation as the cause of the observed lens azimuthal asymmetry. The cause and effect relation between compressive stress and hydride lens anisotropy represents an indirect validation of a key BISON output, the evolved hoop stress associated with hydride formation.

  9. Structural investigations of substituted indolizine derivatives by NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furdui, Bianca; Dinica, Rodica; Demeunynck, Martine; Druta, Ioan

    2008-01-01

    Owing to the increasing importance of indolizine heterocycles in the field of biology and pharmacology we have synthesized and investigated the obtained heterocycles by NMR techniques. In order to investigate the substituent effects on the spectroscopic properties, a series of indolizine derivatives were studied by 1 H-NMR, 13 C-NMR and 2D NMR (GCOSY, GHMBC and GHMQC spectra). (authors)

  10. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  11. 4D imaging and quantification of pore structure modifications inside natural building stones by means of high resolution X-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewanckele, J; De Kock, T; Boone, M A; Cnudde, V; Brabant, L; Boone, M N; Fronteau, G; Van Hoorebeke, L; Jacobs, P

    2012-02-01

    Weathering processes have been studied in detail for many natural building stones. The most commonly used analytical techniques in these studies are thin-section petrography, SEM, XRD and XRF. Most of these techniques are valuable for chemical and mineralogical analysis of the weathering patterns. However, to obtain crucial quantitative information on structural evolutions like porosity changes and growth of weathering crusts in function of time, non-destructive techniques become necessary. In this study, a Belgian historical calcareous sandstone, the Lede stone, was exposed to gaseous SO(2) under wet surface conditions according to the European Standard NBN EN 13919 (2003). Before, during and after the strong acid test, high resolution X-ray tomography has been performed to visualize gypsum crust formation to yield a better insight into the effects of gaseous SO(2) on the pore modification in 3D. The tomographic scans were taken at the Centre for X-ray Tomography at Ghent University (UGCT). With the aid of image analysis, partial porosity changes were calculated in different stadia of the process. Increasing porosity has been observed visually and quantitatively below the new superficial formed layer of gypsum crystals. In some cases micro-cracks and dissolution zones were detected on the grain boundaries of quartz. By using Morpho+, an in-house developed image analysis program, radial porosity, partial porosity, ratio of open and closed porosity and equivalent diameter of individual pore structures have been calculated. The results obtained in this study are promising for a better understanding of gypsum weathering mechanisms, porosity changes and patterns on natural building stones in four dimensions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid state NMR of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Sharon A; Ferguson, David B; Haw, James F [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    In situ NMR experiments are studied, including probe of several structures such as the structures of the organic adsorbates, Broensted acid sites, other nuclei associated with active sites, and other framework sites. The authors report that in the absence of high concentrations of paramagnetic sites or metal particles, high resolution MAS spectra are relatively easy to obtain and interpret. It is also concluded that NMR can measure spatial distributions and rates of diffusion; and are able to characterize equilibrium structures and the frequencies and amplitudes of molecular motion

  13. Modeling an in-register, parallel "iowa" aβ fibril structure using solid-state NMR data from labeled samples with rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Yau, Wai-Ming; Qiang, Wei

    2015-01-06

    Determining the structures of amyloid fibrils is an important first step toward understanding the molecular basis of neurodegenerative diseases. For β-amyloid (Aβ) fibrils, conventional solid-state NMR structure determination using uniform labeling is limited by extensive peak overlap. We describe the characterization of a distinct structural polymorph of Aβ using solid-state NMR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Rosetta model building. First, the overall fibril arrangement is established using mass-per-length measurements from TEM. Then, the fibril backbone arrangement, stacking registry, and "steric zipper" core interactions are determined using a number of solid-state NMR techniques on sparsely (13)C-labeled samples. Finally, we perform Rosetta structure calculations with an explicitly symmetric representation of the system. We demonstrate the power of the hybrid Rosetta/NMR approach by modeling the in-register, parallel "Iowa" mutant (D23N) at high resolution (1.2Å backbone rmsd). The final models are validated using an independent set of NMR experiments that confirm key features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy? NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

  15. Software-aided approach to investigate peptide structure and metabolic susceptibility of amide bonds in peptide drugs based on high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Radchenko

    Full Text Available Interest in using peptide molecules as therapeutic agents due to high selectivity and efficacy is increasing within the pharmaceutical industry. However, most peptide-derived drugs cannot be administered orally because of low bioavailability and instability in the gastrointestinal tract due to protease activity. Therefore, structural modifications peptides are required to improve their stability. For this purpose, several in-silico software tools have been developed such as PeptideCutter or PoPS, which aim to predict peptide cleavage sites for different proteases. Moreover, several databases exist where this information is collected and stored from public sources such as MEROPS and ExPASy ENZYME databases. These tools can help design a peptide drug with increased stability against proteolysis, though they are limited to natural amino acids or cannot process cyclic peptides, for example. We worked to develop a new methodology to analyze peptide structure and amide bond metabolic stability based on the peptide structure (linear/cyclic, natural/unnatural amino acids. This approach used liquid chromatography / high resolution, mass spectrometry to obtain the analytical data from in vitro incubations. We collected experimental data for a set (linear/cyclic, natural/unnatural amino acids of fourteen peptide drugs and four substrate peptides incubated with different proteolytic media: trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, pancreatic elastase, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and neprilysin. Mass spectrometry data was analyzed to find metabolites and determine their structures, then all the results were stored in a chemically aware manner, which allows us to compute the peptide bond susceptibility by using a frequency analysis of the metabolic-liable bonds. In total 132 metabolites were found from the various in vitro conditions tested resulting in 77 distinct cleavage sites. The most frequent observed cleavage sites agreed with those reported in the literature. The

  16. Structure from motion, a low cost, very high resolution method for surveying glaciers using GoPros and opportunistic helicopter flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, L.; Nuth, C.; Schellenberger, T.

    2014-12-01

    The capability of structure from motion techniques to survey glaciers with a very high spatial and temporal resolution is a promising tool for better understanding the dynamic changes of glaciers. Modern software and computing power allow us to produce accurate data sets from low cost surveys, thus improving the observational capabilities on a wider range of glaciers and glacial processes. In particular, highly accurate glacier volume change monitoring and 3D movement computations will be possible Taking advantage of the helicopter flight needed to survey the ice stakes on Kronenbreen, NW Svalbard, we acquired high resolution photogrammetric data over the well-studied Midre Lovénbreen in September 2013. GoPro Hero 2 cameras were attached to the landing gear of the helicopter, acquiring two images per second. A C/A code based GPS was used for registering the stereoscopic model. Camera clock calibration is obtained through fitting together the shapes of the flight given by both the GPS logger and the relative orientation of the images. A DEM and an ortho-image are generated at 30cm resolution from 300 images collected. The comparison with a 2005 LiDAR DEM (5 meters resolution) shows an absolute error in the direct registration of about 6±3m in 3D which could be easily reduced to 1,5±1m by using fine point cloud alignment algorithms on stable ground. Due to the different nature of the acquisition method, it was not possible to use tie point based co-registration. A combination of the DEM and ortho-image is shown with the point cloud in figure below. A second photogrammetric data set will be acquired in September 2014 to survey the annual volume change and movement. These measurements will then be compared to the annual resolution glaciological stake mass balance and velocity measurements to assess the precision of the method to monitor at an annual resolution.

  17. Simultaneous observations of structure function parameter of refractive index using a high-resolution radar and the DataHawk small airborne measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipión, Danny E.; Lawrence, Dale A.; Milla, Marco A.; Woodman, Ronald F.; Lume, Diego A.; Balsley, Ben B.

    2016-09-01

    The SOUSY (SOUnding SYstem) radar was relocated to the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO) near Lima, Peru, in 2000, where the radar controller and acquisition system were upgraded with state-of-the-art parts to take full advantage of its potential for high-resolution atmospheric sounding. Due to its broad bandwidth (4 MHz), it is able to characterize clear-air backscattering with high range resolution (37.5 m). A campaign conducted at JRO in July 2014 aimed to characterize the lower troposphere with a high temporal resolution (8.1 Hz) using the DataHawk (DH) small unmanned aircraft system, which provides in situ atmospheric measurements at scales as small as 1 m in the lower troposphere and can be GPS-guided to obtain measurements within the beam of the radar. This was a unique opportunity to make coincident observations by both systems and to directly compare their in situ and remotely sensed parameters. Because SOUSY only points vertically, it is only possible to retrieve vertical radar profiles caused by changes in the refractive index within the resolution volume. Turbulent variations due to scattering are described by the structure function parameter of refractive index Cn2. Profiles of Cn2 from the DH are obtained by combining pressure, temperature, and relative humidity measurements along the helical trajectory and integrated at the same scale as the radar range resolution. Excellent agreement is observed between the Cn2 estimates obtained from the DH and SOUSY in the overlapping measurement regime from 1200 m up to 4200 m above sea level, and this correspondence provides the first accurate calibration of the SOUSY radar for measuring Cn2.

  18. Simultaneous observations of structure function parameter of refractive index using a high-resolution radar and the DataHawk small airborne measurement system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Scipión

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The SOUSY (SOUnding SYstem radar was relocated to the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO near Lima, Peru, in 2000, where the radar controller and acquisition system were upgraded with state-of-the-art parts to take full advantage of its potential for high-resolution atmospheric sounding. Due to its broad bandwidth (4 MHz, it is able to characterize clear-air backscattering with high range resolution (37.5 m. A campaign conducted at JRO in July 2014 aimed to characterize the lower troposphere with a high temporal resolution (8.1 Hz using the DataHawk (DH small unmanned aircraft system, which provides in situ atmospheric measurements at scales as small as 1 m in the lower troposphere and can be GPS-guided to obtain measurements within the beam of the radar. This was a unique opportunity to make coincident observations by both systems and to directly compare their in situ and remotely sensed parameters. Because SOUSY only points vertically, it is only possible to retrieve vertical radar profiles caused by changes in the refractive index within the resolution volume. Turbulent variations due to scattering are described by the structure function parameter of refractive index Cn2. Profiles of Cn2 from the DH are obtained by combining pressure, temperature, and relative humidity measurements along the helical trajectory and integrated at the same scale as the radar range resolution. Excellent agreement is observed between the Cn2 estimates obtained from the DH and SOUSY in the overlapping measurement regime from 1200 m up to 4200 m above sea level, and this correspondence provides the first accurate calibration of the SOUSY radar for measuring Cn2.

  19. Combining structure-from-motion derived point clouds from satellites and unmanned aircraft systems images with ground-truth data to create high-resolution digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaseanu, M.; Thatcher, C.; Danielson, J.; Gesch, D. B.; Poppenga, S.; Kottermair, M.; Jalandoni, A.; Carlson, E.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal topographic and bathymetric (topobathymetric) data with high spatial resolution (1-meter or better) and high vertical accuracy are needed to assess the vulnerability of Pacific Islands to climate change impacts, including sea level rise. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports, low-lying atolls in the Pacific Ocean are extremely vulnerable to king tide events, storm surge, tsunamis, and sea-level rise. The lack of coastal topobathymetric data has been identified as a critical data gap for climate vulnerability and adaptation efforts in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). For Majuro Atoll, home to the largest city of RMI, the only elevation dataset currently available is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data which has a 30-meter spatial resolution and 16-meter vertical accuracy (expressed as linear error at 90%). To generate high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) in the RMI, elevation information and photographic imagery have been collected from field surveys using GNSS/total station and unmanned aerial vehicles for Structure-from-Motion (SfM) point cloud generation. Digital Globe WorldView II imagery was processed to create SfM point clouds to fill in gaps in the point cloud derived from the higher resolution UAS photos. The combined point cloud data is filtered and classified to bare-earth and georeferenced using the GNSS data acquired on roads and along survey transects perpendicular to the coast. A total station was used to collect elevation data under tree canopies where heavy vegetation cover blocked the view of GNSS satellites. A subset of the GPS / total station data was set aside for error assessment of the resulting DEM.

  20. Solution NMR Structures of Oxidized and Reduced Ehrlichia chaffeensis thioredoxin: NMR-Invisible Structure Owing to Backbone Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2018-01-02

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are small ubiquitous proteins that participate in a diverse variety of redox reactions via the reversible oxidation of two cysteine thiol groups in a structurally conserved active site, CGPC. Here, we describe the NMR solution structures of a Trx from Ehrlichia chaffeensis (Ec-Trx, ECH_0218), the etiological agent responsible for human monocytic ehrlichiosis, in both the oxidized and reduced states. The overall topology of the calculated structures is similar in both redox states and similar to other Trx structures, a five-strand, mixed -sheet (1:3:2:4:5) surrounded by four -helices. Unlike other Trxs studied by NMR in both redox states, the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of reduced Ec-Trx was missing eight amide cross peaks relative to the spectra of oxidized Ec-Trx. These missing amides correspond to residues C32-E39 in the active site containing helix (2) and S72-I75 in a loop near the active site and suggest a substantial change in the backbone dynamics associated with the formation of an intramolecular C32-C35 disulfide bond.

  1. Close-range airborne Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry for high-resolution beach morphometric surveys: Examples from an embayed rotating beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Fleury, Jules; Anthony, Edward J.; Gardel, Antoine; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The field of photogrammetry has seen significant new developments essentially related to the emergence of new computer-based applications that have fostered the growth of the workflow technique called Structure-from-Motion (SfM). Low-cost, user-friendly SfM photogrammetry offers interesting new perspectives in coastal and other fields of geomorphology requiring high-resolution topographic data. The technique enables the construction of topographic products such as digital surface models (DSMs) and orthophotographs, and combines the advantages of the reproducibility of GPS surveys and the high density and accuracy of airborne LiDAR, but at very advantageous cost compared to the latter. Three SfM-based photogrammetric experiments were conducted on the embayed beach of Montjoly in Cayenne, French Guiana, between October 2013 and 2014, in order to map morphological changes and quantify sediment budgets. The beach is affected by a process of rotation induced by the alongshore migration of mud banks from the mouths of the Amazon River that generate spatial and temporal changes in wave refraction and incident wave angles, thus generating the reversals in longshore drift that characterise this process. Sub-vertical aerial photographs of the beach were acquired from a microlight aircraft that flew alongshore at low elevation (275 m). The flight plan included several parallel flight axes with an overlap of 85% between pictures in the lengthwise direction and 50% between paths. Targets of 40 × 40 cm, georeferenced by RTK-DGPS, were placed on the beach, spaced 100 m apart. These targets served in optimizing the model and in producing georeferenced 3D products. RTK-GPS measurements of random points and cross-shore profiles were used to validate the photogrammetry results and assess their accuracy. We produced dense point clouds with 150 to 200 points/m², from which we generated DSMs and orthophotos with respective resolutions of 10 cm and 5 cm. Compared to the GPS control

  2. Additivity, redundancy, and complementarity between structural information from NMR and SAXS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Morimoto, Yasumasa; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yanagi, Shigeru; Kihara, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    At present protein structure in solution is determined by restrained molecular dynamics with distance restraints mainly derived from NMR. Although the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method also confers the structural information, its content is too small to determine the structure by itself. We previously developed a new algorithm that refines the protein structure by restrained molecular dynamics with SAXS constrains. In the present study we performed the protein structure calculation by restrained molecular dynamics with both NMR and SAXS constraints, in order to elucidate the essential structural information that defines the protein architecture. We used RNase T1 as a model protein, which has already been determined by NMR alone. At first we added SAXS constraints (h -1 ) into the original NMR-derived restraints for the calculation. The quality of the structure ensemble was significantly increased. Next we removed the original NMR restraints randomly in order to estimate the redundancy among the NMR-derived information. The essential topology of the resultant structures was hardly changed until the restraints were reduced below the half. Then we added the SAXS constraints into the remaining NMR restraints to expect they could complement the lost structural information. However, the structure was not recovered properly. By removing various types of structural information exclusively from the original NMR data set, we investigated whether the SAXS constraints could complement some kinds of structural information. The results showed that the SAXS could complement the tertiary structure to some extent while it could not secondary structure. (author)

  3. Protein NMR Structures Refined with Rosetta Have Higher Accuracy Relative to Corresponding X-ray Crystal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We have found that refinement of protein NMR structures using Rosetta with experimental NMR restraints yields more accurate protein NMR structures than those that have been deposited in the PDB using standard refinement protocols. Using 40 pairs of NMR and X-ray crystal structures determined by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, for proteins ranging in size from 5–22 kDa, restrained Rosetta refined structures fit better to the raw experimental data, are in better agreement with their X-ray counterparts, and have better phasing power compared to conventionally determined NMR structures. For 37 proteins for which NMR ensembles were available and which had similar structures in solution and in the crystal, all of the restrained Rosetta refined NMR structures were sufficiently accurate to be used for solving the corresponding X-ray crystal structures by molecular replacement. The protocol for restrained refinement of protein NMR structures was also compared with restrained CS-Rosetta calculations. For proteins smaller than 10 kDa, restrained CS-Rosetta, starting from extended conformations, provides slightly more accurate structures, while for proteins in the size range of 10–25 kDa the less CPU intensive restrained Rosetta refinement protocols provided equally or more accurate structures. The restrained Rosetta protocols described here can improve the accuracy of protein NMR structures and should find broad and general for studies of protein structure and function. PMID:24392845

  4. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jiri

    2002-03-25

    The combination of advanced high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques with high-pressure capability represents a powerful experimental tool in studies of protein folding. This review is organized as follows: after a general introduction of high-pressure, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of proteins, the experimental part deals with instrumentation. The main section of the review is devoted to NMR studies of reversible pressure unfolding of proteins with special emphasis on pressure-assisted cold denaturation and the detection of folding intermediates. Recent studies investigating local perturbations in proteins and the experiments following the effects of point mutations on pressure stability of proteins are also discussed. Ribonuclease A, lysozyme, ubiquitin, apomyoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin and troponin C were the model proteins investigated.

  5. High resolution Neutron and Synchrotron Powder Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewat, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    The use of high-resolution powder diffraction has grown rapidly in the past years, with the development of Rietveld (1967) methods of data analysis and new high-resolution diffractometers and multidetectors. The number of publications in this area has increased from a handful per year until 1973 to 150 per year in 1984, with a ten-year total of over 1000. These papers cover a wide area of solid state-chemistry, physics and materials science, and have been grouped under 20 subject headings, ranging from catalysts to zeolites, and from battery electrode materials to pre-stressed superconducting wires. In 1985 two new high-resolution diffractometers are being commissioned, one at the SNS laboratory near Oxford, and one at the ILL in Grenoble. In different ways these machines represent perhaps the ultimate that can be achieved with neutrons and will permit refinement of complex structures with about 250 parameters and unit cell volumes of about 2500 Angstrom/sp3/. The new European Synchotron Facility will complement the Grenoble neutron diffractometers, and extend the role of high-resolution powder diffraction to the direct solution of crystal structures, pioneered in Sweden

  6. Berkeley High-Resolution Ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Criteria for a high-resolution γ-ray system are discussed. Desirable properties are high resolution, good response function, and moderate solid angle so as to achieve not only double- but triple-coincidences with good statistics. The Berkeley High-Resolution Ball involved the first use of bismuth germanate (BGO) for anti-Compton shield for Ge detectors. The resulting compact shield permitted rather close packing of 21 detectors around a target. In addition, a small central BGO ball gives the total γ-ray energy and multiplicity, as well as the angular pattern of the γ rays. The 21-detector array is nearly complete, and the central ball has been designed, but not yet constructed. First results taken with 9 detector modules are shown for the nucleus 156 Er. The complex decay scheme indicates a transition from collective rotation (prolate shape) to single- particle states (possibly oblate) near spin 30 h, and has other interesting features

  7. Contradictions about Fine Structures in Meson Spectra and Proposed High-Resolution Hadron Spectrometer Using 'Interactive' Solid-State Hydrogen Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maglich, Bogdan C.

    2004-01-01

    High resolution has been discouraged in meson spectrometry for 4 decades by the Doctrine of Experiments Incompatible with Theory (DEIT). DEIT a priori rejects narrow hadron resonances on the paradigm that only broad hadron peaks, Γ≥ 100 MeV, can exist -- in spite of the accumulated evidence to the contrary. The facts are: Mesons 2 orders of magnitude narrower than 'allowed' for hadrons, have been confirmed; a new one was announced at this conference. Narrow meson structures have been repeatedly reported at high momentum transfer, vertical bar t vertical bar >0.2, while they are absent at the low transfer, vertical bar t vertical bar ∼0.01, where 99% of the experiments are performed. Modification of meson mass and width as a function of the density of nuclear matter in which they are produced, have been recently reported.We postulate for meson spectra: (1) Intrinsic ('true') width, Γ, is different from the observable ('apparent') width, Γ': Γ< Γ' (2) Γ of all meson states are narrow and can be observed only at or near the maximum vertical bar t vertical bar reachable in the reaction, and (3) Γ of all meson resonances are subject to broadening as vertical bar t vertical bar decreases. Since both Γ' and the production σ are inversely proportional to vertical bar t vertical ar, most of the observed spectra are produced at the lowest vertical bar t vertical bar <0.01 and thus the peaks appear broad. We have conceptually designed a novel type hadron spectrometer with an order of magnitude better resolution (0.1 MeV). It would operate at 2 orders of magnitude higher vertical bar t vertical bar (0.3< vertical bar t vertical bar <1 (GeV/c)2, than most experiments to date (vertical bar t vertical bar <0.01). Mesons in the mass region 0.5 < Mx<5 GeV would be produced in πP→PX (baryons in PP→PP*) in a 'solid state hydrogen target' consisting of an array of plastic scintillator fibers, CH; collisions with C are electronically rejected. Missing mass of P is

  8. Structure of the interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase Src homology 2 domain; comparison between X-ray and NMR-derived structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Raji E.; Ginder, Nathaniel D.; Hoy, Julie A.; Nix, Jay C.; Fulton, D. Bruce; Honzatko, Richard B.; Andreotti, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    The interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase Src homology 2 domain was crystallized and its structure was solved to 2.35 Å resolution. The structure reveals a domain-swapped dimer that is related to other dimeric SH2 domains solved previously. The cis–trans-prolyl isomerization that is evident from solution studies of Itk SH2 cannot be observed in the crystal structure. The crystal structure of the interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase Src homology domain (Itk SH2) is described and it is found that unlike in studies of this domain using NMR spectroscopy, cis–trans-prolyl isomerization is not readily detected in the crystal structure. Based on similarities between the Itk SH2 crystal form and the cis form of the Itk SH2 NMR structure, it is concluded that it is likely that the prolyl imide bond at least in part adopts the cis conformation in the crystal form. However, the lack of high-resolution data and the dynamic nature of the proline-containing loop mean that the precise imide-bond conformation cannot be determined and prolyl cis–trans isomerization in the crystal cannot be ruled out. Given the preponderance of structures that have been solved by X-ray crystallography in the Protein Data Bank, this result supports the notion that prolyl isomerization in folded proteins has been underestimated among known structures. Interestingly, while the precise status of the proline residue is ambiguous, Itk SH2 crystallizes as a domain-swapped dimer. The domain-swapped structure of Itk SH2 is similar to the domain-swapped SH2 domains of Grb2 and Nck, with domain swapping occurring at the β-meander region of all three SH2 domains. Thus, for Itk SH2 structural analysis by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography revealed very different structural features: proline isomerization versus domain-swapped dimerization, respectively

  9. A multi-sample based method for identifying common CNVs in normal human genomic structure using high-resolution aCGH data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihyun Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is difficult to identify copy number variations (CNV in normal human genomic data due to noise and non-linear relationships between different genomic regions and signal intensity. A high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH containing 42 million probes, which is very large compared to previous arrays, was recently published. Most existing CNV detection algorithms do not work well because of noise associated with the large amount of input data and because most of the current methods were not designed to analyze normal human samples. Normal human genome analysis often requires a joint approach across multiple samples. However, the majority of existing methods can only identify CNVs from a single sample. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a multi-sample-based genomic variations detector (MGVD that uses segmentation to identify common breakpoints across multiple samples and a k-means-based clustering strategy. Unlike previous methods, MGVD simultaneously considers multiple samples with different genomic intensities and identifies CNVs and CNV zones (CNVZs; CNVZ is a more precise measure of the location of a genomic variant than the CNV region (CNVR. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We designed a specialized algorithm to detect common CNVs from extremely high-resolution multi-sample aCGH data. MGVD showed high sensitivity and a low false discovery rate for a simulated data set, and outperformed most current methods when real, high-resolution HapMap datasets were analyzed. MGVD also had the fastest runtime compared to the other algorithms evaluated when actual, high-resolution aCGH data were analyzed. The CNVZs identified by MGVD can be used in association studies for revealing relationships between phenotypes and genomic aberrations. Our algorithm was developed with standard C++ and is available in Linux and MS Windows format in the STL library. It is freely available at: http://embio.yonsei.ac.kr/~Park/mgvd.php.

  10. NMR structure of the protein NP-247299.1: comparison with the crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaudzems, Kristaps; Geralt, Michael; Serrano, Pedro; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Horst, Reto; Pedrini, Bill; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the NMR and crystal structures of a protein determined using largely automated methods has enabled the interpretation of local differences in the highly similar structures. These differences are found in segments of higher B values in the crystal and correlate with dynamic processes on the NMR chemical shift timescale observed in solution. The NMR structure of the protein NP-247299.1 in solution at 313 K has been determined and is compared with the X-ray crystal structure, which was also solved in the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) at 100 K and at 1.7 Å resolution. Both structures were obtained using the current largely automated crystallographic and solution NMR methods used by the JCSG. This paper assesses the accuracy and precision of the results from these recently established automated approaches, aiming for quantitative statements about the location of structure variations that may arise from either one of the methods used or from the different environments in solution and in the crystal. To evaluate the possible impact of the different software used for the crystallographic and the NMR structure determinations and analysis, the concept is introduced of reference structures, which are computed using the NMR software with input of upper-limit distance constraints derived from the molecular models representing the results of the two structure determinations. The use of this new approach is explored to quantify global differences that arise from the different methods of structure determination and analysis versus those that represent interesting local variations or dynamics. The near-identity of the protein core in the NMR and crystal structures thus provided a basis for the identification of complementary information from the two different methods. It was thus observed that locally increased crystallographic B values correlate with dynamic structural polymorphisms in solution, including that the solution state of the protein involves

  11. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA

  12. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA.

  13. High resolution metric imaging payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delclaud, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Alcatel Space Industries has become Europe's leader in the field of high and very high resolution optical payloads, in the frame work of earth observation system able to provide military government with metric images from space. This leadership allowed ALCATEL to propose for the export market, within a French collaboration frame, a complete space based system for metric observation.

  14. Solid-State-NMR-Structure-Based Inhibitor Design to Achieve Selective Inhibition of the Parallel-in-Register β-Sheet versus Antiparallel Iowa Mutant β-Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qinghui; Qiang, Wei

    2017-06-08

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy has been widely applied to characterize the high-resolution structures of β-amyloid (Aβ) fibrils. While these structures provide crucial molecular insights on the deposition of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's diseases (AD), ssNMR structures have been rarely used so far as the basis for designing inhibitors. It remains a challenge because the ssNMR-based Aβ fibril structures were usually obtained with sparsely isotope-labeled peptides with limited experimental constraints, where the structural models, especially the side-chain coordinates, showed restricted precision. However, these structural models often possess a higher accuracy within the hydrophobic core regions with more well-defined experimental data, which provide potential targets for the molecular design. This work presents an ssNMR-based molecular design to achieve selective inhibition of a particular type of Aβ fibrillar structure, which was formed with the Iowa mutant of Aβ with parallel-in-register β-sheet hydrophobic core. The results show that short peptides that mimic the C-terminal β-strands of the fibril may have a preference in binding to the parallel Aβ fibrils rather than the antiparallel fibrils, mainly due to the differences in the high-resolution structures in the fibril elongation interfaces. The Iowa mutant Aβ fibrils are utilized in this work mainly as a model to demonstrate the feasibility of the strategy because it is relatively straightforward to distinguish the parallel and antiparallel fibril structures using ssNMR. Our results suggest that it is potentially feasible to design structure-selective inhibitors and/or diagnostic agents to Aβ fibrils using ssNMR-based structural models.

  15. Unified integration intervals for the structural characterization of oil, coal or fractions there of by 1h NMR and 13c NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avella, Eliseo; Fierro, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Based on an analysis of publications reported between 1972 and 2006, it became clear that there are inaccuracies in the limits of the ranges of integration that the authors assigned to signals in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to the structural characterization of petroleum, coals and their derived fractions, from their hydrogen (1H NMR) and carbon (13C NMR) spectra. Consequently, consolidated limits were determined for the integration of 1H NMR spectra and 13C NMR of these samples using a statistical treatment applied to the limits of integration intervals already published. With these unified limits, correlation NMR charts were developed that are useful for the allocation of the integral at such intervals, and at smaller intervals defined in terms of the intersection between different assignments. Also raised equations needed to establish the integral attributable to specific fragments in an attempt to make a more accurate structural characterization from NMR spectra of oil, coal or fractions derived.

  16. Structural Insight on the Mechanism of Regulation of the MarR Family of Proteins: High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Transcriptional Repressor from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saridakis, Vivian; Shahinas, Dea; Xu, Xiaohui; Christendat, Dinesh (York); (Toronto); (CG)

    2008-03-31

    Transcriptional regulators belonging to the MarR family are characterized by a winged-helix DNA binding domain. These transcriptional regulators regulate the efflux and influx of phenolic agents in bacteria and archaea. In Escherichia coli, MarR regulates the multiple antibiotic resistance operon and its inactivation produces a multiple antibiotic resistance phenotype. In some organisms, active efflux of drug compounds will produce a drug resistance phenotype, whereas in other organisms, active influx of chlorinated hydrocarbons results in their rapid degradation. Although proteins in the MarR family are regulators of important biological processes, their mechanism of action is not well understood and structural information about how phenolic agents regulate the activity of these proteins is lacking. This article presents the three-dimensional structure of a protein of the MarR family, MTH313, in its apo form and in complex with salicylate, a known inactivator. A comparison of these two structures indicates that the mechanism of regulation involves a large conformational change in the DNA binding lobe. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and biophysical analyses further suggest that salicylate inactivates MTH313 and prevents it from binding to its promoter region.

  17. High-resolution intravital microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Andresen

    Full Text Available Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy--the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and

  18. High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Volker; Pollok, Karolin; Rinnenthal, Jan-Leo; Oehme, Laura; Günther, Robert; Spiecker, Heinrich; Radbruch, Helena; Gerhard, Jenny; Sporbert, Anje; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2012-01-01

    Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy - the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning) while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs) of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and developmental biology

  19. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Proton NMR studies on Megaphaera elsdenii flavodoxin : structure elucidation by 2D-NMR and implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, van C.

    1990-01-01

    1H NMR techniques have been applied for a thorough study of the uncrystallizable Megasphaera elsdenii flavodoxin in its three redox states. The aim of the research project described in this thesis was to obtain answers regarding questions

  1. Ultra-high resolution protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kazuki; Hirano, Yu; Miki, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Many protein structures have been determined by X-ray crystallography and deposited with the Protein Data Bank. However, these structures at usual resolution (1.5< d<3.0 A) are insufficient in their precision and quantity for elucidating the molecular mechanism of protein functions directly from structural information. Several studies at ultra-high resolution (d<0.8 A) have been performed with synchrotron radiation in the last decade. The highest resolution of the protein crystals was achieved at 0.54 A resolution for a small protein, crambin. In such high resolution crystals, almost all of hydrogen atoms of proteins and some hydrogen atoms of bound water molecules are experimentally observed. In addition, outer-shell electrons of proteins can be analyzed by the multipole refinement procedure. However, the influence of X-rays should be precisely estimated in order to derive meaningful information from the crystallographic results. In this review, we summarize refinement procedures, current status and perspectives for ultra high resolution protein crystallography. (author)

  2. Comparison of NMR and crystal structures for the proteins TM1112 and TM1367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Serrano, Pedro; Pedrini, Bill; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Geralt, Michael; Horst, Reto; Herrmann, Torsten; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    NMR structures of the proteins TM1112 and TM1367 solved by the JCSG in solution at 298 K could be superimposed with the corresponding crystal structures at 100 K with r.m.s.d. values of <1.0 Å for the backbone heavy atoms. For both proteins the structural differences between multiple molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystals correlated with structural variations within the bundles of conformers used to represent the NMR solution structures. A recently introduced JCSG NMR structure-determination protocol, which makes use of the software package UNIO for extensive automation, was further evaluated by comparison of the TM1112 structure obtained using these automated methods with another NMR structure that was independently solved in another PSI center, where a largely interactive approach was applied. The NMR structures of the TM1112 and TM1367 proteins from Thermotoga maritima in solution at 298 K were determined following a new protocol which uses the software package UNIO for extensive automation. The results obtained with this novel procedure were evaluated by comparison with the crystal structures solved by the JCSG at 100 K to 1.83 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. In addition, the TM1112 solution structure was compared with an NMR structure solved by the NESG using a conventional largely interactive methodology. For both proteins, the newly determined NMR structure could be superimposed with the crystal structure with r.m.s.d. values of <1.0 Å for the backbone heavy atoms, which provided a starting platform to investigate local structure variations, which may arise from either the methods used or from the different chemical environments in solution and in the crystal. Thereby, these comparative studies were further explored with the use of reference NMR and crystal structures, which were computed using the NMR software with input of upper-limit distance constraints derived from the molecular models that represent the results of structure

  3. Probing the Structure and Dynamics of Proteins by Combining Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Experimental NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Jane R; Hertig, Samuel; Missimer, John H; Smith, Lorna J; Steinmetz, Michel O; Dolenc, Jožica

    2012-10-09

    NMR experiments provide detailed structural information about biological macromolecules in solution. However, the amount of information obtained is usually much less than the number of degrees of freedom of the macromolecule. Moreover, the relationships between experimental observables and structural information, such as interatomic distances or dihedral angle values, may be multiple-valued and may rely on empirical parameters and approximations. The extraction of structural information from experimental data is further complicated by the time- and ensemble-averaged nature of NMR observables. Combining NMR data with molecular dynamics simulations can elucidate and alleviate some of these problems, as well as allow inconsistencies in the NMR data to be identified. Here, we use a number of examples from our work to highlight the power of molecular dynamics simulations in providing a structural interpretation of solution NMR data.

  4. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola A. Brown

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2 is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S. These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  5. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-04-30

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  6. The second round of Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR: CASD-NMR-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, Antonio; Vranken, Wim; Fogh, Rasmus H.; Ragan, Timothy J.; Tejero, Roberto; Pederson, Kari; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Prestegard, James H.; Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Bin; Lemak, Alexander; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Kennedy, Michael; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Gaohua; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Vuister, Geerten W.

    2015-01-01

    The second round of the community-wide initiative Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR (CASD-NMR-2013) comprised ten blind target datasets, consisting of unprocessed spectral data, assigned chemical shift lists and unassigned NOESY peak and RDC lists, that were made available in both curated (i.e. manually refined) or un-curated (i.e. automatically generated) form. Ten structure calculation programs, using fully automated protocols only, generated a total of 164 three-dimensional structures (entries) for the ten targets, sometimes using both curated and un-curated lists to generate multiple entries for a single target. The accuracy of the entries could be established by comparing them to the corresponding manually solved structure of each target, which was not available at the time the data were provided. Across the entire data set, 71 % of all entries submitted achieved an accuracy relative to the reference NMR structure better than 1.5 Å. Methods based on NOESY peak lists achieved even better results with up to 100 % of the entries within the 1.5 Å threshold for some programs. However, some methods did not converge for some targets using un-curated NOESY peak lists. Over 90 % of the entries achieved an accuracy better than the more relaxed threshold of 2.5 Å that was used in the previous CASD-NMR-2010 round. Comparisons between entries generated with un-curated versus curated peaks show only marginal improvements for the latter in those cases where both calculations converged

  7. The second round of Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR: CASD-NMR-2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, Antonio [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Center (Italy); Vranken, Wim [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Structural Biology Brussels (Belgium); Fogh, Rasmus H.; Ragan, Timothy J. [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom); Tejero, Roberto [Universidad de Valencia, Departamento de Química Física (Spain); Pederson, Kari; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Prestegard, James H. [University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States); Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Bin; Lemak, Alexander; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Biophysics, Cancer Genomics and Proteomics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Kennedy, Michael [Miami University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States); Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Gaohua; Montelione, Gaetano T., E-mail: guy@cabm.rutgers.edu [The State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers (United States); Vuister, Geerten W., E-mail: gv29@le.ac.uk [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    The second round of the community-wide initiative Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR (CASD-NMR-2013) comprised ten blind target datasets, consisting of unprocessed spectral data, assigned chemical shift lists and unassigned NOESY peak and RDC lists, that were made available in both curated (i.e. manually refined) or un-curated (i.e. automatically generated) form. Ten structure calculation programs, using fully automated protocols only, generated a total of 164 three-dimensional structures (entries) for the ten targets, sometimes using both curated and un-curated lists to generate multiple entries for a single target. The accuracy of the entries could be established by comparing them to the corresponding manually solved structure of each target, which was not available at the time the data were provided. Across the entire data set, 71 % of all entries submitted achieved an accuracy relative to the reference NMR structure better than 1.5 Å. Methods based on NOESY peak lists achieved even better results with up to 100 % of the entries within the 1.5 Å threshold for some programs. However, some methods did not converge for some targets using un-curated NOESY peak lists. Over 90 % of the entries achieved an accuracy better than the more relaxed threshold of 2.5 Å that was used in the previous CASD-NMR-2010 round. Comparisons between entries generated with un-curated versus curated peaks show only marginal improvements for the latter in those cases where both calculations converged.

  8. Application of the AMPLE cluster-and-truncate approach to NMR structures for molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibby, Jaclyn [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Keegan, Ronan M. [Research Complex at Harwell, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Mayans, Olga [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn D. [Science and Technology Facilities Council Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Rigden, Daniel J., E-mail: drigden@liv.ac.uk [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Processing of NMR structures for molecular replacement by AMPLE works well. AMPLE is a program developed for clustering and truncating ab initio protein structure predictions into search models for molecular replacement. Here, it is shown that its core cluster-and-truncate methods also work well for processing NMR ensembles into search models. Rosetta remodelling helps to extend success to NMR structures bearing low sequence identity or high structural divergence from the target protein. Potential future routes to improved performance are considered and practical, general guidelines on using AMPLE are provided.

  9. High resolution 148Nd(3He, ny) two proton stripping reaction and the structure of the O2+ state in 150Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpey-Schafer, J.F.; Dinoko, T.S.; Herbert, M.S.; Orce, J.N.; Papka, P.; Kheswa, B.V.; Ndayishimye, J.; Bvumbi, S.P.; Jones, P.M.; Bucher, T.D.; Lawrie, E.A.; Lawrie, J.J.; Negi, D.; Shirinda, O.; Wiedeking, M.; Vymers, P.; Easton, J.L.; Noncolela, S.P.; Sithole, P.; Khumalo, N.; Majola, S.N.T.; Stankiewicz, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of achieving high resolution in binary reactions involving an outgoing high energy neutron is solved by detecting the γ-ray decay of populated excited states in an array of escape suppressed HPGe detectors in coincidence with fast neutrons detected in a wall of scintillator detectors 2 m down beam of the target. The selectivity of the arrangement is of the order of 1 in 1000. The time-of-flight difference is sufficient to separate fast neutrons from direct reactions from a large background of statistical neutrons from fusion-evaporation reactions. Our interest is in the wavefunction of the 0 2 + state at 740 keV in the N=88 nucleus 150 Sm which, with the 0 2 + state in 100 Ru, are the only two excited states observed in 2β2ν double β-decay. (authors)

  10. Structure and aqueous reactivity of silicate glasses high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance contribution; Structure et reactivite aqueuse des verres silicates apport de la resonance magnetique nucleaire haute-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeli, F

    2000-10-25

    This research aims at getting a better understanding of the relations which may exist between the chemical composition of the oxide silicate glasses, the structure and the aqueous reactivity. We study the cations present in most glasses, more particularly the radioactive waste glasses, and those which are more liable to bring information both about structure and reactivity. Among the experimental methods used, the nuclear magnetic resonance of multi-quantum magic-angle spinning (NMR MQ-MAS) has been carried out for the structural characterization of the pristine and altered glasses. In the first part, we discuss the possibility of deducting a type of information from a quantitative approach of the {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 17}O NMR MQ-MAS. In the second part, we apply this method to glasses containing between two and six oxides. The vitreous compositions studied permit to focus our attention on the influence of sodium, aluminum and calcium on their local structural environment. We point out an evolution of the distributions of bond distances and angles in relation to the glass chemical composition. We show the strong potentiality of the {sup 17}O used to probe the pristine and altered glasses. The influence of the different cations studied on the rate of glass dissolution is debated from the alterations made on short periods. On the basis of all these data, we discuss the importance of the structural effect which may influence the kinetic phenomena of alteration. (author)

  11. Vivaldi: Visualization and validation of biomacromolecular NMR structures from the PDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-01-01

    We describe Vivaldi (VIsualization and VALidation DIsplay; http://pdbe.org/vivaldi), a web-based service for the analysis, visualization, and validation of NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Vivaldi provides access to model coordinates and several types of experimental NMR data using interactive visualization tools, augmented with structural annotations and model-validation information. The service presents information about the modeled NMR ensemble, validation of experimental chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, distance and dihedral angle constraints, as well as validation scores based on empirical knowledge and databases. Vivaldi was designed for both expert NMR spectroscopists and casual non-expert users who wish to obtain a better grasp of the information content and quality of NMR structures in the public archive. © Proteins 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23180575

  12. Structural characterization of homogalacturonan by NMR spectroscopy - assignment of reference compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent O.; Meier, Sebastian; Duus, Jens Øllgaard

    2008-01-01

    Complete assignment of 1H and 13C NMR of six hexagalactopyranuronic acids with varying degree and pattern of methyl esterification is reported. The NMR experiments were run at room temperature using approximately 2 mg of sample making this method convenient for studying the structure...

  13. Structure and dynamics of paramagnetic transients by pulsed EPR and NMR detection of nuclear resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of transient radicals in pulse radiolysis can be studied by time resolved EPR and NMR techniques. EPR study of kinetics and relaxation is illustrated. The NMR detection of nuclear resonance in transient radicals is a new method which allows the study of hyperfine coupling, population dynamics, radical kinetics, and reaction mechanism. 9 figures

  14. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  15. NMR methods for the investigation of structure and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Edme H. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Mechanische Verfahrenstechnik und Mechanik

    2012-07-01

    Extensive derivations of required fundamental relations for readers with engineering background New applications based on MRI, PGSE-NMR, and low-field NMR New concepts in quantitative data evaluation and image analysis Methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are increasingly applied in engineering sciences. The book summarizes research in the field of chemical and process engineering performed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Fundamentals of the methods are exposed for readers with an engineering background. Applications cover the fields of mechanical process engineering (filtration, solid-liquid separation, powder mixing, rheometry), chemical process engineering (trickle-bed reactor, ceramic sponges), bioprocess engineering (biofilm growth), and food process engineering (microwave heating, emulsions). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as well as low-field NMR are covered with notes on hardware. Emphasis is placed on quantitative data analysis and image processing. (orig.)

  16. NMR methods for the investigation of structure and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, Edme H.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive derivations of required fundamental relations for readers with engineering background New applications based on MRI, PGSE-NMR, and low-field NMR New concepts in quantitative data evaluation and image analysis Methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are increasingly applied in engineering sciences. The book summarizes research in the field of chemical and process engineering performed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Fundamentals of the methods are exposed for readers with an engineering background. Applications cover the fields of mechanical process engineering (filtration, solid-liquid separation, powder mixing, rheometry), chemical process engineering (trickle-bed reactor, ceramic sponges), bioprocess engineering (biofilm growth), and food process engineering (microwave heating, emulsions). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as well as low-field NMR are covered with notes on hardware. Emphasis is placed on quantitative data analysis and image processing. (orig.)

  17. Structure of Coordination Complexes: The Synergy between NMR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    determined by density functional theory (DFT) methods and the application of the Boltzmann equation, are in ... single crystals suitable for crystallography can be obtained, ...... NMR analysis of bonding in transition metal olefin complexes.

  18. An in-depth analysis of the biological functional studies based on the NMR M2 channel structure of influenza A virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ribo; Du Qishi; Wang Chenghua; Chou, K.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The long-sought three-dimensional structure of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus was successfully determined recently by the high-resolution NMR [J.R. Schnell, J.J. Chou, Structure and mechanism of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus, Nature 451 (2008) 591-595]. Such a milestone work has provided a solid structural basis for studying drug-resistance problems. However, the action mechanism revealed from the NMR structure is completely different from the traditional view and hence prone to be misinterpreted as 'conflicting' with some previous biological functional studies. To clarify this kind of confusion, an in-depth analysis was performed for these functional studies, particularly for the mutations D44N, D44A and N44D on position 44, and the mutations on positions 27-38. The analyzed results have provided not only compelling evidences to further validate the NMR structure but also very useful clues for dealing with the drug-resistance problems and developing new effective drugs against H5N1 avian influenza virus, an impending threat to human beings.

  19. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James M; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone and (13)Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2-1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9-1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments.

  20. Refinement of NMR structures using implicit solvent and advanced sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianhan; Im, Wonpil; Brooks, Charles L

    2004-12-15

    NMR biomolecular structure calculations exploit simulated annealing methods for conformational sampling and require a relatively high level of redundancy in the experimental restraints to determine quality three-dimensional structures. Recent advances in generalized Born (GB) implicit solvent models should make it possible to combine information from both experimental measurements and accurate empirical force fields to improve the quality of NMR-derived structures. In this paper, we study the influence of implicit solvent on the refinement of protein NMR structures and identify an optimal protocol of utilizing these improved force fields. To do so, we carry out structure refinement experiments for model proteins with published NMR structures using full NMR restraints and subsets of them. We also investigate the application of advanced sampling techniques to NMR structure refinement. Similar to the observations of Xia et al. (J.Biomol. NMR 2002, 22, 317-331), we find that the impact of implicit solvent is rather small when there is a sufficient number of experimental restraints (such as in the final stage of NMR structure determination), whether implicit solvent is used throughout the calculation or only in the final refinement step. The application of advanced sampling techniques also seems to have minimal impact in this case. However, when the experimental data are limited, we demonstrate that refinement with implicit solvent can substantially improve the quality of the structures. In particular, when combined with an advanced sampling technique, the replica exchange (REX) method, near-native structures can be rapidly moved toward the native basin. The REX method provides both enhanced sampling and automatic selection of the most native-like (lowest energy) structures. An optimal protocol based on our studies first generates an ensemble of initial structures that maximally satisfy the available experimental data with conventional NMR software using a simplified

  1. Structure Elucidation of Unknown Metabolites in Metabolomics by Combined NMR and MS/MS Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteau, Rene M; Hoyt, David W; Nicora, Carrie D; Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A; Ward, Joy K; Bingol, Kerem

    2018-01-17

    We introduce a cheminformatics approach that combines highly selective and orthogonal structure elucidation parameters; accurate mass, MS/MS (MS²), and NMR into a single analysis platform to accurately identify unknown metabolites in untargeted studies. The approach starts with an unknown LC-MS feature, and then combines the experimental MS/MS and NMR information of the unknown to effectively filter out the false positive candidate structures based on their predicted MS/MS and NMR spectra. We demonstrate the approach on a model mixture, and then we identify an uncatalogued secondary metabolite in Arabidopsis thaliana . The NMR/MS² approach is well suited to the discovery of new metabolites in plant extracts, microbes, soils, dissolved organic matter, food extracts, biofuels, and biomedical samples, facilitating the identification of metabolites that are not present in experimental NMR and MS metabolomics databases.

  2. Fine-structural distribution of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in the rat skeletal muscle upon training: a study by high-resolution in situ zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeghiazaryan, Marine; Żybura-Broda, Katarzyna; Cabaj, Anna; Włodarczyk, Jakub; Sławińska, Urszula; Rylski, Marcin; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M

    2012-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key regulators of extracellular matrix remodeling, but have also important intracellular targets. The purpose of this study was to examine the activity and subcellular localization of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in skeletal muscle of control and physically trained rats. In control hind limb muscle, the activity of the gelatinases was barely detectable. In contrast, after 5 days of intense exercise, in Soleus (Sol), but not Extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle, significant upregulation of gelatinolytic activity in myofibers was observed mainly in the nuclei, as assessed by high resolution in situ zymography. The nuclei of quiescent satellite cells did not contain the activity. Within the myonuclei, the gelatinolytic activity colocalized with an activated RNA Polymerase II. Also in Sol, but not in EDL, there were few foci of mononuclear cells with strongly positive cytoplasm, associated with apparent necrotic myofibers. These cells were identified as activated satellite cells/myoblasts. No extracellular gelatinase activity was observed. Gel zymography combined with subcellular fractionation revealed training-related upregulation of active MMP-2 in the nuclear fraction, and increase of active MMP-9 in the cytoplasmic fraction of Sol. Using RT-PCR, selective increase in MMP-9 mRNA was observed. We conclude that training activates nuclear MMP-2, and increases expression and activity of cytoplasmic MMP-9 in Sol, but not in EDL. Our results suggest that the gelatinases are involved in muscle adaptation to training, and that MMP-2 may play a novel role in myonuclear functions.

  3. Use of high resolution satellite images for tracking of changes in the lineament structure, caused by earthquakes, situated nearly the Pacific coast of the North and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano-Baeza, A. A.; Garcia, R. V.; Trejo-Soto, M.

    The Pacific coast of the North and South America is one of the most seismically and volcanically active regions in the world forming part of the so-called Ring of Fire More than 10 earthquakes with the Richter scale magnitude 4 5 were analyzed They were located in the regions with small seasonal variations and limited vegetation to facilitate the tracking of features associated with the seismic activity only High resolution Aster satellite images were used to extract the principal lineaments using The Lineament Extraction and Stripes Statistic Analysis LESSA software package It was found that the number and orientation of lineaments changed significantly about one month before an earthquake approximately and a few months later the system returns to its initial state This effect increases with the earthquake magnitude and it is much more easily detectable in case of convergent plate boundaries for example Nasca and South American plates The results obtained open the possibility to develop a methodology able to evaluate the seismic risk in the regions with similar geological conditions

  4. Novel NMR tools to study structure and dynamics of biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrisch, Klaus; Eldho, Nadukkudy V; Polozov, Ivan V

    2002-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on biomembranes have benefited greatly from introduction of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques. Improvements in MAS probe technology, combined with the higher magnetic field strength of modern instruments, enables almost liquid-like resolution of lipid resonances. The cross-relaxation rates measured by nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) provide new insights into conformation and dynamics of lipids with atomic-scale resolution. The data reflect the tremendous motional disorder in the lipid matrix. Transfer of magnetization by spin diffusion along the proton network of lipids is of secondary relevance, even at a long NOESY mixing time of 300 ms. MAS experiments with re-coupling of anisotropic interactions, like the 13C-(1)H dipolar couplings, benefit from the excellent resolution of 13C shifts that enables assignment of the couplings to specific carbon atoms. The traditional 2H NMR experiments on deuterated lipids have higher sensitivity when conducted on oriented samples at higher magnetic field strength. A very large number of NMR parameters from lipid bilayers is now accessible, providing information about conformation and dynamics for every lipid segment. The NMR methods have the sensitivity and resolution to study lipid-protein interaction, lateral lipid organization, and the location of solvents and drugs in the lipid matrix.

  5. APPLICATION OF A C-13 NMR TOPOLOGICAL MODEL TO THE STRUCTURE ELUCIDATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁身刚; 彭琛; 郑崇直

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an approach which can elucidate automatically the structures of simple organic compounds from their C-13 NMR spectral data by using a computer. Based on a substructure/C-13 NMR chemical shift topological correlation model, the approach deduces the candidate substructures and the constraints for the substructure assembling from the molecular formula and C-13 NMR spectral data. Then, candidate structures are generated under these constraints by assembling the candidate substructures in a partial superposition manner. Candidate substructures or structures are evaluated once they are generated in order to eliminate those conflicting with the original data as early as possible. The evaluation of a (sub)structure is mainly carried out by simulating its C-13 NMR (sub) spectrum, which is again based on the model, and comparing the simulated spectrum with the original data.

  6. High Resolution Thermometry for EXACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, J. S.; Nash, A. E.; Larson, M.; Mulders, N.

    2000-01-01

    High Resolution Thermometers (HRTs) based on SQUID detection of the magnetization of a paramagnetic salt or a metal alloy has been commonly used for sub-nano Kelvin temperature resolution in low temperature physics experiments. The main applications to date have been for temperature ranges near the lambda point of He-4 (2.177 K). These thermometers made use of materials such as Cu(NH4)2Br4 *2H2O, GdCl3, or PdFe. None of these materials are suitable for EXACT, which will explore the region of the He-3/He-4 tricritical point at 0.87 K. The experiment requirements and properties of several candidate paramagnetic materials will be presented, as well as preliminary test results.

  7. Linking structure and vibrational mode coupling using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy: A comparison of gauche and trans 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. Cameron; Stone, Stephen C.; Philips, Laura A.

    1995-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared spectrum of 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane in a molecular beam was collected over the 2975-2994 cm-1 spectral region. The spectral region of 2975-2981 cm-1 contains a symmetric C-H stretching vibrational band of the gauche conformer containing the 35Cl isotope. The spectral region of 2985-2994 cm-1 contains three vibrational bands of the trans conformer. Two of the three bands are assigned as an antisymmetric C-H stretch of each of the two different chlorine isotopes. The third band is assigned as a symmetric C-H stretch of the 35Cl isotope. The gauche conformer of 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane showed doublet patterns similar to those previously observed in 1,2-difluoroethane. The model for 1,2-difluoroethane is further refined in the present work. These refinements suggest that the coupling dark state in 1,2-difluoroethane is composed of 1 quantum C-H bend, 1 quantum C-C stretch, and 12 quanta of torsion. For 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane the dark state could not be identified due to a small data set. The trans conformer of 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane showed no evidence of mode coupling in the three vibrational bands. Including 2-fluoroethanol in this series of molecules, the extent of vibrational mode coupling did not correlate with the density of states available for coupling. Therefore, density of states alone is insufficient to explain the observed trend. A correlation was observed between the degree of intramolecular interaction and vibrational mode coupling.

  8. High-resolution STIR for 3-T MRI of the posterior fossa: visualization of the lower cranial nerves and arteriovenous structures related to neurovascular compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yamashita, Koji; Kamano, Hironori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    Preoperative evaluation of small vessels without contrast material is sometimes difficult in patients with neurovascular compression disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether 3D STIR MRI could simultaneously depict the lower cranial nerves--fifth through twelfth--and the blood vessels in the posterior fossa. The posterior fossae of 47 adults (26 women, 21 men) without gross pathologic changes were imaged with 3D STIR and turbo spin-echo heavily T2-weighted MRI sequences and with contrast-enhanced turbo field-echo MR angiography (MRA). Visualization of the cranial nerves on STIR images was graded on a 4-point scale and compared with visualization on T2-weighted images. Visualization of the arteries on STIR images was evaluated according to the segments in each artery and compared with that on MRA images. Visualization of the veins on STIR images was also compared with that on MRA images. Statistical analysis was performed with the Mann-Whitney U test. There were no significant differences between STIR and T2-weighted images with respect to visualization of the cranial nerves (p > 0.05). Identified on STIR and MRA images were 94 superior cerebellar arteries, 81 anteroinferior cerebellar arteries, and 79 posteroinferior cerebellar arteries. All veins evaluated were seen on STIR and MRA images. There were no significant differences between STIR and MRA images with respect to visualization of arteries and veins (p > 0.05). High-resolution STIR is a feasible method for simultaneous evaluation of the lower cranial nerves and the vessels in the posterior fossa without the use of contrast material.

  9. Topographic precursors and geological structures of deep-seated catastrophic landslides caused by typhoon Talas, determined from the analysis of high-resolution DEMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigira, Masahiro; Tsou, Ching-Ying; Matsushi, Yuki

    2013-04-01

    Typhoon Talas crossed the Japanese Islands between 2 and 5 September 2011, causing more than 70 deep-seated catastrophic landslides in a Jurassic to Paleogene-Early Miocene accretion complex. Detailed examination of the topographic features of 10 large landslides before the event, recorded on DEMs with a resolution of 1 m (based on airborne laser scanner surveys), showed that all of the landslides had small scarplets near their future crowns prior to the slide, and one landslide had linear depressions along its future crown as precursor topographic features. These scarplets and linear depressions were caused by gravitational slope deformation that preceded the catastrophic failure. Strains, defined by the ratio of the length of a scarplet to the length of the whole slope (as measured along the slope line), ranged from 5% to 21%, and are the first reliable numerical data relating to the topographic precursor features of large and catastrophic landslides. Careful examination of aerial photographs from another four large landslides, for which no high-resolution DEMs were available, suggested that they also developed scarplets at their heads beforehand, which are not precisely quantified. Twelve of the 14 landslides we surveyed in the field had sliding surfaces with wedge-shaped discontinuities that consisted of faults, shear surfaces that formed during accretion, and bedding, suggesting that the buildup of pore pressure occurs readily in a gravitationally deformed rock body containing wedge-shaped discontinuities. Other types of gravitational deformation were also active; e.g., flexural toppling and buckling were each observed to have preceded one landslide.

  10. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational

  11. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  12. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  13. Compatible topologies and parameters for NMR structure determination of carbohydrates by simulated annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yingang

    2017-01-01

    The use of NMR methods to determine the three-dimensional structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins is still challenging, in part because of the lack of standard protocols. In order to increase the convenience of structure determination, the topology and parameter files for carbohydrates in the program Crystallography & NMR System (CNS) were investigated and new files were developed to be compatible with the standard simulated annealing protocols for proteins and nucleic acids. Recalculat...

  14. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical...... side missing structural elements in the models can be suggested. A number of proposed structures for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on the above analysis....

  15. Simultaneous Speciation, Structure, and Equilibrium Constant Determination in the Ni2+-EDTA-CN- Ternary System via High-Resolution Laboratory X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Theoretical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajnóczi, Éva G; Németh, Zoltán; Vankó, György

    2017-11-20

    Even quite simple chemical systems can involve many components and chemical states, and sometimes it can be very difficult to differentiate them by their hardly separable physical-chemical properties. The Ni II -EDTA-CN - (EDTA = ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) ternary system is a good example for this problem where, in spite of its fairly simple components and numerous investigations, several molecular combinations can exist, all of them not having been identified unambiguously yet. In order to achieve a detailed understanding of the reaction steps and chemical equilibria, methods are required in which the structural transitions in the different reaction steps can be followed via element-selective complex spectral feature sets. With the help of our recently developed von Hámos type high-resolution laboratory X-ray absorption spectrometer, both the structural variations and stability constants of the forming complexes were determined from the same measurement series, proving that X-ray absorption spectroscopy can be considered as a multifaced, table-top tool in coordination chemistry. Furthermore, with the help of theoretical calculations, independent structural evidence was also given for the formation of the [NiEDTA(CN)] 3- mixed complex.

  16. Determination of the three-dimensional structure for weakly aligned biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahkhatuni, Astghik A; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G

    2002-01-01

    The key achievements and the potential of NMR spectroscopy for weakly aligned biomolecules are considered. Due to weak alignment, it becomes possible to determine a number of NMR parameters dependent on the orientation of biomolecules, which are averaged to zero in usual isotropic media. The addition of new orientational constraints to standard procedures of 3D structure determination markedly increases the achievable accuracy. The possibility of structure determination for biomolecules using only orientation-dependent parameters without invoking other NMR data is discussed. The methods of orientation, experimental techniques, and calculation methods are systematised. The main results obtained and the prospects of using NMR spectroscopy of weakly aligned systems to study different classes of biomolecules and to solve various problems of molecular biology are analysed. Examples of biomolecules whose structures have been determined using orientation-dependent parameters are given. The bibliography includes 508 references.

  17. High resolution studies of barium Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliel, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    The subtle structure of Rydberg states of barium with orbital angular momentum 0, 1, 2 and 3 is investigated. Some aspects of atomic theory for a configuration with two valence electrons are reviewed. The Multi Channel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT) is concisely introduced as a convenient way to describe interactions between Rydberg series. Three high-resolution UV studies are presented. The first two, presenting results on a transition in indium and europium serve as an illustration of the frequency doubling technique. The third study is of hyperfine structure and isotope shifts in low-lying p states in Sr and Ba. An extensive study of the 6snp and 6snf Rydberg states of barium is presented with particular emphasis on the 6snf states. It is shown that the level structure cannot be fully explained with the model introduced earlier. Rather an effective two-body spin-orbit interaction has to be introduced to account for the observed splittings, illustrating that high resolution studies on Rydberg states offer an unique opportunity to determine the importance of such effects. Finally, the 6sns and 6snd series are considered. The hyperfine induced isotope shift in the simple excitation spectra to 6sns 1 S 0 is discussed and attention is paid to series perturbers. It is shown that level mixing parameters can easily be extracted from the experimental data. (Auth.)

  18. Computer-aided structure analysis. Structure identification by infrared and /sup 13/C NMR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szalontai, G; Simon, Z; Csapo, Z; Farkas, M; Pfeifer, Gy [Nehezvegyipari Kutato Intezet, Veszprem (Hungary)

    1980-01-01

    The results obtained from the computer-aided interpretation of /sup 13/C NMR and IR spectra using the artificial intelligence approach are presented. In its present state the output of the system is a list of functional groups which are resonable candidates for the final structural isomers. The input requires empirical formula, /sup 13/C NMR data (off resonance data also) and IR spectral data. The confirmation of the presence of a functional group is based on comparison of the experimental data with the spectral properties of functional groups stored in a property matrix. If the molecular weight of the compounds studied is less or equal 500, the output contains usually 1.5-2.5 times more groups than really present, in most cases without the loss of the real ones.

  19. CASD-NMR 2: robust and accurate unsupervised analysis of raw NOESY spectra and protein structure determination with UNIO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerry, Paul; Duong, Viet Dung; Herrmann, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    UNIO is a comprehensive software suite for protein NMR structure determination that enables full automation of all NMR data analysis steps involved—including signal identification in NMR spectra, sequence-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignment, NOE assignment and structure calculation. Within the framework of the second round of the community-wide stringent blind NMR structure determination challenge (CASD-NMR 2), we participated in two categories of CASD-NMR 2, namely using either raw NMR spectra or unrefined NOE peak lists as input. A total of 15 resulting NMR structure bundles were submitted for 9 out of 10 blind protein targets. All submitted UNIO structures accurately coincided with the corresponding blind targets as documented by an average backbone root mean-square deviation to the reference proteins of only 1.2 Å. Also, the precision of the UNIO structure bundles was virtually identical to the ensemble of reference structures. By assessing the quality of all UNIO structures submitted to the two categories, we find throughout that only the UNIO–ATNOS/CANDID approach using raw NMR spectra consistently yielded structure bundles of high quality for direct deposition in the Protein Data Bank. In conclusion, the results obtained in CASD-NMR 2 are another vital proof for robust, accurate and unsupervised NMR data analysis by UNIO for real-world applications

  20. OBSERVING THE FINE STRUCTURE OF LOOPS THROUGH HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL RAIN WITH THE CRISP INSTRUMENT AT THE SWEDISH SOLAR TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolin, P.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.

    2012-01-01

    Observed in cool chromospheric lines, such as Hα or Ca II H, coronal rain corresponds to cool and dense plasma falling from coronal heights. Considered as a peculiar sporadic phenomenon of active regions, it has not received much attention since its discovery more than 40 years ago. Yet, it has been shown recently that a close relationship exists between this phenomenon and the coronal heating mechanism. Indeed, numerical simulations have shown that this phenomenon is most likely due to a loss of thermal equilibrium ensuing from a heating mechanism acting mostly toward the footpoints of loops. We present here one of the first high-resolution spectroscopic observations of coronal rain, performed with the CRisp Imaging Spectro Polarimeter (CRISP) instrument at the Swedish Solar Telescope. This work constitutes the first attempt to assess the importance of coronal rain in the understanding of the coronal magnetic field in active regions. With the present resolution, coronal rain is observed to literally invade the entire field of view. A large statistical set is obtained in which dynamics (total velocities and accelerations), shapes (lengths and widths), trajectories (angles of fall of the blobs), and thermodynamic properties (temperatures) of the condensations are derived. Specifically, we find that coronal rain is composed of small and dense chromospheric cores with average widths and lengths of ∼310 km and ∼710 km, respectively, average temperatures below 7000 K, displaying a broad distribution of falling speeds with an average of ∼70 km s –1 , and accelerations largely below the effective gravity along loops. Through estimates of the ion-neutral coupling in the blobs we show that coronal rain acts as a tracer of the coronal magnetic field, thus supporting the multi-strand loop scenario, and acts as a probe of the local thermodynamic conditions in loops. We further elucidate its potential in coronal heating. We find that the cooling in neighboring strands

  1. Disclosure of domain structure in cubic CaxZr1-xO2-x, 0x15 ≤ x ≤ 0x20, by Talbot image enhancement of high-resolution electron micrographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossell, H.J.; Wilson, I.J.; Sellar, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscope images have been recorded of several cystalline samples of calcia-stabilized zirconia (Ca-CSZ) and of the fluorite-related superstructure phase φ 1 (CaZr 4 O 9 ). The contrast of the CSZ images has been enhanced markedly by the light-optical Talbot self-imaging technique. Is is demonstrated that the CSZ crystals contain a coherent dispersion of microdomains approximately 30 A in diameter, and that the structure of the microdomains is that of φ 1 . (orig.)

  2. Designing of high-resolution photoresists: use of modern NMR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Novolac copolymers were prepared by both one- and two- step procedures ... ture was diluted with hydrochloric acid (1 : 1) in an ice bath and the ..... spectrum of the negative photoresist. The almost super-. +. O. N2. SO2. O. O. DNQO. DNQO.

  3. Systematic comparison of crystal and NMR protein structures deposited in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikic, Kresimir; Tomic, Sanja; Carugo, Oliviero

    2010-09-03

    Nearly all the macromolecular three-dimensional structures deposited in Protein Data Bank were determined by either crystallographic (X-ray) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. This paper reports a systematic comparison of the crystallographic and NMR results deposited in the files of the Protein Data Bank, in order to find out to which extent these information can be aggregated in bioinformatics. A non-redundant data set containing 109 NMR - X-ray structure pairs of nearly identical proteins was derived from the Protein Data Bank. A series of comparisons were performed by focusing the attention towards both global features and local details. It was observed that: (1) the RMDS values between NMR and crystal structures range from about 1.5 Å to about 2.5 Å; (2) the correlation between conformational deviations and residue type reveals that hydrophobic amino acids are more similar in crystal and NMR structures than hydrophilic amino acids; (3) the correlation between solvent accessibility of the residues and their conformational variability in solid state and in solution is relatively modest (correlation coefficient = 0.462); (4) beta strands on average match better between NMR and crystal structures than helices and loops; (5) conformational differences between loops are independent of crystal packing interactions in the solid state; (6) very seldom, side chains buried in the protein interior are observed to adopt different orientations in the solid state and in solution.

  4. Compatible topologies and parameters for NMR structure determination of carbohydrates by simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yingang

    2017-01-01

    The use of NMR methods to determine the three-dimensional structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins is still challenging, in part because of the lack of standard protocols. In order to increase the convenience of structure determination, the topology and parameter files for carbohydrates in the program Crystallography & NMR System (CNS) were investigated and new files were developed to be compatible with the standard simulated annealing protocols for proteins and nucleic acids. Recalculating the published structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes and glycosylated proteins demonstrates that the results are comparable to the published structures which employed more complex procedures for structure calculation. Integrating the new carbohydrate parameters into the standard structure calculation protocol will facilitate three-dimensional structural study of carbohydrates and glycosylated proteins by NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Solution NMR structure and inhibitory effect against amyloid-β fibrillation of Humanin containing a D-isomerized serine residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsanousi, Nesreen [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sugiki, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiki@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Furuita, Kyoko; So, Masatomo; Lee, Young-Ho; Fujiwara, Toshimichi [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kojima, Chojiro, E-mail: kojima-chojiro-xk@ynu.ac.jp [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Humanin comprising 24 amino acid residues is a bioactive peptide that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Humanin reportedly suppressed aging-related death of various cells due to amyloid fibrils and oxidative stress. There are reports that the cytoprotective activity of Humanin was remarkably enhanced by optical isomerization of the Ser14 residue from L to D form, but details of the molecular mechanism remained unclear. Here we demonstrated that Humanin D-Ser14 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against fibrillation of amyloid-β and remarkably higher binding affinity for amyloid-β than that of the Humanin wild-type and S14G mutant. In addition, we determined the solution structure of Humanin D-Ser14 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and showed that D-isomerization of the Ser14 residue enables drastic conformational rearrangement of Humanin. Furthermore, we identified an amyloid-β-binding site on Humanin D-Ser14 at atomic resolution by NMR. These biophysical and high-resolution structural analyses clearly revealed structure–function relationships of Humanin and explained the driving force of the drastic conformational change and molecular basis of the potent anti-amyloid-β fibrillation activity of Humanin caused by D-isomerization of the Ser14 residue. This is the first study to show correlations between the functional activity, tertiary structure, and partner recognition mode of Humanin and may lead to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cytoprotective activity of Humanin. - Highlights: • Humanin D-Ser14 showed the strongest inhibitory activity against Aβ40 fibrillation. • NMR structure of Humanin D-Ser14 was determined in alcohol/water mixture solution. • Humanin D-Ser14 directly bound Aβ40 stronger than Humanin wild-type and Humanin S14G. • Aβ40 and zinc ion binding sites of Humanin D-Ser14 were identified. • Structure around Ser14 of Humanin is critical for Aβ40 binding and

  6. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  7. NMR methods for the investigation of structure and transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Edme H

    2011-01-01

    Methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are increasingly applied in engineering sciences. The book summarizes research in the field of chemical and process engineering performed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Fundamentals of the methods are exposed for readers with an engineering background. Applications cover the fields of mechanical process engineering (filtration, solid-liquid separation, powder mixing, rheometry), chemical process engineering (trickle-bed reactor, ceramic sponges), bioprocess engineering (biofilm growth), and food process engineering (microwave heating

  8. High-resolution Al L2,3-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure spectra of Al-containing crystals and glasses: coordination number and bonding information from edge components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigel, C; Calas, G; Cormier, L; Galoisy, L; Henderson, G S

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution Al L 2,3 -edge x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra have been measured in selected materials containing aluminium in 4-, 5- and 6-coordination. A shift of 1.5 eV is observed between the onset of [4] Al and [6] Al L 2,3 -edge XANES, in agreement with the magnitude of the shift observed at the Al K-edge. The differences in the position and shape of low-energy components of Al L 2,3 -edge XANES spectra provide a unique fingerprint of the geometry of the Al site and of the nature of Al-O chemical bond. The high resolution allows the calculation of electronic parameters such as the spin-orbit coupling and exchange energy using intermediate coupling theory. The electron-hole exchange energy decreases in tetrahedral as compared to octahedral symmetry, in relation with the increased screening of the core hole in the former. Al L 2,3 -edge XANES spectra confirm a major structural difference between glassy and crystalline NaAlSi 2 O 6 , with Al in 4- and 6-coordination, respectively, Al coordination remaining unchanged in NaAl 1-x Fe x Si 2 O 6 glasses, as Fe is substituted for Al

  9. High-resolution crystal structure reveals a HEPN domain at the C-terminal region of S. cerevisiae RNA endonuclease Swt1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Shuxia; Zhou, Ke; Wang, Wenjia; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui; Liu, Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 was determined at 2.3 Å. • Structure of the CT domain was identified as HEPN domain superfamily member. • Low-resolution envelope of Swt1 full-length in solution was analyzed by SAXS. • The middle and CT domains gave good fit to SAXS structural model. - Abstract: Swt1 is an RNA endonuclease that plays an important role in quality control of nuclear messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in eukaryotes; however, its structural details remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which shares common characteristics of higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide binding (HEPN) domain superfamily. To study in detail the full-length protein structure, we analyzed the low-resolution architecture of Swt1 in solution using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. Both the CT domain and middle domain exhibited a good fit upon superimposing onto the molecular envelope of Swt1. Our study provides the necessary structural information for detailed analysis of the functional role of Swt1, and its importance in the process of nuclear mRNP surveillance

  10. Raman Spectroscopy Adds Complementary Detail to the High-Resolution X-Ray Crystal Structure of Photosynthetic PsbP from Spinacia oleracea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, V. Jr.; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Lapkouski, Mikalai; Hofbauerová, Kateřina; Sovová, Žofie; Ettrichová, Olga; Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Dulebo, A.; Kaftan, D.; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Reveuelta, J. L.; Arellano, J. B.; Carey, J.; Ettrich, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 10 (2012), s. 46694-46694 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : secondary-structure-analysis * oxygen-evolving complexO * plant photosystem-II * moleculars-dynamics * assisted crystallography * angstrom resolution * protein-structure * amide-I * conformation * biomolecules Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  11. Structural analysis of the carbohydrate chains of glycoproteins by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutsaers, J.H.G.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with the structural analysis by 500-MHz 1 H-NMR spectroscopy of carbohydrate chains obtained from glycoproteins. In the chapters 1 to 6 the structural analysis of N-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains is described. The chapters 7 to 10 describe the structural analysis of O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains. 381 refs.; 44 figs.; 24 tabs.; 7 schemes

  12. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  13. Structural Studies of Bcl-xL/ligand Complexes using {sup 19}F NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Liping; Hajduk, Philip J.; Mack, Jamey; Olejniczak, Edward T. [GPRD, Abbott Laboratories, Pharmaceutical Discovery Division (United States)], E-mail: Edward.olejniczak@abbott.com

    2006-04-15

    Fluorine atoms are often incorporated into drug molecules as part of the lead optimization process in order to improve affinity or modify undesirable metabolic and pharmacokinetic profiles. From an NMR perspective, the abundance of fluorinated drug leads provides an exploitable niche for structural studies using {sup 19}F NMR in the drug discovery process. As {sup 19}F has no interfering background signal from biological sources, {sup 19}F NMR studies of fluorinated drugs bound to their protein receptors can yield easily interpretable and unambiguous structural constraints. {sup 19}F can also be selectively incorporated into proteins to obtain additional constraints for structural studies. Despite these advantages, {sup 19}F NMR has rarely been exploited for structural studies due to its broad lines in macromolecules and their ligand complexes, leading to weak signals in {sup 1}H/{sup 19}F heteronuclear NOE experiments. Here we demonstrate several different experimental strategies that use {sup 19}F NMR to obtain ligand-protein structural constraints for ligands bound to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL, a drug target for anti-cancer therapy. These examples indicate the applicability of these methods to typical structural problems encountered in the drug development process.

  14. Comparison of NMR and crystal structures highlights conformational isomerism in protein active sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Pedro; Pedrini, Bill; Geralt, Michael; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Horst, Reto; Herrmann, Torsten; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Tools for systematic comparisons of NMR and crystal structures developed by the JCSG were applied to two proteins with known functions: the T. maritima anti-σ factor antagonist TM1081 and the mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase A2LD1 (gi:13879369). In an attempt to exploit the complementarity of crystal and NMR data, the combined use of the two structure-determination techniques was explored for the initial steps in the challenge of searching proteins of unknown functions for putative active sites. The JCSG has recently developed a protocol for systematic comparisons of high-quality crystal and NMR structures of proteins. In this paper, the extent to which this approach can provide function-related information on the two functionally annotated proteins TM1081, a Thermotoga maritima anti-σ factor antagonist, and A2LD1 (gi:13879369), a mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase, is explored. The NMR structures of the two proteins have been determined in solution at 313 and 298 K, respectively, using the current JCSG protocol based on the software package UNIO for extensive automation. The corresponding crystal structures were solved by the JCSG at 100 K and 1.6 Å resolution and at 100 K and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. The NMR and crystal structures of the two proteins share the same overall molecular architectures. However, the precision of the structure determination along the amino-acid sequence varies over a significantly wider range in the NMR structures than in the crystal structures. Thereby, in each of the two NMR structures about 65% of the residues have displacements below the average and in both proteins the less well ordered residues include large parts of the active sites, in addition to some highly solvent-exposed surface areas. Whereas the latter show increased disorder in the crystal and in solution, the active-site regions display increased displacements only in the NMR structures, where they undergo local conformational exchange on the

  15. Structure analysis of OmpC, one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli, by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.F.

    1983-07-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the structure analysis of a pore-forming membrane protein, OmpC, which is one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In order to obtain structural information it was necessary to develop a suitable technique for preparing two-dimensional crystalline arrays of this membrane protein in an unfixed, unstained and hydrated condition. Electron micrographs were recorded at exposures of less than 5 electrons/A 2 in order to avoid severe radiation damage. The resulting images were crystallographically averaged, in order to overcome the statistical limitations associated with the low electron exposures. The resulting images, which extend to a resolution of approx. 13.5 A, lend themselves to a natural interpretation that is consistent with the mass density of protein, water and lipid, prior data from 2-D and 3-D structure studies of negatively stained specimens at approx. = 20 A resolution, and published spectroscopic data on the peptide chain secondary structure

  16. Structural investigation of e-beam cured epoxy resins through solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessi, Sabina; Spinella, Alberto; Caponetti, Eugenio; Dispenza, Clelia; Spadaro, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the network structure of e-beam cured DGEBF based epoxy resins is investigated. Two epoxy systems, having different reactivity and cured in different process conditions, were analyzed through solid state NMR spectroscopy. The analysis shows that the more reactive system has higher cross-linking density and higher uniformity of network distribution. Similar information were obtained, in a previous work, on the same systems through dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. It is worth noting that unlike DMTA tests, which interfere with the molecular structure of the analyzed material, due to the heating during the analysis itself, more reliable information, without any artefact, are obtained by solid state NMR, carried out at constant room temperature. - Highlights: ► The structure of two e-beam cured epoxy systems is investigated through solid state NMR. ► The aim is to have direct information about the structure without inducing modifications. ► The different molecular structures are able to emphasize the response of solid state NMR. ► T 1 H, T 1ρ H and T CH measurements indicate different cross-linking degrees. ► The NMR results are in agreement with DMTA analysis performed in a previous paper.

  17. Structural changes of Bi1.8Sr2(Ca1-xYx)Cu2.2Oz ceramics with yttrium content studied by electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Iwabuchi, Yoshihiro; Fukase, Tetsuo; Sato, Hiroshi; Mitchell, Terence E.

    1991-06-01

    The mode of the incommensurate modulation in the b direction of the Bi1.8Sr2(Ca1-xYx)Cu2.2Oz (0.05high-resolution lattice imaging. The change of period of the long-period structure with x is found to be basically due to the mixing ratio of domains of two modulation periods with b=4.5b0 and 5b0 or 4.5b0 and 4b0, thus creating periods of b=4.75b0-4.0b0. The fundamental orthorhombic lattice has dimensions of a~=b~=b0 (0.54 nm) and c~=c0 (3.1 nm). The change of the mixing mode from one to the other mentioned above occurs just in the yttrium concentration range, 0.45high-resolution lattice images. These images are reproduced well by a multislice computer-simulation technique.

  18. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  19. High resolution spectroscopy in solids by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for High Resolution Spectroscopy in Solids are described. Also the construction project of a partially home made spectrometer and its applications in the characterization of solid samples are shown in detail. The high resolution spectrometer used is implemented with the double resonance multiple pulses sequences and magic angle spinning (MAS) and can be used with solid and liquid samples. The maximum spinning frequency for the MAS experiment is in excess of 5 Khz, the double resonance sequences can be performed with any type of nucleus, in the variable temperature operating range with nitrogen gas: -120 0 C to +160 0 C, and is fully controlled by a Macintosh IIci microcomputer. (author)

  20. Structural characterization and gas reactions of small metal particles by high resolution in-situ TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and TED (Transmission Electron Diffraction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1987-01-01

    The detection and size analysis of small metal particles supported on amorphous substrates becomes increasingly difficult when the particle size approaches that of the phase contrast background structures of the support. An approach of digital image analysis, involving Fourier transformation of the original image, filtering, and image reconstruction was studied with respect to the likelihood of unambiguously detecting particles of less than 1 nm diameter on amorphous substrates from a single electron micrograph.

  1. Online coupling of high-resolution chromatography with extreme UV photon activation tandem mass spectrometry: Application to the structural investigation of complex glycans by dissociative photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ropartz, David; Giuliani, Alexandre; Fanuel, Mathieu; Hervé, Cécile; Czjzek, Mirjam; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The activation of ions by extreme-energy photons (XUV) produced by a synchrotron radiation beamline is a powerful method for characterizing complex glycans using tandem mass spectrometry (MS). As previously described, this activation method leads to rich fragmentation spectra with many structurally valuable cross-ring cleavages while maintaining labile modifications on the glycan structures. However, until now, the tandem MS event was too long to be compatible with liquid chromatography elution times. In this work, the duty cycle of the activation and detection of fragments was shortened, and the background signal on the spectra was drastically reduced. Both improvements allowed, for the first time, the successful coupling of a UHPLC system to XUV-activated tandem MS. The approach was used to characterize a complex mixture of oligo-porphyrans, which are a class of highly sulfated oligosaccharides, in a fully automated way. Due to an enhanced dynamic range and an increased sensitivity, some hypothetical structures of low abundance have been unequivocally confirmed in this study and others have been revised. Some previously undescribed species of oligo-porphyrans that exhibit lateral branching have been fully resolved. This work contributes to the scarce knowledge of the structure of porphyrans in red algae and pushes the current capacities of XUV-activation tandem MS by demonstrating the possibility of a direct coupling with UHPLC. This study will considerably broaden the applicability and practicality of this method in many fields of analytical biology. - Highlights: • For the first time, XUV photon activation tandem MS was coupled to UHPLC. • The approach was used to characterize a complex mixture of biomolecules. • The MSMS duty cycle was compatible with elution times of UHPLC without compromised. • Minor species were characterized with an enhanced sensitivity and dynamic range. • These results broaden the application of the technique in many field of

  2. High resolution positron q-value measurements and nuclear structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report, 1983-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avignone, F.T. III.

    1984-01-01

    Results of studies of the beta-delayed proton spectra of 147 Dy and 149 Er are presented, and a preliminary report on measuring the masses of 77 Kr and 75 Kr is given. Studies on the beta decay of 76 Rb and the level structure of 76 Kr and a search for axions from the 1.1155 MeV transition of 65 Cu are briefly described

  3. High-resolution crystal structures of the photoreceptor glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with three and four-bound NAD molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bo Y; Shi, Wuxian; Wang, Benlian; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) into 1,3-diphosphoglycerate (BGP) in the presence of the NAD cofactor. GAPDH is an important drug target because of its central role in glycolysis, and nonglycolytic processes such as nuclear RNA transport, DNA replication/repair, membrane fusion and cellular apoptosis. Recent studies found that GAPDH participates in the development of diabetic retinopathy and its progression after the cessation of hyperglycemia. Here, we report two structures for native bovine photoreceptor GAPDH as a homotetramer with differing occupancy by NAD, bGAPDH(NAD)4, and bGAPDH(NAD)3. The bGAPDH(NAD)4 was solved at 1.52 Å, the highest resolution for GAPDH. Structural comparison of the bGAPDH(NAD)4 and bGAPDH(NAD)3 models revealed novel details of conformational changes induced by cofactor binding, including a loop region (residues 54–56). Structure analysis of bGAPDH confirmed the importance of Phe34 in NAD binding, and demonstrated that Phe34 was stabilized in the presence of NAD but displayed greater mobility in its absence. The oxidative state of the active site Cys149 residue is regulated by NAD binding, because this residue was found oxidized in the absence of dinucleotide. The distance between Cys149 and His176 decreased upon NAD binding and Cys149 remained in a reduced state when NAD was bound. These findings provide an important structural step for understanding the mechanism of GAPDH activity in vision and its pathological role in retinopathies. PMID:25176140

  4. Online coupling of high-resolution chromatography with extreme UV photon activation tandem mass spectrometry: Application to the structural investigation of complex glycans by dissociative photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropartz, David, E-mail: David.Ropartz@nantes.inra.fr [INRA, UR1268 Biopolymers Interactions Assemblies F-44316 Nantes (France); Giuliani, Alexandre [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, F-91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); UAR 1008 CEPIA, INRA, F-44316 Nantes (France); Fanuel, Mathieu [INRA, UR1268 Biopolymers Interactions Assemblies F-44316 Nantes (France); Hervé, Cécile; Czjzek, Mirjam [Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris VI, CNRS, Integrative Biology of Marine Models, UMR 8227, Station Biologique, Place George Teissier, F29688 Roscoff Cedex (France); Rogniaux, Hélène [INRA, UR1268 Biopolymers Interactions Assemblies F-44316 Nantes (France)

    2016-08-24

    The activation of ions by extreme-energy photons (XUV) produced by a synchrotron radiation beamline is a powerful method for characterizing complex glycans using tandem mass spectrometry (MS). As previously described, this activation method leads to rich fragmentation spectra with many structurally valuable cross-ring cleavages while maintaining labile modifications on the glycan structures. However, until now, the tandem MS event was too long to be compatible with liquid chromatography elution times. In this work, the duty cycle of the activation and detection of fragments was shortened, and the background signal on the spectra was drastically reduced. Both improvements allowed, for the first time, the successful coupling of a UHPLC system to XUV-activated tandem MS. The approach was used to characterize a complex mixture of oligo-porphyrans, which are a class of highly sulfated oligosaccharides, in a fully automated way. Due to an enhanced dynamic range and an increased sensitivity, some hypothetical structures of low abundance have been unequivocally confirmed in this study and others have been revised. Some previously undescribed species of oligo-porphyrans that exhibit lateral branching have been fully resolved. This work contributes to the scarce knowledge of the structure of porphyrans in red algae and pushes the current capacities of XUV-activation tandem MS by demonstrating the possibility of a direct coupling with UHPLC. This study will considerably broaden the applicability and practicality of this method in many fields of analytical biology. - Highlights: • For the first time, XUV photon activation tandem MS was coupled to UHPLC. • The approach was used to characterize a complex mixture of biomolecules. • The MSMS duty cycle was compatible with elution times of UHPLC without compromised. • Minor species were characterized with an enhanced sensitivity and dynamic range. • These results broaden the application of the technique in many field of

  5. Structure and microstructure of Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal exhibiting magnetic shape memory effect analysed by high resolution X-ray diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Cejpek, P.; Drahokoupil, Jan; Holý, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 115, Aug (2016), s. 250-258 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-30397S; GA ČR GA15-00262S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic field-induced strain * magnetic shape memory effect * X-ray diffraction * structure of Ni-Mn-Ga Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 5.301, year: 2016

  6. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W. (Scripps)

    2012-09-05

    Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

  7. High-Resolution Imaging of Dense Gas Structure and Kinematics in Nearby Molecular Clouds with the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Shaye

    This thesis utilizes new observations of dense gas in molecular clouds to develop an empirical framework for how clouds form structures which evolve into young cores and stars. Previous observations show the general turbulent and hierarchical nature of clouds. However, current understanding of the star formation pathway is limited by existing data that do not combine angular resolution needed to resolve individual cores with area coverage required to capture entire star-forming regions and with tracers that can resolve gas motions. The original contributions of this thesis to astrophysical research are the creation and analysis of the largest-area high-angular-resolution maps of dense gas in molecular clouds to-date, and the development of a non-binary dendrogram algorithm to quantify the hierarchical nature and three-dimensional morphology of cloud structure. I first describe the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey, which provides spectrally imaged N2H+, HCO+, and HCN (J = 1→0) emission across diverse regions of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. I then present a detailed analysis of the Barnard 1 and L1451 regions in Perseus. A non-binary dendrogram analysis of Barnard 1 N2H emission and all L1451 emission shows that the most hierarchically complex gas corresponds with sub-regions actively forming young stars. I estimate the typical depth of molecular emission in each region using the spatial and kinematic properties of dendrogram-identified structures. Barnard 1 appears to be a sheet-like region at the largest scales with filamentary substructure, while the L1451 region is composed of more spatially distinct ellipsoidal structures. I then do a uniform comparison of the hierarchical structure and young stellar content of all five regions. The more evolved regions with the most young stellar objects (YSOs) and strongest emission have formed the most hierarchical levels. However, all regions show similar mean branching properties at each level

  8. Enhancement of catalytic activity of enzymes by heating in anhydrous organic solvents: 3D structure of a modified serine proteinase at high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Tyagi, R; Gupta, M N; Singh, T P

    2001-01-01

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that exposure of an enzyme to anhydrous organic solvents at optimized high temperature enhances its catalytic power through local changes at the binding region. Six enzymes, namely, proteinase K, wheat germ acid phosphatase, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase, chymotrypsin and trypsin were exposed to acetonitrile at 70 degrees C for three hr. The activities of these enzymes were found to be considerably enhanced. In order to understand the basis of this change in the activity of these enzymes, proteinase K was analyzed in detail using X-ray diffraction method. The overall structure of the enzyme was found to be similar to the native structure in aqueous environment. The hydrogen bonding system of the catalytic triad remained intact after the treatment. However, the water structure in the substrate binding site underwent some rearrangement as some of the water molecules were either displaced or completely absent. The most striking observation concerning the water structure was the complete deletion of the water molecule which occupied the position at the so-called oxyanion hole in the active site of the native enzyme. Three acetonitrile molecules were found in the present structure. All the acetonitrile molecules were located in the recognition site. Interlinked through water molecules, the sites occupied by acetonitrile molecules were independent of water molecules. The acetonitrile molecules are involved in extensive interactions with the protein atoms. The methyl group of one of the acetonitrile molecules (CCN1) interacts simultaneously with the hydrophobic side chains of Leu 96, Ile 107 and Leu 133. The development of such a hydrophobic environment at the recognition site introduced a striking conformation change in Ile 107 by rotating its side chain about C alpha-C beta bond by 180 degrees to bring about the delta-methyl group within the range of attractive van der Waals interactions with the methyl group of CCN1. A similar

  9. Targeting high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis with high-resolution radical scavenging profiles - bioactive secondary metabolites from the endophytic fungus Penicillium namyslowskii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Nyberg, Nils; Tejesvi, Mysore V.

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution radical scavenging profile of an extract of the endophytic fungus Penicillium namyslowskii was used to target analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HPLC...... NMR probe designed for 1.7-mm NMR tubes. To further explore the potential of the above HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR platform for analysis of endophytic extracts, six peaks displaying no radical scavenging activity were also analyzed. This allowed unambiguous identification of six metabolites, i...... and griseofulvin, directly from crude extract via HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Dechlorodehydrogriseofulvin was reported for the first time from nature....

  10. Solution structures of α-conotoxin G1 determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardi, A.; Galdes, A.; Florance, J.; Maniconte, D.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional NMR data have been used to generate solution structures of α-conotoxin G1, a potent peptide antagonist of the acetylcholine receptor. Structural information was obtained in the form of proton-proton internuclear distance constraints, and initial structures were produced with a distance geometry algorithm. Energetically more favorable structures were generated by using the distance geometry structures as input for a constrained energy minimization program. The results of both of these calculations indicate that the overall backbone conformation of the molecule is well-defined by the NMR data whereas the side-chain conformations are generally less well-defined. The main structural features derived from the NMR data were the presence of tight turns centered on residues Pro 5 and Arg 9 . The solution structures are compared with previous proposed models of conotoxin G1, and the NMR data are interpreted in conjunction with chemical modification studies and structural properties of other antagonists of the acetylcholine receptor to gain insight into structure-activity relationships in these peptide toxins

  11. High-resolution structural studies of ultra-thin magnetic, transition metal overlayers and two-dimensional transition metal oxides using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellar, S.A.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1997-05-01

    This thesis report the surface-structure determination of three, ultra-thin magnetic transition-metal films, Fe/Au(100), Mn/Ni(100), and Mn/Cu(100) using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) and photoelectron holography. These structural studies are the first to use non-s initial states in the ARPEFS procedure. This thesis also reports an ARPEFS surface-structure determination of a two-dimensional transition-metal oxide, [(1 x 1)O/W(110)] x 12. The authors have analyzed the ARPFES signal from the Au 4f 7/5 core level of the Au(1 ML)/Fe(15 ML)/Au(100) system. The analysis shows that the Fe grows layer by layer with one monolayer of gold, acting as a surfactant, remaining on top of the growing Fe layers. These surface gold atoms sit in the four-fold hollow site, 1.67 ± 0.02 A above the iron surface. The grown Fe layer is very much like the bulk, bcc iron, with an interlayer spacing of 1.43 ± 0.03 A. Analysis of the Mn 3p ARPEFS signals from c(2 x 2)Mn/Ni(100) and c(2 x 2)Mn/Cu(100) shows that the Mn forms highly corrugated surface alloys. The corrugation of the Mn/Ni(100) and Mn/Cu(100) systems are 0.24 ± 0.02 A and 0.30 ± 0.04 A respectively. In both cases the Mn is sticking above the plane of the surface substrate atoms. For the Mn/Ni(100) system the first layer Ni is contracted 4% from the bulk value. The Mn/Cu(100) system shows bulk spacing for the substrate Cu. Photoelectron holography shows that the Mn/Ni interface is very abrupt with very little Mn leaking into the second layer, while the Mn/Cu(100) case has a significant amount of Mn leaking into the second layer. A new, five-element electrostatic electron lens was developed for hemispherical electron-energy analyzers. This lens system can be operated at constant transverse or constants angular magnification, and has been optimized for use with the very small photon-spot sizes. Improvements to the hemispherical electron-energy analyzer are also discussed

  12. High-resolution structural studies of ultra-thin magnetic, transition metal overlayers and two-dimensional transition metal oxides using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellar, S.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source Div.

    1997-05-01

    This thesis report the surface-structure determination of three, ultra-thin magnetic transition-metal films, Fe/Au(100), Mn/Ni(100), and Mn/Cu(100) using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) and photoelectron holography. These structural studies are the first to use non-s initial states in the ARPEFS procedure. This thesis also reports an ARPEFS surface-structure determination of a two-dimensional transition-metal oxide, [(1 x 1)O/W(110)] x 12. The authors have analyzed the ARPFES signal from the Au 4f{sub 7/5} core level of the Au(1 ML)/Fe(15 ML)/Au(100) system. The analysis shows that the Fe grows layer by layer with one monolayer of gold, acting as a surfactant, remaining on top of the growing Fe layers. These surface gold atoms sit in the four-fold hollow site, 1.67 {+-} 0.02 A above the iron surface. The grown Fe layer is very much like the bulk, bcc iron, with an interlayer spacing of 1.43 {+-} 0.03 A. Analysis of the Mn 3p ARPEFS signals from c(2 x 2)Mn/Ni(100) and c(2 x 2)Mn/Cu(100) shows that the Mn forms highly corrugated surface alloys. The corrugation of the Mn/Ni(100) and Mn/Cu(100) systems are 0.24 {+-} 0.02 A and 0.30 {+-} 0.04 A respectively. In both cases the Mn is sticking above the plane of the surface substrate atoms. For the Mn/Ni(100) system the first layer Ni is contracted 4% from the bulk value. The Mn/Cu(100) system shows bulk spacing for the substrate Cu. Photoelectron holography shows that the Mn/Ni interface is very abrupt with very little Mn leaking into the second layer, while the Mn/Cu(100) case has a significant amount of Mn leaking into the second layer. A new, five-element electrostatic electron lens was developed for hemispherical electron-energy analyzers. This lens system can be operated at constant transverse or constants angular magnification, and has been optimized for use with the very small photon-spot sizes. Improvements to the hemispherical electron-energy analyzer are also discussed.

  13. High-resolution structural and functional assessments of cerebral microvasculature using 3D Gas ΔR2*-mMRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hsiang; Chen, Chiao-Chi V; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou S; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    The ability to evaluate the cerebral microvascular structure and function is crucial for investigating pathological processes in brain disorders. Previous angiographic methods based on blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast offer appropriate visualization of the cerebral vasculature, but these methods remain to be optimized in order to extract more comprehensive information. This study aimed to integrate the advantages of BOLD MRI in both structural and functional vascular assessments. The BOLD contrast was manipulated by a carbogen challenge, and signal changes in gradient-echo images were computed to generate ΔR2* maps. Simultaneously, a functional index representing the regional cerebral blood volume was derived by normalizing the ΔR2* values of a given region to those of vein-filled voxels of the sinus. This method is named 3D gas ΔR2*-mMRA (microscopic MRA). The advantages of using 3D gas ΔR2*-mMRA to observe the microvasculature include the ability to distinguish air-tissue interfaces, a high vessel-to-tissue contrast, and not being affected by damage to the blood-brain barrier. A stroke model was used to demonstrate the ability of 3D gas ΔR2*-mMRA to provide information about poststroke revascularization at 3 days after reperfusion. However, this technique has some limitations that cannot be overcome and hence should be considered when it is applied, such as magnifying vessel sizes and predominantly revealing venous vessels.

  14. Investigation into the Formation, Structure, and Evolution of an EF4 Tornado in East China Using a High-Resolution Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dan; Xue, Haile; Yin, Jinfang; Sun, Jisong; Liang, Xudong; Guo, Jianping

    2018-04-01

    Devastating tornadoes in China have received growing attention in recent years, but little is known about their formation, structure, and evolution on the tornadic scale. Most of these tornadoes develop within the East Asian monsoon regime, in an environment quite different from tornadoes in the U.S. In this study, we used an idealized, highresolution (25-m grid spacing) numerical simulation to investigate the deadly EF4 (Enhanced Fujita scale category 4) tornado that occurred on 23 June 2016 and claimed 99 lives in Yancheng, Jiangsu Province. A tornadic supercell developed in the simulation that had striking similarities to radar observations. The violent tornado in Funing County was reproduced, exceeding EF4 (74 m s-1), consistent with the on-site damage survey. It was accompanied by a funnel cloud that extended to the surface, and exhibited a double-helix vorticity structure. The signal of tornado genesis was found first at the cloud base in the pressure perturbation field, and then developed both upward and downward in terms of maximum vertical velocity overlapping with the intense vertical vorticity centers. The tornado's demise was found to accompany strong downdrafts overlapping with the intense vorticity centers. One of the interesting findings of this work is that a violent surface vortex was able to be generated and maintained, even though the simulation employed a free-slip lower boundary condition. The success of this simulation, despite using an idealized numerical approach, provides a means to investigate more historical tornadoes in China.

  15. Spatial and temporal changes in household structure locations using high-resolution satellite imagery for population assessment: an analysis in southern Zambia, 2006-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Shields

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Satellite imagery is increasingly available at high spatial resolution and can be used for various purposes in public health research and programme implementation. Comparing a census generated from two satellite images of the same region in rural southern Zambia obtained four and a half years apart identified patterns of household locations and change over time. The length of time that a satellite image-based census is accurate determines its utility. Households were enumerated manually from satellite images obtained in 2006 and 2011 of the same area. Spatial statistics were used to describe clustering, cluster detection, and spatial variation in the location of households. A total of 3821 household locations were enumerated in 2006 and 4256 in 2011, a net change of 435 houses (11.4% increase. Comparison of the images indicated that 971 (25.4% structures were added and 536 (14.0% removed. Further analysis suggested similar household clustering in the two images and no substantial difference in concentration of households across the study area. Cluster detection analysis identified a small area where significantly more household structures were removed than expected; however, the amount of change was of limited practical significance. These findings suggest that random sampling of households for study participation would not induce geographic bias if based on a 4.5-year-old image in this region. Application of spatial statistical methods provides insights into the population distribution changes between two time periods and can be helpful in assessing the accuracy of satellite imagery.

  16. A High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Psychrohalophilic α-Carbonic Anhydrase from Photobacterium profundum Reveals a Unique Dimer Interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Somalinga

    Full Text Available Bacterial α-carbonic anhydrases (α-CA are zinc containing metalloenzymes that catalyze the rapid interconversion of CO2 to bicarbonate and a proton. We report the first crystal structure of a pyschrohalophilic α-CA from a deep-sea bacterium, Photobacterium profundum. Size exclusion chromatography of the purified P. profundum α-CA (PprCA reveals that the protein is a heterogeneous mix of monomers and dimers. Furthermore, an "in-gel" carbonic anhydrase activity assay, also known as protonography, revealed two distinct bands corresponding to monomeric and dimeric forms of PprCA that are catalytically active. The crystal structure of PprCA was determined in its native form and reveals a highly conserved "knot-topology" that is characteristic of α-CA's. Similar to other bacterial α-CA's, PprCA also crystallized as a dimer. Furthermore, dimer interface analysis revealed the presence of a chloride ion (Cl- in the interface which is unique to PprCA and has not been observed in any other α-CA's characterized so far. Molecular dynamics simulation and chloride ion occupancy analysis shows 100% occupancy for the Cl- ion in the dimer interface. Zinc coordinating triple histidine residues, substrate binding hydrophobic patch residues, and the hydrophilic proton wire residues are highly conserved in PprCA and are identical to other well-studied α-CA's.

  17. Structure elucidation and quantification of impurities formed between 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol in an oral solution using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Cornett, Claus; Nyberg, Nils; Østergaard, Jesper; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-03-25

    Concentrated solutions containing 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol have been studied at temperatures of 50°C, 60°C, 70°C and 80°C as well as at 20°C. It has previously been reported that the commonly employed citric acid is a reactive excipient, and it is therefore important to thoroughly investigate a possible reaction between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid. The current study revealed the formation of 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Less than 0.03% of 6-aminocaproic acid was converted to 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid after 30 days of storage at 80°C. Degradation products of 6-aminocaproic acid were also observed after storage at the applied temperatures, e.g., dimer, trimer and cyclized 6-aminocaproic acid, i.e., caprolactam. No reaction products between D-sorbitol and 6-aminocaproic acid could be observed. 3-Hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid, dimer and caprolactam were also observed after storage at 20°C for 3 months. The findings imply that an oral solution of 6-aminocaproic acid is relatively stable at 20°C at the pH values 4.00 and 5.00 as suggested in the USP for oral formulations. Compliance with the ICH guideline Q3B is expected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Strategies for dereplication of natural compounds using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Complete structural elucidation of natural products is commonly performed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), but annotating compounds to most likely structures using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry is a faster and feasible first step. The CASMI contest 2016 (Critical Assessment of Small Molecule Identification) provided spectra of eighteen compounds for the best manual structure identification in the natural products category. High resolution precursor and tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) were available to characterize the compounds. We used the Seven Golden Rules, Sirius2 and MS-FINDER software for determination of molecular formulas, and then we queried the formulas in different natural product databases including DNP, UNPD, ChemSpider and REAXYS to obtain molecular structures. We used different in-silico fragmentation tools including CFM-ID, CSI:FingerID and MS-FINDER to rank these compounds. Additional neutral losses and product ion peaks were manually investigated. This manual and time consuming approach allowed for the correct dereplication of thirteen of the eighteen natural products.

  19. KUJIRA, a package of integrated modules for systematic and interactive analysis of NMR data directed to high-throughput NMR structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naohiro; Iwahara, Junji; Koshiba, Seizo; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Tochio, Naoya; Guentert, Peter; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The recent expansion of structural genomics has increased the demands for quick and accurate protein structure determination by NMR spectroscopy. The conventional strategy without an automated protocol can no longer satisfy the needs of high-throughput application to a large number of proteins, with each data set including many NMR spectra, chemical shifts, NOE assignments, and calculated structures. We have developed the new software KUJIRA, a package of integrated modules for the systematic and interactive analysis of NMR data, which is designed to reduce the tediousness of organizing and manipulating a large number of NMR data sets. In combination with CYANA, the program for automated NOE assignment and structure determination, we have established a robust and highly optimized strategy for comprehensive protein structure analysis. An application of KUJIRA in accordance with our new strategy was carried out by a non-expert in NMR structure analysis, demonstrating that the accurate assignment of the chemical shifts and a high-quality structure of a small protein can be completed in a few weeks. The high completeness of the chemical shift assignment and the NOE assignment achieved by the systematic analysis using KUJIRA and CYANA led, in practice, to increased reliability of the determined structure

  20. Investigation of InN layers grown by MOCVD using analytical and high resolution TEM: The structure, band gap, role of the buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruterana, P.; Abouzaid, M.; Gloux, F.; Maciej, W.; Doualan, J.L.; Drago, M.; Schmidtling, T.; Pohl, U.W.; Richter, W.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we investigate the microstructure of InN layers grown by MOCVD on different buffer layers using TEM (InN, GaN). The large mismatch between the various lattices (InN, sapphire or GaN) leads to particular interface structures. Our local analysis allows to show that at atomic scale, the material has the InN lattice parameters and that no metallic In precipitates are present, meaning that the PL emission below 0.8 eV is a genuine property of the InN semiconductor. It is also shown that the N polar layers, which exhibit a 2D growth, have poorer PL emission than In polar layers. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Methods of NMR structure refinement: molecular dynamics simulations improve the agreement with measured NMR data of a C-terminal peptide of GCN4-p1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolenc, Jozica; Missimer, John H.; Steinmetz, Michel O.; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal trigger sequence is essential in the coiled-coil formation of GCN4-p1; its conformational properties are thus of importance for understanding this process at the atomic level. A solution NMR model structure of a peptide, GCN4p16-31, encompassing the GCN4-p1 trigger sequence was proposed a few years ago. Derived using a standard single-structure refinement protocol based on 172 nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) distance restraints, 14 hydrogen-bond and 11 φ torsional-angle restraints, the resulting set of 20 NMR model structures exhibits regular α-helical structure. However, the set slightly violates some measured NOE bounds and does not reproduce all 15 measured 3 J(H N -H Cα )-coupling constants, indicating that different conformers of GCN4p16-31 might be present in solution. With the aim to resolve structures compatible with all NOE upper distance bounds and 3 J-coupling constants, we executed several structure refinement protocols employing unrestrained and restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with two force fields. We find that only configurational ensembles obtained by applying simultaneously time-averaged NOE distance and 3 J-coupling constant restraining with either force field reproduce all the experimental data. Additionally, analyses of the simulated ensembles show that the conformational variability of GCN4p16-31 in solution admitted by the available set of 187 measured NMR data is larger than represented by the set of the NMR model structures. The conformations of GCN4p16-31 in solution differ in the orientation not only of the side-chains but also of the backbone. The inconsistencies between the NMR model structures and the measured NMR data are due to the neglect of averaging effects and the inclusion of hydrogen-bond and torsional-angle restraints that have little basis in the primary, i.e. measured NMR data.

  2. Methods of NMR structure refinement: molecular dynamics simulations improve the agreement with measured NMR data of a C-terminal peptide of GCN4-p1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Jozica; Missimer, John H; Steinmetz, Michel O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2010-07-01

    The C-terminal trigger sequence is essential in the coiled-coil formation of GCN4-p1; its conformational properties are thus of importance for understanding this process at the atomic level. A solution NMR model structure of a peptide, GCN4p16-31, encompassing the GCN4-p1 trigger sequence was proposed a few years ago. Derived using a standard single-structure refinement protocol based on 172 nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) distance restraints, 14 hydrogen-bond and 11 phi torsional-angle restraints, the resulting set of 20 NMR model structures exhibits regular alpha-helical structure. However, the set slightly violates some measured NOE bounds and does not reproduce all 15 measured (3)J(H(N)-H(Calpha))-coupling constants, indicating that different conformers of GCN4p16-31 might be present in solution. With the aim to resolve structures compatible with all NOE upper distance bounds and (3)J-coupling constants, we ex